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Sample records for induces gap junction-dependant

  1. The beneficial effects of cumulus cells and oocyte-cumulus cell gap junctions depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Wu, Sha-Na; Shen, Jiang-Peng; Wang, Dong-Hui; Kong, Xiang-Wei; Lu, Angeleem; Li, Yan-Jiao; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Yue-Fang; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Cumulus cells are a group of closely associated granulosa cells that surround and nourish oocytes. Previous studies have shown that cumulus cells contribute to oocyte maturation and fertilization through gap junction communication. However, it is not known how this gap junction signaling affects in vivo versus in vitro maturation of oocytes, and their subsequent fertilization and embryonic development following insemination. Therefore, in our study, we performed mouse oocyte maturation and insemination using in vivo- or in vitro-matured oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCCs, which retain gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes co-cultured with cumulus cells (DCs, which lack gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), and in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes without cumulus cells (DOs). Using these models, we were able to analyze the effects of gap junction signaling on oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. We found that gap junctions were necessary for both in vivo and in vitro oocyte maturation. In addition, for oocytes matured in vivo, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization and blastocyst formation, and this improvement was strengthened by gap junctions. Moreover, for oocytes matured in vitro, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization, but not blastocyst formation, and this improvement was independent of gap junctions. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the beneficial effect of gap junction signaling from cumulus cells depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods.

  2. Field induced gap infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A tunable infrared detector which employs a vanishing band gap semimetal material provided with an induced band gap by a magnetic field to allow intrinsic semiconductor type infrared detection capabilities is disclosed. The semimetal material may thus operate as a semiconductor type detector with a wavelength sensitivity corresponding to the induced band gap in a preferred embodiment of a diode structure. Preferred semimetal materials include Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, x is less than 0.15, HgCdSe, BiSb, alpha-Sn, HgMgTe, HgMnTe, HgZnTe, HgMnSe, HgMgSe, and HgZnSe. The magnetic field induces a band gap in the semimetal material proportional to the strength of the magnetic field allowing tunable detection cutoff wavelengths. For an applied magnetic field from 5 to 10 tesla, the wavelength detection cutoff will be in the range of 20 to 50 micrometers for Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys with x about 0.15. A similar approach may also be employed to generate infrared energy in a desired band gap and then operating the structure in a light emitting diode or semiconductor laser type of configuration.

  3. Induced spectral gap and pairing correlations from superconducting proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Cole, William S.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically consider superconducting proximity effect, using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) theory, in heterostructure sandwich-type geometries involving a normal s -wave superconductor and a nonsuperconducting material with the proximity effect being driven by Cooper pairs tunneling from the superconducting slab to the nonsuperconducting slab. Applications of the superconducting proximity effect may rely on an induced spectral gap or induced pairing correlations without any spectral gap. We clarify that in a nonsuperconducting material the induced spectral gap and pairing correlations are independent physical quantities arising from the proximity effect. This is a crucial issue in proposals to create topological superconductivity through the proximity effect. Heterostructures of three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) slabs on conventional s -wave superconductor (SC) substrates provide a platform, with proximity-induced topological superconductivity expected to be observed on the "naked" top surface of a thin TI slab. We theoretically study the induced superconducting gap on this naked surface. In addition, we compare against the induced spectral gap in heterostructures of SC with a normal metal or a semiconductor with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman splitting potential (another promising platform for topological superconductivity). We find that for any model for the non-SC metal (including metallic TI) the induced spectral gap on the naked surface decays as L-3 as the thickness (L ) of the non-SC slab is increased in contrast to the slower 1 /L decay of the pairing correlations. Our distinction between proximity-induced spectral gap (with its faster spatial decay) and pairing correlation (with its slower spatial decay) has important implications for the currently active search for topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in various superconducting heterostructures.

  4. Induced gap in topological materials from the superconducting proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Cole, William

    Topological superconductivity has been of considerable interest lately, with several proposed experimental realizations in solid state systems. A heterostructure of s-wave superconductor and 3D topological insulator is one of the more promising platforms, with topological superconductivity realized on the ''naked'' surface of the topological insulator through the superconducting proximity effect. We theoretically study the induced superconducting gap on the naked surface. Adjusting the Fermi level above the bulk gap (which is the case in experiments), our results for the induced superconducting gap are in agreement with that probed in thin topological insulators (<10nm) in the experiments (Nat. Phys. 10, 943-950 (2014) and Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 217001 (2014)). We further predict the gap in thick topological insulators (>10nm). This work is supported by LPS-MPO-CMTC, Microsoft Q, and JQI-NSF-PFC.

  5. Gap Filler Induced Transition on the Mars Science Laboratory Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Barnhardt, Michael D.; Tang, Chun Y.; Sozer, Emre; Candler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Detached Eddy Simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of high-fidelity turbulence modeling on roughness-induced transition to turbulence during Mars entry. Chemically reacting flow solutions will be obtained for a gap filler of Mars Science Laboratory at the peak heating condition.

  6. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  7. Gap Junction Intercellular Communication Mediates Ammonia-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Arús, Bernardo Assein; Leite, Marina Concli; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-02-01

    Astrocytes are important brain targets of ammonia, a neurotoxin implicated in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. During hyperammonemia, the pivotal role of astrocytes in brain function and homeostasis is impaired. These cells are abundantly interconnected by gap junctions (GJ), which are intercellular channels that allow the exchange of signaling molecules and metabolites. This communication may also increase cellular vulnerability during injuries, while GJ uncoupling could limit the extension of a lesion. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate whether astrocyte coupling through GJ contributes to ammonia-induced cytotoxicity. We found that carbenoxolone (CBX), an effective GJ blocker, prevented the following effects induced by ammonia in astrocyte primary cultures: (1) decrease in cell viability and membrane integrity; (2) increase in reactive oxygen species production; (3) decrease in GSH intracellular levels; (4) GS activity; (5) pro-inflammatory cytokine release. On the other hand, CBX had no effect on C6 astroglial cells, which are poorly coupled via GJ. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that GJ play a role in ammonia-induced cytotoxicity. Although more studies in vivo are required to confirm our hypothesis, our data suggest that GJ communication between astrocytes may transmit damage signals and excitotoxic components from unhealthy to normal cells, thereby contributing to the propagation of the neurotoxicity of ammonia.

  8. Gap state analysis in electric-field-induced band gap for bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Kaoru; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the low current on/off ratio at room temperature in dual-gated bilayer graphene field-effect transistors is considered to be the variable range hopping in gap states. However, the quantitative estimation of gap states has not been conducted. Here, we report the systematic estimation of the energy gap by both quantum capacitance and transport measurements and the density of states for gap states by the conductance method. An energy gap of ~250 meV is obtained at the maximum displacement field of ~3.1 V/nm, where the current on/off ratio of ~3 × 103 is demonstrated at 20 K. The density of states for the gap states are in the range from the latter half of 1012 to 1013 eV−1cm−2. Although the large amount of gap states at the interface of high-k oxide/bilayer graphene limits the current on/off ratio at present, our results suggest that the reduction of gap states below ~1011 eV−1cm−2 by continual improvement of the gate stack makes bilayer graphene a promising candidate for future nanoelectronic device applications. PMID:26511395

  9. Substrate-induced band gap opening in epitaxial graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, S.Y.; Gweon, G.-H.; Fedorov, A.V.; First, P.N.; de Heer,W.A.; Lee, D.-H.; Guinea, F.; Castro Neto, A.H.; Lanzara, A.

    2007-09-08

    Graphene has shown great application potential as the hostmaterial for next-generation electronic devices. However, despite itsintriguing properties, one of the biggest hurdles for graphene to beuseful as an electronic material is the lack of an energy gap in itselectronic spectra. This, for example, prevents the use of graphene inmaking transistors. Although several proposals have been made to open agap in graphene's electronic spectra, they all require complexengineering of the graphene layer. Here, we show that when graphene isepitaxially grown on SiC substrate, a gap of ~;0.26 eV is produced. Thisgap decreases as the sample thickness increases and eventually approacheszero when the number of layers exceeds four. We propose that the originof this gap is the breaking of sublattice symmetry owing to thegraphene-substrate interaction. We believe that our results highlight apromising direction for band gap engineering of graphene.

  10. Dirac gap-induced graphene quantum dot in an electrostatic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giavaras, G.; Nori, Franco

    2011-04-01

    A spatially modulated Dirac gap in a graphene sheet leads to charge confinement, thus enabling a graphene quantum dot to be formed without the application of external electric and magnetic fields [G. Giavaras and F. Nori, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 243106 (2010)]. This can be achieved provided the Dirac gap has a local minimum in which the states become localized. In this work, the physics of such a gap-induced dot is investigated in the continuum limit by solving the Dirac equation. It is shown that gap-induced confined states couple to the states introduced by an electrostatic quantum well potential. Hence the region in which the resulting hybridized states are localized can be tuned with the potential strength, an effect which involves Klein tunneling. The proposed quantum dot may be used to probe quasirelativistic effects in graphene, while the induced confined states may be useful for graphene-based nanostructures.

  11. Stacking orders induced direct band gap in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaohui; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Litao

    2016-01-01

    The direct band gap of monolayer semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides (STMDs) enables a host of new optical and electrical properties. However, bilayer STMDs are indirect band gap semiconductors, which limits its applicability for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. Here, we report that the direct band gap can be achieved in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures by alternating stacking orders. Specifically, when Se atoms from opposite layers are stacked directly on top of each other, AA and A’B stacked heterostructures show weaker interlayer coupling, larger interlayer distance and direct band gap. Whereas, when Se atoms from opposite layers are staggered, AA’, AB and AB’ stacked heterostructures exhibit stronger interlayer coupling, shorter interlayer distance and indirect band gap. Thus, the direct/indirect band gap can be controllable in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures. In addition, the calculated sliding barriers indicate that the stacking orders of bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures can be easily formed by sliding one layer with respect to the other. The novel direct band gap in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures provides possible application for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. The results also show that the stacking order is an effective strategy to induce and tune the band gap of layered STMDs. PMID:27528196

  12. Tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Takeshi Furukawa, Takuro; Toma, Ryo; Yanagisawa, Susumu

    2015-09-14

    By means of a hybrid density-functional method, we investigate the tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge. We consider [001], [111], and [110] uniaxial tensility and (001), (111), and (110) biaxial tensility. Under the condition of no normal stress, we determine both normal compression and internal strain, namely, relative displacement of two atoms in the primitive unit cell, by minimizing the total energy. We identify those strain types which can induce the band-gap transition, and evaluate the critical strain coefficient where the gap transition occurs. Either normal compression or internal strain operates unfavorably to induce the gap transition, which raises the critical strain coefficient or even blocks the transition. We also examine how each type of tensile strain decreases the band-gap energy, depending on its orientation. Our analysis clearly shows that synergistic operation of strain orientation and band anisotropy has a great influence on the gap transition and the gap energy.

  13. GAP-43 expression is upregulated in retinal ganglion cells after ischemia/reperfusion-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Dijk, Frederike; Bergen, Arthur A B; Kamphuis, Willem

    2007-05-01

    In response to injury, the adult mammalian retina shows signs of structural remodeling, possibly in an attempt to preserve or regain some of its functional neural connections. In order to study the mechanisms involved in injury-induced plasticity, we have studied changes in growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43) after retinal ischemia/reperfusion in the rat. GAP-43 is a marker for neuronal remodeling and is involved in synapse formation. Ischemic injury of the rat retina was induced by 60 min of ischemia followed by reperfusion times varying from 2h up to 4 weeks. GAP-43 mRNA levels were significantly increased between 12h and 72 h reperfusion with a peak around 24h. GAP-43 specific antibodies showed that the total amount of GAP-43 labeling in the inner plexiform layer was diminished after 12h of reperfusion by approximately 35% and remained at this level up to 1 week postischemia despite the reduction in thickness of this layer during this period resulting from the ischemia-induced cell loss. At 2 and 4 weeks reperfusion, the amount of labeling was reduced by 70%, simultaneously with a decrease of GAP-43 transcript level. Between 72 h up to 2 weeks postischemia, the induction of intense GAP-43 labeling was observed in NeuN- and beta-tubulin-positive ganglion cell somata and in horizontally and vertically oriented processes in the inner plexiform layer. Ischemia also induced GAP-43 expression in some GFAP-positive Müller cells. Double-labeling showed that in controls and after ischemia GAP-43 was expressed by some amacrine cells of the glycinergic (glycine transporter 1), calretinin-positive, and dopaminergic (tyrosine hydroxylase) subpopulations. No increase of GAP-43 expression levels was found in these amacrine cells. The results demonstrate that ganglion cells show an elevated expression of GAP-43 after ischemia-inflicted damage. These findings suggest a temporal window during which ganglion cells may remodel their neuronal network in the damaged retina.

  14. Constitutive phosphorylation of a Rac GAP MgcRacGAP is implicated in v-Src-induced transformation of NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Doki, Noriko; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Akiho; Oneyama, Chitose; Akagi, Tsuyoshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Kitamura, Toshio

    2009-09-01

    MgcRacGAP plays critical roles in cell division through regulating Rho family small GTPases. As we previously reported, phosphorylation of MgcRacGAP on serine 387 (S387) is induced by Aurora B kinase at the midbody during cytokinesis, which is a critical step of cytokinesis. Phosphorylation of S387-MgcRacGAP converts it from RacGAP to RhoGAP, leading to completion of cytokinesis. Here we show that MgcRacGAP is prominently phosphorylated on S387 even in the interphase of v-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells in the cytoplasm, but not in the interphase of parental NIH3T3 or H-RasV12-transformed NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, levels of phosphorylation on S387 (pS387) correlated with soft agar colony-forming abilities of v-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells. Expression of a phosphorylation-mimic mutant MgcRacGAP-S387D enhanced colony formation of v-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells. Surprisingly, a Rac1 inhibitor but not kinase inhibitors including Aurora B kinase inhibitor specifically inhibited phosphorylation of S387-MgcRacGAP in v-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells, suggesting the v-Src-induced pathological positive feedback mechanisms towards Rac1 activation using pS387-MgcRacGAP. These results indicated the difference in the mechanisms between v-Src- and H-RasV12-induced transformation, and should shed some light on pathological roles of disordered phosphorylation of MgcRacGAP at S387 in v-Src-induced cell transformation.

  15. Strain-induced band-gap engineering of graphene monoxide and its effect on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, H. H.; Rhim, S. H.; Hirschmugl, C. J.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, M.; Weinert, M.; Chen, J. H.

    2013-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations we demonstrate the feasibility of band-gap engineering in two-dimensional crystalline graphene monoxide (GMO), a recently reported graphene-based material with a 1:1 carbon/oxygen ratio. The band gap of GMO, which can be switched between direct and indirect, is tunable over a large range (0-1.35 eV) for accessible strains. Electron and hole transport occurs predominantly along the zigzag and armchair directions (armchair for both) when GMO is a direct- (indirect-) gap semiconductor. A band gap of ˜0.5 eV is also induced in graphene at the K' points for GMO/graphene hybrid systems.

  16. Inhibition of RNA transportation induces glioma cell apoptosis via downregulation of RanGAP1 expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Yao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Chen, Ku-Chung; Lin, Chien-Ju; Shih, Chwen-Ming

    2015-05-05

    The prognosis of glioblastoma remains poor, even treatment with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Therefore, it is still important to develop a new strategy for treatment of glioblastoma. Previous reports demonstrated that rRNA is produced at abnormally high levels in tumor cells. Nuclear export of all non-coding RNAs are known to depend on RanGTPase system. Hydrolyzation of RanGTP-RNA complex by RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1) releases RNA from nucleus to cytoplasm. Therefore, inhibition of RNA transportation would be a useful strategy to affect cancer cell fate. In this study, 5-30 μM of oridonin, a natural diterpenoid compound isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine, Rabdosia rubescens, induced U87MG glioma cell apoptosis and RNA accumulation in nucleus at 12h-time point. Before U87MG cell apoptosis, the RanGAP1 protein amount decreased and RanGTP accumulated in nucleus as respectively determined by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, suggesting that decrease of RanGAP1 may result in nuclear entrapment of RanGTP and RNA, and then induce U87MG cell death. In contrast, over-expression of the RanGAP1 protein reversed oridonin-induced U87MG cell apoptosis. Hence, we demonstrated that downregulation of the RanGAP1 protein level by oridonin may result in RNA accumulation in nucleus via nuclear entrapment of RanGTP which eventually led to the apoptosis of glioma cells.

  17. Light-induced gaps in semiconductor band-to-band transitions.

    PubMed

    Vu, Q T; Haug, H; Mücke, O D; Tritschler, T; Wegener, M; Khitrova, G; Gibbs, H M

    2004-05-28

    We observe a triplet around the third harmonic of the semiconductor band gap when exciting 50-100 nm thin GaAs films with 5 fs pulses at 3 x 10(12) W/cm(2). The comparison with solutions of the semiconductor Bloch equations allows us to interpret the observed peak structure as being due to a two-band Mollow triplet. This triplet in the optical spectrum is a result of light-induced gaps in the band structure, which arise from coherent band mixing. The theory is formulated for full tight-binding bands and uses no rotating-wave approximation.

  18. Antofine-induced connexin43 gap junction disassembly in rat astrocytes involves protein kinase Cβ.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Fang; Liao, Chih-Kai; Lin, Jau-Chen; Jow, Guey-Mei; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2013-03-01

    Antofine, a phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid derived from Cryptocaryachinensis and Ficusseptica in the Asclepiadaceae milkweed family, is cytotoxic for various cancer cell lines. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment of rat primary astrocytes with antofine induced dose-dependent inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), as assessed by scrape-loading 6-carboxyfluorescein dye transfer. Levels of Cx43 protein were also decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner following antofine treatment. Double-labeling immunofluorescence microscopy showed that antofine (10ng/ml) induced endocytosis of surface gap junctions into the cytoplasm, where Cx43 was co-localized with the early endosome marker EEA1. Inhibition of lysosomes or proteasomes by co-treatment with antofine and their respective specific inhibitors, NH4Cl or MG132, partially inhibited the antofine-induced decrease in Cx43 protein levels, but did not inhibit the antofine-induced inhibition of GJIC. After 30min of treatment, antofine induced a rapid increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and activation of protein kinase C (PKC)α/βII, which was maintained for at least 6h. Co-treatment of astrocytes with antofine and the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM prevented downregulation of Cx43 and inhibition of GJIC. Moreover, co-treatment with antofine and a specific PKCβ inhibitor prevented endocytosis of gap junctions, downregulation of Cx43, and inhibition of GJIC. Taken together, these findings indicate that antofine induces Cx43 gap junction disassembly by the PKCβ signaling pathway. Inhibition of GJIC by antofine may undermine the neuroprotective effect of astrocytes in CNS.

  19. Polarization-induced hole doping in wide-band-gap uniaxial semiconductor heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Simon, John; Protasenko, Vladimir; Lian, Chuanxin; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2010-01-01

    Impurity-based p-type doping in wide-band-gap semiconductors is inefficient at room temperature for applications such as lasers because the positive-charge carriers (holes) have a large thermal activation energy. We demonstrate high-efficiency p-type doping by ionizing acceptor dopants using the built-in electronic polarization in bulk uniaxial semiconductor crystals. Because the mobile hole gases are field-ionized, they are robust to thermal freezeout effects and lead to major improvements in p-type electrical conductivity. The new doping technique results in improved optical emission efficiency in prototype ultraviolet light-emitting-diode structures. Polarization-induced doping provides an attractive solution to both p- and n-type doping problems in wide-band-gap semiconductors and offers an unconventional path for the development of solid-state deep-ultraviolet optoelectronic devices and wide-band-gap bipolar electronic devices of the future.

  20. Segregation distortion induced by wild-type RanGAP in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, Ayumi; Staber, Cynthia; Ganetzky, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Segregation Distorter (SD) is a meiotic drive system in Drosophila that causes preferential transmission of the SD chromosome from SD/SD+ males owing to the induced dysfunction of SD+ spermatids. The key distorter locus, Sd, is a dominant neomorphic allele encoding a truncated, but enzymatically active, RanGAP (RanGTPase-activating protein) whose nuclear mislocalization underlies distortion by disrupting the Ran signaling pathway. Here, we show that even wild-type RanGAP can cause segregation distortion when it is overexpressed in the male germ line or when the gene dosage of a particular modifier locus is increased. Both manipulations result in substantial nuclear accumulation of RanGAP. Distortion can be suppressed by overexpression of Ran or Ran guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RanGEF) in the male germ line, indicating that the primary consequence of nuclear mislocalization of RanGAP is reduction of intranuclear RanGTP levels. These results prove that segregation distortion does not depend on any unique properties of the mutant RanGAP encoded by Sd and provide a unifying explanation for the occurrence of distortion in a variety of experimental situations. PMID:11997467

  1. GLAST Deficiency in Mice Exacerbates Gap Detection Deficits in a Model of Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Vikhe Patil, Kim; Han, Chul; Fabella, Brian; Canlon, Barbara; Someya, Shinichi; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Gap detection or gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) has been successfully used in rat and guinea pig models of tinnitus, yet this system has been proven to have low efficacy in CBA mice, with low basal GPIAS and subtle tinnitus-like effects. Here, we tested five mouse strains (CBA, BalbC, CD-1, C57BL/6 and 129sv) for pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and gap detection with varying interstimulus intervals (ISI) and found that mice from a CBA genetic background had the poorest capacities of suppressing the startle response in the presence of a pre-pulse or a gap. CD-1 mice displayed variable responses throughout all ISI. Interestingly, C57BL/6, 129sv and BalbC showed efficient suppression with either pre-pulses or gaps with shorter ISI. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) is expressed in support cells from the cochlea and buffers the excess of glutamate. We hypothesized that loss of GLAST function could sensitize the ear to tinnitus-inducing agents, such as salicylate. Using shorter ISI to obtain a greater dynamic range to assess tinnitus-like effects, we found that disruption of gap detection by salicylate was exacerbated across various intensities of a 32-kHz narrow band noise gap carrier in GLAST knockout (KO) mice when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were performed to evaluate the effects on hearing functions. Salicylate caused greater auditory threshold shifts (near 15 dB) in GLAST KO mice than in WT mice across all tested frequencies, despite similarly reduced DPOAE. Despite these changes, inhibition using broad-band gap carriers and 32 kHz pre-pulses were not affected. Our study suggests that GLAST deficiency could become a useful experimental model to decipher the mechanisms underlying drug-induced tinnitus. Future studies addressing the neurological correlates of tinnitus in this model could provide additional insights into the

  2. Pharmacological blockade of gap junctions induces repetitive surging of extracellular potassium within the locust CNS.

    PubMed

    Spong, Kristin E; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2013-10-01

    The maintenance of cellular ion homeostasis is crucial for optimal neural function and thus it is of great importance to understand its regulation. Glial cells are extensively coupled by gap junctions forming a network that is suggested to serve as a spatial buffer for potassium (K(+)) ions. We have investigated the role of glial spatial buffering in the regulation of extracellular K(+) concentration ([K(+)]o) within the locust metathoracic ganglion by pharmacologically inhibiting gap junctions. Using K(+)-sensitive microelectrodes, we measured [K(+)]o near the ventilatory neuropile while simultaneously recording the ventilatory rhythm as a model of neural circuit function. We found that blockade of gap junctions with either carbenoxolone (CBX), 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA) or meclofenamic acid (MFA) reliably induced repetitive [K(+)]o surges and caused a progressive impairment in the ability to maintain baseline [K(+)]o levels throughout the treatment period. We also show that a low dose of CBX that did not induce surging activity increased the vulnerability of locust neural tissue to spreading depression (SD) induced by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibition with ouabain. CBX pre-treatment increased the number of SD events induced by ouabain and hindered the recovery of [K(+)]o back to baseline levels between events. Our results suggest that glial spatial buffering through gap junctions plays an essential role in the regulation of [K(+)]o under normal conditions and also contributes to a component of [K(+)]o clearance following physiologically elevated levels of [K(+)]o.

  3. Spin-Orbit Coupling Induced Gap in Graphene on Pt(111) with Intercalated Pb Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Klimovskikh, Ilya I; Otrokov, Mikhail M; Voroshnin, Vladimir Yu; Sostina, Daria; Petaccia, Luca; Di Santo, Giovanni; Thakur, Sangeeta; Chulkov, Evgueni V; Shikin, Alexander M

    2017-01-24

    Graphene is one of the most promising materials for nanoelectronics owing to its unique Dirac cone-like dispersion of the electronic state and high mobility of the charge carriers. However, to facilitate the implementation of the graphene-based devices, an essential change of its electronic structure, a creation of the band gap should controllably be done. Brought about by two fundamentally different mechanisms, a sublattice symmetry breaking or an induced strong spin-orbit interaction, the band gap appearance can drive graphene into a narrow-gap semiconductor or a 2D topological insulator phase, respectively, with both cases being technologically relevant. The later case, characterized by a spin-orbit gap between the valence and conduction bands, can give rise to the spin-polarized topologically protected edge states. Here, we study the effect of the spin-orbit interaction enhancement in graphene placed in contact with a lead monolayer. By means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we show that intercalation of the Pb interlayer between the graphene sheet and the Pt(111) surface leads to formation of a gap of ∼200 meV at the Dirac point of graphene. Spin-resolved measurements confirm the splitting to be of a spin-orbit nature, and the measured near-gap spin structure resembles that of the quantum spin Hall state in graphene, proposed by Kane and Mele [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 2005 , 95 , 226801 ]. With a bandstructure tuned in this way, graphene acquires a functionality going beyond its intrinsic properties and becomes more attractive for possible spintronic applications.

  4. Dipole-induced band-gap reduction in an inorganic cage.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yaokang; Cheng, Jun; Steiner, Alexander; Gan, Lihua; Wright, Dominic S

    2014-02-10

    Metal-doped polyoxotitanium cages are a developing class of inorganic compounds which can be regarded as nano- and sub-nano sized molecular relatives of metal-doped titania nanoparticles. These species can serve as models for the ways in which dopant metal ions can be incorporated into metal-doped titania (TiO2 ), a technologically important class of photocatalytic materials with broad applications in devices and pollution control. In this study a series of cobalt(II)-containing cages in the size range ca. 0.7-1.3 nm have been synthesized and structurally characterized, allowing a coherent study of the factors affecting the band gaps in well-defined metal-doped model systems. Band structure calculations are consistent with experimental UV/Vis measurements of the Tix Oy absorption edges in these species and reveal that molecular dipole moment can have a profound effect on the band gap. The observation of a dipole-induced band-gap decrease mechanism provides a potentially general design strategy for the formation of low band-gap inorganic cages.

  5. Continuum absorption in the vicinity of the toroidicity-induced Alfvén gap

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Breizman, B. N.; Zheng, L. J.; Chen, Eugene Y.

    2015-12-04

    Excitation of Alfvén modes is commonly viewed as a concern for energetic particle confinement in burning plasmas. The 3.5 MeValpha particles produced by fusion may be affected as well as other fast ions in both present and future devices. Continuum damping of such modes is one of the key factors that determine their excitation thresholds and saturation levels. This work examines the resonant dissipative response of the Alfvén continuum to an oscillating driving current when the driving frequency is slightly outside the edges of the toroidicity-induced spectral gap. The problem is largely motivated by the need to describe the continuum absorption in the frequency sweeping events. Akey element of this problem is the negative interference of the two closely spaced continuum crossing points.Weexplain why the lower and upper edges of the gap can have very different continuum absorption features. Lastly, the difference is associated with an eigenmode whose frequency can be arbitrarily close to the upper edge of the gap whereas the lower edge of the gap is always a finite distance away from the closest eigenmode.

  6. Continuum absorption in the vicinity of the toroidicity-induced Alfvén gap

    DOE PAGES

    Li, M.; Breizman, B. N.; Zheng, L. J.; ...

    2015-12-04

    Excitation of Alfvén modes is commonly viewed as a concern for energetic particle confinement in burning plasmas. The 3.5 MeValpha particles produced by fusion may be affected as well as other fast ions in both present and future devices. Continuum damping of such modes is one of the key factors that determine their excitation thresholds and saturation levels. This work examines the resonant dissipative response of the Alfvén continuum to an oscillating driving current when the driving frequency is slightly outside the edges of the toroidicity-induced spectral gap. The problem is largely motivated by the need to describe the continuummore » absorption in the frequency sweeping events. Akey element of this problem is the negative interference of the two closely spaced continuum crossing points.Weexplain why the lower and upper edges of the gap can have very different continuum absorption features. Lastly, the difference is associated with an eigenmode whose frequency can be arbitrarily close to the upper edge of the gap whereas the lower edge of the gap is always a finite distance away from the closest eigenmode.« less

  7. Vacancy-induced in-gap states in sodium tungsten bronzes: Density functional investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Kumari, S.; Raj, S.

    2016-05-01

    We have performed extensive ab-initio self-consistent electronic-structure calculations on WO3 and NaWO3 with single- and double-oxygen-vacancy defects within the framework of density functional theory. Our calculated density of states reveals that the in-gap states in WO3 and NaWO3 are the consequence of oxygen vacancies in the system. The evolution of the induced states occurs from the unpaired electrons donated by the oxygen vacancy. We found that the energy positions of the in-gap states are sensitive to the oxygen vacancy concentrations. The in-gap states in NaWO3 are formed close to the valence band, which are pushed towards the conduction band with the increase in oxygen vacancies, whereas the states are formed mostly in the mid-gap region in the WO3 system. Our finding can now well explain the discrepancy in experimental band dispersion measurements from ARPES with that of WO3 and NaWO3 band calculations.

  8. Strain-induced gap transition and anisotropic Dirac-like cones in monolayer and bilayer phosphorene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Can; Xia, Qinglin Nie, Yaozhuang; Guo, Guanghua

    2015-03-28

    The electronic properties of two-dimensional monolayer and bilayer phosphorene subjected to uniaxial and biaxial strains have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Strain engineering has obvious influence on the electronic properties of monolayer and bilayer phosphorene. By comparison, we find that biaxial strain is more effective in tuning the band gap than uniaxial strain. Interestingly, we observe the emergence of Dirac-like cones by the application of zigzag tensile strain in the monolayer and bilayer systems. For bilayer phosphorene, we induce the anisotropic Dirac-like dispersion by the application of appropriate armchair or biaxial compressive strain. Our results present very interesting possibilities for engineering the electronic properties of phosphorene and pave a way for tuning the band gap of future electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Spontaneous calcium signals induced by gap junctions in a network model of astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, V. B.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a network model of astrocytes coupled by gap junctions is investigated. Calcium dynamics of the single cell is described by the biophysical model comprising the set of three nonlinear differential equations. Intercellular dynamics is provided by the diffusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) through gap junctions between neighboring astrocytes. It is found that the diffusion induces the appearance of spontaneous activity patterns in the network. Stability of the network steady state is analyzed. It is proved that the increase of the diffusion coefficient above a certain critical value yields the generation of low-amplitude subthreshold oscillatory signals in a certain frequency range. It is shown that such spontaneous oscillations can facilitate calcium pulse generation and provide a certain time scale in astrocyte signaling.

  10. An impurity-induced gap system as a quantum data bus for quantum state transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bing; Li, Yong; Song, Z.; Sun, C.-P.

    2014-09-15

    We introduce a tight-binding chain with a single impurity to act as a quantum data bus for perfect quantum state transfer. Our proposal is based on the weak coupling limit of the two outermost quantum dots to the data bus, which is a gapped system induced by the impurity. By connecting two quantum dots to two sites of the data bus, the system can accomplish a high-fidelity and long-distance quantum state transfer. Numerical simulations for finite system show that the numerical and analytical results of the effective coupling strength agree well with each other. Moreover, we study the robustness of this quantum communication protocol in the presence of disorder in the couplings between the nearest-neighbor quantum dots. We find that the gap of the system plays an important role in robust quantum state transfer.

  11. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-01-01

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing. PMID:26349444

  12. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-09-09

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing.

  13. Radiation induced bystander effect by GAP junction channels in human fibroblast cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Y.; Shao, C.; Aoki, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Funayama, T.; Ando, K.

    The chemical factor involved in bystander effect and its transfer pathway were investigated in a confluent human fibroblast cell (AG1522) population. Micronuclei (MN) and G1-phase arrest were detected in cells irradiated by carbon (~100 keV/μm) ions at HIMAC. A very low dose irradiation showed a high effectiveness in producing MN, suggesting a bystander effect. This effectiveness was enhanced by 8-Br-cAMP treatment that increases gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). On the other hand, the effect was reduced by 5% DMSO treatment, which reduce the reactive oxygen species (ROS), and suppressed by 100 μM lindane treatment, an inhibitor of GJIC. In addition, the radiation-induced G1-phase arrest was also enhanced by cAMP, and reduced or suppressed by DMSO or lindane. A microbeam device (JAERI) was also used for these studies. It was found that exposing one single cell in a confluent cell population to exactly one argon (~1260 keV/μm) or neon (~430 keV/ μm) ion, additional MN could be detected in many other unirradiated cells. The yield of MN increased with the number of irradiated cells. However, there was no significant difference in the MN induction when the cells were irradiated by increasing number of particles. MN induction by bystander effect was partly reduced by DMSO, and effectively suppressed by lindane. Our results obtained from both random irradiation and precise numbered irradiation indicate that both GJIC and ROS contributed to the radiation-induced bystander effect, but the cell gap junction channels likely play an essential role in the release and transfer of radiation-induced chemical factors.

  14. The resonance-induced in-gap modes in photonic crystals composed of metal-coated dielectric spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiyi; Wang, Zhenlin; Hu, An; Ming, Naiben

    2000-11-01

    Using the vector wave multiple-scattering method we show that a sizable photonic band gap and resonance-induced in-gap modes can be realized simultaneously in crystals composed of metal-coated dielectric spheres. The position and width of the in-gap modes can be controlled by making appropriate choices of the dielectric constant of the inner dielectric sphere and thickness of the metal-coating layer, respectively. Such properties can be very useful in making optical band filters as well as microcavity lasers if they are sustained in the presence of dissipation. The calculated transmission spectra suggest that the resonance-induced in-gap modes decrease in intensity with dissipation and exist only for good metals.

  15. Terahertz radiation-induced sub-cycle field electron emission across a split-gap dipole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingdi; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Fan, Kebin; Wang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Gu-Feng; Geng, Kun; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    We use intense terahertz pulses to excite the resonant mode (0.6 THz) of a micro-fabricated dipole antenna with a vacuum gap. The dipole antenna structure enhances the peak amplitude of the in-gap THz electric field by a factor of ˜170. Above an in-gap E-field threshold amplitude of ˜10 MV/cm-1, THz-induced field electron emission is observed as indicated by the field-induced electric current across the dipole antenna gap. Field emission occurs within a fraction of the driving THz period. Our analysis of the current (I) and incident electric field (E) is in agreement with a Millikan-Lauritsen analysis where log (I) exhibits a linear dependence on 1/E. Numerical estimates indicate that the electrons are accelerated to a value of approximately one tenth of the speed of light.

  16. Terahertz radiation-induced sub-cycle field electron emission across a split-gap dipole antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingdi; Averitt, Richard D. E-mail: raveritt@ucsd.edu; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Fan, Kebin; Wang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Xin E-mail: raveritt@ucsd.edu; Zhang, Gu-Feng; Geng, Kun

    2015-12-07

    We use intense terahertz pulses to excite the resonant mode (0.6 THz) of a micro-fabricated dipole antenna with a vacuum gap. The dipole antenna structure enhances the peak amplitude of the in-gap THz electric field by a factor of ∼170. Above an in-gap E-field threshold amplitude of ∼10 MV/cm{sup −1}, THz-induced field electron emission is observed as indicated by the field-induced electric current across the dipole antenna gap. Field emission occurs within a fraction of the driving THz period. Our analysis of the current (I) and incident electric field (E) is in agreement with a Millikan-Lauritsen analysis where log (I) exhibits a linear dependence on 1/E. Numerical estimates indicate that the electrons are accelerated to a value of approximately one tenth of the speed of light.

  17. Variation in yield gap induced by nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilizer in North China Plain.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoqin; Ouyang, Zhu; Li, Yunsheng; Wang, Huimin

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted under a wheat-maize rotation system from 1990 to 2006 in North China Plain (NCP) to determine the effects of N, P and K on yield and yield gap. There were five treatments: NPK, PK, NK, NP and a control. Average wheat and maize yields were the highest in the NPK treatment, followed by those in the NP plots among all treatments. For wheat and maize yield, a significant increasing trend over time was found in the NPK-treated plots and a decreasing trend in the NK-treated plots. In the absence of N or P, wheat and maize yields were significantly lower than those in the NPK treatment. For both crops, the increasing rate of the yield gap was the highest in the P omission plots, i.e., 189.1 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) for wheat and 560.6 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) for maize. The cumulative omission of P fertilizer induced a deficit in the soil available N and extractable P concentrations for maize. The P fertilizer was more pivotal in long-term wheat and maize growth and soil fertility conservation in NCP, although the N fertilizer input was important for both crops growth. The crop response to K fertilizers was much lower than that to N or P fertilizers, but for maize, the cumulative omission of K fertilizer decreased the yield by 26% and increased the yield gap at a rate of 322.7 kg ha(-1) yr(-1). The soil indigenous K supply was not sufficiently high to meet maize K requirement over a long period. The proper application of K fertilizers is necessary for maize production in the region. Thus, the appropriate application of N and P fertilizers for the growth of both crops, while regularly combining K fertilizers for maize growth, is absolutely necessary for sustainable crop production in the NCP.

  18. Gap states in pentacene thin film induced by inert gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Bussolotti, Fabio; Kera, Satoshi; Kudo, Kazuhiro; Kahn, Antoine; Ueno, Nobuo

    2013-06-28

    We studied gas-exposure effects on pentacene (Pn) films on SiO2 and Au(111) substrates by ultrahigh sensitivity photoelectron spectroscopy, which can detect the density of states of ∼10(16) states eV-1 cm-3 comparable to electrical measurements. The results show the striking effects for Pn/SiO2: exposure to inert gas (N2 and Ar) produces a sharp rise in gap states from ∼10(16) to ∼10(18) states eV-1 cm-3 and pushes the Fermi level closer to the valence band (0.15-0.17 eV), as does exposure to O2 (0.20 eV), while no such gas-exposure effect is observed for Pn/Au(111). The results demonstrate that these gap states originate from small imperfections in the Pn packing structure, which are induced by gas penetration into the film through the crystal grain boundaries.

  19. Filling of Cloud-Induced Gaps for Land Use and Land Cover Classifications Around Refugee Camps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas; Hagensieker, Ron; Hochschild, Volker

    2016-08-01

    Clouds cover is one of the main constraints in the field of optical remote sensing. Especially the use of multispectral imagery is affected by either fully obscured data or parts of the image which remain unusable. This study compares four algorithms for the filling of cloud induced gaps in classified land cover products based on Markov Random Fields (MRF), Random Forest (RF), Closest Spectral Fit (CSF) operators. They are tested on a classified image of Sentinel-2 where artificial clouds are filled by information derived from a scene of Sentinel-1. The approaches rely on different mathematical principles and therefore produced results varying in both pattern and quality. Overall accuracies for the filled areas range from 57 to 64 %. Best results are achieved by CSF, however some classes (e.g. sands and grassland) remain critical through all approaches.

  20. Field-induced gap and quantized charge pumping in a nanoscale helical wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2009-06-01

    We propose several physical phenomena based on nanoscale helical wires. Applying a static electric field transverse to the helical wire induces a metal to insulator transition, with the band gap determined by the applied voltage. A similar idea can be applied to “geometrically” construct one-dimensional systems with arbitrary external potential. With a quadrupolar electrode configuration, the electric field could rotate in the transverse plane, leading to a quantized dc charge current proportional to the frequency of the rotation. Such a device could be used as a standard for the high-precession measurement of the electric current. The inverse effect implies that passing an electric current through a helical wire in the presence of a transverse static electric field can lead to a mechanical rotation of the helix. This effect can be used to construct nanoscale electromechanical motors. Finally, our methodology also enables ways of controlling and measuring the electronic properties of helical biological molecules such as the DNA.

  1. Numerical investigation of the effects of the clearance gap between the inducer and impeller of an axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chan, Weng-Kong; Wong, Yew-Wah; Ong, Wendy; Koh, Sy-Yuan; Chong, Victor

    2005-03-01

    A series of numerical models are generated to investigate the flow characteristics and performance of an axial blood pump. The pump model includes a straightener, an inducer-impeller, and diffuser. Numerical studies of the effects of angular alignment of the inducer and impeller blades and the axial clearance gap between the inducer and impeller are presented in this article. The pump characteristics derived from numerical simulation are validated with experimental data. Numerically simulated results showed a sinusoidal variation in the pressure generated across the pump with changes in angular alignment between the inducer and impeller. This is attributed to additional losses when flow is forced or diverted from the trailing edge of the inducer to either the pressure or suction side of the impeller blade when the alignment between the two sets of blades is not optimal. The pressure generated is a maximum when the impeller blades are at 0 or 30 degrees with respect to the inducer. The effect of rotating the impeller with respect to the inducer causes the sinusoidal pressure variation. In addition, it was observed that when the clearance gap between the inducer and impeller is reduced to 1 mm, the pressure generated is a minimum when compared to the other models. This is attributed to the interference between the inducer and impeller when the gap separating them is too small. The location of the maximum pressure on the pressure side of the impeller blade shifts upstream while its magnitude decreases for small clearance gap between the inducer and the impeller. There was no flow separation in the inducer while small regions of backflow are observed at the impeller trailing edge. Recommendations for future modifications and improvements to the pump design and model simulation are also given.

  2. Dopaminergic D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 induces GAP-43 expression and long-term potentiation in hippocampus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Williams, Shimere; Mmbaga, Natu; Chirwa, Sanika

    2006-07-10

    We evaluated whether activating dopamine D1 receptors (D1R) with an agonist will mimic the effects of long-term potentiation (LTP)-inducing electrical stimulation and trigger the expression of the presynaptic growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), a putative synaptic plasticity factor. Thus, we conducted GAP-43 protein analyses together with assessments of LTP across CA3/CA1 synapses in guinea pigs administered with SKF38393 (the D1R agonist) and/or SCH23390 (the D1R antagonist). Our results showed that guinea pigs treated with SKF38393 coupled with low-frequency stimulation gradually exhibited an LTP-like potentiation in correlation with increased GAP-43 protein expression. However, when SKF38393 treatment was preceded by administration of SCH23390, this antagonized the occurrence of both synaptic potentiation and GAP-43 up-regulation. By comparison, persistent LTP was readily expressed after brief high frequency tetanic stimulation in control guinea pigs, whereas animals injected with SCH23390 and tetanized only developed early-LTP but not late-LTP. Western blot analyses showed GAP-43 up-regulation in the tetanized control guinea pigs but not those injected with SCH23390. We conclude that direct D1R activations with an agonist can mimic LTP-inducing electrical stimulation to produce GAP-43 up-regulation and synaptic plasticity.

  3. Chemopreventive Agents Attenuate Rapid Inhibition of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Induced by Environmental Toxicants.

    PubMed

    Babica, Pavel; Čtveráčková, Lucie; Lenčešová, Zuzana; Trosko, James E; Upham, Brad L

    2016-07-01

    Altered gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been associated with chemical carcinogenesis, where both chemical tumor promoters and chemopreventive agents (CPAs) are known to conversely modulate GJIC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether attenuation of chemically inhibited GJIC represents a common outcome induced by different CPAs, which could be effectively evaluated using in vitro methods. Rat liver epithelial cells WB-F344 were pretreated with a CPA for either 30 min or 24 h, and then exposed to GJIC-inhibiting concentration of a selected tumor promoter or environmental toxicant [12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), lindane, fluoranthene, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), or pentachlorophenol]. Out of nine CPAs tested, quercetin and silibinin elicited the most pronounced effects, preventing the dysregulation of GJIC by all the GJIC inhibitors, but DDT. Metformin and curcumin attenuated the effects of three GJIC inhibitors, whereas the other CPAs prevented the effects of two (diallyl sulfide, emodin) or one (indole-3-carbinol, thymoquinone) GJIC inhibitor. Significant attenuation of chemically induced inhibition of GJIC was observed in 27 (50%) out of 54 possible combinations of nine CPAs and six GJIC inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that in vitro evaluation of GJIC can be used as an effective screening tool for identification of chemicals with potential chemopreventive activity.

  4. ASC Induces Apoptosis via Activation of Caspase-9 by Enhancing Gap Junction-Mediated Intercellular Communication.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masato; Hida, Shigeaki; Fujii, Chifumi; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Ito, Kensuke; Matsumura, Tomio; Okada, Nagisa; Sakaizawa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Akira; Takeoka, Michiko; Miyagawa, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD) is a key adaptor molecule of inflammasomes that mediates inflammatory and apoptotic signals. Aberrant methylation-induced silencing of ASC has been observed in a variety of cancer cells, thus implicating ASC in tumor suppression, although this role remains incompletely defined especially in the context of closely neighboring cell proliferation. As ASC has been confirmed to be silenced by abnormal methylation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells as well, this cell line was investigated to characterize the precise role and mechanism of ASC in tumor progression. The effects of ASC were examined using in vitro cell cultures based on comparisons between low and high cell density conditions as well as in a xenograft murine model. ASC overexpression was established by insertion of the ASC gene into pcDNA3 and pMX-IRES-GFP vectors, the latter being packed into a retrovirus and subjected to reproducible competitive assays using parental cells as an internal control, for evaluation of cell viability. p21 and p53 were silenced using shRNA. Cell viability was suppressed in ASC-expressing transfectants as compared with control cells at high cell density conditions in in vitro culture and colony formation assays and in in vivo ectopic tumor formation trials. This suppression was not detected in low cell density conditions. Furthermore, remarkable progression of apoptosis was observed in ASC-introduced cells at a high cell density, but not at a low one. ASC-dependent apoptosis was mediated not by p21, p53, or caspase-1, but rather by cleavage of caspase-9 as well as by suppression of the NF-κB-related X-linked inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein. Caspase-9 cleavage was observed to be dependent on gap junction formation. The remarkable effect of ASC on the induction of apoptosis through caspase-9 and gap junctions revealed in this study may lead to promising new approaches in anticancer therapy.

  5. Noise magnetic fields abolish the gap junction intercellular communication suppression induced by 50 hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qunli; Ke, Xueqin; Gao, Xiangwei; Fu, Yiti; Lu, Deqiang; Chiang, Huai; Xu, Zhengping

    2006-05-01

    Previously, we have reported that exposure to 50 Hz coherent sinusoidal magnetic fields (MF) for 24 h inhibits gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mammalian cells at an intensity of 0.4 mT and enhances the inhibition effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) at 0.2 mT. In the present study, we further explored the effects of incoherent noise MF on MF-induced GJIC inhibition. GJIC was determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. The rate of fluorescence recovery (R) at 10 min after photobleaching was adopted as the functional index of GJIC. The R-value of NIH3T3 cells exposed to 50 Hz sinusoidal MF at 0.4 mT for 24 h was 30.85 +/- 14.70%, while the cells in sham exposure group had an R-value of 46.36 +/- 20.68%, demonstrating that the GJIC of NIH3T3 cells was significantly inhibited by MF exposure (P < .05). However, there were no significant differences in the R-values of the sham exposure, MF-plus-noise MF exposure (R: 49.58 +/- 19.38%), and noise MF exposure groups (R: 46.74 +/- 21.14%) (P > .05), indicating that the superposition of a noise MF alleviated the suppression of GJIC induced by the 50 Hz MF. In addition, although MF at an intensity of 0.2 mT synergistically enhanced TPA-induced GJIC inhibition (R: 24.90 +/- 13.50% vs. 35.82 +/- 17.18%, P < .05), further imposition of a noise MF abolished the synergistic effect of coherent MF (R: 32.51 +/- 18.37%). Overall, the present data clearly showed that although noise MF itself had no effect on GJIC of NIH3T3 cells, its superposition onto a coherent sinusoidal MF at the same intensity abolished MF-induced GJIC suppression. This is the first report showing that noise MF neutralizes 50 Hz MF-induced biological effect by using a signaling component as the test endpoint.

  6. The number and size of subhalo-induced gaps in stellar streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkal, Denis; Belokurov, Vasily; Bovy, Jo; Sanders, Jason L.

    2016-11-01

    Ample observational capabilities exist today to detect the small density perturbations that low-mass dark matter subhaloes impart on stellar streams from disrupting Galactic satellites. In anticipation of these observations, we investigate the expected number and size of gaps by combining an analytic prescription for gap evolution on circular orbits with the flux of subhaloes near the stream. We explore the distribution of gap sizes and depths for a typical cold stream around the Milky Way and find that for a given stream age and gap depth, each subhalo mass produces a characteristic gap size. For a stream with an age of a few Gyr, orbiting at a distance of 10-20 kpc from the Galactic centre, even modest subhaloes with a mass of 106-107 M⊙ produce gaps with sizes that are of the order of several degrees. We consider the number and distribution of gap sizes created by subhaloes with masses 105-109 M⊙, accounting for the expected depletion of subhaloes by the Milky Way disc, and present predictions for six cold streams around the Milky Way. For Pal 5, we forecast 0.7 gaps with a density depletion of at least 25 per cent and a typical gap size of 8°. Thus, there appears to be no tension between the recent non-detection of density depletions in the Pal 5 tidal tails and ΛCDM expectations. These predictions can be used to guide the scale of future gap searches.

  7. Ginsenoside Rg1-induced antidepressant effects involve the protection of astrocyte gap junctions within the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Jin, Can; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Zhou, Heng; Lou, Yu-Xia; Chen, Jiao; Zuo, Wei; Tian, Man-Tong; Wang, Zhi-Qi; Du, Guo-Hua; Kawahata, Ichiro; Yamakuni, Tohru; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Nai-Hong; Zhang, Dan-Shen

    2017-04-03

    Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) exhibits antidepressant-like activity by increasing neurogenesis and dendritic spine density without discernible side effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Rg1 antidepressant activity remain poorly understood. As the dysfunction of gap junctions between astrocytes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in major depression disorder, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Rg1 on astrocyte gap junctions in the PFC. Rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) were administered Rg1 (5, 10, and 20mg/kg) for 28days and analyzed for depressive symptoms using the sucrose preference and forced swimming tests. Functional and morphological changes of gap junction channels in the PFC were evaluated using dye transfer and electron microscopy, respectively. The expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) was analyzed by western blotting. Rg1 markedly alleviated depression-like behavior in rats. Long-term Rg1 treatment of CUS-exposed rats also significantly prevented the decrease in dye diffusion and improved the ultrastructure of astrocyte gap junctions in the PFC, indicating beneficial effects on the functional activity of gap junction channels in the brain. In addition, Rg1 upregulated Cx43 expression in the PFC reduced by CUS exposure, which significantly correlated with its antidepressant-like effects. The results demonstrate that Rg1-induced antidepressant effects are might be mediated, in part, by protecting astrocyte gap junctions within the prefrontal cortex.

  8. Field-induced Gap and Quantized Charge Pumping in Nano-helix

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-02-15

    We propose several novel physical phenomena based on nano-scale helical wires. Applying a static electric field transverse to the helical wire induces a metal to insulator transition, with the band gap determined by the applied voltage. Similar idea can be applied to 'geometrically' constructing one-dimensional systems with arbitrary external potential. With a quadrupolar electrode configuration, the electric field could rotate in the transverse plane, leading to a quantized dc charge current proportional to the frequency of the rotation. Such a device could be used as a new standard for the high precession measurement of the electric current. The inverse effect implies that passing an electric current through a helical wire in the presence of a transverse static electric field can lead to a mechanical rotation of the helix. This effect can be used to construct nano-scale electro-mechanical motors. Finally, our methodology also enables new ways of controlling and measuring the electronic properties of helical biological molecules such as the DNA.

  9. Polarization-induced electrical conductivity in ultra-wide band gap AlGaN alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-11-01

    Unintentionally doped (UID) AlGaN epilayers graded over Al compositions of 80%-90% and 80%-100% were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy and were electrically characterized using contactless sheet resistance (Rsh) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. Strong electrical conductivity in the UID graded AlGaN epilayers resulted from polarization-induced doping and was verified by the low resistivity of 0.04 Ω cm for the AlGaN epilayer graded over 80%-100% Al mole fraction. A free electron concentration (n) of 4.8 × 1017 cm-3 was measured by C-V for Al compositions of 80%-100%. Average electron mobility ( μ ¯ ) was calculated from Rsh and n data for three ranges of Al composition grading, and it was found that UID AlGaN graded from 88%-96% had μ ¯ = 509 cm2/V s. The combination of very large band gap energy, high μ ¯ , and high n for UID graded AlGaN epilayers make them attractive as a building block for high voltage power electronic devices such as Schottky diodes and field effect transistors.

  10. Interface Induced Gap State Models and ZnO Schottky Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Steven; Allen, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Practical aspects of fabricating Schottky contacts, such as lateral inhomogeneity, contaminants, and defects, can complicate the comparison of experimentally obtained barrier heights to theoretical predictions. The diode ideality factor η (which should approach unity for laterally homogeneous interfaces, after accounting for image force effects) is also strongly affected by the same issues, and correlations can be observed between barrier height and η when measuring large numbers of devices. ZnO could prove to be an interesting test case for evaluating various theoretical models, as it is significantly more ionic than most semiconductors, resulting in weaker Fermi pinning due to interface states. ZnO also does not require the removal of a native oxide layer for device processing, thereby avoiding often aggressive cleaning procedures. We have fabricated arrays of rectifying metal-ZnO contacts using bulk wafers and a wide variety of metals, using a technique which results in large barrier heights (typically > 0.8 eV) and low η (approaching the image force limit). Using the electrical characteristics of these diodes, we evaluate both Tung's chemical bonding and M"onch's metal induced gap states + electronegativity models. The lack of agreement with either of these popular models raises several questions, including whether predictions for the branch point energy in ZnO --- a parameter relevant to discussions of heterointerfaces as well as doping ability --- are accurate.

  11. Saffman-Taylor-like instability in a narrow gap induced by dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shang-Yan; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2015-07-01

    This work is inspired by the expansion of the plasma bubble in a narrow gap reported by Chu and Lee [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 225001 (2011)]. We report the unstable phenomena of the plasma-liquid interface with different curvature in a Hele-Shaw cell. Dielectric barrier discharge is produced in the cell at atmospheric pressure which is partially filled with silicone oil. We show that the Saffman-Taylor-like instability is observed on the bubble-type, channel-type, and drop-type interfaces. The Schlieren observation of the plasma-drop interaction reveals that there is a vapor layer around the drop and the particle image velocimetry shows the liquid flow inside the drop. We propose that the thermal Marangoni effect induced by the plasma heating is responsible for the unstable phenomena of the plasma-liquid interaction. The fluctuation of the interface is shown consistently with the Saffman-Taylor instability modified by the temperature-dependent velocity and surface tension.

  12. Porcine induced pluripotent stem cells may bridge the gap between mouse and human iPS.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Miguel A; Peng, Meixiu; Deli, Zhang; Cai, Jie; Yang, Jiayin; Xu, Jianyong; Lai, Liangxue; Pei, Duanqing

    2010-04-01

    Recently, three independent laboratories reported the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from pig (Sus scrofa). This finding sums to the growing list of species (mouse, human, monkey, and rat, in this order) for which successful reprogramming using exogenous factors has been achieved, and multiple others are possibly forthcoming. But apart from demonstrating the universality of the network identified by Shinya Yamanaka, what makes the porcine model so special? On one side, pigs are an agricultural commodity and have an easy and affordable maintenance compared with nonhuman primates that normally need to be imported. On the other side, resemblance (for example, size of organs) of porcine and human physiology is striking and because pigs are a regular source of food the ethical concerns that still remain in monkeys are not applicable. Besides, the prolonged lifespan of pigs compared with other domestic species can allow exhaustive follow up of side effects after transplantation. Porcine iPSCs may thus fill the gap between the mouse model, which due to its ease is preferred for mechanistic studies, and the first clinical trials using iPSCs in humans. However, although these studies are relevant and have created significant interest they face analogous problems that we discuss herein together with potential new directions.

  13. Autophagy and gap junctional intercellular communication inhibition are involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis in rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Hui; Zhuo, Liling; Han, Tao; Hu, Di; Yang, Xiaokang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Gu, Jianhong; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Liu, Zongping

    2015-04-17

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to induce hepatotoxicity, yet the underlying mechanism of how this occurs is not fully understood. In this study, Cd-induced apoptosis was demonstrated in rat liver cells (BRL 3A) with apoptotic nuclear morphological changes and a decrease in cell index (CI) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The role of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and autophagy in Cd-induced apoptosis was investigated. Cd significantly induced GJIC inhibition as well as downregulation of connexin 43 (Cx43). The prototypical gap junction blocker carbenoxolone disodium (CBX) exacerbated the Cd-induced decrease in CI. Cd treatment was also found to cause autophagy, with an increase in mRNA expression of autophagy-related genes Atg-5, Atg-7, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) conversion from cytosolic LC3-I to membrane-bound LC3-II. The autophagic inducer rapamycin (RAP) prevented the Cd-induced CI decrease, while the autophagic inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) caused a further reduction in CI. In addition, CBX promoted Cd-induced autophagy, as well as changes in expression of Atg-5, Atg-7, Beclin-1 and LC3. CQ was found to block the Cd-induced decrease in Cx43 and GJIC inhibition, whereas RAP had opposite effect. These results demonstrate that autophagy plays a protective role during Cd-induced apoptosis in BRL 3A cells during 6 h of experiment, while autophagy exacerbates Cd-induced GJIC inhibition which has a negative effect on cellular fate. - Highlights: • GJIC and autophagy is crucial for biological processes. • Cd exposure causes GJIC inhibition and autophagy increase in BRL 3A cells. • Autophagy protects Cd induced BRL 3A cells apoptosis at an early stage. • Autophagy exacerbates Cd-induced GJIC inhibition. • GJIC plays an important role in autophagy induced cell death or survival.

  14. ASC Induces Apoptosis via Activation of Caspase-9 by Enhancing Gap Junction-Mediated Intercellular Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Shigeaki; Fujii, Chifumi; Taniguchi, Shun’ichiro; Ito, Kensuke; Matsumura, Tomio; Okada, Nagisa; Sakaizawa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Akira; Takeoka, Michiko; Miyagawa, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD) is a key adaptor molecule of inflammasomes that mediates inflammatory and apoptotic signals. Aberrant methylation-induced silencing of ASC has been observed in a variety of cancer cells, thus implicating ASC in tumor suppression, although this role remains incompletely defined especially in the context of closely neighboring cell proliferation. As ASC has been confirmed to be silenced by abnormal methylation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells as well, this cell line was investigated to characterize the precise role and mechanism of ASC in tumor progression. The effects of ASC were examined using in vitro cell cultures based on comparisons between low and high cell density conditions as well as in a xenograft murine model. ASC overexpression was established by insertion of the ASC gene into pcDNA3 and pMX-IRES-GFP vectors, the latter being packed into a retrovirus and subjected to reproducible competitive assays using parental cells as an internal control, for evaluation of cell viability. p21 and p53 were silenced using shRNA. Cell viability was suppressed in ASC-expressing transfectants as compared with control cells at high cell density conditions in in vitro culture and colony formation assays and in in vivo ectopic tumor formation trials. This suppression was not detected in low cell density conditions. Furthermore, remarkable progression of apoptosis was observed in ASC-introduced cells at a high cell density, but not at a low one. ASC-dependent apoptosis was mediated not by p21, p53, or caspase-1, but rather by cleavage of caspase-9 as well as by suppression of the NF-κB-related X-linked inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein. Caspase-9 cleavage was observed to be dependent on gap junction formation. The remarkable effect of ASC on the induction of apoptosis through caspase-9 and gap junctions revealed in this study may lead to promising new approaches in anticancer therapy. PMID:28056049

  15. Functional role of gap junctions in cytokine-induced leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Véliz, Loreto P.; González, Francisco G.; Duling, Brian R.; Sáez, Juan C.; Boric, Mauricio P.

    2008-01-01

    To assess the hypothesis that gap junctions (GJs) participate on leukocyte-endothelium interactions in the inflammatory response, we compared leukocyte adhesion and transmigration elicited by cytokine stimulation in the presence or absence of GJ blockers in the hamster cheek pouch and also in the cremaster muscle of wild-type (WT) and endothelium-specific connexin 43 (Cx43) null mice (Cx43e−/−). In the cheek pouch, topical tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; 150 ng/ml, 15 min) caused a sustained increment in the number of leukocytes adhered to venular endothelium (LAV) and located at perivenular regions (LPV). Superfusion with the GJ blockers 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA; 75 μM) or 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (50 μM) abolished the TNF-α-induced increase in LAV and LPV; carbenoxolone (75 μM) or oleamide (100 μM) reduced LAV by 50 and 75%, respectively, and LPV to a lesser extent. None of these GJ blockers modified venular diameter, blood flow, or leukocyte rolling. In contrast, glycyrrhizin (75 μM), a non-GJ blocker analog of AGA, was devoid of effect. Interestingly, when AGA was removed 90 min after TNF-α stimulation, LAV started to rise at a similar rate as in control. Conversely, application of AGA 90 min after TNF-α reduced the number of previously adhered cells. In WT mice, intrascrotal injection of TNF-α (0.5 μg/0.3 ml) increased LAV (fourfold) and LPV (threefold) compared with saline-injected controls. In contrast to the observations in WT animals, TNF-α stimulation did not increase LAV or LPV in Cx43e−/− mice. These results demonstrate an important role for GJ communication in leukocyte adhesion and transmigration during acute inflammation in vivo and further suggest that endothelial Cx43 is key in these processes. PMID:18599597

  16. Identifying the translational gap in the evaluation of drug-induced QTc interval prolongation

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Anne SY; Dubois, Vincent FS; Danhof, Meindert; Sturkenboom, Miriam CJM; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Aims Given the similarities in QTc response between dogs and humans, dogs are used in pre-clinical cardiovascular safety studies. The objective of our investigation was to characterize the PKPD relationships and identify translational gaps across species following the administration of three compounds known to cause QTc interval prolongation, namely cisapride, d, l-sotalol and moxifloxacin. Methods Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from experiments in conscious dogs and clinical trials were included in this analysis. First, pharmacokinetic modelling and deconvolution methods were applied to derive drug concentrations at the time of each QT measurement. A Bayesian PKPD model was then used to describe QT prolongation, allowing discrimination of drug-specific effects from other physiological factors known to alter QT interval duration. A threshold of ≥10 ms was used to explore the probability of prolongation after drug administration. Results A linear relationship was found to best describe the pro-arrhythmic effects of cisapride, d,l-sotalol and moxifloxacin both in dogs and in humans. The drug-specific parameter (slope) in dogs was statistically significantly different from humans. Despite such differences, our results show that the probability of QTc prolongation ≥10 ms in dogs nears 100% for all three compounds at the therapeutic exposure range in humans. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the slope of PKPD relationship in conscious dogs may be used as the basis for the prediction of drug-induced QTc prolongation in humans. Furthermore, the risk of QTc prolongation can be expressed in terms of the probability associated with an increase ≥10 ms, allowing direct inferences about the clinical relevance of the pro-arrhythmic potential of a molecule. PMID:23351036

  17. Terahertz radiation-induced sub-cycle field electron emission across a split-gap dipole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingdi; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Fan, Kebin; Wang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Gu-Feng; Geng, Kun; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D.

    We use intense terahertz pulses to excite the resonant mode (0.6THz) of a micro-fabricated dipole antenna with a vacuum gap. The dipole antenna structure enhances the peak amplitude of the in-gap THz electric field by a factor of ~170. Above an in-gap E-field threshold amplitude of ~10 MVcm-1, THz-induced field electron emission is observed (TIFEE) as indicated by the field-induced electric current across the dipole antenna gap. Field emission occurs within a fraction of the driving THz period. Our analysis of the current (I) and incident electric field (E) is in agreement with a Millikan-Lauritsen analysis where log (I) exhibits a linear dependence on 1/E. Numerical estimates indicate that the electrons are accelerated to a value of approximately one tenth of the speed of light. (arXiv: 1508.04737) We acknowledge support from DOE-BES No. DE-FG02-09ER46643 and NSF No. ECCS-1309835.

  18. FEL gain as a function of phace displacements induced by undulator intersection gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Gain characteristics are analytically considered for FEL based on a multisection undulator with short intersection gaps. It is shown that small phase displacements between laser beam and electron beam respectively caused by the above intersection gaps can seriously change the gain resonance frequency as well as gain curve shape. This effect is different from that of OK and can be used for fast undulator tuning or for its tapering. Gain characteristics are analitically considered for FEL based on a multisection undulator with short intersection gaps. It is shown that small phase displacements between laser beam and electron beam respectively caused by the above intersection gaps can seriously change the gain resonance frequency as well as gain curve shape. This effect is different from that of OK and can be used for fast undulator tuning or for its tapering.

  19. Self-amplified photo-induced gap quenching in a correlated electron material.

    PubMed

    Mathias, S; Eich, S; Urbancic, J; Michael, S; Carr, A V; Emmerich, S; Stange, A; Popmintchev, T; Rohwer, T; Wiesenmayer, M; Ruffing, A; Jakobs, S; Hellmann, S; Matyba, P; Chen, C; Kipp, L; Bauer, M; Kapteyn, H C; Schneider, H C; Rossnagel, K; Murnane, M M; Aeschlimann, M

    2016-10-04

    Capturing the dynamic electronic band structure of a correlated material presents a powerful capability for uncovering the complex couplings between the electronic and structural degrees of freedom. When combined with ultrafast laser excitation, new phases of matter can result, since far-from-equilibrium excited states are instantaneously populated. Here, we elucidate a general relation between ultrafast non-equilibrium electron dynamics and the size of the characteristic energy gap in a correlated electron material. We show that carrier multiplication via impact ionization can be one of the most important processes in a gapped material, and that the speed of carrier multiplication critically depends on the size of the energy gap. In the case of the charge-density wave material 1T-TiSe2, our data indicate that carrier multiplication and gap dynamics mutually amplify each other, which explains-on a microscopic level-the extremely fast response of this material to ultrafast optical excitation.

  20. Self-amplified photo-induced gap quenching in a correlated electron material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, S.; Eich, S.; Urbancic, J.; Michael, S.; Carr, A. V.; Emmerich, S.; Stange, A.; Popmintchev, T.; Rohwer, T.; Wiesenmayer, M.; Ruffing, A.; Jakobs, S.; Hellmann, S.; Matyba, P.; Chen, C.; Kipp, L.; Bauer, M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Schneider, H. C.; Rossnagel, K.; Murnane, M. M.; Aeschlimann, M.

    2016-10-01

    Capturing the dynamic electronic band structure of a correlated material presents a powerful capability for uncovering the complex couplings between the electronic and structural degrees of freedom. When combined with ultrafast laser excitation, new phases of matter can result, since far-from-equilibrium excited states are instantaneously populated. Here, we elucidate a general relation between ultrafast non-equilibrium electron dynamics and the size of the characteristic energy gap in a correlated electron material. We show that carrier multiplication via impact ionization can be one of the most important processes in a gapped material, and that the speed of carrier multiplication critically depends on the size of the energy gap. In the case of the charge-density wave material 1T-TiSe2, our data indicate that carrier multiplication and gap dynamics mutually amplify each other, which explains--on a microscopic level--the extremely fast response of this material to ultrafast optical excitation.

  1. Terahertz band gaps induced by metal grooves inside parallel-plate waveguides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui Su; So, Jin-Kyu; Park, Gun-Sik; Kim, Daisik; Kee, Chul-Sik; Jeon, Tae-In

    2012-03-12

    We report experimental and finite-difference time-domain simulation studies on terahertz (THz) characteristics of band gaps by using metal grooves which are located inside the flare parallel-plate waveguide. The vertically localized standing-wave cavity mode (SWCM) between the upper waveguide surface and groove bottom, and the horizontally localized SWCM between two groove side walls (groove cavity) are observed. The E field intensity of the horizontally localized SWCM in grooves is very strongly enchanced which is three order higher than that of the input THz. The 4 band gaps except the Bragg band gap are caused by the π radian delay (out of phase) between the reflected THz field by grooves and the propagated THz field through the air gap. The measurement and simulation results agree well.

  2. Leptin Induces Hippocampal Synaptogenesis via CREB-Regulated MicroRNA-132 Suppression of p250GAP

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Matasha; Zhu, Mingyan; Impey, Soren; Lambert, Talley J.; Bland, Tyler; Karatsoreos, Ilia N.; Nakazawa, Takanobu

    2014-01-01

    Leptin acts in the hippocampus to enhance cognition and reduce depression and anxiety. Cognitive and emotional disorders are associated with abnormal hippocampal dendritic spine formation and synaptogenesis. Although leptin has been shown to induce synaptogenesis in the hypothalamus, its effects on hippocampal synaptogenesis and the mechanism(s) involved are not well understood. Here we show that leptin receptors (LepRs) are critical for hippocampal dendritic spine formation in vivo because db/db mice lacking the long form of the leptin receptor (LepRb) have reduced spine density on CA1 and CA3 neurons. Leptin promotes the formation of mature spines and functional glutamate synapses on hippocampal pyramidal neurons in both dissociated and slice cultures. These effects are blocked by short hairpin RNAs specifically targeting the LepRb and are absent in cultures from db/db mice. Activation of the LepR leads to cAMP response element–binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and initiation of CREB-dependent transcription via the MAPK kinase/Erk pathway. Furthermore, both Mek/Erk and CREB activation are required for leptin-induced synaptogenesis. Leptin also increases expression of microRNA-132 (miR132), a well-known CREB target, which is also required for leptin-induced synaptogenesis. Last, leptin suppresses the expression of p250GAP, a miR132 target, and this suppression is obligatory for leptin's effects as is the downstream target of p250GAP, Rac1. LepRs appear to be critical in vivo as db/db mice have lowered hippocampal miR132 levels and elevated p250GAP expression. In conclusion, we identify a novel signaling pathway by which leptin increases synaptogenesis through inducing CREB transcription and increasing microRNA-mediated suppression of p250GAP activity, thus removing a known inhibitor of Rac1-stimulated synaptogenesis. PMID:24877561

  3. Extreme sensitivity of the electric-field-induced band gap to the electronic topological transition in sliding bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the effect of electronic topological transition on the electric field-induced band gap in sliding bilayer graphene by using the density functional theory calculations. The electric field-induced band gap was found to be extremely sensitive to the electronic topological transition. At the electronic topological transition induced by layer sliding, four Dirac cones in the Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene reduces to two Dirac cones with equal or unequal Dirac energies depending on the sliding direction. While the critical electric field required for the band gap opening increases with increasing lateral shift for the two Dirac cones with unequal Dirac energies, the critical field is essentially zero with or without a lateral shift for the two Dirac cones with equal Dirac energies. The critical field is determined by the Dirac energy difference and the electronic screening effect. The electronic screening effect was also found to be enhanced with increasing lateral shift, apparently indicating that the massless helical and massive chiral fermions are responsible for the perfect and imperfect electronic screening, respectively.

  4. The electronic origin of shear-induced direct to indirect gap transition and anisotropy diminution in phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Sa, Baisheng; Li, Yan-Ling; Sun, Zhimei; Qi, Jingshan; Wen, Cuilian; Wu, Bo

    2015-05-29

    Artificial monolayer black phosphorus, so-called phosphorene, has attracted global interest with its distinguished anisotropic, optoelectronic, and electronic properties. Here, we unraveled the shear-induced direct-to-indirect gap transition and anisotropy diminution in phosphorene based on first-principles calculations. Lattice dynamic analysis demonstrates that phosphorene can sustain up to 10% applied shear strain. The bandgap of phosphorene experiences a direct-to- indirect transition when 5% shear strain is applied. The electronic origin of the direct-to-indirect gap transition from 1.54 eV at ambient conditions to 1.22 eV at 10% shear strain for phosphorene is explored. In addition, the anisotropy diminution in phosphorene is discussed by calculating the maximum sound velocities, effective mass, and decomposed charge density, which signals the undesired shear-induced direct-to-indirect gap transition in applications of phosphorene for electronics and optoelectronics. On the other hand, the shear-induced electronic anisotropy properties suggest that phosphorene can be applied as the switcher in nanoelectronic applications.

  5. Dust coagulation and magnetic field strength in a planet-induced gap subject to MRI turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballido, Augusto; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the coagulation of dust particles in and around a gap opened by a Jupiter-mass planet. To this end, we carry out a high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the gap environment, which is turbulent due to the magneto rotational instability. From the MHD simulation, we obtain values of the gas velocities, densities and turbulent stresses close to the gap edge, in one of the two gas streams that accrete onto the planet, and inside the low-density gap. The MHD values are then supplied to a Monte Carlo dust coagulation algorithm, which models grain sticking, compaction and bouncing. We consider two dust populations for each region: one whose initial size distribution is monodisperse, with monomer radius equal to 1 micron, and another one whose initial size distribution follows the Mathis-Rumpl-Nordsieck distribution for interstellar dust grains, with an initial range of monomer radii between 0.5 and 10 microns. Without bouncing, our Monte Carlo calculations show steady growth of dust aggregates in all regions, and the mass-weighted (MW) average porosity of the initially mono disperse population reaches extremely high final values of 98%. The final MW porosities in all other cases without bouncing range from 30% to 82%. The efficiency of compaction is due to high turbulent relative speeds between dust particles. When bouncing is introduced, growth is slowed down in the planetary wake and inside the gap.We also analyze the strength of the magnetic field threading the gaps opened by planets of different sub-Jovian masses. Preliminary results show that, in a gap opened by a large-mass planet (~ 1 MJ), the time-averaged radial profile of the vertical component of the field (Bz) increases sharply inside the gap, and less sharply in the case of less massive planets. In gaps opened by intermediate-mass planets (~ 0.5 — 0.75 MJ), the radial profile of Bz exhibits local maxima in the vicinity of the planet, but not at the gap center.

  6. Oxygen vacancy induced band gap narrowing of ZnO nanostructures by an electrochemically active biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Khan, Mohammad Mansoob; Kalathil, Shafeer; Nisar, Ambreen; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2013-09-01

    Band gap narrowing is important and advantageous for potential visible light photocatalytic applications involving metal oxide nanostructures. This paper reports a simple biogenic approach for the promotion of oxygen vacancies in pure zinc oxide (p-ZnO) nanostructures using an electrochemically active biofilm (EAB), which is different from traditional techniques for narrowing the band gap of nanomaterials. The novel protocol improved the visible photocatalytic activity of modified ZnO (m-ZnO) nanostructures through the promotion of oxygen vacancies, which resulted in band gap narrowing of the ZnO nanostructure (Eg = 3.05 eV) without dopants. X-ray diffraction, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed the oxygen vacancy and band gap narrowing of m-ZnO. m-ZnO enhanced the visible light catalytic activity for the degradation of different classes of dyes and 4-nitrophenol compared to p-ZnO, which confirmed the band gap narrowing because of oxygen defects. This study shed light on the modification of metal oxide nanostructures by EAB with a controlled band structure.Band gap narrowing is important and advantageous for potential visible light photocatalytic applications involving metal oxide nanostructures. This paper reports a simple biogenic approach for the promotion of oxygen vacancies in pure zinc oxide (p-ZnO) nanostructures using an electrochemically active biofilm (EAB), which is different from traditional techniques for narrowing the band gap of nanomaterials. The novel protocol improved the visible photocatalytic activity of modified ZnO (m-ZnO) nanostructures through the promotion of oxygen vacancies, which resulted in band gap narrowing of the ZnO nanostructure (Eg = 3.05 eV) without dopants. X-ray diffraction, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, X

  7. Strain-induced optical band gap variation of SnO2 films

    DOE PAGES

    Rus, Stefania Florina; Ward, Thomas Zac; Herklotz, Andreas

    2016-06-29

    In this paper, thickness dependent strain relaxation effects are utilized to study the impact of crystal anisotropy on the optical band gap of epitaxial SnO2 films grown by pulsed laser deposition on (0001)-oriented sapphire substrates. An X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that all films are under tensile biaxial in-plane strain and that strain relaxation occurs with increasing thickness. Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry shows that the optical band gap of the SnO2 films continuously increases with increasing film thickness. This increase in the band gap is linearly related to the strain state of the films, which indicates that the main origin ofmore » the band gap change is strain relaxation. The experimental observation is in excellent agreement with results from density functional theory for biaxial in-plane strain. Our research demonstrates that strain is an effective way to tune the band gap of SnO2 films and suggests that strain engineering is an appealing route to tailor the optical properties of oxide semiconductors.« less

  8. Strain-induced optical band gap variation of SnO2 films

    SciTech Connect

    Rus, Stefania Florina; Ward, Thomas Zac; Herklotz, Andreas

    2016-06-29

    In this paper, thickness dependent strain relaxation effects are utilized to study the impact of crystal anisotropy on the optical band gap of epitaxial SnO2 films grown by pulsed laser deposition on (0001)-oriented sapphire substrates. An X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that all films are under tensile biaxial in-plane strain and that strain relaxation occurs with increasing thickness. Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry shows that the optical band gap of the SnO2 films continuously increases with increasing film thickness. This increase in the band gap is linearly related to the strain state of the films, which indicates that the main origin of the band gap change is strain relaxation. The experimental observation is in excellent agreement with results from density functional theory for biaxial in-plane strain. Our research demonstrates that strain is an effective way to tune the band gap of SnO2 films and suggests that strain engineering is an appealing route to tailor the optical properties of oxide semiconductors.

  9. Interaction dynamics of gap flow with vortex-induced vibration in side-by-side cylinder arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Jaiman, Rajeev K.

    2016-12-01

    A numerical investigation of the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in a side-by-side circular cylinder arrangement has been performed in a two-dimensional laminar flow environment. One of the cylinders is elastically mounted and only vibrates in the transverse direction, while its counterpart remains stationary in a uniform flow stream. When the gap ratio is sufficiently small, the flip-flopping phenomenon of the gap flow can be an additional time-dependent interference to the flow field. This phenomenon was reported in the experimental work of Bearman and Wadcock ["The interaction between a pair of circular cylinders normal to a stream," J. Fluid Mech. 61(3), 499-511 (1973)] in a side-by-side circular cylinder arrangement, in which the gap flow deflects toward one of the cylinders and switched its sides intermittently. Albeit one of the two cylinders is free to vibrate, the flip-flop of a gap flow during VIV dynamics can still be observed outside the lock-in region. The exact moments of the flip-flop phenomenon due to spontaneous symmetry breaking are observed in this numerical study. The significant characteristic vortex modes in the near-wake region are extracted via dynamic modal analysis and the interference between the gap flow and VIV is found to be mutual. In a vibrating side-by-side arrangement, the lock-in region with respect to reduced velocity becomes narrower due to the interference from its stationary counterpart. The frequency lock-in occurs and ends earlier than that of an isolated vibrating circular cylinder subjected to an identical flow environment. Similar to a tandem cylinder arrangement, in the post-lock-in region, the maximum vibration amplitudes are escalated compared with those of an isolated circular cylinder configuration. On the other hand, subjected to the influence from VIV, the biased gap flow deflects toward the vibrating cylinder quasi-stably during the frequency lock-in process. This behavior is different from the reported bi

  10. Disorder induced evolution of two energy gaps in MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Jihn

    2007-03-01

    We study disorder effect on MgB2 superconductivity using the two band model by Suhl, Matthias, and Walker. We stress the importance of the Cooper pair size effect in the response of the BCS superconductor to the perturbation: the bounded Cooper pairs see the impurities within the range of the coherence length. This effect will undermine the initial decrease of the Tc and the big energy gap due to disorder, until the resistance ratio reaches about ˜3. For the resistance ratio less than 3, weak localization starts to decouple electrons and phonons, leading to the significant decrease of both the Tc and the big gap. In particular, we trace the evolution of two energy gaps of MgB2 as a function of disorder. Estimating the inter-band scattering rate from the experimental data, we compare our calculations with experiments. We also calculate the transition temperature, Tc as a function of the resistance ratio.

  11. Strain-Induced Energy Band Gap Opening in Two-Dimensional Bilayered Silicon Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Z.; Zhou, R.; Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Zhuang, Y.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents a theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of bilayered silicon film (BiSF) under in-plane biaxial strain/stress using density functional theory (DFT). Atomic structures of the two-dimensional (2-D) silicon films are optimized by using both the local-density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). In the absence of strain/stress, five buckled hexagonal honeycomb structures of the BiSF with triangular lattice have been obtained as local energy minima, and their structural stability has been verified. These structures present a Dirac-cone shaped energy band diagram with zero energy band gaps. Applying a tensile biaxial strain leads to a reduction of the buckling height. Atomically flat structures with zero buckling height have been observed when the AA-stacking structures are under a critical biaxial strain. Increase of the strain between 10.7% and 15.4% results in a band-gap opening with a maximum energy band gap opening of ˜0.17 eV, obtained when a 14.3% strain is applied. Energy band diagrams, electron transmission efficiency, and the charge transport property are calculated. Additionally, an asymmetric energetically favorable atomic structure of BiSF shows a non-zero band gap in the absence of strain/stress and a maximum band gap of 0.15 eV as a -1.71% compressive strain is applied. Both tensile and compressive strain/stress can lead to a band gap opening in the asymmetric structure.

  12. Orbital migration of giant planets induced by gravitationally unstable gaps: the effect of planet mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Lin, Min-Kai

    2013-09-01

    It has been established that self-gravitating disc-satellite interaction can lead to the formation of a gravitationally unstable gap. Such an instability may significantly affect the orbital migration of gap-opening perturbers in self-gravitating discs. In this paper, we extend the two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of Lin & Papaloizou to investigate the role of the perturber or planet mass on the gravitational stability of gaps and its impact on orbital migration. We consider giant planets with planet-to-star mass ratio q ≡ Mp/M* ∈ [0.3, 3.0] × 10-3 (so that q = 10-3 corresponds to a Jupiter mass planet if M* = M⊙), in a self-gravitating disc with disc-to-star mass ratio Md/M* = 0.08, aspect ratio h = 0.05 and Keplerian Toomre parameter Qk0 = 1.5 at 2.5 times the planet's initial orbital radius. These planet masses correspond to tilde{q}in [0.9, 1.7], where tilde{q} is the ratio of the planet Hill radius to the local disc scale-height. Fixed-orbit simulations show that all planet masses we consider open gravitationally unstable gaps, but the instability is stronger and develops sooner with increasing planet mass. The disc-on-planet torques typically become more positive with increasing planet mass. In freely migrating simulations, we observe faster outward migration with increasing planet mass, but only for planet masses capable of opening unstable gaps early on. For q = 0.0003 (tilde{q}=0.9), the planet undergoes rapid inward type III migration before it can open a gap. For q = 0.0013 (tilde{q}=1.5) we find it is possible to balance the tendency for inward migration by the positive torques due to an unstable gap, but only for a few 10 s of orbital periods. We find the unstable outer gap edge can trigger outward type III migration, sending the planet to twice its initial orbital radius on dynamical time-scales. We briefly discuss the importance of our results in the context of giant planet formation on wide orbits through disc fragmentation.

  13. The effect of induced strains on the optical band gaps in lanthanum-doped zinc ferrite nanocrystalline powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Fathalla; Ramachandran, Tholkappiyan; Kurapati, Vishista

    2016-07-01

    ZnFe1.96La0.04O4 nanocrystalline powders were synthesized by auto-combustion with the aid of glycine as fuel. The synthesized powders were subjected to heat treatment in air at constant temperatures (600-970∘C) for a period of 2 h. The annealed powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. The as-synthesized and annealed powders formed spongy porous network structure with voids and pores. All the powders were found to be single phase nanomaterial with cubic spinel crystal structure and the desired composition; however, they contained strains, dislocations and lattice distortions. Some of these strains and dislocations are relaxed as a function of annealing temperature. The powders displayed direct and indirect optical band gaps. The energies of these band gaps were found to vary as a function of the induced strains and dislocations. It is suggested that the energy of the optical band gap in lanthanum-doped zinc ferrite nanocrystalline powders can be varied as a function of induced strains if the initial preparation conditions and the following heat treatments are controlled.

  14. The GaN/noble metal interface: metal induced gap states and Schottky barrier heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, Silvia; Continenza, Alessandra; Satta, Guido; Massidda, Sandro; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2000-03-01

    We present ab-initio FLAPW (E. Wimmer, H. Krakauer, M. Weinert and A.J. Freeman, Phys. Rev. B 24), 864 (1981) calculations on N-terminated [001] ordered GaN/Ag and GaN/Au interfaces. Our results show that the density of gap states is appreciable in the interface semiconductor layer; however, the gap states are efficiently screened and become negligible already in the sub-interface layer. The gap states' decay length in the semiconductor side is about 2.0 ± 0.1 Å\\: and seems to be independent of the deposited metal, therefore being, to a good approximation, a bulk GaN property. Our estimated Schottky barrier heights for the GaN/noble-metal interfaces are both smaller than that of the GaN/Al barrier, showing a large dispersion in the values - which seems to exclude the possibility of a Fermi level pinning within the gap. Finally, we investigate the role of atomic positions and of different chemical species at the interface region in determining the final value of the potential line-up.

  15. MoS2-WSe2 Hetero Bilayer: Possibility of Mechanical Strain Induced Band Gap Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-03-01

    The tunability of band gap in two-dimensional (2D) hetero-bilayers of MoS2-WSe2 with applied mechanical strains (in-plane and out-of-plane) in two different types of stackings (AA and AB) have been investigated in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The in-plane biaxial tensile strain is found to reduce electronic band gap monotonically and rendered considered bilayer into metal at 6% of applied strain. The transition pressure required for complete semiconductor-to-metal transition is found to be of 7.89 GPa while tensile strength of the reported hetero-bilayer has been calculated 10 GPa at 25% strain. In case of vertical compression strain, 16 GPa pressure has been calculated for complete semiconductor-to-metal transition. The band-gap deformation potentials and effective masses (electron and hole) have been found to posses strong dependence on the type of applied strain. Such band gap engineering in controlled manner (internal control by composition and external control by applied strain) makes the considered hetero-bilayer as a strong candidate for the application in variety of nano scale devices.

  16. Hofstadter butterflies and magnetically induced band-gap quenching in graphene antidot lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2013-06-01

    We study graphene antidot lattices (GALs) in magnetic fields. Using a tight-binding model and a recursive Green's function technique that we extend to deal with periodic structures, we calculate Hofstadter butterflies of GALs. We compare the results to those obtained in a simpler gapped graphene model. A crucial difference emerges in the behavior of the lowest Landau level, which in a gapped graphene model is independent of magnetic field. In stark contrast to this picture, we find that in GALs the band gap can be completely closed by applying a magnetic field. While our numerical simulations can only be performed on structures much smaller than can be experimentally realized, we find that the critical magnetic field for which the gap closes can be directly related to the ratio between the cyclotron radius and the neck width of the GAL. In this way, we obtain a simple scaling law for extrapolation of our results to more realistically sized structures and find resulting quenching magnetic fields that should be well within reach of experiments.

  17. Extracorporeal shockwaves induce the expression of ATF3 and GAP-43 in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Murata, Ryo; Ohtori, Seiji; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Takahashi, Norimasa; Saisu, Takashi; Moriya, Hideshige; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Wada, Yuichi

    2006-07-30

    Although extracorporeal shockwave has been applied in the treatment of various diseases, the biological basis for its analgesic effect remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the dorsal root ganglion neurons of rats following shockwave exposure to the footpad to elucidate its effect on the peripheral nervous system. We used activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and growth-associated phosphoprotein (GAP-43) as markers for nerve injury and axonal regeneration, respectively. The average number of neurons immunoreactive for ATF3 increased significantly in the treated rats at all experimental time points, with 78.3% of those neurons also exhibiting immunoreactivity for GAP-43. Shockwave exposure induced injury of the sensory nerve fibers within the exposed area. This phenomenon may be linked to the desensitization of the exposure area, not the cause of pain, considering clinical research with a particular absence of painful adverse effect. Subsequent active axonal regeneration may account for the reinnervation of exposed area and the amelioration of the desensitization.

  18. High-pressure induced modifications in the hybridization gap of the intermediate-valence compound SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, K.; Mito, T.; Pristáš, G.; Koyama, T.; Ueda, K.; Kohara, T.; Gabáni, S.; Flachbart, K.; Fukazawa, H.; Kohori, Y.; Takeshita, N.; Shitsevalova, N.; Ikeda, H.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out the measurements of high-pressure 11B -nuclear magnetic resonance on the intermediate-valence compound SmB6 to investigate the effects of pressure on Sm 4 f states and the quasiparticle band. From the measurements of spin-lattice relaxation time, just below the critical pressure Pc of nonmagnetic-magnetic phase transition, we find that quasiparticle bandwidth clearly decreases with pressure, while the insulating gap is almost constant or slightly increases. The latter is consistent with the result of a band-structure calculation. These pressure induced modifications in the band structure indicate the enhancement of the density of states of the quasiparticles when approaching Pc. The pressure dependence of the Sm 4 f states and the origin of the insulating gap are well explained in terms of exchange interactions between conduction and 4 f electrons.

  19. Particle Concentration at Planet-induced Gap Edges and Vortices. I. Inviscid Three-dimensional Hydro Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Bai, Xue-ning

    2014-04-01

    We perform a systematic study of the dynamics of dust particles in protoplanetary disks with embedded planets using global two-dimensional and three-dimensional inviscid hydrodynamic simulations. Lagrangian particles have been implemented into the magnetohydrodynamic code Athena with cylindrical coordinates. We find two distinct outcomes depending on the mass of the embedded planet. In the presence of a low-mass planet (8 M ⊕), two narrow gaps start to open in the gas on each side of the planet where the density waves are shocked. These shallow gaps can dramatically affect particle drift speed and cause significant, roughly axisymmetric dust depletion. On the other hand, a more massive planet (>0.1 MJ ) carves out a deeper gap with sharp edges, which are subject to Rossby wave instability leading to vortex formation. Particles with a wide range of sizes (0.02 < Ωts < 20) are trapped and settle to the midplane in the vortex, with the strongest concentration for particles with Ωts ~ 1. The dust concentration is highly elongated in the phi direction, and can be as wide as four disk scale heights in the radial direction. Dust surface density inside the vortex can be increased by more than a factor of 102 in a very non-axisymmetric fashion. For very big particles (Ωts Gt 1) we find strong eccentricity excitation, in particular around the planet and in the vicinity of the mean motion resonances, facilitating gap openings there. Our results imply that in weakly turbulent protoplanetary disk regions (e.g., the "dead zone") dust particles with a very wide range of sizes can be trapped at gap edges and inside vortices induced by planets with Mp < MJ , potentially accelerating planetesimal and planet formation there, and giving rise to distinctive features that can be probed by ALMA and the Extended Very Large Array.

  20. The strain induced band gap modulation from narrow gap semiconductor to half-metal on Ti{sub 2}CrGe: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Zhidong; Lu, Zunming; Xie, Hongxian; Fang, Wei; Li, Shaomin; Liang, Chunyong; Yin, Fuxing

    2015-11-15

    The Heusler alloy Ti{sub 2}CrGe is a stable L2{sub 1} phase with antiferromagnetic ordering. With band-gap energy (∼ 0.18 eV) obtained from a first-principles calculation, it belongs to the group of narrow band gap semiconductor. The band-gap energy decreases with increasing lattice compression and disappears until a strain of −5%; moreover, gap contraction only occurs in the spin-down states, leading to half-metallic character at the −5% strain. The Ti{sub 1}, Ti{sub 2}, and Cr moments all exhibit linear changes in behavior within strains of −5%– +5%. Nevertheless, the total zero moment is robust for these strains. The imaginary part of the dielectric function for both up and down spin states shows a clear onset energy, indicating a corresponding electronic gap for the two spin channels.

  1. S-diclofenac Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy in Mice via Ameliorating Cardiac Gap Junction Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huili; Zhang, Alian; Guo, Changfa; Shi, Chunzhi; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Qing; Sparatore, Anna; Wang, Changqian

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a novel gaseous mediator, plays important roles in mammalian cardiovascular tissues. In the present study, we investigated the cardioprotective effect of S-diclofenac (2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino] benzeneacetic acid 4-(3H-1,2,dithiol-3-thione-5-yl)phenyl ester), a novel H2S-releasing derivative of diclofenac, in a murine model of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. After a single dose injection of doxorubicin (15 mg/kg, i.p.), male C57BL/6J mice were given daily treatment of S-diclofenac (25 and 50 µmol/kg, i.p.), diclofenac (25 and 50 µmol/kg, i.p.), NaHS (50 µmol/kg, i.p.), or same volume of vehicle. The cardioprotective effect of S-diclofenac was observed after 14 days. It showed that S-diclofenac, but not diclofenac, dose-dependently inhibited the doxorubicin-induced downregulation of cardiac gap junction proteins (connexin 43 and connexin 45) and thus reversed the remodeling of gap junctions in hearts. It also dose-dependently suppressed doxorubicin-induced activation of JNK in hearts. Furthermore, S-diclofenac produced a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect in this model. As a result, S-diclofenac significantly attenuated doxorubicin-related cardiac injury and cardiac dysfunction, and improved the survival rate of mice with doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. These effects of S-diclofenac were mimicked in large part by NaHS. Therefore, we propose that H2S released from S-diclofenac in vivo contributes to the protective effect in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. These data also provide evidence for a critical role of H2S in the pathogenesis of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:22039489

  2. Microwave irradiation induced band gap tuning of MoS2-TiO2 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Jyoti; Mohanty, T.

    2016-05-01

    The MoS2-TiO2 nanocomposites have been synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized by different microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The crystallinity of these nanocomposites has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Raman spectrum of MoS2-TiO2 nanocomposites consists of three distinct peaks (E1 g, E1 2g and A1g) which are associated with TiO2 and MoS2. The morphological study is carried out by scanning electron microscope. The effect of microwave irradiation on the band gap of MoS2-TiO2 nanocomposites has been investigated; it is observed that the microwave irradiation causes decrease in the band gap of MoS2-TiO2 nanocomposites. The microwave treated MoS2-TiO2 thin films offers a novel process route in treating thin films for commercial applications.

  3. Two-dimensional silica: Structural, mechanical properties, and strain-induced band gap tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Enlai; Xie, Bo; Xu, Zhiping

    2016-01-07

    Two-dimensional silica is of rising interests not only for its practical applications as insulating layers in nanoelectronics, but also as a model material to understand crystals and glasses. In this study, we examine structural and electronic properties of hexagonal and haeckelite phases of silica bilayers by performing first-principles calculations. We find that the corner-sharing SiO{sub 4} tetrahedrons in these two phases are locally similar. The robustness and resilience of these tetrahedrons under mechanical perturbation allow effective strain engineering of the electronic structures with band gaps covering a very wide range, from of that for insulators, to wide-, and even narrow-gap semiconductors. These findings suggest that the flexible 2D silica holds great promises in developing nanoelectronic devices with strain-tunable performance, and lay the ground for the understanding of crystalline and vitreous phases in 2D, where bilayer silica provides an ideal test-bed.

  4. Characterization of the Candida albicans Amino Acid Permease Family: Gap2 Is the Only General Amino Acid Permease and Gap4 Is an S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Transporter Required for SAM-Induced Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kraidlova, Lucie; Schrevens, Sanne; Tournu, Hélène; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Sychrova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Amino acids are key sources of nitrogen for growth of Candida albicans. In order to detect and take up these amino acids from a broad range of different and changing nitrogen sources inside the host, this fungus must be able to adapt via its expression of genes for amino acid uptake and further metabolism. We analyzed six C. albicans putative general amino acid permeases based on their homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gap1 general amino acid permease. We generated single- and multiple-deletion strains and found that, based on growth assays and transcriptional or posttranscriptional regulation, Gap2 is the functional orthologue to ScGap1, with broad substrate specificity. Expression analysis showed that expression of all GAP genes is under control of the Csy1 amino acid sensor, which is different from the situation in S. cerevisiae, where the expression of ScGAP1 is not regulated by Ssy1. We show that Gap4 is the functional orthologue of ScSam3, the only S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) transporter in S. cerevisiae, and we report that Gap4 is required for SAM-induced morphogenesis. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans is a commensal organism that can thrive in many niches in its human host. The environmental conditions at these different niches differ quite a bit, and this fungus must be able to sense these changes and adapt its metabolism to them. Apart from glucose and other sugars, the uptake of amino acids is very important. This is underscored by the fact that the C. albicans genome encodes 6 orthologues of the Saccharomyces. cerevisiae general amino acid permease Gap1 and many other amino acid transporters. In this work, we characterize these six permeases and we show that C. albicans Gap2 is the functional orthologue of ScGap1 and that C. albicans Gap4 is an orthologue of ScSam3, an S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) transporter. Furthermore, we show that Gap4 is required for SAM-induced morphogenesis, an important virulence factor of C. albicans. PMID

  5. A RasGAP SH3 Peptide Aptamer Inhibits RasGAP-Aurora Interaction and Induces Caspase-Independent Tumor Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, Marc; Corneloup, Claudine; Barthelaix, Audrey; Lepelletier, Yves; Mercier, Perrine; Schapira, Matthieu; Samson, Jérôme; Mathieu, Anne-Laure; Hugo, Nicolas; Moncorgé, Olivier; Mikaelian, Ivan; Dufour, Sylvie; Garbay, Christiane; Colas, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The Ras GTPase-activating protein RasGAP catalyzes the conversion of active GTP-bound Ras into inactive GDP-bound Ras. However, RasGAP also acts as a positive effector of Ras and exerts an anti-apoptotic activity that is independent of its GAP function and that involves its SH3 (Src homology) domain. We used a combinatorial peptide aptamer approach to select a collection of RasGAP SH3 specific ligands. We mapped the peptide aptamer binding sites by performing yeast two-hybrid mating assays against a panel of RasGAP SH3 mutants. We examined the biological activity of a peptide aptamer targeting a pocket delineated by residues D295/7, L313 and W317. This aptamer shows a caspase-independent cytotoxic activity on tumor cell lines. It disrupts the interaction between RasGAP and Aurora B kinase. This work identifies the above-mentioned pocket as an interesting therapeutic target to pursue and points its cognate peptide aptamer as a promising guide to discover RasGAP small-molecule drug candidates. PMID:18682833

  6. Impurity-induced photoconductivity of narrow-gap Cadmium–Mercury–Telluride structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, D. V. Rumyantsev, V. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Kadykov, A. M.; Varavin, V. S.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvorestky, S. A.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Teppe, F.

    2015-12-15

    The photoconductivity (PC) spectra of CdHgTe (MCT) solid solutions with a Cd fraction of 17 and 19% are measured. A simple model for calculating the states of doubly charged acceptors in MCT solid solutions, which makes it possible to describe satisfactorily the observed photoconductivity spectra, is proposed. The found lines in the photoconductivity spectra of narrow-gap MCT structures are associated with transitions between the states of both charged and neutral acceptor centers.

  7. Phonon-induced enhancements of the energy gap and critical current in superconducting aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Seligson, D.

    1983-05-01

    8 to 10 GHz phonons were generated by piezoelectric transduction of a microwave and by means of a quartz delay line, were allowed to enter the aluminum only after the microwaves had long since disappeared. The maximum enhancements detected were (deltaT/T/sub c/) = -0.07, for i/sub c/ and (deltaT/T/sub c/) = -0.03 for ..delta... The power- and temperature-dependence (0.82 less than or equal to T/T/sub c/ less than or equal to 0.994) of the enhancements were compared with the prediction of a theory given by Eliashberg. The gap-enhancement was in good agreement with the theory only for low input lower. The critical current measurements are predicted to be in rough agreement with the ..delta.. measurements but this was not observed. The magnitude of the critical current enhancements was typically more than twice the observed gap enhancements. The measured critical current enhancement was relatively independent of temperature whereas the gap enhancement decreased rapidly as the temperature was lowered.

  8. In vivo single branch axotomy induces GAP-43-dependent sprouting and synaptic remodeling in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Cesare, Paolo; Sacconi, Leonardo; Grasselli, Giorgio; Mandolesi, Georgia; Maco, Bohumil; Knott, Graham W; Huang, Lieven; De Paola, Vincenzo; Strata, Piergiorgio; Pavone, Francesco S

    2013-06-25

    Plasticity in the central nervous system in response to injury is a complex process involving axonal remodeling regulated by specific molecular pathways. Here, we dissected the role of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43; also known as neuromodulin and B-50) in axonal structural plasticity by using, as a model, climbing fibers. Single axonal branches were dissected by laser axotomy, avoiding collateral damage to the adjacent dendrite and the formation of a persistent glial scar. Despite the very small denervated area, the injured axons consistently reshape the connectivity with surrounding neurons. At the same time, adult climbing fibers react by sprouting new branches through the intact surroundings. Newly formed branches presented varicosities, suggesting that new axons were more than just exploratory sprouts. Correlative light and electron microscopy reveals that the sprouted branch contains large numbers of vesicles, with varicosities in the close vicinity of Purkinje dendrites. By using an RNA interference approach, we found that downregulating GAP-43 causes a significant increase in the turnover of presynaptic boutons. In addition, silencing hampers the generation of reactive sprouts. Our findings show the requirement of GAP-43 in sustaining synaptic stability and promoting the initiation of axonal regrowth.

  9. Ordering-induced direct-to-indirect band gap transition in multication semiconductor compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Sang; Yang, Ji-Hui; Kanevce, Ana; Choi, Sukgeun; Repins, Ingrid L.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations and symmetry analysis, we show that as cation atoms in a zinc blende-based semiconductor are replaced through atomic mutation (e.g., evolve from ZnSe to CuGaS e2 to C u2ZnGeS e4 ), the band gaps of the semiconductors will become more and more indirect because of the band splitting at the zone boundary, and in some cases will even form the segregating states. For example, although ZnSe is a direct band gap semiconductor, quaternary compounds C u2ZnGeS e4 and C u2ZnSnS e4 can be indirect band gap semiconductors if they form the primitive mixed CuAu ordered structures. We also find that the stability and the electronic structure of the quaternary polytypes with different atomic ordering are almost negative-linearly correlated. We suggest that these intrinsic properties of the multication semiconductors can have a large influence on the design and device performance of these materials.

  10. Free energy gap laws for the pulse-induced and stationary fluorescence quenching by reversible charge transfer in polar solutions.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Svetlana S; Burshtein, Anatoly I

    2011-01-21

    The Stern-Volmer constants for either pulse-induced or stationary fluorescence being quenched by a contact charge transfer are calculated and their free energy dependencies (the free energy gap laws) are specified. The reversibility of charge transfer is taken into account as well as spin conversion in radical ion pairs, followed by their recombination in either singlet or triplet neutral products. The natural decay of triplets as well as their impurity quenching by ionization are accounted for when estimating the fluorescence quantum yield and its free energy dependence.

  11. Overexpression of PCNA Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Caused Delay of Gap-Filling during Repair of UV-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    UVC irradiation-caused DNA lesions are repaired in mammalian cells solely by nucleotide excision repair (NER), which consists of sequential events including initial damage recognition, dual incision of damage site, gap-filling, and ligation. We have previously shown that gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions may be delayed by a subsequent treatment of oxidants or prooxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, flavonoids, and colcemid. We considered the delay as a result of competition for limiting protein/enzyme factor(s) during repair synthesis between NER and base excision repair (BER) induced by the oxidative chemicals. In this report, using colcemid as oxidative stress inducer, we showed that colcemid-caused delay of gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions was attenuated by overexpression of PCNA but not ligase-I. PCNA knockdown, as expected, delayed the gap-filling of NER but also impaired the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Fen-1 knockdown, however, did not affect the repair of oxidative DNA damage, suggesting repair of oxidative DNA damage is not of long patch BER. Furthermore, overexpression of XRCC1 delayed the gap-filling, and presumably increase of XRCC1 pulls PCNA away from gap-filling of NER for BER, consistent with our hypothesis that delay of gap-filling of NER attributes the competition between NER and BER. PMID:28116145

  12. Gaps induced by inversion symmetry breaking and second-generation Dirac cones in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Eryin; Lu, Xiaobo; Ding, Shijie; Yao, Wei; Yan, Mingzhe; Wan, Guoliang; Deng, Ke; Wang, Shuopei; Chen, Guorui; Ma, Liguo; Jung, Jeil; Fedorov, Alexei V.; Zhang, Yuanbo; Zhang, Guangyu; Zhou, Shuyun

    2016-12-01

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has emerged as a model van der Waals heterostructure as the superlattice potential, which is induced by lattice mismatch and crystal orientation, gives rise to various novel quantum phenomena, such as the self-similar Hofstadter butterfly states. Although the newly generated second-generation Dirac cones (SDCs) are believed to be crucial for understanding such intriguing phenomena, fundamental knowledge of SDCs, such as locations and dispersion, and the effect of inversion symmetry breaking on the gap opening, still remains highly debated due to the lack of direct experimental results. Here we report direct experimental results on the dispersion of SDCs in 0°-aligned graphene/h-BN heterostructures using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our data unambiguously reveal SDCs at the corners of the superlattice Brillouin zone, and at only one of the two superlattice valleys. Moreover, gaps of approximately 100 meV and approximately 160 meV are observed at the SDCs and the original graphene Dirac cone, respectively. Our work highlights the important role of a strong inversion-symmetry-breaking perturbation potential in the physics of graphene/h-BN, and fills critical knowledge gaps in the band structure engineering of Dirac fermions by a superlattice potential.

  13. Induced Kramer-Pesch effect in a two-gap superconductor: Application to MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumann, A.; Graser, S.; Dahm, T.; Schopohl, N.

    2006-03-01

    The size of the vortex core in a clean superconductor is strongly temperature dependent and shrinks with decreasing temperature, decreasing to zero for T→0 . We study this so-called Kramer-Pesch effect both for a single-gap superconductor and for the case of a two-gap superconductor using parameters appropriate for magnesium diboride. Usually, the Kramer-Pesch effect is absent in the dirty limit. Here, we show that the Kramer-Pesch effect exists in both bands of a two-gap superconductor even if only one of the two bands is in the clean limit and the other band in the dirty limit, a case appropriate for MgB2 . In this case an induced Kramer-Pesch effect appears in the dirty band. Besides numerical results we also present an analytical model for the spatial variation of the pairing potential in the vicinity of the vortex center that allows a simple calculation of the vortex core radius even in the limit T→0 .

  14. Nitrogen-induced perturbation of the valence band states in GaP1-xNx alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudiy, S. V.; Zunger, Alex; Felici, M.; Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M.; Xin, H. P.; Tu, C. W.

    2006-10-01

    The effects of diluted nitrogen impurities on the valence- and conduction-band states of GaP1-xNx have been predicted and measured experimentally. The calculation uses state-of-the-art atomistic modeling: we use large supercells with screened pseudopotentials and consider several random realizations of the nitrogen configurations. These calculations agree with photoluminescence excitation (PLE) measurements performed for nitrogen concentrations x up to 0.035 and photon energies up to 1eV above the GaP optical-absorption edge, as well as with published ellipsometry data. In particular, a predicted nitrogen-induced buildup of the L character near the valence- and conduction-band edges accounts for the surprising broad-absorption plateau observed in PLE between the X1c and the Γ1c critical points of GaP. Moreover, theory accounts quantitatively for the downward bowing of the indirect conduction-band edge and for the upward bowing of the direct transition with increasing nitrogen concentration. We review some of the controversies in the literature regarding the shifts in the conduction band with composition, and conclude that measured results at ultralow N concentration cannot be used to judge behavior at a higher concentration. In particular, we find that at the high concentrations of nitrogen studied here (˜1%) the conduction-band edge (CBE) is a hybridized state made from the original GaP X1c band-edge state plus all cluster states. In this limit, the CBE plunges down in energy as the N concentration increases, in quantitative agreement with the measurements reported here. However, at ultralow nitrogen concentrations (<0.1%) , the CBE is the nearly unperturbed host X1c , which does not sense the nitrogen cluster levels. Thus, this state does not move energetically as nitrogen is added and stays pinned in energy, in agreement with experimental results.

  15. Strain-induced indirect-to-direct band-gap transition in bulk SnS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Babu; Singh, Abhishek K.

    2017-02-01

    While SnS2 is an earth-abundant large-band-gap semiconductor material, the indirect nature of the band gap limits its applications in light harvesting or detection devices. Here, using density functional theory in combination with the many-body perturbation theory, we report indirect-to-direct band-gap transition in bulk SnS2 under moderate, 2.98 % uniform biaxial tensile (BT) strain. Further enhancement of the BT strain up to 9.75 % leads to a semiconductor-to-metal transition. The strain-induced weakening of the interaction of the in-plane orbitals modifies the dispersion as well as the character of the valence- and the conduction-band edges, leading to the transition. A quasiparticle direct band gap of 2.17 eV at the Γ point is obtained at 2.98 % BT strain. By solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation to include excitonic effects on top of the partially self-consistent GW0 calculation, we study the dielectric functions, optical oscillator strength, and exciton binding energy as a function of the applied strain. At 2.98 % BT strain, our calculations show the relatively high exciton binding energy of 170 meV, implying strongly coupled excitons in SnS2. The effect of strain on vibrational properties, including Raman spectra, is also investigated. The Raman shift of both in-plane (E2g 1) and out-of plane (A1 g) modes decreases with the applied BT strain, which can be probed experimentally. Furthermore, SnS2 remains dynamically stable up to 9.75 % BT strain, at which it becomes metallic. A strong coupling between the applied strain and the electronic and optical properties of SnS2 can significantly broaden the applications of this material in strain-detection and optoelectronic devices.

  16. Fano Transparency in Rounded Nanocube Dimers Induced by Gap Plasmon Coupling.

    PubMed

    Pellarin, Michel; Ramade, Julien; Rye, Jan Michael; Bonnet, Christophe; Broyer, Michel; Lebeault, Marie-Ange; Lermé, Jean; Marguet, Sylvie; Navarro, Julien R G; Cottancin, Emmanuel

    2016-12-27

    Homodimers of noble metal nanocubes form model plasmonic systems where the localized plasmon resonances sustained by each particle not only hybridize but also coexist with excitations of a different nature: surface plasmon polaritons confined within the Fabry-Perot cavity delimited by facing cube surfaces (i.e., gap plasmons). Destructive interference in the strong coupling between one of these highly localized modes and the highly radiating longitudinal dipolar plasmon of the dimer is responsible for the formation of a Fano resonance profile and the opening of a spectral window of anomalous transparency for the exciting light. We report on the clear experimental evidence of this effect in the case of 50 nm silver and 160 nm gold nanocube dimers studied by spatial modulation spectroscopy at the single particle level. A numerical study based on a plasmon mode analysis leads us to unambiguously identify the main cavity mode involved in this process and especially the major role played by its symmetry. The Fano depletion dip is red-shifted when the gap size is decreasing. It is also blue-shifted and all the more pronounced that the cube edge rounding is large. Combining nanopatch antenna and plasmon hybridization descriptions, we quantify the key role of the face-to-face distance and the cube edge morphology on the spectral profile of the transparency dip.

  17. Large configuration-induced band-gap fluctuations in GaNxAs1-x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tit, Nacir

    2006-06-01

    The electronic band structures of GaNxAs1-x alloys were investigated versus the nitrogen mole fraction x and the nitrogen atomic configuration. The computational method is based on the sp3s* tight-binding technique. Two main nitrogen atomic distributions were considered: (i) the nitrogen atoms grouped in one region to form like a GaN dot inside the GaAs so as to have a maximally N-clustered (MNC) configuration; and (ii) the nitrogen atoms homogeneously distributed over the alloy and, of course, the minimal N-clustered distribution as the maximally As-clustered (MAsC) configuration. The former is found to always have the lowest band gaps. More interestingly, the results show that in the latter distribution the nitrogen atoms introduce resonant states above the conduction-band edge by about 230 meV, which is consistent with the literature, whereas they introduce a deep gap state above the valence-band edge at about 150 meV in the former distribution. As a suitable model for experimental samples, the MAsC configuration, was used to model some available photoluminescence data in the dilute regime.

  18. Inflammatory conditions induce gap junctional communication between rat Kupffer cells both in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Eugenín, Eliseo A.; González, Hernán E.; Sánchez, Helmuth A.; Brañes, María C.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2007-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit, has been previously detected in Kupffer cells (KCs) during liver inflammation, however, KCs phagocytose cell debris that may include Cx43 protein, which could explain the detection of Cx43 in KCs. We determined that KCs express Cx43 and form gap junctions both in vivo and in vitro. In liver sections of animals treated with LPS, Cx43 was detected at ED2+ cells interfaces, indicating formation of GJ between KCs in vivo. In vitro, unstimulated KCs cultures did not form functional GJs, and expressed low levels of Cx43 that showed a diffuse intracellular distribution. In contrast, KCs treated with LPS plus IFN-γ, expressed a greater amount of Cx43 at both the, protein and mRNA levels, and showed Cx43 at cell-cell contacts associated with higher dye coupling. In conclusion, activation of KCs in vivo or in vitro resulted in enhanced Cx43 expression levels and formation of GJ that might play relevant roles during liver inflammation. PMID:17900549

  19. Deep ventilation in the Okinawa Trough induced by Kerama Gap overflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishina, Ayako; Nakamura, Hirohiko; Park, Jae-Hun; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tanaka, Yuki; Seo, Seongbong; Hibiya, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Near-bottom water flowing over the Kerama Gap's sills is thought to ventilate the deep water below ˜1100 m depth in the Okinawa Trough and then upwell with 5-10 years residence time. The present study follows up on this phenomenon, using comprehensive profile data of temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, currents and turbulence obtained by intensive shipboard observations performed in June 2013 and June 2014 in the region. Strong near-bottom subtidal flow with speeds exceeding 0.5 m s-1 was observed within a layer of about 100 m thickness over the western side of the peak of the main sill. Temperature and salinity sections along the Kerama Gap indicated some depressions and overturns of the deep water downstream of the strong overflow, suggesting the existence of breaking internal gravity waves and hydraulic jumps. Associated vertical diffusivities, estimated using the Thorpe scale and the buoyancy frequency, were three to four orders of magnitude larger than typical values observed in the thermocline of the open ocean (˜10-5 m2 s-1). The dissolved oxygen section also indicated strong vertical mixing and associated upwelling with the entrainment of the near-bottom overflow water into the lower thermocline beneath the Kuroshio in the Okinawa Trough. The present study not only supports the previous conceptual model but also provides new evidence that the Okinawa Trough is an upwelling location where nutrient rich Philippine Sea intermediate water is sucked up into the lower thermocline below the Kuroshio.

  20. Modelling for Transient Optically Induced Metal - Transitions in Narrow-Gap Semiconductors and Semimetals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Jordina

    1994-01-01

    The theoretical work presented in this thesis is based on models developed to interpret a series of optical experiments with short-pulse lasers, which allow a time -domain study of phenomena on a sub-picosecond timescale. By means of a pump-probe technique, we observe large amplitude oscillations in the time domain reflectivity response of a series of narrow-gap semiconductors and semimetals. The oscillations have the frequency of the fully-symmetric optical phonon mode of the system, and are maximally displaced from their midpoint value at zero time delay between pump and probe. These features indicate that a coherent phonon vibration is generated in these materials via an electronic excitation at different points of the Brillouin zone, which displaces instantaneously the equilibrium positions of the atoms. It is precisely this generation of coherent phonons that makes the time-domain technique distinct from conventional frequency domain techniques, such as Raman and neutron scattering. Using a range of theoretical techniques, from nearly free electron models to state-of-the art ab initio calculations, I have made quantitative microscopic evaluations of the coherent phonon phenomenon. The studies focus on two unique aspects of having such coherent atomic vibrations in a narrow gap material, with special emphasis on the group V semimetals Sb and Bi. First of all, I have performed dynamical band structure calculations, as a function of the coherent atomic motion, in order to inspect the possibility of a transient metal-insulator transition at a terahertz frequency. Secondly, I have calculated the evolution of the displaced atoms in quasi-equilibrium with the laser -excited carriers, as the electron-ion coupled system returns to its ground state equilibrium. These calculations are fundamental, insofar they provide a quantitative microscopic description of the coherent phonon phenomenon. Moreover, the predicted magnitude of the atomic displacements, and the resulting

  1. Particle concentration at planet-induced gap edges and vortices. I. Inviscid three-dimensional hydro disks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Bai, Xue-ning

    2014-04-20

    We perform a systematic study of the dynamics of dust particles in protoplanetary disks with embedded planets using global two-dimensional and three-dimensional inviscid hydrodynamic simulations. Lagrangian particles have been implemented into the magnetohydrodynamic code Athena with cylindrical coordinates. We find two distinct outcomes depending on the mass of the embedded planet. In the presence of a low-mass planet (8 M {sub ⊕}), two narrow gaps start to open in the gas on each side of the planet where the density waves are shocked. These shallow gaps can dramatically affect particle drift speed and cause significant, roughly axisymmetric dust depletion. On the other hand, a more massive planet (>0.1 M{sub J} ) carves out a deeper gap with sharp edges, which are subject to Rossby wave instability leading to vortex formation. Particles with a wide range of sizes (0.02 < Ωt{sub s} < 20) are trapped and settle to the midplane in the vortex, with the strongest concentration for particles with Ωt{sub s} ∼ 1. The dust concentration is highly elongated in the φ direction, and can be as wide as four disk scale heights in the radial direction. Dust surface density inside the vortex can be increased by more than a factor of 10{sup 2} in a very non-axisymmetric fashion. For very big particles (Ωt{sub s} >> 1) we find strong eccentricity excitation, in particular around the planet and in the vicinity of the mean motion resonances, facilitating gap openings there. Our results imply that in weakly turbulent protoplanetary disk regions (e.g., the {sup d}ead zone{sup )} dust particles with a very wide range of sizes can be trapped at gap edges and inside vortices induced by planets with M{sub p} < M{sub J} , potentially accelerating planetesimal and planet formation there, and giving rise to distinctive features that can be probed by ALMA and the Extended Very Large Array.

  2. Changes in gap junction organization and decreased coupling during induced apoptosis in lens epithelial and NIH-3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Carsten; Mazur, Antonina; Meller, Karl; Mannherz, Hans Georg

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that global induction of apoptosis in primary bovine lens epithelial (LEC) or fibroblastic mouse NIH-3T3 cells by staurosporine, puromycin, cycloheximide, or etoposide is accompanied by a decrease in coupling by gap junctions. Cell coupling as tested by neurobiotin spreading was maintained when the LEC or NIH-3T3 cells were pre-incubated with the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD or the caspase-3 inhibiting tetrapeptide DEVD. Immunohistochemistry using anti-connexin-43 antibodies showed a reduction of plasma membrane integrated connexin-43 in both cell lines when undergoing apoptosis. Western blotting indicated degradation of connexin-43 that was inhibited by zVAD or DEVD. Cell coupling at single cell level was tested by direct microinjecting into LEC apoptosis-inducing agents of low molecular mass like staurosporine, etoposide and puromycin or the high molecular mass proteins caspase-3 and -8 in activated state. Microinjection of puromycin or etoposide induced apoptotic morphological changes of only the injected cell within 90 or 180 min, but did not affect adjacent cells. In contrast, microinjection of staurosporine led to a rapid induction of apoptosis of the injected and a number of adjacent cells suggesting spreading of staurosporine most probably through gap junction pores held open by dephosphorylation of connexin-43 as verified by immunoblotting and staining using a phospho-serine368-specific anti-connexin-43 antibody. Microinjection of active caspase-8 led after 3 h to morphological apoptotic alterations of only the injected cell, but did not inhibit spreading of co-injected neurobiotin to neighboring cells during the first hour. In contrast, microinjection of active caspase-3-induced apoptosis only of the injected cell after 60 min and rapidly and completely suppressed coupling to neighboring cells.

  3. [Induced abortion--clinical problems, regulatory gaps, chaos. How much longer?].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, A; Marinov, B; Tzankova, M

    2014-01-01

    Induced abortion is becoming more and more frequent in the contemporary clinical practice. Usually these are pregnant women with diagnosed foetal malformations. Most of them reach a final diagnose in the late second trimester and hence need a pregnancy termination at this gestational age. They are treated in accordance with The Artificial Pregnancy Termination Regulations and put on N 142 clinical-care pathway. The presentation describes the patients' journey form the diagnose through the induced abortion and to the discharge. Analyses the regulations, the multiple inaccuracies and striking omissions with regards to the procedure. Stimulates a discussion on the clinical problems and offers reasonable and realistic solutions.

  4. Short-Term Responses of Ground-Dwelling Beetles to Ice Storm-Induced Treefall Gaps in a Subtropical Broad-Leaved Forest in Southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Chong-Ling; Lü, Liang; Luo, Tian-Hong; Zhou, Hong-Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Periodic natural disturbances shape the mosaic character of many landscapes and influence the distribution and abundance of organisms. In this study, we tested the effect of ice storm-induced treefall gaps on ground-dwelling beetle assemblages in different-aged successional stands of subtropical broad-leaved forest in southeastern China. We evaluated the relative importance of gap-phase microhabitat type (within gap, gap edge, and interior shaded) within different stand ages (regenerating stands and mature stands) as determinants of changes in beetle diversity and community structure. At 18 replicate sites sampled during 2009-2010, no significant differences were found in species richness and the abundances of the most common beetle species captured in pitfall traps among the three gap-phase microhabitat types, but the abundances of total beetles, as well as fungivorous and phytophagous species groups, were significantly lower in gap microhabitats than in interior shaded microhabitats in mature stands. Beetle assemblage composition showed no significant differences among the three microhabitat types, and only the fauna of gap plots slightly diverged from those of edge and shaded plots in mature stands. Cover of shrubs and stand age significantly affected beetle assemblage structure. Our results suggest that beetle responses to gap-phase dynamics in early successional forests are generally weak, and that effects are more discernible in the mature stands, perhaps due to the abundance responses of forest-specialist species.

  5. Retention of chimeric Tat2-Gap1 permease in the endoplasmic reticulum induces unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Takahiro; Kimata, Yukio; Uemura, Satoshi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, high-affinity tryptophan import is performed by subtle mechanisms involving tryptophan permease Tat2. We have shown that Tat2 requires 15 amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains (TMDs) for its import activity, whereas leucine permease Bap2 requires only seven corresponding residues for its leucine import. For this reason, the structure of Tat2 is elaborately designed to transport the hydrophobic and bulky tryptophan. Newly synthesized cell surface proteins first undergo endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated quality check before entering the secretory pathway. In this study, we used domain replacement with general amino acid permease Gap1 to show that Tat2 chimeric proteins were dysfunctional when TMD10 or TMD11 was replaced. These chimeras formed large 270-800-kDa protein complexes and were stably retained in the ER membrane without efficient degradation. In contrast, Tat2 chimeras of TMD9 or TMD12 retained some of their tryptophan import activity and underwent vacuolar degradation as observed with wild-type Tat2. Thus, ours results suggest that TMD10 and TMD11 are essential for the correct folding of Tat2, probably because of their interdomain interactions. Notably, overexpression of Tat2-Gap1 chimera of TMD10 activated the unfolded protein response (UPR) element-lacZ reporter, suggesting that ER retention of the protein aggregates induces the UPR.

  6. Ultrafast Below-Band-Gap Laser Pulse Induced Relaxations in CdS Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmelev, A. G.; Leontyev, A. V.; Nikiforov, V. G.; Ivanin, K. V.; Lobkov, V. S.; Khasanov, O. Kh; Samartsev, V. V.

    2015-05-01

    We report an experimental study of the intra- and interband transitions in bulk CdS crystal induced by a strong below-band-edge femtosecond laser pulse. An additional peak was observed in spectrally resolved four-wave mixing signal shifted to lower energy and positive time delay.

  7. Defect distribution and Schottky barrier at metal/Ge interfaces: Role of metal-induced gap states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shogo; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    The defect distribution and Schottky barrier at metal/Ge interfaces were studied using first-principles calculation. It was shown that the defect density markedly increases around the interface owing to the stabilization caused by the hybridization of defect electronic states with metal-induced gap states (MIGS) and by the associated small elastic energy loss around the interface. By comparing the formation energies of various defects at a variety of metal/substrate interfaces, we showed that MIGS not only control the Schottky barrier but also promote a defect-density increase at most metal/semiconductor interfaces. Moreover, we showed that interface oxide layers block MIGS penetration into the Ge substrate and promote the observed breakdown of Fermi-level pinning.

  8. Interaction and fragmentation of pulsed laser induced microbubbles in a narrow gap.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Hong; Chu, Hong-Yu; I, Lin

    2006-01-27

    We investigate the interaction dynamics of an existing stable microbubble B1 and another laser induced nearby expanding microbubble B2 in a thin ink sheet between two glass slices. The fast expanding B2 causes anistropic compression of B1 with a forward penetrating jet. In the subsequent expansion stage of B1, the gas associated with jet protrusion to the opposite edge of B1 and the nonuniform surrounding flow field induce necking with transverse inward jetting from the side lobes, which further interact with the axial jet and lead to the final fragmentation into smaller bubbles. At small interbubble distance, the backward interaction from B1 first leads to the pointed pole of the expanding B2 and then a backward jetting during its collapsing. The strong interaction can merge the two bubbles with complicated asymmetric intermediated patterns.

  9. Resistance modulation in VO2 nanowires induced by an electric field via air-gap gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Teruo; Chikanari, Masashi; Wei, Tingting; Tanaka, Hidekazu; The Institute of Scientific; Industrial Research Team

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) shows huge resistance change with metal-insulator transition (MIT) at around room temperature. Controlling of the MIT by applying an electric field is a topical ongoing research toward the realization of Mott transistor. In this study, we have successfully switched channel resistance of VO2 nano-wire channels by a pure electrostatic field effect using a side-gate-type field-effect transistor (SG-FET) viaair gap and found that single crystalline VO2 nanowires and the channels with narrower width enhance transport modulation rate. The rate of change in resistance ((R0-R)/R, where R0 and R is the resistance of VO2 channel with off state and on state gate voltage (VG) , respectively) was 0.42 % at VG = 30 V in in-plane poly-crystalline VO2 channels on Al2O3(0001) substrates, while the rate in single crystalline channels on TiO2 (001) substrates was 3.84 %, which was 9 times higher than that using the poly-crystalline channels. With reducing wire width from 3000 nm to 400 nm of VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrate, furthermore, resistance modulation ratio enhanced from 0.67 % to 3.84 %. This change can not be explained by a simple free-electron model. In this presentation, we will compare the electronic properties between in-plane polycrystalline VO2 on Al2O3 (0001) and single crystalline VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrates, and show experimental data in detail..

  10. Subcycle Extreme Nonlinearities in GaP Induced by an Ultrastrong Terahertz Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicario, Carlo; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the experimental observation of extreme laser spectral broadening and a change in optical transmission in gallium phosphite induced by 25 MV /cm terahertz (THz) single-cycle internal field. Such intense THz radiation leads to twofold transient modifications of the optical properties in the electro-optical crystal. First, the electric field provokes extensive cross-phase modulation via the χ(2 ) and χ(3 ) nonlinearities on a copropagating 50 fs near infrared laser pulse which turns into 500% spectral broadening. Second, we observe an instantaneous change of the optical transmission occurring at the THz field which is alleged to interband Zener tunneling and charge carrier density modification by impact ionization turning the semiconductor in a metal-like transient state. The presented scheme displays a pathway to coherently control the optical properties of semiconductors on an ultrafast time scale by a strong THz field.

  11. Effects of phenolics in Empire apples on hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Sang Jun; Kang, Nam Joo; Lee, Chang Yong; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated antioxidant and antitumor-promoting activities of major phenolic phytochemicals of apples. The contents of each antioxidant in Empire apples was quantified and their contributions to total antioxidant activity of apples were determined using assay for inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced superoxide radical generation in cell culture model and expressed in vitamin C equivalent antioxidant capacity (VCEAC). The estimated contribution of major phenolics and vitamin C to total anitoxidant capacity of 100 g fresh Empire apples is as follows: quercetin (60.05 VCEAC) > chlorogenic acid (12.32) > phloretin (7.41) > procyanidin B2 (7.22) > vitamin C (6.61) > epicatechin (5.10) in superoxide radical scavenging assay. Recent reports suggest that the mechanism of carcinogenic process of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be associated with the inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), which is involved in tumor promotion process. Apple extracts showed the protective effects against the inhibition of GJIC by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. Quercetin exerted the strongest protective effects among major antioxidants in apples on H2O2-induced inhibition of GJIC, following epicatechin, procyanidin B2, and vitamin C, while chlorogenic acid and phloretin had no effects. Our results indicate that cancer chemopreventive activity of apples is associated with the combined antioxidant capacity and antitumor-promoting activities of diverse antioxidants.

  12. Proposed mode of action of benzene-induced leukemia: Interpreting available data and identifying critical data gaps for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Meek, M E Bette; Klaunig, James E

    2010-03-19

    Mode of action is defined as a series of key biological events leading to an observed toxicological effect (for example, metabolism to a toxic entity, cell death, regenerative repair and tumors). It contrasts with mechanism of action, which generally involves a detailed understanding of the molecular basis for an effect. A framework to consider the weight of evidence for hypothesized modes of action in animals and their relevance to humans, has been widely adopted and used by government agencies and international organizations. The framework, developed and refined through its application in case studies for principally non-DNA-reactive carcinogens, has more recently been extended to DNA-reactive carcinogens, non-cancer endpoints and different life stages. In addition to increasing transparency, use of the framework promotes consistency in decision-making concerning adequacy of weight of evidence, facilitates peer input and review and identifies critical research needs. The framework provides an effective tool to facilitate discussion between the research and risk assessment communities on critical data gaps, which if filled, would permit more refined estimates of risk. As a basis for additionally coordinating and focusing research on critical data gaps in a risk assessment context, five key events in the mode of action for benzene-induced leukemia are proposed: (1) benzene metabolism via Cytochrome P450, (2) the interaction of benzene metabolites with target cells in the bone marrow, (3) formation of initiated, mutated target cells, (4) selective proliferation of the mutated cells and (5) production of leukemia. These key events are considered in a framework analysis of human relevance as a basis to consider appropriate next steps in developing research strategies.

  13. Cation-induced band-gap tuning in organohalide perovskites: interplay of spin-orbit coupling and octahedra tilting.

    PubMed

    Amat, Anna; Mosconi, Edoardo; Ronca, Enrico; Quarti, Claudio; Umari, Paolo; Nazeeruddin, Md K; Grätzel, Michael; De Angelis, Filippo

    2014-06-11

    Organohalide lead perovskites have revolutionized the scenario of emerging photovoltaic technologies. The prototype MAPbI3 perovskite (MA = CH3NH3(+)) has dominated the field, despite only harvesting photons above 750 nm (∼1.6 eV). Intensive research efforts are being devoted to find new perovskites with red-shifted absorption onset, along with good charge transport properties. Recently, a new perovskite based on the formamidinium cation ((NH2)2CH(+) = FA) has shown potentially superior properties in terms of band gap and charge transport compared to MAPbI3. The results have been interpreted in terms of the cation size, with the larger FA cation expectedly delivering reduced band-gaps in Pb-based perovskites. To provide a full understanding of the interplay among size, structure, and organic/inorganic interactions in determining the properties of APbI3 perovskites, in view of designing new materials and fully exploiting them for solar cells applications, we report a fully first-principles investigation on APbI3 perovskites with A = Cs(+), MA, and FA. Our results evidence that the tetragonal-to-quasi cubic structural evolution observed when moving from MA to FA is due to the interplay of size effects and enhanced hydrogen bonding between the FA cations and the inorganic matrix altering the covalent/ionic character of Pb-I bonds. Most notably, the observed cation-induced structural variability promotes markedly different electronic and optical properties in the MAPbI3 and FAPbI3 perovskites, mediated by the different spin-orbit coupling, leading to improved charge transport and red-shifted absorption in FAPbI3 and in general in pseudocubic structures. Our theoretical model constitutes the basis for the rationale design of new and more efficient organohalide perovskites for solar cells applications.

  14. Homology Requirements for Targeting Heterologous Sequences during P-Induced Gap Repair in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Dray, T.; Gloor, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of homology on gene targeting was studied in the context of P-element-induced double-strand breaks at the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster. Double-strand breaks were made by excision of P-w(hd), a P-element insertion in the white gene. A nested set of repair templates was generated that contained the 8 kilobase (kb) yellow gene embedded within varying amounts of white gene sequence. Repair with unlimited homology was also analyzed. Flies were scored phenotypically for conversion of the yellow gene to the white locus. Targeting of the yellow gene was abolished when all of the 3' homology was removed. Increases in template homology up to 51 base pairs (bp) did not significantly promote targeting. Maximum conversion was observed with a construct containing 493 bp of homology, without a significant increase in frequency when homology extended to the tips of the chromosome. These results demonstrate that the homology requirements for targeting a large heterologous insertion are quite different than those for a point mutation. Furthermore, heterologous insertions strongly affect the homology requirements for the conversion of distal point mutations. Several aberrant conversion tracts, which arose from templates that contained reduced homology, also were examined and characterized. PMID:9335605

  15. Changes in soil bacterial community triggered by drought-induced gap succession preceded changes in soil C stocks and quality.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Jorge Curiel; Barba, Josep; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Antonio José; Fernandez-Lopez, Manuel; Mattana, Stefania; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Nolis, Pau; Lloret, Francisco

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how drought-induced tree mortality and subsequent secondary succession would affect soil bacterial taxonomic composition as well as soil organic matter (SOM) quantity and quality in a mixed Mediterranean forest where the Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) population, affected by climatic drought-induced die-off, is being replaced by Holm-oaks (HO; Quercus ilex). We apply a high throughput DNA pyrosequencing technique and (13)C solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP-MAS (13)C NMR) to soils within areas of influence (defined as an surface with 2-m radius around the trunk) of different trees: healthy and affected (defoliated) pines, pines that died a decade ago and healthy HOs. Soil respiration was also measured in the same spots during a spring campaign using a static close-chamber method (soda lime). A decade after death, and before aerial colonization by the more competitive HOs have even taken place, we could not find changes in soil C pools (quantity and/or quality) associated with tree mortality and secondary succession. Unlike C pools, bacterial diversity and community structure were strongly determined by tree mortality. Convergence between the most abundant taxa of soil bacterial communities under dead pines and colonizer trees (HOs) further suggests that physical gap colonization was occurring below-ground before above-ground colonization was taken place. Significantly higher soil respiration rates under dead trees, together with higher bacterial diversity and anomalously high representation of bacteria commonly associated with copiotrophic environments (r-strategic bacteria) further gives indications of how drought-induced tree mortality and secondary succession were influencing the structure of microbial communities and the metabolic activity of soils.

  16. Effects of maturation-inducing hormone on heterologous gap junctional coupling in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yoshizaki, G.; Patino, R.; Thomas, P.; Bolamba, D.; Chang, Xiaotian

    2001-01-01

    A previous ultrastructural study of heterologous (granulosa cell-oocyte) gap junction (GJ) contacts in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker suggested that these contacts disappear late during the process of resumption of oocyte meiosis. This observation suggested that, unlike scenarios proposed for a number of other species, uncoupling of GJ is not necessary for the onset of meiotic resumption in croaker follicles. However, the functionality of heterologous GJ contacts and the temporal association between maturation-inducing hormone (MIH)-induced changes in heterologous coupling and resumption of oocyte meiosis have not been examined in Atlantic croaker. These questions were addressed with a cell-cell coupling assay that is based on the transfer of a GJ marker, Lucifer Yellow, from oocytes to granulosa cells. Follicle-enclosed oocytes injected with Lucifer Yellow allowed transfer of the dye into the follicle cell layer, thus confirming that there is functional heterologous coupling between the oocyte and the granulosa cells. Dye transfer was observed in vitellogenic, full-grown/maturation-incompetent, and full-grown /maturation-competent follicles. Treatment of maturation-competent follicles with MIH caused a time-dependent decline in the number of follicles transferring dye. However, although GJ uncoupling in some of the follicles was observed before germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD, index of meiotic resumption), about 50% of the follicles maintained the ability to transfer dye even after GVBD had occurred. Further, a known GJ inhibitor (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) blocked heterologous GJ within a time frame similar to that seen with MIH but without inducing any of the morphological changes (including GVBD) associated with follicular maturation. In conclusion, uncoupling of heterologous GJ seems insufficient and unnecessary for the onset of meiotic resumption in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science.

  17. Changes in soil bacterial community triggered by drought-induced gap succession preceded changes in soil C stocks and quality

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Jorge Curiel; Barba, Josep; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Antonio José; Fernandez-Lopez, Manuel; Mattana, Stefania; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Nolis, Pau; Lloret, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how drought-induced tree mortality and subsequent secondary succession would affect soil bacterial taxonomic composition as well as soil organic matter (SOM) quantity and quality in a mixed Mediterranean forest where the Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) population, affected by climatic drought-induced die-off, is being replaced by Holm-oaks (HO; Quercus ilex). We apply a high throughput DNA pyrosequencing technique and 13C solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP-MAS 13C NMR) to soils within areas of influence (defined as an surface with 2-m radius around the trunk) of different trees: healthy and affected (defoliated) pines, pines that died a decade ago and healthy HOs. Soil respiration was also measured in the same spots during a spring campaign using a static close-chamber method (soda lime). A decade after death, and before aerial colonization by the more competitive HOs have even taken place, we could not find changes in soil C pools (quantity and/or quality) associated with tree mortality and secondary succession. Unlike C pools, bacterial diversity and community structure were strongly determined by tree mortality. Convergence between the most abundant taxa of soil bacterial communities under dead pines and colonizer trees (HOs) further suggests that physical gap colonization was occurring below-ground before above-ground colonization was taken place. Significantly higher soil respiration rates under dead trees, together with higher bacterial diversity and anomalously high representation of bacteria commonly associated with copiotrophic environments (r-strategic bacteria) further gives indications of how drought-induced tree mortality and secondary succession were influencing the structure of microbial communities and the metabolic activity of soils. PMID:23301169

  18. Inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication is involved in silica nanoparticles-induced H9c2 cardiomyocytes apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhong-jun; Cui, Guan-qun; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Zhi-hu; Jia, Qiang; Ng, Jack C; Peng, Cheng; Bo, Cun-xiang; Shao, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) between cardiomyocytes is essential for synchronous heart contraction and relies on connexin-containing channels. Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a major component involved in GJIC in heart tissue, and its abnormal expression is closely associated with various cardiac diseases. Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) are known to induce cardiovascular toxicity. However, the mechanisms through which GJIC plays a role in cardiomyocytes apoptosis induced by SNPs remain unknown. The aim of the present study is to determine whether SNPs-decreased GJIC promotes apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes cell line (H9c2 cells) via the mitochondrial pathway using CCK-8 Kit, scrape-loading dye transfer technique, Annexin V/PI double-staining assays, and Western blot analysis. The results showed that SNPs elicited cytotoxicity in H9c2 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. SNPs also reduced GJIC in H9c2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner through downregulation of Cx43 and upregulation of P-Cx43. Inhibition of gap junctions by gap junction blocker carbenoxolone disodium resulted in decreased survival and increased apoptosis, whereas enhancement of the gap junctions by retinoic acid led to enhanced survival but decreased apoptosis. Furthermore, SNPs-induced apoptosis through the disrupted functional gap junction was correlated with abnormal expressions of the proteins involved in the mitochondrial pathway-related apoptosis such as Bcl-2/Bax, cytochrome C, Caspase-9, and Caspase-3. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that SNPs-decreased GJIC promotes apoptosis in cardiomyocytes via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, downregulation of GJIC by SNPs in cardiomyocytes is mediated through downregulation of Cx43 and upregulation of P-Cx43. These results suggest that in rat cardiomyocytes cell line, GJIC plays a protective role in SNPs-induced apoptosis and that GJIC may be one of the targets for SNPs-induced biological

  19. Valence-band offsets and Schottky barrier heights of layered semiconductors explained by interface-induced gap states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönch, Winfried

    1998-04-01

    Many metal chalcogenides are layered semiconductors. They consist of chalcogen-metal-chalcogen layers that are themselves bound by van der Waals forces. Hence, heterostructures involving layered compounds are abrupt and strain-free. Experimental valence-band offsets of heterostructures between GaSe, InSe, SnS2, SnSe2, MoS2, MoTe2, WSe2, and CuInSe2 and between some of these compounds and ZnSe, CdS, and CdTe as well as barrier heights of Au contacts on GaSe, InSe, MoS2, MoTe2, WSe2, ZnSe, CdS, and CdTe are analyzed. The valence-band discontinuities of the heterostructures and the barrier heights of the Schottky contact compounds are consistently described by the continuum of interface-induced gap states as the primary mechanism that governs the band lineup at semiconductor interfaces.

  20. Gap Junctional Blockade Stochastically Induces Different Species-Specific Head Anatomies in Genetically Wild-Type Girardia dorotocephala Flatworms

    PubMed Central

    Emmons-Bell, Maya; Durant, Fallon; Hammelman, Jennifer; Bessonov, Nicholas; Volpert, Vitaly; Morokuma, Junji; Pinet, Kaylinnette; Adams, Dany S.; Pietak, Alexis; Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The shape of an animal body plan is constructed from protein components encoded by the genome. However, bioelectric networks composed of many cell types have their own intrinsic dynamics, and can drive distinct morphological outcomes during embryogenesis and regeneration. Planarian flatworms are a popular system for exploring body plan patterning due to their regenerative capacity, but despite considerable molecular information regarding stem cell differentiation and basic axial patterning, very little is known about how distinct head shapes are produced. Here, we show that after decapitation in G. dorotocephala, a transient perturbation of physiological connectivity among cells (using the gap junction blocker octanol) can result in regenerated heads with quite different shapes, stochastically matching other known species of planaria (S. mediterranea, D. japonica, and P. felina). We use morphometric analysis to quantify the ability of physiological network perturbations to induce different species-specific head shapes from the same genome. Moreover, we present a computational agent-based model of cell and physical dynamics during regeneration that quantitatively reproduces the observed shape changes. Morphological alterations induced in a genomically wild-type G. dorotocephala during regeneration include not only the shape of the head but also the morphology of the brain, the characteristic distribution of adult stem cells (neoblasts), and the bioelectric gradients of resting potential within the anterior tissues. Interestingly, the shape change is not permanent; after regeneration is complete, intact animals remodel back to G. dorotocephala-appropriate head shape within several weeks in a secondary phase of remodeling following initial complete regeneration. We present a conceptual model to guide future work to delineate the molecular mechanisms by which bioelectric networks stochastically select among a small set of discrete head morphologies. Taken together

  1. Gap Junctional Blockade Stochastically Induces Different Species-Specific Head Anatomies in Genetically Wild-Type Girardia dorotocephala Flatworms.

    PubMed

    Emmons-Bell, Maya; Durant, Fallon; Hammelman, Jennifer; Bessonov, Nicholas; Volpert, Vitaly; Morokuma, Junji; Pinet, Kaylinnette; Adams, Dany S; Pietak, Alexis; Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2015-11-24

    The shape of an animal body plan is constructed from protein components encoded by the genome. However, bioelectric networks composed of many cell types have their own intrinsic dynamics, and can drive distinct morphological outcomes during embryogenesis and regeneration. Planarian flatworms are a popular system for exploring body plan patterning due to their regenerative capacity, but despite considerable molecular information regarding stem cell differentiation and basic axial patterning, very little is known about how distinct head shapes are produced. Here, we show that after decapitation in G. dorotocephala, a transient perturbation of physiological connectivity among cells (using the gap junction blocker octanol) can result in regenerated heads with quite different shapes, stochastically matching other known species of planaria (S. mediterranea, D. japonica, and P. felina). We use morphometric analysis to quantify the ability of physiological network perturbations to induce different species-specific head shapes from the same genome. Moreover, we present a computational agent-based model of cell and physical dynamics during regeneration that quantitatively reproduces the observed shape changes. Morphological alterations induced in a genomically wild-type G. dorotocephala during regeneration include not only the shape of the head but also the morphology of the brain, the characteristic distribution of adult stem cells (neoblasts), and the bioelectric gradients of resting potential within the anterior tissues. Interestingly, the shape change is not permanent; after regeneration is complete, intact animals remodel back to G. dorotocephala-appropriate head shape within several weeks in a secondary phase of remodeling following initial complete regeneration. We present a conceptual model to guide future work to delineate the molecular mechanisms by which bioelectric networks stochastically select among a small set of discrete head morphologies. Taken together

  2. Impact of obesity on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced altered ovarian connexin gap junction proteins in female mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Nteeba, Jackson Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-01-01

    The ovarian gap junction proteins alpha 4 (GJA4 or connexin 37; CX37), alpha 1 (GJA1 or connexin 43; CX43) and gamma 1 (GJC1 or connexin 45; CX45) are involved in cell communication and folliculogenesis. 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) alters Cx37 and Cx43 expression in cultured neonatal rat ovaries. Additionally, obesity has an additive effect on DMBA-induced ovarian cell death and follicle depletion, thus, we investigated in vivo impacts of obesity and DMBA on CX protein levels. Ovaries were collected from lean and obese mice aged 6, 12, 18, or 24 wks. A subset of 18 wk old mice (lean and obese) were dosed with sesame oil or DMBA (1 mg/kg; ip) for 14 days and ovaries collected 3 days thereafter. Cx43 and Cx45 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 18 wks while Cx37 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 24 wks in obese ovaries. Cx37 mRNA and antral follicle protein staining intensity were reduced (P < 0.05) by obesity while total CX37 protein was reduced (P < 0.05) in DMBA exposed obese ovaries. Cx43 mRNA and total protein levels were decreased (P < 0.05) by DMBA in both lean and obese ovaries while basal protein staining intensity was reduced (P < 0.05) in obese controls. Cx45 mRNA, total protein and protein staining intensity level were decreased (P < 0.05) by obesity. These data support that obesity temporally alters gap junction protein expression and that DMBA-induced ovotoxicity may involve reduced gap junction protein function. - Highlights: • Ovarian gap junction proteins are affected by ovarian aging and obesity. • DMBA exposure negatively impacts gap junction proteins. • Altered gap junction proteins may contribute to infertility.

  3. Involvement of gap junctional intercellular communication in the bystander effect induced by broad-beam or microbeam heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chunlin; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo

    2006-09-01

    Most of the reported bystander responses were studied by using low dose irradiation of γ-rays and light ions such as alpha-particles. In this study, primary human fibroblasts AG1522 in confluent cultures were irradiated with either broad-beam of 100 keV/μm 12C or microbeams of 380 keV/μm 20Ne and 1260 keV/μm 40Ar. When cells were irradiated with 12C ions, the induction of micronucleus (MN) had a low-dose sensitive effect, i.e. a lower dose of irradiation gave a higher yield of MN per cell-traversal. This phenomenon was further reinforced by using a microbeam to irradiate a fraction of cells within a population. Even when only a single cell was targeted with one particle of 40Ar or 20Ne, the MN yield was increased to 1.4-fold of the non-irradiated control. When the number of microbeam targeted cells increased, the MN yield per targeted-cell decreased drastically. In addition, the bystander MN induction did not vary significantly with the number and the linear energy transfer (LET) of microbeam particles. When the culture was treated with PMA, an inhibitor of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), MN induction was decreased for both microbeam and broad-beam irradiations even at high-doses where all cells were hit. The present findings indicate that a GJIC-mediated signaling amplification mechanism was involved in the high-LET heavy ion irradiation induced bystander effect. Moreover, at high-doses of radiation, the bystander signals could perform a complex interaction with direct irradiation.

  4. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity is mediated through gap junction channels and hemichannels and can be prevented by octanol.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Theophilidis, George; Sargiannidou, Irene; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2015-10-01

    Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity (OIN) is a common complication of chemotherapy without effective treatment. In order to clarify the mechanisms of both acute and chronic OIN, we used an ex-vivo mouse sciatic nerve model. Exposure to 25 μM oxaliplatin caused a marked prolongation in the duration of the nerve evoked compound action potential (CAP) by nearly 1200% within 300 min while amplitude remained constant for over 20 h. This oxaliplatin effect was almost completely reversed by the gap junction (GJ) inhibitor octanol in a concentration-dependent manner. Further GJ blockers showed similar effects although with a narrower therapeutic window. To clarify the target molecule we studied sciatic nerves from connexin32 (Cx32) and Cx29 knockout (KO) mice. The oxaliplatin effect and neuroprotection by octanol partially persisted in Cx29 better than in Cx32 KO nerves, suggesting that oxaliplatin affects both, but Cx32 GJ channels more than Cx29 hemichannels. Oxaliplatin also accelerated neurobiotin uptake in HeLa cells expressing the human ortholog of Cx29, Cx31.3, as well as dye transfer between cells expressing the human Cx32, and this effect was blocked by octanol. Oxaliplatin caused no morphological changes initially (up to 3 h of exposure), but prolonged nerve exposure caused juxtaparonodal axonal edema, which was prevented by octanol. Our study indicates that oxaliplatin causes forced opening of Cx32 channels and Cx29 hemichannels in peripheral myelinated fibers leading to disruption of axonal K(+) homeostasis. The GJ blocker octanol prevents OIN at very low concentrations and should be further studied as a neuroprotectant.

  5. Analytically determined topological phase diagram of the proximity-induced gap in diffusive n-terminal Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Morten; Ouassou, Jabir Ali; Linder, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Multiterminal Josephson junctions have recently been proposed as a route to artificially mimic topological matter with the distinct advantage that its properties can be controlled via the superconducting phase difference, giving rise to Weyl points in 4-terminal geometries. A key goal is to accurately determine when the system makes a transition from a gapped to non-gapped state as a function of the phase differences in the system, the latter effectively playing the role of quasiparticle momenta in conventional topological matter. We here determine the proximity gap phase diagram of diffusive n-terminal Josephson junctions (), both numerically and analytically, by identifying a class of solutions to the Usadel equation at zero energy in the full proximity effect regime. We present an analytical equation which provides the phase diagram for an arbitrary number of terminals n. After briefly demonstrating the validity of the analytical approach in the previously studied 2- and 3-terminal cases, we focus on the 4-terminal case and map out the regimes where the electronic excitations in the system are gapped and non-gapped, respectively, demonstrating also in this case full agreement between the analytical and numerical approach. PMID:28094289

  6. Analytically determined topological phase diagram of the proximity-induced gap in diffusive n-terminal Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundsen, Morten; Ouassou, Jabir Ali; Linder, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Multiterminal Josephson junctions have recently been proposed as a route to artificially mimic topological matter with the distinct advantage that its properties can be controlled via the superconducting phase difference, giving rise to Weyl points in 4-terminal geometries. A key goal is to accurately determine when the system makes a transition from a gapped to non-gapped state as a function of the phase differences in the system, the latter effectively playing the role of quasiparticle momenta in conventional topological matter. We here determine the proximity gap phase diagram of diffusive n-terminal Josephson junctions (), both numerically and analytically, by identifying a class of solutions to the Usadel equation at zero energy in the full proximity effect regime. We present an analytical equation which provides the phase diagram for an arbitrary number of terminals n. After briefly demonstrating the validity of the analytical approach in the previously studied 2- and 3-terminal cases, we focus on the 4-terminal case and map out the regimes where the electronic excitations in the system are gapped and non-gapped, respectively, demonstrating also in this case full agreement between the analytical and numerical approach.

  7. Role of Fe doping in tuning the band gap of TiO2 for the photo-oxidation-induced cytotoxicity paradigm.

    PubMed

    George, Saji; Pokhrel, Suman; Ji, Zhaoxia; Henderson, Bryana L; Xia, Tian; Li, LinJiang; Zink, Jeffrey I; Nel, André E; Mädler, Lutz

    2011-07-27

    UV-light-induced electron-hole (e(-)/h(+)) pair generation with free radical production in TiO(2)-based nanoparticles is a major conceptual paradigm for biological injury. However, to date, this hypothesis has been difficult to experimentally verify due to the high energy of UV light that is intrinsically highly toxic to biological systems. Here, a versatile flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) synthetic process has been exploited to synthesize a library of iron-doped (0-10 wt%) TiO(2) nanoparticles. These particles have been tested for photoactivation-mediated cytotoxicity using near-visible light exposure. The reduction in TiO(2) band gap energy with incremental levels of Fe loading maintained the nanoparticle crystalline structure in spite of homogeneous Fe distribution (demonstrated by XRD, HRTEM, SAED, EFTEM, and EELS). Photochemical studies showed that band gap energy was reciprocally tuned proportional to the Fe content. The photo-oxidation capability of Fe-doped TiO(2) was found to increase during near-visible light exposure. Use of a macrophage cell line to evaluate cytotoxic and ROS production showed increased oxidant injury and cell death in parallel with a decrease in band gap energy. These findings demonstrate the importance of band gap energy in the phototoxic response of the cell to TiO(2) nanoparticles and reflect the potential of this material to generate adverse effects in humans and the environment during high-intensity light exposure.

  8. Role of Fe doping in tuning the band gap of TiO2 for photo-oxidation induced cytotoxicity paradigm

    PubMed Central

    George, Saji; Pokhrel, Suman; Ji, Zhaoxia; Henderson, Bryana L.; Xia, Tian; Li, LinJiang; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Nel, André E.; Mädler, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    UV-Light induced electron-hole (e−/h+) pair generation and free radical production in TiO2 based nanoparticles is a major conceptual paradigm for biological injury. However, to date, this hypothesis has been difficult to experimentally verify due to the high energy of UV light that is intrinsically highly toxic to biological systems. Here, a versatile flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) synthetic process has been exploited to synthesize a library of iron doped (0–10 at wt%) TiO2 nanoparticles. These particles have been tested for photoactivation-mediated cytotoxicity using near-visible light exposure. The reduction in TiO2 band gap energy with incremental levels of Fe loading maintained the nanoparticle crystalline structure in spite of homogeneous Fe distribution (demonstrated by XRD, HRTEM, SAED, EFTEM, and EELS). Photochemical studies showed that band gap energy was reciprocally tuned proportional to the Fe content. The photo-oxidation capability of Fe-doped TiO2 was found to increase during near-visible light exposure. Use of a macrophage cell line to evaluate cytotoxic and ROS production showed increased oxidant injury and cell death in parallel with a decrease in band gap energy. These findings demonstrate the importance of band gap energy in the phototoxic response of the cell to TiO2 nanoparticles and reflect the potential of this material to generate adverse effects in humans and the environment during high intensity light exposure. PMID:21678906

  9. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  10. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  11. Thermally induced effect on sub-band gap absorption in Ag doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Sharma, Kriti; Bharti, Shivani; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of Ag doped CdSe have been prepared by thermal evaporation using inert gas condensation (IGC) method taking Argon as inert gas. The prepared thin films are annealed at 363 K for one hour. The sub-band gap absorption spectra in the as deposited and annealed thin films have been studied using constant photocurrent method (CPM). The absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region is described by an Urbach tail in both as deposited and annealed thin films. The value of Urbach energy and number density of trap states have been calculated from the absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region which have been found to increase after annealing treatment indicating increase in disorderness in the lattice. The energy distribution of the occupied density of states below Fermi level has also been studied using derivative procedure of absorption coefficient.

  12. Enhanced spin polarization in graphene with spin energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling and strain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng-Fang; Wu, Qing-Ping E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Chen, Ai-Xi E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Xiao, Xian-Bo; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the possibility of spin polarization in graphene. The result shows that a spin energy gap can be opened in the presence of both spin-orbit coupling and strain. We find that high spin polarization with large spin-polarized current is achieved in the spin energy gap. However, only one of the two modulations is present, no spin polarization can be generated. So the combination of the two modulations provides a way to design tunable spin polarization without need for a magnetic element or an external magnetic field.

  13. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  14. The effects of exercise on the GAP-43 expression in the spinal cord of arthritis-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Jin; Jung, Nam-Jin; Na, Sang-Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of exercise on the recovery of spinal cord nerve cells damaged due to pain signals which are a major symptom of osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=40) were used and induction of osteoarthritis by monosodium iodoacetate. Injected rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Sham control group without MIA injection (SG), control group with injected MIA (CG), OA without exercise (NEG), OA with exercise (EG). Sham control group was injected normal cell line instead of MIA. The exercise group was submitted to 4-week training program on a treadmill for 5 days/week, 30 min/day, 16 m/min velocity, then spinal cord were removed and measured the GAP-43 expression by immunohistochemistry analysis. [Results] In this study, a results of measuring the expression of GAP-43. GAP-43 was observed in all groups, showed that the significant difference in each group. [Conclusion] It could be seen that exercise increased the GAP-43 expression in the spinal cord to promote the recovery of spinal cord nerve cells damaged due to chronic osteoarthritis. PMID:27821962

  15. Anisotropic rectifying characteristics induced by the superconducting gap of YBa2Cu3O7-δ/Nb-doped SrTiO3 heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. J.; Hao, F. X.; Zhang, C.; Liu, X.; Li, X. G.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the anisotropic rectifying characteristics of a YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO)/Nb-doped SrTiO3 heterojunction in magnetic fields of up to 9 T by rotating the junction from H//c to H//ab of the YBCO film. From the temperature and field dependencies of the diffusion potential Vd, we found that the angle-resolved reductions of Vd from its original value, δVd, were induced by the anisotropic superconducting gap Δ of the YBCO. The anisotropic parameter obtained from Δ was close to that obtained from the angular-dependent upper critical fields of the YBCO. This heterojunction is helpful both in investigating the superconducting gap and in designing sensitive superconducting devices.

  16. Indirect effects of emerald ash borer-induced ash mortality and canopy gap formation on epigaeic beetles.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Kamal J K; Smith, Annemarie; Hartzler, Diane M; Herms, Daniel A

    2014-06-01

    Exotic herbivorous insects have drastically and irreversibly altered forest structure and composition of North American forests. For example, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) from Asia has caused wide-scale mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in eastern United States and Canada. We studied the effects of forest changes resulting from emerald ash borer invasion on epigaeic or ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) along a gradient of ash dieback and gap sizes in southeastern Michigan. Ground beetles were sampled in hydric, mesic, and xeric habitats in which black (Fraxinus nigra Marshall), green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall), and white (Fraxinus americana L.) ash were the most common species, respectively. During 2006-2007, we trapped 2,545 adult ground beetles comprising 52 species. There was a negative correlation between percent ash tree mortality in 2006 and catches of all beetles. Catches of Agonum melanarium Dejean (in 2006) and Pterostichus mutus (Say) (in 2006-2007) were negatively correlated with tree mortality and gap size, respectively. However, catches of Pterostichus corvinus Dejean were positively correlated with gap size in 2006. As ash mortality and average gap size increased from 2006 to 2007, catches of all beetles as well as P. mutus and Pterostichus stygicus (Say) increased (1.3-3.9 times), while species diversity decreased, especially in mesic and xeric stands. Cluster analysis revealed that beetle assemblages in hydric and mesic stand diverged (25 and 40%, respectively) in their composition from 2006 to 2007, and that hydric stands had the most unique beetle assemblages. Overall, epigaeic beetle assemblages were altered in ash stands impacted by emerald ash borer; however, these impacts may dissipate as canopy gaps close.

  17. Fully gapped topological surface states in Bi2Se3 films induced by a d-wave high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Eryin; Ding, Hao; Fedorov, Alexei V.; Yao, Wei; Li, Zhi; Lv, Yan-Feng; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Li-Guo; Xu, Zhijun; Schneeloch, John; Zhong, Ruidan; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Gu, Genda; Yao, Hong; Xue, Qi-Kun; Chen, Xi; Zhou, Shuyun

    2013-10-01

    Topological insulators are a new class of material, that exhibit robust gapless surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry. The interplay of such symmetry-protected topological surface states and symmetry-broken states (for example, superconductivity) provides a platform for exploring new quantum phenomena and functionalities, such as one-dimensional chiral or helical gapless Majorana fermions, and Majorana zero modes that may find application in fault-tolerant quantum computation. Inducing superconductivity on the topological surface states is a prerequisite for their experimental realization. Here, by growing high-quality topological insulator Bi2Se3 films on a d-wave superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ using molecular beam epitaxy, we are able to induce high-temperature superconductivity on the surface states of Bi2Se3 films with a large pairing gap up to 15meV. Interestingly, distinct from the d-wave pairing of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, the proximity-induced gap on the surface states is nearly isotropic and consistent with predominant s-wave pairing as revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our work could provide a critical step towards the realization of the long sought Majorana zero modes.

  18. Quantum-size-induced phase transitions in quantum dots: Indirect-band gap GaAs nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunger, Alex; Luo, Jun-Wei; Franceschetti, Alberto

    2008-03-01

    Quantum nanostructures are often advertised as having stronger absorption than the bulk material from which they are made, to the potential benefit of nanotechnology. However, nanostructures made of direct gap materials such as GaAs can convert to indirect-gap, weakly-aborbing systems when the quantum size becomes small. This is the case for spherical GaAs dots of radius 15 å or less (about 1000 atoms) embedded in a wide-gap matrix. The nature of the transition: γ-to-X or γ-to-L is however, controversial. The distinction can not be made on the basis of electronic structure techniques that misrepresent the magnitude of the various competing effective mass tensors (e.g, LDA or GGA) or wavefunction coupling (e.g, tight-binding). Using a carefully fit screened pseudopotential method we show that the transition occurs from γ to X, and, more importantly, that the transition involves a finite V (γ-X) interband coupling, manifested as an ``anti-crossing'' between the confined electron states of GaAs as the dot size crosses 15 å. The physics of this reciprocal-space γ-X transition, as well as the real-space (type II) transition in GaAs/AlGaAs will be briefly discussed.

  19. In vivo single branch axotomy induces GAP-43–dependent sprouting and synaptic remodeling in cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Cesare, Paolo; Sacconi, Leonardo; Grasselli, Giorgio; Mandolesi, Georgia; Maco, Bohumil; Knott, Graham W.; Huang, Lieven; De Paola, Vincenzo; Strata, Piergiorgio; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity in the central nervous system in response to injury is a complex process involving axonal remodeling regulated by specific molecular pathways. Here, we dissected the role of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43; also known as neuromodulin and B-50) in axonal structural plasticity by using, as a model, climbing fibers. Single axonal branches were dissected by laser axotomy, avoiding collateral damage to the adjacent dendrite and the formation of a persistent glial scar. Despite the very small denervated area, the injured axons consistently reshape the connectivity with surrounding neurons. At the same time, adult climbing fibers react by sprouting new branches through the intact surroundings. Newly formed branches presented varicosities, suggesting that new axons were more than just exploratory sprouts. Correlative light and electron microscopy reveals that the sprouted branch contains large numbers of vesicles, with varicosities in the close vicinity of Purkinje dendrites. By using an RNA interference approach, we found that downregulating GAP-43 causes a significant increase in the turnover of presynaptic boutons. In addition, silencing hampers the generation of reactive sprouts. Our findings show the requirement of GAP-43 in sustaining synaptic stability and promoting the initiation of axonal regrowth. PMID:23754371

  20. Annealing-induced optical and sub-band-gap absorption parameters of Sn-doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Thin films of Sn-doped CdSe were prepared by thermal evaporation onto glass substrates in an argon gas atmosphere and annealed at different temperatures. Structural evaluation of the films was carried out using X-ray diffraction and their stoichiometry studied by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The films exhibit a preferred orientation along the hexagonal direction of CdSe. The optical transmittance of the films shows a red shift of the absorption edge with annealing. The fundamental absorption edge corresponds to a direct energy gap with a temperature coefficient of 3.34 × 10-3 eV K-1. The refractive index, optical conductivity and real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constants were found to increase after annealing. The sub-band gap absorption coefficient was evaluated using the constant photocurrent method. It varies exponentially with photon energy. The Urbach energy, the density of defect states, and the steepness of the density of localized states were evaluated from the sub-band-gap absorption.

  1. Remaining gaps for "safe" CO2 storage: the INGV CO2GAPS vision of "learning by doing" monitoring geogas leakage, reservoirs contamination/mixing and induced/triggered seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrocchi, F.; Vinciguerra, S.; Chiarabba, C.; Boschi, E.; Anselmi, M.; Burrato, P.; Buttinelli, M.; Cantucci, B.; Cinti, D.; Galli, G.; Improta, L.; Nazzari, M.; Pischiutta, M.; Pizzino, L.; Procesi, M.; Rovelli, A.; Sciarra, A.; Voltattorni, N.

    2012-12-01

    The CO2GAPS project proposed by INGV is intended to build up an European Proposal for a new kind of research strategy in the field of the geogas storage. Aim of the project would be to fill such key GAPS concerning the main risks associated to CO2 storage and their implications on the entire Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) process, which are: i) the geogas leakage both in soils and shallow aquifers, up to indoor seepage; ii) the reservoirs contamination/mixing by hydrocarbons and heavy metals; iii) induced or triggered seismicity and microseismicity, especially for seismogenic blind faults. In order to consider such risks and make the CCS public acceptance easier, a new kind of research approach should be performed by: i) a better multi-disciplinary and "site specific" risk assessment; ii) the development of more reliable multi-disciplinary monitoring protocols. In this view robust pre-injection base-lines (seismicity and degassing) as well as identification and discrimination criteria for potential anomalies are mandatory. CO2 injection dynamic modelling presently not consider reservoirs geomechanical properties during reactive mass-transport large scale simulations. Complex simulations of the contemporaneous physic-chemical processes involving CO2-rich plumes which move, react and help to crack the reservoir rocks are not totally performed. These activities should not be accomplished only by the oil-gas/electric companies, since the experienced know-how should be shared among the CCS industrial operators and research institutions, with the governments support and overview, also flanked by a transparent and "peer reviewed" scientific popularization process. In this context, a preliminary and reliable 3D modelling of the entire "storage complex" as defined by the European Directive 31/2009 is strictly necessary, taking into account the above mentioned geological, geochemical and geophysical risks. New scientific results could also highlighting such opportunities

  2. Anion Gap Toxicity in Alloxan Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats Treated with Antidiabetic Noncytotoxic Bioactive Compounds of Ethanolic Extract of Moringa oleifera

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera (MO) is used for a number of therapeutic purposes. This raises the question of safety and possible toxicity. The objective of the study was to ascertain the safety and possible metabolic toxicity in comparison with metformin, a known drug associated with acidosis. Animals confirmed with diabetes were grouped into 2 groups. The control group only received oral dose of PBS while the test group was treated with ethanolic extract of MO orally twice daily for 5-6 days. Data showed that the extract significantly lowered glucose level to normal values and did not cause any significant cytotoxicity compared to the control group (P = 0.0698); there was no gain in weight between the MO treated and the control groups (P > 0.8115). However, data showed that treatment with an ethanolic extract of MO caused a decrease in bicarbonate (P < 0.0001), and more than twofold increase in anion gap (P < 0.0001); metformin treatment also decreased bicarbonate (P < 0.0001) and resulted in a threefold increase in anion gap (P < 0.0001). Conclusively, these data show that while MO appears to have antidiabetic and noncytotoxic properties, it is associated with statistically significant anion gap acidosis in alloxan induced type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:25548560

  3. Anion Gap Toxicity in Alloxan Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats Treated with Antidiabetic Noncytotoxic Bioactive Compounds of Ethanolic Extract of Moringa oleifera.

    PubMed

    Omabe, Maxwell; Nwudele, Chibueze; Omabe, Kenneth Nwobini; Okorocha, Albert Egwu

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera (MO) is used for a number of therapeutic purposes. This raises the question of safety and possible toxicity. The objective of the study was to ascertain the safety and possible metabolic toxicity in comparison with metformin, a known drug associated with acidosis. Animals confirmed with diabetes were grouped into 2 groups. The control group only received oral dose of PBS while the test group was treated with ethanolic extract of MO orally twice daily for 5-6 days. Data showed that the extract significantly lowered glucose level to normal values and did not cause any significant cytotoxicity compared to the control group (P = 0.0698); there was no gain in weight between the MO treated and the control groups (P > 0.8115). However, data showed that treatment with an ethanolic extract of MO caused a decrease in bicarbonate (P < 0.0001), and more than twofold increase in anion gap (P < 0.0001); metformin treatment also decreased bicarbonate (P < 0.0001) and resulted in a threefold increase in anion gap (P < 0.0001). Conclusively, these data show that while MO appears to have antidiabetic and noncytotoxic properties, it is associated with statistically significant anion gap acidosis in alloxan induced type 2 diabetic rats.

  4. Visualisation of plasma induced processes in interelectrode gap of micropinch installation using laser illuminator on molecular nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, E.; Sarantsev, S.; Raevsky, I.; Savjolov, A.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of researched processes in the interelectrode gap of High-current low-inductance vacuum spark (HLIV) on the "PION" system [1] by means of active laser diagnostics with visualisation of radiation field. The influence of the cathode geometry and position of the trigger system on the plasma dynamics of HLIV is considered. The regularities of the discharge for different initial conditions are established. The conditions under which the most stable plasma point is formed in space and time are determined.

  5. Induced changes in refractive index, optical band gap, and absorption edge of polycarbonate-SiO2 thin films by Vis-IR lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsani, Hassan; Akhoondi, Somaieh

    2016-09-01

    In this experimental work, we have studied induced changes in refractive index, extinction coefficient, and optical band-gap of Bisphenol-A-polycarbonate (BPA-PC) coated with a uniform and thin, anti-scratch SiO2 film irradiated by visible to near-infrared lasers at 532 nm (green),650 nm(red), and 980 nm (IR)wavelength lasers with different energy densities. Our lasers sources are indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphide, second harmonic of neodymium-YAG-solid state lasers and gallium-aluminum-arsenide-semiconductor laser. The energy densities of our sources have been changed by changing the spot size of incident laser. samples transmission spectra were monitored by carry500 spectrophotometer and induced changes in optical properties are evaluated by using, extrapolation of the transmission spectrum through Swanepoel method and computer application

  6. Annealing-induced structural rearrangement and optical band gap change in Mg–Ni–H thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rašković-Lovre, Ž.; Mongstad, T. T.; Karazhanov, S.; You, C. C.; Lindberg, S.; Lelis, M.; Milcius, D.; Deledda, S.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that optical properties of Mg–Ni–H films can be tuned by hydrogen uptake from Mg–Ni–H and upload into Mg–Ni systems. In this work we show that modulation of optical properties of Mg–Ni–H can take place as a result of thermal processing in air as well. When reactively sputter deposited semiconducting Mg–Ni–H films are annealed at temperatures of 200 °C–300 °C in air, gradual band gap change from 1.6 to 2.04 eV occurs followed by change in optical appearance, from brown, to orange and, subsequently, to yellow. We investigate this phenomenon using optical and structural characterization tools, and link the changes to an atomic rearrangement and a structure reordering of the [NiH4]4‑complex. The films are x-ray amorphous up to 280 °C, where above this temperature an increase in crystallite size and establishing of long-range order lead to a formation of the cubic crystalline phase of Mg2NiH4. Also, the results suggest that even though annealing was conducted in air, no oxidation or other changes in chemical composition of the bulk of the film occurred. Therefore, the band gap of this semiconductor can be tuned permanently by heat treatment, in the range from 1.6 to 2 eV.

  7. Unconventional Magnetism and Band Gap Formation in LiFePO4: Consequence of Polyanion Induced Non-planarity.

    PubMed

    Jena, Ajit; Nanda, B R K

    2016-01-21

    Oxygen plays a critical role in strongly correlated transition metal oxides as crystal field effect is one of the key factors that determine the degree of localization of the valence d/f states. Based on the localization, a set of conventional mechanisms such as Mott-Hubbard, Charge-transfer and Slater were formulated to explain the antiferromagnetic and insulating (AFI) phenomena in many of these correlated systems. From the case study on LiFePO4, through density-functional calculations, we demonstrate that none of these mechanisms are strictly applicable to explain the AFI behavior when the transition metal oxides have polyanions such as (PO4)(3-). The symmetry-lowering of the metal-oxygen complex, to stabilize the polyanion, creates an asymmetric crystal field for d/f states. In LiFePO4 this field creates completely non-degenerate Fe-d states which, with negligible p-d and d-d covalent interactions, become atomically localized to ensure a gap at the Fermi level. Due to large exchange splitting, high spin state is favored and an antiferromagnetic configuration is stabilized. For the prototype LiFePO4, independent electron approximation is good enough to obtain the AFI ground state. Inclusion of additional correlation measures like Hubbard U simply amplifies the gap and therefore LiFePO4 can be preferably called as weakly coupled Mott insulator.

  8. Unconventional Magnetism and Band Gap Formation in LiFePO4: Consequence of Polyanion Induced Non-planarity

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Ajit; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen plays a critical role in strongly correlated transition metal oxides as crystal field effect is one of the key factors that determine the degree of localization of the valence d/f states. Based on the localization, a set of conventional mechanisms such as Mott-Hubbard, Charge-transfer and Slater were formulated to explain the antiferromagnetic and insulating (AFI) phenomena in many of these correlated systems. From the case study on LiFePO4, through density-functional calculations, we demonstrate that none of these mechanisms are strictly applicable to explain the AFI behavior when the transition metal oxides have polyanions such as (PO4)3−. The symmetry-lowering of the metal-oxygen complex, to stabilize the polyanion, creates an asymmetric crystal field for d/f states. In LiFePO4 this field creates completely non-degenerate Fe-d states which, with negligible p-d and d-d covalent interactions, become atomically localized to ensure a gap at the Fermi level. Due to large exchange splitting, high spin state is favored and an antiferromagnetic configuration is stabilized. For the prototype LiFePO4, independent electron approximation is good enough to obtain the AFI ground state. Inclusion of additional correlation measures like Hubbard U simply amplifies the gap and therefore LiFePO4 can be preferably called as weakly coupled Mott insulator. PMID:26791249

  9. Potassium Postdeposition Treatment-Induced Band Gap Widening at Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ Surfaces--Reason for Performance Leap?

    PubMed

    Handick, Evelyn; Reinhard, Patrick; Alsmeier, Jan-Hendrik; Köhler, Leonard; Pianezzi, Fabian; Krause, Stefan; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Ikenaga, Eiji; Koch, Norbert; Wilks, Regan G; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N; Bär, Marcus

    2015-12-16

    Direct and inverse photoemission were used to study the impact of alkali fluoride postdeposition treatments on the chemical and electronic surface structure of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin films used for high-efficiency flexible solar cells. We find a large surface band gap (E(g)(Surf), up to 2.52 eV) for a NaF/KF-postdeposition treated (PDT) absorber significantly increases compared to the CIGSe bulk band gap and to the Eg(Surf) of 1.61 eV found for an absorber treated with NaF only. Both the valence band maximum (VBM) and the conduction band minimum shift away from the Fermi level. Depth-dependent photoemission measurements reveal that the VBM decreases with increasing surface sensitivity for both samples; this effect is more pronounced for the NaF/KF-PDT CIGSe sample. The observed electronic structure changes can be linked to the recent breakthroughs in CIGSe device efficiencies.

  10. Water2Invest: Global facility for calculating investments needed to bridge the climate-induced water gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Droogers, Peter; Brandsma, Jairus; Buytaert, Wouter; Karssenberg, Derek; Meijer, Karen; van Aalst, Maaike; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Decision makers responsible for climate change adaptation investments are confronted with large uncertainties regarding future water availability and water demand, as well as the investment cost required to reduce the water gap. Moreover, scientists have worked hard to increase fundamental knowledge on climate change and its impacts (climate services), while practical use of this knowledge is limited due to a lack of tools for decision support under uncertain long term future scenarios (decision services). The Water2Invest project aims are to (i) assess the joint impact of climate change and socioeconomic change on water scarcity, (ii) integrate impact and potential adaptation in one flow, (iii) prioritize adaptation options to counteract water scarcity on their financial, regional socio-economic and environmental implications, and (iv) deliver all this information in an integrated user-friendly web-based service. Global water availability is computed between 2006 and 2100 using the PCR-GLOBWB water resources model at a 6 minute spatial resolution. Climate change scenarios are based on the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the IPCC Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) that defines four CO2 emission scenarios as representative concentration pathways. Water demand is computed for agriculture, industry, domestic, and environmental requirements based on socio-economic scenarios of increase in population and gross domestic product. Using a linear programming algorithm, water is allocated on a monthly basis over the four sectors. Based on these assessments, the user can evaluate various technological and infrastructural adaptation measures to assess the investments needed to bridge the future water gap. Regional environmental and socioeconomic effects of these investments are evaluated, such as environmental flows or downstream effects. A scheme is developed to evaluate the strategies on robustness and flexibility under climate change and scenario uncertainty

  11. Bisphosphonate-induced, hemichannel-mediated, anti-apoptosis through the Src/ERK pathway: a gap junction-independent action of connexin43.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, L I; Bellido, T

    2001-01-01

    Preservation of the mechanosensory function of osteocytes by inhibiting their apoptosis might contribute to the beneficial effects of bisphosphonates in bone. We report herein a mechanism by which connexin43 hemichannel opening by bisphosphonates triggers the activation of the kinases Src and ERKs and promotes cell survival. Bisphosphonate-induced anti-apoptosis requires connexin channel integrity, but not gap junctions. Osteocytic cells express functional hemichannels that are opened by bisphosphonates, as demonstrated by dye uptake, regulation by established agonists and antagonists, and cell surface biotinylation. The anti-apoptotic effect of bisphosphonates depends on connexin43 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and osteoblastic cells. Transfection of connexin43, but not other connexins, into connexin43 naïve cells confers de novo responsiveness to the drugs. The signal transducing property of connexin43 requires the pore-forming, as well as the C-terminal domains of the protein, the interaction of connexin43 with Src. and the activation of both Src and ERK kinases. These studies establish a role for connexin43 hemichannels in bisphosphonate action, and a novel function of connexin43--beyond gap junction communication--in the regulation of survival signaling pathways.

  12. Central auditory plasticity after carboplatin-induced unilateral inner ear damage in the chinchilla: up-regulation of GAP-43 in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kraus, K S; Ding, D; Zhou, Y; Salvi, R J

    2009-09-01

    Inner ear damage may lead to structural changes in the central auditory system. In rat and chinchilla, cochlear ablation and noise trauma result in fiber growth and synaptogenesis in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). In this study, we documented the relationship between carboplatin-induced hair cell degeneration and VCN plasticity in the chinchilla. Unilateral application of carboplatin (5mg/ml) on the round window membrane resulted in massive hair cell loss. Outer hair cell degeneration showed a pronounced basal-to-apical gradient while inner hair cell loss was more equally distributed throughout the cochlea. Expression of the growth associated protein GAP-43, a well-established marker for synaptic plasticity, was up-regulated in the ipsilateral VCN at 15 and 31 days post-carboplatin, but not at 3 and 7 days. In contrast, the dorsal cochlear nucleus showed only little change. In VCN, the high-frequency area dorsally showed slightly yet significantly stronger GAP-43 up-regulation than the low-frequency area ventrally, possibly reflecting the high-to-low frequency gradient of hair cell degeneration. Synaptic modification or formation of new synapses may be a homeostatic process to re-adjust mismatched inputs from two ears. Alternatively, massive fiber growth may represent a deleterious process causing central hyperactivity that leads to loudness recruitment or tinnitus.

  13. Noise-Induced Tinnitus Using Individualized Gap Detection Analysis and Its Relationship with Hyperacusis, Anxiety, and Spatial Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Edward; Zhang, Jinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus has a complex etiology that involves auditory and non-auditory factors and may be accompanied by hyperacusis, anxiety and cognitive changes. Thus far, investigations of the interrelationship between tinnitus and auditory and non-auditory impairment have yielded conflicting results. To further address this issue, we noise exposed rats and assessed them for tinnitus using a gap detection behavioral paradigm combined with statistically-driven analysis to diagnose tinnitus in individual rats. We also tested rats for hearing detection, responsivity, and loss using prepulse inhibition and auditory brainstem response, and for spatial cognition and anxiety using Morris water maze and elevated plus maze. We found that our tinnitus diagnosis method reliably separated noise-exposed rats into tinnitus(+) and tinnitus(−) groups and detected no evidence of tinnitus in tinnitus(−) and control rats. In addition, the tinnitus(+) group demonstrated enhanced startle amplitude, indicating hyperacusis-like behavior. Despite these results, neither tinnitus, hyperacusis nor hearing loss yielded any significant effects on spatial learning and memory or anxiety, though a majority of rats with the highest anxiety levels had tinnitus. These findings showed that we were able to develop a clinically relevant tinnitus(+) group and that our diagnosis method is sound. At the same time, like clinical studies, we found that tinnitus does not always result in cognitive-emotional dysfunction, although tinnitus may predispose subjects to certain impairment like anxiety. Other behavioral assessments may be needed to further define the relationship between tinnitus and anxiety, cognitive deficits, and other impairments. PMID:24069375

  14. Structure and band gap determination of irradiation-induced amorphous nano-channels in LiNbO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, R. Pakarinen, O. H.; Chisholm, M. F.; Liu, P.; Patel, M. K.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, X. L.; Weber, W. J.

    2015-04-07

    The irradiation of lithium niobate with swift heavy ions results in the creation of amorphous nano-sized channels along the incident ion path. These nano-channels are on the order of a hundred microns in length and could be useful for photonic applications. However, there are two major challenges in these nano-channels characterization: (i) it is difficult to investigate the structural characteristics of these nano-channels due to their very long length and (ii) the analytical electron microscopic analysis of individual ion track is complicated due to electron beam sensitive nature of lithium niobate. Here, we report the first high resolution microscopic characterization of these amorphous nano-channels, widely known as ion-tracks, by direct imaging them at different depths in the material, and subsequently correlating the key characteristics with electronic energy loss of ions. Energetic Kr ions ({sup 84}Kr{sup 22} with 1.98 GeV energy) are used to irradiate single crystal lithium niobate with a fluence of 2 × 10{sup 10} ions/cm{sup 2}, which results in the formation of individual ion tracks with a penetration depth of ∼180 μm. Along the ion path, electron energy loss of the ions, which is responsible for creating the ion tracks, increases with depth under these conditions in LiNbO{sub 3}, resulting in increases in track diameter of a factor of ∼2 with depth. This diameter increase with electronic energy loss is consistent with predictions of the inelastic thermal spike model. We also show a new method to measure the band gap in individual ion track by using electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

  15. Band gap engineering by swift heavy ions irradiation induced amorphous nano-channels in LiNbO3

    DOE PAGES

    Sachan, Ritesh; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Liu, Peng; ...

    2015-04-01

    The irradiation of lithium niobate with swift heavy ions results in the creation of amorphous nano-sized channels along the incident ion path. These nano-channels are on the order of a hundred microns in length and could be useful for photonic applications. However, there are two major challenges in these nano-channels characterization; (i) it is difficult to investigate the structural characteristics of these nano-channels due to their very long length, and (ii) the analytical electron microscopic analysis of individual ion track is complicated due to electron beam sensitive nature of lithium niobate. Here, we report the first high resolution microscopic characterizationmore » of these amorphous nano-channels, widely known as ion-tracks, by direct imaging them at different depths in the material, and subsequently correlating the key characteristics with Se of ions. Energetic Kr ions (84Kr22 with 1.98 GeV energy) are used to irradiate single crystal lithium niobate with a fluence of 2x1010 ions/cm2, which results in the formation of individual ion tracks with a penetration depth of ~180 μm. Along the ion path, electron energy loss of the ions, which is responsible for creating the ion tracks, increases with depth under these conditions in LiNbO3, resulting in increases in track diameter of a factor of ~2 with depth. This diameter increase with electronic stopping power is consistent with predictions of the inelastic thermal spike model. We also show a new method to measure the band gap in individual ion track by using electron energy-loss spectroscopy.« less

  16. Band gap engineering by swift heavy ions irradiation induced amorphous nano-channels in LiNbO3

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Liu, Peng; Patel, Maulik; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Xuelin; Weber, William J.

    2015-04-01

    The irradiation of lithium niobate with swift heavy ions results in the creation of amorphous nano-sized channels along the incident ion path. These nano-channels are on the order of a hundred microns in length and could be useful for photonic applications. However, there are two major challenges in these nano-channels characterization; (i) it is difficult to investigate the structural characteristics of these nano-channels due to their very long length, and (ii) the analytical electron microscopic analysis of individual ion track is complicated due to electron beam sensitive nature of lithium niobate. Here, we report the first high resolution microscopic characterization of these amorphous nano-channels, widely known as ion-tracks, by direct imaging them at different depths in the material, and subsequently correlating the key characteristics with Se of ions. Energetic Kr ions (84Kr22 with 1.98 GeV energy) are used to irradiate single crystal lithium niobate with a fluence of 2x1010 ions/cm2, which results in the formation of individual ion tracks with a penetration depth of ~180 μm. Along the ion path, electron energy loss of the ions, which is responsible for creating the ion tracks, increases with depth under these conditions in LiNbO3, resulting in increases in track diameter of a factor of ~2 with depth. This diameter increase with electronic stopping power is consistent with predictions of the inelastic thermal spike model. We also show a new method to measure the band gap in individual ion track by using electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

  17. A large gap opening of graphene induced by the adsorption of CO on the Al-doped site.

    PubMed

    Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Noei, Maziar; Tabar, Mohammad Bigdeli

    2013-08-01

    We investigated CO adsorption on the pristine, Stone-Wales (SW) defected, Al- and Si- doped graphenes by using density functional calculations in terms of geometric, energetic and electronic properties. It was found that CO molecule is weakly adsorbed on the pristine and SW defected graphenes and their electronic properties were slightly changed. The Al- and Si- doped graphenes show high reactivity toward CO, so calculated adoption energies are about -11.40 and -13.75 kcal mol(-1) in the most favorable states. It was found that, among all the structures, the electronic properties of Al-doped graphene are strongly sensitive to the presence of CO molecule. We demonstrate the existence of a large Eg opening of 0.87 eV in graphene which is induced by Al-doping and CO adsorption.

  18. Red paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) and its main carotenoids, capsanthin and β-carotene, prevent hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of gap-junction intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Woo-Moon; Rhee, Han Cheol; Kim, Suna

    2016-07-25

    This study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of red paprika extract (RPE) and its main carotenoids, namely, capsanthin (CST) and β-carotene (BCT), on the H2O2-induced inhibition of gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells (WB cells). We found that pre-treatment with RPE, CST and BCT protected WB cells from H2O2-induced inhibition of GJIC. RPE, CST and BCT not only recovered connexin 43 (Cx43) mRNA expression but also prevented phosphorylation of Cx43 protein by H2O2 treatment. RPE attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and JNK, whereas pre-treatment with CST and BCT only attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 and did not affect JNK in H2O2-treated WB cells. RPE, CST and BCT significantly suppressed the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in H2O2-treated cells compared to untreated WB cells. These results suggest that dietary intake of red paprika might be helpful for lowering the risk of diseases caused by oxidative stress.

  19. Inorganic arsenic trioxide induces gap junction loss in association with the downregulation of connexin43 and E-cadherin in rat hepatic "stem-like" cells.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Jao, Jo-Chi; Tsai, Jin-Lian; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Jeng, Kuo-Shyang; Kuo, Kung-Kai

    2014-02-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic trioxide causes tumors of the skin, urinary bladder, lung, and liver. Several cancer initiators and promoters have been shown to alter cell-cell signaling by interference with gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or modulation of cell adhesion molecules, such as connexin43 (Cx43), E-cadherin, and β-catenin. The aim of this study was to determine whether the disruption of cell-cell interactions occurs in liver epithelial cells after exposure to arsenic trioxide. WB-F344 cells were treated with arsenic trioxide (6.25-50 μM) for up to 8 hours, and gap junction function was analyzed using the scrape-load/dye transfer assay. In addition, the changes in mRNA and protein levels of Cx43, E-cadherin, and β-catenin were determined. A significant dose- and time-dependent decrease in GJIC was observed when WB-F344 cells were exposed to arsenic trioxide (p < 0.05). Consistent with the inhibition of GJIC, cells' exposure to arsenic trioxide resulted in dose- and time-dependent decreases in Cx43 and E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein levels. However, arsenic trioxide did not alter the mRNA or protein levels of β-catenin. In an immunofluorescence study, nuclei were heavily stained with anti-β-catenin antibody, indicating significant nuclear translocation. In this study, we also demonstrated that arsenic trioxide-induced GJIC loss was a reversible process. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that disruption of cell-cell communication may contribute to the tumor-promoting effect of inorganic arsenic trioxide.

  20. The vascular endothelial growth factor-induced disruption of gap junctions is relayed by an autocrine communication via ATP release in coronary capillary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Thuringer, Dominique

    2004-12-01

    Little is known concerning how the coordination of Ca(2+) signaling aids in capillary endothelial cell (CEC) functions, such as microvascular permeability and angiogenesis. Previous reports support the major involvement of gap junction (GJ) channels. However, the cell-to-cell communication may not be straightforward, especially if we consider the participation of active molecules released by CEC. In this study, short-term effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-165) were compared with those of bradykinin (BK) on gap junction coupling (GJC) and remodeling of connexin-43 (Cx43) and then analyzed for intercellular Ca(2+) signal in primary cultures of coronary CEC. Dye-coupling experiments revealed that BK or VEGF completely blocked GJC. These effects correlated with the rapid internalization of Cx43 and its tyrosine phosphorylation in part via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. GJC slowly recovered with BK but not with VEGF in the following hour. In control conditions, mechanical stimulation of a single cell within a confluent monolayer triggered an intercellular Ca(2+) wave that was partially inhibited by GJC blockers or purinergic inhibitors. No wave propagation was observed after blockage of both GJC and purinergic receptors. Cell treatment with VEGF also reduced propagation of the Ca(2+) wave, which was totally prevented by applying a purinergic receptor antagonist but not with a GJC blocker. That excludes purine efflux through Cx hemichannels. We conclude that VEGF-induced disruption of GJC via Cx43 remodeling is relayed by an autocrine communication via secretion of ATP to preserve intercellular Ca(2+) signaling in capillary endothelium.

  1. Changes in homologous and heterologous gap junction contacts during maturation-inducing hormone-dependent meiotic resumption in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolamba, D.; Patino, R.; Yoshizaki, G.; Thomas, P.

    2003-01-01

    Homologous (granulosa cell-granulosa cell) gap junction (GJ) contacts increase in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) during the early (first) stage of maturation, but their profile during the second stage [i.e., during maturation-inducing hormone (MIH)-mediated meiotic resumption] is unknown. The profile of homologous GJ contacts during the second stage of maturation in croaker follicles was examined in this study and compared to that of heterologous (granulosa cell-oocyte) GJ, for which changes have been previously documented. Follicles were incubated with human chorionic gonadotropin to induce maturational competence (first stage), and then with MIH to induce meiotic resumption. The follicles were collected for examination immediately before and after different durations of MIH exposure until the oocyte had reached the stage of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD; index of meiotic resumption). Ultrathin sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy, and homologous and heterologous GJ contacts were quantified along a 100-??m segment of granulosa cell-zona radiata complex per follicle (three follicles/time/fish, n=3 fish). Relatively high numbers of both types of GJ were observed before and after the first few hours of MIH exposure (up to the stage of oil droplet coalescence). GJ numbers declined during partial yolk globule coalescence (at or near GVBD) and were just under 50% of starting values after the completion of GVBD (P<0.05). These results confirm earlier observations that GVBD temporally correlates with declining heterologous GJ contacts, and for the first time in teleosts show that there is a parallel decline in homologous GJ. The significance of the changes in homologous and heterologous GJ is uncertain and deserves further study. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  2. Observational Properties of Protoplanetary Disk Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnière, Peggy; Bjorkman, J. E.; Frank, Adam; Quillen, Alice C.; Carciofi, A. C.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Wood, Kenneth

    2006-02-01

    We study the effects of an annular gap induced by an embedded protoplanet on disk scattered light images and the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED). We find that the outer edge of a gap is brighter in the scattered light images than a similar location in a gap-free disk. The stellar radiation that would have been scattered by material within the gap is instead scattered by the disk wall at the outer edge of the gap, producing a bright ring surrounding the dark gap in the images. Given sufficient resolution, such gaps can be detected by the presence of this bright ring in scattered light images. A gap in a disk also changes the shape of the SED. Radiation that would have been absorbed by material in the gap is instead reprocessed by the outer gap wall. This leads to a decrease in the SED at wavelengths corresponding to the temperature at the radius of the missing gap material, and to a corresponding flux increase at longer wavelengths corresponding to the temperature of the outer wall. We note, however, that the presence of an annular gap does not change the bolometric IR flux; it simply redistributes the radiation previously produced by material within the gap to longer wavelengths. Although it will be difficult on the basis of the SED alone to distinguish between the presence of a gap and other physical effects, the level of changes can be sufficiently large to be measurable with current instruments (e.g., Spitzer).

  3. Localization of Metal-Induced Gap States at the Metal-Insulator Interface: Origin of Flux Noise in SQUIDs and Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sangkook; Lee, Dung-Hai; Louie, Steven G.; Clarke, John

    2010-03-01

    The origin of magnetic flux noise in dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) with a power spectrum scaling as 1/f (f is frequency) has been a puzzle for over 25 years. This noise limits both the low frequency performance of SQUIDs and the decoherence time of flux-sensitive superconducting qubits, making scaling-up for quantum computing problematic. Recent calculations and experiments indicate that the noise is generated by electrons that randomly reverse their spin directions. Their areal density of ˜ 5 x 10^17 m-2 is relatively insensitive to the nature of the superconductor and substrate. Here, we propose that the local magnetic moments originate in metal-induced gap states (MIGSs) localized by potential disorder at the metal-insulator interface. MIGSs are particularly sensitive to such disorder, so that the localized states have a Coulomb repulsion sufficiently large to make them singly occupied. Our calculations demonstrate that a modest level of disorder generates the required areal density of localized moments. This result suggests that magnetic flux noise could be reduced by fabricating superconductor-insulator interfaces with less disorder. Support: NSF DMR07-05941, US DOE De-AC02-05CH11231, Samsung Foundation, Teragrid, NERSC.

  4. Gravity waves in mesopause region induced by thunderstorms over Northern China observed by a no-gap OH airglow imager network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiyao

    2016-07-01

    A no-gap OH airglow all-sky imager network was established in northern China in February 2012. The network is composed of 6 all-sky airglow imagers that make observations of OH airglow gravity waves and cover an area of about 2000 km east and west and about 1400 km south and north. A large number of gravity wave events in the mesopause region induced by thunderstorms were observed by the network during the past 4 years. A comparison of the observations in 2012, 2013, and 2014 are made, which shows that there were more strong thunderstorms take place in 2013 in the northern China and produce more Concentric Gravity Wave (CGW) events. Especially, a series of CGW events were observed by the network nearly every night during the first half of August 2013. These events were also observed by satellite sensors from FY-2, AIRS/Aqua, and VIIRS/Suomi NPP. Combination of the ground imager network with satellites provides multi-level observations of the CGWs from the stratosphere to the mesopause region. In this talk, two representative CGW events in August 2013 are studied in detail and movies of the two events are displayed. One is the CGW on the night of 13 August 2013, likely launched by a single thunderstorm. The temporal and spatial analyses indicate that the CGW horizontal wavelengths agree with the GW dispersion relation within 300 km from the storm center. A gravity wave with horizontal wavelength of about 20 km propagates horizontally to more than 800 km in the mesopause region, probably due to a ducting layer. Another CGW event was induced by two very strong thunderstorms on 09 August 2013. Multi-scale waves with horizontal wavelengths ranging from less than 10 km to 200 km were observed. Many ripples were found, probably due to the breaking of strong gravity waves with large relative OH intensity perturbations of 10%.

  5. Phosphatidylcholine Specific PLC-Induced Dysregulation of Gap Junctions, a Robust Cellular Response to Environmental Toxicants, and Prevention by Resveratrol in a Rat Liver Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Sovadinova, Iva; Babica, Pavel; Böke, Hatice; Kumar, Esha; Wilke, Andrew; Park, Joon-Suk; Trosko, James E.; Upham, Brad L.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been associated with different pathologies, including cancer; however, molecular mechanisms regulating GJIC are not fully understood. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanisms of GJIC-dysregulation have been well-established, however recent discoveries have implicated phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) in the regulation of GJIC. What is not known is how prevalent these two signaling mechanisms are in toxicant/toxin-induced dysregulation of GJIC, and do toxicants/toxins work through either signaling mechanisms or both, or through alternative signaling mechanisms. Different chemical toxicants were used to assess whether they dysregulate GJIC via MEK or PC-PLC, or both Mek and PC-PLC, or through other signaling pathways, using a pluripotent rat liver epithelial oval-cell line, WB-F344. Epidermal growth factor, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and lindane regulated GJIC through a MEK1/2-dependent mechanism that was independent of PC-PLC; whereas PAHs, DDT, PCB 153, dicumylperoxide and perfluorodecanoic acid inhibited GJIC through PC-PLC independent of Mek. Dysregulation of GJIC by perfluorooctanoic acid and R59022 required both MEK1/2 and PC-PLC; while benzoylperoxide, arachidonic acid, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, 1-monolaurin, pentachlorophenol and alachlor required neither MEK1/2 nor PC-PLC. Resveratrol prevented dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that acted either through MEK1/2 or PC-PLC. Except for alachlor, resveratrol did not prevent dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that worked through PC-PLC-independent and MEK1/2-independent pathways, which indicated at least two other, yet unidentified, pathways that are involved in the regulation of GJIC. In conclusion: the dysregulation of GJIC is a contributing factor to the cancer process; however the underlying mechanisms by which gap

  6. Estimation of Bi induced changes in the direct E0 band gap of III-V-Bi alloys and comparison with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samajdar, D. P.; Dhar, S.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum dielectric Theory (QDT) is used to explain the band gap bowing effect observed in III-V-Bismides such as InSb1-xBix, InAs1-xBix, InP1-xBix, GaSb1-xBix, GaAs1-xBix and GaP1-xBix. The dependence of the direct E0 band gap for these alloys on Bi mole fraction is calculated using QDT which requires the evaluation of the bowing parameter c. The bowing parameter gives the deviation of the direct E0 band gap from the linear relationship of E0 with Bi mole fraction. The band gap reduction values obtained using QDT are compared with those calculated using Virtual Crystal approximation (VCA) and Valence Band Anticrossing (VBAC) model as well as with the reported experimental data and the results of the comparison shows excellent agreement.

  7. Sound-Induced Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics in the Adult Hearing Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Dylan K.; Rouse, Stephanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling has been implicated in the initial pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the cochlea's response to acoustic overstimulation. Intracellular Ca2+ signaling (ICS) waves, which occur in glia and retinal cells in response to injury to activate cell regulatory pathways, have been proposed as an early event in cochlear injury. Disruption of ICS activity is thought to underlie Connexin 26-associated hearing loss, the most common genetic form of deafness, and downstream sequelae of ICS wave activity, such as MAP kinase pathway activation, have been implicated in noise-induced hearing loss. However, ICS waves have only been observed in neonatal cochlear cultures and are thought to be quiescent after the onset of hearing. In this study, we employ an acute explant model of an adult, hearing cochlea that retains many in vivo physiologic features to investigate Ca2+ changes in response to sound. We find that both slow monotonic changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration as well as discrete ICS waves occur with acoustic overstimulation. The ICS waves share many intrinsic features with their better-described neonatal counterparts, including ATP and gap-junction dependence, and propagation velocity and distance. This identification of ICS wave activity in the adult, hearing cochlea thus confirms and characterizes an important early detection mechanism for cochlear trauma and provides a target for interventions for noise-induced and Connexin 26-associated hearing loss. PMID:27959894

  8. Gap Junction Communication and the Propagation of Bystander Effects Induced by Microbeam Irradiation in Human Fibroblast Cultures: The Impact of Radiation Quality

    PubMed Central

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; Suzuki, Masao; Funayama, Tomoo; Usami, Noriko; Plante, Ianik; Yokota, Yuichiro; Mutou, Yasuko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Murakami, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying the bystander effects of low doses/low fluences of low- or high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is relevant to radiotherapy and radiation protection. Here, we investigated the role of gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in the propagation of stressful effects in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures wherein only 0.036–0.144% of cells in the population were traversed by primary radiation tracks. Confluent cells were exposed to graded doses from monochromatic 5.35 keV X ray (LET ~6 keV/μm), 18.3 MeV/u carbon ion (LET ~103 keV/μm), 13 MeV/u neon ion (LET ~380 keV/μm) or 11.5 MeV/u argon ion (LET ~1,260 keV/μm) microbeams in the presence or absence of 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA), an inhibitor of GJIC. After 4 h incubation at 37°C, the cells were subcultured and assayed for micronucleus (MN) formation. Micronuclei were induced in a greater fraction of cells than expected based on the fraction of cells targeted by primary radiation, and the effect occurred in a dose-dependent manner with any of the radiation sources. Interestingly, MN formation for the heavy-ion microbeam irradiation in the absence of AGA was higher than in its presence at high mean absorbed doses. In contrast, there were no significant differences in cell cultures exposed to X-ray microbeam irradiation in presence or absence of AGA. This showed that the inhibition of GJIC depressed the enhancement of MN formation in bystander cells from cultures exposed to high-LET radiation but not low-LET radiation. Bystander cells recipient of growth medium harvested from 5.35 keV X-irradiated cultures experienced stress manifested in the form of excess micronucleus formation. Together, the results support the involvement of both junctional communication and secreted factor(s) in the propagation of radiation-induced stress to bystander cells. They highlight the important role of radiation quality and dose in the observed effects. PMID:23987132

  9. Stress-induced anomalous shift of optical band gap in Ga-doped ZnO thin films: Experimental and first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yaqin; Tang, Wu E-mail: lan.zhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Lan E-mail: lan.zhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2015-04-20

    In this work, highly c-axis oriented Ga-doped ZnO thin films have been deposited on glass substrates by RF magnetron sputtering under different sputtering times. The optical band gap is observed to shift linearly with the electron concentration and in-plane stress. The failure of fitting the shift of band gap as a function of electron concentration using the available theoretical models suggests the in-plane stress, instead of the electron concentration, be regarded as the dominant cause to this anomalous redshift of the optical band gap. And the mechanism of stress-dependent optical band gap is supported by the first-principles calculation based on density functional theory.

  10. Four-wave-mixing gap solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanpeng; Wang Zhiguo; Zheng Huaibin; Yuan Chenzhi; Li Changbiao; Lu Keqing; Xiao Min

    2010-11-15

    We report an experimental demonstration of generating gap soliton trains in a four-wave-mixing (FWM) signal. Such spatial FWM surfacelike gap soliton trains are induced in a periodically modulated self-defocusing atomic medium by the cross-phase modulation, which can be reshaped under different experimental conditions, such as different atomic densities, nonlinear dispersions, and dressing fields. Controlling spatial gap solitons can have important applications in image memory, processing, and communication.

  11. Global ischemia-induced increases in the gap junctional proteins connexin 32 (Cx32) and Cx36 in hippocampus and enhanced vulnerability of Cx32 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Oguro, K; Jover, T; Tanaka, H; Lin, Y; Kojima, T; Oguro, N; Grooms, S Y; Bennett, M V; Zukin, R S

    2001-10-01

    Gap junctions are conductive channels that connect the interiors of coupled cells. In the hippocampus, GABA-containing hippocampal interneurons are interconnected by gap junctions, which mediate electrical coupling and synchronous firing and thereby promote inhibitory transmission. The present study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that the gap junctional proteins connexin 32 (Cx32; expressed by oligodendrocytes, interneurons, or both), Cx36 (expressed by interneurons), and Cx43 (expressed by astrocytes) play a role in defining cell-specific patterns of neuronal death in hippocampus after global ischemia in mice. Global ischemia did not significantly alter Cx32 and Cx36 mRNA expression and slightly increased Cx43 mRNA expression in the vulnerable CA1, as assessed by Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Global ischemia induced a selective increase in Cx32 and Cx36 but not Cx43 protein abundance in CA1 before onset of neuronal death, as assessed by Western blot analysis. The increase in Cx32 and Cx36 expression was intense and specific to parvalbumin-positive inhibitory interneurons of CA1, as assessed by double immunofluorescence. Protein abundance was unchanged in CA3 and dentate gyrus. The finding of increase in connexin protein without increase in mRNA suggests regulation of Cx32 and Cx36 expression at the translational or post-translational level. Cx32(Y/-) null mice exhibited enhanced vulnerability to brief ischemic insults, consistent with a role for Cx32 gap junctions in neuronal survival. These findings suggest that Cx32 and Cx36 gap junctions may contribute to the survival and resistance of GABAergic interneurons, thereby defining cell-specific patterns of global ischemia-induced neuronal death.

  12. The Gap-Tpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Catalanotti, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Di Meo, P.; Longo, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Fiorillo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency.

  13. Band-unfolding approach to moiré-induced band-gap opening and Fermi level velocity reduction in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Hirofumi; Matsushita, Yu-ichiro; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2017-02-01

    We report on the energy spectrum of electrons in twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) obtained by the band-unfolding method in the tight-binding model. We find the band-gap opening at particular points in the reciprocal space, that elucidates the drastic reduction of the Fermi-level velocity with the tiny twisted angles in tBLGs. We find that moiré pattern caused by the twist of the two graphene layers generates interactions among Dirac cones, otherwise absent, and the resultant cone-cone interactions peculiar to each point in the reciprocal space causes the energy gap and thus reduces the Fermi-level velocity.

  14. Intrinsic Islet Heterogeneity and Gap Junction Coupling Determine Spatiotemporal Ca2+ Wave Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Richard K.P.; Hutchens, Troy; Head, W. Steven; McCaughey, Michael J.; Zhang, Min; Le Marchand, Sylvain J.; Satin, Leslie S.; Piston, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is released from the islets of Langerhans in discrete pulses that are linked to synchronized oscillations of intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i). Associated with each synchronized oscillation is a propagating calcium wave mediated by Connexin36 (Cx36) gap junctions. A computational islet model predicted that waves emerge due to heterogeneity in β-cell function throughout the islet. To test this, we applied defined patterns of glucose stimulation across the islet using a microfluidic device and measured how these perturbations affect calcium wave propagation. We further investigated how gap junction coupling regulates spatiotemporal [Ca2+]i dynamics in the face of heterogeneous glucose stimulation. Calcium waves were found to originate in regions of the islet having elevated excitability, and this heterogeneity is an intrinsic property of islet β-cells. The extent of [Ca2+]i elevation across the islet in the presence of heterogeneity is gap-junction dependent, which reveals a glucose dependence of gap junction coupling. To better describe these observations, we had to modify the computational islet model to consider the electrochemical gradient between neighboring β-cells. These results reveal how the spatiotemporal [Ca2+]i dynamics of the islet depend on β-cell heterogeneity and cell-cell coupling, and are important for understanding the regulation of coordinated insulin release across the islet. PMID:25468351

  15. Behind the Pay Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey, Judy Goldberg; Hill, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Women have made remarkable gains in education during the past three decades, yet these achievements have resulted in only modest improvements in pay equity. The gender pay gap has become a fixture of the U.S. workplace and is so ubiquitous that many simply view it as normal. "Behind the Pay Gap" examines the gender pay gap for college graduates.…

  16. Aggregation of BiTe monolayer on Bi2Te3 (111) induced by diffusion of intercalated atoms in the van der Waals gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Wen; Huang, Wen-Kai; Zhang, Kai-Wen; Shu, Da-Jun; Wang, Mu; Li, Shao-Chun

    2017-03-01

    We report a postgrowth aging mechanism of Bi2Te3 (111) films with scanning tunneling microscopy in combination with density functional theory calculation. It is found that a monolayered structure with a squared lattice symmetry gradually aggregates from the surface steps. Theoretical calculations indicate that the van der Waals (vdW) gap not only acts as a natural reservoir for self-intercalated Bi and Te atoms, but also provides them easy diffusion pathways. Once hopping out of the gap, these defective atoms prefer to develop into a two-dimensional BiTe superstructure on the Bi2Te3 (111) surface driven by positive energy gain. Considering the common nature of weak bonding between vdW layers, we expect such unusual diffusion and aggregation of the intercalated atoms may be of general importance for most kinds of vdW layered materials.

  17. Large superconducting double-gap, a pronounced pseudogap and evidence for proximity-induced topological superconductivity in the Bi2Te3/Fe1+yTe interfacial superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. Y.; He, M. Q.; He, Q. L.; Law, K. T.; Sou, I. K.; Lortz, R.; Petrovic, A. P.

    We investigate directional point-contact spectroscopy on a Bi2Te3/ Fe1+yTe heterostructure, fabricated via van der Waals epitaxy, which is interfacial superconducting with an onset TC at 12K and zero resistance below 8K. A large superconducting twin-gap structure is seen down to 0.27K, together with a zero bias conductance peak. The anisotropic smaller gap (Δ1) is around 5 meV at 0.27K and closes at 8K, while the other one (Δ2), as large as 12 meV, is isotropic and eventually evolves into a pseudogap closing at 40K. Both, the two-gap BTK and Dynes models can well reproduce our data, demonstrating Δ1 should be associated with the proximity-induced superconductivity in the topological Bi2Te3 layer, while Δ2 may be attributed to an intrinsically-doped FeTe thin film at the interface. This work was supported by grants from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (603010, SEGHKUST03).

  18. Gap junctional communication modulates gene transcription by altering the recruitment of Sp1 and Sp3 to connexin-response elements in osteoblast promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stains, Joseph P.; Lecanda, Fernando; Screen, Joanne; Towler, Dwight A.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of gap junction proteins, connexins, represent a mechanism of disease in a variety of tissues. We have shown that recessive (gene deletion) or dominant (connexin45 overexpression) disruption of connexin43 function results in osteoblast dysfunction and abnormal expression of osteoblast genes, including down-regulation of osteocalcin transcription. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of gap junction-sensitive transcriptional regulation, we systematically analyzed the rat osteocalcin promoter for sensitivity to gap junctional intercellular communication. We identified an Sp1/Sp3 containing complex that assembles on a minimal element in the -70 to -57 region of the osteocalcin promoter in a gap junction-dependent manner. This CT-rich connexin-response element is necessary and sufficient to confer gap junction sensitivity to the osteocalcin proximal promoter. Repression of osteocalcin transcription occurs as a result of displacement of the stimulatory Sp1 by the inhibitory Sp3 on the promoter when gap junctional communication is perturbed. Modulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment also occurs on the collagen Ialpha1 promoter and translates into gap junction-sensitive transcriptional control of collagen Ialpha1 gene expression. Thus, regulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment to the promoter may represent a potential general mechanism for transcriptional control of target genes by signals passing through gap junctions.

  19. Efficient H{sub 2} production over Au/graphene/TiO{sub 2} induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Hongtao; Wang, Hua; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation were used for H{sub 2} production. • Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalyst was synthesized. • Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} exhibited enhancement of light absorption and charge separation. • H{sub 2} production rate of Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: H{sub 2} production over Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalyst induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO{sub 2} using graphene (Gr) as an electron acceptor has been investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance study indicated that, in this composite, Gr collected electrons not only from Au with surface plasmon resonance but also from TiO{sub 2} with band-gap excitation. Surface photovoltage and UV–vis absorption measurements revealed that compared with Au/TiO{sub 2}, Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} displayed more effective photogenerated charge separation and higher optical absorption. Benefiting from these advantages, the H{sub 2} production rate of Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite with Gr content of 1.0 wt% and Au content of 2.0 wt% was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO{sub 2}. This work represents an important step toward the efficient application of both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation on the way to converting solar light into chemical energy.

  20. Closing the Pay Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    the pay gap has been narrowed, hut only to just under 10 percent. And current military compensation legislation does not close the gap until 2026. There...will continue to be a pay gap until 2026 unless the next administration and the next Congress provide more for pay above the 1999 legislated ramp- up...of .5 percent (one half of one percent) per year to attain pay equality . That means that soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and Coast Guardsmen

  1. Microtron Irradiation Induced Tuning of Band Gap and Photoresponse of Al-ZnO Thin Films Synthesized by mSILAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Deepu; Augustine, Simon; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Alhaddad, Ahmad Yaser; Cabibihan, John-John; Vijayalakshmi, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    Al-doped polycrystalline nano ZnO (Al-ZnO) thin films with different doping concentrations were successfully prepared by the microwave-assisted successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (mSILAR) technique. The structural analysis along with the orientation of the prepared films was examined by powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns. The deposited film is polycrystalline and the (002) orientation enhanced upon doping. Additional investigations were carried out to study the effect of electron beam irradiation (e--irradiation) on the band gap and photoconductivity of both irradiated and unirradiated samples. Both the Al doping and e--irradiation led to the enhancement of the photoconductivity of prepared materials. This property enables us to tune the properties of materials for various applications by controlling dopant concentrations and e--irradiation. The dependence of photocurrent on e--irradiation of Al-ZnO thin films was not reported previously. Therefore, Al-doped polycrystalline nano-ZnO thin film is a promising material for band gap engineering and for the development of solar cells.

  2. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; ...

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperaturemore » behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.« less

  3. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-01-01

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. In contrast to other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap. PMID:26548650

  4. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-11-01

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. In contrast to other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.

  5. Optically tuneable blue phase photonic band gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.-Y.; Wang, C.-T.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Lin, T.-H.; Liu, J.-H.

    2010-03-22

    This study investigates an optically switchable band gap of photonic crystal that is based on an azobenzene-doped liquid crystal blue phase. The trans-cis photoisomerization of azobenzene deforms the cubic unit cell of the blue phase and shifts the photonic band gap. The fast back-isomerization of azobenzene was induced by irradiation with different wavelengths light. The crystal structure is verified using Kossel diffraction diagram. An optically addressable blue phase display, based on Bragg reflection from the photonic band gap, is also demonstrated. The tunable ranges are around red, green, and blue wavelengths and exhibit a bright saturated color.

  6. Bismuth-induced Raman modes in GaP 1₋ x Bi x

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Theresa M.; Fluegel, Brian; Beaton, Daniel A.; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2016-09-02

    Dilute bismide semiconductor alloys are a promising material platform for optoelectronic devices due to drastic impacts of bismuth on the electronic structure of the alloy. At the same time, the details of bismuth incorporation in the lattice are not fully understood. In this work, we conduct Raman scattering spectroscopy on GaP1- x Bi x epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and identify several bismuth-related Raman features including gap vibration modes at 296, 303, and 314 cm-1. This study paves the way for more detailed analysis of the local symmetry at bismuth incorporation sites in the dilute bismide alloy regime.

  7. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mughal, A; El Demellawi, J K; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-12-14

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material's luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon.

  8. Bridging the climate-induced water gap in the twenty-first century: adaptation support based on water supply, demand, adaptation and financing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Droogers, Peter; Brandsma, Jaïrus; Buytaert, Wouter; Karssenberg, Derek; Van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Vitolo, Claudia; Schmitz, Oliver; Meijer, Karen; Van Aalst, Maaike; Bierkens, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Water scarcity affects large parts of the world. Over the course of the twenty-first century, water demand is likely to increase due to population growth and associated food production, and increased economic activity, while water supply is projected to decrease in many regions due to climate change. Despite recent studies that analyze the effect of climate change on water scarcity, e.g. using climate projections under representative concentration pathways (RCP) of the fifth assessment report of the IPCC (AR5), decision support for closing the water gap between now and 2100 does not exist at a meaningful scale and with a global coverage. In this study, we aimed (i) to assess the joint impact of climatic and socio-economic change on water scarcity, (ii) to integrate impact and potential adaptation in one workflow, (iii) to prioritize adaptation options to counteract water scarcity based on their financial, regional socio-economic and environmental implications, and (iv) to deliver all this information in an integrated user-friendly web-based service. To enable the combination of global coverage with local relevance, we aggregated all results for 1604 water provinces (food producing units) delineated in this study, which is five times smaller than previous food producing units. Water supply was computed using the PCR-GLOBWB hydrological and water resources model, parameterized at 5 arcminutes for the whole globe, excluding Antarctica and Greenland. We ran PCR-GLOBWB with a daily forcing derived from five different GCM models from the CMIP5 (GFDL-ESM2M, Hadgem2-ES, IPSL-CMA5-LR, MIROC-ESM-CHEM, NorESM1-M) that were bias corrected using observation-based WATCH data between 1960-1999. For each of the models all four RCPs (RCP 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5) were run, producing the ensemble of 20 future projections. The blue water supply was aggregated per month and per water province. Industrial, domestic and irrigation water demands were computed for a limited number of

  9. Reversal of the TPA-induced inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication by Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extracts: effects on MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Ran; Park, Joon-Suk; Jo, Eun-Hye; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Kim, Sun-Jung; Ra, Jeong-Chan; Aruoma, Okezie I; Lee, Yong-Soon; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2006-01-01

    Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) has continued to receive attention as a folk medicine with indications for the treatment of cancers and digestive diseases. The anticarcinogenic effect of Chaga mushroom extract was investigated using a model system of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in WB-F344 normal rat liver epithelial cells. The cells were pre-incubated with Chaga mushroom extracts (5, 10, 20 microg/ml) for 24 h and this was followed by co-treatment with Chaga mushroom extracts and TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, 10 ng/ml) for 1 h. The inhibition of GJIC by TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), promoter of cancer, was prevented with treatment of Chaga mushroom extracts. Similarly, the increased phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38 protein kinases were markedly reduced in Chaga mushroom extracts-treated cells. There was no change in the JNK kinase protein level, suggesting that Chaga mushroom extracts could only block the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase. The Chaga mushroom extracts further prevented the inhibition of GJIC through the blocking of Cx43 phosphorylation. Indeed cell-to-cell communication through gap junctional channels is a critical factor in the life and death balance of cells because GJIC has an important function in maintaining tissue homeostasis through the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and adaptive functions of differentiated cells. Thus Chaga mushroom may act as a natural anticancer product by preventing the inhibition of GJIC through the inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase.

  10. Senseless Extravagance, Shocking Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissbourd, Richard; Dodge, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Although most people in the United States believe, at least theoretically, in educational equality, fewer and fewer appear to care about the resource gaps between affluent and poor schools, says Weissbourd. He illustrates these gaps with vivid descriptions of what he calls an "opulence arms race" among affluent independent schools, but…

  11. Information Gap Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicekdag, Mehmet Ali

    1995-01-01

    Focuses on a real world technique used to teach language proficiency in the classroom. This method involves creating deliberate information and opinion gaps by administering pop quizzes and other communicative games and filling those gaps through cooperative action. Use of this technique generated heated discussion among students. (nine…

  12. Bridging a Cultural Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviatan, Talma

    2008-01-01

    There has been a broad wave of change in tertiary calculus courses in the past decade. However, the much-needed change in tertiary pre-calculus programmes--aimed at bridging the gap between high-school mathematics and tertiary mathematics--is happening at a far slower pace. Following a discussion on the nature of the gap and the objectives of a…

  13. Narrowing Participation Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Kirtley, Karmen; Matassa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shrinking the achievement gap in mathematics is a tall order. One way to approach this challenge is to think about how the achievement gap manifests itself in the classroom and take concrete action. For example, opportunities to participate in activities that involve mathematical reasoning and argumentation in a safe and supportive manner are…

  14. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  15. The National "Expertise Gap"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's report, "Diversity and the Ph.D.," released in May, which documents in troubling detail the exact dimensions of what the foundation's president, Dr. Robert Weisbuch, is calling the national "expertise gap." Weisbuch states that the expertise gap extends beyond the…

  16. The Parenting Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Richard V.; Howard, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    The parenting gap is a big factor in the opportunity gap. The chances of upward social mobility are lower for children with parents struggling to do a good job--in terms of creating a supportive and stimulating home environment. Children lucky enough to have strong parents are more likely to succeed at all the critical life stages, which means…

  17. Which Achievement Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sharon; Medrich, Elliott; Fowler, Donna

    2007-01-01

    From the halls of Congress to the local elementary school, conversations on education reform have tossed around the term "achievement gap" as though people all know precisely what that means. As it's commonly used, "achievement gap" refers to the differences in scores on state or national achievement tests between various…

  18. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  19. Substrate-induced renormalization of the quasiparticle and optical gaps in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides from GW and GW-BSE calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Jornada, Felipe H.; Ong, Chin Shen; Qiu, Diana Y.; Louie, Steven G.

    There has been a considerable effort to experimentally characterize the electronic and optical properties of novel atomically thin 2D semiconductors, such as mono- and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). However, the role that different substrates play in these experiments still remains unclear. From a theoretical perspective, it is hard to include the substrate in an ab initio framework, while in experiments, it is often difficult to suspend these samples. Here, we present a new method to compute the substrate effect on the quasiparticle and optical properties of quasi-2D materials based on state-of-the-art ab initio GW and GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) methods. We compute the effects of different metallic and semiconducting substrates, and show that the quasiparticle gap and exciton binding energy can be dramatically reduced even with semiconducting substrates. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR15-1508412 and the DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  20. Direct evidence for a pressure induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguchia, Zurab; Amato, Alex; Kang, Jian; Luetkens, Hubertus; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Prando, Giacomo; Rohr, Fabian V.; Bukowski, Zbigniew; Shengelaya, Alexander; Keller, Hugo; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, Rustem

    In contrast to other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-based superconductors (Fe-HTSs) both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these different superconducting (SC) states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. We report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth is observed, while the SC transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behavior of the inverse squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in- T behavior at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the SC gap.

  1. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  2. Magnetic-Field-Induced Spin Excitations and Renormalized Spin Gap of the Underdoped La{sub 1.895}Sr{sub 0.105}CuO{sub 4} Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.; Gilardi, R.; Pailhes, S.; Niedermayer, Ch.; Mesot, J.; Schnyder, A. P.; Mudry, C.; Roennow, H. M.; Christensen, N. B.; McMorrow, D. F.; Hiess, A.; Stunault, A.; Enderle, M.; Lake, B.; Sobolev, O.; Momono, N.; Oda, M.; Ido, M.

    2007-02-16

    High-resolution neutron inelastic scattering experiments in applied magnetic fields have been performed on La{sub 1.895}Sr{sub 0.105}CuO{sub 4} (LSCO). In zero field, the temperature dependence of the low-energy peak intensity at the incommensurate momentum transfer Q{sub IC}=(0.5,0.5{+-}{delta},0),(0.5{+-}{delta},0.5,0) exhibits an anomaly at the superconducting T{sub c} which broadens and shifts to lower temperature upon the application of a magnetic field along the c axis. A field-induced enhancement of the spectral weight is observed, but only at finite energy transfers and in an intermediate temperature range. These observations establish the opening of a strongly downward renormalized spin gap in the underdoped regime of LSCO. This behavior contrasts with the observed doping dependence of most electronic energy features.

  3. 100 MeV O{sup 7+} irradiation induced red shift in the band gaps of 3 wt% 'Li' doped Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kovendhan, M. Mohan, R.; Joseph, D. Paul; Manimuthu, P.; Venkateswaran, C.; Vijayarangamuthu, K.; Asokan, K.

    2014-04-24

    Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}:Li (3 wt%) thin film of thickness 353 nm spray deposited onto ITO coated glass substrate at 350 °C is irradiated with 100 MeV O{sup 7+} ion at a fluence of 5×10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. X-ray diffraction shows that the pristine and irradiated films are polycrystalline with a tetragonal phase. Raman peaks suppressed upon irradiation imply large surface degradation which is also seen as a decrement in transparency in visible region to one half of the pristine film. Large red shift is observed in direct and indirect band gaps upon irradiation. Hall effect reveals slight increase in carrier concentration due to irradiation induced defects.

  4. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Billy E.; Groves, Scott E.; Larsen, Greg J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.

    2006-11-14

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  5. Gap formation following climatic events in spatially structured plant communities

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jinbao; De Boeck, Hans J.; Li, Zhenqing; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps play a crucial role in maintaining species diversity, yet how community structure and composition influence gap formation is still poorly understood. We apply a spatially structured community model to predict how species diversity and intraspecific aggregation shape gap patterns emerging after climatic events, based on species-specific mortality responses. In multispecies communities, average gap size and gap-size diversity increased rapidly with increasing mean mortality once a mortality threshold was exceeded, greatly promoting gap recolonization opportunity. This result was observed at all levels of species richness. Increasing interspecific difference likewise enhanced these metrics, which may promote not only diversity maintenance but also community invasibility, since more diverse niches for both local and exotic species are provided. The richness effects on gap size and gap-size diversity were positive, but only expressed when species were sufficiently different. Surprisingly, while intraspecific clumping strongly promoted gap-size diversity, it hardly influenced average gap size. Species evenness generally reduced gap metrics induced by climatic events, so the typical assumption of maximum evenness in many experiments and models may underestimate community diversity and invasibility. Overall, understanding the factors driving gap formation in spatially structured assemblages can help predict community secondary succession after climatic events. PMID:26114803

  6. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  7. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  8. Impact of ion-implantation-induced band gap engineering on the temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties of InAs/InP quantum dashes

    SciTech Connect

    Hadj Alouane, M. H.; Ilahi, B.; Maaref, H.; Salem, B.; Aimez, V.; Morris, D.; Turala, A.; Regreny, P.; Gendry, M.

    2010-07-15

    We report on the effects of the As/P intermixing induced by phosphorus ion implantation in InAs/InP quantum dashes (QDas) on their photoluminescence (PL) properties. For nonintermixed QDas, usual temperature-dependent PL properties characterized by a monotonic redshift in the emission band and a continual broadening of the PL linewidth as the temperature increases, are observed. For intermediate ion implantation doses, the inhomogeneous intermixing enhances the QDas size dispersion and the enlarged distribution of carrier confining potential depths strongly affects the temperature-dependent PL properties below 180 K. An important redshift in the PL emission band occurs between 10 and 180 K which is explained by a redistribution of carriers among the different intermixed QDas of the ensemble. For higher implantation doses, the homogeneous intermixing reduces the broadening of the localized QDas state distribution and the measured linewidth temperature behavior matches that of the nonintermixed QDas. An anomalous temperature-dependent emission energy behavior has been observed for extremely high implantation doses, which is interpreted by a possible QDas dissolution.

  9. Coloration and oxygen vacancies in wide band gap oxide semiconductors: Absorption at metallic nanoparticles induced by vacancy clustering—A case study on indium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, M. Schewski, R.; Irmscher, K.; Galazka, Z.; Markurt, T.; Naumann, M.; Schulz, T.; Uecker, R.; Fornari, R.; Meuret, S.; Kociak, M.

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we show by optical and electron microscopy based investigations that vacancies in oxides may cluster and form metallic nanoparticles that induce coloration by extinction of visible light. Optical extinction in this case is caused by generation of localized surface plasmon resonances at metallic particles embedded in the dielectric matrix. Based on Mie's approach, we are able to fit the absorption due to indium nanoparticles in In{sub 2}O{sub 3} to our absorption measurements. The experimentally found particle distribution is in excellent agreement with the one obtained from fitting by Mie theory. Indium particles are formed by precipitation of oxygen vacancies. From basic thermodynamic consideration and assuming theoretically calculated activation energies for vacancy formation and migration, we find that the majority of oxygen vacancies form just below the melting point. Since they are ionized at this temperature they are Coulomb repulsive. Upon cooling, a high supersaturation of oxygen vacancies forms in the crystal that precipitates once the Fermi level crosses the transition energy level from the charged to the neutral charge state. From our considerations we find that the ionization energy of the oxygen vacancy must be higher than 200 meV.

  10. Credible enforcement policies under illegal fishing: does individual transferable quotas induce to reduce the gap between approved and proposed allowable catches?

    PubMed

    Da Rocha, José María; Villasante, Sebastián; González, Rafael Trelles

    2013-12-01

    In general, approved Total Allowable Catches (TACs) are higher than proposed TACs by the scientific assessment and reported landings approved are higher than approved TAC. We build a simple enforcement agency's behavior model that generates-as a rational behavior-those two facts. The model has two ingredients. First, there exists illegal fishing generated by an imperfect enforcement technology; second, the enforcement agency cannot commit on announced penalties. We show that lack of commitment increases the potential benefits for national enforcement agency of deviating from proposal (scientific optimal) quotas. Although the enforcement agency wants to announce a low quota target to induce a low level of illegal harvest, it will find optimal to revise the quota announced in order to reduce penalties and improve fishermen welfare. Therefore, agencies find it optimal to approve higher quotas than that proposed by the scientific advice. Our main result is to show that when full compliance is not possible, and national agencies cannot commit, the introduction of Individual Transferable Quotas increases the potential benefits for agencies of deviating from the optimal proposed TAC by the scientific advised.

  11. Mechanical antihypersensitivity effect induced by repeated spinal administrations of a TRPA1 antagonist or a gap junction decoupler in peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Wu, Hai-Yun; Chen, Zuyue; Ma, Ai-Niu; Mao, Xiao-Fang; Li, Teng-Fei; Li, Xin-Yan; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Pertovaara, Antti

    Spinal transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel is associated with various pain hypersensitivity conditions. Spinally, TRPA1 is expressed by central terminals of nociceptive nerve fibers and astrocytes. Among potential endogenous agonists of TRPA1 is H2O2 generated by d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) in astrocytes. Here we studied whether prolonged block of the spinal TRPA1 or astrocytes starting at time of injury attenuates development and/or maintenance of neuropathic hypersensitivity. Additionally, TRPA1 and DAAO mRNA were determined in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal dorsal horn (SDH). Experiments were performed in rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) and chronic intrathecal catheter. Drugs were administered twice daily for the first seven injury days or only once seven days after injury. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed with monofilaments. Acute and prolonged treatment with Chembridge-5861528 (a TRPA1 antagonist), carbenoxolone (an inhibitor of activated astrocytes), or gabapentin (a comparison drug) attenuated tactile allodynia-like responses evoked by low (2g) stimulus. However, antihypersensitivity effect of these compounds was short of significance at a high (15g) stimulus intensity. No preemptive effects were observed. In healthy controls, carbenoxolone failed to prevent hypersensitivity induced by spinal cinnamaldehyde, a TRPA1 agonist. TRPA1 and DAAO mRNA in the DRG but not SDH were slightly increased in SNI, independent of drug treatment. The results indicate that prolonged peri-injury block of spinal TRPA1 or inhibition of spinal astrocyte activation attenuates maintenance but not development of mechanical (tactile allodynia-like) hypersensitivity after nerve injury.

  12. Rho GAPs and GEFs

    PubMed Central

    van Buul, Jaap D; Geerts, Dirk; Huveneers, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Within blood vessels, endothelial cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions are crucial to preserve barrier function, and these adhesions are tightly controlled during vascular development, angiogenesis, and transendothelial migration of inflammatory cells. Endothelial cellular signaling that occurs via the family of Rho GTPases coordinates these cell adhesion structures through cytoskeletal remodelling. In turn, Rho GTPases are regulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). To understand how endothelial cells initiate changes in the activity of Rho GTPases, and thereby regulate cell adhesion, we will discuss the role of Rho GAPs and GEFs in vascular biology. Many potentially important Rho regulators have not been studied in detail in endothelial cells. We therefore will first overview which GAPs and GEFs are highly expressed in endothelium, based on comparative gene expression analysis of human endothelial cells compared with other tissue cell types. Subsequently, we discuss the relevance of Rho GAPs and GEFs for endothelial cell adhesion in vascular homeostasis and disease. PMID:24622613

  13. Closing the Performance Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Cheryl G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the principal of a K-2, 400-student suburban elementary school near Flint, Michigan, worked with her staff and superintendent to develop and implement a strategic plan to close the student achievement gap. Reports significant improvement in reading and math scores after 1 year. (PKP)

  14. STEMMING the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Jim; Valentine, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    America has a gap when it comes to youth pursuing science and technology careers. In an effort to improve the knowledge and application of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), after-school programs can work in conjunction with formal in-school curriculum to improve science education. One organization that actively addresses this…

  15. Confronting the Autonomy Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamowski, Steven; Petrilli, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    "The Autonomy Gap," a recent study by the American Institute for Research and the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, found that many public elementary school principals feel constrained by a bureaucracy that impedes their ability to raise student achievement. Unfortunately, those principals are still held accountable for their school's results--even…

  16. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  17. Structuring the Information Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Julian

    1984-01-01

    Describes an information gap procedure to teach a new structure which requires students to look for and exchange information in order to complete a task in an English as a second language class. Illustrates the method with a set of materials and suggests ways for teachers to produce similar materials. (SED)

  18. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  19. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  20. California: Emigrant Gap

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of the Central Valley and the Sierra Nevada Mountains show several smoke plumes from wildfires ... from the Emigrant Gap Fire, located about 40 kilometers west of Lake Tahoe. The animated panorama uses different MISR cameras to enable ...

  1. Bridging a Communication Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Ethel

    1972-01-01

    Description of a community program in cooperation with a regional extension service. The goals were to explore the generation gap, and conflict in life values, understand family role, increase self awareness, improve adult-youth communication, and understand the individual and his relationship to basic social principles. (Author/JB)

  2. Bridging the Development Gap.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    Bridging the Development Gap is contractual cooperative agreement between Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. and DARPA. This program was developed...processing, interfacing with I/O devices, memory constraints, as well as real-time throughput and latency challenges. Mercury has bridged the indicated

  3. Bimodal loop-gap resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, W.; Froncisz, W.; Hyde, James S.

    1996-05-01

    A bimodal loop-gap resonator for use in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at S band is described. It consists of two identical one-loop-one-gap resonators in coaxial juxtaposition. In one mode, the currents in the two loops are parallel and in the other antiparallel. By introducing additional capacitors between the loops, the frequencies of the two modes can be made to coincide. Details are given concerning variable coupling to each mode, tuning of the resonant frequency of one mode to that of the other, and adjustment of the isolation between modes. An equivalent circuit is given and network analysis carried out both experimentally and theoretically. EPR applications are described including (a) probing of the field distributions with DPPH, (b) continuous wave (cw) EPR with a spin-label line sample, (c) cw electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR), (d) modulation of saturation, and (e) saturation-recovery (SR) EPR. Bloch induction experiments can be performed when the sample extends half way through the structure, but microwave signals induced by Mx and My components of magnetization cancel when it extends completely through. This latter situation is particularly favorable for SR, modulation of saturation, and ELDOR experiments, which depend on observing Mz indirectly using a second weak observing microwave source.

  4. Size-confined fixed-composition and composition-dependent engineered band gap alloying induces different internal structures in L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-06-01

    The development of alloyed quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals with attractive optical properties for a wide array of chemical and biological applications is a growing research field. In this work, size-tunable engineered band gap composition-dependent alloying and fixed-composition alloying were employed to fabricate new L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS QDs exhibiting different internal structures. Lattice parameters simulated based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) revealed the internal structure of the composition-dependent alloyed CdxZnyTeS QDs to have a gradient nature, whereas the fixed-composition alloyed QDs exhibited a homogenous internal structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis confirmed the size-confined nature and monodispersity of the alloyed nanocrystals. The zeta potential values were within the accepted range of colloidal stability. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that the surface-capped L-cysteine ligand induced electronic and conformational chiroptical changes in the alloyed nanocrystals. The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) values of the gradient alloyed QDs were 27–61%, whereas for the homogenous alloyed QDs, the PL QY values were spectacularly high (72–93%). Our work demonstrates that engineered fixed alloying produces homogenous QD nanocrystals with higher PL QY than composition-dependent alloying.

  5. Tuning the singlet-triplet energy gap of AIE luminogens: crystallization-induced room temperature phosphorescence and delay fluorescence, tunable temperature response, highly efficient non-doped organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Jiang, Yibin; Cheng, Juan; Zhang, Yilin; Su, Huimin; Lam, Jacky W Y; Sung, Herman H Y; Wong, Kam Sing; Kwok, Hoi Sing; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-01-14

    In this contribution, we finely tuned the singlet-triplet energy gap (ΔEST) of AIE-active materials to modulate their fluorescence, phosphorescence and delay fluorescence via rational molecular design and investigated the possible ways to harvest their triplet energy in OLEDs. Noteworthily, two molecules o-TPA-3TPE-o-PhCN and o-TPA-3TPE-p-PhCN with larger ΔEST values (0.59 eV and 0.45 eV, respectively) emitted efficient long-lived low temperature phosphorescence in their glassy solutions and exhibited efficient crystallization-induced room temperature phosphorescence (RTP). Meanwhile, it was the first time to observe a novel crystallization-induced delay fluorescence phenomenon in another AIE-active molecule p-TPA-3TPE-p-PhCN owing to its very small ΔEST value (0.21 eV). It was also found that molecules with various ΔEST values showed significantly different temperature sensitivity. Non-doped electroluminescent (EL) devices using these molecules as light-emitting layers were fabricated, exhibiting external quantum efficiencies (EQE) higher than theoretical values of purely singlet emitter type devices. Particularly, p-TPA-3TPE-p-PhCN showed outstanding device performances with high luminance and efficiencies up to 36,900 cd m(-2), 11.2 lm W(-1), 12.8 cd A(-1) and 4.37%, respectively, considering that its solid-state quantum yield was only 42%. All the above observations suggested that tuning the ΔEST values of AIE materials is a powerful methodology to generate many more interesting and meaningful optoelectronic properties.

  6. Minding the Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Millicent Anne

    2015-02-23

    Neutron & X-ray scattering provides nano- to meso-scale details of complex fluid structure; 1D electronic density maps dervied from SAXS yield molecular level insights; Neutron reflectivity provides substructure details of substrate supported complex fluids; Complex fluids composition can be optimized to support a wide variety of both soluble and membrane proteins; The water gap dimensions can be finely tuned through polymer component.

  7. Variable Gap Conjugated Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    conducting gold interfacial layer interjected between the ITO glass electrode and the PEDOT/PSS hole transport layer . A family of low band gap, and near IR...which can be used as both electrochromics and as the hole transport layers in light emitting diodes. Hybrid electrochromic and electroluminescent (EC...MEH-PPV, P3HT, etc.) in order to blanket the solar spectrum. Initial device results on these multi-component blends are promising. In addition, we

  8. Edge currents shunt the insulating bulk in gapped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M. J.; Kretinin, A. V.; Thompson, M. D.; Bandurin, D. A.; Hu, S.; Yu, G. L.; Birkbeck, J.; Mishchenko, A.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Polini, M.; Prance, J. R.; Novoselov, K. S.; Geim, A. K.; Ben Shalom, M.

    2017-02-01

    An energy gap can be opened in the spectrum of graphene reaching values as large as 0.2 eV in the case of bilayers. However, such gaps rarely lead to the highly insulating state expected at low temperatures. This long-standing puzzle is usually explained by charge inhomogeneity. Here we revisit the issue by investigating proximity-induced superconductivity in gapped graphene and comparing normal-state measurements in the Hall bar and Corbino geometries. We find that the supercurrent at the charge neutrality point in gapped graphene propagates along narrow channels near the edges. This observation is corroborated by using the edgeless Corbino geometry in which case resistivity at the neutrality point increases exponentially with increasing the gap, as expected for an ordinary semiconductor. In contrast, resistivity in the Hall bar geometry saturates to values of about a few resistance quanta. We attribute the metallic-like edge conductance to a nontrivial topology of gapped Dirac spectra.

  9. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP LAND COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gap Analysis Program is a national inter-agency program that maps the distribution

    of plant communities and selected animal species and compares these distributions with land

    stewardship to identify gaps in biodiversity protection. GAP uses remote satellite imag...

  10. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  11. The global drug gap.

    PubMed

    Reich, M R

    2000-03-17

    Global inequities in access to pharmaceutical products exist between rich and poor countries because of market and government failures as well as huge income differences. Multiple policies are required to address this global drug gap for three categories of pharmaceutical products: essential drugs, new drugs, and yet-to-be-developed drugs. Policies should combine "push" approaches of subsidies to support targeted drug development, "pull" approaches of financial incentives such as market guarantees, and "process" approaches aimed at improved institutional capacity. Constructive solutions are needed that can both protect the incentives for research and development and reduce the inequities of access.

  12. Mind the gap.

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, M. S.; Krassnigg, A.; Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.; Physics; Univ. Graz; Univ. of Pittsburgh

    2007-03-01

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  13. Molecular determinants of membrane potential dependence in vertebrate gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Revilla, A; Bennett, M V; Barrio, L C

    2000-12-19

    The conductance, g(j), of many gap junctions depends on voltage between the coupled cells (transjunctional voltage, V(j)) with little effect of the absolute membrane potential (V(m)) in the two cells; others show combined V(j) and V(m) dependence. We examined the molecular determinants of V(m) dependence by using rat connexin 43 expressed in paired Xenopus oocytes. These junctions have, in addition to V(j) dependence, V(m) dependence such that equal depolarization of both cells decreases g(j). The dependence of g(j) on V(m) was abolished by truncation of the C-terminal domain (CT) at residue 242 but not at 257. There are two charged residues between 242 and 257. In full-length Cx43, mutations neutralizing either one of these charges, Arg243Gln and Asp245Gln, decreased and increased V(m) dependence, respectively, suggesting that these residues are part of the V(m) sensor. Mutating both residues together abolished V(m) dependence, although there is no net change in charge. The neutralizing mutations, together or separately, had no effect on V(j) dependence. Thus, the voltage sensors must differ. However, V(j) gating was somewhat modulated by V(m), and V(m) gating was reduced when the V(j) gate was closed. These data suggest that the two forms of voltage dependence are mediated by separate but interacting domains.

  14. Small Multiples with Gaps.

    PubMed

    Meulemans, Wouter; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay; Wood, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Small multiples enable comparison by providing different views of a single data set in a dense and aligned manner. A common frame defines each view, which varies based upon values of a conditioning variable. An increasingly popular use of this technique is to project two-dimensional locations into a gridded space (e.g. grid maps), using the underlying distribution both as the conditioning variable and to determine the grid layout. Using whitespace in this layout has the potential to carry information, especially in a geographic context. Yet, the effects of doing so on the spatial properties of the original units are not understood. We explore the design space offered by such small multiples with gaps. We do so by constructing a comprehensive suite of metrics that capture properties of the layout used to arrange the small multiples for comparison (e.g. compactness and alignment) and the preservation of the original data (e.g. distance, topology and shape). We study these metrics in geographic data sets with varying properties and numbers of gaps. We use simulated annealing to optimize for each metric and measure the effects on the others. To explore these effects systematically, we take a new approach, developing a system to visualize this design space using a set of interactive matrices. We find that adding small amounts of whitespace to small multiple arrays improves some of the characteristics of 2D layouts, such as shape, distance and direction. This comes at the cost of other metrics, such as the retention of topology. Effects vary according to the input maps, with degree of variation in size of input regions found to be a factor. Optima exist for particular metrics in many cases, but at different amounts of whitespace for different maps. We suggest multiple metrics be used in optimized layouts, finding topology to be a primary factor in existing manually-crafted solutions, followed by a trade-off between shape and displacement. But the rich range of possible

  15. Orbiter Gap Filler Bending Model for Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure loads on a protruding gap filler during an Orbiter reentry are investigated to evaluate the likelihood of extraction due to pressure loads, and to ascertain how much bending will be induced by re-entry pressure loads. Oblique shock wave theory is utilized to develop a representation of the pressure loads induced on a gap filler for the ISSHVFW trajectory, representative of a heavy weight ISS return. A free body diagram is utilized to react the forces induced by the pressure forces. Preliminary results developed using these methods demonstrate that pressure loads, alone, are not likely causes of gap filler extraction during reentry. Assessment of the amount a gap filler will bend over is presented. Implications of gap filler bending during re-entry include possible mitigation of early boundary layer transition concerns, uncertainty in ground based measurement of protruding gap fillers from historical Orbiter flight history, and uncertainty in the use of Orbiter gap fillers for boundary layer prediction calibration. Authors will be added to the author list as appropriate.

  16. Gap Opening in 3D: Single-planet Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Giant planets can clear deep gaps when embedded in 2D (razor-thin) viscous circumstellar disks. We show by direct simulation that giant planets are just as capable of carving out gaps in 3D. Surface density maps are similar between 2D and 3D, even in detail. In particular, the scaling {{{Σ }}}{gap}\\propto {q}-2 of gap surface density with planet mass, derived from a global “zero-dimensional” balance of Lindblad and viscous torques, applies equally well to results obtained at higher dimensions. Our 3D simulations reveal extensive, near-sonic, meridional flows both inside and outside the gaps; these large-scale circulations might bear on disk compositional gradients, in dust or other chemical species. At high planet mass, gap edges are mildly Rayleigh unstable and intermittently shed streams of material into the gap—less so in 3D than in 2D.

  17. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  18. Molecular doping and band-gap opening of bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2013-03-26

    The ability to induce an energy band gap in bilayer graphene is an important development in graphene science and opens up potential applications in electronics and photonics. Here we report the emergence of permanent electronic and optical band gaps in bilayer graphene upon adsorption of π electron containing molecules. Adsorption of n- or p-type dopant molecules on one layer results in an asymmetric charge distribution between the top and bottom layers and in the formation of an energy gap. The resultant band gap scales linearly with induced carrier density though a slight asymmetry is found between n-type dopants, where the band gap varies as 47 meV/10(13) cm(-2), and p-type dopants where it varies as 40 meV/10(13) cm(-2). Decamethylcobaltocene (DMC, n-type) and 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyano-quinodimethane (F2-HCNQ, p-type) are found to be the best molecules at inducing the largest electronic band gaps up to 0.15 eV. Optical adsorption transitions in the 2.8-4 μm region of the spectrum can result between states that are not Pauli blocked. Comparison is made between the band gaps calculated from adsorbate-induced electric fields and from average displacement fields found in dual gate bilayer graphene devices. A key advantage of using molecular adsorption with π electron containing molecules is that the high binding energy can induce a permanent band gap and open up possible uses of bilayer graphene in mid-infrared photonic or electronic device applications.

  19. THE DYNAMICS OF STAR STREAM GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, R. G.

    2013-10-01

    A massive object crossing a narrow stream of stars orbiting in the halo of the galaxy induces velocity changes both along and transverse to the stream that can lead to the development of a visible gap. For a stream narrow relative to its orbital radius, the stream crossing time is sufficiently short that the impact approximation can be used to derive the changes in angular momenta and radial actions along the star stream. The epicyclic approximation is used to calculate the evolution of the density of the stream as it orbits around in a galactic potential. Analytic expressions are available for a point mass, however, the general expressions are easily numerically evaluated for perturbing objects with arbitrary density profiles. With a simple allowance for the velocity dispersion of the stream, moderately warm streams can be modeled. The predicted evolution agrees well with the outcomes of simulations of stellar streams for streams with widths up to 1% of the orbital radius of the stream. The angular momentum distribution within the stream shears out gaps with time, further reducing the visibility of streams, although the size of the shear effect requires more detailed simulations that account for the creation of the stream. An illustrative model indicates that shear will set a lower limit of a few times the stream width for the length of gaps that persist. In general, the equations are useful for dynamical insights into the development of stream gaps and their measurement.

  20. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1984-02-16

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  1. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  2. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1986-08-19

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

  3. Tunable nanometer electrode gaps by MeV ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheang-Wong, J.-C.; Narumi, K.; Schuermann, G. M.; Aziz, M. J.; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2012-04-09

    We report the use of MeV ion-irradiation-induced plastic deformation of amorphous materials to fabricate electrodes with nanometer-sized gaps. Plastic deformation of the amorphous metal Pd{sub 80}Si{sub 20} is induced by 4.64 MeV O{sup 2+} ion irradiation, allowing the complete closing of a sub-micrometer gap. We measure the evolving gap size in situ by monitoring the field emission current-voltage (I-V) characteristics between electrodes. The I-V behavior is consistent with Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. We show that using feedback control on this signal permits gap size fabrication with atomic-scale precision. We expect this approach to nanogap fabrication will enable the practical realization of single molecule controlled devices and sensors.

  4. MODELING GD-1 GAPS IN A MILKY WAY POTENTIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, R. G.

    2016-03-20

    The GD-1 star stream is currently the best available for identifying density fluctuations, “gaps,” along its length as a test of the LCDM prediction of large numbers of dark matter sub-halos orbiting in the halo. Density variations of some form are present, since the variance of the density along the stream is three times that expected from the empirically estimated variation in the filtered mean star counts. The density variations are characterized with filters that approximate the shape of sub-halo, gravitationally induced stream gaps. The filters locate gaps and measure their amplitude, leading to a measurement of the distribution of gap widths. To gain an understanding of the factors influencing the gap width distribution, a suite of collisionless n-body simulations for a GD-1-like orbit in a Milky-Way-like potential provides a dynamically realistic statistical prediction of the gap distribution. The simulations show that every location in the stream has been disturbed to some degree by a sub-halo. The small gaps found via the filtering are largely noise. Larger gaps, those longer than 1 kpc, or 10° for GD-1, are the source of the excess variance. The suite of stream simulations shows that sub-halos at the predicted inner halo abundance or possibly somewhat higher can produce the required large-scale density variations.

  5. Modeling GD-1 Gaps in a Milky Way Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, R. G.

    2016-03-01

    The GD-1 star stream is currently the best available for identifying density fluctuations, “gaps,” along its length as a test of the LCDM prediction of large numbers of dark matter sub-halos orbiting in the halo. Density variations of some form are present, since the variance of the density along the stream is three times that expected from the empirically estimated variation in the filtered mean star counts. The density variations are characterized with filters that approximate the shape of sub-halo, gravitationally induced stream gaps. The filters locate gaps and measure their amplitude, leading to a measurement of the distribution of gap widths. To gain an understanding of the factors influencing the gap width distribution, a suite of collisionless n-body simulations for a GD-1-like orbit in a Milky-Way-like potential provides a dynamically realistic statistical prediction of the gap distribution. The simulations show that every location in the stream has been disturbed to some degree by a sub-halo. The small gaps found via the filtering are largely noise. Larger gaps, those longer than 1 kpc, or 10° for GD-1, are the source of the excess variance. The suite of stream simulations shows that sub-halos at the predicted inner halo abundance or possibly somewhat higher can produce the required large-scale density variations.

  6. Measuring the Gap

    PubMed Central

    She, Xinshu; Zhao, Deqing; Scholnick, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    China is a large country where rapid development is accompanied by growing inequalities. How economic inequalities translate to health inequalities is unknown. Baseline health assessment is lacking among rural Chinese children. We aimed at assessing baseline student health of rural Chinese children and comparing them with those of urban children of similar ages. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2003 Global School-Based Student Health Survey among 100 students Grade 4 to 6 from rural Guizhou, China. Results were summarized and compared with public data from urban Beijing using multivariate logistic regression models. Rural children are more likely to not wash their hands before a meal (odds ratio [OR] = 5.71, P < .01) and after using the toilet (OR = 5.41, P < .01). They are more likely to feel sick or to get into trouble after drinking (OR = 7.28, P < .01). They are more likely to have used drugs (OR = 8.54, P < .01) and to have no close friends (OR = 8.23, P < .01). An alarming percentage of rural (8.22%) and urban (14.22%) children have had suicidal ideation in the past year (OR = 0.68, P > .05). Rural parents are more likely to not know their children’s whereabouts (OR = 1.81, P < .05). Rural children are more than 4 times likely to have serious injuries (OR = 4.64, P < .01) and to be bullied (OR = 4.01, P < .01). In conclusion, school-age rural Chinese children exhibit more health risk behaviors and fewer protective factors at baseline compared to their urban counterparts. Any intervention aimed at improving child health should take this distributive gap into consideration. PMID:27335999

  7. GAP Analysis Bulletin Number 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, Jill; Gergely, Kevin; Aycrigg, Jocelyn; Canonico, Gabrielle; Davidson, Anne; Coffey, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    The Mission of the Gap Analysis Program (GAP) is to promote conservation by providing broad geographic information on biological diversity to resource managers, planners, and policy makers who can use the information to make informed decisions. As part of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) ?a collaborative program to provide increased access to data and information on the nation?s biological resources--GAP data and analytical tools have been used in hundreds of applications: from basic research to comprehensive state wildlife plans; from educational projects in schools to ecoregional assessments of biodiversity. The challenge: keeping common species common means protecting them BEFORE they become threatened. To do this on a state or regional basis requires key information such as land cover descriptions, predicted distribution maps for native animals, and an assessment of the level of protection currently given to those plants and animals. GAP works cooperatively with Federal, state, and local natural resource professionals and academics to provide this kind of information. GAP activities focus on the creation of state and regional databases and maps that depict patterns of land management, land cover, and biodiversity. These data can be used to identify ?gaps? in conservation--instances where an animal or plant community is not adequately represented on the existing network of conservation lands. GAP is administered through the U.S. Geological Survey. Through building partnerships among disparate groups, GAP hopes to foster the kind of collaboration that is needed to address conservation issues on a broad scale. For more information, contact: John Mosesso National GAP Director 703-648-4079 Kevin Gergely National GAP Operations Manager 208-885-3565

  8. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagdal, Karl T.; King, Edward L.; Follstaedt, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment.

  9. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagdal, K.T.; King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment. 6 figs.

  10. Mass gap in Yang's theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2015-06-01

    The quantization of a curvature-squared model of gravity, in the affine form proposed by Yang, is reconsidered in the path integral formulation. Due to its inherent Weyl invariance, sharing this with internal Yang-Mills fields, it or some of its topological generalizations are still a possible route to quantum gravity. Instanton type solutions with double duality properties exhibit a "vacuum degeneracy", i.e. a bifurcation into distinct classical Einsteinian backgrounds. For linearized fields, this conclusively induces a mass gap in the graviton spectrum, a feature which is an open problem in the quantization of internal Yang-Mills fields.

  11. GAP Analysis. Bulletin Number 11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Lucas jack pine that is the habitat but rather (say) jack pine in which tree dynamics, and the test of accuracy was done at a time of high popu... testing are elaborated by Krohn [1996]). stresses) killed the birds that would have occupied them, in which Commission error (predicting the presence...thereby destroying the dove-arable correlation that would which GAP has historically been based should lead it to accept any have underlain a GAP assessment

  12. Eight electrode optical readout gap

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.; Crain, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    A protective device for a plurality of electrical circuits includes a pluity of isolated electrodes forming a gap with a common electrode. An output signal, electrically isolated from the circuits being monitored, is obtained by a photosensor viewing the discharge gap through an optical window. Radioactive stabilization of discharge characteristics is provided for slowly changing voltages and carbon tipped dynamic starters provide desirable discharge characteristics for rapidly varying voltages. A hydrogen permeation barrier is provided on external surfaces of the device.

  13. Attentional Capacity Limits Gap Detection during Concurrent Sound Segregation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ada W S; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Alain, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Detecting a brief silent interval (i.e., a gap) is more difficult when listeners perceive two concurrent sounds rather than one in a sound containing a mistuned harmonic in otherwise in-tune harmonics. This impairment in gap detection may reflect the interaction of low-level encoding or the division of attention between two sound objects, both of which could interfere with signal detection. To distinguish between these two alternatives, we compared ERPs during active and passive listening with complex harmonic tones that could include a gap, a mistuned harmonic, both features, or neither. During active listening, participants indicated whether they heard a gap irrespective of mistuning. During passive listening, participants watched a subtitled muted movie of their choice while the same sounds were presented. Gap detection was impaired when the complex sounds included a mistuned harmonic that popped out as a separate object. The ERP analysis revealed an early gap-related activity that was little affected by mistuning during the active or passive listening condition. However, during active listening, there was a marked decrease in the late positive wave that was thought to index attention and response-related processes. These results suggest that the limitation in detecting the gap is related to attentional processing, possibly divided attention induced by the concurrent sound objects, rather than deficits in preattentional sensory encoding.

  14. Stabilizers for GAP and GAP-based Propellants Interim Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-09

    the m j o r deconposit inn pathways of GAP and U P prope l lan ts i n o r d e r to i n p r o w long term storage stabi l i ty. Model c- s inw...la t i ng t h e ut ido-bear ing frmctional units of GAP ( a z i d e adjacent t o po lye ther k k b o n e , az ide sd jacent t o terminal...binder i n prope l lan t -ag ing studies has varied accord2~g t o the to t of GAP used. This v a r i a b i l i t y my k linked to residual i n p

  15. Crop yield gaps in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Yengoh, Genesis T; Ardö, Jonas

    2014-03-01

    Although food crop yields per hectare have generally been increasing in Cameroon since 1961, the food price crisis of 2008 and the ensuing social unrest and fatalities raised concerns about the country's ability to meet the food needs of its population. This study examines the country's potential for increasing crop yields and food production to meet this food security challenge. Fuzzy set theory is used to develop a biophysical spatial suitability model for different crops, which in turn is employed to ascertain whether crop production is carried out in biophysically suited areas. We use linear regression to examine the trend of yield development over the last half century. On the basis of yield data from experimental stations and farmers' fields we assess the yield gap for major food crops. We find that yields have generally been increasing over the last half century and that agricultural policies can have significant effects on them. To a large extent, food crops are cultivated in areas that are biophysically suited for their cultivation, meaning that the yield gap is not a problem of biophysical suitability. Notwithstanding, there are significantly large yield gaps between actual yields on farmers' farms and maximum attainable yields from research stations. We conclude that agronomy and policies are likely to be the reasons for these large yield gaps. A key challenge to be addressed in closing the yield gaps is that of replenishing and properly managing soil nutrients.

  16. Explaining the Gender Wealth Gap

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Erin; Hauser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    To assess and explain the United States’ gender wealth gap, we use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine wealth accumulated by a single cohort over 50 years by gender, by marital status, and limited to the respondents who are their family’s best financial reporters. We find large gender wealth gaps between currently married men and women, and never-married men and women. The never-married accumulate less wealth than the currently married, and there is a marital disruption cost to wealth accumulation. The status-attainment model shows the most power in explaining gender wealth gaps between these groups explaining about one-third to one-half of the gap, followed by the human-capital explanation. In other words, a lifetime of lower earnings for women translates into greatly reduced wealth accumulation. A gender wealth gap remains between married men and women after controlling for the full model that we speculate may be related to gender differences in investment strategies and selection effects. PMID:23264038

  17. ABORT GAP CLEANING IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.; AHRENS,L.; III FLILLER,R.; GASSNER,D.; MCINTYRE,G.T.; MICHNOFF,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    2002-06-03

    During the RHIC Au-run in 2001 the 200 MHz storage cavity system was used for the first time. The rebucketing procedure caused significant beam debunching in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam could account for approximately 30%-40% of the total beam intensity. Some of it will be in the abort gap. In order to minimize the risk of magnet quenching due to uncontrolled beam losses at the time of a beam dump, a combination of a fast transverse kicker and copper collimators were used to clean the abort gap. This report gives an overview of the gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.

  18. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  19. Want to Close the Achievement Gap? Close the Teaching Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2015-01-01

    For years now, educators have looked to international tests as a yardstick to measure how well students from the United States are learning compared with their peers. The answer has been: not so well. The United States has been falling further behind other nations and has struggled with a large achievement gap. Federal policy under No Child Left…

  20. Folk Belief Theory, the Rigor Gap, and the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torff, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Folk belief theory is suggested as a primary cause for the persistence of the achievement gap. In this research-supported theory, culturally specified folk beliefs about learning and teaching prompt educators to direct more rigorous curriculum to high-advantage students but not to low-advantage students, resulting in impoverished pedagogy in…

  1. Src Family Tyrosine Kinase Signaling Regulates FilGAP through Association with RBM10

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hazuki; Tsutsumi, Koji; Nakazawa, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Hattori, Seisuke; Ohta, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    FilGAP is a Rac-specific GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that suppresses lamellae formation. In this study, we have identified RBM10 (RNA Binding Motif domain protein 10) as a FilGAP-interacting protein. Although RBM10 is mostly localized in the nuclei in human melanoma A7 cells, forced expression of Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn induced translocation of RBM10 from nucleus into cell peripheries where RBM10 and FilGAP are co-localized. The translocation of RBM10 from nucleus appears to require catalytic activity of Fyn since kinase-negative Fyn mutant failed to induce translocation of RBM10 in A7 cells. When human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells are spreading on collagen-coated coverslips, endogenous FilGAP and RBM10 were localized at the cell periphery with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. RBM10 appears to be responsible for targeting FilGAP at the cell periphery because depletion of RBM10 by siRNA abrogated peripheral localization of FilGAP during cell spreading. Association of RBM10 with FilGAP may stimulate RacGAP activity of FilGAP. First, forced expression of RBM10 suppressed FilGAP-mediated cell spreading on collagen. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RBM10 by siRNA abolished FilGAP-mediated suppression of cell spreading on collagen. Second, FilGAP suppressed formation of membrane ruffles induced by Fyn and instead produced spiky cell protrusions at the cell periphery. This protrusive structure was also induced by depletion of Rac, suggesting that the formation of protrusions may be due to suppression of Rac by FilGAP. We found that depletion of RBM10 markedly reduced the formation of protrusions in cells transfected with Fyn and FilGAP. Finally, depletion of RBM10 blocked FilGAP-mediated suppression of ruffle formation induced by EGF. Taken together, these results suggest that Src family tyrosine kinase signaling may regulate FilGAP through association with RBM10. PMID:26751795

  2. Method and radial gap machine for high strength undiffused brushless operation

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2006-10-31

    A radial gap brushless electric machine (30) having a stator (31) and a rotor (32) and a main air gap (34) also has at least one stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) separated from the rotor (32) by a secondary air gap (35e, 35f, 36e, 36f) so as to induce a secondary flux in the rotor (32) which controls a resultant flux in the main air gap (34). Permanent magnetic (PM) material (38) is disposed in spaces between the rotor pole portions (39) to inhibit the second flux from leaking from the pole portions (39) prior to reaching the main air gap (34). By selecting the direction of current in the stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) both flux enhancement and flux weakening are provided for the main air gap (34). A method of non-diffused flux enhancement and flux weakening for a radial gap machine is also disclosed.

  3. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.

  4. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  5. Edge currents shunt the insulating bulk in gapped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, M. J.; Kretinin, A. V.; Thompson, M. D.; Bandurin, D. A.; Hu, S.; Yu, G. L.; Birkbeck, J.; Mishchenko, A.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Polini, M.; Prance, J. R.; Novoselov, K. S.; Geim, A. K.; Ben Shalom, M.

    2017-01-01

    An energy gap can be opened in the spectrum of graphene reaching values as large as 0.2 eV in the case of bilayers. However, such gaps rarely lead to the highly insulating state expected at low temperatures. This long-standing puzzle is usually explained by charge inhomogeneity. Here we revisit the issue by investigating proximity-induced superconductivity in gapped graphene and comparing normal-state measurements in the Hall bar and Corbino geometries. We find that the supercurrent at the charge neutrality point in gapped graphene propagates along narrow channels near the edges. This observation is corroborated by using the edgeless Corbino geometry in which case resistivity at the neutrality point increases exponentially with increasing the gap, as expected for an ordinary semiconductor. In contrast, resistivity in the Hall bar geometry saturates to values of about a few resistance quanta. We attribute the metallic-like edge conductance to a nontrivial topology of gapped Dirac spectra. PMID:28211517

  6. Gap narrowing in charged and doped silicon nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Andrey; Michelini, Fabienne; Raymond, Laurent; Kulatov, Erkin; Uspenskii, Yurii A.

    2010-12-01

    The gap narrowing in charged Si35H36 and n -type doped Si34DH36 ( D=P , As, Sb, S, Se, and Te) clusters is studied within the GW approximation, including energy dependence of the dielectric matrix and local-field effects. It is shown that the density functional theory does not properly describe the gap narrowing in clusters, as it was found earlier in bulk Si. The main mechanisms of this effect in clusters are the same as in bulk Si: (i) the screened exchange interaction between additional electrons and (ii) the extra screening of the Coulomb interaction by additional electrons. At the same time, our calculations show that the carrier-induced gap narrowing has peculiar features in the clusters. A much weaker screening of the electron-electron interaction strongly increases the first and decreases the second mechanism of gap narrowing in Si clusters as compared to bulk Si. We find also that the gap-narrowing effect is more pronounced in doped clusters than in charged ones due to the charge localization near impurity ions. The electronic spectrum of the charged and doped Si clusters with one electron is spin split. The local-density approximation calculation greatly underestimates the value of the spin splitting. A calculation performed with the screened Hartree-Fock method shows that the splitting is large. It considerably narrows the gap and brings important spin effects into cluster properties.

  7. Fear Similarly Alters Perceptual Estimates of and Actions over Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Geuss, Michael N.; McCardell, Michael J.; Stefanucci, Jeanine K.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated an influence of one’s emotional state on estimates of spatial layout. For example, estimates of heights are larger when the viewer is someone typically afraid of heights (trait fear) or someone who, in the moment, is experiencing elevated levels of fear (state fear). Embodied perception theories have suggested that such a change in perception occurs in order to alter future actions in a manner that reduces the likelihood of injury. However, other work has argued that when acting, it is important to have access to an accurate perception of space and that a change in conscious perception does not necessitate a change in action. No one has yet investigated emotional state, perceptual estimates, and action performance in a single paradigm. The goal of the current paper was to investigate whether fear influences perceptual estimates and action measures similarly or in a dissociable manner. In the current work, participants either estimated gap widths (Experiment 1) or were asked to step over gaps (Experiment 2) in a virtual environment. To induce fear, the gaps were placed at various heights up to 15 meters. Results showed an increase in gap width estimates as participants indicated experiencing more fear. The increase in gap estimates was mirrored in participants’ stepping behavior in Experiment 2; participants stepped over fewer gaps when experiencing higher state and trait fear and, when participants actually stepped, they stepped farther over gap widths when experiencing more fear. The magnitude of the influence of fear on both perception and action were also remarkably similar (5.3 and 3.9 cm, respectively). These results lend support to embodied perception claims by demonstrating an influence on action of a similar magnitude as seen on estimates of gap widths. PMID:27389399

  8. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOEpatents

    Hysinger, C.L.; Beaman, J.J.; Melgaard, D.K.; Williamson, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows. 17 figs.

  9. Featured Image: Simulating Planetary Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    The authors model of howthe above disk would look as we observe it in a scattered-light image. The morphology of the gap can be used to estimate the mass of the planet that caused it. [Dong Fung 2017]The above image from a computer simulation reveals the dust structure of a protoplanetary disk (with the star obscured in the center) as a newly formed planet orbits within it. A recent study by Ruobing Dong (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) and Jeffrey Fung (University of California, Berkeley) examines how we can determine mass of such a planet based on our observations of the gap that the planet opens in the disk as it orbits. The authors models help us to better understand how our observations of gaps might change if the disk is inclined relative to our line of sight, and how we can still constrain the mass of the gap-opening planet and the viscosity of the disk from the scattered-light images we have recently begun to obtain of distant protoplanetary disks. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationRuobing Dong () and Jeffrey Fung () 2017 ApJ 835 146. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/146

  10. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOEpatents

    Hysinger, Christopher L.; Beaman, Joseph J.; Melgaard, David K.; Williamson, Rodney L.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows.

  11. Large gap magnetic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelsalam, Moustafa K.; Eyssa, Y. M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of a large gap magnetic suspension system is discussed. Some of the topics covered include: the system configuration, permanent magnet material, levitation magnet system, superconducting magnets, resistive magnets, superconducting levitation coils, resistive levitation coils, levitation magnet system, and the nitrogen cooled magnet system.

  12. The Widening Income Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.

    2013-01-01

    Has the academic achievement gap between high-income and low-income students changed over the last few decades? If so, why? And what can schools do about it? Researcher Sean F. Reardon conducted a comprehensive analysis of research to answer these questions and came up with some striking findings. In this article, he shows that income-related…

  13. Literary Gaps Invite Creative Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jerry J.

    Literary gaps were identified by Wolfgang Iser in 1974 as "vacant pages" that invite the reader to reflect and enter into the text thereby motivating students to experience the text as reality. Arthur Applebee, in 1979, identified three categories to distinguish children's types of interaction with stories: (1) the complexity of literary…

  14. ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCTED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS.
    OBJECTIVE: We have shown that functional gap junction communication as measured by Lucifer yellow dye transfer (DT) in Clone-9 rat liver epithelial cells, c...

  15. Gaps"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of daily quizzes on the performance of college students. Students in an introductory psychology course used their own wireless-enabled devices to take short Internet-based quizzes at the beginning of every class. The quiz items were drawn approximately equally from material covered in the readings and the…

  16. Continuously controlled optical band gap in oxide semiconductor thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Herklotz, Andreas; Rus, Stefania Florina; Ward, Thomas Zac

    2016-02-02

    The optical band gap of the prototypical semiconducting oxide SnO2 is shown to be continuously controlled through single axis lattice expansion of nanometric films induced by low-energy helium implantation. While traditional epitaxy-induced strain results in Poisson driven multidirectional lattice changes shown to only allow discrete increases in bandgap, we find that a downward shift in the band gap can be linearly dictated as a function of out-of-plane lattice expansion. Our experimental observations closely match density functional theory that demonstrates that uniaxial strain provides a fundamentally different effect on the band structure than traditional epitaxy-induced multiaxes strain effects. In conclusion, charge density calculations further support these findings and provide evidence that uniaxial strain can be used to drive orbital hybridization inaccessible with traditional strain engineering techniques.

  17. Continuously controlled optical band gap in oxide semiconductor thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Herklotz, Andreas; Rus, Stefania Florina; Ward, Thomas Zac

    2016-02-02

    The optical band gap of the prototypical semiconducting oxide SnO2 is shown to be continuously controlled through single axis lattice expansion of nanometric films induced by low-energy helium implantation. While traditional epitaxy-induced strain results in Poisson driven multidirectional lattice changes shown to only allow discrete increases in bandgap, we find that a downward shift in the band gap can be linearly dictated as a function of out-of-plane lattice expansion. Our experimental observations closely match density functional theory that demonstrates that uniaxial strain provides a fundamentally different effect on the band structure than traditional epitaxy-induced multiaxes strain effects. In conclusion, chargemore » density calculations further support these findings and provide evidence that uniaxial strain can be used to drive orbital hybridization inaccessible with traditional strain engineering techniques.« less

  18. Emplacement Gantry Gap Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect

    R. Thornley

    2005-05-27

    To date, the project has established important to safety (ITS) performance requirements for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) based on the identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171512], Table A-11). Further, SSCs credited with performing safety functions are classified as ITS. In turn, assurance that these SSCs will perform as required is sought through the use of consensus codes and standards. This gap analysis is based on the design completed for license application only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, alternative designs currently under consideration will be discussed throughout this study. This gap analysis will evaluate each code and standard identified within the ''Emplacement Gantry ITS Standards Identification Study'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173586]) to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied, a gap is highlighted. This study will identify requirements to supplement or augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, this gap analysis will identify nonstandard areas of the design that will be subject to a design development plan. Nonstandard components and nonstandard design configurations are defined as areas of the design that do not follow standard industry practices or codes and standards. Whereby, assurance that an SSC will perform as required may not be readily sought though the use of consensus standards. This

  19. Air Gap Effects in LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Ault, S; Avara, R; Bahl, K L; Boat, R; Cunningham, B; Gidding, D; Janzen, J; Kuklo, D; Lee, R; Lauderbach, L; Weingart, W C; Wu, B; Winer, K

    2005-09-26

    Three experiments done over twenty years on gaps in LX-17 are reported. For the detonation front moving parallel to the gaps, jets of gas products were seen coming from the gaps at velocities greater than the detonation velocity. A case can be made that the jet velocity increased with gap thickness but the data is scattered. For the detonation front moving transverse to the gap, time delays were seen. The delays roughly increase with gap width, going from 0-70 ns at 'zero gap' to around 300 ns at 0.5-1 mm gap. Larger gaps of up to 6 mm width almost certainly stopped the detonation, but this was not proved. Real-time resolution of the parallel jets and determination of the actual re-detonation or failure in the transverse case needs to be done in future experiments.

  20. Pregnancy-induced remodelling and enhanced endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type vasodilator activity in rat uterine radial artery: transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels, caveolae and myoendothelial gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Senadheera, Sevvandi; Bertrand, Paul P; Grayson, T Hilton; Leader, Leo; Murphy, Timothy V; Sandow, Shaun L

    2013-01-01

    In pregnancy, the vasculature of the uterus undergoes rapid remodelling to increase blood flow and maintain perfusion to the fetus. The present study determines the distribution and density of caveolae, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels (TRPV4) and myoendothelial gap junctions, and the relative contribution of related endothelium-dependent vasodilator components in uterine radial arteries of control virgin non-pregnant and 20-day late-pregnant rats. The hypothesis examined is that specific components of endothelium-dependent vasodilator mechanisms are altered in pregnancy-related uterine radial artery remodelling. Conventional and serial section electron microscopy were used to determine the morphological characteristics of uterine radial arteries from control and pregnant rats. TRPV4 distribution and expression was examined using conventional confocal immunohistochemistry, and the contribution of endothelial TRPV4, nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type activity determined using pressure myography with pharmacological intervention. Data show outward hypertrophic remodelling occurs in uterine radial arteries in pregnancy. Further, caveolae density in radial artery endothelium and smooth muscle from pregnant rats was significantly increased by ∼94% and ∼31%, respectively, compared with control, whereas caveolae density did not differ in endothelium compared with smooth muscle from control. Caveolae density was significantly higher by ∼59% on the abluminal compared with the luminal surface of the endothelium in uterine radial artery of pregnant rats but did not differ at those surfaces in control. TRPV4 was present in endothelium and smooth muscle, but not associated with internal elastic lamina hole sites in radial arteries. TRPV4 fluorescence intensity was significantly increased in the endothelium and smooth muscle of radial artery of pregnant compared with control rats by ∼2.6- and 5.5-fold

  1. Electronic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; King, E.L.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-08-06

    Disclosed are an apparatus and method for regulating the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel in which the gap between the casting nozzle and the casting wheel is monitored by means of at least one sensing element protruding from the face of the casting nozzle. The sensing element is preferably connected to a voltage source and the casting wheel grounded. When the sensing element contacts the casting wheel, an electric circuit is completed. The completion of the circuit can be registered by an indicator, and the presence or absence of a completed circuit indicates the relative position of the casting nozzle to the casting wheel. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. 5 figures.

  2. Electronic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; King, Edward L.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for regulating the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel in which the gap between the casting nozzle and the casting wheel is monitored by means of at least one sensing element protruding from the face of the casting nozzle. The sensing element is preferably connected to a voltage source and the casting wheel grounded. When the sensing element contacts the casting wheel, an electric circuit is completed. The completion of the circuit can be registered by an indicator, and the presence or absence of a completed circuit indicates the relative position of the casting nozzle to the casting wheel. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces.

  3. Hard gap in epitaxial semiconductor-superconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Albrecht, S M; Jespersen, T S; Kuemmeth, F; Krogstrup, P; Nygård, J; Marcus, C M

    2015-03-01

    Many present and future applications of superconductivity would benefit from electrostatic control of carrier density and tunnelling rates, the hallmark of semiconductor devices. One particularly exciting application is the realization of topological superconductivity as a basis for quantum information processing. Proposals in this direction based on the proximity effect in semiconductor nanowires are appealing because the key ingredients are currently in hand. However, previous instances of proximitized semiconductors show significant tunnelling conductance below the superconducting gap, suggesting a continuum of subgap states--a situation that nullifies topological protection. Here, we report a hard superconducting gap induced by the proximity effect in a semiconductor, using epitaxial InAs-Al semiconductor-superconductor nanowires. The hard gap, together with favourable material properties and gate-tunability, makes this new hybrid system attractive for a number of applications, as well as fundamental studies of mesoscopic superconductivity.

  4. Military Pay Gaps and Caps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    RATIOS AND ENLISTED RECRUIT QUALITY AND RETENTION 27 C. MILITARY-CrVIL SERVICE PAY ADJUSTMENT LINKAGE: LEGISLATIVE BACKGROUND, 1967-1993 30...DECI), which we constructed previously and have updated to include fiscal 1992. We compare pay gaps based on the ECI versus the DECI and present DECI...do. There is no claim that the levels of military and civilian pay are equal at base point. If pay levels are equal at the base point, the divergence

  5. The Fundamental Gap of Simplices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiqin; Rowlett, Julie

    2013-04-01

    The gap function of a domain {Ω subset {R}^n} is ξ(Ω) := d^2 (λ_2 - λ_1) , where d is the diameter of Ω, and λ1 and λ2 are the first two positive Dirichlet eigenvalues of the Euclidean Laplacian on Ω. It was recently shown by Andrews and Clutterbuck (J Amer Math Soc 24:899-916, 2011) that for any convex {Ω subset {R}^n}, ξ(Ω) ≥ 3 π^2 , where the infimum occurs for n = 1. On the other hand, the gap function on the moduli space of n-simplices behaves differently. Our first theorem is a compactness result for the gap function on the moduli space of n-simplices. Next, specializing to n = 2, our second main result proves the recent conjecture of Antunes-Freitas (J Phys A: Math Theor 41(5):055201, 2008) for any triangle {T subset {R}^2}, ξ(T) ≥ 64 π^2/9 , with equality if and only if T is equilateral.

  6. Prometheus and the Keeler gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajeddine, Radwan; Nicholson, Phillip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.; French, Richard G.; Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Burns, Joseph A.

    2014-11-01

    Linblad resonances with Saturn’s satellites are located at many radii in the rings. While some cause density or bending waves, others hold gap edges from spreading, like the 2:1 resonance with Mimas located at the B-ring edge, the 7:6 resonance with Janus at the A-ring edge, and the 32:31 resonance with Prometheus at the inner edge of the Keeler gap. The latter is the case of study here.Theoretically, the inner edge of the Keeler gap should have 32 regular sinusoidal lobes, where either the maximum or the minimum radius is expected to be aligned with Prometheus and rotating with its mean motion. We show that such is not the case. Fit of occultation data shows the presence of the 32:31 resonance, however, the fit residuals is as high as the amplitude of the resonance amplitude (about 2 km). Analysis of the ISS data, shows irregularities overlapping the lobes (Tiscareno et al. 2005, DPS), that follow Keplerian motion. These irregularities may be due to clumps of particles with different eccentricities than the rest of the edge particles. This phenomenon may be caused by the resonance, as it has not been observed at other circular edges were no resonance is present at their location. The ISS data also shows that the lobe’s minimum/maximum is not perfectly aligned with the longitude of Prometheus, which may be due to libration about the centre of the resonance.

  7. Electroluminescence from indirect band gap semiconductor ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Lezama, Ignacio; Aditya Reddy, Bojja; Ubrig, Nicolas; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2016-12-01

    It has been recently claimed that bulk crystals of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) ReS2 are direct band gap semiconductors, which would make this material an ideal candidate, among all TMDs, for the realization of efficient opto-electronic devices. The situation is however unclear, because even more recently an indirect transition in the PL spectra of this material has been detected, whose energy is smaller than the supposed direct gap. To address this issue we exploit the properties of ionic liquid gated field-effect transistors (FETs) to investigate the gap structure of bulk ReS2. Using these devices, whose high quality is demonstrated by a record high electron FET mobility of 1100 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 4 K, we can induce hole transport at the surface of the material and determine quantitatively the smallest band gap present in the material, irrespective of its direct or indirect nature. The value of the band gap is found to be 1.41 eV, smaller than the 1.5 eV direct optical transition but in good agreement with the energy of the indirect optical transition, providing an independent confirmation that bulk ReS2 is an indirect band gap semiconductor. Nevertheless, contrary to the case of more commonly studied semiconducting TMDs (e.g., MoS2, WS2, etc) in their bulk form, we also find that ReS2 FETs fabricated on bulk crystals do exhibit electroluminescence when driven in the ambipolar injection regime, likely because the difference between direct and indirect gap is only 100 meV. We conclude that ReS2 does deserve more in-depth investigations in relation to possible opto-electronic applications.

  8. Epithelial gap closure governed by forces and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladoux, Benoit

    The closure of gaps within epithelia is crucial to maintain the integrity and the homeostasis of the tissue during wound healing or cell extrusion processes. Cells mediate gap closure through either the assembly of multicellular actin-based contractile cables (purse-string contraction) or the protrusive activity of border cells into the gap (cell crawling). I will present experimental data and numerical modeling that show how these mechanisms can mutually interact to promote efficient epithelial gap closure and how mechanical constraints can regulate these mechanisms. I will first present how geometrical constraints dictate mechanisms of epithelial gap closure. We determine the importance of tissue shape during closure and the role of curvature of cell boundaries in this process. An essential difference between the two closure mechanisms is that cell crawling always pulls the edge of the tissue forward (i.e. towards the gap) while purse string pulls the edge forward or backwards depending on the local geometry. Our study demonstrates how the interplay between these two mechanisms is crucial for closing gaps and wounds, which naturally come in arbitrary shapes. Then I will focus on epithelial closure mechanism during cell extrusion. Within confluent cell layers, cellular motions coupled between neighbors are tightly regulated by the packing density of the epithelium inducing drastic changes in the dynamics of these tissues. I will show how cell density and tissue mechanics regulate the extrusion of cells within a confluent epithelial cell sheet, simultaneously measuring collective movements and traction forces. Epithelial packing and collective cell dynamics dictate the modes of cellular extrusions from lamellipodia crawling of the neighboring cells at low densities to coordinated actin-based contractile purse-string mechanism at higher density.

  9. Hard Superconducting Gap in InSb Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gül, Önder; Zhang, Hao; de Vries, Folkert K; van Veen, Jasper; Zuo, Kun; Mourik, Vincent; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Nowak, Michał P; van Woerkom, David J; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Cassidy, Maja C; Geresdi, Attila; Koelling, Sebastian; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastien R; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Kouwenhoven, Leo P

    2017-04-12

    Topological superconductivity is a state of matter that can host Majorana modes, the building blocks of a topological quantum computer. Many experimental platforms predicted to show such a topological state rely on proximity-induced superconductivity. However, accessing the topological properties requires an induced hard superconducting gap, which is challenging to achieve for most material systems. We have systematically studied how the interface between an InSb semiconductor nanowire and a NbTiN superconductor affects the induced superconducting properties. Step by step, we improve the homogeneity of the interface while ensuring a barrier-free electrical contact to the superconductor and obtain a hard gap in the InSb nanowire. The magnetic field stability of NbTiN allows the InSb nanowire to maintain a hard gap and a supercurrent in the presence of magnetic fields (∼0.5 T), a requirement for topological superconductivity in one-dimensional systems. Our study provides a guideline to induce superconductivity in various experimental platforms such as semiconductor nanowires, two-dimensional electron gases, and topological insulators and holds relevance for topological superconductivity and quantum computation.

  10. Electric field dependence of hybridized gap in InAs/GaSb quantum well system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Jiufu; Wei, Xiangfei; Wang, Weiyang

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that exchange interaction induced by electron-hole scattering via Coulomb interaction can cause a hybridized gap in InAs/GaSb based type II and broken-gap quantum wells. The hybridized energy spectra are obtained analytically at the low temperature and long wave limits. An electric field depended hybridized gap about 4 meV opens at the anti-crossing points of the hybridized energy spectra, in accordance with experimental measurements. The hybridized gap varies linearly with the gate electric voltage due to the fact that the electric field can change the exchange self-energy by tuning the overlap of the wavefunctions and the Fermi energy. Our theoretical results can give a deep insight of the origin of the hybridized gap and provide a simple way to determine the value and the position of the hybridized gap in the presence of the gate electric voltage.

  11. Direct Band Gap Wurtzite Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The main challenge for light-emitting diodes is to increase the efficiency in the green part of the spectrum. Gallium phosphide (GaP) with the normal cubic crystal structure has an indirect band gap, which severely limits the green emission efficiency. Band structure calculations have predicted a direct band gap for wurtzite GaP. Here, we report the fabrication of GaP nanowires with pure hexagonal crystal structure and demonstrate the direct nature of the band gap. We observe strong photoluminescence at a wavelength of 594 nm with short lifetime, typical for a direct band gap. Furthermore, by incorporation of aluminum or arsenic in the GaP nanowires, the emitted wavelength is tuned across an important range of the visible light spectrum (555–690 nm). This approach of crystal structure engineering enables new pathways to tailor materials properties enhancing the functionality. PMID:23464761

  12. Closing the Prescription Drug Coverage Gap

    MedlinePlus

    ... coverage gap discount work for brand-name drugs? Companies that make brand-name prescription drugs must sign ... Coverage Gap Discount Program. This program requires the companies to offer discounts on brand-name drugs to ...

  13. Gap Year: Time off, with a Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2009-01-01

    A gap year allows people to step off the usual educational or career path and reassess their future. According to people who have taken a gap year, the time away can be well worth it. This article can help a person decide whether to take a gap year and how to make the most of his time off. It describes what a gap year is, including its pros and…

  14. Comparison of the surface dielectric barrier discharge characteristics under different electrode gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guoqiang; Dong, Lei; Peng, Kaisheng; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Chunmao; Wu, Guangning

    2017-01-01

    Currently, great interests are paid to the surface dielectric barrier discharge due to the diverse and interesting application. In this paper, the influences of the electrode gap on the discharge characteristics have been studied. Aspects of the electrical parameters, the optical emission, and the discharge induced gas flow were considered. The electrode gap varied from 0 mm to 21 mm, while the applied AC voltage was studied in the range of 17 kV-27 kV. Results indicate that with the increase of the electrode gap, the variation of discharge voltage exhibits an increasing trend, while the other parameters (i.e., the current, power, and induced flow velocity) increase first, and then decrease once the gap exceeded the critical value. Mechanisms of the electrode gap influencing these key parameters were discussed from the point of equivalent circuit. The experimental results reveal that an optimal discharge gap can be obtained, which is closely related to the applied voltage. Visualization of the induced flow with different electrode gaps was realized by the Schlieren diagnostic technique. Finally, the velocities of induced gas flow determined by the pitot tube were compared with the results of intensity-integral method, and good agreements were found.

  15. Closing the Achievement Gap: Four States' Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixom, Micah Ann

    2015-01-01

    The achievement gap separating economically disadvantaged students from their more advantaged peers disproportionately affects students of color and has been the focus of discussion, research and controversy for more than 40 years. While the gap between black and white students narrowed considerably from the 1950s to the 1980s, that gap has…

  16. Calibration curves for some standard Gap Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, A.L.; Sommer, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    The relative shock sensitivities of explosive compositions are commonly assessed using a family of experiments that can be described by the generic term ''Gap Test.'' Gap tests include a donor charge, a test sample, and a spacer, or gap, between two explosives charges. The donor charge, gap material, and test dimensions are held constant within each different version of the gap test. The thickness of the gap is then varied to find the value at which 50% of the test samples will detonate. The gap tests measure the ease with a high-order detonation can be established in the test explosive, or the ''detonability,'' of the explosive. Test results are best reported in terms of the gap thickness at the 50% point. It is also useful to define the shock pressure transmitted into the test sample at the detonation threshold. This requires calibrating the gap test in terms of shock pressure in the gap as a function of the gap thickness. It also requires a knowledge of the shock Hugoniot of the sample explosive. We used the 2DE reactive hydrodynamic code with Forest Fire burn rates for the donor explosives to calculate calibration curves for several gap tests. The model calculations give pressure and particle velocity on the centerline of the experimental set-up and provide information about the curvature and pulse width of the shock wave. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Band gaps in bubble phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, V.; Bretagne, A.; Lanoy, M.; Tourin, A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the interaction between Bragg and hybridization effects on the band gap properties of bubble phononic crystals. These latter consist of air cavities periodically arranged in an elastomer matrix and are fabricated using soft-lithography techniques. Their transmission properties are affected by Bragg effects due to the periodicity of the structure as well as hybridization between the propagating mode of the embedding medium and bubble resonance. The hybridization gap survives disorder while the Bragg gap requires a periodic distribution of bubbles. The distance between two bubble layers can be tuned to make the two gaps overlap or to create a transmission peak in the hybridization gap.

  18. NMR parameters in gapped graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, Mircea; Grosu, Ioan; Ţifrea, Ionel

    2016-06-01

    We calculate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time and the Knight shift for the case of gapped graphene systems. Our calculations consider both the massive and massless gap scenarios. Both the spin-lattice relaxation time and the Knight shift depend on temperature, chemical potential, and the value of the electronic energy gap. In particular, at the Dirac point, the electronic energy gap has stronger effects on the system nuclear magnetic resonance parameters in the case of the massless gap scenario. Differently, at large values of the chemical potential, both gap scenarios behave in a similar way and the gapped graphene system approaches a Fermi gas from the nuclear magnetic resonance parameters point of view. Our results are important for nuclear magnetic resonance measurements that target the 13C active nuclei in graphene samples.

  19. Chlorpromazine reduces the intercellular communication via gap junctions in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orellana, Juan A.; Palacios-Prado, Nicolas; Saez, Juan C. . E-mail: jsaez@bio.puc.cl

    2006-06-15

    In the work presented herein, we evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on gap junctions expressed by two mammalian cell types; Gn-11 cells (cell line derived from mouse LHRH neurons) and rat cortical astrocytes maintained in culture. We also attempted to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of CPZ effects on gap junctions. CPZ, in concentrations comparable with doses used to treat human diseases, was found to reduce the intercellular communication via gap junctions as evaluated with measurements of dye coupling (Lucifer yellow). In both cell types, maximal inhibition of functional gap junctions was reached within about 1 h of treatment with CPZ, an recovery was almost complete at about 5 h after CPZ wash out. In both cell types, CPZ treatment increased the phosphorylation state of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit. Moreover, CPZ reduced the reactivity of Cx43 (immunofluorescence) at cell interfaces and concomitantly increased its reactivity in intracellular vesicles, suggesting an increased retrieval from and/or reduced insertion into the plasma membrane. CPZ also caused cellular retraction reducing cell-cell contacts in a reversible manner. The reduction in contact area might destabilize existing gap junctions and abrogate formation of new ones. Moreover, the CPZ-induced reduction in gap junctional communication may depend on the connexins (Cxs) forming the junctions. If Cx43 were the only connexin expressed, MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of this connexin would induce closure of gap junction channels.

  20. Assessment of the Chemosensitizing Activity of TAT-RasGAP317-326 in Childhood Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Nadja; Gross, Nicole; Widmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Although current anti-cancer protocols are reasonably effective, treatment-associated long-term side effects, induced by lack of specificity of the anti-cancer procedures, remain a challenging problem in pediatric oncology. TAT-RasGAP317-326 is a RasGAP-derived cell-permeable peptide that acts as a sensitizer to various anti-cancer treatments in adult tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the effect of TAT-RasGAP317-326 in several childhood cancer cell lines. The RasGAP-derived peptide-induced cell death was analyzed in several neuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma and leukemia cell lines (as well as in normal lymphocytes). Cell death was evaluated using flow cytometry methods in the absence or in the presence of the peptide in combination with various genotoxins used in the clinics (4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide, etoposide, vincristine and doxorubicin). All tested pediatric tumors, in response to at least one genotoxin, were sensitized by TAT-RasGAP317-326. The RasGAP-derived peptide did not increase cell death of normal lymphocytes, alone or in combination with the majority of the tested chemotherapies. Consequently, TAT-RasGAP317-326 may benefit children with tumors by increasing the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies notably by allowing reductions in anti-cancer drug dosage and the associated drug-induced side effects. PMID:25826368

  1. The influence of GAP-43 on orientation of cell division through G proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Zhao, Junpeng; Ju, Lili; Wen, Yujun; Xu, Qunyuan

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that GAP-43 is highly expressed in horizontally dividing neural progenitor cells, and G protein complex are required for proper mitotic-spindle orientation of those progenitors in the mammalian developing cortex. In order to verify the hypothesis that GAP-43 may influence the orientation of cell division through interacting with G proteins during neurogenesis, the GAP-43 RNA from adult C57 mouse was cloned into the pEGFP-N1 vector, which was then transfected into Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture system. The interaction of GAP-43 with Gαi was detected by co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP), while cystogenesis of 3D morphogenesis of MDCK cells and expression of GAP-43 and Gαi were determined by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The results showed are as follows: After being transfected by pEGFP-N1-GAP-43, GAP-43 was localized on the cell membrane and co-localized with Gαi, and this dramatically induced a defective cystogenesis in 3D morphogenesis of MDCK cells. The functional interaction between GAP-43 and Gαi proteins was proven by the co-IP assay. It can be considered from the results that the GAP-43 is involved in the orientation of cell division by interacting with Gαi and this should be an important mechanism for neurogenesis in the mammalian brain.

  2. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  3. Updated Starshade Technology Gap List

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, Brendan P.; Siegler, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) guides the development of technology that enables the direct imaging and characterization of exo-Earths in the habitable zone of their stars, for future space observatories. Here we present the Starshade portion of the 2017 ExEP Enabling Technology Gap List, an annual update to ExEP's list of of technology to be advanced in the next 1-5 years. A Starshade is an external occulter on an independent spacecraft, allowing a space telescope to achieve exo-Earth imaging contrast requirements by blocking starlight before it enters the telescope. Building and operating a Starshade requires new technology: the occulter is a structure tens of meters in diameter that must be positioned precisely at a distance of tens of thousands of kilometers from the telescope. We review the current state-of-the-art performance and the performance level that must be achieved for a Starshade.

  4. Narrow gap electronegative capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2013-10-15

    Narrow gap electronegative (EN) capacitive discharges are widely used in industry and have unique features not found in conventional discharges. In this paper, plasma parameters are determined over a range of decreasing gap length L from values for which an electropositive (EP) edge exists (2-region case) to smaller L-values for which the EN region connects directly to the sheath (1-region case). Parametric studies are performed at applied voltage V{sub rf}=500 V for pressures of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mTorr, and additionally at 50 mTorr for 1000 and 2000 V. Numerical results are given for a parallel plate oxygen discharge using a planar 1D3v (1 spatial dimension, 3 velocity components) particle-in-cell (PIC) code. New interesting phenomena are found for the case in which an EP edge does not exist. This 1-region case has not previously been investigated in detail, either numerically or analytically. In particular, attachment in the sheaths is important, and the central electron density n{sub e0} is depressed below the density n{sub esh} at the sheath edge. The sheath oscillations also extend into the EN core, creating an edge region lying within the sheath and not characterized by the standard diffusion in an EN plasma. An analytical model is developed using minimal inputs from the PIC results, and compared to the PIC results for a base case at V{sub rf}=500 V and 50 mTorr, showing good agreement. Selected comparisons are made at the other voltages and pressures. A self-consistent model is also developed and compared to the PIC results, giving reasonable agreement.

  5. Giant Hall Photoconductivity in Narrow-Gapped Dirac Materials.

    PubMed

    Song, Justin C W; Kats, Mikhail A

    2016-12-14

    Carrier dynamics acquire a new character in the presence of Bloch-band Berry curvature, which naturally arises in gapped Dirac materials (GDMs). Here, we argue that photoresponse in GDMs with small band gaps is dramatically enhanced by Berry curvature. This manifests in a giant and saturable Hall photoconductivity when illuminated by circularly polarized light. Unlike Hall motion arising from a Lorentz force in a magnetic field, which impedes longitudinal carrier motion, Hall photoconductivity arising from Berry curvature can boost longitudinal carrier transport. In GDMs, this results in a helicity-dependent photoresponse in the Hall regime, where photoconductivity is dominated by its Hall component. We find that the induced Hall conductivity per incident irradiance is enhanced by up to 6 orders of magnitude when moving from the visible regime (with corresponding band gaps) to the far infrared. These results suggest that narrow-gap GDMs are an ideal test-bed for the unique physics that arise in the presence of Berry curvature and open a new avenue for infrared and terahertz optoelectronics.

  6. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Band Gap in Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Cesar E P; Rocha, A R; Marini, Andrea

    2016-08-10

    Black phosphorus (BP) has gained renewed attention due to its singular anisotropic electronic and optical properties that might be exploited for a wide range of technological applications. In this respect, the thermal properties are particularly important both to predict its room temperature operation and to determine its thermoelectric potential. From this point of view, one of the most spectacular and poorly understood phenomena is indeed the BP temperature-induced band gap opening; when temperature is increased, the fundamental band gap increases instead of decreases. This anomalous thermal dependence has also been observed recently in its monolayer counterpart. In this work, based on ab initio calculations, we present an explanation for this long known and yet not fully explained effect. We show that it arises from a combination of harmonic and lattice thermal expansion contributions, which are in fact highly interwined. We clearly narrow down the mechanisms that cause this gap opening by identifying the peculiar atomic vibrations that drive the anomaly. The final picture we give explains both the BP anomalous band gap opening and the frequency increase with increasing volume (tension effect).

  7. Dynamically Active Compartments Coupled by a Stochastically Gated Gap Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Lawley, Sean D.

    2017-03-01

    We analyze a one-dimensional PDE-ODE system representing the diffusion of signaling molecules between two cells coupled by a stochastically gated gap junction. We assume that signaling molecules diffuse within the cytoplasm of each cell and then either bind to some active region of the cell's membrane (treated as a well-mixed compartment) or pass through the gap junction to the interior of the other cell. We treat the gap junction as a randomly fluctuating gate that switches between an open and a closed state according to a two-state Markov process. This means that the resulting PDE-ODE is stochastic due to the presence of a randomly switching boundary in the interior of the domain. It is assumed that each membrane compartment acts as a conditional oscillator, that is, it sits below a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. In the ungated case (gap junction always open), the system supports diffusion-induced oscillations, in which the concentration of signaling molecules within the two compartments is either in-phase or anti-phase. The presence of a reflection symmetry (for identical cells) means that the stochastic gate only affects the existence of anti-phase oscillations. In particular, there exist parameter choices where the gated system supports oscillations, but the ungated system does not, and vice versa. The existence of oscillations is investigated by solving a spectral problem obtained by averaging over realizations of the stochastic gate.

  8. The psychostimulant modafinil enhances gap junctional communication in cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhe; Petit, Jean-Marie; Ezan, Pascal; Gyger, Joël; Magistretti, Pierre; Giaume, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Sleep-wake cycle is characterized by changes in neuronal network activity. However, for the last decade there is increasing evidence that neuroglial interaction may play a role in the modulation of sleep homeostasis and that astrocytes have a critical impact in this process. Interestingly, astrocytes are organized into communicating networks based on their high expression of connexins, which are the molecular constituents of gap junction channels. Thus, neuroglial interactions should also be considered as the result of the interplay between neuronal and astroglial networks. Here, we investigate the effect of modafinil, a wakefulness-promoting agent, on astrocyte gap junctional communication. We report that in the cortex modafinil injection increases the expression of mRNA and protein of connexin 30 but not those of connexin 43, the other major astroglial connexin. These increases are correlated with an enhancement of intercellular dye coupling in cortical astrocytes, which is abolished when neuronal activity is silenced by tetrodotoxin. Moreover, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, which at a millimolar concentration induces sleep, has an opposite effect on astroglial gap junctions in an activity-independent manner. These results support the proposition that astroglia may play an important role in complex physiological brain functions, such as sleep regulation, and that neuroglial networking interaction is modified during sleep-wake cycle. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Current Pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels'.

  9. [Gap edge effect of Castanopsis kawakamii community].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfu; Hong, Wei; Li, Junqing; Lin, Rongfu

    2003-09-01

    This paper reported the characters of gap edge effect of Castanopsis kawakamii community in Sanming, Fujian Province. The species diversity, ecological dominance, and edge effect strength of 38 forest gaps with different development stages in different stands of Castanopsis kawakamii community were measured, and Shannon-Wiener index, Simpson index, and index of edge effect strength were calculated. The results showed that the index of the gap edge effect of Castanopsis kawakamii community was about 0.7-1.3 (according to the species diversity index) and 0.3-1.8 (according to the ecological dominance index). The gap edge effect had the trend of increasing the species diversity of forest communities. The index of gap effect was affected by the size and development stage of the gap and the related forest type. The study provided a theoretical basis for the maintenance of species diversity and the forest management in Castanopsis kawakamii community.

  10. National GAP Conference 2007-Discussion Groups Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratz, Joan M.; Lamb, Berton Lee

    2010-01-01

    We led two discussion groups during the 2007 National GAP Conference. These discussion groups provided information to help develop a survey of National Gap Analysis Program (GAP) data users. One group discussed technical issues, and the second group discussed the use of GAP data for decisionmaking. Themes emerging from the technical issues group included concerns about data quality, need for information on how to use data, and passive data distribution. The decisionmaking discussion included a wide range of topics including the need to understand presentation of information, the need to connect with and understand users of data, the revision of GAP's mission, and the adaptability of products and data. The decisionmaking group also raised concerns regarding technical issues. One conclusion is that a deep commitment to ongoing information transfer and support is a key component of success for the GAP program.

  11. Gap between active and passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

  12. The Hydroacoustics of Beveled Steps and Gaps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    to measure and predict the sound radiation from steps and gaps on large pales excited by turbulent boundary layers. Results are given showing the...the last few years there have been some enlightening experimental and numerical studies on the sound radiated by turbulent flow over steps and gaps...used to predict the sound radiated from steps and gaps at full scale. The purpose of this study was to develop these scaling laws by combining the

  13. The F-BAR domains from srGAP1, srGAP2 and srGAP3 regulate membrane deformation differently

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Zylka, Mark J.; Polleux, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Summary Coordination of membrane deformation and cytoskeletal dynamics lies at the heart of many biological processes critical for cell polarity, motility and morphogenesis. We have recently shown that Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 2 (srGAP2) regulates neuronal morphogenesis through the ability of its F-BAR domain to regulate membrane deformation and induce filopodia formation. Here, we demonstrate that the F-BAR domains of two closely related family members, srGAP1 and srGAP3 [designated F-BAR(1) and F-BAR(3), respectively] display significantly different membrane deformation properties in non-neuronal COS7 cells and in cortical neurons. F-BAR(3) induces filopodia in both cell types, though less potently than F-BAR(2), whereas F-BAR(1) prevents filopodia formation in cortical neurons and reduces plasma membrane dynamics. These three F-BAR domains can heterodimerize, and they act synergistically towards filopodia induction in COS7 cells. As measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, F-BAR(2) displays faster molecular dynamics than F-BAR(3) and F-BAR(1) at the plasma membrane, which correlates well with its increased potency to induce filopodia. We also show that the molecular dynamic properties of F-BAR(2) at the membrane are partially dependent on F-Actin. Interestingly, acute phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] depletion in cells does not interfere with plasma membrane localization of F-BAR(2), which is compatible with our result showing that F-BAR(2) binds to a broad range of negatively-charged phospholipids present at the plasma membrane, including phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). Overall, our results provide novel insights into the functional diversity of the membrane deformation properties of this subclass of F-BAR-domains required for cell morphogenesis. PMID:22467852

  14. GAP-43 augments G protein-coupled receptor transduction in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, S M; Cannon, S C; Ross, E M; Higashijima, T; Fishman, M C

    1993-01-01

    The neuronal protein GAP-43 is thought to play a role in determining growth-cone motility, perhaps as an intracellular regulator of signal transduction, but its molecular mechanism of action has remained unclear. We find that GAP-43, when microinjected into Xenopus laevis oocytes, increases the oocyte response to G protein-coupled receptor agonists by 10- to 100-fold. Higher levels of GAP-43 cause a transient current flow, even without receptor stimulation. The GAP-43-induced current, like receptor-stimulated currents, is mediated by a calcium-activated chloride channel and can be desensitized by injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. This suggests that neuronal GAP-43 may serve as an intracellular signal to greatly enhance the sensitivity of G protein-coupled receptor transduction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7685122

  15. Gap Assessment (FY 13 Update)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Getman, Dan

    2013-09-30

    To help guide its future data collection efforts, The DOE GTO funded a data gap analysis in FY2012 to identify high potential hydrothermal areas where critical data are needed. This analysis was updated in FY2013 and the resulting datasets are represented by this metadata. The original process was published in FY 2012 and is available here: https://pangea.stanford.edu/ERE/db/GeoConf/papers/SGW/2013/Esposito.pdf Though there are many types of data that can be used for hydrothermal exploration, five types of exploration data were targeted for this analysis. These data types were selected for their regional reconnaissance potential, and include many of the primary exploration techniques currently used by the geothermal industry. The data types include: 1. well data 2. geologic maps 3. fault maps 4. geochemistry data 5. geophysical data To determine data coverage, metadata for exploration data (including data type, data status, and coverage information) were collected and catalogued from nodes on the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). It is the intention of this analysis that the data be updated from this source in a semi-automated fashion as new datasets are added to the NGDS nodes. In addition to this upload, an online tool was developed to allow all geothermal data providers to access this assessment and to directly add metadata themselves and view the results of the analysis via maps of data coverage in Geothermal Prospector (http://maps.nrel.gov/gt_prospector). A grid of the contiguous U.S. was created with 88,000 10-km by 10-km grid cells, and each cell was populated with the status of data availability corresponding to the five data types. Using these five data coverage maps and the USGS Resource Potential Map, sites were identified for future data collection efforts. These sites signify both that the USGS has indicated high favorability of occurrence of geothermal resources and that data gaps exist. The uploaded data are contained in two data files for

  16. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Maria O.; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas; Cook, Bruce; Lefsky, Michael; Ducey, Mark; Saleska, Scott; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme; Schietti, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012) at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8 %) as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0 %). On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1). Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10 % of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6 % at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality) and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13 % and 10 %, respectively). At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal (23

  17. [Gap junctions and cancer: implications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mesnil, Marc

    2004-02-01

    Gap junctions are made of intercellular channels which permit the diffusion from cytoplasm to cytoplasm of small hydrophilic molecules (<1,200 Da) such as ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers (calcium, inositol triphosphate, etc.). Since their discovery in the early sixties, several groups have described the loss of their function in cancer cells. The accumulation of such data led to the hypothesis that gap junctions are involved in the carcinogenesis process. This assumption has been confirmed by data establishing that gap junctional intercellular communication is inhibited by most of the tumor promoters and that the restoration of such a communication, by transfection of cDNAs encoding gap junction proteins (connexins), inhibits the aberrant growth rates of tumorigenic cells. Despite these important informations, several fundamental questions remain still open. First, we do not know how gap junctions mediate such a tumor suppressor effect and whether it may depend either on the cell type or on the connexin type. Moreover, most of the data concerning a possible involvement of gap junctions in carcinogenesis have been obtained from in vitro and animal models. The very few results which have been currently collected from human tumors are not sufficient to have a clear idea concerning the real involvement of gap junctions in sporadic human cancers. These points as well as other unresolved questions about the role of gap junctional intercellular communication in carcinogenesis are mentioned. To bring some answers, some prospects are proposed with the objective to use gap junctions for increasing the effect of anticancer therapies.

  18. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Maria O; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas; Cook, Bruce; Lefsky, Michael; Ducey, Mark; Saleska, Scott; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme; Schietti, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012) at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8%) as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0%). On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1). Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10% of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6% at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality) and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13% and 10%, respectively). At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal (23% versus 6

  19. Two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector with electroluminescence gap operated in argon doped with nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Nosov, V.; Shekhtman, L.; Shemyakina, E.; Sokolov, A.

    2017-02-01

    A two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) with electroluminescence (EL) gap, operated in argon doped with a minor (49±7 ppm) admixture of nitrogen, has been studied. The EL gap was optically read out using cryogenic PMTs located on the perimeter of the gap. We present the results of the measurements of the N2 content, detector sensitivity to X-ray-induced signals, EL gap yield and electron lifetime in the liquid. The detector sensitivity, at a drift field in liquid Ar of 0.6 kV/cm, was measured to be 9 and 16 photoelectrons recorded at the PMTs per keV of deposited energy at 23 and 88 keV respectively. Such two-phase detectors, with enhanced sensitivity to the S2 (ionization-induced) signal, are relevant in the field of argon detectors for dark matter search and low energy neutrino detection.

  20. NEN Division Funding Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ernst I.; Goettee, Jeffrey D.; Desimone, David J.; Lakis, Rollin E.; Miko, David K.

    2012-09-05

    The work in NEN Division revolves around proliferation detection. The sponsor funding model seems to have shifted over the last decades. For the past three lustra, sponsors are mainly interested in funding ideas and detection systems that are already at a technical readiness level 6 (TRL 6 -- one step below an industrial prototype) or higher. Once this level is reached, the sponsoring agency is willing to fund the commercialization, implementation, and training for the systems (TRL 8, 9). These sponsors are looking for a fast turnaround (1-2 years) technology development efforts to implement technology. To support the critical national and international needs for nonprolifertion solutions, we have to maintain a fluent stream of subject matter expertise from the fundamental principals of radiation detection through prototype development all the way to the implementation and training of others. NEN Division has large funding gaps in the Valley of Death region. In the current competitive climate for nuclear nonproliferation projects, it is imminent to increase our lead in this field.

  1. Voltage-controlled switching and thermal effects in VO{sub 2} nano-gap junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Joushaghani, Arash; Jeong, Junho; Stewart Aitchison, J.; Poon, Joyce K. S.; Paradis, Suzanne; Alain, David

    2014-06-02

    Voltage-controlled switching in lateral VO{sub 2} nano-gap junctions with different gap lengths and thermal properties was investigated. The effect of Joule heating on the phase transition was found to be strongly influenced by the device geometry, the contact material, and the current. Our results indicate that the VO{sub 2} phase transition was likely initiated electronically, which was sometimes followed by a secondary thermally induced transition.

  2. Dual circular polarization gaps in helix photonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tzu-Hung; Chien, Lung-Yu Chang; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-09-21

    Chiral structures exhibit strong interactions with circularly polarized light, and have been demonstrated to show many polarization-dependent properties. Various chiral structures exhibit some level of circular dichroism, where right-handed and left-handed circularly polarized waves experience different transmission. In this study, we use a dielectric helix array as a model system to examine the interactions of circularly polarized light with helical structures. Our results show that circular polarization band gaps can be formed in a dielectric helix array not only by light having the same handedness with the structure but also by light with the opposite handedness, resulting from additional chiral motifs induced by the arrangement of helices. Dual polarization band gaps can thus be tailored by varying the geometrical parameters, and circular-polarization dependent properties can be manipulated for optoelectronic devices and applications.

  3. Tunable gap graphene micro-ribbons for terahertz plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Danhong; Gumbs, Godfrey; Roslyak, Oleksiy

    2012-02-01

    Maxwell's equations are solved for an array of graphene micro-ribbons located at the interface between a vacuum half-space and a half-space of a dielectric substrate. Our calculations are include mode-mixing in the optical-response function. A closed-form analytic expression is obtained for the nonlocal optical-response function of a graphene layer with an induced energy gap which is then employed in our calculations beyond the long-wavelength approximation. Both the reflectivity and transmissivity spectral functions are calculated. Specifically, we obtain their dependences on the period of the array, the ribbon width, chemical potential of doped graphene, energy gap between the valence and conduction bands, substrate refractive index, and incident angle of a plane-wave electromagnetic field. Additionally, a qualitative comparison is made between our calculated results in this paper and the recent experimental data given by Ju, et al./, [Nature Nanotechnology, 6, 630 (2011)].

  4. Anomalous aharonov-bohm gap oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sangalli, Davide; Marini, Andrea

    2011-10-12

    The gap oscillations caused by a magnetic flux penetrating a carbon nanotube represent one of the most spectacular observations of the Aharonov-Bohm effect at the nanoscale. Our understanding of this effect is, however, based on the assumption that the electrons are strictly confined on the tube surface, on trajectories that are not modified by curvature effects. Using an ab initio approach based on density functional theory, we show that this assumption fails at the nanoscale inducing important corrections to the physics of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Curvature effects and electronic density that is spilled out of the nanotube surface are shown to break the periodicity of the gap oscillations. We predict the key phenomenological features of this anomalous Aharonov-Bohm effect in semiconductive and metallic tubes and the existence of a large metallic phase in the low flux regime of multiwalled nanotubes, also suggesting possible experiments to validate our results.

  5. Tunable mode-locked laser with micro-air gap cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Aidit, S. N.; Hassan, N. A.; Ooi, S. I.; Tiu, Z. C.

    2017-02-01

    A tunable mode-locked laser with a micro-air gap cavity acting as a high resolution tuning is proposed and demonstrated. The laser utilizes the nonlinear polarization technique in the cavity to obtain a reliable and stable mode locking over the whole tuning range at a resolution of 1 nm. The micro-air gap is constructed by aligning two fiber facets coaxially, and the variation of micro-air gap introduces a tuning mechanism where it changes the gain saturation compensation in the gain medium and thus induces wavelength shifting on the generated solitons.

  6. Mind the gap - tip leakage vortex in axial turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, M.; Decaix, J.; Münch-Alligné, C.; Farhat, M.

    2014-03-01

    The tendency of designing large Kaplan turbines with a continuous increase of output power is bringing to the front the cavitation erosion issue. Due to the flow in the gap between the runner and the discharge ring, axial turbine blades may develop the so called tip leakage vortex (TLV) cavitation with negative consequences. Such vortices may interact strongly with the wake of guide vanes leading to their multiple collapses and rebounds. If the vortex trajectory remains close to the blade tip, these collapses may lead to severe erosion. One is still unable today to predict its occurrence and development in axial turbines with acceptable accuracy. Numerical flow simulations as well as the actual scale-up rules from small to large scales are unreliable. The present work addresses this problematic in a simplified case study representing TLV cavitation to better understand its sensitivity to the gap width. A Naca0009 hydrofoil is used as a generic blade in the test section of EPFL cavitation tunnel. A sliding mounting support allowing an adjustable gap between the blade tip and wall was manufactured. The vortex trajectory is visualized with a high speed camera and appropriate lighting. The three dimensional velocity field induced by the TLV is investigated using stereo particle image velocimetry. We have taken into account the vortex wandering in the image processing to obtain accurate measurements of the vortex properties. The measurements were performed in three planes located downstream of the hydrofoil for different values of the flow velocity, the incidence angle and the gap width. The results clearly reveal a strong influence of the gap width on both trajectory and intensity of the tip leakage vortex.

  7. Effect of air gap variation on the performance of single stator single rotor axial flux permanent magnet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasim, Muhammad; Irasari, Pudji; Hikmawan, M. Fathul; Widiyanto, Puji; Wirtayasa, Ketut

    2017-02-01

    The axial flux permanent magnet generator (AFPMG) has been widely used especially for electricity generation. The effect of the air gap variation on the characteristic and performances of single rotor - single stator AFPMG has been described in this paper. Effect of air gap length on the magnetic flux distribution, starting torque and MMF has been investigated. The two dimensional finite element magnetic method has been deployed to model and simulated the characteristics of the machine which is based on the Maxwell equation. The analysis has been done for two different air gap lengths which were 2 mm and 4 mm using 2D FEMM 4.2 software at no load condition. The increasing of air gap length reduces the air-gap flux density. For air gap 2 mm, the maximum value of the flux density was 1.04 T while 0.73 T occured for air gap 4 mm.. Based on the experiment result, the increasing air gap also reduced the starting torque of the machine with 39.2 Nm for air gap 2 mm and this value decreased into 34.2 Nm when the air gap increased to 4 mm. Meanwhile, the MMF that was generated by AFPMG decreased around 22% at 50 Hz due to the reduction of magnetic flux induced on stator windings. Overall, the research result showed that the variation of air gap has significant effect on the machine characteristics.

  8. Forensics of subhalo-stream encounters: the three phases of gap growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkal, Denis; Belokurov, Vasily

    2015-06-01

    There is hope to discover dark matter subhaloes free of stars (predicted by the current theory of structure formation) by observing gaps they produce in tidal streams. In fact, this is the most promising technique for dark substructure detection and characterization as such gaps grow with time, magnifying small perturbations into clear signatures observable by ongoing and planned Galaxy surveys. To facilitate such future inference, we develop a comprehensive framework for studies of the growth of the stream density perturbations. Starting with simple assumptions and restricting to streams on circular orbits, we derive analytic formulae that describe the evolution of all gap properties (size, density contrast, etc.) at all times. We uncover complex, previously unnoticed behaviour, with the stream initially forming a density enhancement near the subhalo impact point. Shortly after, a gap forms due to the relative change in period induced by the subhalo's passage. There is an intermediate regime where the gap grows linearly in time. At late times, the particles in the stream overtake each other, forming caustics, and the gap grows like √{t}. In addition to the secular growth, we find that the gap oscillates as it grows due to epicyclic motion. We compare this analytic model to N-body simulations and find an impressive level of agreement. Importantly, when analysing the observation of a single gap we find a large degeneracy between the subhalo mass, the impact geometry and kinematics, the host potential, and the time since flyby.

  9. Spin susceptibility of disordered gapped graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosu, I.; Biter, T. L.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the spin susceptibility for the case of gapped graphene systems in the presence of disorder. The average single-particle density of states in gapped graphene with disorder was calculated, using the Born and the T-matrix approximations. The temperature dependence of the static spin susceptibility was analyzed. The influence of the chemical potential position and disorder is also discussed.

  10. Caring Closes the Language-Learning Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borba, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The gap in academic achievement between English speakers and English learners continues to concern educators, parents, and legislators. Rising expectations for literacy and the increasing number of students from diverse backgrounds contribute to this achievement gap. In this article, the author discusses a variety of strategies for reaching out to…

  11. Delaying the Academy: A Gap Year Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This investigation serves as one of the first empirical analyses to examine the international volunteering gap year from an educational perspective, concluding an in-depth case study of a prominent gap year organisation in the UK. Contrary to widespread industry promotion of international development, the findings suggest that the experience can…

  12. The "Developing" Achievement Gap: Colombian Voucher Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Jonathan M. B.

    2014-01-01

    The achievement gap in many developing countries is defined in terms of rich/poor and public/private. The prevailing explanation for the "developing" achievement gap is an underfunded, inefficient, and/or inadequately supplied public school sector. Via an analysis of a Colombian voucher experiment, this article examines the extent to…

  13. High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

  14. Reusable Thermal Barrier for Insulation Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saladee, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Filler composed of resilient, heat-resistant materials. Thermal barrier nestles snugly in gap between two tiles with minimal protrusion beyond faces of surrounding tiles. When removed from gap, barrier springs back to nearly original shape. Developed for filling spaces between tiles on Space Shuttle, also used in furnaces and kilns.

  15. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps: A Data Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    In the authors' 2011 "JEE" article, "Estimating Gender Wage Gaps," they described an interesting class project that allowed students to estimate the current gender earnings gap for recent college graduates using data from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). Unfortunately, since 2012, NACE no longer…

  16. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Idaho, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Idaho for 2010. Idaho showed improvement in reading and math in grade 8 at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for Latino and white students, low income students, and boys and girls. The state has also made progress in narrowing achievement gaps between Latino and white…

  17. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  18. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches.

  19. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Robert W.; Maroone, James P.; Tipping, Donald W.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  20. Closing the Gender Gap: Act Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Gender gaps are pervasive in all walks of economic life and imply large losses in terms of foregone productivity and living standards to the individuals concerned and the economy. This new OECD report focuses on how best to close these gender gaps under four broad headings: (1) Gender equality, social norms and public policies; and gender equality…

  1. Public Perceptions of the Pay Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Catherine; Silva, Elena

    2005-01-01

    Women have made gains toward closing the gender pay gap during the past two decades. Much of the progress occurred during the 1980s, with smaller gains in the 1990s (Institute for Women's Policy Research 2004). Women's achievements in higher education are partly responsible for narrowing the pay gap in the 1980s and 1990s. As more women earned…

  2. Telling Gaps: Adolescents Making Literary Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, P. W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents results of a study of how readers fill in information "gaps" in a text to make meaning, using adolescents' response to a story by Brecht. Concludes that such gaps bore children uninterested in making meaning, and that those who make meaning from a mechanical stance may be limited in their comprehension unless deeper ways of…

  3. GAP-43 Gene Expression Regulates Information Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holahan, Matthew R.; Honegger, Kyle S.; Tabatadze, Nino; Routtenberg, Aryeh

    2007-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that overexpression of the growth- and plasticity-associated protein GAP-43 improves memory. However, the relation between the levels of this protein to memory enhancement remains unknown. Here, we studied this issue in transgenic mice (G-Phos) overexpressing native, chick GAP-43. These G-Phos mice could be divided at…

  4. Closing the Achievement Gap: Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robards, Shirley N.

    2008-01-01

    Closing the achievement gap between low- and high-achieving public school students is an important goal of public education. This article explores background information and research and discusses examples of best practices to close the achievement gap. Several plans have been proposed as ways to enhance the achievement of under-represented…

  5. The Wage Gap and Administrative Salaries Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Kirk D.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of national data on college administrator salaries by gender, minority/nonminority status, years of service, and institution type found that wage gaps related to gender and minority status persisted in 1991-92 but that interaction of length of service with other study variables explained a significant amount of this gap. (MSE)

  6. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Mississippi, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Mississippi for 2010. Mississippi made changes to its state testing program in the 2007-08 school year. Therefore, subgroup and achievement gap trends could not be calculated because fewer than three consecutive years of data were available, too short a period to constitute a…

  7. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  8. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, D. P.; Chalmers, L.; Kusmartsev, F.; Swallowe, G. M.

    We present several new classes of metamaterials and/or locally resonant sonic crystal that are comprised of complex resonators. The proposed systems consist of multiple resonating inclusion that correspond to different excitation frequencies. This causes the formation of multiple overlapped resonance band gaps. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the individual band gaps achieved, span a far greater range (≈ 2kHz) than previously reported cases. The position and width of the band gap is independent of the crystal's lattice constant and forms in the low frequency regime significantly below the conventional Bragg band gap. The broad envelope of individual resonance band gaps is attractive for sound proofing applications and furthermore the devices can be tailored to attenuate lower or higher frequency ranges, i.e., from seismic to ultrasonic.

  9. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, D. P.; Chalmers, L.; Kusmartsev, F.; Swallowe, G. M.

    2011-03-01

    We present several new classes of metamaterials and/or locally resonant sonic crystal that are comprised of complex resonators. The proposed systems consist of multiple resonating inclusion that correspond to different excitation frequencies. This causes the formation of multiple overlapped resonance band gaps. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the individual band gaps achieved, span a far greater range (≈ 2kHz) than previously reported cases. The position and width of the band gap is independent of the crystal's lattice constant and forms in the low frequency regime significantly below the conventional Bragg band gap. The broad envelope of individual resonance band gaps is attractive for sound proofing applications and furthermore the devices can be tailored to attenuate lower or higher frequency ranges, i.e., from seismic to ultrasonic.

  10. Superconducting gap structure of FeSe.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Lin; Huang, Chien-Lung; Rößler, Sahana; Koz, Cevriye; Rößler, Ulrich K; Schwarz, Ulrich; Wirth, Steffen

    2017-03-07

    The microscopic mechanism governing the zero-resistance flow of current in some iron-based, high-temperature superconducting materials is not well understood up to now. A central issue concerning the investigation of these materials is their superconducting gap symmetry and structure. Here we present a combined study of low-temperature specific heat and scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements on single crystalline FeSe. The results reveal the existence of at least two superconducting gaps which can be represented by a phenomenological two-band model. The analysis of the specific heat suggests significant anisotropy in the gap magnitude with deep gap minima. The tunneling spectra display an overall "U"-shaped gap close to the Fermi level away as well as on top of twin boundaries. These results are compatible with the anisotropic nodeless models describing superconductivity in FeSe.

  11. Superconducting gap structure of FeSe

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Lin; Huang, Chien-Lung; Rößler, Sahana; Koz, Cevriye; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Schwarz, Ulrich; Wirth, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism governing the zero-resistance flow of current in some iron-based, high-temperature superconducting materials is not well understood up to now. A central issue concerning the investigation of these materials is their superconducting gap symmetry and structure. Here we present a combined study of low-temperature specific heat and scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements on single crystalline FeSe. The results reveal the existence of at least two superconducting gaps which can be represented by a phenomenological two-band model. The analysis of the specific heat suggests significant anisotropy in the gap magnitude with deep gap minima. The tunneling spectra display an overall “U”-shaped gap close to the Fermi level away as well as on top of twin boundaries. These results are compatible with the anisotropic nodeless models describing superconductivity in FeSe. PMID:28266654

  12. Superconducting gap structure of FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Lin; Huang, Chien-Lung; Rößler, Sahana; Koz, Cevriye; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Schwarz, Ulrich; Wirth, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    The microscopic mechanism governing the zero-resistance flow of current in some iron-based, high-temperature superconducting materials is not well understood up to now. A central issue concerning the investigation of these materials is their superconducting gap symmetry and structure. Here we present a combined study of low-temperature specific heat and scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements on single crystalline FeSe. The results reveal the existence of at least two superconducting gaps which can be represented by a phenomenological two-band model. The analysis of the specific heat suggests significant anisotropy in the gap magnitude with deep gap minima. The tunneling spectra display an overall “U”-shaped gap close to the Fermi level away as well as on top of twin boundaries. These results are compatible with the anisotropic nodeless models describing superconductivity in FeSe.

  13. In vitro formation of gap junction vesicles.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A

    1976-02-01

    A method is described that uses trypsin digestion combined with collagenase-hyaluronidase which produces a population of gap junction vesicles. The hexagonal lattice of subunits ("connexons") comprising the gapjunctions appears unaltered by various structural criteria and by buoyant density measurements. The gap junction vesciles are closed by either a single or a double profile of nonjunctional "membrane," which presents a smooth, particle-free fracture face. Horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c studies have revealed that about 20% of the gap junction vesicles are impermeable to proteins 12,000 daltons or larger. The increased purity of the trypsinized junction preparation suggests that one of the disulfide reduction products of the gap-junction principal protein may be a nonjunctional contaminating peptide. The gap junction appears to be composed of a single 18,000-dalton protein, connexin, which may be reduced to a single 9,000-dalton peak. The number of peptides in this reduced peak are still unknown.

  14. Energy gaps in α-graphdiyne nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, X. N.; Yang, D. Z.; Si, M. S. Xue, D. S.

    2014-04-14

    α-graphdiyne is a novel predicted Dirac cone material, which is similar to graphene. But the absence of a band gap significantly limits its practical applications. In order to extend this limitation, an opening of energy gap is needed. To this end, we resort to the nanoribbon structure of α-graphdiyne. This is a conventional proposal to open up the energy gaps in nanomaterials. The results show that both the armchair and the zigzag α-graphdiyne nanoribbons do generate energy gaps, which are width-dependent. In addition, the underlying mechanism of this opening is explored. The former is ascribed to the combination of quantum confinement and edges' effect, while the latter arises from the edge magnetic ordering. These novel nanoribbons with opening energy gaps would be potentially used in electronic devices.

  15. Terminology gap in hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    Water is central to life on Earth. People have been trying to understand how water moves in the hydrosphere throughout the human history. In the 9th century BC, the famous Greek poet Homer described the hydrological cycle in Iliad as "okeanos whose stream bends back in a circle" with a belief that rivers are ocean-fed from subterranean seas. Later, Aristotle (4th century BC) claimed that most of the water came from underground caverns in which air was transformed into water. It was only until 1674, French scientist Perrault developed the correct concept of the water cycle. In modern times, scientists are interested in understanding the individual processes of the hydrological cycle with a keen focus on runoff which supplies water to rivers, lakes, and oceans. Currently, the prevailing concepts on runoff processes include 'infiltration excess runoff' and 'saturation excess runoff'. However, there is no term to describe another major runoff due to the excess beyond the soil water holding capacity (i.e., the field capacity). We argue that a new term should be introduced to fill this gap, and it could be called 'holding excess runoff' which is compatible with the convention. This new term is significant in correcting a half-century misnomer where 'holding excess runoff' has been incorrectly named as 'saturation excess runoff', which was introduced by the Xinanjiang model in China in 1960s. Similar concept has been adopted in many well-known hydrological models such as PDM and HBV in which the saturation refers to the field capacity. The term 'holding excess runoff' resolves such a common confusion in the hydrological community.

  16. Gap solitons in Rabi lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaopin; Malomed, Boris A.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a two-component one-dimensional system, which is based on two nonlinear Schrödinger or Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with spatially periodic modulation of linear coupling ("Rabi lattice") and self-repulsive nonlinearity. The system may be realized in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate, whose components are resonantly coupled by a standing optical wave, as well as in terms of the bimodal light propagation in periodically twisted waveguides. The system supports various types of gap solitons (GSs), which are constructed, and their stability is investigated, in the first two finite bandgaps of the underlying spectrum. These include on- and off-site-centered solitons (the GSs of the off-site type are additionally categorized as spatially even and odd ones), which may be symmetric or antisymmetric, with respect to the coupled components. The GSs are chiefly stable in the first finite bandgap and unstable in the second one. In addition to that, there are narrow regions near the right edge of the first bandgap, and in the second one, which feature intricate alternation of stability and instability. Unstable solitons evolve into robust breathers or spatially confined turbulent modes. On-site-centered GSs are also considered in a version of the system that is made asymmetric by the Zeeman effect, or by birefringence of the optical waveguide. A region of alternate stability is found in the latter case too. In the limit of strong asymmetry, GSs are obtained in a semianalytical approximation, which reduces two coupled GPEs to a single one with an effective lattice potential.

  17. Revisiting G3BP1 as a RasGAP Binding Protein: Sensitization of Tumor Cells to Chemotherapy by the RasGAP 317–326 Sequence Does Not Involve G3BP1

    PubMed Central

    Annibaldi, Alessandro; Dousse, Aline; Martin, Sophie; Tazi, Jamal; Widmann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    RasGAP is a multifunctional protein that controls Ras activity and that is found in chromosomal passenger complexes. It also negatively or positively regulates apoptosis depending on the extent of its cleavage by caspase-3. RasGAP has been reported to bind to G3BP1 (RasGAP SH3-domain-binding protein 1), a protein regulating mRNA stability and stress granule formation. The region of RasGAP (amino acids 317–326) thought to bind to G3BP1 corresponds exactly to the sequence within fragment N2, a caspase-3-generated fragment of RasGAP, that mediates sensitization of tumor cells to genotoxins. While assessing the contribution of G3BP1 in the anti-cancer function of a cell-permeable peptide containing the 317–326 sequence of RasGAP (TAT-RasGAP317–326), we found that, in conditions where G3BP1 and RasGAP bind to known partners, no interaction between G3BP1 and RasGAP could be detected. TAT-RasGAP317–326 did not modulate binding of G3BP1 to USP10, stress granule formation or c-myc mRNA levels. Finally, TAT-RasGAP317–326 was able to sensitize G3BP1 knock-out cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Collectively these results indicate that G3BP1 and its putative RasGAP binding region have no functional influence on each other. Importantly, our data provide arguments against G3BP1 being a genuine RasGAP-binding partner. Hence, G3BP1-mediated signaling may not involve RasGAP. PMID:22205990

  18. Closing the condom KAP gap.

    PubMed

    Roberto, E L

    1977-01-01

    A number of program strategies have been suggested to close the gap between knowledge and awareness of family planning, and its practice. Most focus on the interim between awareness and usage. This article presents data to support the argument that the problem lies in the awareness stage. Its assumption is that the quality of the awareness is important. As opposed to the survey method of determining awareness, the author proposes the "Focus Group Discussion." As illustration, he presents results of a study using this method, on awareness about condoms, undertaken as part of a Population Center Foundation Condom Distribution Project, in 1975. Its purpose was to identify the more important attitudes toward condoms among married couples, the factors which motivate the couples to use or reject them, and the meanings associated with condoms and how these influence the time, manner, and reasons for rejecting or accepting them. 4 group discussions were carried out, with 8 or 10 married male and female respondents, age 18-35, with at least 2 children, of middle and lower class, and all having at least heard of condoms. Discussions were taped and subjected to content analysis. The 7 major findings are: 1) Quality of awareness depends on experience with use. 2) Experience with use does not guarantee positive quality awareness -- some regular users were still ignorant of some aspects of condom use. 3) Respondents perceive positive aspects of condoms, which should be reinforced. 4) Most of the negative qualities perceived by respondents were imaginary, but can be combatted by the positive statements of users. 5) Filipino men respond to their wives' reactions and project an image of sexual prowess, both possibly damaging to the reputation of condoms; communicators and educators must address the wives equally with their husbands. 6) Buying condoms is embarrassing: studies are needed on how this can be overcome at the places of purchase. 7) Brand awareness is low: only 3 or 4 out

  19. Closing the Geoscience Talent Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    The geosciences, like most technical professions, are facing a critical talent gap into the future, with too few new students entering the profession and too many opportunities for that supply. This situation has evolved as a result of multiple forces, including increased commodity prices, greater strain on water resources, development encroachment on hazardous terrain, and the attrition of Baby Boomers from the workforce. Demand is not the only issue at hand, the legacy of lagging supplies of new students and consequently new professionals has enhanced the problem. The supply issue is a result of the fallout from the 1986 oil bust and the unsubstantiated hopes for an environmental boom in the 1990"s, coupled by the lengthening of academic careers, indefinitely delaying the predicted exodus of faculty. All of these issues are evident in the data collected by AGI, its Member Societies, and the federal government. Two new factors are beginning to play an increased role in the success or failure of geosciences programs: namely student attitudes towards careers and the ability for departments to successfully bridge the demands of the incoming student with the requirements for an individual to succeed in the profession. An issue often lost for geosciences departments is that 95% of geoscientists in the United States work in the private sector or for government agencies, and that those employers drive the profession forward in the long term. Departments that manage to balance the student needs with an end source of gainful employment are witnessing great success and growth. Currently, programs with strong roots in mining, petroleum, and groundwater hydrology are booming, as are graduate programs with strong technology components. The challenge is recognizing the booms, busts, and long-term trends and positioning programs to weather the changes yet retain the core of their program. This level of planning coupled with a profession-wide effort to improve initial recruitment

  20. The Knowledge Gap Versus the Belief Gap and Abstinence-Only Sex Education.

    PubMed

    Hindman, Douglas Blanks; Yan, Changmin

    2015-08-01

    The knowledge gap hypothesis predicts widening disparities in knowledge of heavily publicized public affairs issues among socioeconomic status groups. The belief gap hypothesis extends the knowledge gap hypothesis to account for knowledge and beliefs about politically contested issues based on empirically verifiable information. This analysis of 3 national surveys shows belief gaps developed between liberals and conservatives regarding abstinence-only sex education; socioeconomic status-based knowledge gaps did not widen. The findings partially support both belief gap and knowledge gap hypotheses. In addition, the unique contributions of exposure to Fox News, CNN, and MSNBC in this process were investigated. Only exposure to Fox News was linked to beliefs about abstinence-only sex education directly and indirectly through the cultivation of conservative ideology.

  1. Antideuteron sensitivity for the GAPS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, T.; Hailey, C. J.; Boggs, S. E.; von Doetinchem, P.; Fuke, H.; Mognet, S. I.; Ong, R. A.; Perez, K.; Zweerink, J.

    2016-02-01

    The General Antiparticle Spectrometer (GAPS) is a novel approach for indirect dark matter searches that exploits cosmic antiparticles, especially antideuterons. The GAPS antideuteron measurement utilizes distinctive detection methods using atomic X-rays and charged particles from the decay of exotic atoms as well as the timing and stopping range of the incoming particle, which together provide excellent antideuteron identification. Prior to the future balloon experiment, an accelerator test and a prototype flight were successfully conducted in 2005 and 2012 respectively, in order to verify the GAPS detection concept. This paper describes how the sensitivity of GAPS to antideuterons was estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation along with the atomic cascade model and the Intra-Nuclear Cascade model. The sensitivity for the GAPS antideuteron search obtained using this method is 2.0 ×10-6 [m-2s-1sr-1(GeV/n)-1] for the proposed long duration balloon program (LDB, 35 days × 3 flights), indicating that GAPS has a strong potential to probe a wide variety of dark matter annihilation and decay models through antideuteron measurements. GAPS is proposed to fly from Antarctica in the austral summer of 2019-2020.

  2. The treatment gap in mental health care.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Robert; Saxena, Shekhar; Levav, Itzhak; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2004-01-01

    Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychotic disorders, major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and alcohol abuse or dependence. The median rates of untreated cases of these disorders were calculated across the studies. Examples of the estimation of the treatment gap for WHO regions are also presented. Thirty-seven studies had information on service utilization. The median treatment gap for schizophrenia, including other non-affective psychosis, was 32.2%. For other disorders the gap was: depression, 56.3%; dysthymia, 56.0%; bipolar disorder, 50.2%; panic disorder, 55.9%; GAD, 57.5%; and OCD, 57.3%. Alcohol abuse and dependence had the widest treatment gap at 78.1%. The treatment gap for mental disorders is universally large, though it varies across regions. It is likely that the gap reported here is an underestimate due to the unavailability of community-based data from developing countries where services are scarcer. To address this major public health challenge, WHO has adopted in 2002 a global action programme that has been endorsed by the Member States. PMID:15640922

  3. Confined PBX 9501 gap reinitiation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, Terry R; Hill, Larry G; Lam, Kin

    2009-01-01

    For explosive systems that exhibit gaps or cracks between their internal components (either by design or mechanical failure), measurable time delays exist for detonation waves crossing them. Reinitiation across such gaps is dependent on the type of explosive, gap width, gap morphology, confinement, and temperature effects. To examine this reinitiation effect, a series of tests has been conducted to measure the time delay across a prescribed gap within an 'infinitely' confined PBX 9501 system. Detonation breakout along the explosive surface is measured with a streak camera, and flow features are examined during reinitiation near the gap. Such tests allow for quantitative determination of the time delay corresponding to the time of initiation across a given gap oriented normal to the direction of the detonation wave. Measured time delays can be compared with numerical calculations, making it possible to validate initiation models as well as estimate detonation run-up distances. Understanding this reinitiation behavior is beneficial for the design and evaluation of explosive systems that require precision timing and performance.

  4. Plasmon transmission through excitonic subwavelength gaps.

    PubMed

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-04-14

    We study the transfer of electromagnetic energy across a subwavelength gap separating two co-axial metal nanorods. In the absence of spacer in the gap separating the rods, the system exhibits strong coupling behavior between longitudinal plasmons in the two rods. The nature and magnitude of this coupling are studied by varying various geometrical parameters. As a function of frequency, the transmission is dominated by a split longitudinal plasmon peak. The two hybrid modes are the dipole-like "bonding" mode characterized by a peak intensity in the gap and a quadrupole-like "antibonding" mode whose amplitude vanishes at the gap center. When the length of one rod is varied, this mode spectrum exhibits the familiar anti-crossing behavior that depends on the coupling strength determined by the gap width. When off-resonant 2-level emitters are placed in the gap, almost no effect on the frequency dependent transmission is observed. In contrast, when the molecular system is resonant with the plasmonic line shape, the transmission is strongly modified, showing characteristics of strong exciton-plasmon coupling. Most strongly modified is the transmission near the lower frequency "bonding" plasmon mode. The presence of resonant molecules in the gap affects not only the molecule-field interaction but also the spatial distribution of the field intensity and the electromagnetic energy flux across the junction.

  5. Plasmon transmission through excitonic subwavelength gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    We study the transfer of electromagnetic energy across a subwavelength gap separating two co-axial metal nanorods. In the absence of spacer in the gap separating the rods, the system exhibits strong coupling behavior between longitudinal plasmons in the two rods. The nature and magnitude of this coupling are studied by varying various geometrical parameters. As a function of frequency, the transmission is dominated by a split longitudinal plasmon peak. The two hybrid modes are the dipole-like "bonding" mode characterized by a peak intensity in the gap and a quadrupole-like "antibonding" mode whose amplitude vanishes at the gap center. When the length of one rod is varied, this mode spectrum exhibits the familiar anti-crossing behavior that depends on the coupling strength determined by the gap width. When off-resonant 2-level emitters are placed in the gap, almost no effect on the frequency dependent transmission is observed. In contrast, when the molecular system is resonant with the plasmonic line shape, the transmission is strongly modified, showing characteristics of strong exciton-plasmon coupling. Most strongly modified is the transmission near the lower frequency "bonding" plasmon mode. The presence of resonant molecules in the gap affects not only the molecule-field interaction but also the spatial distribution of the field intensity and the electromagnetic energy flux across the junction.

  6. Flow Induced Noise from Turbulent Flow over Steps and Gaps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-04

    HP-8D20 is housed inside of a casing constructed of medium density fiberboard, MDF , and pushes air into a settling chamber consisting of...settling chamber is constructed of MDF with square steel tubing along the outside for support as the settling chamber pressurizes during operation...is housed inside of a removable acoustic enclosure of dimension 2.13 by 2.43 by 4.06 m. This enclosure is constructed of MDF and square steel

  7. Fragmented coastal boundary layer induced by gap winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Rui M. A.; Iglesias, Isabel; Sala, Iria; Vieira, Rui R.; Bastos, Luísa

    2015-04-01

    The oceanic impact of offshore-localized winds in the NW Iberian Peninsula was studied. Satellite and in situ observations showed the formation of plumes protruding offshore from the coast. To study the dynamics of such episodes tee Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave- Sediment Transport Modeling System (COAWST) was used to reproduce the coastal conditions of the nortwestern Iberian Peninsula, allowing the concurrent representation of local winds, waves, currents, and rivers runoff. The use of coupled models is of outmost importance in order to accurately study the impact of the local winds on the coastal currents. The NW Iberian Peninsula has prominent capes, promontories and submarine canyons, which produce persistent hydrodynamic features. Thus far, the scientific literature shows that the western Iberian rivers produce a recurrent combined plume often denominated as the Western Iberian Buoyant Plume (WIBP) which increases the stratification of the water column and produces a vertical retention mechanism that keeps the biological material inshore. The WIBP extends northward along the coast (over the inner-shelf), and forms a front with the warmer and more saline surface (offshore) waters. However during episodes of strong offshore winds this coastal boundary layer is broken interrupting the WIBP. Coastal orography allows the formation of down-valley winds that produce coastal jets, promoting the offshore transport of pollutants, larvae and sediments. Acknowledgments: Acknowledgments: Numerical model solutions were calculated at CIIMARs HPC unit, acquired and maintained by FCT pluriannual funds (PesTC/Mar/LA0015/2013), and RAIA (0313-RAIA-1-E) and RAIA.co (0520-RAIACO-1-E) projects. The NICC (POCTI/CTA/49563/2002) project provided databases for this work. Rui Caldeira was supported by funds from the ECORISK project (NORTE-07-0124-FEDER-000054), co-financed by the North Portugal Regional Operational Programme (ON.2 - O Novo Norte), under the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF), through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). RAIA.co and RAIA tec (0688-RAIATEC-1-P) projects provided postdoctoral funds for Isabel Iglesias. The RAIA Coastal Observatory has been funded by the Programa Operativo de Cooperación Transfronteriza España-Portugal (POCTEP 2007-2013).

  8. Quantum-Hall Activation Gaps in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesbers, A. J. M.; Zeitler, U.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Ponomarenko, L. A.; Mohiuddin, T. M.; Maan, J. C.

    2007-11-01

    We have measured the quantum-Hall activation gaps in graphene at filling factors ν=2 and ν=6 for magnetic fields up to 32 T and temperatures from 4 to 300 K. The ν=6 gap can be described by thermal excitation to broadened Landau levels with a width of 400 K. In contrast, the gap measured at ν=2 is strongly temperature and field dependent and approaches the expected value for sharp Landau levels for fields B>20T and temperatures T>100K. We explain this surprising behavior by a narrowing of the lowest Landau level.

  9. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    SciTech Connect

    Uythoven, Jan; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Goddard, Brennan; Hemelsoet, Georges-Henry; Höfle, Wolfgang; Jacquet, Delphine; Kain, Verena; Mazzoni, Stefano; Meddahi, Malika; Valuch, Daniel; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2014-07-01

    To minimize the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 μs long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  10. Modeling Plasma Formation in a Micro-gap at Microwave Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Arthur; Remillard, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    In the presence of a strong electric field, gas molecules become ionized, forming a plasma. The study of this dielectric breakdown at microwave frequency has important applications in improving the operation of radio frequency (RF) devices, where the high electric fields present in small gaps can easily ionize gases like air. A cone and tuner resonant structure was used to induce breakdown of diatomic Nitrogen in adjustable micro-gaps ranging from 13 to 1,156 μm. The electric field for plasma formation exhibited strong pressure dependence in the larger gap sizes, as predicted by previous theoretical and experimental work. Pressure is proportional to the frequency of collision between electrons and molecules, which increases with pressure when the gap is large, but levels off in the micro-gap region. A separate model of the breakdown electric field based on the characteristic diffusion length of the plasma also fit the data poorly for these smaller gap sizes. This may be explained by a hypothesis that dielectric breakdown at and below the 100 μm gap size occurs outside the gap, an argument that is supported by the observation of very high breakdown threshold electric fields in this region. Optical emissions revealed that vibrational and rotational molecular transitions of the first positive electronic system are suppressed in micro-gaps, indicating that transitions into the molecular ground state do not occur in micro-gap plasmas. Acknowledgements: National Science Foundation under NSF-REU Grant No. PHY/DMR-1004811, the Provost's Office of Hope College, and the Hope College Division of Natural and Applied Sciences.

  11. Determining the nature of the gap in semiconducting graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestigiacomo, J. C.; Nath, A.; Osofsky, M. S.; Hernández, S. C.; Wheeler, V. D.; Walton, S. G.; Gaskill, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Since its discovery, graphene has held great promise as a two-dimensional (2D) metal with massless carriers and, thus, extremely high-mobility that is due to the character of the band structure that results in the so-called Dirac cone for the ideal, perfectly ordered crystal structure. This promise has led to only limited electronic device applications due to the lack of an energy gap which prevents the formation of conventional device geometries. Thus, several schemes for inducing a semiconductor band gap in graphene have been explored. These methods do result in samples whose resistivity increases with decreasing temperature, similar to the temperature dependence of a semiconductor. However, this temperature dependence can also be caused by highly diffusive transport that, in highly disordered materials, is caused by Anderson-Mott localization and which is not desirable for conventional device applications. In this letter, we demonstrate that in the diffusive case, the conventional description of the insulating state is inadequate and demonstrate a method for determining whether such transport behavior is due to a conventional semiconductor band gap.

  12. High power microwave switching utilizing a waveguide spark gap.

    PubMed

    Foster, J; Edmiston, G; Thomas, M; Neuber, A

    2008-11-01

    A reduction in the rise time of a 2.85 GHz high power microwave (HPM) pulse is achieved by implementing an overvoltaged spark gap inside a waveguide structure. The spark gap is oriented such that when triggered, the major electric field component of the dominant TE(10) mode is shorted. The transition from a transmissive to a highly reflective microwave structure in a relatively short period of time (tens of nanoseconds) creates a means to switch multimegawatt power levels on a much faster timescale than mechanical switches. An experimental arrangement composed of the waveguide spark gap and a high power circulator is used to reduce the effective rise time of a HPM pulse from a U.S. Air Force AW/PFS-6 radar set from 600 ns down to 50 ns. The resulting HPM pulse exhibits a much more desirable excitation profile when investigating microwave induced dielectric window flashover. Since most theoretical discussions on microwave breakdown assume an ideal step excitation, achieving a "squarelike" pulse is needed if substantial comparison between experiment and theory is sought. An overview of the experimental setup is given along with relevant performance data and comparison with computer modeling of the structure.

  13. Determining the nature of the gap in semiconducting graphene

    PubMed Central

    Prestigiacomo, J. C.; Nath, A.; Osofsky, M. S.; Hernández, S. C.; Wheeler, V. D.; Walton, S. G.; Gaskill, D. K.

    2017-01-01

    Since its discovery, graphene has held great promise as a two-dimensional (2D) metal with massless carriers and, thus, extremely high-mobility that is due to the character of the band structure that results in the so-called Dirac cone for the ideal, perfectly ordered crystal structure. This promise has led to only limited electronic device applications due to the lack of an energy gap which prevents the formation of conventional device geometries. Thus, several schemes for inducing a semiconductor band gap in graphene have been explored. These methods do result in samples whose resistivity increases with decreasing temperature, similar to the temperature dependence of a semiconductor. However, this temperature dependence can also be caused by highly diffusive transport that, in highly disordered materials, is caused by Anderson-Mott localization and which is not desirable for conventional device applications. In this letter, we demonstrate that in the diffusive case, the conventional description of the insulating state is inadequate and demonstrate a method for determining whether such transport behavior is due to a conventional semiconductor band gap. PMID:28181521

  14. Determining the nature of the gap in semiconducting graphene.

    PubMed

    Prestigiacomo, J C; Nath, A; Osofsky, M S; Hernández, S C; Wheeler, V D; Walton, S G; Gaskill, D K

    2017-02-09

    Since its discovery, graphene has held great promise as a two-dimensional (2D) metal with massless carriers and, thus, extremely high-mobility that is due to the character of the band structure that results in the so-called Dirac cone for the ideal, perfectly ordered crystal structure. This promise has led to only limited electronic device applications due to the lack of an energy gap which prevents the formation of conventional device geometries. Thus, several schemes for inducing a semiconductor band gap in graphene have been explored. These methods do result in samples whose resistivity increases with decreasing temperature, similar to the temperature dependence of a semiconductor. However, this temperature dependence can also be caused by highly diffusive transport that, in highly disordered materials, is caused by Anderson-Mott localization and which is not desirable for conventional device applications. In this letter, we demonstrate that in the diffusive case, the conventional description of the insulating state is inadequate and demonstrate a method for determining whether such transport behavior is due to a conventional semiconductor band gap.

  15. Extremely confined gap surface-plasmon modes excited by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Pors, Anders; Holmgaard, Tobias; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Wagner, Jakob B.; Pedersen, Kjeld; Wubs, Martijn; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-06-01

    High-spatial and energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used for detailed characterization of localized and propagating surface-plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures, giving insight into fundamental physical phenomena and various plasmonic effects. Here, applying EELS to ultra-sharp convex grooves in gold, we directly probe extremely confined gap surface-plasmon (GSP) modes excited by swift electrons in nanometre-wide gaps. We reveal the resonance behaviour associated with the excitation of the antisymmetric GSP mode for extremely small gap widths, down to ~5 nm. We argue that excitation of this mode, featuring very strong absorption, has a crucial role in experimental realizations of non-resonant light absorption by ultra-sharp convex grooves with fabrication-induced asymmetry. The occurrence of the antisymmetric GSP mode along with the fundamental GSP mode exploited in plasmonic waveguides with extreme light confinement is a very important factor that should be taken into account in the design of nanoplasmonic circuits and devices.

  16. Nonparametric Analysis of Bivariate Gap Time with Competing Risks

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chiung-Yu; Wang, Chenguang; Wang, Mei-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Summary This article considers nonparametric methods for studying recurrent disease and death with competing risks. We first point out that comparisons based on the well-known cumulative incidence function can be confounded by different prevalence rates of the competing events, and that comparisons of the conditional distribution of the survival time given the failure event type are more relevant for investigating the prognosis of different patterns of recurrence disease. We then propose nonparametric estimators for the conditional cumulative incidence function as well as the conditional bivariate cumulative incidence function for the bivariate gap times, that is, the time to disease recurrence and the residual lifetime after recurrence. To quantify the association between the two gap times in the competing risks setting, a modified Kendall’s tau statistic is proposed. The proposed estimators for the conditional bivariate cumulative incidence distribution and the association measure account for the induced dependent censoring for the second gap time. Uniform consistency and weak convergence of the proposed estimators are established. Hypothesis testing procedures for two-sample comparisons are discussed. Numerical simulation studies with practical sample sizes are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed nonparametric estimators and tests. An application to data from a pancreatic cancer study is presented to illustrate the methods developed in this article. PMID:26990686

  17. Gap junction structures. VIII. Membrane cross-sections.

    PubMed

    Sosinsky, G E; Jésior, J C; Caspar, D L; Goodenough, D A

    1988-05-01

    Profiles of negatively stained gap junctions have been measured by grid sectioning. After normal levels of electron irradiation, the membrane thickness shrinks to about half that of unirradiated controls, but no shrinkage occurs in the hexagonal lattice plane. Even under low irradiation conditions, there is significant thinning of the membranes. Edge views, in which rows of connexons are aligned parallel to the beam, were obtained from grid sections, folds in normal negatively stained specimens, and sections of a positively stained specimen. Averaging these micrographs with the translational and mirror symmetry of the projected lattice image displays conserved and variable features in the stain distribution of different specimens. Variations in the relative amount of negative stain in the gap at the surfaces and in the channel are uncorrelated with the irradiation but appear to depend on the local staining conditions and the integrity of the connexons. The dimensions measured from previously unirradiated grid sections, folds, and positively stained sections are in accord with x-ray diffraction measurements. Radiation-induced shrinkage can be accounted for by mass loss principally from the membrane bilayer. Disordering of the surface structure appears to be correlated with the radiation sensitivity of the bilayer; in contrast, the gap structure is well preserved under a variety of conditions.

  18. RotundRacGAP Functions with Ras during Spermatogenesis and Retinal Differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bergeret, Evelyne; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Guichard, Annabel; Raymond, Karine; Fauvarque, Marie-Odile; Cazemajor, Michel; Griffin-Shea, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Our analysis of rotund (rn) null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster revealed that deletion of the rn locus affects both spermatid and retinal differentiation. In the male reproductive system, the absence of RnRacGAP induced small testes, empty seminal vesicles, short testicular cysts, reduced amounts of interspermatid membrane, the absence of individualization complexes, and incomplete mitochondrial condensation. Flagellar growth continued within the short rn null cysts to produce large bulbous terminations of intertwined mature flagella. Organization of the retina was also severely perturbed as evidenced by grossly misshapen ommatidia containing reduced numbers of photoreceptor and pigment cells. These morphological phenotypes were rescued by genomic rnRacGAP transgenes, demonstrating that RnRacGAP function is critical to spermatid and retinal differentiation. The testicular phenotypes were suppressed by heterozygous hypomorphic mutations in the Dras1 and drk genes, indicating cross talk between RacGAP-regulated signaling and that of the Ras pathway. The observed genetic interactions are consistent with a model in which Rac signaling is activated by Ras and negatively regulated by RnRacGAP during spermatid differentiation. RnRacGAP and Ras cross talk also operated during retinal differentiation; however, while the heterozygous hypomorphic drk mutation continued to act as a suppressor of the rn null mutation, the heterozygous hypomorphic Dras1 mutation induced novel retinal phenotypes. PMID:11509670

  19. Gap Junction Enhancer Potentiates Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2012-11-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs due to its ability to damage DNA and induce apoptosis. However, increasing reports of side effects and drug resistance indicate the limitation of cisplatin in cancer therapeutics. Recent studies showed that inhibition of gap junctions diminishes the cytotoxic effect and contributes to drug resistance. Therefore, identification of molecules that counteract gap junctional inhibition without decreasing the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin could be used in combinational treatment, potentiating cisplatin efficacy and preventing resistance. This study investigates the effects of combinational treatment of cisplatin and PQ1, a gap junction enhancer, in T47D breast cancer cells. Our results showed that combinational treatment of PQ1 and cisplatin increased gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) as well as expressions of connexins (Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43), and subsequently decreased cell viability. Ki67, a proliferation marker, was decreased by 75% with combinational treatment. Expressions of pro-apoptotic factors (cleaved caspase-3/-8/-9 and bax) were increased by the combinational treatment with PQ1 and cisplatin; whereas, the pro-survival factor, bcl-2, was decreased by the combinational treatment. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the combinational treatment with gap junction enhancers can counteract cisplatin induced inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication and reduction of connexin expression, thereby increasing the efficacy of cisplatin in cancer cells.

  20. Fear conditioning facilitates rats gap detection measured by prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Dan; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2005-04-01

    A low-intensity acoustic event presented shortly before an intense startling sound can inhibit the acoustic startle reflex. This phenomenon is called prepulse inhibition (PPI), and is widely used as a model of sensorimotor gating in both humans and animals. Particularly, it has been used for evaluating the aging effect on the mouse's ability to detect a silent gap in otherwise continuous sounds. The present study extended this model to the emotional modulation of gap detection. The results show that a silent gap embedded in each of the two broadband noise sounds (55 dB SPL), which were delivered by two spatially separated loudspeakers, could inhibit the startle reflex that was induced by a loud sound presented from the third loudspeaker 50 ms after the gap. The inhibitory effect largely depended on the duration of the gap, with the mean duration threshold around 11 ms across 18 rats tested. Pairing the gap with foot shock in a temporally specific manner, but not in a temporally random manner, significantly reduced the duration threshold. Thus this study established a new animal behavioral model both for studying auditory temporal processing and for studying auditory signal-detection plasticity induced by emotional learning.

  1. Inhibition of connexin43 gap junction channels by the endocrine disruptor ioxynil

    SciTech Connect

    Leithe, Edward; Kjenseth, Ane; Bruun, Jarle; Sirnes, Solveig; Rivedal, Edgar

    2010-08-15

    Gap junctions are intercellular plasma membrane domains containing channels that mediate transport of ions, metabolites and small signaling molecules between adjacent cells. Gap junctions play important roles in a variety of cellular processes, including regulation of cell growth and differentiation, maintenance of tissue homeostasis and embryogenesis. The constituents of gap junction channels are a family of trans-membrane proteins called connexins, of which the best-studied is connexin43. Connexin43 functions as a tumor suppressor protein in various tissue types and is frequently dysregulated in human cancers. The pesticide ioxynil has previously been shown to act as an endocrine disrupting chemical and has multiple effects on the thyroid axis. Furthermore, both ioxynil and its derivative ioxynil octanoate have been reported to induce tumors in animal bioassays. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the possible tumorigenic effects of these compounds are unknown. In the present study we show that ioxynil and ioxynil octanoate are strong inhibitors of connexin43 gap junction channels. Both compounds induced rapid loss of connexin43 gap junctions at the plasma membrane and increased connexin43 degradation. Ioxynil octanoate, but not ioxynil, was found to be a strong activator of ERK1/2. The compounds also had different effects on the phosphorylation status of connexin43. Taken together, the data show that ioxynil and ioxynil octanoate are potent inhibitors of intercellular communication via gap junctions.

  2. Multi Band Gap High Efficiency Converter (RAINBOW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Lewis, C.; Phillips, W.; Shields, V.; Stella, P.

    1997-01-01

    The RAINBOW multi band gap system represents a unique combination of solar cells, concentrators and beam splitters. RAINBOW is a flexible system which can readily expand as new high efficiency components are developed.

  3. Ab initio approach for gap plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenester, Ulrich; Draxl, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Gap plasmonics deals with the properties of surface plasmons in the narrow region between two metallic nanoparticles forming the gap. For subnanometer gap distances, electrons can tunnel between the nanoparticles, leading to the emergence of novel charge-transfer plasmons. These are conveniently described within the quantum corrected model by introducing an artificial material with a tunnel conductivity inside the gap region. Here we develop a methodology for computing such tunnel conductivities within the first-principles framework of density functional theory and apply our approach to a jellium model representative for sodium. We show that the frequency dependence of the tunnel conductivity at infrared and optical frequencies can be significantly more complicated than previously thought.

  4. Semiconductor band gap localization via Gaussian function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, B.; Brown, G. J.; Xi, H.

    2012-10-01

    To determine the band gap of bulk semiconductors with transmission spectroscopy alone is considered as an extremely difficult task because in the higher energy range, approaching and exceeding the band gap energy, the material is opaque yielding no useful data to be recorded. In this paper, by investigating the transmission of industrial GaSb wafers with a thickness of 500 µm, we demonstrate how these obstacles of transmission spectroscopy can be overcome. The key is the transmission spectrums’ derivative, which coincides with the Gaussian function. This understanding can be used to transfer Beers’ law in an integral form opening the pathway of band gap determinations based on mathematical parameters only. The work also emphasizes the correlation between the thermal band gap variation and Debye temperature.

  5. Workshop on Bridging Satellite Climate Data Gaps.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, Catherine; Datla, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Detecting the small signals of climate change for the most essential climate variables requires that satellite sensors make highly accurate and consistent measurements. Data gaps in the time series (such as gaps resulting from launch delay or failure) and inconsistencies in radiometric scales between satellites undermine the credibility of fundamental climate data records, and can lead to erroneous analysis in climate change detection. To address these issues, leading experts in Earth observations from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminstration (NOAA), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and academia assembled at the National Institute of Standards and Technology on December 10, 2009 for a workshop to prioritize strategies for bridging and mitigating data gaps in the climate record. This paper summarizes the priorities for ensuring data continuity of variables relevant to climate change in the areas of atmosphere, land, and ocean measurements and the recommendations made at the workshop for overcoming planned and unplanned gaps in the climate record.

  6. Recovery properties of vacuum spark gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E. ); Gurbaxani, S.H. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Buttram, M.T. . Pulsed Power Systems Dept.)

    1989-12-01

    Multi-kilohertz vacuum spark gap switching utilizing diffuse discharge and counter-pulse techniques has recently been demonstrated. In addition, commercial, high coulomb vacuum interrupter switches have shown free recovery rates greater than 10 kV / {mu}s. Thus, vacuum spark gap switches may provide an alternative method of high average power switching. The authors have investigated the recovery properties of a 90 kV, 15 kA multiple site, triggered vacuum spark gap. Triggering was accomplished with a multisite surface flashover plasma source with approximately 60 sites distributed over a 10 cm/sup 2/ area. Gap dimensions were 1-cm spacing by 7.5-cm diam. Recovery measurements are presented and discussed.

  7. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  8. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mayank; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  9. Thermally Activated Retainers For Insertion In Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimaldi, Margaret E.; Hartz, Leslie S.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical retainers of new type for use with gap filler easy to install and to attach themselves securely. Concept based on shape-memory properties of metal alloy Nitinol, alloy of nickel and titanium. Retainers conceived for use with Space Shuttle insulating tiles but used on other assemblies of blocks or tiles configured similarly. Tabs bent outward made flush by cooling below memory transition temperature. After insertion in gap and reheating, tabs spring outward.

  10. Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2007-10-23

    This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

  11. Investigations Into Alternate Spark Gap Switching Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    2 2. Spark gap in inactive sttge ............................................ 4 3. High voltage relay closing...spark gap in an inactive state with the high voltage relay open. The relay switch has very little contact capacitance, so the trigger resisters remain...open) Figure 2. Bork ggn in inactive stnM TRIGGER ARC CHARGE 200K_--- 100 CAPACITOR ohms_ _ _ ohms HIGH VOLTAGE SWITCH (closed) Figure 3. High voltaq

  12. Gap soliton propagation in optical fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohideen, U.; Slusher, R. E.; Mizrahi, V.; Erdogan, T.; Kuwata-Gonokami, M.; Lemaire, P. J.; Sipe, J. E.; Martijn de Sterke, C.; Broderick, Neil G. R.

    1995-08-01

    Intense optical pulse propagation in a GeO2 -doped silica glass fiber grating results in nonlinear pulse propagation velocities and increased transmission at wavelengths where the grating reflects light in the linear limit. These nonlinear pulse propagation effects are predicted by numerical simulations of gap soliton propagation. The large linear refractive-index variations used for the fiber gratings in these experiments permit the propagation of gap solitons in short lengths of fiber.

  13. Gap Junctions in the Ventral Hippocampal-Medial Prefrontal Pathway Are Involved in Anxiety Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J.; Kloth, Alexander D.; Hsueh, Brian; Runkle, Matthew B.; Kane, Gary A.; Wang, Samuel S.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent but little is known about their underlying mechanisms. Gap junctions exist in brain regions important for anxiety regulation, such as the ventral hippocampus (vHIP) and mPFC, but their functions in these areas have not been investigated. Using pharmacological blockade of neuronal gap junctions combined with electrophysiological recordings, we found that gap junctions play a role in theta rhythm in the vHIP and mPFC of adult mice. Bilateral infusion of neuronal gap junction blockers into the vHIP decreased anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze and open field. Similar anxiolytic effects were observed with unilateral infusion of these drugs into the vHIP combined with contralateral infusion into the mPFC. No change in anxious behavior was observed with gap junction blockade in the unilateral vHIP alone or in the bilateral dorsal HIP. Since physical exercise is known to reduce anxiety, we examined the effects of long-term running on the expression of the neuronal gap junction protein connexin-36 among inhibitory interneurons and found a reduction in the vHIP. Despite this change, we observed no alteration in theta frequency or power in long-term runners. Collectively, these findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions in the vHIP–mPFC pathway are important for theta rhythm and anxiety regulation under sedentary conditions but that additional mechanisms are likely involved in running-induced reduction in anxiety. PMID:25411496

  14. Closing Yield Gaps: How Sustainable Can We Be?

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Prajal; Fischer, Günther; van Velthuizen, Harrij; Reusser, Dominik E.; Kropp, Juergen P.

    2015-01-01

    Global food production needs to be increased by 60–110% between 2005 and 2050 to meet growing food and feed demand. Intensification and/or expansion of agriculture are the two main options available to meet the growing crop demands. Land conversion to expand cultivated land increases GHG emissions and impacts biodiversity and ecosystem services. Closing yield gaps to attain potential yields may be a viable option to increase the global crop production. Traditional methods of agricultural intensification often have negative externalities. Therefore, there is a need to explore location-specific methods of sustainable agricultural intensification. We identified regions where the achievement of potential crop calorie production on currently cultivated land will meet the present and future food demand based on scenario analyses considering population growth and changes in dietary habits. By closing yield gaps in the current irrigated and rain-fed cultivated land, about 24% and 80% more crop calories can respectively be produced compared to 2000. Most countries will reach food self-sufficiency or improve their current food self-sufficiency levels if potential crop production levels are achieved. As a novel approach, we defined specific input and agricultural management strategies required to achieve the potential production by overcoming biophysical and socioeconomic constraints causing yield gaps. The management strategies include: fertilizers, pesticides, advanced soil management, land improvement, management strategies coping with weather induced yield variability, and improving market accessibility. Finally, we estimated the required fertilizers (N, P2O5, and K2O) to attain the potential yields. Globally, N-fertilizer application needs to increase by 45–73%, P2O5-fertilizer by 22–46%, and K2O-fertilizer by 2–3 times compared to the year 2010 to attain potential crop production. The sustainability of such agricultural intensification largely depends on the way

  15. Closing Yield Gaps: How Sustainable Can We Be?

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Prajal; Fischer, Günther; van Velthuizen, Harrij; Reusser, Dominik E; Kropp, Juergen P

    2015-01-01

    Global food production needs to be increased by 60-110% between 2005 and 2050 to meet growing food and feed demand. Intensification and/or expansion of agriculture are the two main options available to meet the growing crop demands. Land conversion to expand cultivated land increases GHG emissions and impacts biodiversity and ecosystem services. Closing yield gaps to attain potential yields may be a viable option to increase the global crop production. Traditional methods of agricultural intensification often have negative externalities. Therefore, there is a need to explore location-specific methods of sustainable agricultural intensification. We identified regions where the achievement of potential crop calorie production on currently cultivated land will meet the present and future food demand based on scenario analyses considering population growth and changes in dietary habits. By closing yield gaps in the current irrigated and rain-fed cultivated land, about 24% and 80% more crop calories can respectively be produced compared to 2000. Most countries will reach food self-sufficiency or improve their current food self-sufficiency levels if potential crop production levels are achieved. As a novel approach, we defined specific input and agricultural management strategies required to achieve the potential production by overcoming biophysical and socioeconomic constraints causing yield gaps. The management strategies include: fertilizers, pesticides, advanced soil management, land improvement, management strategies coping with weather induced yield variability, and improving market accessibility. Finally, we estimated the required fertilizers (N, P2O5, and K2O) to attain the potential yields. Globally, N-fertilizer application needs to increase by 45-73%, P2O5-fertilizer by 22-46%, and K2O-fertilizer by 2-3 times compared to the year 2010 to attain potential crop production. The sustainability of such agricultural intensification largely depends on the way

  16. Flows of gas through a protoplanetary gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassus, Simon; van der Plas, Gerrit; M, Sebastian Perez; Dent, William R. F.; Fomalont, Ed; Hagelberg, Janis; Hales, Antonio; Jordán, Andrés; Mawet, Dimitri; Ménard, Francois; Wootten, Al; Wilner, David; Hughes, A. Meredith; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Girard, Julien H.; Ercolano, Barbara; Canovas, Hector; Román, Pablo E.; Salinas, Vachail

    2013-01-01

    The formation of gaseous giant planets is thought to occur in the first few million years after stellar birth. Models predict that the process produces a deep gap in the dust component (shallower in the gas). Infrared observations of the disk around the young star HD 142527 (at a distance of about 140 parsecs from Earth) found an inner disk about 10 astronomical units (AU) in radius (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance), surrounded by a particularly large gap and a disrupted outer disk beyond 140 AU. This disruption is indicative of a perturbing planetary-mass body at about 90 AU. Radio observations indicate that the bulk mass is molecular and lies in the outer disk, whose continuum emission has a horseshoe morphology. The high stellar accretion rate would deplete the inner disk in less than one year, and to sustain the observed accretion matter must therefore flow from the outer disk and cross the gap. In dynamical models, the putative protoplanets channel outer-disk material into gap-crossing bridges that feed stellar accretion through the inner disk. Here we report observations of diffuse CO gas inside the gap, with denser HCO+ gas along gap-crossing filaments. The estimated flow rate of the gas is in the range of 7 × 10-9 to 2 × 10-7 solar masses per year, which is sufficient to maintain accretion onto the star at the present rate.

  17. Flows of gas through a protoplanetary gap.

    PubMed

    Casassus, Simon; van der Plas, Gerrit; Sebastian Perez, M; Dent, William R F; Fomalont, Ed; Hagelberg, Janis; Hales, Antonio; Jordán, Andrés; Mawet, Dimitri; Ménard, Francois; Wootten, Al; Wilner, David; Hughes, A Meredith; Schreiber, Matthias R; Girard, Julien H; Ercolano, Barbara; Canovas, Hector; Román, Pablo E; Salinas, Vachail

    2013-01-10

    The formation of gaseous giant planets is thought to occur in the first few million years after stellar birth. Models predict that the process produces a deep gap in the dust component (shallower in the gas). Infrared observations of the disk around the young star HD 142527 (at a distance of about 140 parsecs from Earth) found an inner disk about 10 astronomical units (AU) in radius (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance), surrounded by a particularly large gap and a disrupted outer disk beyond 140 AU. This disruption is indicative of a perturbing planetary-mass body at about 90 AU. Radio observations indicate that the bulk mass is molecular and lies in the outer disk, whose continuum emission has a horseshoe morphology. The high stellar accretion rate would deplete the inner disk in less than one year, and to sustain the observed accretion matter must therefore flow from the outer disk and cross the gap. In dynamical models, the putative protoplanets channel outer-disk material into gap-crossing bridges that feed stellar accretion through the inner disk. Here we report observations of diffuse CO gas inside the gap, with denser HCO(+) gas along gap-crossing filaments. The estimated flow rate of the gas is in the range of 7 × 10(-9) to 2 × 10(-7) solar masses per year, which is sufficient to maintain accretion onto the star at the present rate.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Gap Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles. PMID:25635395

  19. Water limits to closing yield gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kyle Frankel; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Garrassino, Francesco; Chiarelli, Davide; Seveso, Antonio; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is often seen as a suitable approach to meet the growing demand for agricultural products and improve food security. It typically entails the use of fertilizers, new cultivars, irrigation, and other modern technology. In regions of the world affected by seasonal or chronic water scarcity, yield gap closure is strongly dependent on irrigation (blue water). Global yield gap assessments have often ignored whether the water required to close the yield gap is locally available. Here we perform a gridded global analysis (10 km resolution) of the blue water consumption that is needed annually to close the yield gap worldwide and evaluate the associated pressure on renewable freshwater resources. We find that, to close the yield gap, human appropriation of freshwater resources for irrigation would have to increase at least by 146%. Most study countries would experience at least a doubling in blue water requirement, with 71% of the additional blue water being required by only four crops - maize, rice, soybeans, and wheat. Further, in some countries (e.g., Algeria, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, and Yemen) the total volume of blue water required for yield gap closure would exceed sustainable levels of freshwater consumption (i.e., 40% of total renewable surface and groundwater resources).

  20. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Effects of Ventricular Gap

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Karnell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Supraglottic compression is frequently observed in individuals with dysphonia. It is commonly interpreted as an indication of excessive circumlaryngeal muscular tension and ventricular medialization. The purpose of this study was to describe the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of varying ventricular medialization in a canine model. Methods Subglottal air pressure, glottal airflow, electroglottograph, acoustic signals and high-speed video images were recorded in seven excised canine larynges mounted in vitro for laryngeal vibratory experimentation. The degree of gap between the ventricular folds was adjusted and measured using sutures and weights. Data was recorded during phonation when the ventricular gap was narrow, neutral, and large. Glottal resistance was estimated by measures of subglottal pressure and glottal flow. Results Glottal resistance increased systematically as ventricular gap became smaller. Wide ventricular gaps were associated with increases in fundamental frequency and decreases in glottal resistance. Sound pressure level did not appear to be impacted by the adjustments in ventricular gap used in this research. Conclusions Increases in supraglottic compression and associated reduced ventricular width may be observed in a variety of disorders that affect voice quality. Ventricular compression may interact with true vocal fold posture and vibration resulting in predictable changes in aerodynamic, physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual measures of phonation. The data from this report supports the theory that narrow ventricular gaps may be associated with disordered phonation. In vitro and in vivo human data are needed to further test this association. PMID:24321590

  1. Self-modulated band gap in boron nitride nanoribbons and hydrogenated sheets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhua; Guo, Wanlin; Yakobson, Boris I

    2013-07-21

    Using hybrid density functional theory calculations with van der Waals correction, we show that polar boron nitride (BN) nanoribbons can be favorably aligned via substantial hydrogen bonding at the interfaces, which induces significant interface polarizations and sharply reduces the band gap of insulating ribbons well below the silicon range. The interface polarization can strongly couple with carrier doping or applied electric fields, yielding not only enhanced stability but also widely tunable band gap for the aligned ribbons. Furthermore, similar layer-by-layer alignment also effectively reduces the band gap of a 2D hydrogenated BN sheet and even turns it into metal. This novel strategy for band gap control appears to be general in semiconducting composite nanostructures with polar nonbonding interfaces and thus offers unique opportunities for developing nanoscale electronic and optical devices.

  2. Rotochemical heating with a density-dependent superfluid energy gap in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Jimenez, Nicolas; Petrovich, Cristobal; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2010-08-04

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (rotochemical heating). This effect has previously been studied by Fernandez and Reisenegger for neutron stars of non-superfluid matter and by Petrovich and Reisenegger for superfluid matter, finding that the system in both cases reaches a quasi-steady state, corresponding to a partial equilibration between compression, due to the loss of angular momentum, and reactions that try to restore the equilibrium. However, Petrovich and Reisenegger assumes a constant value of the superfluid energy gap, whereas theoretical models predict density-dependent gap amplitudes, and therefore gaps that depend on the location in the star. In this work, we try to discriminate between several proposed gap models, comparing predicted surface temperatures to the value measured for the nearest millisecond pulsar, J0437-4715.

  3. Air gap sparkover and gap factors: Analysis of published data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gela, G.

    1994-12-01

    This report is an account of a literature search on air gap sparkover which was conducted as part of the Live Working 2000 project. The objective of this literature search was to locate and analyze published data on sparkover of air gaps which are relevant to live working. The sparkover data form the basis for determination of gap factors for live working situations. Data dating back to 1930`s were located in published papers and reports, extracted and analyzed for a variety of air gaps, including: rod-to-plane, rod-to-rod, sphere-to-plane, bundle-to-plane, hoop-to-plane, bundle-to-tower window, bundle-to-tower outside phase, and worker-to-tower air gap. The rod-to-plane air gap has been analyzed extensively in the literature, and several accurate empirical formulae have been developed to calculate the 50% sparkover voltage of the gap when subjected to transient overvoltages with the critical wave shape. The terms, such as gap factor, transient overvoltage (TOV), critical wave shape, and other relevant terms, are defined in this report for completeness. The CRIEPI formula is used as the reference in this report, since this formula has been adopted by several technical organizations (IEC, IEEE). Comparisons are also made with the second popular formula, the Gallet formula. All sparkover data obtained from the literature are presented in tables and graphs. In addition, where applicable and available, data for the critical wave shape are identified and placed in separate tables for ready reference. The calculated gap factors are based on the CRIEPI formula. Detailed comparisons of the CRIEPI and the Gallet formulae allow easy determination of the gap factors based on the Gallet formula, should one desire to compute these numbers. The calculated gap factors are summarized in tables and compared with the gap factor values tentatively suggested for use by IEC TC 78 WG 10.

  4. Groundlayer vegetation gradients across oak woodland canopy gaps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlovic, N.B.; Grundel, R.; Sluis, W.

    2006-01-01

    Frequency of groundlayer plants was measured across oak woodland canopy gaps at three sites in northwest Indiana to examine how vegetation varied with gap size, direction along the gap edge, and microhabitat. Microhabitats were defined as under the canopy adjacent to the gap, along the gap edge, and within the gap. Gap-sites consisted of gaps plus adjacent tree canopy. Gaps were classified as small (16 ± 1 m2), medium (97 ± 8), and large (310 ± 32). Neither richness nor diversity differed among microhabitats, gap sizes, or edges. Similarity between microhabitats wthin a gap-site increased as the distance between plots decreased and as the difference in PAR decreased, the latter explaining twice the variation in percent dissimilarity compared to Mg concentration, A horizon depth, and litter cover. Diervilla lonicera, Frageria virginiana, Helianthus divaricatus, Polygonatum pubescens, Quercus velutina, Smilacena stellata, and Tradescantia ohiensis decreased, whileTephrosia virginiana and legumes increased in frequency, from canopy to gap, and C4 grasses peaked at the gap edge, independent of gap size. Additional species frequency varied across the microhabitat gradient within specific sites. Sorghastrum nutans was three times more frequent in gaps at large sites than elsewhere. The vegetation in medium-sized gap-sites was more variable than within small and large gap-sites, suggesting greater environmental heterogeneity at that scale. Within gap-sites, vegetation was more heterogeneous within edges and canopies than in gaps. Edges were more similar in composition to gaps than to canopy groundlayer within gap-sites. Few species varied significantly in frequency around the gap edge. The oak woodland groundlayer on sandy substrates can be characterized as a mosaic of forb dominated vegetation that varies across light gradients associated with canopy gaps, transitioning to islands of grassland vegetation when gaps exceed 160 m2.

  5. Directed Growth of Carbon Nanotubes Across Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Meyyapan, Meyya

    2008-01-01

    An experiment has shown that when single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown by chemical vapor deposition in the presence of an electric field of suitable strength, the nanotubes become aligned along the electric field. In an important class of contemplated applications, one would exploit this finding in fabricating nanotube transistors; one would grow SWNTs across gaps between electrodes that would serve, subsequently, as source and drain contacts during operation of the transistors. In preparation for the experiment, a multilayer catalyst comprising a 20-nmthick underlayer of iridium (platinum group), a 1-nm-thick middle layer of iron, and a 0.2-nm-thick outer layer of molybdenum was ion-beam sputtered onto a quartz substrate. A 25 micrometers-diameter iron wire was used as a shadow mask during the sputtering to create a 25 micrometers gap in the catalyst. Then electrical leads were connected to the catalyst areas separated by the gap so that these catalyst areas would also serve as electrodes. The substrate as thus prepared was placed in a growth chamber that consisted of a quartz tube of 1-in. (2.54-cm) diameter enclosed in a furnace. SWNTs of acceptably high quantity and quality were grown in 10 minutes with methane at atmospheric pressure flowing through the chamber at a rate of 1,000 standard cubic centimeters per minute at a temperature of 900 C. To prevent oxidation of the SWNTs, the chamber was purged with 99.999-percent pure argon before and after growth, and the chamber was cooled to less than 300 C before opening it to the atmosphere after growth. When no voltage was applied across the gap, the SWNTs grew in random directions extending out from the edges of the catalyst at the gap. When a potential of 10 V was applied between the catalyst/electrode areas to create an electric field across the gap, the SWNTs grew across the gap, as shown in the figure.

  6. Heterotypic gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses are abundant in goldfish brain

    PubMed Central

    Rash, John E.; Kamasawa, Naomi; Vanderpool, Kimberly G.; Yasumura, Thomas; O'Brien, John; Nannapaneni, Srikant; Pereda, Alberto E.; Nagy, James I.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junctions provide for direct intercellular electrical and metabolic coupling. The abundance of gap junctions at “large myelinated club ending” synapses on Mauthner cells of the teleost brain provided a convenient model to correlate anatomical and physiological properties of electrical synapses. There, presynaptic action potentials were found to evoke short-latency electrical “pre-potentials” immediately preceding their accompanying glutamate-induced depolarizations, making these the first unambiguously identified “mixed” (i.e., chemical plus electrical) synapses in the vertebrate CNS. We recently showed that gap junctions at these synapses exhibit asymmetric electrical resistance (i.e., electrical rectification), which we correlated with total molecular asymmetry of connexin composition in their apposing gap junction hemiplaques, with Cx35 restricted to axon terminal hemiplaques and Cx34.7 restricted to apposing Mauthner cell plasma membranes. We now show that similarly heterotypic neuronal gap junctions are abundant throughout goldfish brain, with labeling exclusively for Cx35 in presynaptic hemiplaques and exclusively for Cx34.7 in postsynaptic hemiplaques. Moreover, the vast majority of these asymmetric gap junctions occur at glutamatergic axon terminals. The widespread distribution of heterotypic gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses throughout goldfish brain and spinal cord implies that pre- vs. postsynaptic asymmetry at electrical synapses evolved early in the chordate lineage. We propose that the advantages of the molecular and functional asymmetry of connexins at electrical synapses that are so prominently expressed in the teleost CNS are unlikely to have been abandoned in higher vertebrates. However, to create asymmetric coupling in mammals, where most gap junctions are composed of Cx36 on both sides, would require some other mechanism, such as differential phosphorylation of connexins on opposite sides of the same gap junction or

  7. Heterotypic gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses are abundant in goldfish brain.

    PubMed

    Rash, J E; Kamasawa, N; Vanderpool, K G; Yasumura, T; O'Brien, J; Nannapaneni, S; Pereda, A E; Nagy, J I

    2015-01-29

    Gap junctions provide for direct intercellular electrical and metabolic coupling. The abundance of gap junctions at "large myelinated club ending (LMCE)" synapses on Mauthner cells (M-cells) of the teleost brain provided a convenient model to correlate anatomical and physiological properties of electrical synapses. There, presynaptic action potentials were found to evoke short-latency electrical "pre-potentials" immediately preceding their accompanying glutamate-induced depolarizations, making these the first unambiguously identified "mixed" (i.e., chemical plus electrical) synapses in the vertebrate CNS. We recently showed that gap junctions at these synapses exhibit asymmetric electrical resistance (i.e., electrical rectification), which we correlated with total molecular asymmetry of connexin composition in their apposing gap junction hemiplaques, with connexin35 (Cx35) restricted to axon terminal hemiplaques and connexin34.7 (Cx34.7) restricted to apposing M-cell plasma membranes. We now show that similarly heterotypic neuronal gap junctions are abundant throughout goldfish brain, with labeling exclusively for Cx35 in presynaptic hemiplaques and exclusively for Cx34.7 in postsynaptic hemiplaques. Moreover, the vast majority of these asymmetric gap junctions occur at glutamatergic axon terminals. The widespread distribution of heterotypic gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses throughout goldfish brain and spinal cord implies that pre- vs. postsynaptic asymmetry at electrical synapses evolved early in the chordate lineage. We propose that the advantages of the molecular and functional asymmetry of connexins at electrical synapses that are so prominently expressed in the teleost CNS are unlikely to have been abandoned in higher vertebrates. However, to create asymmetric coupling in mammals, where most gap junctions are composed of connexin36 (Cx36) on both sides, would require some other mechanism, such as differential phosphorylation of connexins on

  8. Resistance to change and vulnerability to stress: autistic-like features of GAP43-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, K J; Lagace, D C; Eisch, A J; McCasland, J S

    2010-11-01

    There is an urgent need for animal models of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to understand the underlying pathology and facilitate development and testing of new treatments. The synaptic growth-associated protein-43 (GAP43) has recently been identified as an autism candidate gene of interest. Our previous studies show many brain abnormalities in mice lacking one allele for GAP43 [GAP43 (+/-)] that are consistent with the disordered connectivity theory of ASD. Thus, we hypothesized that GAP43 (+/-) mice would show at least some autistic-like behaviors. We found that GAP43 (+/-) mice, relative to wild-type (+/+) littermates, displayed resistance to change, consistent with one of the diagnostic criteria for ASD. GAP43 (+/-) mice also displayed stress-induced behavioral withdrawal and anxiety, as seen in many autistic individuals. In addition, both GAP43 (+/-) mice and (+/+) littermates showed low social approach and lack of preference for social novelty, consistent with another diagnostic criterion for ASD. This low sociability is likely because of the mixed C57BL/6J 129S3/SvImJ background. We conclude that GAP43 deficiency leads to the development of a subset of autistic-like behaviors. As these behaviors occur in a mouse that displays disordered connectivity, we propose that future anatomical and functional studies in this mouse may help uncover underlying mechanisms for these specific behaviors. Strain-specific low sociability may be advantageous in these studies, creating a more autistic-like environment for study of the GAP43-mediated deficits of resistance to change and vulnerability to stress.

  9. Evaluation of the National Gap Analysis Program (GAP): survey of users of GAP data: report to respondents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratz, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a summary of responses to the questions included in a survey of individuals who use or have used data created and provided by the U.S. Geological Survey National Gap Analysis Program (GAP). The survey was commissioned by the GAP main office and was conducted by U.S. Geological Survey personnel in the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance branch. The data collection process started on September 18, 2012, and ended on November 9, 2012. The dataset includes the responses from 359 individuals. The adjusted response rate for the survey was 35 percent. This report provides a summary of results for the survey questions in the order in which the questions were asked. The text of comments provided by respondents to open-ended questions is provided.

  10. Symbiotic two-component gap solitons.

    PubMed

    Roeksabutr, Athikom; Mayteevarunyoo, Thawatchai; Malomed, Boris A

    2012-10-22

    We consider a two-component one-dimensional model of gap solitons (GSs), which is based on two nonlinear Schrödinger equations, coupled by repulsive XPM (cross-phase-modulation) terms, in the absence of the SPM (self-phase-modulation) nonlinearity. The equations include a periodic potential acting on both components, thus giving rise to GSs of the "symbiotic" type, which exist solely due to the repulsive interaction between the two components. The model may be implemented for "holographic solitons" in optics, and in binary bosonic or fermionic gases trapped in the optical lattice. Fundamental symbiotic GSs are constructed, and their stability is investigated, in the first two finite bandgaps of the underlying spectrum. Symmetric solitons are destabilized, including their entire family in the second bandgap, by symmetry-breaking perturbations above a critical value of the total power. Asymmetric solitons of intra-gap and inter-gap types are studied too, with the propagation constants of the two components falling into the same or different bandgaps, respectively. The increase of the asymmetry between the components leads to shrinkage of the stability areas of the GSs. Inter-gap GSs are stable only in a strongly asymmetric form, in which the first-bandgap component is a dominating one. Intra-gap solitons are unstable in the second bandgap. Unstable two-component GSs are transformed into persistent breathers. In addition to systematic numerical considerations, analytical results are obtained by means of an extended ("tailed") Thomas-Fermi approximation (TFA).

  11. Comparative study of INPIStron and spark gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1993-01-01

    An inverse pinch plasma switch, INPIStron, was studied in comparison to a conventional spark gap. The INPIStron is under development for high power switching applications. The INPIStron has an inverse pinch dynamics, opposed to Z-pinch dynamics in the spark gap. The electrical, plasma dynamics and radiative properties of the closing plasmas have been studied. Recently the high-voltage pulse transfer capabilities or both the INPIStron and the spark gap were also compared. The INPIStron with a low impedance Z = 9 ohms transfers 87 percent of an input pulse with a halfwidth of 2 mu s. For the same input pulse the spark gap of Z = 100 ohms transfers 68 percent. Fast framing and streak photography, taken with an TRW image converter camera, was used to observe the discharge uniformity and closing plasma speed in both switches. In order to assess the effects of closing plasmas on erosion of electrode material, emission spectra of two switches were studied with a spectrometer-optical multi channel analyzer (OMA) system. The typical emission spectra of the closing plasmas in the INPIStron and the spark gap showed that there were comparatively weak carbon line emission in 658.7 nm and copper (electrode material) line emissions in the INPIStron, indicating low erosion of materials in the INPIStron.

  12. Trunnion Collar Removal Machine - Gap Analysis Table

    SciTech Connect

    M. Johnson

    2005-06-27

    The purpose of this document is to review the existing the trunnion collar removal machine against the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) [Ref. 10] requirements and to identify codes and standards and supplemental requirements to meet these requirements. If these codes and standards can not fully meet these requirements then a ''gap'' is identified. These gaps will be identified here and addressed using the ''Trunnion Collar Removal Machine Design Development Plan'' [Ref. 15]. The codes and standards, supplemental requirements, and design development requirements for the trunnion collar removal machine are provided in the gap analysis table (Appendix A, Table 1). Because the trunnion collar removal machine is credited with performing functions important to safety (ITS) in the NSDB [Ref. 10], design basis requirements are applicable to ensure equipment is available and performs required safety functions when needed. The gap analysis table is used to identify design objectives and provide a means to satisfy safety requirements. To ensure that the trunnion collar removal machine performs required safety functions and meets performance criteria, this portion of the gap analysis tables supplies codes and standards sections and the supplemental requirements and identifies design development requirements, if needed.

  13. Tire Crumb Research Study Literature Review / Gap ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In order to more fully understand data gaps in human exposure and toxicity to tire crumb materials, ATSDR, CPSC and EPA undertook a collaborative effort in the form of a scientific literature review and subsequent gaps analysis. The first objective of the Literature Review and Gap Analysis (LRGA) collaboration was to identify the existing body of literature related specifically to human exposure to tire crumb materials through the use of synthetic turf athletic fields and playgrounds. The second objective was to characterize and summarize the relevant data from the scientific literature. The final objective was to review the summary information and identify data gaps to build on the current understanding of the state-of-the-science and inform the development of specific research efforts that would be most impactful in the near-term. Because of the need for additional information, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) launched a multi-agency action plan to study key environmental human health questions. The Federal Research Action Plan includes numerous activities, including research studies (U.S. EPA, 2016). A key objective of the Action Plan is to identify key knowledge gaps.

  14. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor.

    PubMed

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. L-lysine, L-histidine and L-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike L-histidine, L-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and D-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, L-Asp-γ-L-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of L-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1(Y395C) by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1(K9R,K16R). Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes.

  15. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor

    PubMed Central

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. l-lysine, l-histidine and l-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike l-histidine, l-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and d-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, l-Asp-γ-l-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of l-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1Y395C by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1K9R,K16R. Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes. PMID:24852066

  16. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5.

    PubMed

    Wright, Catherine S; Berends, Rebecca F; Flint, David J; Martin, Patricia E M

    2013-02-15

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance.

  17. The gap-startle paradigm for tinnitus screening in animal models: limitations and optimization.

    PubMed

    Lobarinas, Edward; Hayes, Sarah H; Allman, Brian L

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Turner and colleagues (Behav. Neurosci., 120:188-195) introduced the gap-startle paradigm as a high-throughput method for tinnitus screening in rats. Under this paradigm, gap detection ability was assessed by determining the level of inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex produced by a short silent gap inserted in an otherwise continuous background sound prior to a loud startling stimulus. Animals with tinnitus were expected to show impaired gap detection ability (i.e., lack of inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex) if the background sound containing the gap was qualitatively similar to the tinnitus pitch. Thus, for the gap-startle paradigm to be a valid tool to screen for tinnitus, a robust startle response from which to inhibit must be present. Because recent studies have demonstrated that the acoustic startle reflex could be dramatically reduced following noise exposure, we endeavored to 1) modify the gap-startle paradigm to be more resilient in the presence of hearing loss, and 2) evaluate whether a reduction in startle reactivity could confound the interpretation of gap prepulse inhibition and lead to errors in screening for tinnitus. In the first experiment, the traditional broadband noise (BBN) startle stimulus was replaced by a bandpass noise in which the sound energy was concentrated in the lower frequencies (5-10 kHz) in order to maintain audibility of the startle stimulus after unilateral high-frequency noise exposure (16 kHz). However, rats still showed a 57% reduction in startle amplitude to the bandpass noise post-noise exposure. A follow-up experiment on a separate group of rats with transiently-induced conductive hearing loss revealed that startle reactivity was better preserved when the BBN startle stimulus was replaced by a rapid airpuff to the back of the rat's neck. Furthermore, it was found that transient unilateral conductive hearing loss, which was not likely to induce tinnitus, caused an impairment in gap prepulse

  18. Mind the (Other) Gap! The Growing Excellence Gap in K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; Burroughs, Nathan; Song, Ruiting

    2010-01-01

    This report is intended to provide some preliminary excellence gap data and kick start the national discussion on the importance of excellence in the national and state K-12 education systems. After briefly summarizing recent literature on the excellence gap, the trends in National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) scores along gender,…

  19. Widening the Gap: Pre-University Gap Years and the "Economy of Experience"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Embarking upon a pre-university gap year is an increasingly popular option among British students. Drawing on Brown et al.'s work on positional conflict theory and the increased importance of the "economy of experience", this paper seeks to explore this growing popularity and argues that the gap year's enhanced profile raises important…

  20. ECOREGIONAL GAP ANALYSIS OF THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES: THE SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP ANALYSIS PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gap Analysis Program is a national program with the mission of developing key datasets needed to assess biological diversity across the nation. The primary objectives of the Gap Analysis Program are: (1) Land Cover Mapping – to map the distributions of natural communities; (2...

  1. Closing the Gap: An Overview. The Achievement Gap: An Overview. Info Brief. Number 44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakoff, Anne Rogers

    2006-01-01

    Persistent gaps between the academic achievements of different groups of children are thoroughly documented by the U.S. National Assessment of Educational Progress and other statistical analyses of state assessments, grades, course selection, and dropout rates. Despite improvements in some years, the gap endures as a consistent and disturbing…

  2. On "Gap Gazing" in Mathematics Education: The Need for Gaps Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubienski, Sarah Theule

    2008-01-01

    There are three articles in this month's "Research Commentary" section. Analyses of disparities in students' mathematics experiences and outcomes are an essential part of efforts to promote equity. Scholars concerned about equity should not write off such analyses as mere "gap gazing." Research on gaps between underserved groups and their more…

  3. GAP: A computer program for gene assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Eisnstein, J.R.; Uberbacher, E.C.; Guan, X.; Mural, R.J.; Mann, R.C.

    1991-09-01

    A computer program, GAP (Gene Assembly Program), has been written to assemble and score hypothetical genes, given a DNA sequence containing the gene, and the outputs of several other programs which analyze the sequence. These programs include the codign-recognition and splice-junction-recognition modules developed in this laboratory. GAP is a prototype of a planned system in which it will be integrated with an expert system and rule base. Initial tests of GAP have been carried out with four sequences, the exons of which have been determined by biochemcial methods. The highest-scoring hypothetical genes for each of the four sequences had percent correct splice junctions ranging from 50 to 100% (average 81%) and percent correct bases ranging from 92 to 100% (average 96%). 9 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Sizable band gap in organometallic topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on first principle calculation when Ceperley-Alder and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerh type exchange-correlation energy functional were adopted to LSDA and GGA calculation, electronic properties of organometallic honeycomb lattice as a two-dimensional topological insulator was calculated. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction bulk band gap of organometallic lattice with heavy metals such as Au, Hg, Pt and Tl atoms were investigated. Our results show that the organometallic topological insulator which is made of Mercury atom shows the wide bulk band gap of about ∼120 meV. Moreover, by fitting the conduction and valence bands to the band-structure which are produced by Density Functional Theory, spin-orbit interaction parameters were extracted. Based on calculated parameters, gapless edge states within bulk insulating gap are indeed found for finite width strip of two-dimensional organometallic topological insulators.

  5. Plasma-cathode-initiated vacuum gap closure

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Gurbaxani, S.H. ); Buttram, M.T. )

    1990-09-01

    The properties of vacuum gap closure initiated by a plasma cathode are presented. The plasma cathode consisted of approximately 60 surface flashover sites distributed over a 10-cm{sup 2} area. Vacuum gap dimensions were 1{times}7.5 cm in diameter. Faraday cup measurements indicated an ion density greater than 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, which was controllable by the amplitude of the initiating high-voltage pulse. Although the field-free expansion velocity of the plasma was measured to be 7 cm/{mu}s, plasma-cathode-initiated closure of the vacuum gap indicated closure speeds on the order of 0.5 cm/{mu}s. Also, increased injected ion density and increased anode-cathode potential resulted in increased closure velocity.

  6. Large gap control in electromagnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Subrata; Prasad, Dinkar; Pal, Jayanta

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes design and implementation of a single axis dc attraction type electromagnetic suspension system where an electromagnet of 2.6 kg mass is levitated over a large gap under a fixed ferromagnetic guide-way. The electromagnet exhibits nonlinear force-current-distance characteristics, and if controllers are to be designed by using linear analysis, the air-gap is restricted to a small region around the chosen nominal operating point. In this work, an attempt has been made to increase the operating range of an electromagnetic suspension system by using the concept of piecewise linear control where the nonlinear force-current-airgap relationships of the magnetic suspension system have been successively linearized at several operating points with a suitable controller designed for each operating point. A novel analog switching scheme has been designed and implemented to automatically switch to the relevant controller depending on the actual air-gap.

  7. Closing the gap on unmeasured anions

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A

    2003-01-01

    Many critically ill and injured patients, especially those with metabolic acidosis, have abnormally high levels of unmeasured anions in their blood. At the same time, such patients are prone to hypoalbuminemia, which makes the traditional anion gap calculation inaccurate. Thus, little is known about the epidemiology and clinical consequences of an excess in unmeasured anions in the blood. Indeed, even the etiology of these "missing ions" is often unclear. Unfortunately, more precise means of quantifying unmeasured anions, such as the strong ion gap (SIG), are cumbersome to use clinically. However, a simple means of correcting the anion gap can be used to estimate SIG and may provide additional insight into this common clinical problem. PMID:12793870

  8. Downregulation of Rap1GAP in Human Tumor Cells Alters Cell/Matrix and Cell/Cell Adhesion▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tsygankova, Oxana M.; Ma, Changqing; Tang, Waixing; Korch, Christopher; Feldman, Michael D.; Lv, Yu; Brose, Marcia S.; Meinkoth, Judy L.

    2010-01-01

    Rap1GAP expression is decreased in human tumors. The significance of its downregulation is unknown. We show that Rap1GAP expression is decreased in primary colorectal carcinomas. To elucidate the advantages conferred on tumor cells by loss of Rap1GAP, Rap1GAP expression was silenced in human colon carcinoma cells. Suppressing Rap1GAP induced profound alterations in cell adhesion. Rap1GAP-depleted cells exhibited defects in cell/cell adhesion that included an aberrant distribution of adherens junction proteins. Depletion of Rap1GAP enhanced adhesion and spreading on collagen. Silencing of Rap expression normalized spreading and restored E-cadherin, β-catenin, and p120-catenin to cell/cell contacts, indicating that unrestrained Rap activity underlies the alterations in cell adhesion. The defects in adherens junction protein distribution required integrin signaling as E-cadherin and p120-catenin were restored at cell/cell contacts when cells were plated on poly-l-lysine. Unexpectedly, Src activity was increased in Rap1GAP-depleted cells. Inhibition of Src impaired spreading and restored E-cadherin at cell/cell contacts. These findings provide the first evidence that Rap1GAP contributes to cell/cell adhesion and highlight a role for Rap1GAP in regulating cell/matrix and cell/cell adhesion. The frequent downregulation of Rap1GAP in epithelial tumors where alterations in cell/cell and cell/matrix adhesion are early steps in tumor dissemination supports a role for Rap1GAP depletion in tumor progression. PMID:20439492

  9. Review and bibliometric analysis of published literature citing data produced by the Gap Analysis Program (GAP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratz, Joan M.; Conk, Shannon J.

    2014-01-01

    The Gap Analysis Program (GAP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produces geospatial datasets providing information on land cover, predicted species distributions, stewardship (ownership and conservation status), and an analysis dataset which synthesizes the other three datasets. The intent in providing these datasets is to support the conservation of biodiversity. The datasets are made available at no cost. The initial datasets were created at the state level. More recent datasets have been assembled at regional and national levels. GAP entered an agreement with the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance branch of the USGS to conduct an evaluation to describe the effect that using GAP data has on those who utilize the datasets (GAP users). The evaluation project included multiple components: a discussion regarding use of GAP data conducted with participants at a GAP conference, a literature review of publications that cited use of GAP data, and a survey of GAP users. The findings of the published literature search were used to identify topics to include on the survey. This report summarizes the literature search, the characteristics of the resulting set of publications, the emergent themes from statements made regarding GAP data, and a bibliometric analysis of the publications. We cannot claim that this list includes all publications that have used GAP data. Given the time lapse that is common in the publishing process, more recent datasets may be cited less frequently in this list of publications. Reports or products that used GAP data may be produced but never published in print or released online. In that case, our search strategies would not have located those reports. Authors may have used GAP data but failed to cite it in such a way that the search strategies we used would have located those publications. These are common issues when using a literature search as part of an evaluation project. Although the final list of publications we identified is not

  10. Non-invasive microfluidic gap junction assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sisi; Lee, Luke P

    2010-03-01

    Gap junctions are protein channels between cells that allow direct electrical and metabolic coupling via the exchange of biomolecules and ions. Their expression, though ubiquitous in most mammalian cell types, is especially important for the proper functioning of cardiac and neuronal systems. Many existing methods for studying gap junction communication suffer from either unquantifiable data or difficulty of use. Here, we measure the extent of dye spread and effective diffusivities through gap junction connected cells using a quantitative microfluidic cell biology platform. After loading dye by hydrodynamic focusing of calcein/AM, dye transfer dynamics into neighboring, unexposed cells can be monitored via timelapse fluorescent microscopy. By using a selective microfluidic dye loading over a confluent layer of cells, we found that high expression of gap junctions in C6 cells transmits calcein across the monolayer with an effective diffusivity of 3.4 x 10(-13) m(2)/s, which are highly coupled by Cx43. We also found that the gap junction blocker 18alpha-GA works poorly in the presence of serum even at high concentrations (50 microM); however, it is highly effective down to 2.5 microM in the absence of serum. Furthermore, when the drug is washed out, dye spread resumes rapidly within 1 min for all doses, indicating the drug does not affect transcriptional regulation of connexins in these Cx43+ cells, in contrast to previous studies. This integrated microfluidic platform enables the in situ monitoring of gap junction communication, yielding dynamic information about intercellular molecular transfer and pharmacological inhibition and recovery.

  11. Co-expression of GAP-43 and nNOS in avulsed motoneurons and their potential role for motoneuron regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiuju; Hu, Bing; Chu, Tak-Ho; Su, Huanxing; Zhang, Wenming; So, Kwok-Fai; Lin, Zhixiu; Wu, Wutian

    2010-12-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is induced after axonal injury. The role of induced nNOS in injured neurons is not well established. In the present study, we investigated the co-expression of nNOS with GAP-43 in spinal motoneurons following axonal injury. The role of induced nNOS was discussed and evaluated. In normal rats, spinal motoneurons do not express nNOS or GAP-43. Following spinal root avulsion, expression of nNOS and GAP-43 were induced and colocalized in avulsed motoneurons. Reimplantation of avulsed roots resulted in a remarkable decrease of GAP-43- and nNOS-IR in the soma of the injured motoneurons. A number of GAP-43-IR regenerating motor axons were found in the reimplanted nerve. In contrast, the nNOS-IR was absent in reimplanted nerve. These results suggest that expression of GAP-43 in avulsed motoneurons is related to axonal regeneration whereas nNOS is not.

  12. Resonant plasmon nanofocusing by closed tapered gaps.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Beermann, Jonas; Novikov, Sergey M; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    We study radiation nanofocusing by closed tapered gaps, i.e. metal V-grooves, under normal illumination, and discover that the local field inside a groove can be resonantly enhanced due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. Considering V-grooves milled in gold, we analyze this phenomenon theoretically, deriving an analytic expression for the resonance condition and predicting more than 550-fold intensity enhancements at resonance, and observe it experimentally with two-photon photoluminescence microscopy, demonstrating more than 100-fold intensity enhancements.

  13. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  14. Sculpting the band gap: a computational approach

    PubMed Central

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Materials with optimized band gap are needed in many specialized applications. In this work, we demonstrate that Hellmann-Feynman forces associated with the gap states can be used to find atomic coordinates that yield desired electronic density of states. Using tight-binding models, we show that this approach may be used to arrive at electronically designed models of amorphous silicon and carbon. We provide a simple recipe to include a priori electronic information in the formation of computer models of materials, and prove that this information may have profound structural consequences. The models are validated with plane-wave density functional calculations. PMID:26490203

  15. Sculpting the band gap: a computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    Materials with optimized band gap are needed in many specialized applications. In this work, we demonstrate that Hellmann-Feynman forces associated with the gap states can be used to find atomic coordinates that yield desired electronic density of states. Using tight-binding models, we show that this approach may be used to arrive at electronically designed models of amorphous silicon and carbon. We provide a simple recipe to include a priori electronic information in the formation of computer models of materials, and prove that this information may have profound structural consequences. The models are validated with plane-wave density functional calculations.

  16. Natural Gas Engine Development Gaps (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Zigler, B.T.

    2014-03-01

    A review of current natural gas vehicle offerings is presented for both light-duty and medium- and heavy-duty applications. Recent gaps in the marketplace are discussed, along with how they have been or may be addressed. The stakeholder input process for guiding research and development needs via the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) to the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission is reviewed. Current high-level natural gas engine development gap areas are highlighted, including efficiency, emissions, and the certification process.

  17. The Gender Wage Gap and Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Aizer, Anna

    2010-09-01

    Three quarters of all violence against women is perpetrated by domestic partners. This study exploits exogenous changes in the demand for labor in female-dominated industries to estimate the impact of the male-female wage gap on domestic violence. Decreases in the wage gap reduce violence against women, consistent with a household bargaining model. These findings shed new light on the health production process as well as observed income gradients in health and suggest that in addition to addressing concerns of equity and efficiency, pay parity can also improve the health of American women via reductions in violence.

  18. Excellence Gaps in Education: Expanding Opportunities for Talented Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; Peters, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    In "Excellence Gaps in Education," Jonathan A. Plucker and Scott J. Peters shine a spotlight on "excellence gaps"--the achievement gaps among subgroups of students performing at the highest levels of achievement. Much of the focus of recent education reform has been on closing gaps in achievement between students from different…

  19. Edge-Waves in Ring Gaps and the Determination of Masses of Embedded Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, John W.; Porco, C. C.; Tiscareno, M. S.

    2008-05-01

    Moons embedded in planetary-ring gaps generate radial waves on the gap-edges. The scale and morphology of these waves can be used to deduce properties of the moons, particularly their masses. However, existing analytic theory describing the relationship between the moon's mass and the edge-wave amplitudes neglects non-linear effects during encounters as well as possible effects of pre-encounter inclinations and eccentricities of the moon and particles. We will present our numerical integrations of ring-satellite encounters in which we explore the effects of the non-linearity, eccentricities, and inclinations. We find that in the Saturnian system, Pan's mass can accurately be deduced using the existing analytic theory. Daphnis is more dynamically interesting, being more inclined, more eccentric, and closer to its gap-edge than Pan. The proximity of Daphnis to the Keeler gap's edges results in significant non-linear effects, leading to the analytic calculation over-estimating the mass of Daphnis by 30%. The eccentricity and inclination both cause time-variable structure on the gap-edge, meaning single observations are not sufficient for determining the mass of the satellite. Additionally, Daphnis' inclination induces an inclination in the gap-edge which conversely act to decrease Daphnis' inclination with a damping timescale of several thousands of years.

  20. Pressure gradient effects on heat transfer to reusable surface insulation tile-array gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the effect of pressure gradient on the heat transfer within space shuttle reusable surface insulation (RSI) tile-array gaps under thick, turbulent boundary-layer conditions. Heat-transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a curved array of full-scale simulated RSI tiles in a tunnel-wall boundary layer at a nominal free-stream Mach number and free-stream Reynolds numbers. Transverse pressure gradients of varying degree were induced over the model surface by rotating the curved array with respect to the flow. Definition of the tunnel-wall boundary-layer flow was obtained by measurement of boundary-layer pitot pressure profiles, wall pressure, and heat transfer. Flat-plate heat-transfer data were correlated and a method was derived for prediction of heat transfer to a smooth curved surface in the highly three-dimensional tunnel-wall boundary-layer flow. Pressure on the floor of the RSI tile-array gap followed the trends of the external surface pressure. Heat transfer to the surface immediately downstream of a transverse gap is higher than that for a smooth surface at the same location. Heating to the wall of a transverse gap, and immediately downstream of it, at its intersection with a longitudinal gap is significantly greater than that for the simple transverse gap.

  1. Observation of variable hybridized-band gaps in Eu-intercalated graphene.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sijin; Kim, Sooran; Lee, Paengro; Kim, Jingul; Ryu, Min-Tae; Park, Heemin; Kim, Kyoo; Min, Byung; Chung, Jinwook

    2017-03-27

    We report europium (Eu)-induced changes in the π-band of graphene (G) formed on 6H-SiC(0001) surface by a combined study of photoemission measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our photoemission data reveal that Eu intercalates upon annealing at 120 °C into the region between graphene and buffer layer (BL) to form a G/Eu/BL system, where a band gap of 0.29 eV opens at room temperature. This band gap is found to increase further to 0.48 eV upon cooling down to 60 K. Our DFT calculations suggest that the increased band gap originates from the enhanced hybridization between graphene π-Eu 4f band due to the increased magnetic ordering upon cooling. These Eu atoms continue to intercalate further down below the BL to produce a bilayer graphene (G/BL/Eu) upon annealing at 300 °C. The π-band stemming from the BL then exhibits another band gap of 0.37 eV, which appears to be a gap due to the strong hybridization between the π-band of the BL and the Eu 4f band. The Eu-intercalated graphene thus illustrates an example of versatile band gaps formed under different thermal treatments, which may play a critical role for future applications in graphene-based electronics.

  2. Single-electron gap in the spectrum of twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, A. V.; Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.; Nori, Franco

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the gap in the single-electron spectrum of twisted bilayer graphene. In a perfect infinite lattice of a twisted bilayer, the gap varies exponentially in response to weak changes of the twist angle. Such a large sensitivity makes theoretical predictions of the gap nearly impossible, since experimentally the twist angle is always known with finite accuracy. To address this issue, we numerically study finite clusters of twisted bilayer graphene. For finite systems, changing the twist angle causes a gradual crossover between gapless and gapped regimes. The crossover occurs when the finite-size quantization energy becomes comparable to the matrix elements responsible for the generation of the gap. We further argue that disorder scattering can induce similar crossover, in which the mean-free path plays the same role as the system size for the finite clusters. It is demonstrated that to observe the gap experimentally, it is necessary to have a sample of suitable purity and to possess the ability to tune the twist angle accurately.

  3. An ultrasonic air pump using an acoustic traveling wave along a small air gap.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Yuji; Nakamura, Kentaro; Nishikawa, Masato; Nakagawa, Tatsuyuki; Kihara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic air pump that uses a traveling wave along a small air gap between a bending vibrator and a reflector is discussed. The authors investigate ultrasonic air pumps that make use of bending vibrators and reflectors and confirm that air can be induced to flow by generating an asymmetric acoustic standing wave along an air gap. In this paper, we proposed a novel ultrasonic air pump in which a traveling wave along an air gap induces acoustic streaming and achieves one-way airflow. Two new reflector configurations, stepped and tapered, were designed and used to generate traveling waves. To predict airflow generation, sound pressure distribution in the air gap was calculated by means of finite element analysis (FEA). As a preliminary step, 2 FEA models were compared: one piezoelectric-structure-acoustic model and one piezoelectric- structure-fluid model, which included the viscosity effect of the fluid. The sound pressure distribution in the air gap, including fluid viscosity, was calculated by the FEA because it is expected to be dominant and thus have a strong effect on the sound pressure field in such a thin fluid layer. Based on the FEA results of the stepped and the tapered reflectors, it was determined that acoustic traveling waves could propagate along the gaps. Experiments were carried out with the designed bending vibrator and the reflectors. The acoustic fields in the air gap were measured via a fiber optic probe, and it was determined that the sound pressure and the phase distribution tendencies corresponded well with the results computed by FEA. Through our experiments, one-way airflow generation, in the same direction of the traveling wave and with the maximum flow velocity of 5.6 cm/s, was achieved.

  4. Establishment of cell-cell junctions depends on the oligomeric states of VE-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Bibert, Stéphanie; Ayari, Hélène; Riveline, Daniel; Concord, Evelyne; Hermant, Bastien; Vernet, Thierry; Gulino-Debrac, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    Specifically expressed at intercellular adherens junctions of endothelial cells, VE-cadherin is a receptor that exhibits particular self-association properties. Indeed, in vitro studies demonstrated that the extracellular part of VE-cadherin elaborates Ca++-dependent hexameric structures. We hypothesized that this assembly could be at the basis of a new cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion mechanism. To verify this assumption, we first demonstrated that VE-cadherin can elaborate hexamers at the cell surface of confluent endothelial cells. Second, mutations were introduced within the extracellular part of VE-cadherin to destabilize the hexamer. Following an in vitro screening, three mutants were selected, among which, one is able to elaborate only dimers. The selected mutations were expressed as C-terminal Green Fluorescent Protein fusions in CHO cells. Despite their capacity to elaborate nascent cell-cell contacts, the mutants seem to be rapidly degraded and or internalized. Altogether, our results suggest that the formation of VE-cadherin hexamers protects this receptor and might allow the elaboration of mature endothelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:18343874

  5. FINAL REPORT ON GDE GAP CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D.; Summers, W.; Danko, E.

    2009-09-28

    A project has been undertaken to develop an electrochemical cell and support equipment for evaluation of a gas diffusion electrode-based, narrow-electrolyte-gap anode for SO{sub 2} oxidation in the hydrogen production cycle of the hybrid sulfur (HyS) process. The project supported the HyS development program at the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL). The benefits of using a gas diffusion electrode in conjunction with the narrow anolyte gap are being determined through electrochemical polarization testing under a variety conditions, and by comparison to results produced by SRNL and others using anode technologies that have no anolyte gap. These test results indicate that the NGA cell has low resistance suitable for use in the HyS electrolyzer, exhibits good efficiency at high current densities compared to the direct feed HyS electrolyzer, and indicates robust performance in extended testing over 65 hours. Seepage episodes were mostly caused by port clogging, which can be mitigated in future designs through minor modifications to the hardware. Significant reductions in sulfur crossover have not yet been demonstrated in the NGA configuration compared to in-house direct feed testing, but corroborative sulfur layer analysis is as yet incomplete. Further testing in a single-pass anolyte configuration is recommended for complete evaluation of steady-state electrochemical efficiency and SO{sub 2} crossover in the narrow gap configuration.

  6. Addressing the Gender Gap in Boys' Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welldon, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Research shows that boys have a tougher time that girls learning to read, and they score lower in reading achievement tests. The school literacy initiative was to help reduce the gender gap in reading and get boys in grades 4-6 excited about reading. To achieve this goal, the Cool Guys Reading Club, promoting reading as a cool activity, was born.…

  7. Producing gapped-ferrite transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Improved manufacturing techniques make reproducible gaps and minimize cracking. Molded, unfired transformer cores are cut with thin saw and then fired. Hardened semicircular core sections are bonded together, placed in aluminum core box, and fluidized-coated. After winding is run over box, core is potted. Economical method significantly reduces number of rejects.

  8. Getting to Results. Closing the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Tory

    2008-01-01

    The "Closing the Achievement Gap" series explores the Casey Foundation's education investments and presents stories, results, and lessons learned. This publication describes efforts to develop a flexible but rigorous results measurements system that enables the Foundation and its grantees to reflect on practice and course-correct as…

  9. Bridging the Gap between Community and Cardiologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamatia, Biplab

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are an emerging cause of morbidity and mortality in India. India produces less than 150 cardiologists annually, leading to a gap between the need and availability of trained professionals. A three-year cardiology-training programme is available for post-graduate doctors in the conventional medical education system. The…

  10. Bridging the semantic gap in sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoxin; Errico, James; Pan, Hao; Sezan, M. Ibrahim

    2003-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing current media management systems and the related applications is the so-called "semantic gap" between the rich meaning that a user desires and the shallowness of the content descriptions that are automatically extracted from the media. In this paper, we address the problem of bridging this gap in the sports domain. We propose a general framework for indexing and summarizing sports broadcast programs. The framework is based on a high-level model of sports broadcast video using the concept of an event, defined according to domain-specific knowledge for different types of sports. Within this general framework, we develop automatic event detection algorithms that are based on automatic analysis of the visual and aural signals in the media. We have successfully applied the event detection algorithms to different types of sports including American football, baseball, Japanese sumo wrestling, and soccer. Event modeling and detection contribute to the reduction of the semantic gap by providing rudimentary semantic information obtained through media analysis. We further propose a novel approach, which makes use of independently generated rich textual metadata, to fill the gap completely through synchronization of the information-laden textual data with the basic event segments. An MPEG-7 compliant prototype browsing system has been implemented to demonstrate semantic retrieval and summarization of sports video.

  11. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In New Jersey, achievement gaps narrowed in grade 11 reading and math for all major subgroups, with one exception. Comparable data for grade 11 by subgroup were available for 2002-2009, with a few exceptions. Because the state changed its tests at grades 4 and 8 in recent years, there were too few years of comparable data to determine trends at…

  12. Finite Element Model for Gap Contact Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    22 8.1 Axisymmetric Perfectly Plastic Problem ............................... 22 8.2 Flat Gap-Coarse Grid Problem...Axisymmetric Perfectly Plastic Problem . The purpose of the first example is to check the elastic-plastic capability of the SAAC program. This is done by

  13. The Rural Differential: Bridging the Resource Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluharty, Charles; Scaggs, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Rural communities have fewer financial resources, making the community colleges located in these regions central to economic development. This chapter reviews the importance of recognizing the rural differential via policy changes and offers strategies to close the resource gap between rural and nonrural community colleges.

  14. Decomposing Achievement Gaps among OECD Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Liang; Lee, Kristen A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use decomposition methods on PISA 2006 data to compare student academic performance across OECD countries. We first establish an empirical model to explain the variation in academic performance across individuals, and then use the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition method to decompose the achievement gap between each of the OECD…

  15. Intercellular Communication—Filling in the Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Meiners, Sally; Baron-Epel, Orna; Schindler, Melvin

    1988-01-01

    Coordination and synchrony of a variety of cellular activities in tissues of plants and animals occur as a consequence of the transfer of low molecular weight biosynthetic and signaling molecules through specialized structures (plasmodesmata in plant cells and gap junctions in mammalian cells) that form aqueous channels between contacting cells. Investigations with rat liver demonstrated that cell-cell communication is mediated by a 32 kilodalton polypeptide that forms a hexameric pore structure in the plasma membrane. Following association with the same structure in a contiguous cell, a trans-double membrane channel is created that has been termed a gap junction. In plant tissue, long tubelike structures called plasmodesmata are suggested to serve a similar cell-cell linking function between cytoplasmic compartments. Although morphologically distinct, dynamic observations suggest similarities in transport properties between gap junctions and plasmodesmata. Recent work now provides evidence that these functional similarities may reflect a more profound identity between the paradigm animal gap junction polypeptide (32 kilodalton rat liver polypeptide) and an immunologically homologous protein localized to plant plasma membrane/cell wall fractions that may be a component of plasmodesmata. PMID:16666225

  16. Gap analysis: Concepts, methods, and recent results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid progress is being made in the conceptual, technical, and organizational requirements for generating synoptic multi-scale views of the earth's surface and its biological content. Using the spatially comprehensive data that are now available, researchers, land managers, and land-use planners can, for the first time, quantitatively place landscape units - from general categories such as 'Forests' or 'Cold-Deciduous Shrubland Formation' to more categories such as 'Picea glauca-Abies balsamea-Populus spp. Forest Alliance' - in their large-area contexts. The National Gap Analysis Program (GAP) has developed the technical and organizational capabilities necessary for the regular production and analysis of such information. This paper provides a brief overview of concepts and methods as well as some recent results from the GAP projects. Clearly, new frameworks for biogeographic information and organizational cooperation are needed if we are to have any hope of documenting the full range of species occurrences and ecological processes in ways meaningful to their management. The GAP experience provides one model for achieving these new frameworks.

  17. Radial-Gap Motor for Ship Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamoto, Toshiyuki; Yokoyama, Minoru

    The KHI team has developed radial gap high-temperature superconducting (HTS) motors of three sizes, 1 MW-class, 3 MW, and 20 MW, to be used for electric propulsion systems for ships. The volumetric torque density of the assembled 3 MW HTS motor was recorded at 40 kNm/m3 in the load test; the world's highest in the class.

  18. Characterizing the Gender Gap in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kost, Lauren E.; Pollock, Steven J.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research [S. J. Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 1 (2007)] showed that despite the use of interactive engagement techniques, the gap in performance between males and females on a conceptual learning survey persisted from pretest to post-test at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Such findings were counter to…

  19. Book Probes Scoring Gaps Tied to Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    A recent book assembles a collection of studies on one of the great mysteries of contemporary American education: Why did national progress in narrowing the achievement gap separating African-American and white students stall from the late 1980s until 2004? "Steady Gains and Stalled Progress," published by the Russell Sage Foundation of New York…

  20. Gaps in agricultural climate adaptation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Debra

    2016-05-01

    The value of the social sciences to climate change research is well recognized, but notable gaps remain in the literature on adaptation in agriculture. Contributions focus on farmer behaviour, with important research regarding gender, social networks and institutions remaining under-represented.

  1. Featured Image: A Gap in TW Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    This remarkable image (click for the full view!) is a high-resolution map of the 870 m light emitted by the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young solar analog TW Hydrae. A recent study led by Sean Andrews (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) presents these observations, obtained with the long-baseline configuration of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) at an unprecedented spatial resolution of ~1 AU. The data represent the distribution of millimeter-sized dust grains in this disk, revealing a beautiful concentric ring structure out to a radial distance of 60 AU from the host star. The apparent gaps in the disk could have anyof three origins:Chemical: apparent gaps can becaused by condensation fronts of volatilesMagnetic: apparent gaps can becaused by radial magnetic pressure variationsDynamic: actual gaps can becaused by the clearing of dust by young planets.For more information, check out the paper below!CitationSean M. Andrews et al 2016 ApJ 820 L40. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/820/2/L40

  2. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  3. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Kansas, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Kansas for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Kansas students showed across-the-board gains--both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and…

  4. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Wyoming, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Wyoming for 2010. Wyoming's demographic profile is such that achievement trends could only be determined for white, Latino, male and female, and low-income student subgroups. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), the white,…

  5. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Vermont, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Vermont for 2010. Vermont's demographic profile is such that achievement trends could only be determined for white, male and female, and low-income student subgroups. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), the white, low-income,…

  6. The Black-White Test Score Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jencks, Christopher, Ed.; Phillips, Meredith, Ed.

    The 15 chapters of this book address issues related to the continuing test score gap between black and white students. The editors argue against traditional explanations which emphasize differences in economic resources and demographic factors, and they urge that more emphasis be put on psychological and cultural factors. The book suggests studies…

  7. Spark gap device for precise switching

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1984-10-02

    A spark gap device for precise switching of an energy storage capacitor into an exploding bridge wire load is disclosed. Niobium electrodes having a melting point of 2,415 degrees centigrade are spaced apart by an insulating cylinder to define a spark gap. The electrodes are supported by conductive end caps which, together with the insulating cylinder, form a hermetically sealed chamber filled with an inert, ionizable gas, such as pure xenon. A quantity of solid radioactive carbon-14 within the chamber adjacent the spark gap serves as a radiation stabilizer. The sides of the electrodes and the inner wall of the insulating cylinder are spaced apart a sufficient distance to prevent unwanted breakdown initiation. A conductive sleeve may envelop the outside of the insulating member from the midpoint of the spark gap to the cap adjacent the cathode. The outer metallic surfaces of the device may be coated with a hydrogen-impermeable coating to lengthen the shelf life and operating life of the device. The device breaks down at about 1,700 volts for input voltage rates up to 570 volts/millisecond and allows peak discharge currents of up to 3,000 amperes from a 0.3 microfarad energy storage capacitor for more than 1,000 operations. 3 figs.

  8. Addressing South Africa's Engineering Skills Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jonathan; Sandelands, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide a case study of how engineering skills gaps are being addressed by Murray & Roberts in South Africa. Design/methodology/approach: The paper focuses on skills challenges in South Africa from a reflective practitioner perspective, exploring a case example from an industry leader. Findings: The paper explores…

  9. "Megatrends" and Knowledge Gaps: Future Predictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie

    The distribution of knowledge in society tends to parallel the distribution of other social and economic resources. Currently four major socioeconomic trends point not only to widened knowledge gaps in the future but also to greater divisions between higher and lower socioeconomic status (SES) groups. First, a long-term trend toward a more…

  10. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  11. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  12. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  13. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  14. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  15. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  16. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  17. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  19. Health Disparities and Gaps in School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The author documents pervasive racial disparities in the health of American children and analyzes how and how much those disparities contribute to racial gaps in school readiness. She explores a broad sample of health problems common to U.S. children, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, asthma, and lead poisoning, as well as maternal…

  20. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Hawaii showed improvement in reading and math in grade 8 at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for Asian and white students, low income students, and boys and girls. Gains in math tended to be larger than in reading. Trends in closing achievement gaps were mixed. Comparable data were available from 2007 through 2009. (Contains 9 tables.)…

  1. High Ability Readers and the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Scott L.; Parke, Cynthia J.; Bramble, Joan G.

    2004-01-01

    To close the achievement gap, the "No Child Left Behind" law calls for all students to make appropriate yearly progress. This presumably means that progress is being made by capable readers at the same time progress is being made by struggling readers. However, there appear to be unintended effects of "No Child Left Behind"…

  2. 76 FR 32316 - Gap in Termination Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... Copyright Office 37 CFR Part 201 Gap in Termination Provisions AGENCY: Copyright Office, Library of Congress... termination provisions apply in circumstances where an author agreed to make a grant prior to January 1, 1978... provisions. It also considered transfer of copyrights and renewal rights under common law, prior to...

  3. 75 FR 72771 - Gap in Termination Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Copyright Office 37 CFR Part 201 Gap in Termination Provisions AGENCY: Copyright Office, Library of Congress... after January 1, 1978 (the effective date of the 1976 Copyright Act). However, the provisions do not...), the Office sought comments as to whether or how the termination provisions apply in...

  4. 75 FR 81952 - Gap in Termination Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 249 (Wednesday, December 29, 2010)] [Proposed Rules] [Page 81952] [FR Doc No: 2010-32864] LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Copyright Office 37 CFR Part 201 [Docket No. RM 2010-5] Gap in Termination Provisions AGENCY: Copyright Office, Library of Congress. ACTION: Notice...

  5. Gap junctional communication during limb cartilage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Kosher, R A

    1991-03-01

    The onset of cartilage differentiation in the developing limb bud is characterized by a transient cellular condensation process in which prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells become closely apposed to one another prior to initiating cartilage matrix deposition. During this condensation process intimate cell-cell interactions occur which are necessary to trigger chondrogenic differentiation. In the present study, we demonstrate that extensive cell-cell communication via gap junctions as assayed by the intercellular transfer of lucifer yellow dye occurs during condensation and the onset of overt chondrogenesis in high density micromass cultures prepared from the homogeneous population of chondrogenic precursor cells comprising the distal subridge region of stage 25 embryonic chick wing buds. Furthermore, in heterogeneous micromass cultures prepared from the mesodermal cells of whole stage 23/24 limb buds, extensive gap junctional communication is limited to differentiating cartilage cells, while the nonchondrogenic cells of the cultures that are differentiating into the connective tissue lineage exhibit little or no intercellular communication via gap junctions. These results provide a strong incentive for considering and further investigating the possible involvement of cell-cell communication via gap junctions in the regulation of limb cartilage differentiation.

  6. Quantifying the Gender Gap in Science Interests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet; Yarden, Anat

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 5,000 self-generated science-related K-12 students' questions, classified into seven science subjects, were used to quantitatively measure the gender gap in science interests and its change with age. In this data set, a difference between boys' and girls' science interests did not exist during early childhood, but increased over 20-fold by…

  7. Spark gap device for precise switching

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1984-01-01

    A spark gap device for precise switching of an energy storage capacitor into an exploding bridge wire load is disclosed. Niobium electrodes having a melting point of 2,415 degrees centrigrade are spaced apart by an insulating cylinder to define a spark gap. The electrodes are supported by conductive end caps which, together with the insulating cylinder, form a hermetically sealed chamber filled with an inert, ionizable gas, such as pure xenon. A quantity of solid radioactive carbon-14 within the chamber adjacent the spark gap serves as a radiation stabilizer. The sides of the electrodes and the inner wall of the insulating cylinder are spaced apart a sufficient distance to prevent unwanted breakdown initiation. A conductive sleeve may envelop the outside of the insulating member from the midpoint of the spark gap to the cap adjacent the cathode. The outer metallic surfaces of the device may be coated with a hydrogen-impermeable coating to lengthen the shelf life and operating life of the device. The device breaks down at about 1,700 volts for input voltage rates up to 570 volts/millisecond and allows peak discharge currents of up to 3,000 amperes from a 0.3 microfarad energy storage capacitor for more than 1,000 operations.

  8. Temperature Tunable Air-Gap Etalon Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Stephen, Mark A.; Lunt, David L.

    1998-01-01

    We report on experimental measurements of a temperature tuned air-gap etalon filter. The filter exhibits temperature dependent wavelength tuning of 54 pm/C. It has a nominal center wavelength of 532 nm. The etalon filter has a 27 pm optical bandpass and 600 pm free spectral range (finesse approximately 22). The experimental results are in close agreement with etalon theory.

  9. The Wage Gap: Briefing Paper #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Committee on Pay Equity, Washington, DC.

    Women have made slow, steady progress in the labor market since 1979, but the wage gap has not narrowed significantly. This briefing paper updates a September 1987 paper based on "Male-Female Differences in Work Experience, Occupations, and Earnings: 1984" (Current Population Reports, Household Economic Studies, Series P-70, No. 10, issued in…

  10. The Earnings Gap between Women and Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The size of the earnings gap between men and women has not changed substantially in recent years. The sustained earnings differential contrasts significantly with recent gains women have made in the job market. Several factors contribute to the wage differences: (1) The majority of women are in lower-paying occupations and lower-status jobs even…

  11. How We Can Bridge the Culture Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    As the cultural and experience gap between an increasingly diverse student population and predominantly white, female educators widens, schools continue to rely heavily on the pedagogies, curricula, assessments, and interventions that more effectively served a homogeneous group of educators than they do a heterogeneous student population. The…

  12. Plasmonic band gap cavities on biharmonic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabas, Askin; Seckin Senlik, S.; Aydinli, Atilla

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we have experimentally demonstrated the formation of plasmonic band gap cavities in infrared and visible wavelength range. The cavity structure is based on a biharmonic metallic grating with selective high dielectric loading. A uniform metallic grating structure enables strong surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation and a superimposed second harmonic component forms a band gap for the propagating SPPs. We show that a high dielectric superstructure can dramatically perturb the optical properties of SPPs and enables the control of the plasmonic band gap structure. Selective patterning of the high index superstructure results in an index contrast in and outside the patterned region that forms a cavity. This allows us to excite the SPPs that localize inside the cavity at specific wavelengths, satisfying the cavity resonance condition. Experimentally, we observe the formation of a localized state in the band gap and measure the dispersion diagram. Quality factors as high as 37 have been observed in the infrared wavelength. The simplicity of the fabrication and the method of testing make this approach attractive for applications requiring localization of propagating SPPs.

  13. Information Gaps: The Missing Links to Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Carl R.

    Communication takes place when a speaker conveys new information to the listener. In second language teaching, information gaps motivate students to use and learn the target language in order to obtain information. The resulting interactive language use may develop affective bonds among the students. A variety of classroom techniques are available…

  14. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Nevada, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Nevada for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Nevada showed across-the-board gains--improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low income…

  15. Gap balancing sacrifices joint-line maintenance to improve gap symmetry: a randomized controlled trial comparing gap balancing and measured resection.

    PubMed

    Babazadeh, Sina; Dowsey, Michelle M; Stoney, James D; Choong, Peter F M

    2014-05-01

    A total knee arthroplasty can be completed using two techniques; measured resection or gap balancing. A prospective blinded randomized controlled trial was completed with 103 patients randomized to measured resection (n = 52) or gap balancing (n = 51). Primary outcome measure was femoral component rotation. Secondary outcome measures were joint-line change, gap symmetry and function and quality-of-life outcomes. Gap balancing resulted in a significantly raised joint-line compared to measured resection. Gap symmetry was significantly better using gap balancing. Functional outcomes and quality-of-life were not significantly different at 24 months. Using computer navigation, gap balancing significantly raises the joint-line in order to improve gap symmetry. This does not result in a clinical difference in function or quality of life at 24 months.

  16. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  17. Sub-wavelength plasmonic modes in a conductor-gap-dielectric system with a nanoscale gap.

    PubMed

    Avrutsky, Ivan; Soref, Richard; Buchwald, Walter

    2010-01-04

    We study guided modes in a conductor-gap-dielectric (CGD) system that includes a low-index dielectric gap layer of deep sub-wavelength thickness sandwiched between a conductor and a high-index dielectric cladding. Analysis of the dispersion equation for CGD modes provides an analytical estimation for the cut-off thickness of the gap layer. This guided mode is unusual because it exists when the gap thickness is less than the cutoff thickness. In the direction normal to the interfaces, the modal electric field is tightly confined within the gap. Sub-wavelength lateral mode confinement is readily provided by a spatial variation of the gap-layer thickness: the modal field localizes at the narrowest gap. Various lateral confinement schemes are proposed and verified by numerical simulations. Possible applications of CGD modes include surface-plasmon nano-lasers (SPASERs) and sensors. If these plasmonic waveguides are scaled for operation at far infrared rather than telecomm wavelengths, then the propagation losses are dramatically reduced, thereby enabling the construction of practical chip-scale plasmonic integrated circuits or PLICs.

  18. Relationships between gap makers and gap fillers in an Arkansas floodplain forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, S.L.; Antrobus, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    Question: In floodplain forests, does frequent flooding allow for self-replacement of shade-intolerant tree species or do small canopy gap openings lead to replacement by shade-tolerant tree species? Location: Cache River, Arkansas, US; 55 m a.s.l. Methods: The species, diameter-at-breast height, and elevation of primary gap-maker trees were determined for new gaps from 1995-1998. The size and species of gap-filler trees were identified and placed into three classes: definitive, edge, or interior. Transition probabilities were determined. Results: The dominant shade-intolerant species Quercus texana is being replaced primarily by the more shade-tolerant A. rubrum var. drummondii, Fraxinus spp. and Ulmus americana. Only 20 of 2767 gap fillers were Q. texana. Replacement probabilities are not constant across elevations, however, as the least shade-tolerant of the three most common species of definitive gap fillers, Fraxinus spp., occurred at lower elevations than A. rubrum var. drummondii, and U. americana. Conclusions: The contention that frequent flooding would allow for self-replacement of shade-intolerant species was only partially supported. The small canopy gaps undoubtedly influenced canopy replacement processes. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  19. Health disparities and gaps in school readiness.

    PubMed

    Currie, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The author documents pervasive racial disparities in the health of American children and analyzes how and how much those disparities contribute to racial gaps in school readiness. She explores a broad sample of health problems common to U.S. children, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, asthma, and lead poisoning, as well as maternal health problems and health-related behaviors that affect children's behavioral and cognitive readiness for school. If a health problem is to affect the readiness gap, it must affect many children, it must be linked to academic performance or behavior problems, and it must show a racial disparity either in its prevalence or in its effects. The author focuses not only on the black-white gap in health status but also on the poor-nonpoor gap because black children tend to be poorer than white children. The health conditions Currie considers seriously impair cognitive skills and behavior in individual children. But most explain little of the overall racial gap in school readiness. Still, the cumulative effect of health differentials summed over all conditions is significant. Currie's rough calculation is that racial differences in health conditions and in maternal health and behaviors together may account for as much as a quarter of the racial gap in school readiness. Currie scrutinizes several policy steps to lessen racial and socioeconomic disparities in children's health and to begin to close the readiness gap. Increasing poor children's eligibility for Medicaid and state child health insurance is unlikely to be effective because most poor children are already eligible for public insurance. The problem is that many are not enrolled. Even increasing enrollment may not work: socioeconomic disparities in health persist in Canada and the United Kingdom despite universal public health insurance. The author finds more promise in strengthening early childhood programs with a built-in health component, like Head Start; family

  20. A Gap in TW Hydrae's Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Located a mere 176 light-years away, TW Hydrae is an 8-million-year-old star surrounded by a nearly face-on disk of gas and dust. Recent observations have confirmed the existence of a gap within that disk a particularly intriguing find, since gaps can sometimes signal the presence of a planet.Gaps and PlanetsNumerical simulations have shown that newly-formed planets orbiting within dusty disks can clear the gas and dust out of their paths. This process results in pressure gradients that can be seen in the density structure of the disk, in the form of visible gaps, rings, or spirals.For this reason, finding a gap in a protoplanetary disk can be an exciting discovery. Previous observations of the disk around TW Hydrae had indicated that there might be a gap present, but they were limited in their resolution; despite TW Hydraes relative nearness, attempting to observe the dim light scattered off dust particles in a disk surrounding a distant, bright star is difficult!But a team led by Valerie Rapson (Rochester Institute of Technology, Dudley Observatory) recently set out to follow up on this discovery using a powerful tool: the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI).New ObservationsComparison of the actual image of TW Hydraes disk from GPI (right) to a simulated scattered-light image from a model of a ~0.2 Jupiter-mass planet orbiting in the disk at ~21 AU (left) in two different bands (top: J, bottom: K1).[Adapted from Rapson et al. 2015]GPI is an instrument on the Gemini South Telescope in Chile. Its near-infrared imagers, equipped with extreme adaptive optics, allowed it to probe the disk from ~80 AU all the way in to ~10 AU from the central star, with an unprecedented resolution of ~1.5 AU.These observations from GPI allowed Rapson and collaborators to unambiguously confirm the presence of a gap in TW Hydraes disk. The gap lies at a distance of ~23 AU from the central star (roughly the same distance as Uranus to the Sun), and its ~5 AU wide.Modeled PossibilitiesThere are a