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Sample records for induces ifng dependent

  1. Autophagy restricts Chlamydia trachomatis growth in human macrophages via IFNG-inducible guanylate binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zeer, Munir A.; Al-Younes, Hesham M.; Lauster, Daniel; Abu Lubad, Mohammad; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Interferon γ (IFNG) is a key host response regulator of intracellular pathogen replication, including that of Chlamydia spp The antichlamydial functions of IFNG manifest in a strictly host, cell-type and chlamydial strain dependent manner. It has been recently shown that the IFNG-inducible family of immunity-related GTPases (IRG) proteins plays a key role in the defense against nonhost adapted chlamydia strains in murine epithelial cells. In humans, IFN-inducible guanylate binding proteins (hGBPs) have been shown to potentiate the antichlamydial effect of IFNG; however, how hGBPs regulate this property of IFNG is unknown. In this study, we identified hGBP1/2 as important resistance factors against C. trachomatis infection in IFNG-stimulated human macrophages. Exogenous IFNG reduced chlamydial infectivity by 50 percent in wild-type cells, whereas shRNA hGBP1/2 knockdown macrophages fully supported chlamydial growth in the presence of exogenous IFNG. hGBP1/2 were recruited to bacterial inclusions in human macrophages upon stimulation with IFNG, which triggered rerouting of the typically nonfusogenic bacterial inclusions for lysosomal degradation. Inhibition of lysosomal activity and autophagy impaired the IFNG-mediated elimination of inclusions. Thus, hGBP1/2 are critical effectors of antichlamydial IFNG responses in human macrophages. Through their capacity to remodel classically nonfusogenic chlamydial inclusions and stimulate fusion with autophagosomes, hGBP1/2 disable a major chlamydial virulence mechanism and contribute to IFNG-mediated pathogen clearance. PMID:23086406

  2. Allergen challenge induces Ifng dependent GTPases in the lungs as part of a Th1 transcriptome response in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Dharajiya, Nilesh; Vaidya, Swapnil; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2009-01-01

    According to the current paradigm, allergic airway inflammation is mediated by Th2 cytokines and pro-inflammatory chemokines. Since allergic inflammation is self-limited, we hypothesized that allergen challenge simultaneously induces anti-inflammatory genes to counter-balance the effects of Th2 cytokines and chemokines. To identify these putative anti-inflammatory genes, we compared the gene expression profile in the lungs of ragweed-sensitized mice four hours after challenge with either PBS or ragweed extract (RWE) using a micro-array platform. Consistent with our hypothesis, RWE challenge concurrently upregulated Th1-associated early target genes of the Il12/Stat4 pathway, such as p47 and p65 GTPases (Iigp, Tgtp and Gbp1), Socs1, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Gadd45g with the Th2 genes Il4, Il5, Ccl2 and Ccl7. These Th1-associated genes remain upregulated longer than the Th2 genes. Augmentation of the local Th1 milieu by administration of Il12 or CpG prior to RWE challenge further upregulated these Th1 genes. Abolition of the Th1 response by disrupting the Ifng gene increased allergic airway inflammation and abrogated RWE challenge-induced upregulation of GTPases, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Socs1, but not Gadd45g. Our data demonstrate that allergen challenge induces two sets of Th1-associated genes in the lungs: 1) Ifng-dependent genes such as p47 and p65 GTPases, Socs1, Cxcl9 and Cxcl10 and 2) Ifng-independent Th1-inducing genes like Gadd45g. We propose that allergen-induced airway inflammation is regulated by simultaneous upregulation of Th1 and Th2 genes, and that persistent unopposed upregulation of Th1 genes resolves allergic inflammation. PMID:20027288

  3. Monocytes play an IL-12-dependent crucial role in driving cord blood NK cells to produce IFN-g in response to Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Guilmot, Aline; Bosse, Julie; Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that foetuses congenitally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, mount an adult-like parasite-specific CD8(+) T-cell response, producing IFN-g, and present an altered NK cell phenotype, possibly reflecting a post-activation state supported by the ability of the parasite to trigger IFN-g synthesis by NK cells in vitro. We here extended our knowledge on NK cell activation by the parasite. We compared the ability of T. cruzi to activate cord blood and adult NK cells from healthy individuals. Twenty-four hours co-culture of cord blood mononuclear cells with T. cruzi trypomastigotes and IL-15 induced high accumulation of IFN-g transcripts and IFN-g release. TNF-a, but not IL-10, was also produced. This was associated with up-regulation of CD69 and CD54, and down-regulation of CD62L on NK cells. The CD56(bright) NK cell subset was the major IFN-g responding subset (up to 70% IFN-g-positive cells), while CD56(dim) NK cells produced IFN-g to a lesser extent. The response points to a synergy between parasites and IL-15. The neonatal response, observed in all newborns, remained however slightly inferior to that of adults. Activation of IL-15-sensitized cord blood NK cells by the parasite required contacts with live/intact parasites. In addition, it depended on the engagement of TLR-2 and 4 and involved IL-12 and cross-talk with monocytes but not with myeloid dendritic cells, as shown by the use of neutralizing antibodies and cell depletion. This work highlights the ability of T. cruzi to trigger a robust IFN-g response by IL-15-sensitized human neonatal NK cells and the important role of monocytes in it, which might perhaps partially compensate for the neonatal defects of DCs. It suggests that monocyte- and IL-12- dependent IFN-g release by NK cells is a potentially important innate immune response pathway allowing T. cruzi to favour a type 1 immune response in neonates.

  4. Selective inhibition of IFNG-induced autophagy by Mir155- and Mir31-responsive WNT5A and SHH signaling.

    PubMed

    Holla, Sahana; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Balaji, Kithiganahalli Narayanaswamy

    2014-02-01

    Autophagy is one of the major immune mechanisms engaged to clear intracellular infectious agents. However, several pathogens have evolved strategies to evade autophagy. Here, we demonstrated that Mycobacteria, Shigella, and Listeria but not Klebsiella, Staphylococcus, and Escherichia inhibit IFNG-induced autophagy in macrophages by evoking selective and robust activation of WNT and SHH pathways via MTOR. Utilization of gain- or loss-of-function analyses as well as mir155-null macrophages emphasized the role of MTOR-responsive epigenetic modifications in the induction of Mir155 and Mir31. Importantly, cellular levels of PP2A, a phosphatase, were regulated by Mir155 and Mir31 to fine-tune autophagy. Diminished expression of PP2A led to inhibition of GSK3B, thus facilitating the prolonged activation of WNT and SHH signaling pathways. Sustained WNT and SHH signaling effectuated the expression of anti-inflammatory lipoxygenases, which in tandem inhibited IFNG-induced JAK-STAT signaling and contributed to evasion of autophagy. Altogether, these results established a role for new host factors and inhibitory mechanisms employed by the pathogens to limit autophagy, which could be targeted for therapeutic interventions.

  5. Twist1 regulates Ifng expression in T helper 1 cells by interfering with Runx3 function

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy; Vincentz, Joshua W.; Firulli, Anthony B.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    A transcription factor network that includes STAT4, T-bet and Runx3 promotes the differentiation of T helper type 1 (Th1) cells and inflammatory immune responses. How additional transcription factors regulate the function of Th1 cells has not been defined. In this report we show that the negative regulatory factor Twist1 decreases expression of T-bet, Runx3 and IL-12Rβ2 as it inhibits IFN-γ production. Ectopic expression of Runx3, but not T-bet or IL-12Rβ2 compensates for the effects of Twist1 on IFN-γ production, and Twist1 regulation of Ifng depends upon complex formation with Runx3. Twist1 decreases Runx3 and T-bet binding at the Ifng locus, and decreases chromatin looping within the Ifng locus. These data define an IL-12/STAT4-induced negative regulatory loop that impacts multiple components of the Th1 transcriptional network and provides further insight into regulation of Th1 differentiation. PMID:22685315

  6. IFNG-mediated immune responses enhance autophagy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Recalde, Gabriela M; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Bigi, Fabiana; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gutierrez, Marisa; Colombo, María I; García, Verónica E

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires IFNG. Besides, IFNG-mediated induction of autophagy suppresses survival of virulent Mtb in macrophage cell lines. We investigated the contribution of autophagy to the defense against Mtb antigen (Mtb-Ag) in cells from tuberculosis patients and healthy donors (HD). Patients were classified as high responders (HR) if their T cells produced significant IFNG against Mtb-Ag; and low responders (LR) when patients showed weak or no T cell responses to Mtb-Ag. The highest autophagy levels were detected in HD cells whereas the lowest quantities were observed in LR patients. Interestingly, upon Mtb-Ag stimulation, we detected a positive correlation between IFNG and MAP1LC3B-II/LC3-II levels. Actually, blockage of Mtb-Ag-induced IFNG markedly reduced autophagy in HR patients whereas addition of limited amounts of IFNG significantly increased autophagy in LR patients. Therefore, autophagy collaborates with human immune responses against Mtb in close association with specific IFNG secreted against the pathogen. PMID:25426782

  7. IFNG-mediated immune responses enhance autophagy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Recalde, Gabriela M; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Bigi, Fabiana; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gutierrez, Marisa; Colombo, María I; García, Verónica E

    2014-01-01

    Protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires IFNG. Besides, IFNG-mediated induction of autophagy suppresses survival of virulent Mtb in macrophage cell lines. We investigated the contribution of autophagy to the defense against Mtb antigen (Mtb-Ag) in cells from tuberculosis patients and healthy donors (HD). Patients were classified as high responders (HR) if their T cells produced significant IFNG against Mtb-Ag; and low responders (LR) when patients showed weak or no T cell responses to Mtb-Ag. The highest autophagy levels were detected in HD cells whereas the lowest quantities were observed in LR patients. Interestingly, upon Mtb-Ag stimulation, we detected a positive correlation between IFNG and MAP1LC3B-II/LC3-II levels. Actually, blockage of Mtb-Ag-induced IFNG markedly reduced autophagy in HR patients whereas addition of limited amounts of IFNG significantly increased autophagy in LR patients. Therefore, autophagy collaborates with human immune responses against Mtb in close association with specific IFNG secreted against the pathogen.

  8. IFNG rs1861494 Polymorphism is Associated with IBD Disease Severity and Functional Changes in both IFNG Methylation and Protein Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gonsky, Rivkah; Deem, Richard L; Landers, Carol J; Haritunians, Talin; Yang, Shaohong; Targan, Stephan R

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucosal expression of IFN-γ plays a pivotal role in IBD pathogenesis and IBD-risk regions flank IFNG. The conserved IFNG rs1861494 T/C, introduces a new CpG methylation site, and is associated with disease severity and lack of therapeutic response in other infectious and immune mediated disorders, and is in linkage-disequilibrium with a UC disease severity region. It seems likely that CpG-altering SNPs modify methylation and gene expression. This study evaluated the association between rs1861494 and clinical, serologic and methylation patterns in IBD patients. Methods Peripheral T cells of UC and CD patients were genotyped for rs1861494 and analyzed for allele-specific and IFNG promoter methylation. Serum ANCA and IFN-γ secretion were measured by ELISA and nucleo-protein complex formation by EMSA. Results IFNG rs1861494 T allele carriage in IBD patients was associated with enhanced secretion of IFN-γ. T allele carriage was associated in UC with high levels of ANCA and faster progression to colectomy. In CD, it was associated with complicated disease involving a stricturing/penetrating phenotype. Likewise, IFNG rs1861494 displayed genotype specific modulation of DNA methylation and transcription factor complex formation. Conclusions This study reports the first association of IFNG rs1861494 T allele with enhanced IFN-γ secretion and known IBD clinical parameters indicative of more aggressive disease, as well as serological markers associated with treatment resistance to anti-TNF therapy in IBD patients. These data may be useful prognostically as predictors of early response to anti-TNF therapy to identify IBD patients for improved personalized therapeutics. PMID:25171510

  9. The Long Noncoding RNA IFNG-AS1 Promotes T Helper Type 1 Cells Response in Patients with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huiyong; Liu, Yingzhao; Tian, Jie; Ma, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Rui, Ke; Tian, Xinyu; Mao, Chaoming; Lu, Liwei; Xu, Huaxi; Jiang, Pengcheng; Wang, Shengjun

    2015-01-01

    The long noncoding (lnc) RNA-Ifng-AS1 plays an essential role in the transcription of the gene encoding IFN-γ by Th1 cells, and its human ortholog, IFNG-AS1, is expressed in human Th1 cells. However, IFNG-AS1 contributing to Th1 cells' response in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) patients has not been reported. Twenty-eight HT patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The proportion of circulating Th1 cells and the level of T-bet, IFNG mRNA were increased in HT patients, the expression of IFNG-AS1 was upregulated and positively correlated with the proportion of circulating Th1 cells or T-bet, and IFNG expression, or serum level of anti-thyroglobulin antibody/thyroperoxidase antibody in HT patients. IFNG-AS1 regulated the expression of IFNG at both transcriptional and translational level in human CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, strong positive correlations between the increased transcript level of IFNG-AS1 and the increased transcript level of T-bet or IFNG were revealed in thyroid tissues from HT patients. Our results indicate that enhanced expression of lncRNA-IFNG-AS1 contributes to Th1 cell response in HT patients and may be involved in the pathogenesis of HT. PMID:26634912

  10. A long noncoding RNA signature for ulcerative colitis identifies IFNG-AS1 as an enhancer of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Padua, David; Mahurkar-Joshi, Swapna; Law, Ivy Ka Man; Polytarchou, Christos; Vu, John P; Pisegna, Joseph R; Shih, David; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput technologies revealed new categories of genes, including the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), involved in the pathogenesis of human disease; however, the role of lncRNAs in the ulcerative colitis (UC) has not been evaluated. Gene expression profiling was used to develop lncRNA signatures in UC samples. Jurkat T cells were activated by PMA/ionomycin subsequently interferon-γ (IFNG) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α protein levels were assessed by ELISA. Anti-sense molecules were designed to block IFNG-AS1 expression. A unique set of lncRNAs was differentially expressed between UC and control samples. Of these, IFNG-AS1 was among the highest statistically significant lncRNAs (fold change: 5.27, P value: 7.07E-06). Bioinformatic analysis showed that IFNG-AS1 was associated with the IBD susceptibility loci SNP rs7134599 and its genomic location is adjacent to the inflammatory cytokine IFNG. In mouse models of colitis, active colitis samples had increased colonic expression of this lncRNA. Utilizing the Jurkat T cell model, we found IFNG-AS1 to positively regulate IFNG expression. Novel lncRNA signatures differentiate UC patients with active disease, patients in remission, and control subjects. A subset of these lncRNAs was found to be associated with the clinically validated IBD susceptibility loci. IFNG-AS1 was one of these differentially expressed lncRNAs in UC patients and found to regulate the key inflammatory cytokine, IFNG, in CD4 T cells. Taking these findings together, our study revealed novel lncRNA signatures deregulated in UC and identified IFNG-AS1 as a novel regulator of IFNG inflammatory responses, suggesting the potential importance of noncoding RNA mechanisms on regulation of inflammatory bowel disease-related inflammatory responses. PMID:27492330

  11. Cytokines induce tight junction disassembly in airway cells via an EGFR-dependent MAPK/ERK1/2-pathway.

    PubMed

    Petecchia, Loredana; Sabatini, Federica; Usai, Cesare; Caci, Emanuela; Varesio, Luigi; Rossi, Giovanni A

    2012-08-01

    Epithelial barrier permeability is altered in inflammatory respiratory disorders by a variety of noxious agents through modifications of the epithelial cell structure that possibly involve tight junction (TJ) organization. To evaluate in vitro whether pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of respiratory disorders could alter TJ organization and epithelial barrier integrity, and to characterize the signal transduction pathway involved Calu-3 airway epithelial cells were exposed to TNF-a, IL-4 and IFN-g to assess changes in: (a) TJ assembly, that is, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 expression and localization, evaluated by confocal microscopy; (b) apoptotic activity, quantified using terminal transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling staining; (c) epithelial barrier integrity, detected as transmembrane electrical resistance and expressed as G(T) values; (d) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation, assessed by western blotting. Exposure to cytokines for 48 h induced a noticeable downregulation of the TJ transmembrane proteins. The degree ZO-1 and occludin colocalization was 62±2% in control cultures and significantly decreased in the presence of TNF-a (47±3%), IL-4 (43±1%) and INF-g (35±3%). Although no apoptosis induction was detected following exposure to cytokines, changes in the epithelial barrier integrity were observed, with a significant enhancement in paracellular conductance. G(T) values were, respectively, 1.030±0.0, 1.300±0.04, 1.260±0.020 and 2.220±0.015 (mS/cm²)1000 in control cultures and in those exposed to TNF-a, IFN-g and IL-4. The involvement of EGFR-dependent MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in cytokine-induced damage was demonstrated by a significant increase in threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2, already detectable after 5 min incubation. All these cytokine-induced changes were

  12. Evidence for genetic association of TBX21 and IFNG with systemic lupus erythematosus in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Leng, Rui-Xue; Pan, Hai-Feng; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Chao; Tao, Sha-Sha; Wang, De-Guang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Li, Xiang-Pei; Yang, Wanling; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    TBX21 recode T-bet which is an important transcription factor that drives the Th1 immune response primarily by promoting expression of the interferon-gamma (IFNG) gene. Recent studies have shown that genetic variants in TBX21 and IFNG are connected with risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the present study was to replicate these genetic associations with SLE in Anhui Chinese population. Genotyping of 3 variants (rs4794067 in TBX21, rs2069705 and rs2069718 in IFNG) was performed. A total of 3732 subjects were included in the final analysis. The study only identified the association of rs2069705 with SLE susceptibility (T vs. C: odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00-1.26, P = 0.046). Combined analysis with Hong Kong GWAS showed that the OR for rs2069705 was 1.10 (95% CI: 1.01-1.21, P = 0.027). Further pooled analysis with Korean populations involving 10498 subjects showed a more significant association between rs2069705 and SLE (T vs. C: OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.04-1.19, P = 0.002; TT + TC vs. CC: OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.02-1.21, P = 0.012; TT vs. TC + CC: OR = 1.28, 95%CI = 1.07-1.54, P = 0.008; TT vs. CC: OR =  .33, 95%CI = 1.10-1.60, P = 0.003). In addition, we also identified a significant genetic interaction between rs2069705 and rs4794067 in Anhui Chinese population. Our study suggests that IFNG and IFNG-TBX21 interaction are involved in SLE susceptibility. PMID:26916970

  13. Density-dependent adjustment of inducible defenses

    PubMed Central

    Tollrian, Ralph; Duggen, Sonja; Weiss, Linda C.; Laforsch, Christian; Kopp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Predation is a major factor driving evolution, and organisms have evolved adaptations increasing their survival chances. However, most defenses incur trade-offs between benefits and costs. Many organisms save costs by employing inducible defenses as responses to fluctuating predation risk. The level of defense often increases with predator densities. However, individual predation risk should not only depend on predator density but also on the density of conspecifics. If the predator has a saturating functional response one would predict a negative correlation between prey density and individual predation risk and hence defense expression. Here, we tested this hypothesis using six model systems, covering a taxonomic range from protozoa to rotifers and crustaceans. In all six systems, we found that the level of defense expression increased with predator density but decreased with prey density. In one of our systems, i.e. in Daphnia, we further show that the response to prey density is triggered by a chemical cue released by conspecifics and congeners. Our results indicate that organisms adjust the degree of defense to the acute predation risk, rather than merely to predators’ densities. Our study suggests that density-dependent defense expression reflects accurate predation-risk assessment and is a general principle in many inducible-defense systems. PMID:26235428

  14. [Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Seoane-Rodríguez, Marta; Caralli, María Elisa; Morales-Cabeza, Cristina; Micozzi, Sarah; De Barrio-Fernández, Manuel; Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is increasing. In vitro test such as omega-5-gliadin levels are useful in the diagnosis, while oral single blind challenge tests (OCT) with wheat plus exercise continuous being the gold standard diagnostic method. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old woman, with several episodes of anaphylaxis after eating different foods and doing exercise after ingestion. An allergy study was performed with positive skin prick tests for wheat, barley and rye. Total IgE 238.0KU/L, positive specific IgE (>100KU/L) to wheat, barley and rye, and negative to rTri-a-19 omega-5 gliadin. OCT with bread and exercise was positive. In this case of wheat-dependent exerciseinduced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with negative serum specific IgE to omega-5-gliadin, negative results with gamma, alpha, bheta y omega-gliadin doesn't exclude the diagnosis of WDEIA. PMID:26943835

  15. [Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Seoane-Rodríguez, Marta; Caralli, María Elisa; Morales-Cabeza, Cristina; Micozzi, Sarah; De Barrio-Fernández, Manuel; Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is increasing. In vitro test such as omega-5-gliadin levels are useful in the diagnosis, while oral single blind challenge tests (OCT) with wheat plus exercise continuous being the gold standard diagnostic method. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old woman, with several episodes of anaphylaxis after eating different foods and doing exercise after ingestion. An allergy study was performed with positive skin prick tests for wheat, barley and rye. Total IgE 238.0KU/L, positive specific IgE (>100KU/L) to wheat, barley and rye, and negative to rTri-a-19 omega-5 gliadin. OCT with bread and exercise was positive. In this case of wheat-dependent exerciseinduced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with negative serum specific IgE to omega-5-gliadin, negative results with gamma, alpha, bheta y omega-gliadin doesn't exclude the diagnosis of WDEIA.

  16. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Scherf, K A; Brockow, K; Biedermann, T; Koehler, P; Wieser, H

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a rare, but potentially severe food allergy exclusively occurring when wheat ingestion is accompanied by augmenting cofactors. It is clinically characterized by anaphylactic reactions ranging from urticaria and angioedema to dyspnoea, hypotension, collapse, and shock. WDEIA usually develops after ingestion of wheat products followed by physical exercise. Other cofactors are acetylsalicylic acid and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol, and infections. The precise mechanisms of WDEIA remain unclear; exercise and other cofactors might increase gastrointestinal allergen permeability and osmolality, redistribute blood flow, or lower the threshold for IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. Among wheat proteins, ω5-gliadin and high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits have been reported to be the major allergens. In some patients, WDEIA has been discussed to be caused by epicutaneous sensitization with hydrolysed wheat gluten included in cosmetics. Diagnosis is made based on the patient's history in combination with allergy skin testing, determination of wheat-specific IgE serum antibodies, basophil activation test, histamine release test, and/or exercise challenge test. Acute treatment includes application of adrenaline or antihistamines. The most reliable prophylaxis of WDEIA is a gluten-free diet. In less severe cases, a strict limitation of wheat ingestion before exercise and avoidance of other cofactors may be sufficient.

  17. MAPKAP kinase 3 suppresses Ifng gene expression and attenuates NK cell cytotoxicity and Th1 CD4 T-cell development upon influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Köther, Katharina; Nordhoff, Carolin; Masemann, Dörthe; Varga, Georg; Bream, Jay H; Gaestel, Matthias; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    MK2 and MK3 are downstream targets of p38 and ERK1/2. They control the mRNA stability of several inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-10. Whereas MK2 is expressed ubiquitously, the expression of MK3 is restricted to muscle, liver, and heart tissues and T and NK cells. Using Mk-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice, we demonstrated an inhibitory effect of MK3, but not of MK2, on interferon (IFN)-γ expression in T and NK lymphocytes. The results provided evidence that the inhibitory effect of MK3 is based on negative feedback phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2, which causes decreased binding of Stat4 to the IFN-γ promoter and reduced expression of IFN-γ mRNA and protein. Consequently, all Mk3(-/-) mice challenged with the Th1-inducing influenza A virus (IAV) survived the WT LD50 virus dose. The reduced disease severity in the Mk3(-/-) mice was accompanied by a >10-fold reduction in viral lung titer and an increase in the number of activated NK cells and enhanced Th1 activation of CD4 T cells. Thus, our data describe the protein kinase MK3 as a novel regulator of the innate and adaptive immune responses.-Köther, K., Nordhoff, C., Masemann, D., Varga, G., Bream, J. H., Gaestel, M., Wixler, V., Ludwig, S. MAPKAP kinase 3 suppresses Ifng gene expression and attenuates NK cell cytotoxicity and Th1 CD4 T-cell development upon influenza A virus infection.

  18. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii-skeletal muscle cells interaction increases lipid droplet biogenesis and positively modulates the production of IL-12, IFN-g and PGE2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The interest in the mechanisms involved in Toxoplasma gondii lipid acquisition has steadily increased during the past few decades, but it remains not completely understood. Here, we investigated the biogenesis and the fate of lipid droplets (LD) of skeletal muscle cells (SkMC) during their interaction with T. gondii by confocal and electron microscopy. We also evaluated whether infected SkMC modulates the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cytokines interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interferon-gamma (INF-g), and also the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene induction. Methods Primary culture of skeletal muscle cells were infected with tachyzoites of T. gondii and analysed by confocal microscopy for observation of LD. Ultrastructural cytochemistry was also used for lipid and sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SR) detection. Dosage of cytokines (IL-12 and INF-g) by ELISA technique and enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) for PGE2 measurement were employed. The COX-2 gene expression analysis was performed by real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results We demonstrated that T. gondii infection of SkMC leads to increase in LD number and area in a time course dependent manner. Moreover, the ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that SR and LD are in direct contact with parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), within the vacuolar matrix, around it and interacting directly with the membrane of parasite, indicating that LD are recruited and deliver their content inside the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in T. gondii-infected SkMC. We also observed a positive modulation of the production of IL-12 and IFN-g, increase of COX-2 mRNA levels in the first hour of T. gondii-SkMC interaction and an increase of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis from 6 h up to 48 h of infection. Conclusions Taken together, the close association between SR and LD with PV could represent a source of lipids as well as other nutrients for the parasite survival, and together with the

  20. Artesunate induces AIF-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen-juan; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of the sesquiterpene artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, exerts a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. It has been shown that ART induces cancer cells death through apoptosis pathway. This study investigated whether ART treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in the apoptosis fashion in human lung adenocarconoma A549 cell line and the proapoptotic protein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is involved in ART-induced apoptosis. Cells treated with ART exhibited typical apoptotic morphology as chromatin condensation, margination and shrunken nucleus. ART treatment also induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and AIF release from mitochondria. Silencing AIF can remarkable attenuated ART-induced apoptosis. Collectively, ART induces apoptosis by caspase-independent intrinsic pathway in A549 cells.

  1. Polymorphisms on IFNG, IL12B and IL12RB1 genes and paracoccidioidomycosis in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, F M C; Busser, F D; Freitas, V L T; Furucho, C R; Sadahiro, A; Kono, A S G; Criado, P R; Moretti, M L; Sato, P K; Shikanai-Yasuda, M A

    2016-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic chronic mycosis, endemic in Latin America, especially Brazil, and is the eighth leading cause of death among chronic and recurrent infectious diseases. PCM infection is characterized by the presence of Th1 immune response; the acute form, by a mixed Th2/Th9, while the chronic form is characterized by Th17/Th22 profiles. The occurrence and severity of human PCM may also be associated with genetic factors such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on cytokines encoding genes. We investigated the association between these polymorphisms and the different clinical forms of PCM. We included 156 patients with PCM (40 with the acute form, 99 with the chronic multifocal and 17 with the chronic unifocal form) and assayed their DNA samples for IFNG +874 T/A SNP by PCR-ARMS (Amplification Refractory Mutational System), IL12B +1188 A/C SNP on 3' UTR and IL12RB1 641 A/G SNP on exon 7 by PCR-RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism). We found similar genotypic and allelic frequencies of the investigated SNPs among the clinical forms of PCM. Considering male patients, the IL12RB1 641 AA genotype was more frequent in the chronic multifocal form while heterozygosis was in the chronic unifocal form of PCM (p=0.048). Although our data suggest that the AA genotype (IL12RB1) may be associated with the more disseminated chronic disease, more patients of the chronic unifocal PCM group need to be analyzed as well as the secretion patterns of IFN-γ combined with the IL-12Rβ1 expression for a better comprehension of this association. PMID:27223631

  2. Morphine dependence and withdrawal induced changes in cholinergic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Nichole M.; Einstein, Emily B.; Lopez, Maria B.; McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Mineur, Yann S.; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling is thought to be involved in morphine dependence and withdrawal, but the specific mechanisms involved remain unclear. The current study aimed to identify alterations in the cholinergic system that may contribute to the development of morphine dependence and withdrawal. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and [3H]-epibatidine binding were evaluated in order to determine if morphine dependence and withdrawal induces alterations in cholinergic signaling or expression of high affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the midbrain (MB), medial habenula (MHb) and interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). The effect of cholinergic signaling through nAChRs on morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior was then determined. Lastly, the contribution of β4-containing nAChRs receptors in the MHb to morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior and neuronal activity as indicated by c-fos expression was assessed. Chronic morphine administration decreased AChE activity in MB and MHb, an effect that was no longer present following precipitated withdrawal. Morphine dependent mice showed increased nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) levels in MB. Further, nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) and lobeline (3 mg/kg) decreased jumping behavior while mecamylamine (1 mg/kg) had no effect. Knock-down of β4 subunit-containing nAChRs in the MHb attenuated c-fos activation, but did not decrease morphine withdrawal-induced jumping. Thus, morphine withdrawal induces cholinergic signaling in the MHb, but this does not appear to be responsible for the effects of cholinergic drugs on somatic signs of opiate withdrawal, as measured by jumping behavior. PMID:23651795

  3. Signaling induced by hop/STI-1 depends on endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Americo, Tatiana A.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Linden, Rafael . E-mail: rlinden@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-06-29

    The co-chaperone hop/STI-1 is a ligand of the cell surface prion protein (PrP{sup C}), and their interaction leads to signaling and biological effects. Among these, hop/STI-1 induces proliferation of A172 glioblastoma cells, dependent on both PrP{sup C} and activation of the Erk pathway. We tested whether clathrin-mediated endocytosis affects signaling induced by hop/STI-1. Both hyperosmolarity induced by sucrose and monodansyl-cadaverine blocked Erk activity induced by hop/STI-1, without affecting the high basal Akt activity typical of A172. The endocytosis inhibitors also affected the sub-cellular distribution of phosphorylated Erk, consistent with blockade of the latter's activity. The data indicate that signaling induced by hop/STI-1 depends on endocytosis. These findings are consistent with a role of sub-cellular trafficking in signal transduction following engagement by PrP{sup C} by ligands such as hop/STI-1, and may help help unravel both the functions of the prion protein, as well as possible loss-of-function components of prion diseases.

  4. State dependence of Rydberg interaction-induced collisional loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhigang; Zhao, Kejia; Miao, Jingyuan; Li, Difei; Yang, Zhijun; Wu, Zhaochun; He, Zhao; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-09-01

    We present a simple analytical formula from an existing theoretical model and theoretically investigate in detail the state dependence of interaction-induced collisional loss rate coefficients, and the various parameter effects on collisional loss rate. We also investigate the different mechanisms and corresponding effects on collisional loss by analyzing our previous experimental results using the present formula, and even investigate the time evolution of Rydberg atom number for different Rydberg states.

  5. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J.; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R.; Lamb, Jonathan R.; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1β-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  6. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R; Lamb, Jonathan R; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1β-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  7. Distance dependence in photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven; Volosov, Andrey

    1986-09-01

    The distance dependence of the rate of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is studied. A quantum mechanical method CNDO/S is applied to a series of molecules recently investigated by Hush et al. experimentally. The calculations show a large interaction through the saturated bridge which connects the two chromophores. The electronic matrix element HAB decreases a factor 10 in about 4 Å. There is also a decrease of the rate due to less exothermicity for the longer molecule. The results are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Pump/Probe Angular Dependence of Hanle Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Richard; Campbell, Kaleb; Crescimanno, Michael; Bali, Samir

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of Hanle Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) on angular separation between pump and probe field propagation directions in room-temperature Rb vapor. We observe the FWHM of the probe transmission spectrum and the amplitude of the EIT signal while varying the angular separation from 0 to 1 milliradian. Following the work of Ref., we examine potential applications in information storage and retrieval. We are grateful to Miami University for their generous financial support, and to the Miami University Instrumentation lab for their invaluable contributions.

  9. Retrieval induces hippocampal-dependent reconsolidation of spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Nonreinforced retrieval can cause extinction and/or reconsolidation, two processes that affect subsequent retrieval in opposite ways. Using the Morris water maze task we show that, in the rat, repeated nonreinforced expression of spatial memory causes extinction, which is unaffected by inhibition of protein synthesis within the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. However, if the number of nonreinforced retrieval trials is insufficient to induce long-lasting extinction, then a hippocampal protein synthesis-dependent reconsolidation process recovers the original memory. Inhibition of hippocampal protein synthesis after reversal learning sessions impairs retention of the reversed preference and blocks persistence of the original one, suggesting that reversal learning involves reconsolidation rather than extinction of the original memory. Our results suggest the existence of a hippocampal protein synthesis-dependent reconsolidation process that operates to recover or update retrieval-weakened memories from incomplete extinction.

  10. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: is wheat unique?

    PubMed

    Wong, Gabriel K; Krishna, Mamidipudi T

    2013-12-01

    This review draws comparisons between wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) and other food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIAs) and discusses the importance of co-factors in its pathophysiology. FDEIA remains an enigmatic condition since it was first described 30 years ago. The sporadic and unpredictable nature of its reactions has puzzled clinicians and scientists for decades, but recent studies on WDEIA have enlightened us about the pathophysiology of this condition. The identification of defined allergic epitopes such as Tri a 19, α-gliadin, β-gliadin and γ-gliadin in WDEIA enables it to become the perfect model for studying FDEIA, but WDEIA is by no means a unique condition. On a larger scale, FDEIA represents a crucial link between IgE-mediated and anaphylactoid reactions and provides supportive evidence for the concept of 'summation anaphylaxis' and the need to overcome the 'allergen threshold'. Future work should focus on identifying more of the FDEIA epitopes and understanding their distinct molecular properties. The development of a biomarker in order to identify patients susceptible to co-factor influences would be invaluable.

  11. Aprotinin induced lipohypertrophy and glomerulonephritis in an insulin dependent diabetic.

    PubMed

    Dandona, P; Mier, A; Boag, F; Chappell, M; Beckett, A G

    1985-07-01

    In an insulin dependent diabetic who was hyperglycaemic and ketotic despite 3,000 u of insulin injected subcutaneously in 2 divided doses daily, 50 u of intravenous insulin infused over 24 hr restored normal glucose homeostasis. A combination of insulin (800 u) and aprotinin (10,000 u) given twice daily also produced adequate glucose homeostasis for a period of 12 months. The patient then developed local hypertrophy of subcutaneous tissue at the injection site and her diabetic control deteriorated. Non-selective proteinuria followed and she developed nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed a membraneous glomerulonephritis with subepithelial immune complexes, appearances consistent with a drug-induced glomerulonephritis. Withdrawal of aprotinin led to a gradual remission of nephrotic syndrome and proteinuria over several months. During this period, her diabetes was well controlled with continuous subcutaneous infusion of insulin at a dose of 500 u/24 hr. This case report demonstrates: the effective use of aprotinin for prolonged periods in insulin dependent diabetics with abnormal absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin; aprotinin induced lipohypertrophy which was not observed when insulin was injected alone; aprotinin-associated glomerulonephritis and nephrotic syndrome; the effective use of CSII--at higher insulin doses--in such patients with subcutaneous malabsorption of insulin.

  12. Sphingosine-induced apoptosis is dependent on lysosomal proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Kågedal, K; Zhao, M; Svensson, I; Brunk, U T

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism for sphingosine-induced apoptosis, involving relocation of lysosomal hydrolases to the cytosol. Owing to its lysosomotropic properties, sphingosine, which is also a detergent, especially when protonated, accumulates by proton trapping within the acidic vacuolar apparatus, where most of its action as a detergent would be exerted. When sphingosine was added in low-to-moderate concentrations to Jurkat and J774 cells, partial lysosomal rupture occurred dose-dependently, starting within a few minutes. This phenomenon preceded caspase activation, as well as changes of mitochondrial membrane potential. High sphingosine doses rapidly caused extensive lysosomal rupture and ensuing necrosis, without antecedent apoptosis or caspase activation. The sphingosine effect was prevented by pre-treatment with another, non-toxic, lysosomotropic base, ammonium chloride, at 10 mM. The lysosomal protease inhibitors, pepstatin A and epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-3-methyl-butane ethyl ester ('E-64d'), inhibited markedly sphingosine-induced caspase activity to almost the same degree as the general caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-DL-Asp-fluoromethylketone ('Z-VAD-FMK'), although they did not by themselves inhibit caspases. We conclude that cathepsin D and one or more cysteine proteases, such as cathepsins B or L, are important mediators of sphingosine-induced apoptosis, working upstream of the caspase cascade and mitochondrial membrane-potential changes. PMID:11583579

  13. The two-sample problem with induced dependent censorship.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y

    1999-12-01

    Induced dependent censorship is a general phenomenon in health service evaluation studies in which a measure such as quality-adjusted survival time or lifetime medical cost is of interest. We investigate the two-sample problem and propose two classes of nonparametric tests. Based on consistent estimation of the survival function for each sample, the two classes of test statistics examine the cumulative weighted difference in hazard functions and in survival functions. We derive a unified asymptotic null distribution theory and inference procedure. The tests are applied to trial V of the International Breast Cancer Study Group and show that long duration chemotherapy significantly improves time without symptoms of disease and toxicity of treatment as compared with the short duration treatment. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed tests, with a wide range of weight choices, perform well under moderate sample sizes.

  14. Stachybotrys chartarum-Induced Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Is TLR9 Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Urvashi; Newstead, Michael J.; Zeng, Xianying; Ballinger, Megan N.; Standiford, Louis R.; Standiford, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), an inflammatory lung disease, develops after repeated exposure to inhaled particulate antigen and is characterized by a vigorous T helper type 1-mediated immune response, resulting in the release of IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ. These T helper type 1 cytokines may participate in the pathogenesis of HP. Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) is a dimorphic fungus implicated in a number of respiratory illnesses, including HP. Here, we have developed a murine model of SC-induced HP that reproduces pathology observed in human HP and hypothesized that toll receptor-like 9 (TLR9)-mediated dendritic cell responses are required for the generation of granulomatous inflammation induced by inhaled SC. Mice sensitized and challenged with 106 SC spores develop granulomatous inflammation with multinucleate giant cells, accompanied by increased accumulation of neutrophils and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. SC sensitization and challenge resulted in robust pulmonary expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-12, and IFN-γ. SC-mediated granulomatous inflammation required IFN-γ and was TLR9 dependent, because TLR9−/− mice displayed reduced peribronchial inflammation, decreased accumulation and/or activation of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and reduced lung expression of type 1 cytokines and chemokines. T-cell production of IFN-γ was IL-12 dependent. Our studies suggest that TLR9 is critical for dendritic cell-mediated development of a type 1 granulomatous inflammation in the lung in response to SC. PMID:21982832

  15. Sugar-induced plant growth is dependent on brassinosteroids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqiang; He, Junxian

    2015-01-01

    Sugars, the end products of photosynthesis, not only fuel growth and development of plants as carbon and energy sources, but also function as signaling molecules to modulate a range of important processes during plant growth and development. We recently found that sugar can promote hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis in darkness and this is largely dependent on brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of essential phytohormones involved in mediation of plant cell elongation. Sugars not only positively regulate the transcription of BZR1, the gene encoding the BR-activated transcription factor BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT1 (BRZ1), but also stabilize the BZR1 protein. Based on these results, we proposed that BZR1 may act as a converging node for crosstalk between BR and sugar signaling in regulating plant growth in darkness. In this short communication, we present some new data showing that HEXOKINASE1 (HXK1), the first identified glucose (Glc) sensor in plants, was positively involved in Glc promotion of hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis in the dark. It appears that the function of HXK1 is dependent on the presence of BR, suggesting that BR may act downstream of HXK1 to positively regulate Glc-induced hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis in darkness.

  16. Aerosol-induced laser breakdown thresholds: wavelength dependence.

    PubMed

    Pinnick, R G; Chylek, P; Jarzembski, M; Creegan, E; Srivastava, V; Fernandez, G; Pendleton, J D; Biswas, A

    1988-03-01

    Aerosol-induced loser breakdown thresholds have been measured for liquid droplets at wavelengths lambda= 1.064, 0.532, 0.355, 0.266 microm using a Nd:YAG laser with 5-10-ns pulse duration. Breakdown thresholds are 2-3 orders of magnitude below those for clean air and range from 4 x 10(7) to 3 x 10(9) W cm(-2) for nominal 50-microm diam droplets, depending on laser wavelength and droplet composition. Thresholds decrease with decreasing wavelength; they also decrease for droplets having a higher real refractive index. For water droplets the breakdown threshold intensity varies approximately as lambda(0.5). The wavelength dependence of breakdown thresholds can be qualitatively explained by considering (1) the effect of enhancement of internal fields and energy density within and near droplets and (2) the increasing importance of multiphoton absorption processes at shorter wavelengths. Laser transmission losses through the breakdown plasma and observations of the suppression of stimulated Raman scattering by the addition of small quantitites of absorbing material to water and carbon tetrachloride droplets are also reported.

  17. Handedness Dependent Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Hybrid Chiral Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lei; Hao Jiang, Zhi; Yue, Taiwei; Werner, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first experimental demonstration of the handedness dependent electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in chiral metamaterials during the interaction with circularly polarized waves. The observed chiral-sensitive EIT phenomena arise from the coherent excitation of a non-radiative mode in the component split ring resonators (SRRs) produced by the corresponding Born−Kuhn type (radiative) resonators that are responsible for the pronounced chirality. The coherent coupling, which is dominated by the bonding and antibonding resonances of the Born−Kuhn type resonators, leads to an extremely steep dispersion for a circularly polarized wave of predefined handedness. Accordingly, retrieved effective medium parameters from simulated results further reveal a difference of 80 in the group indices for left- and right-handed circularly polarized waves at frequencies within the EIT window, which can potentially result in handedness-sensitive pulse delays. These chiral metamaterials which enable a handedness dependent EIT effect may provide more degrees of freedom for designing circular polarization based communication devices. PMID:26183735

  18. Counterintuitive DNA Sequence Dependence in Supercoiling-Induced DNA Melting

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; v.d. Torre, Jaco; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of DNA in cells relies on the balance between hybridized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and local de-hybridized regions of ssDNA that provide access to binding proteins. Traditional melting experiments, in which short pieces of dsDNA are heated up until the point of melting into ssDNA, have determined that AT-rich sequences have a lower binding energy than GC-rich sequences. In cells, however, the double-stranded backbone of DNA is destabilized by negative supercoiling, and not by temperature. To investigate what the effect of GC content is on DNA melting induced by negative supercoiling, we studied DNA molecules with a GC content ranging from 38% to 77%, using single-molecule magnetic tweezer measurements in which the length of a single DNA molecule is measured as a function of applied stretching force and supercoiling density. At low force (<0.5pN), supercoiling results into twisting of the dsDNA backbone and loop formation (plectonemes), without inducing any DNA melting. This process was not influenced by the DNA sequence. When negative supercoiling is introduced at increasing force, local melting of DNA is introduced. We measured for the different DNA molecules a characteristic force Fchar, at which negative supercoiling induces local melting of the dsDNA. Surprisingly, GC-rich sequences melt at lower forces than AT-rich sequences: Fchar = 0.56pN for 77% GC but 0.73pN for 38% GC. An explanation for this counterintuitive effect is provided by the realization that supercoiling densities of a few percent only induce melting of a few percent of the base pairs. As a consequence, denaturation bubbles occur in local AT-rich regions and the sequence-dependent effect arises from an increased DNA bending/torsional energy associated with the plectonemes. This new insight indicates that an increased GC-content adjacent to AT-rich DNA regions will enhance local opening of the double-stranded DNA helix. PMID:26513573

  19. Counterintuitive DNA Sequence Dependence in Supercoiling-Induced DNA Melting.

    PubMed

    Vlijm, Rifka; V D Torre, Jaco; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of DNA in cells relies on the balance between hybridized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and local de-hybridized regions of ssDNA that provide access to binding proteins. Traditional melting experiments, in which short pieces of dsDNA are heated up until the point of melting into ssDNA, have determined that AT-rich sequences have a lower binding energy than GC-rich sequences. In cells, however, the double-stranded backbone of DNA is destabilized by negative supercoiling, and not by temperature. To investigate what the effect of GC content is on DNA melting induced by negative supercoiling, we studied DNA molecules with a GC content ranging from 38% to 77%, using single-molecule magnetic tweezer measurements in which the length of a single DNA molecule is measured as a function of applied stretching force and supercoiling density. At low force (<0.5pN), supercoiling results into twisting of the dsDNA backbone and loop formation (plectonemes), without inducing any DNA melting. This process was not influenced by the DNA sequence. When negative supercoiling is introduced at increasing force, local melting of DNA is introduced. We measured for the different DNA molecules a characteristic force Fchar, at which negative supercoiling induces local melting of the dsDNA. Surprisingly, GC-rich sequences melt at lower forces than AT-rich sequences: Fchar = 0.56pN for 77% GC but 0.73pN for 38% GC. An explanation for this counterintuitive effect is provided by the realization that supercoiling densities of a few percent only induce melting of a few percent of the base pairs. As a consequence, denaturation bubbles occur in local AT-rich regions and the sequence-dependent effect arises from an increased DNA bending/torsional energy associated with the plectonemes. This new insight indicates that an increased GC-content adjacent to AT-rich DNA regions will enhance local opening of the double-stranded DNA helix.

  20. Tissue Crowding Induces Caspase-Dependent Competition for Space

    PubMed Central

    Levayer, Romain; Dupont, Carole; Moreno, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulation of tissue size requires fine tuning at the single-cell level of proliferation rate, cell volume, and cell death. Whereas the adjustment of proliferation and growth has been widely studied [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], the contribution of cell death and its adjustment to tissue-scale parameters have been so far much less explored. Recently, it was shown that epithelial cells could be eliminated by live-cell delamination in response to an increase of cell density [6]. Cell delamination was supposed to occur independently of caspase activation and was suggested to be based on a gradual and spontaneous disappearance of junctions in the delaminating cells [6]. Studying the elimination of cells in the midline region of the Drosophila pupal notum, we found that, contrary to what was suggested before, Caspase 3 activation precedes and is required for cell delamination. Yet, using particle image velocimetry, genetics, and laser-induced perturbations, we confirmed [6] that local tissue crowding is necessary and sufficient to drive cell elimination and that cell elimination is independent of known fitness-dependent competition pathways [7, 8, 9]. Accordingly, activation of the oncogene Ras in clones was sufficient to compress the neighboring tissue and eliminate cells up to several cell diameters away from the clones. Mechanical stress has been previously proposed to contribute to cell competition [10, 11]. These results provide the first experimental evidences that crowding-induced death could be an alternative mode of super-competition, namely mechanical super-competition, independent of known fitness markers [7, 8, 9], that could promote tumor growth. PMID:26898471

  1. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  2. Corticospinal modulation induced by sounds depends on action preparedness

    PubMed Central

    Marinovic, Welber; Tresilian, James R; de Rugy, Aymar; Sidhu, Simranjit; Riek, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A loud acoustic stimulus (LAS) presented during movement preparation can induce an early release of the prepared action. Because loud sound has been found to have an inhibitory effect on motor cortex excitability, it is possible that the motor cortex plays little role in the early release of prepared responses. We sought to shed new light on this suggestion by probing changes in corticospinal excitability after LAS presentation during preparation for an anticipatory action. Unexpectedly, we show that the changes in corticospinal excitability after LAS presentation are not fixed. Based on the magnitude of motor-evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic and electric stimulation of the motor cortex, we demonstrate that the effects of auditory stimuli on corticospinal excitability depend on the level of readiness for action: inhibition in early preparation and facilitation close to movement onset. We also show that auditory stimuli can regulate intracortical excitability by increasing intracortical facilitation and reducing short-interval intracortical inhibition. Together, these findings indicate that, at least in part, the early release of motor responses by auditory stimuli involves the motor cortex. PMID:24081157

  3. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ{sub 1}(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v{sub r}/ω{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  4. SHP-1-dependent macrophage differentiation exacerbates virus-induced myositis

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Neva B.; Schneider, Karin M.; Massa, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    Virus-induced myositis is an emerging global affliction that remains poorly characterized with few treatment options. Moreover, muscle-tropic viruses often spread to the central nervous system causing dramatically increased morbidity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to explore genetic factors involved in this class of human disease. This report investigates critical innate immune pathways affecting murine virus-induced myositis. Of particular importance, the key immune regulator SHP-1, which normally suppresses macrophage-mediated inflammation, is a major factor in promoting clinical disease in muscle. We show that Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus infection of skeletal myofibers induces inflammation and subsequent dystrophic calcification with loss of ambulation in wild type mice. Surprisingly, although similar extensive myofiber infection and inflammation is observed in SHP-1-deficient (SHP-1−/−) mice, these mice neither accumulate dead calcified myofibers nor lose ambulation. Macrophages were the predominant effector cells infiltrating WT and SHP-1−/− muscle, and an increased infiltration of immature monocytes/macrophages correlated with absence of clinical disease in SHP-1−/− mice, while mature M1-like macrophages corresponded with increased myofiber degeneration in WT mice. Furthermore, blocking SHP-1 activation in WT macrophages blocked virus-induced myofiber degeneration, and pharmacologic ablation of macrophages inhibited muscle calcification in TMEV-infected WT animals. These data suggest that following TMEV infection of muscle, SHP-1 promotes M1 differentiation of infiltrating macrophages, and these inflammatory macrophages are likely involved in damaging muscle fibers. These findings reveal a pathological role for SHP-1 in promoting inflammatory macrophage differentiation and myofiber damage in virus-infected skeletal muscle, thus identifying SHP-1 and M1 macrophages as essential mediators of virus-induced myopathy. PMID:25681345

  5. Chronic methamphetamine exposure induces cardiac fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liou, Cher-Ming; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Williams, Timothy; Ting, Hua; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-06-01

    Very limited information regarding the influence of chronic methamphetamine exposure on cardiac apoptosis is available. In this study, we evaluate whether chronic methamphetamine exposure will increase cardiac Fas-dependent (type I) and mitochondria-dependent (type II) apoptotic pathways. Thirty-two male Wistar rats at 3-4 months of age were randomly divided into a vehicle-treated group [phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) 0.5 ml SQ per day] and a methamphetamine-treated group (MA 10 mg/kg SQ per day) for 3 months. We report that after 3 months of exposure, abnormal myocardial architecture, more minor cardiac fibrosis and cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were observed at greater frequency in the MA group than in the PBS group. Protein levels of TNF-α, Fas ligand, Fas receptor, Fas-associated death domain, activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptosis) extracted from excised hearts were significantly increased in the MA group, compared to the PBS group. Protein levels of cardiac Bak, t-Bid, Bak to Bcl-xL ratio, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptosis) were significantly increased in the MA group, compared with the PBS group. The results from this study reveal that chronic methamphetamine exposure will activate cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways, which may indicate a possible mechanism for developing cardiac abnormalities in humans with chronic methamphetamine abuse.

  6. Isotopic dependence of induced fission cross sections for heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, A. S.; Bolgova, O. N.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2009-10-01

    Using the statistical model, we calculate the induced fission cross sections for the nuclei 211-223Ra in their peripheral collisions with 208Pb. The role of closed shell N = 126 is studied. Level densities of the Fermi-gas model and of the model with collective enhancement are used. Taking into account the particle-hole excitation in addition to the collective Coulomb excitation, we obtain satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors induce autophagy through FOXO1-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbin; Ng, Shukie; Wang, Jigang; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Shi-Hao; Yang, Naidi; Lin, Qingsong; Xia, Dajing; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process in response to starvation or other stress conditions to sustain cellular homeostasis. At present, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to induce autophagy in cells through inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) pathway. FOXO1, an important transcription factor regulated by AKT, is also known to play a role in autophagy induction. At present, the role of FOXO1 in the HDACIs-induced autophagy has not been reported. In this study, we first observed that HDACIs increased the expression of FOXO1 at the mRNA and protein level. Second, we found that FOXO1 transcriptional activity was enhanced by HDACIs, as evidenced by increased FOXO1 nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity. Third, suppression of FOXO1 function by siRNA knockdown or by a chemical inhibitor markedly blocked HDACIs-induced autophagy. Moreover, we found that FOXO1-mediated autophagy is achieved via its transcriptional activation, leading to a dual effect on autophagy induction: (i) enhanced expression of autophagy-related (ATG) genes, and (ii) suppression of MTOR via transcription of the SESN3 (sestrin 3) gene. Finally, we found that inhibition of autophagy markedly enhanced HDACIs-mediated cell death, indicating that autophagy serves as an important cell survival mechanism. Taken together, our studies reveal a novel function of FOXO1 in HDACIs-mediated autophagy in human cancer cells and thus support the development of a novel therapeutic strategy by combining HDACIs and autophagy inhibitors in cancer therapy.

  8. Resistance to BRAF inhibitors induces glutamine dependency in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Baenke, Franziska; Chaneton, Barbara; Smith, Matthew; Van Den Broek, Niels; Hogan, Kate; Tang, Haoran; Viros, Amaya; Martin, Matthew; Galbraith, Laura; Girotti, Maria R.; Dhomen, Nathalie; Gottlieb, Eyal; Marais, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors can extend progression-free and overall survival in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor mutations in BRAF. However, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these drugs. Here we show that BRAF mutant melanoma cells that have developed acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors display increased oxidative metabolism and increased dependency on mitochondria for survival. Intriguingly, the increased oxidative metabolism is associated with a switch from glucose to glutamine metabolism and an increased dependence on glutamine over glucose for proliferation. We show that the resistant cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial poisons and to inhibitors of glutaminolysis, suggesting that targeting specific metabolic pathways may offer exciting therapeutic opportunities to treat resistant tumors, or to delay emergence of resistance in the first-line setting. PMID:26365896

  9. Consequences of induced hatching plasticity depend on predator community.

    PubMed

    Wojdak, Jeremy M; Touchon, Justin C; Hite, Jessica L; Meyer, Beth; Vonesh, James R

    2014-08-01

    Many prey species face trade-offs in the timing of life history switch points like hatching and metamorphosis. Costs associated with transitioning early depend on the biotic and abiotic conditions found in the subsequent life stage. The red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas, faces risks from predators in multiple, successive life stages, and can hatch early in response to mortality threats at the egg stage. Here we tested how the consequences of life history plasticity, specifically early hatching in response to terrestrial egg predators, depend on the assemblage of aquatic larval predators. We predicted that diverse predator assemblages would impose lower total predation pressure than the most effective single predator species and might thereby reduce the costs of hatching early. We then conducted a mesocosm experiment where we crossed hatchling phenotype (early vs. normal hatching) with five larval-predator environments (no predators, either waterbugs, dragonflies, or mosquitofish singly, or all three predator species together). The consequences of hatching early varied across predator treatments, and tended to disappear through time in some predation treatments, notably the waterbug and diverse predator assemblages. We demonstrate that the fitness costs of life history plasticity in an early life stage depend critically on the predator community composition in the next stage.

  10. Multiple sclerosis risk markers in HLA-DRA, HLA-C, and IFNG genes are associated with sex-specific childhood leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Brittany A; Ucisik-Akkaya, Esma; Flores, Hilario; Alaez, Carmen; Gorodezky, Clara; Dorak, M Tevfik

    2010-12-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies showed four times increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children of women with multiple sclerosis (MS). MS shows a risk association with Human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-DRA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3135388, which is a proxy marker for DRB1*1501. We examined the relevance of rs3135388 in childhood ALL risk along with two other HLA-DRA SNPs in two case-control groups: 114 cases and 388 controls from South Wales (UK) and 100 Mexican Mestizo cases and 253 controls. We first confirmed the correlation between rs3135388 and DRB1*1501 in HLA-typed reference cell lines. We noted a female-specific risk association in childhood ALL (pooled odds ratio (OR) = 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-4.5, Mantel-Haenszel P = 0.0009) similar to the stronger association of DRB1*1501 in females with MS. Examination of an HLA-C 5' flanking region SNP rs9264942, known to correlate with HLA-C expression, showed a protective association in girls (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.7, Mantel-Haenszel P = 0.0003) similar to the protective HLA-Cw*05 association in MS. In a reference cell line panel, HLA-Cw5 homozygous samples (n = 8) were also homozygous for the minor allele of the SNP. Likewise, the male-specific protective association of interferon-gamma (IFNG) SNP rs2069727 in MS was replicated with the same sex specificity in childhood ALL (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4-1.0, Mantel-Haenszel P = 0.03). Two other SNPs in superkiller viralicidic activity 2-like and tenascin XB that are markers for systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility showed female-specific associations but due to linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1*15. Our observations supported the epidemiologic link between MS and childhood ALL and added the sex effect to this connection. It appears that only girls born to mothers with MS may have an increased risk of ALL. Investigating the mechanism of these sex-specific associations may help understand the pathogenesis of MS and ALL.

  11. Opiate dependence induces network state shifts in the limbic system.

    PubMed

    Dejean, C; Boraud, T; Le Moine, C

    2013-11-01

    Among current theories of addiction, hedonic homeostasis dysregulation predicts that the brain reward systems, particularly the mesolimbic dopamine system, switch from a physiological state to a new "set point." In opiate addiction, evidence show that the dopamine system principal targets, prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAC) and basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) also adapt to repeated drug stimulation. Here we investigated the impact of chronic morphine on the dynamics of the network of these three interconnected structures. For that purpose we performed simultaneous electrophysiological recordings in freely-moving rats subcutaneously implanted with continuous-release morphine pellets. Chronic morphine produced a shift in the network state underpinned by changes in Delta and Gamma oscillations in the LFP of PFC, NAC and BLA, in correlation to behavioral changes. However despite continuous stimulation by the drug, an apparent normalization of the network activity and state occurred after 2 days indicating large scale adaptations. Blockade of μ opioid receptors was nonetheless sufficient to disrupt this acquired new stability in morphine-dependent animals. In line with the homeostatic dysregulation theory of addiction, our study provides original direct evidence that the PFC-NAC-BLA network of the dependent brain is characterized by a de novo balance for which the drug of abuse becomes the main contributor.

  12. Frequency-dependent ultrasound-induced transformation in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Jeremy; Windmill, James; Agbeze-Onuma, Maduka; Kalin, Robert M; Argondizza, Peter; Knapp, Charles W

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound-enhanced gene transfer (UEGT) is continuing to gain interest across many disciplines; however, very few studies investigate UEGT efficiency across a range of frequencies. Using a variable frequency generator, UEGT was tested in E. coli at six ultrasonic frequencies. Results indicate frequency can significantly influence UEGT efficiency positively and negatively. A frequency of 61 kHz improved UEGT efficiency by ~70 % higher, but 99 kHz impeded UEGT to an extent worse than no ultrasound exposure. The other four frequencies (26, 133, 174, and 190 kHz) enhanced transformation compared to no ultrasound, but efficiencies did not vary. The influence of frequency on UEGT efficiency was observed across a range of operating frequencies. It is plausible that frequency-dependent dynamics of mechanical and chemical energies released during cavitational-bubble collapse (CBC) are responsible for observed UEGT efficiencies.

  13. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  14. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  15. Temperature Dependence in Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, T. F.; Misewich, J. A.

    1996-03-01

    The process of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) is a subject of great theoretical and experimental interest. We have extended the classic MGR model for DIET to include initial thermal excitation of the adsorbate. In the MGR model, an electronic transition causes the adsorbate to move on excited potential energy surface. Desorption ensues whenever the adsorbate stays in the excited state long enough to acquire the necessary energy to escape from the surface. At finite temperatures, the initial transition occurs from a distribution of ground-state vibrational energies and momenta. Compared with the zero temperature desorption yield some components of the finite-temperature distribution will have enhanced yields while others will have suppressed yields. Averaging over the initial distribution, we find that the desorption yield increases substantially with temperature, particularly for short excited-state lifetimes. These findings and their extension to the multiple excitation regime are relevant to understanding the long-time scale response observed in femtosecond two-pulse correlation measurements of O_2/Pd(111). J. A. Misewich et al., J. Chem. Phys. 100, 736 (1994)

  16. Skill Dependent Audiovisual Integration in the Fusiform Induces Repetition Suppression

    PubMed Central

    McNorgan, Chris; Booth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Learning to read entails mapping existing phonological representations to novel orthographic representations and is thus an ideal context for investigating experience driven audiovisual integration. Because two dominant brain-based theories of reading development hinge on the sensitivity of the visual-object processing stream to phonological information, we were interested in how reading skill relates to audiovisual integration in this area. Thirty-two children between 8 and 13 years of age spanning a range of reading skill participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Participants completed a rhyme judgment task to word pairs presented unimodally (auditory- or visual-only) and cross-modally (auditory followed by visual). Skill-dependent sub-additive audiovisual modulation was found in left fusiform gyrus, extending into the putative visual word form area, and was correlated with behavioral orthographic priming. These results suggest learning to read promotes facilitatory audiovisual integration in the ventral visual-object processing stream and may optimize this region for orthographic processing. PMID:25585276

  17. Revisiting the Heterogeneous IFN-γ Response of Bacille of Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-Revaccinated Healthy Volunteers in a Randomized Controlled Trial: Effect of the Body Mass Index and of the IFNG+874 A/T Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Conceição, Elisabete L.; Nascimento-Sampaio, Francisco S.; Schwingel, Paulo A.; Oliveira, Evelin S.; Rocha, Michael S.; Vieira, Igor; Mendes, Carlos M. C.; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Oliveira, Martha M.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Marinho, Jamocyr M.

    2016-01-01

    In trials evaluating the immune responses to Bacille of Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the genetic background and the nutritional status are host-related factors that could affect the heterogeneity in these parameters. The IFNG+874 A/T (rs 62559044) polymorphism has been reported to influence the IFN-γ production by BCG-vaccinated individuals challenged in vitro with mycobacterial antigens. The body mass index (BMI) is a proxy for the nutritional status and has been associated both with the susceptibility to tuberculosis and with the IFN-γ response. We show that although the IFNG+874 A/T polymorphism was not associated with the heterogeneity of IFN-γ production in a randomized controlled trial that evaluated long-term immune responses to BCG revaccination previously conducted in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, the effect of this polymorphism on the observed increase in IFN-γ production among revaccinated subjects was adjusted in individuals with a low BMI. PMID:27472280

  18. AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM INDUCES DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of P. chrysogenum (PCE) can dose-dependently induce responses typ...

  19. A geographic cline induced by negative frequency-dependent selection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Establishment of geographic morph frequency clines is difficult to explain in organisms with limited gene flow. Balancing selection, such as negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS), is instead suggested to establish a morph frequency cline on a geographic scale at least theoretically. Here we tested whether a large-scale smooth cline in morph frequency is established by NFDS in the female-dimorphic damselfly, Ischnura senegalensis, where andromorphs and gynomorphs are maintained by NFDS. Results We found a large-scale latitudinal cline in the morph frequency: andromorph frequency ranged from 0.05 (South) to 0.79 (North). Based on the empirical data on the numbers of eggs, the number of ovariole, abdomen length and latitude, the potential fitness of andromorphs was estimated to be lower than that of gynomorphs in the south, and higher in the north, suggesting the gene-by-environment interaction. From the morph-specific latitudinal cline in potential fitness, the frequency of andromorphs was expected to shift from 0 to 1 without NFDS, because a morph with higher potential fitness wins completely and the two morphs will switch at some point. In contrast, NFDS led to the coexistence of two morphs with different potential fitness in a certain geographic range along latitude due to rare morph advantage, and resulted in a smooth geographic cline of morph frequency. Conclusion Our results provide suggestive evidence that the combination of NFDS and gene-by-environment interaction, i.e., multi-selection pressure on color morphs, can explain the geographic cline in morph frequency in the current system. PMID:21917171

  20. Simulated apnoeas induce serotonin-dependent respiratory long-term facilitation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2008-01-01

    Long-term facilitation (LTF) is a form of respiratory neuroplasticity frequently induced by acute intermittent isocapnic hypoxia (AIH, three 5 min isocapnic hypoxic episodes). Although repetitive apnoeas are a frequent natural occurrence producing brief (< 30 s) episodes of hypoxia and hypercapnia, it is unknown if repetitive apnoeas also elicit LTF. Apnoea-induced LTF may preserve upper airway patency during sleep, thereby limiting further apnoeic events. We tested the hypothesis that repeated, brief ventilator-induced apnoeas are sufficient to induce serotonin-dependent phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) LTF in anaesthetized rats. Anaesthetized, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to three or six 25 s ventilator apnoeas with 5 min intervals, and compared to time control and AIH-treated rats. Three and six ventilator apnoeas induced phrenic and XII LTF with a magnitude similar to AIH. Both apnoea-induced and AIH-induced LTF were associated with a decreased CO2 recruitment threshold for phrenic and XII activity (∼4 mmHg). Spinal methysergide, a serotonin receptor antagonist, blocked apnoea-induced LTF but not changes in the CO2-recruitment threshold. Thus, brief ventilator apnoeas elicit phrenic and XII LTF. Similar to AIH-induced LTF, apnoea-induced LTF is serotonin dependent, and the relevant serotonin receptors for phrenic LTF are located in the cervical spinal cord. Apnoea-induced LTF may have implications for the maintenance of breathing stability, particularly during sleep. PMID:18292130

  1. Nrf2-dependent protection from LPS induced inflammatory response and mortality by CDDO-Imidazolide.

    PubMed

    Thimmulappa, Rajesh K; Scollick, Catherine; Traore, Kassim; Yates, Melinda; Trush, Michael A; Liby, Karen T; Sporn, Michael B; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Kensler, Thomas W; Biswal, Shyam

    2006-12-29

    Sepsis induced lethality is characterized by amplified host innate immune response. Nrf2, a bZIP transcription factor, regulates a battery of cellular antioxidative genes and maintains cellular redox homeostasis. This study demonstrates that increasing Nrf2 activity by a potent small molecule activator, CDDO-Im (1-[2-cyano-3-,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oyl]imidazole), protects from deregulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced innate immune response. In response to LPS stimuli, nrf2-deficient (nrf2 -/-) peritoneal neutrophils showed increased NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation, proinflammatory cytokines (Tnf-alpha and Il-6) and chemokines (Mip2 and Mcp-1) relative to wild-type (nrf2 +/+) cells. Pretreatment of peritoneal neutrophils with CDDO-Im induced antioxidative genes (Ho-1, Gclc, Gclm, and Nqo1) and attenuated LPS induced ROS generation as well as expression of proinflammatory cytokines exclusively in nrf2 +/+ neutrophils but not in nrf2 -/- cells. In corroboration with in vitro studies, pretreatment with CDDO-Im induced Nrf2-dependent antioxidative genes, attenuated LPS induced proinflammatory cytokine expression, and decreased mortality specifically in the nrf2 +/+ mice. In conclusion, the results suggest that Nrf2 is associated with oxidative regulation of LPS induced innate immune response in neutrophils. Activation of Nrf2-dependent compensatory antioxidative pathways by CDDO-Im protects from LPS induced inflammatory response and mortality.

  2. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  3. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  4. Frequency-dependent polarization-angle-phase-shift in the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Han-Chun; Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2015-02-14

    Linear polarization angle, θ, dependent measurements of the microwave radiation-induced oscillatory magnetoresistance, R{sub xx}, in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron devices have shown a θ dependence in the oscillatory amplitude along with magnetic field, frequency, and extrema-dependent phase shifts, θ{sub 0}. Here, we suggest a microwave frequency dependence of θ{sub 0}(f) using an analysis that averages over other smaller contributions, when those contributions are smaller than estimates of the experimental uncertainty.

  5. STING-Dependent Cytosolic DNA Sensing Promotes Radiation-Induced Type I Interferon-Dependent Antitumor Immunity in Immunogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liufu; Liang, Hua; Xu, Meng; Yang, Xuanming; Burnette, Byron; Arina, Ainhoa; Li, Xiao-Dong; Mauceri, Helena; Beckett, Michael; Darga, Thomas; Huang, Xiaona; Gajewski, Thomas F; Chen, Zhijian J; Fu, Yang-Xin; Weichselbaum, Ralph R

    2014-11-20

    Ionizing radiation-mediated tumor regression depends on type I interferon (IFN) and the adaptive immune response, but several pathways control I IFN induction. Here, we demonstrate that adaptor protein STING, but not MyD88, is required for type I IFN-dependent antitumor effects of radiation. In dendritic cells (DCs), STING was required for IFN-? induction in response to irradiated-tumor cells. The cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) mediated sensing of irradiated-tumor cells in DCs. Moreover, STING was essential for radiation-induced adaptive immune responses, which relied on type I IFN signaling on DCs. Exogenous IFN-? treatment rescued the cross-priming by cGAS or STING-deficient DCs. Accordingly, activation of STING by a second messenger cGAMP administration enhanced antitumor immunity induced by radiation. Thus radiation-mediated antitumor immunity in immunogenic tumors requires a functional cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway and suggests that cGAMP treatment might provide a new strategy to improve radiotherapy.

  6. Dependence of cisplatin-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo on cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Yu, Fang; Kaldis, Philipp; Aleem, Eiman; Nowak, Grazyna; Safirstein, Robert L; Megyesi, Judit

    2006-09-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutics, but its usefulness is limited by its toxicity to normal tissues, including cells of the kidney proximal tubule. The purpose of these studies was to determine the mechanism of cisplatin cytotoxicity. It was shown in vivo that cisplatin administration induces upregulation of the gene for the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor in kidney cells. This protein is a positive effector on the fate of cisplatin-exposed renal tubule cells in vivo and in vitro; adenoviral transduction of p21 completely protected proximal tubule cells from cisplatin toxicity. Herein is reported that cdk2 inhibitory drugs protect kidney cells in vivo and in vitro, that transduction of kidney cells in vitro with dominant-negative cdk2 also protected, and that cdk2 knockout cells were resistant to cisplatin. The cdk2 knockout cells regained cisplatin sensitivity after transduction with wild-type cdk2. It is concluded that cisplatin cytotoxicity depends on cdk2 activation and that the mechanism of p21 protection is by direct inhibition of cdk2. This demonstrated the involvement of a protein that previously was associated with cell-cycle progression with pathways of apoptosis. It also was demonstrated that this pathway of cisplatin-induced cell death can be interceded in vivo to prevent nephrotoxicity.

  7. Nonlinear temperature dependence of glue-induced birefringence in polarization maintaining FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopf, Barbara; Koch, Alexander W.; Roths, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Glue-induced stresses decrease the accuracy of surface-mounted fiber Bragg gratings (FBG). Significant temperature dependent glue-induced birefringence was verified when a thermally cured epoxy-based bonding technique had been used. Determining the peak separation of two azimuthally aligned FBGs in PM fibers combined with a polarization resolved measurement set-up in a temperature range between -30°C and 150°C revealed high glue-induced stresses at low temperatures. Peak separations of about 60 pm and a nonlinear temperature dependence of the glue-induced birefringence due to stress relaxation processes and a visco-elastic behavior of the used adhesive have been shown.

  8. Bias dependence of synergistic radiation effects induced by electrons and protons on silicon bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoming; Li, Xingji; Yang, Jianqun; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi

    2015-06-01

    Bias dependence on synergistic radiation effects caused by 110 keV electrons and 170 keV protons on the current gain of 3DG130 NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) is studied in this paper. Experimental results indicate that the influence induced by 170 keV protons is always enhancement effect during the sequential irradiation. However, the influence induced by 110 keV electrons on the BJT under various bias cases is different during the sequential irradiation. The transition fluence of 110 keV electrons is dependent on the bias case on the emitter-base junction of BJT.

  9. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica; Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent

  10. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  11. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  12. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine’s effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance task. A step-through type passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. To identify the complex pattern of protein expression induced by morphine, we compared rat hippocampal proteome either in morphine-induced amnesia or in state-dependent learning by two-dimensional gel electerophoresis and combined mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS). Post-training administration of morphine decreased step-through latency. Pre-test administration of morphine induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine influence. In the hippocampus, a total of 18 proteins were identified whose MASCOT (Modular Approach to Software Construction Operation and Test) scores were inside 95% confidence level. Of these, five hippocampal proteins altered in morphine-induced amnesia and ten proteins were found to change in the hippocampus of animals that had received post-training and pre-test morphine. These proteins show known functions in cytoskeletal architecture, cell metabolism, neurotransmitter secretion and neuroprotection. The findings indicate that the effect of morphine on memory formation in passive avoidance learning has a morphological correlate on the hippocampal proteome level. In addition, our proteomicscreensuggests that morphine induces memory impairment and state-dependent learning through modulating neuronal plasticity. PMID:25901168

  13. Cytotoxicity of atropine to human corneal endothelial cells by inducing mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Fan, Ting-Jun; Tian, Cheng-Lei

    2016-07-01

    Atropine, a widely used topical anticholinergic drug, might have adverse effects on human corneas in vivo. However, its cytotoxic effect on human corneal endothelium (HCE) and its possible mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of atropine and its underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms using an in vitro model of HCE cells and verified the cytotoxicity using cat corneal endothelium (CCE) in vivo. Our results showed that atropine at concentrations above 0.3125 g/L could induce abnormal morphology and viability decline in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro. The cytotoxicity of atropine was proven by the induced density decrease and abnormality of morphology and ultrastructure of CCE cells in vivo. Meanwhile, atropine could also induce dose- and time-dependent elevation of plasma membrane permeability, G1 phase arrest, phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic body formation of HCE cells. Moreover, 2.5 g/L atropine could also induce caspase-2/-3/-9 activation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential disruption, downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, upregulation of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bad, and upregulation of cytoplasmic cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor. In conclusion, atropine above 1/128 of its clinical therapeutic dosage has a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity to HCE cells in vitro which is confirmed by CCE cells in vivo, and its cytotoxicity is achieved by inducing HCE cell apoptosis via a death receptor-mediated mitochondrion-dependent signaling pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing effect of atropine which should be used with great caution in eye clinic. PMID:27022135

  14. Linear polarization study of microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations: Comparison of power dependence to theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tianyu; Iñarrea, Jesús; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R. G.

    2016-07-01

    We present an experimental study of the microwave power and the linear polarization angle dependence of the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron system. Experimental results show the sinusoidal dependence of the oscillatory magnetoresistance extrema as a function of the polarization angle. Yet, as the microwave power increases, the angular dependence includes additional harmonic content, and it begins to resemble the absolute value of the cosine function. We present a theory to explain such peculiar behavior.

  15. Zeeman Electromagnetically Induced Transparency with crossed pump and probe beams: Small angle dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Kaleb; Madkhaly, Samaya; de Medeiros, Dillon; Bali, Samir; Macklin Quantum Information Sciences Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Progress toward undergraduate oriented experiments on image storage in room-temperature atomic vapor using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency is described. Using a scanning longitudinal magnetic field technique we diagnose and suppress stray magnetic fields and polarization impurity. We consider the pump-probe angular dependence of the EIT signal but at much smaller angles of less than a milliradian.

  16. STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS
    M S Miller, J E Moore, M Xu, G B Nelson, S T Dance, N D Kock, J A Ross Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC and USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Previously, our laboratory demonstrated...

  17. Spermidine-Induced Improvement of Reconsolidation of Memory Involves Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girardi, Bruna Amanda; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Signor, Cristiane; Muller, Michele; Gais, Mayara Ana; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Rubin, Maribel Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined whether the calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling pathway is involved in the improvement of fear memory reconsolidation induced by the intrahippocampal administration of spermidine in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning apparatus using a 0.4-mA footshock as an unconditioned stimulus.…

  18. Dihydroartemisinin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dou, C; Ding, N; Xing, J; Zhao, C; Kang, F; Hou, T; Quan, H; Chen, Y; Dai, Q; Luo, F; Xu, J; Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a widely used antimalarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recent studies suggested that DHA has antitumor effects utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism. Here, we reported that DHA is inhibitory on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast (OC) differentiation, fusion and bone-resorption activity in vitro. Intracellular ROS detection revealed that DHA could remarkably increase ROS accumulation during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, cell apoptosis was also increased by DHA treatment. We found that DHA-activated caspase-3 increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol were observed, indicating that ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial in DHA-induced apoptosis during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. In vivo study showed that DHA treatment decreased OC number, prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture and restores bone strength in LPS-induced bone-loss mouse model. Together, our findings indicate that DHA is protective against LPS-induced bone loss through apoptosis induction of osteoclasts via ROS accumulation and the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Therefore, DHA may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27031959

  19. Dihydroartemisinin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Dou, C; Ding, N; Xing, J; Zhao, C; Kang, F; Hou, T; Quan, H; Chen, Y; Dai, Q; Luo, F; Xu, J; Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a widely used antimalarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recent studies suggested that DHA has antitumor effects utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism. Here, we reported that DHA is inhibitory on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast (OC) differentiation, fusion and bone-resorption activity in vitro. Intracellular ROS detection revealed that DHA could remarkably increase ROS accumulation during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, cell apoptosis was also increased by DHA treatment. We found that DHA-activated caspase-3 increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol were observed, indicating that ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial in DHA-induced apoptosis during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. In vivo study showed that DHA treatment decreased OC number, prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture and restores bone strength in LPS-induced bone-loss mouse model. Together, our findings indicate that DHA is protective against LPS-induced bone loss through apoptosis induction of osteoclasts via ROS accumulation and the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Therefore, DHA may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27031959

  20. IKK{epsilon} modulates RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu Tianshuang; Liao Suiling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-12-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical I{kappa}B kinase (IKK){epsilon} in modulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKK{epsilon} activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKK{epsilon} results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKK{epsilon} regulates viral-induced cellular signaling.

  1. KHDC1A, a Novel Translational Repressor, Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum-Dependent Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Congli; Liu, Jing; Wang, Chao

    2012-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are characterized as a new family of apoptosis inducers; however, the mechanism by which they induce apoptosis is poorly understood. KHDC1 family members were recently identified as K-homology (KH)-domain containing RNA binding proteins that are unique to eutherian mammals and highly expressed in oocytes. In this study, we report that the expression of KHDC1A induces caspase-3 dependent apoptosis and inhibits mRNA translation, and the translational repression is independent of apoptosis. We demonstrate that both the N-terminus and C-terminus of KHDC1A are required for its pro-apoptotic and translational repression activities. Furthermore, in the C-terminus of KHDC1A, a putative trans-membrane motif (TMM) is critical for these activities. In addition, the ectopically expressed KHDC1A is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and changes the morphology of the ER. The inhibition of ER-specific caspase-12 successfully rescues KHDC1A-induced apoptosis, but not Fas-induced apoptosis. Taken together, we conclude that KHDC1A functions as a global translational repressor and induces apoptosis through an ER-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:22731819

  2. Endothelium-dependent and-independent relaxation induced by resveratrol in rat superior mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Xu, Cangbao; Wei, Yahui; Zhang, Yaping; Cao, Ailan

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (Res) is a specific agonist of sirtuin 1, and has many cardioprotective effects. Although Res is able to relax various vascular beds, its pharmacological properties in rat superior mesenteric arteries and the underlying mechanism are not well clarified. The aim of present study was to investigate the vasorelaxant effects of Res on rat superior mesenteric arteries and the mechanisms involved. The isometric tension of rat superior mesenteric arterial rings was recorded in vitro using myography. It was found that Res concentration-dependently relaxed endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine hydrochloride (Emax, 97.66±0.79%; pD2, 4.30±0.14) or KCl (Emax, 101.3±0.6%; pD2, 4.12±0.03). The vasorelaxant effect of Res on the superior mesenteric artery rings was partially endothelium-dependent. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 µM) significantly inhibited the Res-induced vasorelaxant effect. However, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM) and indomethacin (5 µM) each had no effect on the Res-induced vasorelaxation. In artery rings without endothelium, the vasorelaxation induced by Res was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine (100 µM) and glibenclamide (10 µM). However, barium chloride dehydrate (10 µM) and tetraethylammonium chloride (1 mM) did not affect the vasorelaxation induced by Res. Moreover, Res also inhibited the contraction induced by an increase in external calcium concentration in Ca2+-free medium plus KCl (60 mM). These results suggest that Res induces relaxation in superior mesenteric arterial rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, involving nitric oxide release, and also through an endothelium-independent pathway, with opening of voltage-dependent K+ channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels and blockade of extracellular Ca2+ influx. PMID:27698719

  3. Endothelium-dependent and-independent relaxation induced by resveratrol in rat superior mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Xu, Cangbao; Wei, Yahui; Zhang, Yaping; Cao, Ailan

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (Res) is a specific agonist of sirtuin 1, and has many cardioprotective effects. Although Res is able to relax various vascular beds, its pharmacological properties in rat superior mesenteric arteries and the underlying mechanism are not well clarified. The aim of present study was to investigate the vasorelaxant effects of Res on rat superior mesenteric arteries and the mechanisms involved. The isometric tension of rat superior mesenteric arterial rings was recorded in vitro using myography. It was found that Res concentration-dependently relaxed endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine hydrochloride (Emax, 97.66±0.79%; pD2, 4.30±0.14) or KCl (Emax, 101.3±0.6%; pD2, 4.12±0.03). The vasorelaxant effect of Res on the superior mesenteric artery rings was partially endothelium-dependent. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 µM) significantly inhibited the Res-induced vasorelaxant effect. However, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM) and indomethacin (5 µM) each had no effect on the Res-induced vasorelaxation. In artery rings without endothelium, the vasorelaxation induced by Res was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine (100 µM) and glibenclamide (10 µM). However, barium chloride dehydrate (10 µM) and tetraethylammonium chloride (1 mM) did not affect the vasorelaxation induced by Res. Moreover, Res also inhibited the contraction induced by an increase in external calcium concentration in Ca2+-free medium plus KCl (60 mM). These results suggest that Res induces relaxation in superior mesenteric arterial rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, involving nitric oxide release, and also through an endothelium-independent pathway, with opening of voltage-dependent K+ channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels and blockade of extracellular Ca2+ influx.

  4. Cell cycle age dependence for radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest: evidence for time-dependent repair

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.

    1985-09-01

    Exponentially growing eucaryotic cells, irradiated in interphase, are delayed in progression to mitosis chiefly by arrest in G/sub 2/. The sensitivity of Chinese hamster ovary cells to G/sub 2/ arrest induction by X rays increases through the cell cycle, up to the X-ray transition point (TP) in G/sub 2/. This age response can be explained by cell cycle age-dependent changes in susceptibility of the target(s) for G/sub 2/ arrest and/or by changes in capability for postirradiation recovery from G/sub 2/ arrest damage. Discrimination between sensitivity changes and repair phenomena is possible only if the level of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage sustained by a cell at the time of irradiation and the level ultimately expressed as arrest can be determined. The ability of caffeine to ameliorate radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest, while inhibiting repair of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage makes such an analysis possible. In the presence of caffeine, progression of irradiated cells was relatively unperturbed, but on caffeine removal, G/sub 2/ arrest was expressed. The duration of G/sub 2/ arrest was independent of the length of the prior caffeine exposure. This finding indicates that the target for G/sub 2/ arrest induction is present throughout the cell cycle and that the level of G/sub 2/ arrest damage incurred is initially constant for all cell cycle phases. The data are consistent with the existence of a time-dependent recovery mechanism to explain the age dependence for radiation induction of G/sub 2/ arrest.

  5. Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Dysfunction Results From p53-Dependent Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Jennifer L.; Grundmann, Oliver; Burd, Randy; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer causes adverse secondary side effects in the salivary glands and results in diminished quality of life for the patient. A previous in vivo study in parotid salivary glands demonstrated that targeted head-and-neck irradiation resulted in marked increases in phosphorylated p53 (serine{sup 18}) and apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active mutant of Akt1 (myr-Akt1). Methods and Materials: Transgenic and knockout mouse models were exposed to irradiation, and p53-mediated transcription, apoptosis, and salivary gland dysfunction were analyzed. Results: The proapoptotic p53 target genes PUMA and Bax were induced in parotid salivary glands of mice at early time points after therapeutic radiation. This dose-dependent induction requires expression of p53 because no radiation-induced expression of PUMA and Bax was observed in p53-/- mice. Radiation also induced apoptosis in the parotid gland in a dose-dependent manner, which was p53 dependent. Furthermore, expression of p53 was required for the acute and chronic loss of salivary function after irradiation. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced in p53-/- mice, and their salivary function was preserved after radiation exposure. Conclusions: Apoptosis in the salivary glands after therapeutic head-and-neck irradiation is mediated by p53 and corresponds to salivary gland dysfunction in vivo.

  6. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  7. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  8. Bufalin Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Dependent Bax Translocation and Apoptosis in ASTC-a-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lei; Chen, Tongsheng; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Yun; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-01-01

    Bufalin has been shown to induce cancer cell death through apoptotic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we used the confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) to monitor the spatio-temporal dynamics of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, Bax translocation and caspase-3 activation during bufalin-induced apoptosis in living human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. Bufalin induced ROS production and apoptotic cell death, demonstrated by Hoechst 33258 staining as well as flow cytometry analysis. Bax redistributed from cytosol to mitochondria from 12 to 48 h after bufalin treatment in living cells expressed with green fluorescent protein Bax. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, inhibited ROS generation and Bax translocation and led to a significant protection against bufalin-induced apoptosis. Our results also revealed that bufalin induced a prominent increase of caspase-3 activation blocked potently by NAC. Taken together, bufalin induced ROS-mediated Bax translocation, mitochondrial permeability transition and caspase-3 activation, implying that bufalin induced apoptosis via ROS-dependent mitochondrial death pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells. PMID:19592481

  9. Captopril augments acetylcholine-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions in vitro via kinin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors therapy is aassociated with bothersome dry cough as an adverse effect. The mechanisms underlying this adverse effect are not clear. Therefore, influence of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions was investigated. Further, the mechanisms underlying the captopril-induced changes were also explored. In vitro contractions of rat bronchial smooth muscle to cumulative concentrations of ACh were recorded before and after exposure to captopril. Further, the involvement of kinin and inositol triphosphate (IP₃) pathways for captopril-induced alterations were explored. ACh produced concentration-dependent (5-500 µM) increase in bronchial smooth muscle contractions. Pre-treatment with captopril augmented the ACh-induced contractions at each concentration significantly. Pre-treatment with aprotinin (kinin synthesis inhibitor) or heparin (inositol triphosphate, IP₃-inhibitor), blocked the captopril-induced augmentation of bronchial smooth muscle contractions evoked by ACh. Further, captopril-induced augmentation was absent in calcium-free medium. These results suggest that captopril sensitizes bronchial smooth muscles to ACh-induced contractions. This sensitization may be responsible for dry cough associated with captopril therapy. PMID:27468462

  10. Ofloxacin induces apoptosis in microencapsulated juvenile rabbit chondrocytes by caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Zhiguo; Cao Xiaojuan; Peng Shuangqing Wang Changyong; Li Qianqian; Wang Yimei; Liu Mifeng

    2008-01-15

    Quinolones (QNs)-induced arthropathy is an important toxic effect in immature animals leading to restriction of their therapeutic use in pediatrics. However, the exact mechanism still remains unclear. Recently, we have demonstrated that ofloxacin, a typical QN, induces apoptosis of alginate microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes by disturbing the {beta}{sub 1} integrin functions and inactivating the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway. In this study, we extend our initial observations to further elucidate the mechanism(s) of ofloxacin-induced apoptosis by utilizing specific caspase inhibitors. Pretreatment with both caspase-9-specific inhibitor zLEHD-fmk and caspase-8 inhibitor zIETD-fmk attenuated ofloxacin-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3 of chondrocyte in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescent dye staining, enzyme activity assay and immunoblotting. Furthermore, the activation of caspase-9, -8 and -3 stimulated by ofloxacin was significantly inhibited in the presence of zIETD-fmk while pretreatment with zLEHD-fmk only blocked the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Ofloxacin also stimulated a concentration-dependent translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol and a decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, which was completely inhibited by zIETD-fmk. In addition, ofloxacin was found to increase the level of Bax, tBid, p53 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, The current results indicate that the caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway is primarily involved in the ofloxacin-induced apoptosis of microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes.

  11. Right anterior insula connectivity is important for cue-induced craving in nicotine-dependent smokers.

    PubMed

    Moran-Santa Maria, Megan M; Hartwell, Karen J; Hanlon, Colleen A; Canterberry, Melanie; Lematty, Todd; Owens, Max; Brady, Kathleen T; George, Mark S

    2015-03-01

    The insula has been implicated in cue-induced craving and relapse in nicotine-dependent tobacco cigarette smokers. The aims of the present study were to identify brain regions that exhibit greater functional connectivity with the right anterior insula in response to smoking cues than to neutral cues and the role of functional connectivity between these regions in mediating cue-induced craving in healthy (free of axis I psychiatric disorders) nicotine-dependent tobacco cigarette smokers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected from 63 healthy nicotine-dependent smokers viewing blocks of smoking and neutral cues. Craving ratings were obtained after each block. A psychophysiologic interaction approach was used to identify regions that exhibited significantly greater functional connectivity with the right anterior insula (seed) during the smoking cues than during the neutral (corrected cluster thresholding, Z > 2.3, P = 0.05). Parameter estimates of the interaction effects from each region were regressed against the mean cue-induced craving scores. Significant task by seed interactions were observed in two clusters centered in the bilateral precuneus and left angular gyrus. The strength of connectivity between the right anterior insula and the precuneus, which is involved interoceptive processing and self-awareness, was positively correlated with the magnitude of the craving response to the smoking cues (r(2)  = 0.15; P < 0.01). These data suggest that among smokers, cue-induced craving may be a function of connectivity between two regions involved in interoception and self-awareness. Moreover, treatment strategies that incorporate mindful attention may be effective in attenuating cue-induced craving and relapse in nicotine-dependent smokers.

  12. Cue-induced craving for marijuana in cannabis-dependent adults.

    PubMed

    Lundahl, Leslie H; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn

    2011-06-01

    Recent interest in the development of medications for treatment of cannabis-use disorders indicates the need for laboratory models to evaluate potential compounds prior to undertaking clinical trials. To investigate whether a cue-reactivity paradigm could induce marijuana craving in cannabis-dependent adults, 16 (eight female) cannabis-dependent and 16 (eight female) cannabis-naïve participants were exposed to neutral and marijuana-related cues, and subsequent changes in mood, self-reported craving, and physiologic function were assessed. Significant Group X cue interactions were found on all three VAS craving indices as well as on the Compulsivity scale of the Marijuana Craving Questionnaire-Brief Form (MCQ-BF). Cannabis-dependent individuals responded to marijuana-related cues with significantly increased reports of marijuana craving compared to neutral cue exposure, although there were no cue-induced changes in any of the physiological measures. There were no significant gender differences on any of the measures. These results indicate that marijuana craving can be induced and assessed in cannabis-dependent, healthy adults within a laboratory setting, and support the need for further research of the cue reactivity paradigm in the development of medications to treat cannabis-use disorders.

  13. Challenges in Modelling of Lightning-Induced Delamination; Effect of Temperature-Dependent Interfacial Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naghipour, P.; Pineda, E. J.; Arnold, S.

    2014-01-01

    Lightning is a major cause of damage in laminated composite aerospace structures during flight. Due to the dielectric nature of Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs), the high energy induced by lightning strike transforms into extreme, localized surface temperature accompanied with a high-pressure shockwave resulting in extensive damage. It is crucial to develop a numerical tool capable of predicting the damage induced from a lightning strike to supplement extremely expensive lightning experiments. Delamination is one of the most significant failure modes resulting from a lightning strike. It can be extended well beyond the visible damage zone, and requires sophisticated techniques and equipment to detect. A popular technique used to model delamination is the cohesive zone approach. Since the loading induced from a lightning strike event is assumed to consist of extreme localized heating, the cohesive zone formulation should additionally account for temperature effects. However, the sensitivity to this dependency remains unknown. Therefore, the major focus point of this work is to investigate the importance of this dependency via defining various temperature dependency profiles for the cohesive zone properties, and analyzing the corresponding delamination area. Thus, a detailed numerical model consisting of multidirectional composite plies with temperature-dependent cohesive elements in between is subjected to lightning (excessive amount of heat and pressure) and delamination/damage expansion is studied under specified conditions.

  14. Bupivacaine induces apoptosis through caspase-dependent and -independent pathways in canine mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Shu; Cheng, Yeong-Hsiang; Lin, Sui-Wen; Chang, Te-Sheng; Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, Yu-Shen

    2015-06-01

    Local anesthetics have been reported to induce apoptosis in various cell lines. In this study, we showed that bupivacaine also induced apoptosis in DTK-SME cells, a vimentin(+)/AE1(+)/CK7(+)/HSP27(+), tumorigenic, immortalized, canine mammary tumor cell line. Bupivacaine induced apoptosis in DTK-SME cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Apoptosis-associated morphological changes, including cell shrinkage and rounding, chromatin condensation, and formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed in the bupivacaine-treated DTK-SME cells. Apoptosis was further confirmed with annexin V staining, TUNEL staining, and DNA laddering assays. At the molecular level, the activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9 corresponded well to the degree of DNA fragmentation triggered by bupivacaine. We also demonstrated that the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, only partially inhibited the apoptosis induced by bupivacaine. Moreover, treated cells increased expression of endonuclease G, a death effector that acts independently of caspases. Our data suggested that bupivacaine-induced apoptosis occurs through both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptotic pathways.

  15. Mannosylated lipoarabinomannan antagonizes Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis by altering Ca+2-dependent cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Rojas, M; García, L F; Nigou, J; Puzo, G; Olivier, M

    2000-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis can be inhibited by mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), although it induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and NO production, which participate in apoptosis induction. ManLAM also modulates Ca(+2)-dependent intracellular events, and Ca(+2) participates in apoptosis in different systems. Ca(+2) was assessed for involvement in M. tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis and for modulation by ManLAM. The role of Ca(+2) was supported by the blockade of apoptosis by cAMP inhibitors and the Ca(+2) chelator, BAPTA/AM. These agents also inhibited caspase-1 activation and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein translocation without affecting TNF-alpha production. Infection of macrophages with M. tuberculosis induced an influx of Ca(+2) that was prevented by ManLAM. Similarly, M. tuberculosis infection-altered mitochondrial permeability transition was prevented by ManLAM and BAPTA/AM. Finally, ManLAM and BAPTA/AM reversed the effects of M. tuberculosis on p53 and Bcl-2 expression. ManLAM counteracts the alterations of calcium-dependent intracellular events that occur during M. tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis.

  16. Retrieval-Induced versus Context-Induced Forgetting: Does Retrieval-Induced Forgetting Depend on Context Shifts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Julia S.; Polack, Cody W.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2016-01-01

    Retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is the observation that retrieval of target information causes forgetting of related nontarget information. A number of accounts of this phenomenon have been proposed, including a context-shift-based account (Jonker, Seli, & Macleod, 2013). This account proposes that RIF occurs as a result of the context…

  17. Distance-dependent photo-induced electron transport in nanometer-sized junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albee, Brian; Liu, Xuejun; Tork Ladani, Faezeh; Dutta, Rajen K.; Potma, Eric O.

    2016-05-01

    We describe photo-induced current experiments observed in nm-sized electro-migrated nano gaps, using surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) as the source of the optical driving field. For gaps smaller than 5 nm, we observe a stable photo-induced current that is linear with the intensity of the SPP mode, whereas the photo-current in wider gaps shows a highly nonlinear dependence that is reminiscent of field emission. The results are explained by a modified Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin tunneling model, which reproduces the observed transition from optical rectification to optically driven field emission in the nano junction.

  18. Two cases of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with different culprit foods

    PubMed Central

    Mobayed, Hassan M.S.; Ali Al-Nesf, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is one of the severe allergic reactions in which symptoms develop only if exercise takes place within a few hours of eating a specific food. It is important to consider FDEIA in cases of unexplained anaphylaxis as reactions can occur several hours after ingesting the culprit food(s). We herein report the first two cases of FDEIA in the Middle East. The first one is induced by wheat, while the other by peanut. The pathophysiology, predisposing factors, diagnosis, and treatment of FDEIA are also summarized here. PMID:24551018

  19. Risk factors for cocaine-induced psychosis in cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Roncero, C; Daigre, C; Gonzalvo, B; Valero, S; Castells, X; Grau-López, L; Eiroa-Orosa, F J; Casas, M

    2013-03-01

    Cocaine consumption can induce transient psychotic symptoms, expressed as paranoia or hallucinations. Cocaine induced psychosis (CIP) is common but not developed in all cases. This is the first European study on the relationship between CIP, consumption pattern variables and personality disorders. We evaluated 173 cocaine-dependent patients over 18 years; mostly males, whose average age was 33.6 years (SD=7.8). Patients attending an outpatient addictions department were enrolled in the study and subsequently systematically evaluated using SCID I and SCID II interviews for comorbid disorders, a clinical interview for psychotic symptoms and EuropASI for severity of addiction. A high proportion of cocaine dependent patients reported psychotic symptoms under the influence of cocaine (53.8%), the most frequently reported being paranoid beliefs and suspiciousness (43.9%). A logistic regression analysis was performed, finding that a model consisting of amount of cocaine consumption, presence of an antisocial personality disorder and cannabis dependence history had 66.2% sensitivity 75.8% specificity predicting the presence of CIP. In our conclusions, we discuss the relevance of evaluating CIP in all cocaine dependent-patients, and particularly in those fulfilling the clinical profile derived from our results. These findings could be useful for a clinical approach to the risks of psychotic states in cocaine-dependent patients.

  20. Symptom-dependent taste aversion induced by an anticoagulant rodenticide in the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Smith, P; Inglis, I R; Cowan, D P; Kerins, G M; Bull, D S

    1994-09-01

    In a series of 3 experiments with different experimental paradigms, feeding patterns of laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) were monitored in 2-choice feeding tests after intubation with a sublethal dose of an anticoagulant rodenticide. We report for the first time that contrary to accepted wisdom, anticoagulants can induce taste aversions. Furthermore, we report behavioral symptoms within the 1st day after dosing. Our data suggest that the taste aversion is induced through an inhibition of the vitamin K cycle and is transient, attenuating over the same period as the levels of vitamin K-dependent proteins return to normal. Because the taste aversion is expressed most strongly when symptoms are most pronounced and is not expressed after symptoms have disappeared, we term this novel form of control symptom-dependent taste aversion. PMID:7924258

  1. Toll-like receptor and tumour necrosis factor dependent endotoxin-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Togbe, Dieudonnée; Schnyder-Candrian, Silvia; Schnyder, Bruno; Doz, Emilie; Noulin, Nicolas; Janot, Laure; Secher, Thomas; Gasse, Pamela; Lima, Carla; Coelho, Fernando Rodrigues; Vasseur, Virginie; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernhard; Couillin, Isabelle; Moser, Rene

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies on endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute inflammatory response in the lung are reviewed. The acute airway inflammatory response to inhaled endotoxin is mediated through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CD14 signalling as mice deficient for TLR4 or CD14 are unresponsive to endotoxin. Acute bronchoconstriction, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-12 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) production, protein leak and neutrophil recruitment in the lung are abrogated in mice deficient for the adaptor molecules myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP), but independent of TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-beta (TRIF). In particular, LPS-induced TNF is required for bronchoconstriction, but dispensable for inflammatory cell recruitment. Lipopolysaccharide induces activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Inhibition of pulmonary MAPK activity abrogates LPS-induced TNF production, bronchoconstriction, neutrophil recruitment into the lungs and broncho-alveolar space. In conclusion, TLR4-mediated, bronchoconstriction and acute inflammatory lung pathology to inhaled endotoxin are dependent on TLR4/CD14/MD2 expression using the adapter proteins TIRAP and MyD88, while TRIF, IL-1R1 or IL-18R signalling pathways are dispensable. Further downstream in this axis of signalling, TNF blockade reduces only acute bronchoconstriction, while MAPK inhibition abrogates completely endotoxin-induced inflammation. PMID:18039275

  2. Cadmium induces NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent pyroptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Lu, Yonghui; Cao, Zhengwang; Ma, Qinlong; Pi, Huifeng; Fang, Yiliang; Yu, Zhengping; Hu, Houxiang; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-03-30

    Cadmium (Cd) is an important and common environmental pollutant that has been linked to cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. Increasing evidence demonstrates that Cd impairs the cardiovascular system by targeting vascular endothelial cells, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we observed that Cd treatment led to cell death and the generation of inflammatory cytokines. The Cd-induced cell death was identified as pyroptosis, a novel pro-inflammatory form of cell death depending on caspase-1 activation. In addition, exposure of HUVECs to Cd resulted in NLRP3 inflammasome activation as evidenced by cleavage of caspase-1 and downstream interleukin (IL)-1β production. Moreover, knockdown of NLRP3 by small interfering RNA efficiently suppressed Cd-induced caspase-1 cleavage, IL-1β production and pyroptosis in HUVECs. Additional experiments demonstrated that treatment with Cd significantly increased the levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and intracellular ROS in HUVECs. Accordingly, pre-treatment with mtROS scavenger or total ROS scavenger reduced Cd-induced activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and pyroptotic cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome, activated by the generation of mtROS, mediates Cd-induced pyroptosis in HUVECs. Our results provide novel insights into Cd-induced cytotoxicity and the underlying mechanism by which Cd induces endothelial injury.

  3. Oxidative stress–dependent phosphorylation activates ZNRF1 to induce neuronal/axonal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuki, Shuji; Furuno, Akiko; Ohshima, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known inducer of neuronal apoptosis and axonal degeneration. We previously showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF1 promotes Wallerian degeneration by degrading AKT to induce GSK3B activation. We now demonstrate that oxidative stress serves as an activator of the ubiquitin ligase activity of ZNRF1 by inducing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mediated phosphorylation at the 103rd tyrosine residue and that the up-regulation of ZNRF1 activity by oxidative stress leads to neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. We also show that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–reduced oxidase activity is required for the EGFR-dependent phosphorylation-induced activation of ZNRF1 and resultant AKT degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system to induce Wallerian degeneration. These results indicate the pathophysiological significance of the EGFR–ZNRF1 pathway induced by oxidative stress in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. A deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanism for ZNRF1 catalytic activity via phosphorylation will provide a potential therapeutic avenue for neurodegeneration. PMID:26572622

  4. Flicker-light induced visual phenomena: frequency dependence and specificity of whole percepts and percept features.

    PubMed

    Allefeld, Carsten; Pütz, Peter; Kastner, Kristina; Wackermann, Jiří

    2011-12-01

    Flickering light induces visual hallucinations in human observers. Despite a long history of the phenomenon, little is known about the dependence of flicker-induced subjective impressions on the flicker frequency. We investigate this question using Ganzfeld stimulation and an experimental paradigm combining a continuous frequency scan (1-50 Hz) with a focus on re-occurring, whole percepts. On the single-subject level, we find a high degree of frequency stability of percepts. To generalize across subjects, we apply two rating systems, (1) a set of complex percept classes derived from subjects' reports and (2) an enumeration of elementary percept features, and determine distributions of occurrences over flicker frequency. We observe a stronger frequency specificity for complex percept classes than elementary percept features. Comparing the similarity relations among percept categories to those among frequency profiles, we observe that though percepts are preferentially induced by particular frequencies, the frequency does not unambiguously determine the experienced percept. PMID:21123084

  5. Flickering task–irrelevant distractors induce dilation of target duration depending upon cortical distance

    PubMed Central

    Okajima, Miku; Yotsumoto, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    Flickering stimuli are perceived to be longer than stable stimuli. This so-called “flicker-induced time dilation” has been investigated in a number of studies, but the factors critical for this effect remain unclear. We explored the spatial distribution of the flicker effect and examined how the flickering task-irrelevant distractors spatially distant from the target induce time dilation. In two experiments, we demonstrated that flickering distractors dilated the perceived duration of the target stimulus even though the target stimulus itself was stable. In addition, when the distractor duration was much longer than the target duration, a flickering distractor located ipsilateral to the target caused greater time dilation than did a contralateral distractor. Thus the amount of dilation depended on the distance between the cortical areas responsible for the stimulus locations. These findings are consistent with the recent study reporting that modulation of neural oscillators encoding the interval duration could explain flicker-induced time dilation. PMID:27577614

  6. TRPV1 Activation in Primary Cortical Neurons Induces Calcium-Dependent Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Jun Hong; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1, also known as vanilloid receptor 1) is a receptor that detects capsaicin, a pungent component of chili peppers, and noxious heat. Although its function in the primary nociceptor as a pain receptor is well established, whether TRPV1 is expressed in the brain is still under debate. In this study, the responses of primary cortical neurons were investigated. Here, we report that 1) capsaicin induces caspase-3-dependent programmed cell death, which coincides with increased production of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite ; that 2) the prolonged capsaicin treatment induces a steady increase in the degree of capase-3 activation, which is prevented by the removal of capsaicin; 3) and that blocking calcium entry and calcium-mediated signaling prevents capsaicin-induced cell death. These results indicate that cortical neurons express TRPV1 whose prolonged activation causes cell death. PMID:23585723

  7. Thrombocytopenia induced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor abexinostat involves p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ali, A; Bluteau, O; Messaoudi, K; Palazzo, A; Boukour, S; Lordier, L; Lecluse, Y; Rameau, P; Kraus-Berthier, L; Jacquet-Bescond, A; Lelièvre, H; Depil, S; Dessen, P; Solary, E; Raslova, H; Vainchenker, W; Plo, I; Debili, N

    2013-01-01

    Abexinostat is a pan histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that demonstrates efficacy in malignancy treatment. Like other HDACi, this drug induces a profound thrombocytopenia whose mechanism is only partially understood. We have analyzed its effect at doses reached in patient plasma on in vitro megakaryopoiesis derived from human CD34+ cells. When added at day 0 in culture, abexinostat inhibited CFU-MK growth, megakaryocyte (MK) proliferation and differentiation. These effects required only a short incubation period. Decreased proliferation was due to induction of apoptosis and was not related to a defect in TPO/MPL/JAK2/STAT signaling. When added later (day 8), the compound induced a dose-dependent decrease (up to 10-fold) in proplatelet (PPT) formation. Gene profiling from MK revealed a silencing in the expression of DNA repair genes with a marked RAD51 decrease at protein level. DNA double-strand breaks were increased as attested by elevated γH2AX phosphorylation level. Moreover, ATM was phosphorylated leading to p53 stabilization and increased BAX and p21 expression. The use of a p53 shRNA rescued apoptosis, and only partially the defect in PPT formation. These results suggest that HDACi induces a thrombocytopenia by a p53-dependent mechanism along MK differentiation and a p53-dependent and -independent mechanism for PPT formation. PMID:23887629

  8. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis due to wheat in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Farid, Reza; Ansari, Elham; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Purreza, Reza; Noorizadeh, Shadi

    2013-03-01

    Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy is a rare condition. However, the occurrence of anaphylaxis is increasing especially in young people. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is based on clinical criteria and can be supported by laboratory tests such as serum tryptase and positive skin test results for specific IgE to potential triggering allergens. Anaphylaxis prevention needs strict avoidance of confirmed relevant allergen. Food-exercise challenge test may be an acceptable method for diagnosis of Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy and dietary elimination of food is recommended to manage it. In this study, a 32 year-old woman visited the allergy clinic with a history of several episodes of hives since 11 years ago and 3 life-threatening attacks of anaphylaxis during the previous 6 months. The onsets of majority of these attacks were due to physical activity after breakfast. On Blood RAST test, the panel of common food Allergens was used and she had positive test only to wheat flour. On skin prick tests for common food allergens she showed a 6 millimeter wheal with 14 mm flare to Wheat Extract. The rest of allergens were negative.The patient was diagnosed as wheat-dependent exercise-induced, and all foods containing wheat were omitted from her diet. In this report we emphasized on the importance of careful history taking in anaphylaxis diagnosis.

  9. β-caryophyllene ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in a cannabinoid 2 receptor-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kechrid, Malek; Patel, Vivek; Tanashian, Galin; Wink, David A.; Gertsch, Jürg; Pacher, Pál

    2012-01-01

    (E)-β-caryophyllene (BCP) is a natural sequiterpene found in many essential oils of spice (best known for contributing to the spiciness of black pepper) and food plants with recognized anti-inflammatory properties. Recently it was shown that BCP is a natural agonist of endogenous cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors, which are expressed in immune cells and mediate anti-inflammatory effects. In this study we aimed to test the effects of BCP in a clinically relevant murine model of nephropathy (induced by the widely used antineoplastic drug cisplatin) in which the tubular injury is largely dependent on inflammation and oxidative/nitrative stress. β-caryophyllene dose-dependently ameliorated cisplatin-induced kidney dysfunction, morphological damage, and renal inflammatory response (chemokines MCP-1 and MIP-2, cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration). It also markedly mitigated oxidative/nitrative stress (NOX-2, NOX-4 expression, 4-HNE and 3-NT content) and cell death. The protective effects of BCP against biochemical and histological markers of nephropathy were absent in CB2 knockout mice. Thus, BCP may be an excellent therapeutic agent to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through a CB2 receptor dependent pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of BCP in humans it has tremendous therapeutic potential in multitude of diseases associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:22326488

  10. Intestinal Enteroids Model Guanylate Cyclase C-Dependent Secretion Induced by Heat-Stable Enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Amanda M; Blomain, Erik S; Merlino, Dante J; Wang, Fang; Crissey, Mary Ann S; Kraft, Crystal L; Rappaport, Jeff A; Snook, Adam E; Lynch, John P; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes ∼20% of the acute infectious diarrhea (AID) episodes worldwide, often by producing heat-stable enterotoxins (STs), which are peptides structurally homologous to paracrine hormones of the intestinal guanylate cyclase C (GUCY2C) receptor. While molecular mechanisms mediating ST-induced intestinal secretion have been defined, advancements in therapeutics have been hampered for decades by the paucity of disease models that integrate molecular and functional endpoints amenable to high-throughput screening. Here, we reveal that mouse and human intestinal enteroids in three-dimensional ex vivo cultures express the components of the GUCY2C secretory signaling axis. ST and its structural analog, linaclotide, an FDA-approved oral secretagog, induced fluid accumulation quantified simultaneously in scores of enteroid lumens, recapitulating ETEC-induced intestinal secretion. Enteroid secretion depended on canonical molecular signaling events responsible for ETEC-induced diarrhea, including cyclic GMP (cGMP) produced by GUCY2C, activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and opening of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CFTR abrogated enteroid fluid secretion, providing proof of concept for the utility of this model to screen antidiarrheal agents. Intestinal enteroids offer a unique model, integrating the GUCY2C signaling axis and luminal fluid secretion, to explore the pathophysiology of, and develop platforms for, high-throughput drug screening to identify novel compounds to prevent and treat ETEC diarrheal disease. PMID:27481254

  11. A CDK4/6-Dependent Epigenetic Mechanism Protects Cancer Cells from PML-induced Senescence.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Mariana; Vernier, Mathieu; Mignacca, Lian; Lessard, Frédéric; Huot, Geneviève; Moiseeva, Olga; Bourdeau, Véronique; Ferbeyre, Gerardo

    2016-06-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) plays a tumor suppressive role by inducing cellular senescence in response to oncogenic stress. However, tumor cell lines fail to engage in complete senescence upon PML activation. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying resistance to PML-induced senescence. Here, we report that activation of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 are essential and sufficient to impair senescence induced by PML expression. Disrupting CDK function by RNA interference or pharmacological inhibition restored senescence in tumor cells and diminished their tumorigenic potential in mouse xenograft models. Complete senescence correlated with an increase in autophagy, repression of E2F target genes, and an gene expression signature of blocked DNA methylation. Accordingly, treatment of tumor cells with inhibitors of DNA methylation reversed resistance to PML-induced senescence. Further, CDK inhibition with palbociclib promoted autophagy-dependent degradation of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Lastly, we found that CDK4 interacted with and phosphorylated DNMT1 in vitro, suggesting that CDK activity is required for its stabilization. Taken together, our findings highlight a potentially valuable feature of CDK4/6 inhibitors as epigenetic modulators to facilitate activation of senescence programs in tumor cells. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3252-64. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Salmonella typhimurium-induced M1 macrophage polarization is dependent on the bacterial O antigen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengling; Sun, Xiaoming; Qu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolian

    2016-02-01

    Recently, macrophages were shown to be capable of differentiating toward two phenotypes after antigen stimulation: a classically activated (M1) or an alternatively activated phenotype (M2). To investigate the effect of Salmonella enteric serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) on macrophage differentiation, we compared macrophage phenotypes after infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type S. typhimurium and its isogenic rfc mutant. S. typhimurium C5 induced M1 macrophage polarization and enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by macrophages; this induction was dependent on Toll-like receptor 4. In contrast, the Δrfc mutant (S. typhimurium C5 rfc::Km(r)) lost this function and induced an M2 response in the macrophages. Here, we propose that S. typhimurium C5 is capable of polarizing macrophages towards the M1 phenotype and that this polarization is dependent on the O antigen encoded by rfc. Our finding indicates that M1 macrophage polarization induced by S. typhimurium may be related to the ability of this intracellular bacterium to survive and replicate within macrophages, which is essential for systemic disease.

  13. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Costa, P.G.; Branco, L.G.S.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress. PMID:25387672

  14. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Costa, P G; Branco, L G S; Leite-Panissi, C R A

    2014-12-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress. PMID:25387672

  15. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Costa, P G; Branco, L G S; Leite-Panissi, C R A

    2014-09-19

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress. PMID:25250589

  16. Dihydroartemisinin induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells through the mitochondria-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Sun, Luhaoran; Zhou, Jin; Yang, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semisynthetic derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua, has been shown to exhibit antitumor activity in various cancer cells, including colorectal cancer. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying its antitumor activity in colorectal cancer remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated DHA-induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells in vitro. The results showed that DHA treatment significantly reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA induced G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptotic cell death, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that DHA decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential; activated the caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9; and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria were observed. Strikingly, the free radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine or the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO significantly prevented DHA-induced apoptotic cell death. Taken together, we concluded that DHA-triggered apoptosis in HCT-116 cells occurs through the ROS-mediated mitochondria-dependent pathway. Our data suggest that DHA has great potential to be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:24519064

  17. Simvastatin induces apoptosis by a Rho-dependent mechanism in cultured cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Copaja, Miguel; Venegas, Daniel; Aranguiz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Vivar, Raul; Catalan, Mabel; Olmedo, Ivonne; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Chiong, Mario; Leyton, Lisette; Lavandero, Sergio; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2011-08-15

    Several clinical trials have shown the beneficial effects of statins in the prevention of coronary heart disease. Additionally, statins promote apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells, in renal tubular epithelial cells and also in a variety of cell lines; yet, the effects of statins on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast, primarily responsible for cardiac tissue healing are almost unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast viability and studied the molecular cell death mechanism triggered by simvastatin in both cell types. Methods: Rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts were treated with simvastatin (0.1-10 {mu}M) up to 72 h. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by trypan blue exclusion method and by flow cytometry, respectively. Caspase-3 activation and Rho protein levels and activity were also determined by Western blot and pull-down assay, respectively. Results: Simvastatin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with greater effects on fibroblasts than myofibroblasts. These effects were prevented by mevalonate, farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, but not squalene. These last results suggest that apoptosis was dependent on small GTPases of the Rho family rather than Ras. Conclusion: Simvastatin triggered apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by a mechanism independent of cholesterol synthesis, but dependent of isoprenilation of Rho protein. Additionally, cardiac fibroblasts were more susceptible to simvastatin-induced apoptosis than cardiac myofibroblasts. Thus simvastatin could avoid adverse cardiac remodeling leading to a less fibrotic repair of the damaged tissues. - Research Highlights: > Simvastatin decreases CF and CMF viability independent of cholesterol synthesis. > Simvastatin induces CF and CMF apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner being CMF more resistant

  18. Phenylbutyrate induces LL-37-dependent autophagy and intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rekha, Rokeya Sultana; Rao Muvva, S S V Jagadeeswara; Wan, Min; Raqib, Rubhana; Bergman, Peter; Brighenti, Susanna; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    LL-37 is a human antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the cathelicidin family with multiple activities including a mediator of vitamin D-induced autophagy in human macrophages, resulting in intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In a previous trial in healthy volunteers, we have shown that LL-37 expression and subsequent Mtb-killing can be further enhanced by 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), also an inducer of LL-37 expression. Here, we explore a potential mechanism(s) behind PBA and LL-37-induced autophagy and intracellular killing of Mtb. Mtb infection of macrophages downregulated the expression of both the CAMP transcript and LL-37 peptide as well as certain autophagy-related genes (BECN1 and ATG5) at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, activation of LC3-II in primary macrophages and THP-1 cells was not detected. PBA and the active form of vitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3), separately or particularly in combination, were able to overcome Mtb-induced suppression of LL-37 expression. Notably, reactivation of autophagy occurred by stimulation of macrophages with PBA and promoted colocalization of LL-37 and LC3-II in autophagosomes. Importantly, PBA treatment failed to induce autophagy in Mtb-infected THP-1 cells, when the expression of LL-37 was silenced. However, PBA-induced autophagy was restored when the LL-37 knockdown cells were supplemented with synthetic LL-37. Interestingly, we have found that LL-37-induced autophagy was mediated via P2RX7 receptor followed by enhanced cytosolic free Ca(2+), and activation of AMPK and PtdIns3K pathways. Altogether, these results suggest a novel activity for PBA as an inducer of autophagy, which is LL-37-dependent and promotes intracellular killing of Mtb in human macrophages.

  19. Progesterone receptors induce FOXO1-dependent senescence in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Caroline H.; Charles, Nathan J.; Gilks, C. Blake; Kalloger, Steve E.; Argenta, Peter A.; Lange, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of nuclear progesterone receptors (PR) and low circulating progesterone levels are associated with increased ovarian cancer (OC) risk. However, PR are abundantly expressed in a significant percentage of serous and endometrioid ovarian tumors; patients with PR+ tumors typically experience longer progression-free survival relative to those with PR-null tumors. The molecular mechanisms of these protective effects are poorly understood. To study PR action in OC in the absence of added estrogen (i.e., needed to induce robust PR expression), we created ES-2 OC cells stably expressing vector control or GFP-tagged PR-B (GFP-PR). Progestin (R5020) stimulation of ES-2 cells stably expressing GFP-PR induced cellular senescence characterized by altered cellular morphology, prolonged survival, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, G1 cell cycle arrest and upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21, as well as the Forkhead-box transcription factor, FOXO1; these results repeated in unmodified ER+/PR+ PEO4 OC cells. PR-B and FOXO1 were detected within the same PRE-containing regions of the p21 upstream promoter. Knockdown of p21 resulted in molecular compensation via FOXO1-dependent upregulation of numerous FOXO1 target genes (p15, p16, p27) and an increased rate of senescence. Inhibition of FOXO1 (with AS1842856) or stable FOXO1 knockdown inhibited progestin-induced p21 expression and blocked progestin-induced senescence. Overall, these findings support a role for PR as a tumor suppressor in OC cells, which exhibits inhibitory effects by inducing FOXO1-dependent cellular senescence. Clinical “priming” of the PR-FOXO1-p21 signaling pathway using PR agonists may provide a useful strategy to induce irreversible cell cycle arrest and thereby sensitize OC cells to existing chemotherapies as part of combination “two-step” therapies. PMID:23574718

  20. Metformin induces apoptosis through AMPK-dependent inhibition of UPR signaling in ALL lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Gilles M; Leclerc, Guy J; Kuznetsov, Jeffim N; DeSalvo, Joanna; Barredo, Julio C

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of patients with resistant phenotypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or those who relapse remains poor. We investigated the mechanism of cell death induced by metformin in Bp- and T-ALL cell models and primary cells, and show that metformin effectively induces apoptosis in ALL cells. Metformin activated AMPK, down-regulated the unfolded protein response (UPR) demonstrated by significant decrease in the main UPR regulator GRP78, and led to UPR-mediated cell death via up-regulation of the ER stress/UPR cell death mediators IRE1α and CHOP. Using shRNA, we demonstrate that metformin-induced apoptosis is AMPK-dependent since AMPK knock-down rescued ALL cells, which correlated with down-regulation of IRE1α and CHOP and restoration of the UPR/GRP78 function. Additionally rapamycin, a known inhibitor of mTOR-dependent protein synthesis, rescued cells from metformin-induced apoptosis and down-regulated CHOP expression. Finally, metformin induced PIM-2 kinase activity and co-treatment of ALL cells with a PIM-1/2 kinase inhibitor plus metformin synergistically increased cell death, suggesting a buffering role for PIM-2 in metformin's cytotoxicity. Similar synergism was seen with agents targeting Akt in combination with metformin, supporting our original postulate that AMPK and Akt exert opposite regulatory roles on UPR activity in ALL. Taken together, our data indicate that metformin induces ALL cell death by triggering ER and proteotoxic stress and simultaneously down-regulating the physiologic UPR response responsible for effectively buffering proteotoxic stress. Our findings provide evidence for a role of metformin in ALL therapy and support strategies targeting synthetic lethal interactions with Akt and PIM kinases as suitable for future consideration for clinical translation in ALL. PMID:24009772

  1. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock. II. Boost-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide 240Pu as an example. Methods: Following upon the work presented in Goddard et al. [Phys. Rev. C 92, 054610 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.054610, quadrupole-constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickly absorbed by the nucleus. In instantaneous boosts, this leads to fast shape rearrangements and violent dynamics that can ultimately lead to fission. This is a qualitatively different process than the deformation-induced fission. Boosts induced within a finite time window excite the system in a relatively gentler way and do induce fission but with a smaller energy deposition. Conclusions: The fission products obtained using boost-induced fission in time-dependent Hartree-Fock are more asymmetric than the fragments obtained in deformation-induced fission or the corresponding adiabatic approaches.

  2. Zinc pyrithione induces ERK- and PKC-dependent necrosis distinct from TPEN-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carraway, Robert E; Dobner, Paul R

    2012-02-01

    Zinc dyshomeostasis can induce cell death. However, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated in prostate cancer (PCa) cells, which differ dramatically from normal cells in their zinc handling ability. Here, we studied the effects of the ionophore Zn-pyrithione (ZP) and the chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN). Both compounds induced cell death at micromolar concentrations when incubated with androgen-dependent (LNCaP), androgen-independent (PC3, DU145) and androgen-sensitive (C4-2) PCa cell-lines. Compared to PCa cells, RWPE1 prostate epithelial cells were less sensitive to ZP and more sensitive to TPEN, but total cellular zinc levels were changed similarly. ZnSO4 enhanced the toxicity of ZP, but inhibited the effects of TPEN as expected. The morphological/biochemical responses to ZP and TPEN differed. ZP decreased ATP levels and stimulated ERK, AKT and PKC phosphorylation. DNA laddering was observed only at low doses of ZP but all doses of TPEN. TPEN activated caspase 3/7 and induced PARP-cleavage, DNA-fragmentation, ROS-formation and apoptotic bodies. PKC and ERK-pathway inhibitors, and antioxidants protected against ZP-induced but not TPEN-induced death. Inhibitors of MPTP-opening protected both. Cell death in response to TPEN (but not ZP) was diminished by a calpain inhibitor and largely prevented by a caspase 3 inhibitor. Overall, the results indicated primarily a necrotic cell death for ZP and an apoptotic cell death for TPEN. The enhanced sensitivity of PCa cells to ZP and the apparent ability of ZP and TPEN to kill quiescent and rapidly dividing cells in a p53-independent manner suggest that ZP/TPEN might be used to develop adjunct treatments for PCa. PMID:22027089

  3. Morphine-induced receptor endocytosis in a novel knockin mouse reduces tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joseph A; Bartlett, Selena; He, Li; Nielsen, Carsten K; Chang, Amy M; Kharazia, Viktor; Waldhoer, Maria; Ou, Chrissi J; Taylor, Stacy; Ferwerda, Madeline; Cado, Dragana; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2008-01-22

    Opioid drugs, such as morphine, are among the most effective analgesics available. However, their utility for the treatment of chronic pain is limited by side effects including tolerance and dependence. Morphine acts primarily through the mu-opioid receptor (MOP-R) , which is also a target of endogenous opioids. However, unlike endogenous ligands, morphine fails to promote substantial receptor endocytosis both in vitro, and in vivo. Receptor endocytosis serves at least two important functions in signal transduction. First, desensitization and endocytosis act as an "off" switch by uncoupling receptors from G protein. Second, endocytosis functions as an "on" switch, resensitizing receptors by recycling them to the plasma membrane. Thus, both the off and on function of the MOP-R are altered in response to morphine compared to endogenous ligands. To examine whether the low degree of endocytosis induced by morphine contributes to tolerance and dependence, we generated a knockin mouse that expresses a mutant MOP-R that undergoes morphine-induced endocytosis. Morphine remains an excellent antinociceptive agent in these mice. Importantly, these mice display substantially reduced antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence. These data suggest that opioid drugs with a pharmacological profile similar to morphine but the ability to promote endocytosis could provide analgesia while having a reduced liability for promoting tolerance and dependence.

  4. Chronic CRF1 receptor blockade reduces heroin intake escalation and dependence-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Park, Paula E; Schlosburg, Joel E; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schulteis, Gery; Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F

    2015-03-01

    Opioids represent effective drugs for the relief of pain, yet chronic opioid use often leads to a state of increased sensitivity to pain that is exacerbated during withdrawal. A sensitization of pain-related negative affect has been hypothesized to closely interact with addiction mechanisms. Neuro-adaptive changes occur as a consequence of excessive opioid exposure, including a recruitment of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and norepinephrine (NE) brain stress systems. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the transition to dependence, we determined the effects of functional antagonism within these two systems on hyperalgesia-like behavior during heroin withdrawal utilizing models of both acute and chronic dependence. We found that passive or self-administered heroin produced a significant mechanical hypersensitivity. During acute opioid dependence, systemic administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist MPZP (20 mg/kg) alleviated withdrawal-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In contrast, several functional adrenergic system antagonists (clonidine, prazosin, propranolol) failed to alter mechanical hypersensitivity in this state. We then determined the effects of chronic MPZP or clonidine treatment on extended access heroin self-administration and found that MPZP, but not clonidine, attenuated escalation of heroin intake, whereas both drugs alleviated chronic dependence-associated hyperalgesia. These findings suggest that an early potentiation of CRF signaling occurs following opioid exposure that begins to drive both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and eventually intake escalation.

  5. Endotoxin (Etx) induced lung protein leak and loss of endothelial dependent relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, C.H.; McMurtry, I.F.; Weil, J.V.

    1986-03-01

    Endotoxin injures pulmonary vascular endothelium as assessed by histology and increased protein permeability. We hypothesized that another endothelial function might also be impaired by endotoxin. Lung protein leak was measured in rats given S. enteriditis Etx ip (4 mg/kg) with extravascular (EV) protein accumulation derived from total lung radiolabelled protein (/sup 125/I albumin) corrected for iv protein using /sup 51/Cr-RBC tag. Etx treated rats failed to show increased EV protein at 6 h after Etx but developed increased EV protein by 24 h. Endothelial dependent relaxation was assessed in rats using isolated pulmonary artery rings preconstricted with norepinephrine (10/sup -7/M). Endothelial dependent relaxation was induced by acetylcholine (10/sup -6/M, ACH) and calcium ionophore A23187 (10/sup -6/M,A23) and compared to endothelial independent relaxation with nitroprusside (10/sup -7/M, NP). Endothelial dependent relaxation was impaired only at 24 h. In conclusion, Etx induced a delayed pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in the rat as manifest by increased protein leak paralleled by diminished endothelial dependent relaxation.

  6. Inflammation-induced effector CD4+ T cell interstitial migration is alpha-v integrin dependent

    PubMed Central

    Overstreet, Michael G.; Gaylo, Alison; Angermann, Bastian; Hughson, Angela; Hyun, Young-min; Lambert, Kris; Acharya, Mridu; Billroth-Maclurg, Alison C.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Topham, David J.; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Minsoo; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Leukocytes must traverse inflamed tissues to effectively control local infection. Although motility in dense tissues appears to be integrin-independent actin-myosin based, during inflammation changes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) may necessitate distinct motility requirements. Indeed, we found that T cell interstitial motility was critically dependent on RGD-binding integrins in the inflamed dermis. Inflammation-induced deposition of fibronectin was functionally linked to increased αv integrin expression on effector CD4+ T cells. Using intravital multi-photon imaging, we found that CD4+ T cell motility was dependent on αv expression. Selective αv blockade or knockdown arrested TH1 motility in the inflamed tissue and attenuated local effector function. These data show a context-dependent specificity of lymphocyte movement in inflamed tissues that is essential for protective immunity. PMID:23933892

  7. Charge-state dependence of kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.; Dubus, A.; Roesler, M.

    2003-07-01

    A calculation is performed in order to analyze the charge-state dependence of the kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals. All stages of the emission process are included: the excitation of the electrons, the neutralization of the projectile during its passage through the solid, and the transport of the excited electrons from where they are created to the surface. It is shown that the number of excited electrons depends strongly on the ion charge state. Nevertheless, due to the fast neutralization of the ions within the escape depth of the excited electrons, no significant initial charge-state dependence is expected in the kinetic electron yield. This result is consistent with available experimental data.

  8. Intense two-cycle laser pulses induce time-dependent bond hardening in a polyatomic molecule.

    PubMed

    Dota, K; Garg, M; Tiwari, A K; Dharmadhikari, J A; Dharmadhikari, A K; Mathur, D

    2012-02-17

    A time-dependent bond-hardening process is discovered in a polyatomic molecule (tetramethyl silane, TMS) using few-cycle pulses of intense 800 nm light. In conventional mass spectrometry, symmetrical molecules such as TMS do not exhibit a prominent molecular ion (TMS(+)) as unimolecular dissociation into [Si(CH(3))(3)](+) proceeds very fast. Under a strong field and few-cycle conditions, this dissociation channel is defeated by time-dependent bond hardening: a field-induced potential well is created in the TMS(+) potential energy curve that effectively traps a wave packet. The time dependence of this bond-hardening process is verified using longer-duration (≥100 fs) pulses; the relatively slower falloff of optical field in such pulses allows the initially trapped wave packet to leak out, thereby rendering TMS(+) unstable once again.

  9. Prostaglandin-dependent modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission elicits inflammation-induced aversion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Michael; Klawonn, Anna M.; Nilsson, Anna; Singh, Anand Kumar; Zajdel, Joanna; Björk Wilhelms, Daniel; Lazarus, Michael; Löfberg, Andreas; Jaarola, Maarit; Örtegren Kugelberg, Unn; Billiar, Timothy R.; Hackam, David J.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Breyer, Matthew D.; Jakobsson, Johan; Schwaninger, Markus; Schütz, Günther; Rodriguez Parkitna, Jan; Saper, Clifford B.; Blomqvist, Anders; Engblom, David

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation causes malaise and general feelings of discomfort. This fundamental aspect of the sickness response reduces the quality of life for people suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases and is a nuisance during mild infections like common colds or the flu. To investigate how inflammation is perceived as unpleasant and causes negative affect, we used a behavioral test in which mice avoid an environment that they have learned to associate with inflammation-induced discomfort. Using a combination of cell-type–specific gene deletions, pharmacology, and chemogenetics, we found that systemic inflammation triggered aversion through MyD88-dependent activation of the brain endothelium followed by COX1-mediated cerebral prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. Further, we showed that inflammation-induced PGE2 targeted EP1 receptors on striatal dopamine D1 receptor–expressing neurons and that this signaling sequence induced aversion through GABA-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic cells. Finally, we demonstrated that inflammation-induced aversion was not an indirect consequence of fever or anorexia but that it constituted an independent inflammatory symptom triggered by a unique molecular mechanism. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that PGE2-mediated modulation of the dopaminergic motivational circuitry is a key mechanism underlying the negative affect induced by inflammation. PMID:26690700

  10. Dose and time-dependent selective neurotoxicity induced by mephedrone in mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Clemente, José; López-Arnau, Raúl; Abad, Sonia; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena; Camarasa, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Mephedrone is a drug of abuse marketed as 'bath salts". There are discrepancies concerning its long-term effects. We have investigated the neurotoxicity of mephedrone in mice following different exposition schedules. Schedule 1: four doses of 50 mg/kg. Schedule 2: four doses of 25 mg/kg. Schedule 3: three daily doses of 25 mg/kg, for two consecutive days. All schedules induced, in some animals, an aggressive behavior and hyperthermia as well as a decrease in weight gain. Mephedrone (schedule 1) induced dopaminergic and serotoninergic neurotoxicity that persisted 7 days after exposition. At a lower dose (schedule 2) only a transient dopaminergic injury was found. In the weekend consumption pattern (schedule 3), mephedrone induced dopamine and serotonin transporter loss that was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 expression one week after exposition. Also, mephedrone induced a depressive-like behavior, as well as a reduction in striatal D2 density, suggesting higher susceptibility to addictive drugs. In cultured cortical neurons, mephedrone induced a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect. Using repeated doses for 2 days in an elevated ambient temperature we evidenced a loss of frontal cortex dopaminergic and hippocampal serotoninergic neuronal markers that suggest injuries at nerve endings.

  11. A New Fungal Diterpene Induces VDAC1-dependent Apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Han, Junjie; Ben-Hail, Danya; He, Luwei; Li, Baowei; Chen, Ziheng; Wang, Yueying; Yang, Yanlei; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Yushan; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda; Liu, Hongwei; Chen, Quan

    2015-09-25

    The pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins are considered central to apoptosis, yet apoptosis occurs in their absence. Here, we asked whether the mitochondrial protein VDAC1 mediates apoptosis independently of Bax/Bak. Upon screening a fungal secondary metabolite library for compounds inducing apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we identified cyathin-R, a new cyathane diterpenoid compound able to activate apoptosis in the absence of Bax/Bak via promotion of the VDAC1 oligomerization that mediates cytochrome c release. Diphenylamine-2-carboxilic acid, an inhibitor of VDAC1 conductance and oligomerization, inhibited cyathin-R-induced VDAC1 oligomerization and apoptosis. Similarly, Bcl-2 overexpression conferred resistance to cyathin-R-induced apoptosis and VDAC1 oligomerization. Silencing of VDAC1 expression prevented cyathin-R-induced apoptosis. Finally, cyathin-R effectively attenuated tumor growth and induced apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient cells implanted into a xenograft mouse model. Hence, this study identified a new compound promoting VDAC1-dependent apoptosis as a potential therapeutic option for cancerous cells lacking or presenting inactivated Bax/Bak.

  12. A New Fungal Diterpene Induces VDAC1-dependent Apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Han, Junjie; Ben-Hail, Danya; He, Luwei; Li, Baowei; Chen, Ziheng; Wang, Yueying; Yang, Yanlei; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Yushan; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda; Liu, Hongwei; Chen, Quan

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins are considered central to apoptosis, yet apoptosis occurs in their absence. Here, we asked whether the mitochondrial protein VDAC1 mediates apoptosis independently of Bax/Bak. Upon screening a fungal secondary metabolite library for compounds inducing apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we identified cyathin-R, a new cyathane diterpenoid compound able to activate apoptosis in the absence of Bax/Bak via promotion of the VDAC1 oligomerization that mediates cytochrome c release. Diphenylamine-2-carboxilic acid, an inhibitor of VDAC1 conductance and oligomerization, inhibited cyathin-R-induced VDAC1 oligomerization and apoptosis. Similarly, Bcl-2 overexpression conferred resistance to cyathin-R-induced apoptosis and VDAC1 oligomerization. Silencing of VDAC1 expression prevented cyathin-R-induced apoptosis. Finally, cyathin-R effectively attenuated tumor growth and induced apoptosis in Bax/Bak-deficient cells implanted into a xenograft mouse model. Hence, this study identified a new compound promoting VDAC1-dependent apoptosis as a potential therapeutic option for cancerous cells lacking or presenting inactivated Bax/Bak. PMID:26253170

  13. ATP-Dependent Lon Protease Contributes to Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bin; Wang, Minggang; Hou, Nengyi; Hu, Xiao; Jia, Guiqing; Qin, Xianpeng; Zuo, Xiaofei; Liu, Yang; Luo, Kun; Song, Wei; Wang, Kang; Pang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Host cellular stress responses, including inflammatory and immune responses, have been reported highly linked to H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. However, whether mitochondrial regulation and metabolic reprogramming, which are potently associated with various cancers, play a role in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Here we revealed that Lon protease (Lonp1), which is a key inductive of mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and is required to maintain the mitochondrial quality, was greatly induced in H. pylori infected gastric epithelial cells. Importantly, we uncovered that knockdown of Lonp1 expression significantly diminished the metabolic switch to glycolysis and gastric cell proliferation associated with low multiplicity of H. pylori infection. In addition, Lonp1 overexpression in gastric epithelial cells also promoted glycolytic switch and cell overgrowth, suggesting H. pylori effect is Lonp1 dependent. We further demonstrated that H. pylori induced Lonp1 expression and cell overgrowth, at least partially, via HIF-1α regulation. Collectively, our results concluded the relevance of Lonp1 for cell proliferation and identified Lonp1 as a key regulator of metabolic reprogramming in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27108387

  14. Apoptosis Induced by Ginkgo biloba (EGb761) in Melanoma Cells Is Mcl-1-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yao; Du, Jipei; Chen, Degao; Li, Chengtao; Zhang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive skin cancer. Unfortunately, there is currently no chemotherapeutic agent available to significantly prolong the survival of the most patients with metastatic melanomas. Here we report that the Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb761), one of the most widely sold herbal supplements in the world, potently induces apoptosis in human melanoma cells by disturbing the balance between pro- and anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 family proteins. Treatment with EGb761 induced varying degrees of apoptosis in melanoma cell lines but not in melanocytes. Induction of apoptosis was caspase-dependent and appeared to be mediated by the mitochondrial pathway, in that it was associated with reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of Bax and Bak. Although EGb761 did not cause significant change in the expression levels of the BH3-only Bcl-2 family proteins Bim, Puma, Noxa, and Bad, it significantly downregulated Mcl-1 in sensitive but not resistant melanoma cells, suggesting a major role of Mcl-1 in regulating apoptosis of melanoma cells induced by EGb761. Indeed, siRNA knockdown of Mcl-1 enhanced EGb761-induced apoptosis, which was associated with increased activation of Bax and Bak. Taken together, these results demonstrate that EGb761 kills melanoma cells through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and that Mcl-1 is a major regulator of sensitivity of melanoma cells to apoptosis induced by EGb761. Therefore, EGb761 with or without in combination with targeting Mcl-1 may be a useful strategy in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25860257

  15. Zinc is a transmembrane agonist that induces platelet activation in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Watson, Ben R; White, Nathan A; Taylor, Kirk A; Howes, Joanna-Marie; Malcor, Jean-Daniel M; Bihan, Dominique; Sage, Stewart O; Farndale, Richard W; Pugh, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Following platelet adhesion and primary activation at sites of vascular injury, secondary platelet activation is induced by soluble platelet agonists, such as ADP, ATP, thrombin and thromboxane. Zinc ions are also released from platelets and damaged cells and have been shown to act as a platelet agonist. However, the mechanism of zinc-induced platelet activation is not well understood. Here we show that exogenous zinc gains access to the platelet cytosol and induces full platelet aggregation that is dependent on platelet protein tyrosine phosphorylation, PKC and integrin αIIbβ3 activity and is mediated by granule release and secondary signalling. ZnSO4 increased the binding affinity of GpVI, but not integrin α2β1. Low concentrations of ZnSO4 potentiated platelet aggregation by collagen-related peptide (CRP-XL), thrombin and adrenaline. Chelation of intracellular zinc reduced platelet aggregation induced by a number of different agonists, inhibited zinc-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibited platelet activation in whole blood under physiologically relevant flow conditions. Our data are consistent with a transmembrane signalling role for zinc in platelet activation during thrombus formation.

  16. Reflex hypertensive response induced by capsaicin involves endothelin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, a nociceptive agent produces triphasic pressure response in rats. The mechanisms underlying capsaicin-induced pressure responses are not clear. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine the mechanisms involved in capsaicin - induced pressure responses. The trachea, jugular vein and femoral artery were cannulated in anaesthetized rats. Capsaicin (10 µg/kg; i.v) - induced reflex changes in the blood pressure, respiratory excursions and ECG were recorded before/after vagotomy in the absence/presence of antagonists. Capsaicin produced the triphasic pressure response characterized by immediate fall, recovery (intermediate phase) and delayed progressive fall. After vagotomy, the immediate hypotension was abolished and the intermediate pressure response was potentiated as a hypertensive response while the delayed hypotensive response persisted. The time-matched heart rate changes (bradycardia) and respiratory changes (tachypnea in delayed phase) were abolished after vagotomy. Pretreatment with endothelin receptor antagonist (bosentan; 10 mg/kg) blocked the capsiaicn-induced intermediate hypertensive response in vagotomised animals but not the delayed hypotension. Pretreatment with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (L-NAME; 30 pg/kg), prostaglandin synthase inhibitor (indomethacin; 10 mg/kg) and kinin synthase inhibitor (aprotinin; 6000 KIU) did not block the delayed hypotensive response. These results demonstrate that capsaicin-induced intermediate hypertensive response involves endothelin-dependent mechanisms and the delayed hypotensive response is independent of nitrergic, prostaglandinergic or kininergic mechanisms.

  17. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in methamphetamine-induced neural damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xufeng; Xing, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Sun, Hao; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illicit drug, is widely abused in many parts of the world. Mounting evidence shows that METH exposure contributes to neurotoxicity, particularly for the monoaminergic neurons. However, to date, only a few studies have tried to unravel the mechanisms involved in METH-induced non-monoaminergic neural damage. Therefore, in the present study, we tried to explore the mechanisms for METH-induced neural damage in cortical neurons. Our results showed that METH significantly increased intracellular [Ca(2) (+) ]i in Ca(2) (+) -containing solution rather than Ca(2) (+) -free solution. Moreover, METH also upregulated calmodulin (CaM) expression and activated CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Significantly, METH-induced neural damage can be partially retarded by CaM antagonist W7 as well as CaMKII blocker KN93. In addition, L-type Ca(2) (+) channel was also proved to be involved in METH-induced cell damage, as nifedipine, the L-type Ca(2) (+) channel-specific inhibitor, markedly attenuated METH-induced neural damage. Collectively, our results suggest that Ca(2) (+) -CaM-CaMKII is involved in METH-mediated neurotoxicity, and it might suggest a potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies for METH abuse. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. State-dependent interaction in the antihistamine-induced disruption of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1982-06-01

    Two experiments were run to evaluate the possibility that injection of antihistamine can produce a state-dependent acquisition of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion. In the first experiment, pretreating rats with the antihistamine chlorpheniramine maleate prior to their initial exposure to sucrose and to low-level irradiation on the conditioning day did not prevent the acquisition of a taste aversion to sucrose when the antihistamine was also administered prior to a subsequent preference test. In the second experiment, rats were both conditioned and tested for a radiation-induced aversion in a drug-free state. Under these condtions, the rats continued to show an aversion to sucrose despite pretreating them with chlorpheniramine prior to irradiation. Since rats conditioned under the antihistamine do not show the radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion when tested for sucrose preference in a nondrug state, it would seem that pretreating rats with an antihistamine prior to conditioning affects only the retrieval of the previously learned response and not its acquisition.

  19. Febuxostat protects rats against lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Alaa N A; Shehatou, George S G; Shebl, Abdelhadi M; Salem, Hatem A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate possible protective effects of febuxostat, a highly potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor, against acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, as follows: (i) vehicle control group; (ii) and (iii) febuxostat 10 and febuxostat 15 groups, drug-treated controls; (iv) LPS group, receiving an intraperitoneal injection of LPS (7.5 mg/kg); (v) and (vi) febuxostat 10-LPS and febuxostat 15-LPS groups, receiving oral treatment of febuxostat (10 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively) for 7 days before LPS. After 18 h administration of LPS, blood was collected for C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was examined for leukocyte infiltration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, protein content, and total nitrate/nitrite. Lung weight gain was determined, and lung tissue homogenate was prepared and evaluated for oxidative stress. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was assessed in BALF and lung homogenate. Moreover, histological changes of lung tissues were evaluated. LPS elicited lung injury characterized by increased lung water content (by 1.2 fold), leukocyte infiltration (by 13 fold), inflammation and oxidative stress (indicated by increased malondialdehyde (MDA), by 3.4 fold), and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (by 34 %). Febuxostat dose-dependently decreased LPS-induced lung edema and elevations in BALF protein content, infiltration of leukocytes, and LDH activity. Moreover, the elevated levels of TNF-α in BALF and lung tissue of LPS-treated rats were attenuated by febuxostat pretreatment. Febuxostat also displayed a potent antioxidant activity by decreasing lung tissue levels of MDA and enhancing SOD activity. Histological analysis of lung tissue further demonstrated that febuxostat dose-dependently reversed LPS-induced histopathological changes. These findings demonstrate a significant dose-dependent

  20. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner.

  1. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p < 0.001), but Rho inhibitor-1 failed to suppress the membrane blebbing (p = 0.875). Lidocaine (30 mM) reduced the cell viability of isolated chondrocytes (p < 0.001) and in situ chondrocytes (p < 0.001). The chondrotoxicity was attenuated by pretreatment of cells with ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016.

  2. The hippocampus mediates glucocorticoid-induced impairment of spatial memory retrieval: Dependence on the basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Roozendaal, Benno; Griffith, Qyana K.; Buranday, Jason; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; McGaugh, James L.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that stress-activated glucocorticoid hormones induce temporary memory retrieval impairment. The present study examined whether adrenal steroid receptors in the hippocampus mediate such glucocorticoid effects on spatial memory retrieval. The specific glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist 11β, 17β-dihydroxy-6,21-dimethyl-17α-pregna-4,6-trien-20yn-3-one (RU 28362; 5 or 15 ng) infused into the hippocampus of male Sprague–Dawley rats 60 min before water-maze retention testing, 24 h after training, dose-dependently impaired probe-trial retention performance, as assessed both by time spent in the training quadrant and initial latency to cross the platform location. The GR agonist did not affect circulating corticosterone levels immediately after the probe trial, indicating that RU 28362 infusions did not influence retention by altering glucocorticoid feedback mechanisms. As infusions of the GR agonist into the hippocampus 60 min before training did not influence water-maze acquisition or immediate recall, the findings indicated that the GR agonist-induced retention impairment was induced selectively by an influence on information retrieval. In contrast, pretest infusions of the GR agonist administered into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA; 2 or 6 ng) did not alter retention performance in the water maze. However, N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced lesions of the BLA, made 1 week before training, blocked the memory retrieval impairment induced by intrahippocampal infusions of RU 28362 given 60 min before the retention test. These findings indicate that the effects of glucocorticoids on retrieval of long-term spatial memory depend on the hippocampus and, additionally, that neuronal input from the BLA is critical in enabling hippocampal glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval. PMID:12538851

  3. Tetrandrine induces cell death in SAS human oral cancer cells through caspase activation-dependent apoptosis and LC3-I and LC3-II activation-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Huang, An-Cheng; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lin, Meng-Wei; Yang, Jai-Sing; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chang, Shu-Jen; Lai, Tung-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that autophagy is associated with cancer development. Thus, agents to induce autophagy could be employed in some cases for the treatment of cancer. Our results showed that tetrandrine significantly decreased the viability of SAS cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Tetrandrine induced nuclear condensation, demonstrated by DAPI staining. The early events in apoptosis analysed by Annexin V/PI staining indicated that the percentage of cells staining positive for Annexin V was slightly increased in SAS cells with tetrandrine treatment but was much lower following bafilomycin A1 pre-treatment. Tetrandrine caused AVO and MDC induction in SAS cells in a concentration-dependent manner by fluorescence microscopy. Tetrandrine also caused LC-3 expression in SAS cells in a time-dependent manner. Our results show that tetrandrine treatment induced the levels of cleaved caspase-3 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Tetrandrine treatment induced the levels of LC-3 II, Atg-5, beclin-1, p-S6, p-ULK, p-mTOR, p-Akt (S473) and raptor. Tetrandrine decreased cell viability, but bafilomycin A1, 3-MA, chloroquine and NAC protected tetrandrine-treated SAS cells against decrease of cell viability. Atg-5, beclin-1 siRNA decreased tetrandrine-induced cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP in SAS cells and protected tetrandrine-treated SAS cells against decrease in cell viability. Chloroquine, NAC and bafilomycin A1 also decreased tetrandrine-induced cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP in SAS cells. Our results indicate the tetrandrine induces apoptosis and autophagy of SAS human cancer cells via caspase-dependent and LC3-I and LC3-II‑dependent pathways.

  4. Viral single-strand DNA induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Fagan, B Matthew; Dumitru, Raluca; Bower, Jacquelyn J; Yadav, Swati; Porteus, Matthew H; Pevny, Larysa H; Samulski, R Jude

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are primed for rapid apoptosis following mild forms of genotoxic stress. A natural form of such cellular stress occurs in response to recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) single-strand DNA genomes, which exploit the host DNA damage response for replication and genome persistence. Herein, we discovered a unique DNA damage response induced by rAAV transduction specific to pluripotent hESCs. Within hours following rAAV transduction, host DNA damage signaling was elicited as measured by increased gamma-H2AX, ser15-p53 phosphorylation, and subsequent p53-dependent transcriptional activation. Nucleotide incorporation assays demonstrated that rAAV transduced cells accumulated in early S-phase followed by the induction of apoptosis. This lethal signaling sequalae required p53 in a manner independent of transcriptional induction of Puma, Bax and Bcl-2 and was not evident in cells differentiated towards a neural lineage. Consistent with a lethal DNA damage response induced upon rAAV transduction of hESCs, empty AAV protein capsids demonstrated no toxicity. In contrast, DNA microinjections demonstrated that the minimal AAV origin of replication and, in particular, a 40 nucleotide G-rich tetrad repeat sequence, was sufficient for hESC apoptosis. Our data support a model in which rAAV transduction of hESCs induces a p53-dependent lethal response that is elicited by a telomeric sequence within the AAV origin of replication.

  5. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis in mice is caused by gliadin and glutenin treatments.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Hana; Yano, Hiromi; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Kato, Yasuko

    2006-01-15

    Various foods may be associated with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIAn). However, although the most frequently reported cause of FDEIAn has been wheat, the mechanism of FDEIAn for wheat has remained largely uninvestigated. To investigate the effect of wheat-fractionated proteins on FDEIAn, female B10.A mice (16-20 g) were divided into four groups; i.e. salt-soluble (S-group), gliadin-rich (GLI-group), and glutenin-rich (GLU-group)-sensitized mice, and unsensitized mice. The three sensitized groups were run on a treadmill after oral intake of each wheat-fractionated protein. The mice showed a significant increase in serum IgE, especially in the GLI- and GLU-group. After oral administration of each wheat-fractionated protein, the running time until exhaustion was remarkably shorter for the GLI- and GLU-group than for the S-group and unsensitized mice. The level of intestinal erosion was higher in all the sensitized mice than that in the unsensitized ones after exhaustive running. Furthermore, moderate exercise for 30 min after oral ingestion of each wheat-fractionated protein also induced intestinal erosion in the GLI- and GLU-group. In addition, we observed leaking of gliadin and glutenin proteins out of the intestine into the liver. These results indicated that the main factor involved in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis might be the gliadin and glutenin in wheat proteins.

  6. 5-Hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity is PDGFβ receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the hippocampus. Long-term (2-24 h) activation of 5-HT7 receptors regulates growth factor receptor expression, including the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors. Direct activation of PDGFβ receptors in primary hippocampal and cortical neurons inhibits NMDA receptor activity and attenuates NMDA receptor-induced neurotoxicity. Our objective was to investigate whether the 5-HT7 receptor-induced increase in PDGFβ receptor expression would be similarly neuroprotective. We demonstrate that 5-HT7 receptor agonist treatment in primary hippocampal neurons also increases the expression of phospholipase C (PLC) γ, a downstream effector of PDGFβ receptors associated with the inhibition of NMDA receptor activity. To determine if the up-regulation of PDGFβ receptors is neuroprotective, primary hippocampal neurons were incubated with the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP 12, for 24 h. Indeed, LP 12 treatment prevented NMDA-induced neurotoxicity and this effect was dependent on PDGFβ receptor kinase activity. Treatment of primary neurons with LP 12 also differentially altered NMDA receptor subunit expression, reducing the expression of NR1 and NR2B, but not NR2A. These findings demonstrate the potential for providing growth factor receptor-dependent neuroprotective effects using small-molecule ligands of G protein-coupled receptors.

  7. Arsenic induces apoptosis in mouse liver is mitochondria dependent and is abrogated by N-acetylcysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Amal . E-mail: asantra2000@yahoo.co.in; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna

    2007-04-15

    Arsenicosis, caused by arsenic contamination of drinking water supplies, is a major public health problem in India and Bangladesh. Chronic liver disease, often with portal hypertension occurs in chronic arsenicosis, contributes to the morbidity and mortality. The early cellular events that initiate liver cell injury due to arsenicosis have not been studied. Our aim was to identify the possible mechanisms related to arsenic-induced liver injury in mice. Liver injury was induced in mice by arsenic treatment. The liver was used for mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Evidence of apoptosis was sought by TUNEL test, caspase assay and histology. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was done to modulate hepatic GSH level. Arsenic treatment in mice caused liver injury associated with increased oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and alteration of MPT. Altered MPT facilitated cytochrome c release in the cytosol, activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and apoptotic cell death. Pretreatment of NAC to arsenic-treated mice abrogated all these alteration suggesting a glutathione (GSH)-dependent mechanism. Oxidative stress in mitochondria and inappropriate MPT are important in the pathogenesis of arsenic induced apoptotic liver cell injury. The phenomenon is GSH dependent and supplementation of NAC might have beneficial effects.

  8. Mechanical stimulation induces formin-dependent assembly of a perinuclear actin rim

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaowei; Li, Qingsen; Mogilner, Alex; Bershadsky, Alexander D.; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2015-01-01

    Cells constantly sense and respond to mechanical signals by reorganizing their actin cytoskeleton. Although a number of studies have explored the effects of mechanical stimuli on actin dynamics, the immediate response of actin after force application has not been studied. We designed a method to monitor the spatiotemporal reorganization of actin after cell stimulation by local force application. We found that force could induce transient actin accumulation in the perinuclear region within ∼2 min. This actin reorganization was triggered by an intracellular Ca2+ burst induced by force application. Treatment with the calcium ionophore A23187 recapitulated the force-induced perinuclear actin remodeling. Blocking of actin polymerization abolished this process. Overexpression of Klarsicht, ANC-1, Syne Homology (KASH) domain to displace nesprins from the nuclear envelope did not abolish Ca2+-dependent perinuclear actin assembly. However, the endoplasmic reticulum- and nuclear membrane-associated inverted formin-2 (INF2), a potent actin polymerization activator (mutations of which are associated with several genetic diseases), was found to be important for perinuclear actin assembly. The perinuclear actin rim structure colocalized with INF2 on stimulation, and INF2 depletion resulted in attenuation of the rim formation. Our study suggests that cells can respond rapidly to external force by remodeling perinuclear actin in a unique Ca2+- and INF2-dependent manner. PMID:25941386

  9. Glufosinate aerogenic exposure induces glutamate and IL-1 receptor dependent lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Isabelle; Perche, Olivier; Pâris, Arnaud; Richard, Olivier; Gombault, Aurélie; Herzine, Ameziane; Pichon, Jacques; Huaux, Francois; Mortaud, Stéphane; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline

    2016-11-01

    Glufosinate-ammonium (GLA), the active component of an herbicide, is known to cause neurotoxicity. GLA shares structural analogy with glutamate. It is a powerful inhibitor of glutamine synthetase (GS) and may bind to glutamate receptors. Since these potentials targets of GLA are present in lung and immune cells, we asked whether airway exposure to GLA may cause lung inflammation in mice. A single GLA exposure (1 mg/kg) induced seizures and inflammatory cell recruitment in the broncho-alveolar space, and increased myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), interstitial inflammation and disruption of alveolar septae within 6-24 h. Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was increased and lung inflammation depended on IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1). We demonstrate that glutamate receptor pathway is central, since the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibitor MK-801 prevented GLA-induced lung inflammation. Chronic exposure (0.2 mg/kg 3× per week for 4 weeks) caused moderate lung inflammation and enhanced airway hyperreactivity with significant increased airway resistance. In conclusion, GLA aerosol exposure causes glutamate signalling and IL-1R-dependent pulmonary inflammation with airway hyperreactivity in mice.

  10. Phase-Dependent Shifting of the Adrenal Clock by Acute Stress-Induced ACTH.

    PubMed

    Engeland, William C; Yoder, J Marina; Karsten, Carley A; Kofuji, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal cortex has a molecular clock that generates circadian rhythms in glucocorticoid production, yet it is unclear how the clock responds to acute stress. We hypothesized that stress-induced ACTH provides a signal that phase shifts the adrenal clock. To assess whether acute stress phase shifts the adrenal clock in vivo in a phase-dependent manner, mPER2:LUC mice on a 12:12-h light:dark cycle underwent restraint stress for 15 min or no stress at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 (early subjective day) or at ZT16 (early subjective night). Adrenal explants from mice stressed at ZT2 showed mPER2:LUC rhythms that were phase-advanced by ~2 h, whereas adrenals from mice stressed at ZT16 showed rhythms that were phase-delayed by ~2 h. The biphasic response was also observed in mice injected subcutaneously either with saline or with ACTH at ZT2 or ZT16. Blockade of the ACTH response with the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, prevented restraint stress-induced phase shifts in the mPER2:LUC rhythm both at ZT2 and at ZT16. The finding that acute stress results in a phase-dependent shift in the adrenal mPER2:LUC rhythm that can be blocked by dexamethasone indicates that stress-induced effectors, including ACTH, act to phase shift the adrenal clock rhythm. PMID:27445984

  11. Viral Single-Strand DNA Induces p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Fagan, B. Matthew; Dumitru, Raluca; Bower, Jacquelyn J.; Yadav, Swati; Porteus, Matthew H.; Pevny, Larysa H.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are primed for rapid apoptosis following mild forms of genotoxic stress. A natural form of such cellular stress occurs in response to recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) single-strand DNA genomes, which exploit the host DNA damage response for replication and genome persistence. Herein, we discovered a unique DNA damage response induced by rAAV transduction specific to pluripotent hESCs. Within hours following rAAV transduction, host DNA damage signaling was elicited as measured by increased gamma-H2AX, ser15-p53 phosphorylation, and subsequent p53-dependent transcriptional activation. Nucleotide incorporation assays demonstrated that rAAV transduced cells accumulated in early S-phase followed by the induction of apoptosis. This lethal signaling sequalae required p53 in a manner independent of transcriptional induction of Puma, Bax and Bcl-2 and was not evident in cells differentiated towards a neural lineage. Consistent with a lethal DNA damage response induced upon rAAV transduction of hESCs, empty AAV protein capsids demonstrated no toxicity. In contrast, DNA microinjections demonstrated that the minimal AAV origin of replication and, in particular, a 40 nucleotide G-rich tetrad repeat sequence, was sufficient for hESC apoptosis. Our data support a model in which rAAV transduction of hESCs induces a p53-dependent lethal response that is elicited by a telomeric sequence within the AAV origin of replication. PMID:22114676

  12. Arsenic induces apoptosis in mouse liver is mitochondria dependent and is abrogated by N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Santra, Amal; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna

    2007-04-15

    Arsenicosis, caused by arsenic contamination of drinking water supplies, is a major public health problem in India and Bangladesh. Chronic liver disease, often with portal hypertension occurs in chronic arsenicosis, contributes to the morbidity and mortality. The early cellular events that initiate liver cell injury due to arsenicosis have not been studied. Our aim was to identify the possible mechanisms related to arsenic-induced liver injury in mice. Liver injury was induced in mice by arsenic treatment. The liver was used for mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Evidence of apoptosis was sought by TUNEL test, caspase assay and histology. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was done to modulate hepatic GSH level. Arsenic treatment in mice caused liver injury associated with increased oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and alteration of MPT. Altered MPT facilitated cytochrome c release in the cytosol, activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and apoptotic cell death. Pretreatment of NAC to arsenic-treated mice abrogated all these alteration suggesting a glutathione (GSH)-dependent mechanism. Oxidative stress in mitochondria and inappropriate MPT are important in the pathogenesis of arsenic induced apoptotic liver cell injury. The phenomenon is GSH dependent and supplementation of NAC might have beneficial effects.

  13. Phase-Dependent Shifting of the Adrenal Clock by Acute Stress-Induced ACTH

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, William C.; Yoder, J. Marina; Karsten, Carley A.; Kofuji, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal cortex has a molecular clock that generates circadian rhythms in glucocorticoid production, yet it is unclear how the clock responds to acute stress. We hypothesized that stress-induced ACTH provides a signal that phase shifts the adrenal clock. To assess whether acute stress phase shifts the adrenal clock in vivo in a phase-dependent manner, mPER2:LUC mice on a 12:12-h light:dark cycle underwent restraint stress for 15 min or no stress at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 (early subjective day) or at ZT16 (early subjective night). Adrenal explants from mice stressed at ZT2 showed mPER2:LUC rhythms that were phase-advanced by ~2 h, whereas adrenals from mice stressed at ZT16 showed rhythms that were phase-delayed by ~2 h. The biphasic response was also observed in mice injected subcutaneously either with saline or with ACTH at ZT2 or ZT16. Blockade of the ACTH response with the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, prevented restraint stress-induced phase shifts in the mPER2:LUC rhythm both at ZT2 and at ZT16. The finding that acute stress results in a phase-dependent shift in the adrenal mPER2:LUC rhythm that can be blocked by dexamethasone indicates that stress-induced effectors, including ACTH, act to phase shift the adrenal clock rhythm. PMID:27445984

  14. Involvement of caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways in cisplatin-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Yingjie; Wang, Xianwang

    2009-02-01

    Cisplatin, an efficient anticancer agent, can trigger multiple apoptotic pathways in cancer cells. However, the signal transduction pathways in response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy are complicated, and the mechanism is not fully understood. In current study, we showed that, during cisplatin-induced apoptosis of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, both the caspase-dependent and -independent pathways were activated. Herein, we reported that after cisplatin treatment, the activities of caspase-9/-3 were sharply increased; pre-treatment with Z-LEHD-fmk (inhibitor of caspase-9), Z-DEVD-fmk (inhibitor of caspase-3), and Z-VAD-fmk (a pan-caspase inhibitor) increased cell viability and decreased apoptosis, suggesting that caspase-mediated apoptotic pathway was activated following cisplatin treatment. Confocal imaging of the cells transfected with AIF-GFP demonstrated that AIF release occurred about 9 h after cisplatin treatment. The event proceeded progressively over time, coinciding with a nuclear translocation and lasting for more than 2 hours. Down-regulation of AIF by siRNA also significantly increased cell viability and decreased apoptosis, these results suggested that AIF-mediated caspase-independent apoptotic pathway was involved in cispatin-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that both caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways were involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  15. Citreoviridin induces ROS-dependent autophagic cell death in human liver HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Nan; Wang, Yue-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Jiang, Li-Ping; Yang, Guang; Sun, Xian-Ce; Geng, Cheng-Yan; Li, Qiu-Juan; Chen, Min; Yao, Xiao-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Citreoviridin (CIT) is one of toxic mycotoxins derived from fungal species in moldy cereals. Whether CIT exerts hepatotoxicity and the precise molecular mechanisms of CIT hepatotoxicity are not completely elucidated. In this study, the inhibitor of autophagosome formation, 3-methyladenine, protected the cells against CIT cytotoxicity, and the autophagy stimulator rapamycin further decreased the cell viability of CIT-treated HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Atg5 with Atg5 siRNA alleviated CIT-induced cell death. These finding suggested the hypothesis that autophagic cell death contributed to CIT-induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. CIT increased the autophagosome number in HepG2 cells observed under a transmission electron microscope, and this effect was confirmed by the elevated LC3-II levels detected through Western blot. Reduction of P62 protein levels and the result of LC3 turnover assay indicated that the accumulation of autophagosomes in the CIT-treated HepG2 cells was due to increased formation rather than impaired degradation. The pretreatment of HepG2 cells with the ROS inhibitor NAC reduced autophagosome formation and reversed the CIT cytotoxicity, indicating that CIT-induced autophagic cell death was ROS-dependent. In summary, ROS-dependent autophagic cell death of HpeG2 cells described in this study may help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of CIT cytotoxicity.

  16. Retrieval-induced versus context-induced forgetting: Does retrieval-induced forgetting depend on context shifts?

    PubMed

    Soares, Julia S; Polack, Cody W; Miller, Ralph R

    2016-03-01

    Retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is the observation that retrieval of target information causes forgetting of related nontarget information. A number of accounts of this phenomenon have been proposed, including a context-shift-based account (Jonker, Seli, & Macleod, 2013). This account proposes that RIF occurs as a result of the context shift from study to retrieval practice, provided there is little context shift between retrieval practice and test phases. We tested both claims put forth by this context account. In Experiment 1, we degraded the context shift between study and retrieval practice by implementing a generative study condition that was highly similar to retrieval practice. We observed no degradation of RIF for these generated exemplars relative to a conventional study control. In Experiment 2, we conceptually replicated the finding of RIF following generative study, and tested whether context differences between each of the three phases affected the size of RIF. Our findings were again contrary to the predictions of the context account. Conjointly, the 2 experiments refute arguments about the potential inadequacy of our context shifts that could be used to explain either result alone. Overall, our results are most consistent with an inhibitory account of RIF (e.g., Anderson, 2003).

  17. Evolution of polarization dependent microstructures induced by high repetition rate femtosecond laser irradiation in glass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangteng; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Chen, Qiuqun; Zhang, Hang; Dai, Ye; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-09-19

    We report the observation of an anomalous polarization dependent process in an isotropic glass induced by long time stationary irradiation of a high repetition rate near-infrared femtosecond laser. Two distinctive types of polarization dependent microstructures were induced at different irradiation stages. At early stage (a few seconds), a dumbbell-shaped structure elongated perpendicularly to the laser polarization formed at the top of the modified region, which was later erased by further irradiation. At later stage (above 30 s), bubbles filled with O2 formed by the irradiation, which were distributed along the laser polarization at a distance far beyond the radius of the laser beam. Based on a simple modeling of light reflection on boundaries, a thermal accumulation process was proposed to explain the formation and evolution of the dumbbell-shaped microstructure. The possible factors responsible for polarization dependent distribution of bubbles are discussed, which needs further systematic investigations. The results may be helpful in the development of femtosecond laser microprocessing for various applications. PMID:27661877

  18. PUMA promotes Bax translocation in FOXO3a-dependent pathway during STS-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Qun

    2009-08-01

    PUMA (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, also called Bbc3) was first identified as a BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein that is transcriptionally up-regulated by p53 and activated upon p53-dependent apoptotic stimuli, such as treatment with DNA-damaging drugs or UV irradiation. Recently studies have been shown that Puma is also up-regulated in response to certain p53-independent apoptotic stimuli, such as growth factor deprivation or treatment with glucocorticoids or STS (staurosporine). However, the molecular mechanisms of PUMA up-regulation and how PUMA functions in response to p53-independent apoptotic stimuli remain poorly understood. In this study, based on real-time single cell analysis, flow cytometry and western blotting technique, we investigated the function of PUMA in living human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) after STS treatment. Our results show that FOXO3a was activated by STS stimulation and then translocated from cytosol to nucleus. The expression of PUMA was up-regulated via a FOXO3a-dependent manner after STS treatment, while p53 had little function in this process. Moreover, cell apoptosis and Bax translocation induced by STS were not blocked by Pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor), which suggested that p53 was not involved in this signaling pathway. Taken together, these results indicate that PUMA promoted Bax translocation in a FOXO3a-dependment pathway during STS-induced apoptosis, while p53 was dispensable in this process.

  19. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with a high level of plasma noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yukihiko; Nagai, Ayako; Saito, Masuyoshi; Ito, Tomonobu; Koga, Michiyuki; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2007-02-01

    Ingesting certain foods sometimes triggers anaphylaxis when followed by exercise (food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, FDEIA). Specific food-induced mucocutaneous urticaria may also progress to anaphylaxis (oral allergy syndrome, OAS). A positive skin test and/or radioallergosorbent test (RAST) to the foods suggest involvement of immunoglobulin (Ig)E-anaphylaxis in both disorders. The triggering foods and initial target organs are usually different in each case. In the present study, a 32-year-old male reported dyspnea accompanied by wheals, and symptoms of low blood pressure while walking after eating Chinese noodles and donuts. He also reported uncomfortable sensations in his mouth and throat after ingesting melon. Exercise challenge tests were administered. Serum histamine, plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine were measured pre- and post-test. No symptoms were induced by exercise or by the ingestion of any single food item before exercise. However, numerous wheals appeared when exercise followed the combined ingestion of foods. Likewise, the sequence of eating pancakes and then exercising resulted in numerous wheals and anaphylaxis. Olopatadine hydrochloride and ketotifen fumarate completely inhibited this anaphylaxis. The skin prick tests resulted in fruit-induced erythema and wheals. The results of these tests with wheat, butter and sugar were negative, and no symptoms were induced by the exercise test after ingestion of watermelon, melon or apple. The anaphylactoid symptoms were accompanied by a significant increase of plasma noradrenaline. In this case, not only wheat, but sugar and butter may induce the onset of FDEIA. There was no significant correlation between the intensity of the symptoms and the serum histamine levels in the present case. Noradrenaline may be involved in the onset of FDEIA, since noradrenaline may selectively inhibit T-helper (Th)1 functions while favoring Th2 responses. The tests showed no cross-reactivity between the

  20. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ristic, Biljana; Bosnjak, Mihajlo; Arsikin, Katarina; Mircic, Aleksandar; Suzin-Zivkovic, Violeta; Bogdanovic, Andrija; Perovic, Vladimir; Martinovic, Tamara; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica

    2014-08-01

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  1. Acrolein induces vasodilatation of rodent mesenteric bed via an EDHF-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Awe, S.O.; Adeagbo, A.S.O.; D'Souza, S.E.; Bhatnagar, A.; Conklin, D.J. . E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu

    2006-12-15

    Acrolein is generated endogenously during lipid peroxidation and inflammation and is an environmental pollutant. Protein adducts of acrolein are detected in atherosclerotic plaques and neurons of patients with Alzheimer's disease. To understand vascular effects of acrolein exposure, we studied acrolein vasoreactivity in perfused rodent mesenteric bed. Acrolein induced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation that was more robust and more sensitive than dilation induced by 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal, trans-2-hexenal, or propionaldehyde. Acrolein-induced vasodilatation was mediated by K{sup +}-sensitive components, e.g., it was abolished in 0 [K{sup +}]{sub o} buffer or in 3 mM tetrabutylammonium, inhibited 75% in 50 {mu}M ouabain, and inhibited 64% in 20 mM K{sup +} buffer. Moreover, combined treatment with the Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channel inhibitors 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34, 100 nM) and apamin (5 {mu}M) significantly reduced vasodilatation without altering sensitivity to acrolein. However, acrolein-induced % dilation was unaffected by L-NAME or indomethacin pretreatment indicating mechanistic independence of NO and prostaglandins. Moreover, acrolein induced vasodilatation in cirazoline-precontracted mesenteric bed of eNOS-null mice confirming eNOS independence. Pretreatment with 6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl) hexanoic acid (PPOH 50 {mu}M), an epoxygenase inhibitor, or the superoxide dismutase mimetic Tempol (100 {mu}M) significantly attenuated acrolein-induced vasodilatation. Collectively, these data indicate that acrolein stimulates mesenteric bed vasodilatation due to endothelium-derived signal(s) that is K{sup +}-, ouabain-, PPOH-, and Tempol-sensitive, and thus, a likely endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). These data indicate that low level acrolein exposure associated with vascular oxidative stress or inflammation stimulates vasodilatation via EDHF release in medium-sized arteries - a novel function.

  2. Extract of motorcycle exhaust particles induced macrophages apoptosis by calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2002-12-01

    Large survey and experiments have reported that environment pollutants from fossil fuel combustion would cause immune system deleterious by enhancement of allergic reaction and damage to respiratory tract. In this study, we reported that the extract of motorcycle exhaust particles (MEP) might affect the immune system by inducing cell apoptosis on macrophages. The motorcycle exhaust particles were collected from a two-stoke engine and their cytotoxic effect on macrophages was investigated. We found MEP is cytotoxic and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells, murine peritoneal macrophage, and rat alveolar macrophage. Pretreatment with mitochondria permeability transition inhibitor (cyclosporin A), intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca(2+) chelator, and antioxidants (NAC, GSH, catalase, SOD) attenuated the MEP-induced cell apoptosis, and BAPTA-AM was the most effective one. Utilized Fura-2/AM loaded RAW 264.7 cells to directly detect the change of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), we found that MEP could induce a sustained increase of [Ca(2+)](i). The raise of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by MEP could be completely blocked by the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA-AM, however, only partially inhibited by the extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, EGTA. These results suggested that both influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and release of Ca(2+) from the internal storage were involved. We also found that MEP caused a decrease of mitochondria membrane potential and an increase of oxidative stress in RAW 264.7 cells. In conclusion, we found that the particles, collected from the motorcycle exhaust, contain chemicals that will induce apoptosis of macrophage in calcium-dependent manner.

  3. p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects Aβ42-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyunjung; Song, Hyundong; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Ahbin; Ryu, Hoon; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and age-related neurodegenerative disease. Elucidating the cellular changes that occur during ageing is an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. SIRT6 is a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of anti-aging genes. However, the relationship between SIRT6 and AD has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that SIRT6 protein expression levels are reduced in the brains of both the 5XFAD AD mouse model and AD patients. Aβ42, a major component of senile plaques, decreases SIRT6 expression, and Aβ42-induced DNA damage is prevented by the overexpression of SIRT6 in HT22 mouse hippocampal neurons. Also, there is a strong negative correlation between Aβ42-induced DNA damage and p53 levels, a protein involved in DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition, upregulation of p53 protein by Nutlin-3 prevents SIRT6 reduction and DNA damage induced by Aβ42. Taken together, this study reveals that p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects cells from Aβ42-induced DNA damage, making SIRT6 a promising new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:27156849

  4. Acute Vhl gene inactivation induces cardiac HIF-dependent erythropoietin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Miró-Murillo, Marta; Elorza, Ainara; Soro-Arnáiz, Inés; Albacete-Albacete, Lucas; Ordoñez, Angel; Balsa, Eduardo; Vara-Vega, Alicia; Vázquez, Silvia; Fuertes, Esther; Fernández-Criado, Carmen; Landázuri, Manuel O; Aragonés, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Von Hippel Lindau (Vhl) gene inactivation results in embryonic lethality. The consequences of its inactivation in adult mice, and of the ensuing activation of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), have been explored mainly in a tissue-specific manner. This mid-gestation lethality can be also circumvented by using a floxed Vhl allele in combination with an ubiquitous tamoxifen-inducible recombinase Cre-ER(T2). Here, we characterize a widespread reduction in Vhl gene expression in Vhl(floxed)-UBC-Cre-ER(T2) adult mice after dietary tamoxifen administration, a convenient route of administration that has yet to be fully characterized for global gene inactivation. Vhl gene inactivation rapidly resulted in a marked splenomegaly and skin erythema, accompanied by renal and hepatic induction of the erythropoietin (Epo) gene, indicative of the in vivo activation of the oxygen sensing HIF pathway. We show that acute Vhl gene inactivation also induced Epo gene expression in the heart, revealing cardiac tissue to be an extra-renal source of EPO. Indeed, primary cardiomyocytes and HL-1 cardiac cells both induce Epo gene expression when exposed to low O(2) tension in a HIF-dependent manner. Thus, as well as demonstrating the potential of dietary tamoxifen administration for gene inactivation studies in UBC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse lines, this data provides evidence of a cardiac oxygen-sensing VHL/HIF/EPO pathway in adult mice.

  5. Correlation between Cyclin Dependent Kinases and Artemisinin-Induced Dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Karen-Ann; Gresty, Karryn J.; Chen, Nanhua; Zhang, Veronica; Gutteridge, Clare E.; Peatey, Christopher L.; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C.; Cheng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-induced dormancy provides a plausible explanation for recrudescence following artemisinin monotherapy. This phenomenon shares similarities with cell cycle arrest where cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins play an important role. Methods Transcription profiles of Plasmodium falciparum CDKs and cyclins before and after dihydroartemisinin (DHA) treatment in three parasite lines, and the effect of CDK inhibitors on parasite recovery from DHA-induced dormancy were investigated. Results After DHA treatment, parasites enter a dormancy phase followed by a recovery phase. During the dormancy phase parasites up-regulate pfcrk1, pfcrk4, pfcyc2 and pfcyc4, and down-regulate pfmrk, pfpk5, pfpk6, pfcrk3, pfcyc1 and pfcyc3. When entering the recovery phase parasites immediately up-regulate all CDK and cyclin genes. Three CDK inhibitors, olomoucine, WR636638 and roscovitine, produced distinct effects on different phases of DHA-induced dormancy, blocking parasites recovery. Conclusions The up-regulation of PfCRK1 and PfCRK4, and down regulation of other CDKs and cyclins correlate with parasite survival in the dormant state. Changes in CDK expression are likely to negatively regulate parasite progression from G1 to S phase. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of artemisinin-induced dormancy and cell cycle regulation of P. falciparum, opening new opportunities for preventing recrudescence following artemisinin treatment. PMID:27326764

  6. Infiltration with Agrobacterium tumefaciens induces host defense and development-dependent responses in the infiltrated zone.

    PubMed

    Pruss, Gail J; Nester, Eugene W; Vance, Vicki

    2008-12-01

    Despite the widespread use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to transfer genes into plant systems, host responses to this plant pathogen are not well understood. The present study shows that disarmed strains of Agrobacterium induce distinct host responses when infiltrated into leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. The responses are limited to the infiltrated zone and consist of i) induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene PR-1 expression and resistance to subsequent infection with tobacco mosaic virus, ii) chlorosis and loss of chloroplast rRNAs, and iii) inhibition of leaf expansion. Induction of the latter two sets of responses depends on the age of the leaf and is most apparent in young leaves. Strains with or without binary vectors induce all the responses, showing that DNA transfer is neither required nor inhibitory. A. tumefaciens cured of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid is slightly defective for induction of the three responses, showing that Ti plasmid-encoded factors produced by the disarmed strains contribute only slightly. However, T-DNA-encoded factors alter at least one of the host responses, because infiltration with the oncogenic strain C58 induced more pronounced chlorosis than the disarmed control. Auxin is one of the T-DNA products responsible for disease induction by oncogenic A. tumefaciens. We found that C58-infiltrated zones-but not those infiltrated with the disarmed control-have increased levels of miR393, a microRNA that represses auxin signaling and contributes to antibacterial resistance. PMID:18986249

  7. Crystalline silica-induced leukotrieneB4-dependent inflammation promotes lung tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Shuchismita R.; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.; Bodduluri, Sobha R.; Krishnan, Elangovan; Hegde, Bindu; Hoyle, Gary; Fraig, Mostafa; Luster, Andrew D.; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to crystalline silica (CS) causes silicosis, an irreversible lung inflammatory disease that may eventually lead to lung cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that in K-rasLA1 mice, CS exposure markedly enhances the lung tumor burden and genetic deletion of leukotriene B4 receptor1 (BLT1−/−) attenuates this increase. Pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation induced by CS is significantly reduced in BLT1−/−K-rasLA1 mice. CS exposure induces LTB4 production by mast cells and macrophages independent of inflammasome activation. In an air pouch model, CS-induced neutrophil recruitment is dependent on LTB4 production by mast cells and BLT1 expression on neutrophils. In an implantable lung tumor model, CS exposure results in rapid tumor growth and decrease survival that is attenuated in the absence of BLT1. These results suggest that LTB4/BLT1 axis sets the pace of CS-induced sterile inflammation that promotes lung cancer progression. This knowledge will facilitate development of immunotherapeutic strategies to fight silicosis and lung cancer. PMID:25923988

  8. Friend virus utilizes the BMP4-dependent stress erythropoiesis pathway to induce erythroleukemia.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Aparna; Hegde, Shailaja; Porayette, Prashanth; Yon, Michele; Hankey, Pamela; Paulson, Robert F

    2008-01-01

    More than 50 years of genetic analysis has identified a number of host genes that are required for the expansion of infected cells during the progression of Friend-virus-induced erythroleukemia. In this report, we show that Friend virus induces the bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4)-dependent stress erythropoiesis pathway in the spleen, which rapidly amplifies target cells, propagating their infection and resulting in acute splenomegaly. This mechanism mimics the response to acute anemia, in which BMP4 expressed in the spleen drives the expansion of a specialized population of stress erythroid progenitors. Previously we demonstrated that these progenitors, termed stress BFU-E, are targets for Friend virus in the spleen (A. Subramanian, H. E. Teal, P. H. Correll, and R. F. Paulson, J. Virol. 79:14586-14594, 2005). Here, we extend those findings by showing that Friend virus infects two distinct populations of bone marrow cells. One population, when infected, differentiates into mature erythrocytes in an Epo-independent manner, while a second population migrates to the spleen after infection, where it induces BMP4 expression and acts as a reservoir of virus. The activation of the stress erythropoiesis pathway in the spleen by Friend virus results in the rapid expansion of stress BFU-E, providing abundant target cells for viral infection. These observations suggest a novel mechanism by which a virus induces a stress response pathway that amplifies target cells for the virus, leading to acute expansion of infected cells.

  9. Superoxide Induces Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in a TLR-4 and NOX-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza Obaid; Miller, David; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the early innate immune response to perceived infectious and sterile threats. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a novel mechanism to counter pathogenic invasion and sequelae of ischemia, including cell death and oxidative stress. Superoxide is a radical intermediate of oxygen metabolism produced by parenchymal and nonparenchymal hepatic cells, and is a hallmark of oxidative stress after liver ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). While extracellular superoxide recruits neutrophils to the liver and initiates sterile inflammatory injury, it is unknown whether superoxide induces the formation of NETs. We hypothesize that superoxide induces NET formation through a signaling cascade involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and neutrophil NADPH oxidase (NOX). We treated neutrophils with extracellular superoxide and observed NET DNA release, histone H3 citrullination and increased levels of MPO-DNA complexes occurring in a TLR-4–dependent manner. Inhibition of superoxide generation by allopurinol and inhibition of NOX by diphenyleneiodonium prevented NET formation. When mice were subjected to warm liver I/R, we found significant NET formation associated with liver necrosis and increased serum ALT in TLR-4 WT but not TLR-4 KO mice. To reduce circulating superoxide, we pretreated mice undergoing I/R with allopurinol and N-acetylcysteine, which resulted in decreased NETs and ameliorated liver injury. Our study demonstrates a requirement for TLR-4 and NOX in superoxide-induced NETs, and suggests involvement of superoxide-induced NETs in pathophysiologic settings. PMID:27453505

  10. Chikungunya virus–induced autophagy delays caspase-dependent cell death

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Werneke, Scott W.; de la Calle, Claire; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Giodini, Alessandra; Peduto, Lucie; Levine, Beth; Schwartz, Olivier; Lenschow, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an important survival pathway and can participate in the host response to infection. Studying Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), the causative agent of a major epidemic in India, Southeast Asia, and southern Europe, we reveal a novel mechanism by which autophagy limits cell death and mortality after infection. We use biochemical studies and single cell multispectral assays to demonstrate that direct infection triggers both apoptosis and autophagy. CHIKV-induced autophagy is mediated by the independent induction of endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress pathways. These cellular responses delay apoptotic cell death by inducing the IRE1α–XBP-1 pathway in conjunction with ROS-mediated mTOR inhibition. Silencing of autophagy genes resulted in enhanced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis, favoring viral propagation in cultured cells. Providing in vivo evidence for the relevance of our findings, Atg16LHM mice, which display reduced levels of autophagy, exhibited increased lethality and showed a higher sensitivity to CHIKV-induced apoptosis. Based on kinetic studies and the observation that features of apoptosis and autophagy were mutually exclusive, we conclude that autophagy inhibits caspase-dependent cell death but is ultimately overwhelmed by viral replication. Our study suggests that inducers of autophagy may limit the pathogenesis of acute Chikungunya disease. PMID:22508836

  11. Endotoxemia induces IκBβ/NFκB dependent ET-1 expression in hepatic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Sarah; Gossling, Megan; Bugarini, Alejandro; Hill, Elizabeth; Anderson, Aimee L.; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Wright, Clyde J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum concentrations of the vasoactive protein ET-1 occur in the setting of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and contribute to distal organ hypoperfusion and pulmonary hypertension. Thus, understanding the cellular source and transcriptional regulation of systemic inflammatory stress-induced ET-1 expression may reveal therapeutic targets. Using a murine model of LPS-induced septic shock, we demonstrate that the hepatic macrophage is the primary source of elevated circulating ET-1, rather than the endothelium as previously proposed. Using pharmacologic inhibitors, ET-1 promoter luciferase assays, and by silencing and overexpressing NFκB inhibitory protein IκB expression, we demonstrate that LPS-induced ET-1 expression occurs via an NFκB dependent pathway. Finally, the specific role of the cRel/p65 inhibitory protein IκBβ was evaluated. Although cytoplasmic IκBβ inhibits activity of cRel containing NFκB dimers, nuclear IκBβ stabilizes NFκB/DNA binding and enhances gene expression. Using targeted pharmacologic therapies to specifically prevent IκBβ/NFκB signaling, as well as mice genetically modified to overexpress IκBβ, we show that nuclear IκBβ is both necessary and sufficient to drive LPS-induced ET-1 expression. Together, these results mechanistically link the innate immune response mediated by IκBβ/NFκB to ET-1 expression and potentially reveals therapeutic targets for patients with gram-negative septic shock. PMID:26342031

  12. XPD-dependent activation of apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik Tiwari, Meetu; Rogers, Faye A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA sequences capable of forming triplexes are prevalent in the human genome and have been found to be intrinsically mutagenic. Consequently, a balance between DNA repair and apoptosis is critical to counteract their effect on genomic integrity. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotides to synthetically create altered helical distortions, we have determined that pro-apoptotic pathways are activated by the formation of triplex structures. Moreover, the TFIIH factor, XPD, occupies a central role in triggering apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA strand breaks. Here, we show that triplexes are capable of inducing XPD-independent double strand breaks, which result in the formation of γH2AX foci. XPD was subsequently recruited to the triplex-induced double strand breaks and co-localized with γH2AX at the damage site. Furthermore, phosphorylation of H2AX tyrosine 142 was found to stimulate the signaling pathway of XPD-dependent apoptosis. We suggest that this mechanism may play an active role in minimizing genomic instability induced by naturally occurring noncanonical structures, perhaps protecting against cancer initiation. PMID:23913414

  13. Growing tumors induce a local STING dependent Type I IFN response in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Andzinski, Lisa; Spanier, Julia; Kasnitz, Nadine; Kröger, Andrea; Jin, Lei; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Kalinke, Ulrich; Weiss, Siegfried; Jablonska, Jadwiga; Lienenklaus, Stefan

    2016-09-15

    The importance of endogenous Type I IFNs in cancer immune surveillance is well established by now. Their role in polarization of tumor-associated neutrophilic granulocytes into anti-tumor effector cells has been recently demonstrated. Yet, the cellular source of Type I IFNs as well as the mode of induction is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-β is induced by growing murine tumors. Induction is mainly mediated via STING-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting tumor derived DNA as trigger. Transcription factors IRF3 and IRF5 were activated under these conditions which is consistent with tumor infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) being the major cellular source of IFN-β at the tumor site. Besides DCs, tumor cells themselves are induced to contribute to the production of IFN-β. Taken together, our data provide further information on immune surveillance by Type I IFNs and suggest novel potent cellular targets for future cancer therapy. PMID:27116225

  14. IFN-alpha/beta-dependent cross-priming induced by specific toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2006-04-12

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors that have been identified as crucial in the initiation of innate immune responses against pathogens. They are thought to be involved in shaping appropriate adaptive immune responses, although their precise contribution has not yet been fully characterised. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on cellular immune responses. We examined the ability of a range of TLR stimuli to induce CD8+ T cell responses against a model soluble protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA). We found that TLR 3, TLR 4, and TLR 9 agonists induced functional cross-priming, and that this process was dependent on IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:16823911

  15. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Lixin; Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2009-01-01

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic α- and β-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy in coping with crisis of misfolded proteins. PMID:19682429

  16. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Lixin; Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2009-10-16

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule-organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic {alpha}- and {beta}-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy to cope with misfolded proteins.

  17. Evodiamine induces caspase-dependent apoptosis and S phase arrest in human colon lovo cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Xu, Xiang; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xi; Liang, Hua-Ping

    2010-09-01

    Evodiamine, one of the major bioactive components derived from Wu-Chu-Yu, a long-standing Chinese herb, was reported to possess anticancer activity. In this study, we investigated the in-vitro and in-vivo anticancer effects of evodiamine on human colon lovo cells and their potential mechanisms. The 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that the in-vitro proliferation of lovo cells was inhibited by evodiamine of various concentrations. Flow cytometry showed a time-dependent increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and cells arrested in the S phase after treatment with 60 micromol/l evodiamine. Western blot indicated that evodiamine treatment decreased the expression of procaspase-8, procaspase-9, and procaspase-3 in lovo cells, accompanied by the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3. However, the translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G was not affected by evodiamine. Moreover, western blot assay also suggested that evodiamine-induced S phase arrest in lovo cells was associated with a marked decrease in the protein expression of cyclinA, cyclinA-dependent kinase 2, and cdc25c. In-vivo antineoplastic characteristics of evodiamine were examined in a human colon carcinoma lovo xenograft model and results showed that evodiamine increased the number of TUNEL-positive cells accompanied by the downregulated expression of procaspase-8, procaspase-9, and procaspase-3. In conclusion, these findings indicated that evodiamine could inhibit the in-vitro and in-vivo proliferation of human colon lovo cells by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis and S phase arrest.

  18. Modeling Time Dependent Earthquake Magnitude Distributions Associated with Injection-Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, J.; Segall, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and predicting earthquake magnitudes from injection-induced seismicity is critically important for estimating hazard due to injection operations. A particular problem has been that the largest event often occurs post shut-in. A rigorous analysis would require modeling all stages of earthquake nucleation, propagation, and arrest, and not just initiation. We present a simple conceptual model for predicting the distribution of earthquake magnitudes during and following injection, building on the analysis of Segall & Lu (2015). The analysis requires several assumptions: (1) the distribution of source dimensions follows a Gutenberg-Richter distribution; (2) in environments where the background ratio of shear to effective normal stress is low, the size of induced events is limited by the volume perturbed by injection (e.g., Shapiro et al., 2013; McGarr, 2014), and (3) the perturbed volume can be approximated by diffusion in a homogeneous medium. Evidence for the second assumption comes from numerical studies that indicate the background ratio of shear to normal stress controls how far an earthquake rupture, once initiated, can grow (Dunham et al., 2011; Schmitt et al., submitted). We derive analytical expressions that give the rate of events of a given magnitude as the product of three terms: the time-dependent rate of nucleations, the probability of nucleating on a source of given size (from the Gutenberg-Richter distribution), and a time-dependent geometrical factor. We verify our results using simulations and demonstrate characteristics observed in real induced sequences, such as time-dependent b-values and the occurrence of the largest event post injection. We compare results to Segall & Lu (2015) as well as example datasets. Future work includes using 2D numerical simulations to test our results and assumptions; in particular, investigating how background shear stress and fault roughness control rupture extent.

  19. Integrins mediate mechanical compression-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression-induced vasodilation and NOx (NO(-)2 and NO(-)3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression-induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading.

  20. Diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-stimulated human thyrocytes through two caspase-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Shumin; Tian, Xingsong; Ruan, Yongwei; Liu, Yuantao; Bian, Dezhi; Ma, Chunyan; Yu, Chunxiao; Feng, Mei; Wang, Furong; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-treated thyrocytes through two caspase pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diosgenin inhibits FLIP and activates caspase-8 in FAS related-pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diosgenin increases ROS, regulates the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in mitochondrial pathway. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a growth factor of the thyroid that has been shown in our previous study to possess proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in FRTL-5 cell lines through the upregulation of cyclin D and Fas-associated death domain-like interleukin-1-converting enzyme (FLICE)-inhibitory protein (FLIP). Diosgenin, a natural steroid sapogenin from plants, has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cell lines, with the exception of thyroid cells. In this report, we investigated the apoptotic effect and mechanism of diosgenin in IGF-1-stimulated primary human thyrocytes. Primary human thyrocytes were preincubated with or without IGF-1 for 24 h and subsequently exposed to varying concentrations of diosgenin for different times. We found that diosgenin induced apoptosis in human thyrocytes pretreated with IGF-1 in a dose-dependent manner through the activation of caspase cascades. Moreover, diosgenin inhibited FLIP and activated caspase-8 in the FAS-related apoptotic pathway. Diosgenin increased the production of ROS, regulated the balance of Bax and Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-9 in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. These results indicate that diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-stimulated primary human thyrocytes through two caspase-dependent pathways.

  1. Scalable network of quadrangle entanglements via multiple phase-dependent electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Xiangming; Sun Hong; Wang Fei

    2010-10-15

    One important class of multipartite continuous variable entanglement is described by a closed polygon, where every vertex represents one optical field and every side corresponds to the entanglement between the two connected vertices. Here we show that it is possible to obtain a scalable network of quadrangle entanglements by using multiple phase-dependent electromagnetically induced transparency. For 4,6,8,...,2n (n{>=}2) mode cases the network consists of 1,9,36,...,(1/4)n{sup 2} (n-1){sup 2} quadrangles, respectively. This suggests an efficient way of creating complex quantum networks and has great potentials for quantum information and computation.

  2. Gravitation-dependent, thermally-induced self-diffraction in carbon nanotube solutions.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Chen, Weizhe; Lim, Sanhua; Lin, Jianyi; Guo, Zhixin

    2006-10-01

    We report the observation of thermally-induced self-diffraction in carbon nanotube (CNT) solutions under the influence of the gravity. We present a theoretical model in which CNTs are assumed to obey the Boltzmman distribution law. Under the approximations of small temperature rise and a very narrow distribution of CNT masses, the model simulation is consistent with the data measured at low laser powers. An immediate application of such a gravitation-dependent characteristic is the optical measurement for molecular weights of CNTs.

  3. Voltage-dependence of drug-induced conductance in frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed Central

    Neher, E; Sakmann, B

    1975-01-01

    Membrane currents from voltage-clamped frog muscle fibers were recorded during iontophoretic application of steady doses of carbachol, acetylcholine, and suberyldicholine to the endplate region. In the presence of these drugs, an exponentially relaxing current was observed after step changes of membrane potential. The time constant of relaxation was found to be voltage-dependent. It was equal to the time constant obtained from the autocorrelation function of drug-induced conductance fluctuations measured under similar conditions. Analysis of instantaneous current at the on- and offsets of voltageclamp pulses showed that there is no shift in equilibrium potential during the pulses. PMID:1079601

  4. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  5. 3,39-Diindolylmethane Ameliorates Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B–Induced Acute Lung Injury through Alterations in the Expression of MicroRNA that Target Apoptosis and Cell-Cycle Arrest in Activated T Cells.

    PubMed

    Elliott, David M; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2016-04-01

    3,39-Diindolylmethane (DIM), a natural indole found in cruciferous vegetables, has significant anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. In this current study, we investigated the effects of DIM on acute lung injury (ALI) induced by exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). We found that pretreatment of mice with DIM led to attenuation of SEB-induced inflammation in the lungs, vascular leak, and IFN-g secretion. Additionally, DIM could induce cell-cycle arrest and cell death in SEB-activated T cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, microRNA (miRNA) microarray analysis uncovered an altered miRNA profile in lung-infiltrating mononuclear cells after DIM treatment of SEB-exposed mice. Moreover, computational analysis of miRNA gene targets and regulation networks indicated that DIM alters miRNA in the cell death and cell-cycle progression pathways. Specifically, DIM treatment significantly downregulated several miRNA and a correlative increase associated gene targets. Furthermore, overexpression and inhibition studies demonstrated that DIM-induced cell death, at least in part, used miR-222. Collectively, these studies demonstrate for the first time that DIM treatment attenuates SEB-induced ALI and may do so through the induction of microRNAs that promote apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in SEB-activated T cells. PMID:26818958

  6. Phase-dependent multiple optomechanically induced absorption in multimode optomechanical systems with mechanical driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cheng; Cui, Yuanshun; Bian, Xintian; Zuo, Fen; Yu, Hualing; Chen, Guibin

    2016-08-01

    We investigate theoretically the response of the output field from an optomechanical system consisting of N nearly degenerate mechanical resonators each coupled to a common cavity mode. When the cavity is driven simultaneously by a strong control field and a weak probe field and each mechanical resonator is driven by a coherent mechanical pump, we obtain the analytical expression for the probe transmission. We show that the probe transmission spectrum can exhibit multiple optomechanically induced absorption (OMIA) with at most N narrow absorption dips, which can be tuned by the phase and amplitude of the mechanical driving field as well as the control field. Moreover, it is shown that the peak probe transmission can be enhanced or suppressed by increasing the amplitude of the mechanical pump, which depends on the phase difference. This phase-dependent effect plays an important role in controlling the propagation of the probe field between OMIA and parametric amplification.

  7. mTORC1-Induced HK1-Dependent Glycolysis Regulates NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Seok; Hisata, Shu; Park, Mi-Ae; DeNicola, Gina M; Ryter, Stefan W; Nakahira, Kiichi; Choi, Augustine M K

    2015-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) regulates activation of immune cells and cellular energy metabolism. Although glycolysis has been linked to immune functions, the mechanisms by which glycolysis regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1-induced glycolysis provides an essential mechanism for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, we demonstrate that hexokinase 1 (HK1)-dependent glycolysis, under the regulation of mTORC1, represents a critical metabolic pathway for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Downregulation of glycolysis by inhibition of Raptor/mTORC1 or HK1 suppressed both pro-IL-1β maturation and caspase-1 activation in macrophages in response to LPS and ATP. These results suggest that upregulation of HK1-dependent glycolysis by mTORC1 regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

  8. 2-Methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyljuglone (MAM), a natural naphthoquinone, induces NO-dependent apoptosis and necroptosis by H2O2-dependent JNK activation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Bao, Jiaolin; Lin, Wei; Gao, Hongwei; Zhao, Wenwen; Zhang, Qingwen; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Lu, Jinjian; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-03-01

    Redox signaling plays a fundamental role in maintaining cell physiological activities. A deregulation of this balance through oxidative stress or nitrosative stress has been implicated in cancer. Here, we reported that 2-methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyl juglone (MAM), a natural naphthoquinone isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc, caused hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) dependent activation of JNK and induced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thereby leading to nitric oxide (NO) generation in multiple cancer cells. Nitrosative stress induced necroptosis in A549 lung cancer cells, but resulted in caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis in B16-F10 melanoma and MCF7 breast cancer cells. In addition, a decrease in GSH/GSSG levels accompanied with increased ROS production was observed. Reversal of ROS generation and cell death in GSH pretreated cells indicated the involvement of GSH depletion in MAM mediated cytotoxicity. In summary, a natural product MAM induced NO-dependent multiple forms of cell death in cancer cells mediated by H2O2-dependent JNK activation in cancer cells. GSH depletion might play an initial role in MAM-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26802903

  9. Bile acids induce uncoupling protein 1-dependent thermogenesis and stimulate energy expenditure at thermoneutrality in mice.

    PubMed

    Zietak, Marika; Kozak, Leslie P

    2016-03-01

    It has been proposed that diet-induced obesity at thermoneutrality (TN; 29°C) is reduced by a UCP1-dependent thermogenesis; however, it has not been shown how UCP1-dependent thermogenesis can be activated in the absence of sympathetic activity. A recent study provides such a mechanism by showing that dietary bile acids (BAs) suppress obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) by a mechanism dependent on type 2 deiodinase (DIO2); however, neither a role for UCP1 nor the influence of sympathetic activity was properly assessed. To test whether the effects of BAs on adiposity are independent of Ucp1 and cold-activated thermogenesis, obesity phenotypes were determined in C57BL6/J.(+)/(+) (WT) and C57BL6/J.Ucp1.(-)/(-) mice (Ucp1-KO) housed at TN and fed a HFD with or without 0.5% (wt/wt) cholic acid (CA) for 9 wk. CA in a HFD reduced adiposity and hepatic lipogenesis and improved glucose tolerance in WT but not in Ucp1-KO mice and was accompanied by increases in food intake and energy expenditure (EE). In iBAT, CA increased Ucp1 mRNA and protein levels 1.5- and twofold, respectively, and increased DIO2 and TGR5 protein levels in WT mice. Despite enhanced Dio2 expression in Ucp1-KO and Ucp1-KO-CA treated mice, this did not enhance the ability of BAs to reduce obesity. By comparing the effects of BAs on WT and Ucp1-KO mice at TN, our study showed that BAs suppress diet-induced obesity by increasing EE through a mechanism dependent on Ucp1 expression, which is likely independent of adrenergic signaling. PMID:26714852

  10. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suomi, Visa; Han, Yang; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2016-10-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1–200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 °C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with respect to the conventional model with up to two orders of magnitude lower sum of squared errors (SSE). The characteristics of experimental displacement data were also seen in the simulations due to the changes in attenuation coefficient and lesion development. At low temperatures before thermal ablation, attenuation was found to affect the displacement amplitude. At higher temperature, the decrease in displacement amplitude occurs approximately at 60–70 °C due to the combined effect of viscoelasticity changes and lesion growth overpowering the effect of attenuation. The results suggest that it is necessary to monitor displacement continuously during HIFU therapy in order to ascertain when ablation occurs.

  11. IP(3)-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2010-10-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5-7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP(3)R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10-20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP(3)R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP(3)R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP(3)R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  12. IP3-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5–7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP3R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10–20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP3R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP3R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP3R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  13. Temperature dependence of spectral induced polarization data: experimental results and membrane polarization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairlein, Katharina; Bücker, Matthias; Hördt, Andreas; Hinze, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization measurements are affected by temperature variations due to a variety of temperature-dependent parameters that control the complex electrical conductivity. Most important is the influence of the ion mobility, which increases with increasing temperature. It is responsible for the increase of the conductivity of the fluid in the pores with temperature and influences the electrical double layer on the mineral surface. This work is based on laboratory measurements of 13 sandstone samples from different sources with different geological and petrophysical characteristics. We measured the complex impedance in a frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz and a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. The main observation is a decrease of the characteristic time (defined by the inverse of the frequency, at which the phase shift is maximum) with increasing temperature. The strength of this decrease differs from one sample to another. The temperature dependence of the phase shift magnitude cannot easily be generalized, as it depends on the particular sample. The experimental findings suggest that neglecting the influence of temperature on complex conductivity may lead to significant errors when estimating hydraulic conductivity from relaxation time. We also simulate the temperature dependence with a theoretical model of membrane polarization and review some of the model properties, with an emphasis on the temperature dependence of the parameters. The model reproduces several features characterizing the measured data, including the temperature dependence of the characteristic times. Computed tomography and microscope images of the pore structure of three samples also allow us to associate differences in the geometrical parameters used in the modelling with pore scale parameters of the actual samples.

  14. Identification of inducible calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase in the liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Iida, S; Ohshima, H; Oguchi, S; Hata, T; Suzuki, H; Kawasaki, H; Esumi, H

    1992-12-15

    A calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase was significantly induced in the liver of rats treated intravenously with heat-killed Propionibacterium acnes and 5 days later with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. The apparent calmodulin-dependent and -independent isozymes were separated by Mono Q column chromatography after their partial purification by 2',5'-ADP-agarose affinity chromatography. Both enzymes had a molecular weight of 125,000 as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and required NADPH, tetrahydrobiopterin, and dithiothreitol as cofactors. Their activities were completely inhibited by the specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitors NG-monomethyl-L-arginine and N omega-nitro-L-arginine at 80 and 800 microM, respectively. The peptide maps of these two isozymes with lysylendopeptidase and their reverse-phase column chromatographic profiles were indistinguishable. In the presence of bovine calmodulin, the purified calmodulin-dependent isozyme behaved as a calmodulin-independent isozyme on Mono Q column chromatography. The purified calmodulin-independent isozyme was converted to a calmodulin-dependent isozyme by EDTA and EGTA. Calmodulin blot analysis using 125I-calmodulin showed that the two isozymes bound calmodulin equally efficiently.

  15. A Non-Cytosolic Protein of Trypanosoma evansi Induces CD45-Dependent Lymphocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas; Cornet, Anne; Cornet, François; Glineur, Stéphanie; Dermine, Martin; Desmecht, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study dealing with a mouse model of Trypanosoma evansi-associated disease, a remarkable synchrony between the parasitaemia peak and the white-blood-cell count nadir was noticed. The present study was designed to establish whether there is a direct causal link between the parasite load during its exponential phase of growth and the disappearance of peripheral blood leukocytes. In vitro experiments performed with trypanosomes and purified peripheral blood mononucleated cells revealed the existence of a lymphotoxin embedded in the T. evansi membrane: a protein sensitive to serine proteases, with a molecular mass of less than 30 kDa. Lymphocytes death induced by this protein was found to depend on the intervention of a lymphocytic protein tyrosine phosphatase. When lymphocytes were exposed to increasing quantities of a monoclonal antibody raised against the extracellular portion of CD45, a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase covering over 10% of the lymphocyte surface, T. evansi membrane extracts showed a dose-dependent decrease in cytotoxicity. As the regulatory functions of CD45 concern not only the fate of lymphocytes but also the activation threshold of the TCR-dependent signal and the amplitude and nature of cytokinic effects, this demonstration of its involvement in T. evansi-dependent lymphotoxicity suggests that T. evansi might manipulate, via CD45, the host's cytokinic and adaptive responses. PMID:19478957

  16. The P-element-induced silencing effect of KP transposons is dose dependent in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sameny, Alireza; Locke, John

    2011-09-01

    Transposable elements are found in the genomes of all eukaryotes and play a critical role in altering gene expression and genome organization. In Drosophila melanogaster, transposable P elements are responsible for the phenomenon of hybrid dysgenesis. KP elements, a deletion-derivative of the complete P element, can suppress this mutagenic effect. KP elements can also silence the expression of certain other P-element-mediated transgenes in a process called P-element-dependent silencing (PDS), which is thought to involve the recruitment of heterochromatin proteins. To explore the mechanism of this silencing, we have mobilized KP elements to create a series of strains that contain single, well-defined KP insertions that show PDS. To understand the quantitative role of KP elements in PDS, these single inserts were combined in a series of crosses to obtain genotypes with zero, one, or two KP elements, from which we could examine the effect of KP gene dose. The extent of PDS in these genotypes was shown to be dose dependent in a logarithmic rather than linear fashion. A logarithmic dose dependency is consistent with the KP products interacting with heterochromatic proteins in a concentration-dependent manner such that two molecules are needed to induce gene silencing. PMID:21888571

  17. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, María A; Carretta, María D; Teuber, Stefanie E; Zárate, Cristian; Cárcamo, Leonardo; Concha, Ilona I; Burgos, Rafael A

    2015-01-01

    N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP), diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibitor) inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils. PMID:26634216

  18. EGFR activation suppresses respiratory virus-induced IRF1-dependent CXCL10 production.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, April; Ueki, Iris; Min-Oo, Gundula; Ballon-Landa, Eric; Knoff, David; Galen, Benjamin; Lanier, Lewis L; Nadel, Jay A; Koff, Jonathan L

    2014-07-15

    Airway epithelial cells are the primary cell type involved in respiratory viral infection. Upon infection, airway epithelium plays a critical role in host defense against viral infection by contributing to innate and adaptive immune responses. Influenza A virus, rhinovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) represent a broad range of human viral pathogens that cause viral pneumonia and induce exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These respiratory viruses induce airway epithelial production of IL-8, which involves epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. EGFR activation involves an integrated signaling pathway that includes NADPH oxidase activation of metalloproteinase, and EGFR proligand release that activates EGFR. Because respiratory viruses have been shown to activate EGFR via this signaling pathway in airway epithelium, we investigated the effect of virus-induced EGFR activation on airway epithelial antiviral responses. CXCL10, a chemokine produced by airway epithelial cells in response to respiratory viral infection, contributes to the recruitment of lymphocytes to target and kill virus-infected cells. While respiratory viruses activate EGFR, the interaction between CXCL10 and EGFR signaling pathways is unclear, and the potential for EGFR signaling to suppress CXCL10 has not been explored. Here, we report that respiratory virus-induced EGFR activation suppresses CXCL10 production. We found that influenza virus-, rhinovirus-, and RSV-induced EGFR activation suppressed IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 1-dependent CXCL10 production. In addition, inhibition of EGFR during viral infection augmented IRF1 and CXCL10. These findings describe a novel mechanism that viruses use to suppress endogenous antiviral defenses, and provide potential targets for future therapies.

  19. Toll pathway modulates TNF-induced JNK-dependent cell death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Changyan; Dai, Jianli; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yujun; Li, Wenzhe; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xue, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Signalling networks that control the life or death of a cell are of central interest in modern biology. While the defined roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in regulating cell death have been well-established, additional factors that modulate JNK-mediated cell death have yet to be fully elucidated. To identify novel regulators of JNK-dependent cell death, we performed a dominant-modifier screen in Drosophila and found that the Toll pathway participates in JNK-mediated cell death. Loss of Toll signalling suppresses ectopically and physiologically activated JNK signalling-induced cell death. Our epistasis analysis suggests that the Toll pathway acts as a downstream modulator for JNK-dependent cell death. In addition, gain of JNK signalling results in Toll pathway activation, revealed by stimulated transcription of Drosomycin (Drs) and increased cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of Dorsal. Furthermore, the Spätzle (Spz) family ligands for the Toll receptor are transcriptionally upregulated by activated JNK signalling in a non-cell-autonomous manner, providing a molecular mechanism for JNK-induced Toll pathway activation. Finally, gain of Toll signalling exacerbates JNK-mediated cell death and promotes cell death independent of caspases. Thus, we have identified another important function for the evolutionarily conserved Toll pathway, in addition to its well-studied roles in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and innate immunity.

  20. Fipronil induces apoptosis through caspase-dependent mitochondrial pathways in Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoyan; Xu, Zhiping; Zhang, Yixi; Shao, Xusheng; Xu, Xiaoyong; Cheng, Jiaogao; Li, Zhong

    2015-03-01

    Fipronil is the first phenylpyrazole insecticide widely used in controlling pests, including pyrethroid, organophosphate and carbamate insecticides. It is generally accepted that fipronil elicits neurotoxicity via interactions with GABA and glutamate receptors, although alternative mechanisms have recently been proposed. This study evaluates the genotoxicity of fipronil and its likely mode of action in Drosophila S2 cells, as an in vitro model. Fipronil administrated the concentration- and time-dependent S2 cell proliferation. Intracellular biochemical assays showed that fipronil-induced S2 cell apoptosis coincided with a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase reactive oxygen species generation, a significant decrease of Bcl-2 and DIAP1, and a marked augmentation of Cyt c and caspase-3. Because caspase-3 is the major executioner caspase downstream of caspase-9 in Drosophila, enzyme activity assays were used to determine the activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Our results indicated that fipronil effectively induced apoptosis in Drosophila S2 cells through caspase-dependent mitochondrial pathways.

  1. Detergent sclerosants at sub-lytic concentrations induce endothelial cell apoptosis through a caspase dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Cooley-Andrade, Osvaldo; Cheung, Kelvin; Chew, An-Ning; Connor, David Ewan; Parsi, Kurosh

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the apoptotic effects of detergent sclerosants sodium tetradecylsulphate (STS) and polidocanol (POL) on endothelial cells at sub-lytic concentrations. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were isolated and labelled with antibodies to assess for apoptosis and examined with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Isolated HUVECs viability was assessed using propidium iodide staining. Early apoptosis was determined by increased phosphatidylserine exposure by lactadherin binding. Caspase 3, 8, 9 and Bax activation as well as inhibitory assays with Pan Caspase (Z-VAD-FMK) and Bax (BI-6C9) were assessed to identify apoptotic pathways. Porimin activation was used to assess cell membrane permeability. Cell lysis reached almost 100 % with STS at 0.3 % and with POL at 0.6 %. Apoptosis was seen with both STS and POL at concentrations ranging from 0.075 to 0.15 %. PS exposure increased with both STS and POL and exhibited a dose-dependent trend. Active Caspase 3, 8 and 9 but not Bax were increased in HUVECs stimulated with low concentrations of both STS and POL. Inhibitory assays demonstrated Caspase 3, 8, 9 inhibition at low concentrations (0.075 to 0.6 %) with both STS and POL. Both agents increased the activation of porimin at all concentrations. Both sclerosants induced endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis at sub-lytic concentrations through a caspase-dependant pathway. Both agents induced EC oncosis. PMID:27225250

  2. Early maternal deprivation in rats induces gender-dependent effects on developing hippocampal and cerebellar cells.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Ricardo; Gallardo, Meritxell López; Berzal, Alvaro Llorente; Prada, Carmen; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Viveros, María-Paz

    2009-05-01

    Adult animals submitted to a single prolonged episode of maternal deprivation [24h, postnatal day 9-10] show behavioral alterations that resemble specific symptoms of schizophrenia. According to the neurodevelopmental theory, these behavioral deficits might be mediated by detrimental neurodevelopmental processes that might be associated, at least partially, with stress-induced corticosterone responses. In order to address this hypothesis, we have focused on the hippocampus and cerebellar cortex, two brain regions that show high density of glucocorticoid receptors, and analyzed possible neuronal and glial alterations by immunohistochemical techniques. To evaluate the presence of degenerated neurons we used Fluoro-Jade-C (FJ-C) staining and for the study of astrocytes we employed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Within control animals, females showed significantly more GFAP positive cells than males and a trend towards more FJ-C positive cells. Maternal deprivation induced neuronal degeneration and astroglial changes in the hippocampus and cerebellar cortex of neonatal rats that, in general, were more marked in males. This differential effect may be attributable to a greater vulnerability of males to this kind of early environmental insult and/or to sex-dependent differences in the onset and/or progression of the effects. The present experimental procedure may be instrumental in elucidating sex-dependent mechanisms of neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders with a basis in early environmental insults.

  3. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Steven O; Fan, Chun-Yang; Yeoman, Kim; Wakefield, John; Ramabhadran, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this study, we describe the development of an Nrf2-specific reporter gene assay that can be used to study the oxidative stress response in multiple cell types. Using five different cell lines, the Nrf2-activating potency of twenty metals was assessed across a range of concentrations. While ten of the metals tested (cadmium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, lead, mercury, silver, sodium arsenite and zinc) stimulated Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity in at least three of the engineered cell lines, only three (cadmium, copper and sodium arsenite) were active in all five cell lines. A comparison of metal-induced Nrf2 transcriptional activation revealed significant differences in the absolute magnitude of activation as well as the relative potencies between the cell lines tested. However, there was no direct correlation between activity and potency. Taken together, these results show that the capacity to stimulate Nrf2 activity and relative potencies of these test compounds are highly dependent on the cell type tested. Since oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the mode of action of many toxicological studies, this observation may inform the design of paradigms for toxicity testing for toxicant prioritization and characterization. PMID:21643505

  4. Interleukin-1beta induced vascular permeability is dependent on induction of endothelial tissue factor (TF) activity.

    PubMed

    Puhlmann, Markus; Weinreich, David M; Farma, Jeffrey M; Carroll, Nancy M; Turner, Ewa M; Alexander, H Richard

    2005-09-30

    IL-1beta is a pleotropic cytokine that may mediate increased procoagulant activity and permeability in endothelial tissue during inflammatory conditions. The procoagulant effects of IL-1beta are mediated through induction of tissue factor (TF) but its alterations on vascular permeability are not well characterized. We found that IL-1beta induced a rapid and dose-dependent increase in TF activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs) under routine culture conditions. However, IL-1beta caused a rapid and marked increase in permeability across confluent EC monolayers using a two-compartment in vitro model only in the presence of factor VIII-deficient plasma that was completely abrogated by neutralizing anti-TF antibody pre-treatment. In vitro permeability was associated with loss of EC surface expression of VE-cadherin and contraction of F-actin cytoskeletal elements that resulted in EC intercellular gap formation. These data demonstrate that IL-1beta induces marked changes in permeability across activated endothelium via a TF dependent mechanism and suggest that modulation of TF activity may represent a strategy to treat various acute and chronic inflammatory conditions mediated by this cytokine.

  5. Polysaccharide peptide induces a tumor necrosis factor-α-dependent drop of body temperature in rats.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejewski, Tomasz; Piotrowski, Jakub; Wrotek, Sylwia; Kozak, Wieslaw

    2014-08-01

    Polysaccharide peptide (PSP) extracted from the Coriolus versicolor mushroom is frequently suggested as an adjunct to the chemo- or radiotherapy in cancer patients. It improves quality of the patients' life by decreasing pain, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. However, the effect of PSP on body temperature has not thus far been studied, although it is well known that treatment with other polysaccharide adjuvants, such as lipopolysaccharides, may induce fever. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to investigate the influence of PSP on temperature regulation in rats. We report that intraperitoneal injection of PSP provoked a dose-dependent decrease of temperature in male Wistar rats equipped with biotelemetry devices to monitor deep body temperature (Tb). The response was rapid (i.e., with latency of 15-20min), transient (lasting up to 5h post-injection), and accompanied by a significant elevation of the blood tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level. Pretreatment of the rats with anti-TNF-α antibody prevented the PSP-induced drop in Tb. Based on these data, we conclude that rats may develop an anapyrexia-like response to the injection of peptidopolysaccharide rather than fever, and the response was TNF-α-dependent.

  6. The New World arenavirus Tacaribe virus induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Svenja; Groseth, Allison; Meyer, Bjoern; Jackson, David; Strecker, Thomas; Kaufmann, Andreas; Becker, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The Arenaviridae is a diverse and growing family of viruses that already includes more than 25 distinct species. While some of these viruses have a significant impact on public health, others appear to be non-pathogenic. At present little is known about the host cell responses to infection with different arenaviruses, particularly those found in the New World; however, apoptosis is known to play an important role in controlling infection of many viruses. Here we show that infection with Tacaribe virus (TCRV), which is widely considered the prototype for non-pathogenic arenaviruses, leads to stronger induction of apoptosis than does infection with its human-pathogenic relative Junín virus. TCRV-induced apoptosis occurred in several cell types during late stages of infection and was shown to be caspase-dependent, involving the activation of caspases 3, 7, 8 and 9. Further, UV-inactivated TCRV did not induce apoptosis, indicating that the activation of this process is dependent on active viral replication/transcription. Interestingly, when apoptosis was inhibited, growth of TCRV was not enhanced, indicating that apoptosis does not have a direct negative effect on TCRV infection in vitro. Taken together, our data identify and characterize an important virus-host cell interaction of the prototypic, non-pathogenic arenavirus TCRV, which provides important insight into the growing field of arenavirus research aimed at better understanding the diversity in responses to different arenavirus infections and their functional consequences.

  7. The New World arenavirus Tacaribe virus induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Svenja; Groseth, Allison; Meyer, Bjoern; Jackson, David; Strecker, Thomas; Kaufmann, Andreas; Becker, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The Arenaviridae is a diverse and growing family of viruses that already includes more than 25 distinct species. While some of these viruses have a significant impact on public health, others appear to be non-pathogenic. At present little is known about the host cell responses to infection with different arenaviruses, particularly those found in the New World; however, apoptosis is known to play an important role in controlling infection of many viruses. Here we show that infection with Tacaribe virus (TCRV), which is widely considered the prototype for non-pathogenic arenaviruses, leads to stronger induction of apoptosis than does infection with its human-pathogenic relative Junín virus. TCRV-induced apoptosis occurred in several cell types during late stages of infection and was shown to be caspase-dependent, involving the activation of caspases 3, 7, 8 and 9. Further, UV-inactivated TCRV did not induce apoptosis, indicating that the activation of this process is dependent on active viral replication/transcription. Interestingly, when apoptosis was inhibited, growth of TCRV was not enhanced, indicating that apoptosis does not have a direct negative effect on TCRV infection in vitro. Taken together, our data identify and characterize an important virus-host cell interaction of the prototypic, non-pathogenic arenavirus TCRV, which provides important insight into the growing field of arenavirus research aimed at better understanding the diversity in responses to different arenavirus infections and their functional consequences. PMID:26769540

  8. Folic acid induces salicylic acid-dependent immunity in Arabidopsis and enhances susceptibility to Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Kanawati, Basem; Wenig, Marion; Hoffmann, Thomas; Franz-Oberdorf, Katrin; Schwab, Wilfried; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Vlot, A Corina

    2015-08-01

    Folates are essential for one-carbon transfer reactions in all organisms and contribute, for example, to de novo DNA synthesis. Here, we detected the folate precursors 7,8-dihydropteroate (DHP) and 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate (ADC) in extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. The accumulation of DHP, but not ADC, was induced after infection of plants with Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. Application of folic acid or the DHP precursor 7,8-dihydroneopterin (DHN) enhanced resistance in Arabidopsis to P. syringae and elevated the transcript accumulation of the salicylic acid (SA) marker gene pathogenesis-related1 in both the treated and systemic untreated leaves. DHN- and folic acid-induced systemic resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signalling. Similar to SA, folic acid application locally enhanced Arabidopsis susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. Together, the data associate the folic acid pathway with innate immunity in Arabidopsis, simultaneously activating local and systemic SA-dependent resistance to P. syringae and suppressing local resistance to A. brassicicola.

  9. ROS-dependent phosphorylation of Bax by wortmannin sensitizes melanoma cells for TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Quast, S-A; Berger, A; Eberle, J

    2013-01-01

    The pathways of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis induction, of Bax activation and the sensitization of tumor cells for TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand)-induced apoptosis are still largely elusive. Here, sensitization of melanoma cells for TRAIL by the PI3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin correlated to the activation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Apoptosis was dependent on Bax and abrogated by Bcl-2 overexpression. The synergistic enhancement was explained by Bax activation through wortmannin, which tightly correlated to the characteristic Bax phosphorylation patterns. Thus, wortmannin resulted in early reduction of the Bax-inactivating phosphorylation at serine-184, whereas the Bax-activating phosphorylation at threonine-167 was enhanced. Proving the responsibility of the pathway, comparable effects were obtained with an Akt inhibitor (MK-2206); while suppressed phosphorylation of serine-184 may be attributed to reduced Akt activity itself, the causes of enhanced threonine-167 phosphorylation were addressed here. Characteristically, production of ROS was seen early in response to wortmannin and MK-2206. Providing the link between ROS and Bax, we show that abrogated ROS production by α-tocopherol or by NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) siRNA suppressed apoptosis and Bax activation. This correlated with reduced Bax phosphorylation at threonine-167. The data unraveled a mechanism by which NOX4-dependent ROS production controls apoptosis via Bax phosphorylation. The pathway may be considered for proapoptotic, anticancer strategies. PMID:24113173

  10. On Latitudinal Dependence of Secular Variations Induced by a Dissipating Gravity Wave Packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Hickey, M. P.

    2003-12-01

    A time evolution of the response of the minor species and the OH airglow to a dissipating gravity wave packet can be simulated with a 2-dimensional, time-dependent, fully nonlinear OH model developed recently by Huang and Hickey [2002]. The wave packet was simulated using a spectral full-wave model described by Hickey et al. [2000] and Hickey and Walterscheid [2001], and then input to a 2-D chemistry model to study the secular variation of the minor species and OH nightglow. Previous studies of OH nightglow at high latitudes show strong secular variations of minor species and also of the OH brightness induced by wave transience and dissipation [Huang and Hickey, 2002]. We plan to employ the same models to study the secular variations of minor species and the OH nightglow at mid- and low-latitudes. The latitudinal dependence of the secular variations can thus be deduced. Satellite observations reveal much larger OH brightness at mid-latitudes compared to those at high and low latitudes. Therefore, we expect greater secular variations induced by the same wave packet at mid-latitudes.

  11. Alcohol-Induced Changes in Opioid Peptide Levels in Adolescent Rats Are Dependent on Housing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Sara; Nylander, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Background Endogenous opioids are implicated in the mechanism of action of alcohol and alcohol affects opioids in a number of brain areas, although little is known about alcohol's effects on opioids in the adolescent brain. One concern, in particular when studying young animals, is that alcohol intake models often are based on single housing that may result in alcohol effects confounded by the lack of social interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate short- and long-term alcohol effects on opioids and the influence of housing conditions on these effects. Methods In the first part, opioid peptide levels were measured after one 24-hour session of single housing and 2-hour voluntary alcohol intake in adolescent and adult rats. In the second part, a model with a cage divider inserted during 2-hour drinking sessions was tested and the effects on opioids were examined after 6 weeks of adolescent voluntary intake in single-and pair-housed rats, respectively. Results The effects of single housing were age specific and affected Met-enkephalin-Arg6Phe7 (MEAP) in particular. In adolescent rats, it was difficult to distinguish between effects induced by alcohol and single housing, whereas alcohol-specific effects were seen in dynorphin B (DYNB), beta-endorphin (BEND), and MEAP levels in adults. Voluntary drinking affected several brain areas and the majority of alcohol-induced effects were not dependent on housing. However, alcohol effects on DYNB and BEND in the amygdala were dependent on housing. Housing alone affected MEAP in the cingulate cortex. Conclusions Age-specific housing- and alcohol-induced effects on opioids were found. In addition, prolonged voluntary alcohol intake under different housing conditions produced several alcohol-induced effects independent of housing. However, housing-dependent effects were found in areas implicated in stress, emotionality, and alcohol use disorder. Housing condition and age may therefore affect the reasons and

  12. Clonidine-induced nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxation mediated by endothelial α2-adrenoceptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Xavier F; Poblete, M Inés; Boric, Mauricio P; Mendizábal, Victoria E; Adler-Graschinsky, Edda; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo

    2001-01-01

    To assess the involvement of endothelial α2-adrenoceptors in the clonidine-induced vasodilatation, the mesenteric artery of Sprague Dawley rats was cannulated and perfused with Tyrode solution (2 ml min−1). We measured perfusion pressure, nitric oxide (NO) in the perfusate using chemiluminescence, and tissue cyclic GMP by RIA.In phenylephrine-precontracted mesenteries, clonidine elicited concentration-dependent vasodilatations associated to a rise in luminal NO. One hundred nM rauwolscine or 100 μM Lω-nitro-L-arginine antagonized the clonidine-induced vasodilatation. Guanabenz, guanfacine, and oxymetazoline mimicked the clonidine-induced vasorelaxation.In non-contracted mesenteries, 100 nM clonidine elicited a maximal rise of NO (123±13 pmol); associated to a peak in tissue cyclic GMP. Endothelium removal, Lω-nitro-L-arginine, or rauwolscine ablated the rise in NO. One hundred nM aminoclonidine, guanfacine, guanabenz, UK14,304 and oxymetazoline mimicked the clonidine-induced surge of NO. Ten μM ODQ obliterated the clonidine-induced vasorelaxation and the associated tissue cyclic GMP accumulation; 10 – 100 nM sildenafil increased tissue cyclic GMP accumulation without altering the clonidine-induced NO release.α2-Adrenergic blockers antagonized the clonidine-induced rise in NO. Consistent with a preferential α2D-adrenoceptor activation, the KBs for yohimbine, rauwolscine, phentolamine, WB-4101, and prazosin were: 6.8, 24, 19, 165, and 1489 nM, respectively.Rat pretreatment with 100 mg kg−1 6-hydroxydopamine reduced 95% tissue noradrenaline and 60% neuropeptide Y. In these preparations, 100 nM clonidine elicited a rise of 91.9±15.5 pmol NO. Perfusion with 1 μM guanethidine or 1 μM guanethidine plus 1 μM atropine did not modify the NO surge evoked by 100 nM clonidine.Clonidine and congeners activate endothelial α2D-adrenoceptors coupled to the L-arginine pathway, suggesting that the antihypertensive action of

  13. Ionizing radiation induces a Yap1-dependent peroxide stress response in yeast.

    PubMed

    Molin, Mikael; Renault, Jean-Philippe; Lagniel, Gilles; Pin, Serge; Toledano, Michel; Labarre, Jean

    2007-07-01

    Repair of DNA damage is fundamental for cellular tolerance to ionizing radiation (IR) and many IR-induced DNA lesions are thought to occur as a result of oxidative stress. We investigated the physiological effects of IR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by performing protein expression profiles in cells exposed to electron pulse irradiation. Transient induction of several antioxidant enzymes in wild-type cells, but not in cells lacking the oxidative stress regulator Yap1, indicated that IR exposure causes cellular oxidative stress. Yap1 activation involved oxidation to the intramolecular disulfide bond, a signature of activation by peroxide, and was dependent on the Yap1 peroxide sensor Orp1/Gpx3. H(2)O(2) was produced in the culture medium of irradiated cells and was both necessary and sufficient for IR-induced Yap1 activation. When IR was performed in the presence of N(2)O, obviating H(2)O(2) production and increasing hydroxyl radical ((*)OH) production, the Yap1 response was lost, indicating that Yap1 was unable to respond to (*)OH or (*)OH-induced damage. However, the Yap1 response to IR did not seem to be a primary determinant of cellular IR tolerance. Altogether, these data provide a molecular demonstration that cells experience in vivo peroxide stress during IR and indicate that the H(2)O(2) produced cannot account for IR toxicity. PMID:17561102

  14. The protective effect of conditioning on noise-induced hearing loss is frequency-dependent.

    PubMed

    Pourbakht, Akram; Imani, Azadeh

    2012-01-01

    We compared the extent of temporary threshold shift (TTS) and hair cell loss following high level 4 kHz noise exposure with those preconditioned with moderate level 1 and 4 kHz octave band noise. Fifteen Male albino guinea pigs (300- 350 g in weight) were randomly allocated into three groups: those exposed to 4 kHz octave band noise at 102 dB SPL (group 1, n=5); those conditioned with 1 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, 6 hours per day for 5 days, then exposed to noise (group 2, n=5); those conditioned with 4 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, then exposed to noise (group 3, n=5). An hour and one week after noise exposure, threshold shifts were evaluated by auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR) and then animals were euthanized for histological evaluation. We found that TTS and cochlear damage caused by noise exposure were significantly reduced by 1 kHz and 4 kHz conditioning (P<0.001). We also showed that 4 kHz protocol attenuates noise- induced TTS but no significant TTS reduction occurred by 1 kHz conditioning. Both protocol protected noise-induced cochlear damage. We concluded that lower tone conditioning could not protect against higher tone temporary noise-induced hearing loss, thus conditioning is a local acting and frequency-dependent phenomenon.

  15. Neural cell apoptosis induced by microwave exposure through mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongyan; Lin, Tao; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Shuiming; Gao, Yabing; Xu, Xinping; Li, Yang; Wang, Shaoxia; Zhao, Li; Wang, Lifeng; Zhou, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether microwave (MW) radiation induces neural cell apoptosis, differentiated PC12 cells and Wistar rats were exposed to 2.856 GHz for 5 min and 15 min, respectively, at an average power density of 30  mW/cm². JC-1 and TUNEL staining detected significant apoptotic events, such as the loss of mitochondria membrane potential and DNA fragmentation, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and Hoechst staining were used to observe chromatin ultrastructure and apoptotic body formation. Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was used to quantify the level of apoptosis. The expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP were examined by immunoblotting or immunocytochemistry. Caspase-3 activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation in neural cells 6h after microwave exposure. Moreover, the mitochondria membrane potential decreased, DNA fragmentation increased, leading to an increase in the apoptotic cell percentage. Furthermore, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, expression of cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP all increased. In conclusion, microwave radiation induced neural cell apoptosis via the classical mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. This study may provide the experimental basis for further investigation of the mechanism of the neurological effects induced by microwave radiation.

  16. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein in soap.

    PubMed

    Chinuki, Yuko; Morita, Eishin

    2012-12-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a specific form of wheat allergy typically induced by exercise after ingestion of wheat products. Wheat ω-5 gliadin is a major allergen associated with conventional WDEIA, and detection of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific to recombinant ω-5 gliadin is a reliable method for its diagnosis. Recently, an increased incidence of a new subtype of WDEIA, which is likely to be sensitized via a percutaneous and/or rhinoconjunctival route to hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWP), has been observed. All of the patients with this new subtype had used the same brand of soap, which contained HWP. Approximately half of these patients developed contact allergy several months later and subsequently developed WDEIA. In each of these patients, contact allergy with soap exposure preceded food ingestion-induced reactions. Other patients directly developed generalized symptoms upon ingestion of wheat products. The predominant observed symptom of the new WDEIA subtype was angioedema of the eyelids; a number of patients developed anaphylaxis. This new subtype of WDEIA has little serum ω-5 gliadin-specific serum IgE.

  17. Measurement of the energy dependence of X-ray-induced decomposition of potassium chlorate.

    PubMed

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Sneed, Daniel; Park, Changyong

    2013-03-21

    We report the first measurements of the X-ray induced decomposition of KClO3 as a function of energy in two experiments. KClO3 was pressurized to 3.5 GPa and irradiated with monochromatic synchrotron X-rays ranging in energy from 15 to 35 keV in 5 keV increments. A systematic increase in the decomposition rate as the energy was decreased was observed, which agrees with the 1/E(3) trend for the photoelectric process, except at the lowest energy studied. A second experiment was performed to access lower energies (10 and 12 keV) using a beryllium gasket; suggesting an apparent resonance near 15 keV or 0.83 Ǻ maximizing the chemical decomposition rate. A third experiment was performed using KIO3 to ascertain the anionic dependence of the decomposition rate, which was observed to be far slower than in KClO3, suggesting that the O-O distance is the critical factor in chemical reactions. These results will be important for more efficiently initiating chemical decomposition in materials using selected X-ray wavelengths that maximize decomposition to aid useful hard X-ray-induced chemistry and contribute understanding of the mechanism of X-ray-induced decomposition of the chlorates.

  18. Oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia induces antibody-mediated complement-dependent cancer cell lysis in humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Breitbach, Caroline J; Moon, Anne; Heo, Jeong; Lee, Yu Kyoung; Cho, Mong; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Seong-Geun; Kang, Dae Hwan; Bell, John C; Park, Byeong Ho; Kirn, David H; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2013-05-15

    Oncolytic viruses cause direct cytolysis and cancer-specific immunity in preclinical models. The goal of this study was to demonstrate induction of functional anticancer immunity that can lyse target cancer cells in humans. Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirepvec; JX-594) is a targeted oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus engineered to express human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Pexa-Vec demonstrated replication, GM-CSF expression, and tumor responses in previous phase 1 trials. We now evaluated whether Pexa-Vec induced functional anticancer immunity both in the rabbit VX2 tumor model and in patients with diverse solid tumor types in phase 1. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cancer cell cytotoxicity (CDC) was induced by intravenous Pexa-Vec in rabbits; transfer of serum from Pexa-Vec-treated animals to tumor-bearing animals resulted in tumor necrosis and improved survival. In patients with diverse tumor types treated on a phase 1 trial, CDC developed within 4 to 8 weeks in most patients; normal cells were resistant to the cytotoxic effects. T lymphocyte activation in patients was evidenced by antibody class switching. We determined that patients with the longest survival duration had the highest CDC activity, and identified candidate target tumor cell antigens. Thus, we demonstrated that Pexa-Vec induced polyclonal antibody-mediated CDC against multiple tumor antigens both in rabbits and in patients with diverse solid tumor types.

  19. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids.

  20. Methods to detect replication-dependent and replication-independent DNA structure-induced genetic instability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guliang; Gaddis, Sally; Vasquez, Karen M

    2013-11-01

    DNA can adopt a variety of alternative secondary (i.e., non-B DNA) conformations that play important roles in cellular metabolism, including genetic instability, disease etiology and evolution. While we still have much to learn, research in this field has expanded dramatically in the past decade. We have summarized in our previous Methods review (Wang et al., Methods, 2009) some commonly used techniques to determine non-B DNA structural conformations and non-B DNA-induced genetic instability in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Since that time, we and others have further characterized mechanisms involved in DNA structure-induced mutagenesis and have proposed both replication-dependent and replication-independent models. Thus, in this review, we highlight some current methodologies to identify DNA replication-related and replication-independent mutations occurring at non-B DNA regions to allow for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA structure-induced genetic instability. We also describe a new web-based search engine to identify potential intramolecular triplex (H-DNA) and left-handed Z-DNA-forming motifs in entire genomes or at selected sequences of interest.

  1. Th-1 lymphocytes induce dendritic cell tumor killing activity by an IFN-γ-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    LaCasse, Collin J; Janikashvili, Nona; Larmonier, Claire B; Alizadeh, Darya; Hanke, Neale; Kartchner, Jessica; Situ, Elaine; Centuori, Sara; Har-Noy, Michael; Bonnotte, Bernard; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Larmonier, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) encompass a heterogeneous population of cells capable of orchestrating innate and adaptive immune responses. The ability of DCs to act as professional APCs has been the foundation for the development and use of these cells as vaccines in cancer immunotherapy. DCs are also endowed with the nonconventional property of directly killing tumor cells. The current study investigates the regulation of murine DC cytotoxic function by T lymphocytes. We provide evidence that CD4(+) Th-1, but not Th-2, Th-17 cells, or regulatory T cells, are capable of inducing DC cytotoxic function. IFN-γ was identified as the major factor responsible for Th-1-induced DC tumoricidal activity. Tumor cell killing mediated by Th-1-activated killer DCs was dependent on inducible NO synthase expression and NO production. Importantly, Th-1-activated killer DCs were capable of presenting the acquired Ags from the killed tumor cells to T lymphocytes in vitro or in vivo. These observations offer new possibilities for the application of killer DCs in cancer immunotherapy.

  2. The copper chelator ATN-224 induces peroxynitrite-dependent cell death in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kristy; Briehl, Margaret M; Mazar, Andrew P; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Reboucas, Julio S; Glinsmann-Gibson, Betty; Rimsza, Lisa M; Tome, Margaret E

    2013-07-01

    Chemoresistance due to oxidative stress resistance or upregulation of Bcl-2 contributes to poor outcome in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In this study, we utilize the copper-chelator drug ATN-224 (choline tetrathiomolybdate) to induce cell death in oxidative stress-resistant cells and cells overexpressing Bcl-2 by modulating the cellular redox environment and causing mitochondrial dysfunction. ATN-224 treatment decreases superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) activity, increases intracellular oxidants, and induces peroxynitrite-dependent cell death. ATN-224 also targets the mitochondria, decreasing both cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX) activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. The concentration of ATN-224 required to induce cell death is proportional to SOD1 levels, but independent of Bcl-2 status. In combination with doxorubicin, ATN-224 enhances cell death. In primary B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient samples, ATN-224 decreases the viable cell number. Our findings suggest that ATN-224's dual targeting of SOD1 and CcOX is a promising approach for treatment of hematological malignancies either as an adjuvant or as a single agent.

  3. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids. PMID:26134630

  4. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids. PMID:26134630

  5. Levofloxacin‐Induced QTc Prolongation Depends on the Time of Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Kervezee, L; Gotta, V; Stevens, J; Birkhoff, W; Kamerling, IMC; Danhof, M; Meijer, JH

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors influencing a drug's potential to prolong the QTc interval on an electrocardiogram is essential for the correct evaluation of its safety profile. To explore the effect of dosing time on drug‐induced QTc prolongation, a randomized, crossover, clinical trial was conducted in which 12 healthy male subjects received levofloxacin at 02:00, 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Using a pharmacokinetic‐pharmacodynamic (PK‐PD) modeling approach to account for variations in PKs, heart rate, and daily variation in baseline QT, we find that the concentration‐QT relationship shows a 24‐hour sinusoidal rhythm. Simulations show that the extent of levofloxacin‐induced QT prolongation depends on dosing time, with the largest effect at 14:00 (1.73 (95% prediction interval: 1.56–1.90) ms per mg/L) and the smallest effect at 06:00 (−0.04 (−0.19 to 0.12) ms per mg/L). These results suggest that a 24‐hour variation in the concentration‐QT relationship could be a potentially confounding factor in the assessment of drug‐induced QTc prolongation. PMID:27479699

  6. Neural Cell Apoptosis Induced by Microwave Exposure Through Mitochondria-dependent Caspase-3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hongyan; Lin, Tao; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Shuiming; Gao, Yabing; Xu, Xinping; Li, Yang; Wang, Shaoxia; Zhao, Li; Wang, Lifeng; Zhou, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether microwave (MW) radiation induces neural cell apoptosis, differentiated PC12 cells and Wistar rats were exposed to 2.856GHz for 5min and 15min, respectively, at an average power density of 30 mW/cm2. JC-1 and TUNEL staining detected significant apoptotic events, such as the loss of mitochondria membrane potential and DNA fragmentation, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and Hoechst staining were used to observe chromatin ultrastructure and apoptotic body formation. Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was used to quantify the level of apoptosis. The expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP were examined by immunoblotting or immunocytochemistry. Caspase-3 activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation in neural cells 6h after microwave exposure. Moreover, the mitochondria membrane potential decreased, DNA fragmentation increased, leading to an increase in the apoptotic cell percentage. Furthermore, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, expression of cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP all increased. In conclusion, microwave radiation induced neural cell apoptosis via the classical mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. This study may provide the experimental basis for further investigation of the mechanism of the neurological effects induced by microwave radiation. PMID:24688304

  7. AMPK dependent protective effects of metformin on tumor necrosis factor-induced apoptotic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Hu, Kai; Lin, Ling; Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Liu, Yiqing; Dai, Jie; Ye, Bin; Zhang, Li

    2015-09-25

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)-induced cellular apoptosis represents a common pathological mechanism underlying the progression of various liver disorders. Recently studies revealed that the anti-diabetic metformin provided protective benefits in several animal models of liver injury. In the present study, the potential modulatory effects of metformin on TNF-α-dependent apoptotic liver damage was investigated in mice with TNF-α/d-galactosamine (D-Gal)-induced liver injury. The results indicated that treatment with metformin significantly suppressed the elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), the activation of caspase cascade and the induction of cleaved caspase-3. Morphological analysis showed that metformin alleviated histopathological abnormalities and reduced TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells. Co-administration of the AMPK inhibitor compound C completely abolished the inhibitory effects of metformin on caspase cascade activation, significantly reversed the beneficial effects of metformin on histopathological abnormalities and hepatocytes apoptosis, and partially abolished the suppressive effects of metformin on plasma ALT elevation. These data indicated that metformin effectively alleviated TNF-α/D-Gal-induced apoptotic liver injury and these beneficial effects were at least partially mediated by AMPK.

  8. Local factors modify the dose dependence of 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Yu, Tao; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz; Yu, Shaohua

    2012-07-01

    Radiation exposure from a number of terrestrial sources is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence establishing whether high-LET radiation has similar effects has been lacking. We recently demonstrated that 600 MeV/n 56Fe induces atherosclerosis as well. Ten-week old male apolipoprotein-E deficient mice, a well-characterized atherosclerosis animal model, were exposed to 0 (control) 2, or 5Gy 56Fe targeted to the chest and neck. In these mice, 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis was similar in character to that induced by X-rays in the same mouse model and to that resulting from therapeutic radiation in cancer patients. Atherosclerosis was exacerbated by 56Fe only in targeted areas, however, suggesting a direct effect of the radiation on the arteries themselves. This is in contrast to some other risk factors, such as high cholesterol or tobacco use, which have systemic effects. The radiation dose required to accelerate development of atherosclerotic plaques, however, differed depending on the vessel that was irradiated and even the location within the vessel. For example, atherosclerosis in the aortic arch was accelerated only by the highest dose (5 Gy), while the carotid arteries and the aortic root showed effects at 2 Gy (a dose four- to eight-fold lower than the dose of X-rays that produces similar effects in this model). Since shear stress is disrupted in the area of the aortic root, it is likely that at least part of the site-specificity is due to additive or synergistic effects of radiation and local hydrodynamics. Other factors, such as local oxidative stress or gene expression may also have been involved. Since the pro-atherogenic effects of 56Fe depend on additional local factors, this suggests that radiation exposure, when unavoidable, might be mitigated by modification of factors unrelated to the radiation itself.

  9. Listeria monocytogenes induced Rac1-dependent signal transduction in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schmeck, Bernd; Beermann, Wiebke; van Laak, Vincent; Opitz, Bastian; Hocke, Andreas C; Meixenberger, Karolin; Eitel, Julia; Chakraborty, Trinad; Schmidt, Gudula; Barth, Holger; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan

    2006-11-30

    Infection of endothelial cells by Listeria monocytogenes is an essential step in the pathogenesis of listeriosis. Small GTPases of the Rho family act as molecular switches in signal transduction. We tested the hypothesis that Rho GTPases contribute to the regulation of cytokine expression following L. monocytogenes infection. L. monocytogenes induced release of distinct CC and CXC, as well as Th1 and Th2 cytokines and growth factors by endothelial cells and activated RhoA and Rac1. Inhibition of Rac1 by inhibitor Nsc23766 reduced cytokine expression, and slightly yet significantly the uptake of bacteria. Blocking of Rho proteins by Clostridium difficile toxin B-10463 (TcdB) reduced Listeria-dependent cytokine expression, whereas activating Rho proteins by Escherichia coli CNF1 increased it. We analyzed regulation of IL-8 expression in more detail: Listeria-induced IL-8 release was reduced by inhibition of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 (TcdB) or Rac1 while blocking of RhoA/B/C by Clostridium limosum C3 fusion toxin (C3FT) or Rho kinase by Y27632 reduced cytokine expression only slightly. Activation of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 (CNF1), but not of RhoA alone (CNF(Y)), enhanced Listeria-dependent IL-8 release significantly. Furthermore, inhibition of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 (TcdB) and Rac1 (Nsc23766), but not of RhoA (C3FT) reduced Listeria-related recruitment of NF-kappaB/p65 and RNA polymerase II to the il8 promoter, as well as acetylation of histone H4 and Ser10/Lys14-phosphorylation/acetylation of histone H3 at the il8 gene promoter in HUVEC. In conclusion, Rac1 contributed to L. monocytogenes-induced cytokine expression by human endothelial cells.

  10. Cocaine induces state-dependent learning of sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Gill, Karin E; Rice, Beth Ann; Akins, Chana K

    2015-01-01

    State dependent learning effects have been widely studied in a variety of drugs of abuse. However, they have yet to be studied in relation to sexual motivation. The current study investigated state-dependent learning effects of cocaine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) using a sexual conditioning paradigm. Cocaine-induced state-dependent learning effects were investigated using a 2×2 factorial design with training state as one factor and test state as the other factor. During a 14-day training phase, male quail were injected once daily with 10mg/kg cocaine or saline and then placed in a test chamber after 15min. In the test chamber, sexual conditioning trials consisted of presentation of a light conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. During the state dependent test, half of the birds received a shift in drug state from training to testing (Coc→Sal or Sal→Coc) while the other half remained in the same drug state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal). Results showed that male quail that were trained and tested in the same state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal) showed greater sexual conditioning than male quail that were trained and tested in different states (Sal→Coc) except when cocaine was administered chronically prior to the test (Coc→Sal). For the latter condition, sexual conditioning persisted from cocaine training to the saline test. The findings suggest that state dependent effects may alter sexual motivation and that repeated exposure to cocaine during sexual activity may increase sexual motivation which, in turn, may lead to high risk sexual activities. An alternative explanation for the findings is also discussed.

  11. Cocaine induces state-dependent learning of sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Karin E.; Rice, Beth Ann; Akins, Chana K.

    2014-01-01

    State dependent learning effects have been widely studied in a variety of drugs of abuse. However, they have yet to be studied in relation to sexual motivation. The current study investigated state-dependent learning effects of cocaine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) using a sexual conditioning paradigm. Cocaine-induced state-dependent learning effects were investigated using a 2 × 2 factorial design with training state as one factor and test state as the other factor. During a 14-day training phase, male quail were injected once daily with 10 mg/kg cocaine or saline and then placed in a test chamber after 15 min. In the test chamber, sexual conditioning trials consisted of presentation of a light conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. During the state dependent test, half of the birds received a shift in drug state from training to testing (Coc → Sal or Sal → Coc) while the other half remained in the same drug state (Coc → Coc or Sal → Sal). Results showed that male quail that were trained and tested in the same state (Coc → Coc or Sal → Sal) showed greater sexual conditioning than male quail that were trained and tested in different states (Sal → Coc) except when cocaine was administered chronically prior to the test (Coc → Sal). For the latter condition, sexual conditioning persisted from cocaine training to the saline test. The findings suggest that state dependent effects may alter sexual motivation and that repeated exposure to cocaine during sexual activity may increase sexual motivation which may, in turn, may lead to high risk sexual activities. An alternative explanation for the findings is also discussed. PMID:25447336

  12. Cocaine induces state-dependent learning of sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Gill, Karin E; Rice, Beth Ann; Akins, Chana K

    2015-01-01

    State dependent learning effects have been widely studied in a variety of drugs of abuse. However, they have yet to be studied in relation to sexual motivation. The current study investigated state-dependent learning effects of cocaine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) using a sexual conditioning paradigm. Cocaine-induced state-dependent learning effects were investigated using a 2×2 factorial design with training state as one factor and test state as the other factor. During a 14-day training phase, male quail were injected once daily with 10mg/kg cocaine or saline and then placed in a test chamber after 15min. In the test chamber, sexual conditioning trials consisted of presentation of a light conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. During the state dependent test, half of the birds received a shift in drug state from training to testing (Coc→Sal or Sal→Coc) while the other half remained in the same drug state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal). Results showed that male quail that were trained and tested in the same state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal) showed greater sexual conditioning than male quail that were trained and tested in different states (Sal→Coc) except when cocaine was administered chronically prior to the test (Coc→Sal). For the latter condition, sexual conditioning persisted from cocaine training to the saline test. The findings suggest that state dependent effects may alter sexual motivation and that repeated exposure to cocaine during sexual activity may increase sexual motivation which, in turn, may lead to high risk sexual activities. An alternative explanation for the findings is also discussed. PMID:25447336

  13. VEGF-Production by CCR2-Dependent Macrophages Contributes to Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Torsten A.; Alex, Anne F.; Engel, Daniel R.; Kurts, Christian; Eter, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most prevalent cause of blindness in the elderly, and its exsudative subtype critically depends on local production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF). Mononuclear phagocytes, such as macrophages and microglia cells, can produce VEGF. Their precursors, for example monocytes, can be recruited to sites of inflammation by the chemokine receptor CCR2, and this has been proposed to be important in AMD. To investigate the role of macrophages and CCR2 in AMD, we studied intracellular VEGF content in a laser-induced murine model of choroidal neovascularisation. To this end, we established a technique to quantify the VEGF content in cell subsets from the laser-treated retina and choroid separately. 3 days after laser, macrophage numbers and their VEGF content were substantially elevated in the choroid. Macrophage accumulation was CCR2-dependent, indicating recruitment from the circulation. In the retina, microglia cells were the main VEGF+ phagocyte type. A greater proportion of microglia cells contained VEGF after laser, and this was CCR2-independent. On day 6, VEGF-expressing macrophage numbers had already declined, whereas numbers of VEGF+ microglia cells remained increased. Other sources of VEGF detectable by flow cytometry included in dendritic cells and endothelial cells in both retina and choroid, and Müller cells/astrocytes in the retina. However, their VEGF content was not increased after laser. When we analyzed flatmounts of laser-treated eyes, CCR2-deficient mice showed reduced neovascular areas after 2 weeks, but this difference was not evident 3 weeks after laser. In summary, CCR2-dependent influx of macrophages causes a transient VEGF increase in the choroid. However, macrophages augmented choroidal neovascularization only initially, presumably because VEGF production by CCR2-independent eye cells prevailed at later time points. These findings identify macrophages as a relevant source of VEGF in laser-induced

  14. INSULIN INDUCED EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR ACTIVATION IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS IS ADAM-DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Roztocil, Elisa; Nicholl, Suzanne M.; Davies, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Background With the rise in metabolic syndrome, understanding the role of insulin signaling within the cells of vasculature has become more important but yet remains poorly defined. The study examines the role of insulin actions on a pivotal cross-talk receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). EGFR is transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor linked tyrosine kinases and is key to many of their responses. Objective To determine the pathway of EGFR transactivation by insulin in human coronary smooth muscle cells (VSMC) Methods VSMC were cultured in vitro. Assays of EGFR phosphorylation were examined in response to insulin in the presence and absence of the plasmin inhibitors (e-aminocaproic acid and aprotinin) matrix metalloprotease (MMP) inhibitor GM6001, the ADAM (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase Domain) inhibitors TAPI-0 and TAPI-1, Heparin binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) inhibitor, CRM197, HB-EGF inhibitory antibodies, EGF inhibitory antibodies and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Results Insulin induced time-dependent EGFR phosphorylation, which was inhibited by AG1478 in a concentration dependent manner. Application of the plasmin inhibitors did not block the response. EGFR phosphorylation by insulin was blocked by inhibition of MMP activity and the ligand HB-EGF. The presence of the ADAM inhibitors, TAPI-0 and TAPI-1 significantly decreased EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation by EGF was not interrupted by inhibition of plasmin, MMPs TAPIs, or HB-EGF. Direct blockade of the EGFR prevented activation by both insulin and EGF. Conclusion Insulin can induce transactivation of EGFR by an ADAM-mediated, HB-EGF dependent process. This is the first description of crosstalk via ADAM between insulin and EGFR in vascular SMC. Targeting a pivotal cross-talk receptor such as EGFR, which can be transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases is an attractive molecular target. PMID:18656632

  15. Helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by the in-plane transverse electric current in an InAs quantum well.

    PubMed

    Li, J B; Wu, X G; Wang, G W; Xu, Y Q; Niu, Z C; Zhang, X H

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of a new type of helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by an in-plane transverse direct electric current in an InAs quantum well. The amplitude of the photocurrent depends linearly on the transverse current. Moreover, the observed incident azimuth-angle dependence of this photocurrent is different from that induced by the circular photogalvanic effect. This new photocurrent appears as a result of an asymmetrical carrier distribution in both the conduction and valence bands induced by the transverse current. The photoexcited carrier density created by interband transition processes is thus modulated and leads to the observed new azimuth-angle dependence. The observed efficient generation of the helicity-dependent photocurrent offers an effective approach to manipulate electron spins in two-dimensional semiconductor systems with the added advantage of electrical control of the spin-related photocurrent in spintronic applications. PMID:27501858

  16. Helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by the in-plane transverse electric current in an InAs quantum well

    PubMed Central

    Li, J. B.; Wu, X. G.; Wang, G. W.; Xu, Y. Q.; Niu, Z. C.; Zhang, X. H.

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of a new type of helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by an in-plane transverse direct electric current in an InAs quantum well. The amplitude of the photocurrent depends linearly on the transverse current. Moreover, the observed incident azimuth-angle dependence of this photocurrent is different from that induced by the circular photogalvanic effect. This new photocurrent appears as a result of an asymmetrical carrier distribution in both the conduction and valence bands induced by the transverse current. The photoexcited carrier density created by interband transition processes is thus modulated and leads to the observed new azimuth-angle dependence. The observed efficient generation of the helicity-dependent photocurrent offers an effective approach to manipulate electron spins in two-dimensional semiconductor systems with the added advantage of electrical control of the spin-related photocurrent in spintronic applications. PMID:27501858

  17. Plant Dependence on Rhizobia for Nitrogen Influences Induced Plant Defenses and Herbivore Performance

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jennifer M.; Mescher, Mark C.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic rhizobia induce many changes in legumes that could affect aboveground interactions with herbivores. We explored how changing the intensity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, as modulated by soil nitrogen (N) levels, influenced the interaction between soybean (Glycine max) and herbivores of different feeding guilds. When we employed a range of fertilizer applications to manipulate soil N, plants primarily dependent on rhizobia for N exhibited increased root nodulation and higher levels of foliar ureides than plants given N fertilizer; yet all treatments maintained similar total N levels. Soybean podworm (Helicoverpa zea) larvae grew best on plants with the highest levels of rhizobia but, somewhat surprisingly, preferred to feed on high-N-fertilized plants when given a choice. Induction of the defense signaling compound jasmonic acid (JA) by H. zea feeding damage was highest in plants primarily dependent on rhizobia. Differences in rhizobial dependency on soybean did not appear to affect interactions with the phloem-feeding soybean aphid (Aphis glycines). Overall, our results suggest that rhizobia association can affect plant nutritional quality and the induction of defense signaling pathways and that these effects may influence herbivore feeding preferences and performance—though such effects may vary considerably for different classes of herbivores. PMID:24451132

  18. Pulsewidth dependence of laser-induced periodic surface structure formed on yttria-stabilized zirconia polycrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakehata, Masayuki; Yashiro, Hidehiko; Oyane, Ayako; Ito, Atsuo; Torizuka, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Three-mol% yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP) is a fine engineering ceramic that offers high fracture resistance and flexural strength. Thus, it is often applied in mechanical components and medical implants. The surface roughness can be controlled to improve the device characters in some applications. Ultrashort pulse lasers can form laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on 3Y-TZP, which have never been investigated in detail. Therefore, this paper reports the formation and characteristics of LIPSS formed on 3Y-TZP, focusing on the pulsewidth dependence. The LIPSS was formed by a Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplification system, which generates 810 nmcentered 80-fs pulses at a 570 Hz repetition rate. The measured ablation threshold peak fluence was ~1.5 J/cm2 and the LIPSS was formed at the peak fluence of 2.7-7.7 J/cm2. For linearly polarized pulses, the lines of the LIPSS were oriented parallel to the polarization direction, and their period was comparable to or larger than the center wavelength of the laser. These characteristics differ from the reported characteristics of LIPSS on metals and dielectrics. The pulsewidth dependence of the ablation and LIPSS was investigated for different pulsewidths and signs of chirp. Under the investigated fluence condition, the LIPSS period increased with increasing pulsewidth for both signs of chirp. Similar pulsewidth dependencies were observed for circularly polarized pulses.

  19. Acidosis Mediates the Switching of Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε Dependence in Prolonged Hyperalgesia Induced by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Yu; Dai, Shih-Ping; Chang, Yan-Ching; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Previous studies suggested that in male Sprague Dawley rats, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced short-term hyperalgesia depends on protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas long-lasting hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 with carrageenan pre-injection, requires protein kinase Cε (PKCε). However, the mechanism underlying the kinase switch with short- to long-term hyperalgesia remains unclear. In this study, we used the inflammatory agents carrageenan or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce long-term hyperalgesia, and examined PKA and PKCε dependence and switching time. Hyperalgesia induced by both agents depended on PKA/PKCε and Gs/Gi-proteins, and the switching time from PKA to PKCε and from Gs to Gi was about 3 to 4 h after inflammation induction. Among the single inflammatory mediators tested, PGE2 and 5-HT induced transient hyperalgesia, which depended on PKA and PKCε, respectively. Only acidic solution-induced hyperalgesia required Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε, and the switch time for kinase dependency matched inflammatory hyperalgesia, in approximately 2 to 4 h. Thus, acidosis in inflamed tissues may be a decisive factor to regulate switching of PKA and PKCε dependence via proton-sensing G-protein–coupled receptors. PMID:25933021

  20. Sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human Tau fragment in an inducible cell model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ling; Hu, Ji-Ying; Hu, Meng-Yun; Zhang, Yi; Hong, Zheng-Yuan; Cheng, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jie; Pang, Dai-Wen; Liang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of misfolded hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein Tau within neurons, forming neurofibrillary tangles and leading to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death. Here we study sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human fragment Tau244-372 in an inducible cell model. As evidenced by confocal laser scanning microscopy, Western blot, and immunogold electron microscopy, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells induced by Congo red: when its two fibril-forming segments PHF6 and PHF6* are deleted, Tau244-372 does lose its ability to form fibrils in SH-SY5Y cells, and the replacement of PHF6 and PHF6* with an unrelated amyloidogenic sequence IFQINS from human lysozyme does rescue the fibril-forming ability of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, insertion of a non-fibril forming peptide GGGGGG does not drive the disabled Tau244-372 to misfold in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, as revealed by quantum dots based probes combined with annexin V staining, annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection assay, and immunofluorescence, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for early apoptosis of living SH-SY5Y cells induced by abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372. Our results suggest that fibril-forming motifs could be the determinants of Tau protein tending to misfold in living cells, thereby inducing neuronal apoptosis and causing the initiation and development of AD.

  1. PTEN induces apoptosis and cavitation via HIF-2-dependent Bnip3 upregulation during epithelial lumen formation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Y; Liu, J; Saadat, S; Tian, X; Han, Y; Fong, G-H; Pandolfi, P P; Lee, L Y; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) dephosphorylates PIP3 and antagonizes the prosurvival PI3K-Akt pathway. Targeted deletion of PTEN in mice led to early embryonic lethality. To elucidate its role in embryonic epithelial morphogenesis and the underlying mechanisms, we used embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid body (EB), an epithelial cyst structurally similar to the periimplantation embryo. PTEN is upregulated during EB morphogenesis in parallel with apoptosis of core cells, which mediates EB cavitation. Genetic ablation of PTEN causes Akt overactivation, apoptosis resistance and cavitation blockade. However, rescue experiments using mutant PTEN and pharmacological inhibition of Akt suggest that the phosphatase activity of PTEN and Akt are not involved in apoptosis-mediated cavitation. Instead, hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bnip3, a proapoptotic BH3-only protein, mediates PTEN-dependent apoptosis and cavitation. PTEN inactivation inhibits hypoxia- and reactive oxygen species-induced Bnip3 elevation. Overexpression of Bnip3 in PTEN-null EBs rescues apoptosis of the core cells. Mechanistically, suppression of Bnip3 following PTEN loss is likely due to reduction of hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) because forced expression of an oxygen-stable HIF-2α mutant rescues Bnip3 expression and apoptosis. Lastly, we show that HIF-2α is upregulated by PTEN at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Ablation of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (PHD2) in normal EBs or inhibition of PHD activities in PTEN-null EBs stabilizes HIF-2α and induces Bnip3 and caspase-3 activation. Altogether, these results suggest that PTEN is required for apoptosis-mediated cavitation during epithelial morphogenesis by regulating the expression of HIF-2α and Bnip3. PMID:25394489

  2. Insulin inhibits hepatocyte iNOS expression induced by cytokines by an Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Harbrecht, Brian G; Nweze, Ikenna; Smith, Jason W; Zhang, Baochun

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocyte inducible nitric oxide synthese (iNOS) expression is a tightly controlled pathway that mediates hepatic inflammation and hepatocyte injury in a variety of disease states. We have shown that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates cytokine-induced hepatocyte iNOS expression through mechanisms that involve protein kinase B/Akt. We hypothesized that insulin, which activates Akt signaling in hepatocytes, as well as signaling through p38 and MAPK p42/p44, would regulate iNOS expression during inflammation. In primary rat hepatocytes, insulin inhibited cytokine-stimulated nitrite accumulation and iNOS expression in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of MAPK p42/p44 with PD98059 had no effect on iNOS activation, whereas SB203580 to block p38 reversed insulin's inhibitory effect. However, insulin did not increase p38 activation and inhibition of p38 signaling with a dominant negative p38 plasmid had no effect on cytokine- or insulin-mediated effects on iNOS. We found that SB203580 blocked insulin-induced Akt activation. Inhibition of Akt signaling with LY294002 or a dominant negative Akt plasmid increased cytokine-stimulated nitrite production and iNOS protein expression and blocked the inhibitory effects of insulin. NF-κB induces iNOS expression and can be regulated by Akt, but insulin had no effect on cytokine-mediated IκBα levels or NF-κB p65 translocation. Our data demonstrate that insulin inhibits cytokine-stimulated hepatocyte iNOS expression and does so through effects on Akt-mediated signaling. PMID:22038823

  3. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  4. 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate-induced apoptosis through the ATM- and p53-dependent intrinsic mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Schweikl, Helmut; Petzel, Christine; Bolay, Carola; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Krifka, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    Resin monomers of dental composites like 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) disturb cell functions including responses of the innate immune system, mineralization and differentiation of dental pulp-derived cells, or induce cell death via apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis is related to the availability of the antioxidant glutathione, although a detailed understanding of the signaling pathways is still unknown. The present study provides insight into the causal relationship between oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, and the specific signaling pathway leading to HEMA-induced apoptosis in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. The differential expression of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in HEMA-exposed cells indicated oxidative stress, which was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspase 3 as a critical apoptosis executioner. A 2-fold increase in the amount of mitochondrial superoxide anions after a 24 h exposure to HEMA (6-8 mM) was paralleled by a considerable decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Additionally, expression of proteins critical for the signaling of apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway was detected. Transcription-dependent and transcription-independent mechanisms of p53-regulated apoptosis were activated, and p53 was translocated from the cytosol to mitochondria. HEMA-induced transcriptional activity of p53 was indicated by increased levels of PUMA localized to mitochondria as a potent inducer of apoptosis. The expression of Bcl-xL and Bax suggested that cells responded to stress caused by HEMA via the activation of a complicated and antagonistic machinery of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. A HEMA-induced and oxidative stress-sensitive delay of the cell cycle, indicating a DNA damage response, occurred independent of the influence of KU55399, a potent inhibitor of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) activity. However, ATM, a protein kinase which

  5. TNF induces caspase-dependent inflammation in renal endothelial cells through a Rho- and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Guo, Rongqing; Chen, Peili; Wang, Quan; Cunningham, Patrick N

    2009-08-01

    The pathogenesis of LPS-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) requires signaling through tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1), which within the kidney is primarily located in the endothelium. We showed previously that caspase inhibition protected mice against LPS-induced AKI and in parallel significantly inhibited LPS-induced renal inflammation. Therefore we hypothesized that caspase activation amplifies TNF-induced inflammation in renal endothelial cells (ECs). In cultured renal ECs, TNF induced apoptosis through a caspase-8-dependent pathway. TNF caused translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB to the nucleus, resulting in upregulation of inflammatory markers such as adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. However, the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Boc-d-fmk reduced NF-kB activation as assessed by gel shift assay, reduced phosphorylation of subunit IkappaBalpha, and significantly inhibited TNF-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 as assessed by both real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Broad-spectrum caspase inhibition markedly inhibited neutrophil adherence to the TNF-activated endothelial monolayer, supporting the functional significance of this effect. Specific inhibitors of caspases-8 and -3, but not of caspase-1, reduced TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation. Caspase inhibition also reduced TNF-induced myosin light chain (MLC)-2 phosphorylation, and activation of upstream regulator RhoA. Consistent with this, MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 reduced TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation. Thus caspase activation influences NF-kappaB signaling via its affect on cytoskeletal changes occurring through RhoA and MLCK pathways. These cell culture experiments support a role for caspase activation in TNF-induced inflammation in the renal endothelium, a key event in LPS-induced AKI. PMID:19420112

  6. Baicalein induces apoptosis via ROS-dependent activation of caspases in human bladder cancer 5637 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Ok; Park, Cheol; Hwang, Hye-Jin; Hong, Su Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young; Cho, Eun-Ju; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Baicalein is a flavonoid derived originally from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, which has been used in Oriental medicines for treating various diseases. Although this compound has been reported to have anticancer activities in several human cancer cell lines, the therapeutic effects of baicalein on human bladder cancer and its mechanisms of action have not been extensively studied. This study investigated the proapoptotic effects of baicalein in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. For this study, cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthia-zol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, trypan blue dye exclusion assay 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, and flow cytometry. Measurements of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), caspase activity assays and western blots were conducted to determine whether 5637 cell death occurred by apoptosis. Treatment with baicalein resulted in a concentration-dependent growth inhibition coupled with apoptosis induction, as indicated by the results of nuclei morphology examination and flow cytometry analyses. The induction of the apoptotic cell death of 5637 cells by baicalein exhibited a correlation with the downregulation of members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, including cIAP-1 and cIAP-2, and the activation of caspase-9 and -3 accompanied by proteolytic degradation of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. The study also showed that baicalein decreases the expression of the proapoptotic protein Bax, increases antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression, and noticeably aggravates the loss of MMP. Concomitantly, the data showed that baicalein increases the levels of death receptors and their associated ligands and enhances the activation of caspase-8 and truncation of Bid. However, the pan-caspase inhibitor can reverse baicalein-induced apoptosis, demonstrating that it is a caspase-dependent pathway. Moreover, it was found that baicalein can induce the production of reactive oxygen

  7. Baicalein induces apoptosis via ROS-dependent activation of caspases in human bladder cancer 5637 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Ok; Park, Cheol; Hwang, Hye-Jin; Hong, Su Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young; Cho, Eun-Ju; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Baicalein is a flavonoid derived originally from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, which has been used in Oriental medicines for treating various diseases. Although this compound has been reported to have anticancer activities in several human cancer cell lines, the therapeutic effects of baicalein on human bladder cancer and its mechanisms of action have not been extensively studied. This study investigated the proapoptotic effects of baicalein in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. For this study, cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthia-zol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, trypan blue dye exclusion assay 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, and flow cytometry. Measurements of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), caspase activity assays and western blots were conducted to determine whether 5637 cell death occurred by apoptosis. Treatment with baicalein resulted in a concentration-dependent growth inhibition coupled with apoptosis induction, as indicated by the results of nuclei morphology examination and flow cytometry analyses. The induction of the apoptotic cell death of 5637 cells by baicalein exhibited a correlation with the downregulation of members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, including cIAP-1 and cIAP-2, and the activation of caspase-9 and -3 accompanied by proteolytic degradation of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. The study also showed that baicalein decreases the expression of the proapoptotic protein Bax, increases antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression, and noticeably aggravates the loss of MMP. Concomitantly, the data showed that baicalein increases the levels of death receptors and their associated ligands and enhances the activation of caspase-8 and truncation of Bid. However, the pan-caspase inhibitor can reverse baicalein-induced apoptosis, demonstrating that it is a caspase-dependent pathway. Moreover, it was found that baicalein can induce the production of reactive oxygen

  8. Ion beam induced surface patterns due to mass redistribution and curvature-dependent sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobes, Omar; Zhang, Kun; Hofsäss, Hans

    2012-12-01

    Recently it was reported that ion-induced mass redistribution would solely determine nano pattern formation on ion-irradiated surfaces. We investigate the pattern formation on amorphous carbon thin films irradiated with Xe ions of energies between 200 eV and 10 keV. Sputter yield as well as number of displacements within the collision cascade vary strongly as function of ion energy and allow us to investigate the contributions of curvature-dependent erosion according to the Bradley-Harper model as well as mass redistribution according to the Carter-Vishnyakov model. We find parallel ripple orientations for an ion incidence angle of 60° and for all energies. A transition to perpendicular pattern orientation or a rather flat surface occurs around 80° for energies between 1 keV and 10 keV. Our results are compared with calculations based on both models. For the calculations we extract the shape and size of Sigmund's energy ellipsoid (parameters a, σ, μ), the angle-dependent sputter yield, and the mean mass redistribution distance from the Monte Carlo simulations with program SDTrimSP. The calculated curvature coefficients Sx and Sy describing the height evolution of the surface show that mass redistribution is dominant for parallel pattern formation in the whole energy regime. Furthermore, the angle where the parallel pattern orientation starts to disappear is related to curvature-dependent sputtering. In addition, we investigate the case of Pt erosion with 200 eV Ne ions, where mass redistribution vanishes. In this case, we observe perpendicular ripple orientation in accordance with curvature-dependent sputtering and the predictions of the Bradley-Harper model.

  9. Dependence of Memory Effects of Induced Magnetic Anisotropy on Pressure and Possibility of Using These Effects in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vechfinskii, V. S.; Remizov, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the dependence of memory effects of induced magnetic anisotropy (IMA) on pressure. The authors suggest an empirical formula for this dependence and analyze the possibility of using IMA properties in aviation industry, particularly in wear control of gas turbine engines.

  10. Nitric oxide production and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation induced by wine polyphenols in rat aorta

    PubMed Central

    Andriambeloson, Emile; Kleschyov, Andrei L; Muller, Bernard; Beretz, Alain; Stoclet, Jean Claude; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism of vasorelaxation induced by red wine polyphenolic compounds (RWPC) and two defined polyphenols contained in wine, leucocyanidol and catechin. The role of the endothelium, especially endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO), was also investigated.Relaxation produced by polyphenols was studied in rat aortic rings with and without functional endothelium, pre-contracted to the same extent with noradrenaline (0.3 and 0.1 μM, respectively). RWPC and leucocyanidol, but not catechin, produced complete relaxation of vessels with and without endothelium. However, 1000 fold higher concentrations were needed to relax endothelium-denuded rings compared to those with functional endothelium.High concentrations of catechin (in the range of 10−1 g l−1) only produced partial relaxation (maximum 30%) and had the same potency in rings with and without endothelium.The NO synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME, 300 μM) completely abolished the endothelium-dependent but not the endothelium-independent relaxations produced by all of the polyphenolic compounds.In contrast to superoxide dismutase (SOD, 100 u ml−1), neither RWPC nor leucocyanidol affected the concentration-response curve for the NO donor, SIN-1 (3-morpholino-sydnonimine) which also produces superoxide anion (O2−).In aortic rings with endothelium, RWPC (10−2 g l−1) produced a 7 fold increase in the basal production of guanosine 3′ : 5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) which was prevented by L-NAME (300 μM).Electron paramagnetic resonance (e.p.r.) spectroscopy studies with Fe2+-diethyldithiocarbamate as an NO spin trap demonstrated that RWPC and leucocyanidol increased NO levels in rat thoracic aorta about 2 fold. This NO production was entirely dependent on the presence of the endothelium and was abolished by L-NAME (300 μM).These results show that RWPC and leucocyanidol, but not the structurally closely

  11. Endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is dependent on expression of transforming growth factors β1 and β2.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Montorfano, Ignacio; Tapia, Pablo; Riedel, Claudia; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Simon, Felipe

    2014-09-01

    During endotoxemia-induced inflammatory disease, bacterial endotoxins circulate in the bloodstream and interact with endothelial cells (ECs), inducing dysfunction of the ECs. We previously reported that endotoxins induce the conversion of ECs into activated fibroblasts. Through endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis, ECs change their morphology and their protein expression pattern, thereby suppressing endothelial markers and upregulating fibrotic proteins. The most commonly used fibrotic inducers are transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and TGF-β2. However, whether TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 participate in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis remains unknown. We have shown that the endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis process is dependent on the TGF-β receptor, ALK5, and the activation of Smad3, a protein that is activated by ALK5 activation, thus suggesting that endotoxin elicits TGF-β production to mediate endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Therefore, we investigated the dependence of endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis on the expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. Endotoxin-treated ECs induced the expression and secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 downregulation inhibited the endotoxin-induced changes in the endothelial marker VE-cadherin and in the fibrotic proteins α-SMA and fibronectin. Thus, endotoxin induces the production of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 as a mechanism to promote endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that endotoxin induces endothelial fibrosis via TGF-β secretion, which represents an emerging source of vascular dysfunction. These findings contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis, which could be useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  12. Endotoxin-Induced Endothelial Fibrosis Is Dependent on Expression of Transforming Growth Factors β1 and β2

    PubMed Central

    Echeverría, César; Montorfano, Ignacio; Tapia, Pablo; Riedel, Claudia; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    During endotoxemia-induced inflammatory disease, bacterial endotoxins circulate in the bloodstream and interact with endothelial cells (ECs), inducing dysfunction of the ECs. We previously reported that endotoxins induce the conversion of ECs into activated fibroblasts. Through endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis, ECs change their morphology and their protein expression pattern, thereby suppressing endothelial markers and upregulating fibrotic proteins. The most commonly used fibrotic inducers are transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and TGF-β2. However, whether TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 participate in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis remains unknown. We have shown that the endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis process is dependent on the TGF-β receptor, ALK5, and the activation of Smad3, a protein that is activated by ALK5 activation, thus suggesting that endotoxin elicits TGF-β production to mediate endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Therefore, we investigated the dependence of endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis on the expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. Endotoxin-treated ECs induced the expression and secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 downregulation inhibited the endotoxin-induced changes in the endothelial marker VE-cadherin and in the fibrotic proteins α-SMA and fibronectin. Thus, endotoxin induces the production of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 as a mechanism to promote endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that endotoxin induces endothelial fibrosis via TGF-β secretion, which represents an emerging source of vascular dysfunction. These findings contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis, which could be useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24935972

  13. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  14. Cutting Edge: Nitrogen bisphosphonate-induced inflammation is dependent upon mast cells and IL-1

    PubMed Central

    Norton, John T.; Hayashi, Tomoko; Crain, Brian; Cho, John S.; Miller, Lloyd S.; Corr, Maripat; Carson, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen containing bisphosphonates (NBPs) are taken by millions for bone disorders but may cause serious inflammatory reactions. Here, we utilized a murine peritonitis model to characterize the inflammatory mechanisms of these agents. At dosages comparable to those used in humans, injection of NBPs into the peritoneum caused recruitment of neutrophils, followed by an influx of monocytes. These cellular changes corresponded to an initial increase in IL-1α, which preceded a rise in multiple other proinflammatory cytokines. IL-1 receptor, IL-1α, and IL-1β were required for neutrophil recruitment, whereas other MyD88-dependent signaling pathways were needed for the monocyte influx. Mice deficient in mast cells, but not mice lacking lymphocytes, were resistant to NBP-induced inflammation and reconstitution of these mice with mast cells restored sensitivity to NBPs. These results document the critical role of mast cells and IL-1 in NBP mediated inflammatory reactions. PMID:22387558

  15. Dose-dependent protective effect of BPC 157 on capsaicin-induced rhinitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalogjera, L; Ries, M; Baudoin, T; Ferencic, Z; Trotic, R; Pegan, B

    1997-01-01

    Protection of BPC 157 on capsaicin-induced rhinitis was studied in Wistar rats for its effect on mastocyte infiltration, degranulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Animals were pretreated with 10 microg/kg, 10 ng/kg or 2 ml saline i.p. and capsaicin (0.05 ml/nostril of 1750 nmol/l sol.) was applied intranasally. They were then euthanized at 1, 3 and 12 h after capsaicin provocation. Nasal mucosa was analyzed and scored for mastocyte infiltration, degranulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. BPC 157 pretreatment significantly prevented mastocyte infiltration at 1 h. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration was significantly reduced in rats pretreated with 10 microg/kg BPC 157. A dose-dependent effect of BPC 157 pretreatment was demonstrated only for polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration at 12 h. PMID:9065615

  16. Prioritizing urban sustainability solutions: coordinated approaches must incorporate scale-dependent built environment induced effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, M.; Chow, W. T. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Brazel, A.; Trapido-Lurie, B.; Roth, M.; Benson-Lira, V.

    2015-06-01

    Because of a projected surge of several billion urban inhabitants by mid-century, a rising urgency exists to advance local and strategically deployed measures intended to ameliorate negative consequences on urban climate (e.g., heat stress, poor air quality, energy/water availability). Here we highlight the importance of incorporating scale-dependent built environment induced solutions within the broader umbrella of urban sustainability outcomes, thereby accounting for fundamental physical principles. Contemporary and future design of settlements demands cooperative participation between planners, architects, and relevant stakeholders, with the urban and global climate community, which recognizes the complexity of the physical systems involved and is ideally fit to quantitatively examine the viability of proposed solutions. Such participatory efforts can aid the development of locally sensible approaches by integrating across the socioeconomic and climatic continuum, therefore providing opportunities facilitating comprehensive solutions that maximize benefits and limit unintended consequences.

  17. Dependence of cyclic stretch-induced stress fiber reorientation on stretch waveform.

    PubMed

    Tondon, Abhishek; Hsu, Hui-Ju; Kaunas, Roland

    2012-03-15

    Cyclic uniaxial stretching of adherent nonmuscle cells induces the gradual reorientation of their actin stress fibers perpendicular to the stretch direction to an extent dependent on stretch frequency. By subjecting cells to various temporal waveforms of cyclic stretch, we revealed that stress fibers are much more sensitive to strain rate than strain frequency. By applying asymmetric waveforms, stress fibers were clearly much more responsive to the rate of lengthening than the rate of shortening during the stretch cycle. These observations were interpreted using a theoretical model of networks of stress fibers with sarcomeric structure. The model predicts that stretch waveforms with fast lengthening rates generate greater average stress fiber tension than that generated by fast shortening. This integrated approach of experiment and theory provides new insight into the mechanisms by which cells respond to matrix stretching to maintain tensional homeostasis.

  18. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  19. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  20. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2014-06-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  1. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-30

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca²⁺). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca²⁺ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway.

  2. Desorption induced by electronic transitions studied with a time-dependent quantum mechanical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johan Setterlind, Carl

    1992-05-01

    We have used the split time operator FFT method to describe a DIET (desorption induced by electronic transitions) process of the Menzel-Gomer-Redhead type. H+ desorbing from a tungsten surface is described, in a one-dimensional picture, with the time dependent Schrödinger equation and a complex potential. The imaginary potential part corresponds to decay processes. We have also compared results of the split time operator method with results of an analytical semiclassical method described by Schuck et al. [Z. Phys. B 46 (1982) 137]. These results seem to indicate that the split operator method, at least in the case concerning decay rates, is a better tool for studying DIET models than a semiclassical method.

  3. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  4. Wavelength dependence of femtosecond laser-induced damage threshold of optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gallais, L. Douti, D.-B.; Commandré, M.; Batavičiūtė, G.; Pupka, E.; Ščiuka, M.; Smalakys, L.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Melninkaitis, A.

    2015-06-14

    An experimental and numerical study of the laser-induced damage of the surface of optical material in the femtosecond regime is presented. The objective of this work is to investigate the different processes involved as a function of the ratio of photon to bandgap energies and compare the results to models based on nonlinear ionization processes. Experimentally, the laser-induced damage threshold of optical materials has been studied in a range of wavelengths from 1030 nm (1.2 eV) to 310 nm (4 eV) with pulse durations of 100 fs with the use of an optical parametric amplifier system. Semi-conductors and dielectrics materials, in bulk or thin film forms, in a range of bandgap from 1 to 10 eV have been tested in order to investigate the scaling of the femtosecond laser damage threshold with the bandgap and photon energy. A model based on the Keldysh photo-ionization theory and the description of impact ionization by a multiple-rate-equation system is used to explain the dependence of laser-breakdown with the photon energy. The calculated damage fluence threshold is found to be consistent with experimental results. From these results, the relative importance of the ionization processes can be derived depending on material properties and irradiation conditions. Moreover, the observed damage morphologies can be described within the framework of the model by taking into account the dynamics of energy deposition with one dimensional propagation simulations in the excited material and thermodynamical considerations.

  5. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115±2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124±2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113±1; Ay, 128±7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  6. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cécile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115 ± 2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124 ± 2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113 ± 1; Ay, 128 ± 7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  7. Dose-Related and Time-Dependent Development of Collagenase-Induced Tendinopathy in Rats.

    PubMed

    Perucca Orfei, Carlotta; Lovati, Arianna B; Viganò, Marco; Stanco, Deborah; Bottagisio, Marta; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Setti, Stefania; de Girolamo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a big burden in clinics and it represents 45% of musculoskeletal lesions. Despite the relevant social impact, both pathogenesis and development of the tendinopathy are still under-investigated, thus limiting the therapeutic advancement in this field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose-dependent and time-related tissue-level changes occurring in a collagenase-induced tendinopathy in rat Achilles tendons, in order to establish a standardized model for future pre-clinical studies. With this purpose, 40 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups, treated by injecting collagenase type I within the Achilles tendon at 1 mg/mL (low dose) or 3 mg/mL (high dose). Tendon explants were histologically evaluated at 3, 7, 15, 30 and 45 days. Our results revealed that both the collagenase doses induced a disorganization of collagen fibers and increased the number of rounded resident cells. In particular, the high dose treatment determined a greater neovascularization and fatty degeneration with respect to the lower dose. These changes were found to be time-dependent and to resemble the features of human tendinopathy. Indeed, in our series, the acute phase occurred from day 3 to day 15, and then progressed towards the proliferative phase from day 30 to day 45 displaying a degenerative appearance associated with a very precocious and mild remodeling process. The model represents a good balance between similarity with histological features of human tendinopathy and feasibility, in terms of tendon size to create lesions and costs when compared to other animal models. Moreover, this model could contribute to improve the knowledge in this field, and it could be useful to properly design further pre-clinical studies to test innovative treatments for tendinopathy. PMID:27548063

  8. Dose-Related and Time-Dependent Development of Collagenase-Induced Tendinopathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Viganò, Marco; Stanco, Deborah; Bottagisio, Marta; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Setti, Stefania; de Girolamo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a big burden in clinics and it represents 45% of musculoskeletal lesions. Despite the relevant social impact, both pathogenesis and development of the tendinopathy are still under-investigated, thus limiting the therapeutic advancement in this field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose-dependent and time-related tissue-level changes occurring in a collagenase-induced tendinopathy in rat Achilles tendons, in order to establish a standardized model for future pre-clinical studies. With this purpose, 40 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups, treated by injecting collagenase type I within the Achilles tendon at 1 mg/mL (low dose) or 3 mg/mL (high dose). Tendon explants were histologically evaluated at 3, 7, 15, 30 and 45 days. Our results revealed that both the collagenase doses induced a disorganization of collagen fibers and increased the number of rounded resident cells. In particular, the high dose treatment determined a greater neovascularization and fatty degeneration with respect to the lower dose. These changes were found to be time-dependent and to resemble the features of human tendinopathy. Indeed, in our series, the acute phase occurred from day 3 to day 15, and then progressed towards the proliferative phase from day 30 to day 45 displaying a degenerative appearance associated with a very precocious and mild remodeling process. The model represents a good balance between similarity with histological features of human tendinopathy and feasibility, in terms of tendon size to create lesions and costs when compared to other animal models. Moreover, this model could contribute to improve the knowledge in this field, and it could be useful to properly design further pre-clinical studies to test innovative treatments for tendinopathy. PMID:27548063

  9. Jagged1-selective notch signaling induces smooth muscle differentiation via a RBP-Jkappa-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroshi; Iso, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Miki; Matsui, Hiroki; Tanaka, Toru; Manabe, Ichiro; Arai, Masashi; Nagai, Ryozo; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2006-09-29

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a crucial role in specifying cellular fates by interaction between cellular neighbors; however, the molecular mechanism underlying smooth muscle cell (SMC) differentiation by Notch signaling has not been well characterized. Here we demonstrate that Jagged1-Notch signaling promotes SMC differentiation from mesenchymal cells. Overexpression of the Notch intracellular domain, an activated form of Notch, up-regulates the expression of multiple SMC marker genes including SMC-myosin heavy chain (Sm-mhc) in mesenchymal 10T1/2 cells, but not in non-mesenchymal cells. Physiological Notch stimulation by its ligand Jagged1, but not Dll4, directly induces Sm-mhc expression in 10T1/2 cells without de novo protein synthesis, indicative of a ligand-selective effect. Jagged1-induced expression of SM-MHC was blocked bygamma-secretase inhibitor, N-(N-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-l-alanyl)-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester, which impedes Notch signaling. Using Rbp-jkappa-deficient cells and site-specific mutagenesis of the SM-MHC gene, we show that such an induction is independent of the myocardin-serum response factor-CArG complex, but absolutely dependent on RBP-Jkappa, a major mediator of Notch signaling, and its cognate binding sequence. Of importance, Notch signaling and myocardin synergistically activate SM-MHC gene expression. Taken together, these data suggest that the Jagged1-Notch pathway constitutes an instructive signal for SMC differentiation through an RBP-Jkappa-dependent mechanism and augments gene expression mediated by the myocardin-SRF-CArG complex. Given that Notch pathway components are expressed in vascular SMC during normal development and disease, Notch signaling is likely to play a pivotal role in such situations to modulate the vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype. PMID:16867989

  10. Selenium supplementation induces metalloproteinase-dependent L-selectin shedding from monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Ingo; Ellwanger, Christoph; Smith, Belinda K; Bassler, Nicole; Chen, Yung Chih; Neudorfer, Irene; Ludwig, Andreas; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz

    2008-06-01

    Selenium therapy in patients with severe sepsis improves clinical outcome and has been associated with increased activity of the selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase. However, the mechanism of the observed beneficial effects remains unclear. We determined the effect of selenium treatment on the monocyte adhesion molecule L-selectin and L-selectin-related monocyte functions in vitro and transferred our findings to an in vivo mouse model. Monocytes were purified, cultured, and incubated in the presence or absence of supplemented selenium and metalloproteinase (MP) inhibitors for up to 16 h. Expression of L-selectin was unaffected after 2 and 6 h but decreased after 16 h of incubation in the presence of selenium. Soluble L-selectin (sL-selectin) in the supernatant was determined by ELISA. A 2.3-fold increase as a result of shedding of L-selectin was observed after 16 h of selenium treatment. Addition of the MP inhibitors GM6001, TNF-alpha-converting enzyme inhibitor 2, or GW280264X strongly reduced selenium-induced L-selectin shedding, indicating a MP-dependent mechanism. The functional consequences of L-selectin shedding were examined in a flow chamber model. Selenium-treated monocytes showed significantly decreased rolling and adhesion to the L-selectin ligand Sialyl-Lewis(a) under conditions of venous shear stress (0.5 dyne/cm(2)). Selenium treatment of C57BL6 mice led to increased serum levels of sL-selectin, underscoring the in vivo relevance of our findings. We describe a selenium-induced down-regulation of L-selectin on monocytes as a consequence of MP-dependent shedding of this membrane-anchored adhesion molecule. The impairment of monocyte adhesion by selenium supplementation may represent an important, underlying mechanism for the modulation of inflammatory reactions in patients with severe sepsis. PMID:18305178

  11. The pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the composition and size of casein micelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengjie; Jin, Shaoming; Guo, Huiyuan; Zhao, Liang; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-04-15

    The effects of lactose on the changes in the composition and size of casein micelles induced by high-pressure treatment and the related mechanism of action were investigated. Dispersions of ultracentrifuged casein micelle pellets with 0-10% (w/v) lactose were subjected to high pressure (400 MPa) at 20 °C for 40 min. The results indicated that the level of non-sedimentable caseins was positively related to the amount of lactose added prior to pressure treatment, and negatively correlated to the size. A mechanism for the pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the casein micelles is proposed. Lactose inhibits the hydrophobic interactions between the micellar fragments during or after pressure release, through the hydrophilic layer formed by their hydrogen bonds around the micellar fragments. In addition, lactose does not favour the association between calcium and the casein aggregates after pressure release. Due to these two functions, lactose inhibited the formation of larger micelles after pressure treatment.

  12. Mucosal Administration of Collagen V Ameliorates the Atherosclerotic Plaque Burden by Inducing Interleukin 35-dependent Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Huang, Guorui; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Massoudi, Dawiyat; Kernien, John F; Vignali, Dario A; Sullivan, Jeremy A; Wilkes, David S; Burlingham, William J; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2016-02-12

    We have shown previously that collagen V (col(V)) autoimmunity is a consistent feature of atherosclerosis in human coronary artery disease and in the Apoe(-/-) mouse model. We have also shown sensitization of Apoe(-/-) mice with col(V) to markedly increase the atherosclerotic burden, providing evidence of a causative role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic pathogenesis. Here we sought to determine whether induction of immune tolerance to col(V) might ameliorate atherosclerosis, providing further evidence for a causal role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherogenesis and providing insights into the potential for immunomodulatory therapeutic interventions. Mucosal inoculation successfully induced immune tolerance to col(V) with an accompanying reduction in plaque burden in Ldlr(-/-) mice on a high-cholesterol diet. The results therefore demonstrate that inoculation with col(V) can successfully ameliorate the atherosclerotic burden, suggesting novel approaches for therapeutic interventions. Surprisingly, tolerance and reduced atherosclerotic burden were both dependent on the recently described IL-35 and not on IL-10, the immunosuppressive cytokine usually studied in the context of induced tolerance and amelioration of atherosclerotic symptoms. In addition to the above, using recombinant protein fragments, we were able to localize two epitopes of the α1(V) chain involved in col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice, suggesting future courses of experimentation for the characterization of such epitopes.

  13. Temperature-Dependent Nanofabrication on Silicon by Friction-Induced Selective Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenning; Yu, Bingjun; Xiao, Chen; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2016-04-01

    Friction-induced selective etching provides a convenient and practical way for fabricating protrusive nanostructures. A further understanding of this method is very important for establishing a controllable nanofabrication process. In this study, the effect of etching temperature on the formation of protrusive hillocks and surface properties of the etched silicon surface was investigated. It is found that the height of the hillock produced by selective etching increases with the etching temperature before the collapse of the hillock. The temperature-dependent selective etching rate can be fitted well by the Arrhenius equation. The etching at higher temperature can cause rougher silicon surface with a little lower elastic modulus and hardness. The contact angle of the etched silicon surface decreases with the etching temperature. It is also noted that no obvious contamination can be detected on silicon surface after etching at different temperatures. As a result, the optimized condition for the selective etching was addressed. The present study provides a new insight into the control and application of friction-induced selective nanofabrication.

  14. Bixin protects mice against ventilation-induced lung injury in an NRF2-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Quijada, Hector; Wondrak, Georg T.; Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a therapeutic intervention widely used in the clinic to assist patients that have difficulty breathing due to lung edema, trauma, or general anesthesia. However, MV causes ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), a condition characterized by increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier that results in edema, hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, leading to exacerbated lung inflammation and oxidative stress. This study explored the feasibility of using bixin, a canonical NRF2 inducer identified during the current study, to ameliorate lung damage in a murine VILI model. In vitro, bixin was found to activate the NRF2 signaling pathway through blockage of ubiquitylation and degradation of NRF2 in a KEAP1-C151 dependent manner; intraperitoneal (IP) injection of bixin led to pulmonary upregulation of the NRF2 response in vivo. Remarkably, IP administration of bixin restored normal lung morphology and attenuated inflammatory response and oxidative DNA damage following MV. This observed beneficial effect of bixin derived from induction of the NRF2 cytoprotective response since it was only observed in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2−/− mice. This is the first study providing proof-of-concept that NRF2 activators can be developed into pharmacological agents for clinical use to prevent patients from lung injury during MV treatment. PMID:26729554

  15. Treadmill exercise induces age and protocol-dependent epigenetic changes in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cechinel, Laura Reck; Basso, Carla Giovana; Bertoldi, Karine; Schallenberger, Bruna; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have linked age-related beneficial effects of exercise and epigenetic mechanisms. Although, the impact of treadmill exercise on histone acetylation, histone and DNA methylation marks in aged cortices yet remains poorly understood. Considering the role of frontal cortex on brain functions, we investigated the potential of different exercise protocols, single session and daily exercise, to modulate epigenetic marks, namely global H4 acetylation, histone methyltransferase activity (HMT H3K27) and levels of DNA methytransferase (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) in prefrontal cortices from 3 and 21-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two treadmill exercise protocols, single session (20min) or daily moderate (20min/day during 14days). The daily exercise protocol induced an increased in histone H4 acetylation levels in prefrontal cortices of 21-months-old rats, without any effects in young adult group. DNMT3b levels were increased in aged cortices of animals submitted to single session of exercise. These results indicate that prefrontal cortex is susceptible to epigenetic changes in a protocol dependent-manner and that H4 acetylation levels and DNMT3b content changes might be linked at least in part to exercise-induced effects on brain functions. PMID:27418438

  16. Electromagnetic millimeter wave induced hypoalgesia: frequency dependence and involvement of endogenous opioids.

    PubMed

    Radzievsky, A A; Gordiienko, O V; Alekseev, S; Szabo, I; Cowan, A; Ziskin, M C

    2008-05-01

    Millimeter wave treatment (MMWT) is based on the systemic biological effects that develop following local skin exposure to low power electromagnetic waves in the millimeter range. In the present set of experiments, the hypoalgesic effect of this treatment was analyzed in mice. The murine nose area was exposed to MMW of "therapeutic" frequencies: 42.25, 53.57, and 61.22 GHz. MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was shown to be frequency dependent in two experimental models: (1) the cold water tail-flick test (chronic non-neuropathic pain), and (2) the wire surface test (chronic neuropathic pain following unilateral constriction injury to the sciatic nerve). Maximum hypoalgesic effect was obtained when the frequency was 61.22 GHz. Other exposure parameters were: incident power density = 13.3 mW/cm(2), duration of each exposure = 15 min. Involvement of delta and kappa endogenous opioids in the MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was demonstrated using selective blockers of delta- and kappa-opioid receptors and the direct ELISA measurement of endogenous opioids in CNS tissue. Possible mechanisms of the effect and the perspectives of the clinical application of MMWT are discussed.

  17. Dose-dependent protective effects of apomorphine against methamphetamine-induced nigrostriatal damage.

    PubMed

    Fornai, F; Battaglia, G; Gesi, M; Orzi, F; Nicoletti, F; Ruggieri, S

    2001-04-13

    (R)-apomorphine is a non-selective dopamine (DA) agonist which is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. In addition to symptomatic effects, apomorphine exerts a neuroprotective activity in specific experimental models. For instance, apomorphine prevents experimental parkinsonism induced by the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Neuroprotection obtained with apomorphine does not seem to be related to its dopamine (DA) agonist properties, instead it appears to be grounded on the antioxidant and the free radical scavenging effects of the compound. In this study, we sought to determine whether apomorphine protects against methamphetamine toxicity. We found that apomorphine (1; 5 and 10 mg/kg) dose-dependently protects against methamphetamine- (5 mg/kg X3, 2 h apart) induced striatal DA loss and reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity in the rat striatum. These protective effects are neither due to a decrease in the amount of striatal methamphetamine nor to hypothermia as indicated by measurement of striatal methamphetamine and body temperature at different time intervals after drug administration. The effects of apomorphine were neither opposite to, nor reversed by the DA antagonist haloperidol despite no decrease in body temperature was observed when apomorphine was given in combination with haloperidol. The present data are in line with recent studies suggesting a DA receptor-independent neuroprotective effect of apomorphine on DA neurons and call for further studies aimed at evaluating potential neuroprotective effects of apomorphine in Parkinson's disease.

  18. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: a case related to chickpea ingestion and review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chet G; Mace, Sean R

    2007-12-15

    : Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is recognized as a distinct category of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) but is very likely underdiagnosed. This report describes a 41-year-old Indian woman who experienced two separate episodes of anaphylaxis while dancing after she had eaten chickpea-containing foods. The chickpea, a small legume, is a staple ingredient in culinary traditions from around the world, especially in India, the Middle East, and North Africa. Chickpea-containing dishes are also becoming more widespread in the Western world with the growing popularity of South Asian, Middle Eastern, and African cuisines. It is important to consider FDEIA in cases of unexplained anaphylaxis as reactions can occur several hours after ingesting the culprit food(s). Furthermore, no reaction occurs if a sensitized individual eats the culprit food(s) without exercising afterward; therefore, triggering foods can easily be overlooked. Current ideas on the pathophysiology, predisposing factors, workup, and treatment of FDEIA are also summarized here.

  19. Measurements of frequency dependent shear wave attenuation in sedimentary basins using induced earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of peak ground velocity caused by induced earthquakes requires detailed knowledge about seismic attenuation properties of the subsurface. Especially shear wave attenuation is important, because shear waves usually show the largest amplitude in high frequency seismograms. We report intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients of shear waves near three geothermal reservoirs in Germany for frequencies between 2 Hz and 50 Hz. The geothermal plants are located in the sedimentary basins of the upper Rhine graben (Insheim and Landau) and the Molasse basin (Unterhaching). The method optimizes the fit between Green's functions for the acoustic, isotropic radiative transfer theory and observed energy densities of induced earthquakes. The inversion allows the determination of scattering and intrinsic attenuation, site corrections, and spectral source energies for the investigated frequency bands. We performed the inversion at the three sites for events with a magnitude between 0.7 and 2. We determined a transport mean free path of 70 km for Unterhaching. For Landau and Insheim the transport mean free path depends on frequency. It ranges from 2 km (at 2 Hz) to 30 km (at 40 Hz) for Landau and from 9 km to 50 km for Insheim. The quality factor for intrinsic attenuation is constant for frequencies smaller than 10 Hz at all three sites. It is around 100 for Unterhaching and 200 for Landau and Insheim with higher values above 10 Hz.

  20. HZE particle radiation induces tissue-specific and p53-dependent mutagenesis in transgenic animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic animals, with the integrated target gene, provide a unique approach for measuring and characterizing mutations in any tissue of the animal. We are using the plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mice with different p53 genetic background to examine radiation-induced genetic damage resulting from exposure to heavy particle radiation. We measured lacZ mutation frequencies (MF) in the brain and spleen tissues at various times after exposing animals to an acute dose of 1 Gy of 1GeV/amu iron particles. MF in the spleen of p53+/+ animals increased up to 2.6-fold above spontaneous levels at 8 weeks post irradiation. In contrast, brain MF from the same animals increased 1.7-fold above controls in the same period. In the p53-/- animals, brain MF increased to 2.2-fold above spontaneous levels at 1 week after treatment, but returned to control levels thereafter. Radiation also induced alterations in the spectrum of mutants in both tissues, accompanied by changes in the frequency of mutants with deletions extending past the transgene into mouse genomic DNA. Our results indicate that the accumulation of transgene MF after radiation exposure is dependant on the tissue examined as well as the p53 genetic background of the animals.

  1. Cordycepin, a Natural Antineoplastic Agent, Induces Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells via Caspase-dependent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Zhang, Yongfeng; Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Yang; Wang, Junyue; Meng, Qingfan; Lee, Robert J; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin, a major compound separated from Cordyceps sinensis, is known as a potential novel candidate for cancer therapy. Breast cancer, the most typical cancer diagnosed among women, remains a global health problem. In this study, the anti-breast cancer property of cordycepin and its underlying mechanisms was investigated. The direct effects of cordycepin on breast cancer cells both in in vitro and in vivo experiments were evaluated. Cordycepin exerted cytotoxicity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells confirmed by reduced cell viability, inhibition of cell proliferation, enhanced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species accumulation, induced mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Cordycepin increased the activation of pro-apoptotic proteins, including caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3 and Bax, and suppressed the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). The inhibition on MCF-7-xenografted tumor growth in nude mice further confirmed cordycepin's anti-breast cancer effect. These aforementioned results reveal that cordycepin induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells via caspase-dependent pathways. The data shed light on the possibility of cordycepin being a safe agent for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26996021

  2. Food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis: a study on 11 Japanese cases.

    PubMed

    Dohi, M; Suko, M; Sugiyama, H; Yamashita, N; Tadokoro, K; Juji, F; Okudaira, H; Sano, Y; Ito, K; Miyamoto, T

    1991-01-01

    Eleven patients with food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis were studied. Seven patients experienced anaphylactic symptoms only after eating certain foods, such as shellfish, wheat, and grape before exercise. In the remaining four patients, no specific food could be identified, but the act of eating itself predisposed to anaphylaxis. Their anaphylactic symptoms were all clearly distinguished from cholinergic urticaria by history. Patients who developed anaphylactic symptoms before 20 years of age (N = 7) were atopic themselves or had atopic first-degree relatives. Six patients had increased serum IgE levels, and IgE antibodies against the causative food allergens were detected by the skin prick test or RAST in four cases. In contrast, patients who developed the symptoms after 30 years of age (N = 4) appeared to have a less atopic background, and IgE levels were within normal range except in one case. Three of four patients in the latter group developed symptoms after ingesting food made of wheat followed by exercise. All patients were sensitive to wheat as determined by the skin prick test. In six of 11 patients, a considerable rise in plasma histamine concentration was observed after exercise challenge with treadmill alone, and food intake followed by exercise induced a further increase in one patient.

  3. Chalcone-Induced Apoptosis through Caspase-Dependent Intrinsic Pathways in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo; Escobar, Carlos A; Romero, Valentina; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisén, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Jeldes, Emanuel; Pizarro, Luis; Simon, Felipe; Echeverria, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. Chemoprevention of HCC can be achieved through the use of natural or synthetic compounds that reverse, suppress or prevent the development of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effects and the mechanism of action of two compounds, 2,3,4'-trimethoxy-2'-hydroxy-chalcone (CH1) and 3'-bromo-3,4-dimethoxy-chalcone (CH2), over human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and Huh-7) and cultured mouse hepatocytes (HepM). Cytotoxic effects were observed over the HepG2 and Huh-7, and no effects were observed over the HepM. For HepG2 cells, treated separately with each chalcone, typical apoptotic laddering and nuclear condensation were observed. Additionally, the caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins activation by using Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were studied. Caspase-8 was not activated, but caspase-3 and -9 were both activated by chalcones in HepG2 cells. Chalcones also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after 4, 8 and 24 h of treatment in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that apoptosis in HepG2 was induced through: (i) a caspase-dependent intrinsic pathway; and (ii) by alterations in the cellular levels of Bcl-2 family proteins, and also, that the chalcone moiety could be a potent candidate as novel anticancer agents acting on human hepatomas.

  4. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  5. NP24 induces apoptosis dependent on caspase-like activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Naoki; Ito, Yasuhiro; Kato, Jun; Ogihara, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2016-06-01

    Tomato NP24 is a homolog of osmotin, a PR-5 protein from tobacco that can initiate apoptosis in yeast via PHO36 in the plasma membrane. We cloned and sequenced NP24 from tomato cv. Momotaro. Based on phylogenetic analysis, NP24 from Momotaro belonged to the Solanaceae clade. The amino acid sequence was identical to that of cv. Ailsa Craig including signal peptide, but the residues predicted to interact with the adiponectin receptor, ADIPOR, were slightly different from osmotin. Recombinant NP24 (rNP24) was expressed in a reductase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli as host cell, and purified from cell extract by affinity chromatography. Purified rNP24 significantly inhibited growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type spheroplasts. In contrast, growth of PHO36 deletion mutant (ΔIzh2) spheroplasts was not inhibited. Moreover, rNP24 induced significant activity of reactive oxygen species, caspase-like activity, and also nuclear fragmentation in wild-type spheroplast cells. These results demonstrated that rNP24 from Momotaro greatly influenced cell viability due to triggering apoptosis through PHO36. Notably, apoptosis induced by NP24 was caspase-like protease dependent.

  6. Fast strontium transport induced by hydrodynamic dispersion and pH-dependent sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigiobbe, Valentina; Hesse, Marc A.; Bryant, Steven L.

    2012-09-01

    As a fluid carries solutes through a porous material, species that sorb onto the surface of the material travel more slowly than the fluid. Stronger adsorption results in slower solute migration, or increased solute retardation. The adsorption of strontium (Sr2+) onto iron-oxides is strongly pH-dependent and becomes significant at high pH. Radioactive Sr2+ isotopes are, therefore, commonly stored in alkaline solutions to maximize their retardation. Field observations and numerical simulations of the leakage of such solutions into low-pH soils, however, show that even Sr2+ stored in alkaline solutions can migrate without retardation. Migration occurs because hydrodynamic dispersion allows mixing of Sr2+ with the low-pH fluid forming an acidic Sr2+-rich plume which can travel without retardation. Here we report the first experimental observations confirming this dispersion-induced fast Sr2+ transport. We report column-flood experiments where a high-pH solution containing Sr2+ was injected into a low-pH porous medium of iron-oxide-coated beads. We observe both a strongly retarded Sr2+ front and an isolated fast pulse of Sr2+ traveling at the average fluid velocity. This dispersion-induced fast pulse of strontium must be taken into account when considering the safety of radionuclide storage in alkaline solutions.

  7. Downregulation of renal type IIa sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shoko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Masuda, Masashi; Takei, Yuichiro; Nakahashi, Otoki; Kozai, Mina; Tanaka, Sarasa; Nakao, Mari; Taketani, Yutaka; Segawa, Hiroko; Iwano, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2014-04-01

    The type IIa sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a) plays a critical role in reabsorption of inorganic phosphate (Pi) by renal proximal tubular cells. Pi abnormalities during early stages of sepsis have been reported, but the mechanisms regulating Pi homeostasis during acute inflammation are poorly understood. We examined the regulation of Pi metabolism and renal Npt2a expression during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in mice. Dose-response and time-course studies with LPS showed significant increases of plasma Pi and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels and renal Pi excretion, while renal calcium excretion was significantly decreased. There was no difference in plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels, but the induction of plasma intact fibroblast growth factor 23 levels peaked 3 h after LPS treatment. Western blotting, immunostaining, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that LPS administration significantly decreased Npt2a protein expression in the brush border membrane (BBM) 3 h after injection, but there was no change in renal Npt2a mRNA levels. Moreover, tumor necrosis factor-α injection also increased plasma iPTH and decreased renal BBM Npt2a expression. Importantly, we revealed that parathyroidectomized rats had impaired renal Pi excretion and BBM Npt2a expression in response to LPS. These results suggest that the downregulation of Npt2a expression in renal BBM through induction of plasma iPTH levels alter Pi homeostasis during LPS-induced acute inflammation. PMID:24500689

  8. Chalcone-Induced Apoptosis through Caspase-Dependent Intrinsic Pathways in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo; Escobar, Carlos A.; Romero, Valentina; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisén, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Jeldes, Emanuel; Pizarro, Luis; Simon, Felipe; Echeverria, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. Chemoprevention of HCC can be achieved through the use of natural or synthetic compounds that reverse, suppress or prevent the development of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effects and the mechanism of action of two compounds, 2,3,4′-trimethoxy-2′-hydroxy-chalcone (CH1) and 3′-bromo-3,4-dimethoxy-chalcone (CH2), over human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and Huh-7) and cultured mouse hepatocytes (HepM). Cytotoxic effects were observed over the HepG2 and Huh-7, and no effects were observed over the HepM. For HepG2 cells, treated separately with each chalcone, typical apoptotic laddering and nuclear condensation were observed. Additionally, the caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins activation by using Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were studied. Caspase-8 was not activated, but caspase-3 and -9 were both activated by chalcones in HepG2 cells. Chalcones also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after 4, 8 and 24 h of treatment in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that apoptosis in HepG2 was induced through: (i) a caspase-dependent intrinsic pathway; and (ii) by alterations in the cellular levels of Bcl-2 family proteins, and also, that the chalcone moiety could be a potent candidate as novel anticancer agents acting on human hepatomas. PMID:26907262

  9. State-dependent amygdala stimulation-induced cardiovascular effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ruei-Jen; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Liang, Keng-Chen; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2009-12-31

    Stimulation of the amygdala is known to produce pressor, depressor, or has no effects. The present study was performed to test whether amygdala cardiovascular effects are influenced by consciousness states and by different types of anesthetics. Adult rats were set up for stimulation amygdala and measurement of blood pressure in a chronic preparation. After recovery, same sites of the amygdala were stimulated electrically for several trials with the rat under conscious or anesthetic states induced by pentobarbital, urethane, ketamine, alpha-chloralose and urethane plus alpha-chloralose, respectively. The interval between any two stimulation trials was at least 2 days. The stimulation was an 80-Hz, 0.5-ms, 100-micro A square wave pulse train lasting for 15 s. Cardiovascular responsive sites were found in the central, medial, and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala. In stimulating these responsive sites, significantly different cardiovascular effects were induced under a conscious state and an anesthetized state of the animal, yet no significant differences were found among the various anesthetic agents. We conclude, that the cardiovascular influence of the amygdala is state-dependent in the rat.

  10. High Fat and High Sucrose (Western) Diet Induce Steatohepatitis that is Dependent on Fructokinase

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A.; Orlicky, David J.; Cicerchi, Christina; McMahan, Rachel H.; Abdelmalek, Manal F.; Rosen, Hugo R.; Jackman, Matthew R.; MacLean, Paul S.; Diggle, Christine P.; Asipu, Aruna; Inaba, Shinichiro; Kosugi, Tomoki; Sato, Waichi; Maruyama, Shoichi; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G.; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Hill, James O.; Bonthron, David T.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fructose intake from added sugars has been implicated as a cause of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we tested the hypothesis that fructose may interact with high fat diet to induce fatty liver, and to determine if this was dependent on a key enzyme in fructose metabolism, fructokinase. Wild type or fructokinase knockout mice were fed a low fat (11%), high fat (36%) or high fat (36%) and high sucrose (30%) diet for 15 weeks. Both wild type and fructokinase knockout mice developed obesity with mild hepatic steatosis and no evidence for hepatic inflammation on a high fat diet compared to a low fat diet. In contrast, wild type mice fed a high fat and high sucrose diet developed more severe hepatic steatosis with low grade inflammation and fibrosis, as noted by increased CD68, TNF-alpha, MCP-1, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and collagen I and TIMP1 expression. These changes were prevented in the fructokinase knockout mice. Conclusion An additive effect of high fat and high sucrose diet on the development of hepatic steatosis exists. Further, the combination of sucrose with high fat diet may induce steatohepatitis. The protection in fructokinase knockout mice suggests a key role for fructose (from sucrose) in this development of steatohepatitis. These studies emphasize the important role of fructose in the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). PMID:23813872

  11. Novel small molecule induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Eun; Min, Yong Ki; Ha, Jae Du; Kim, Bum Tae; Lee, Woo Ghil . E-mail: bigguy@krict.re.kr

    2007-07-06

    Using high-throughput screening with small-molecule libraries, we identified a compound, KCG165 [(2-(3-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)ethoxy)-1,10b-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c] quinazolin-5(6H)-one)], which strongly activated p53-mediated transcriptional activity. KCG165-induced phosphorylations of p53 at Ser{sup 6}, Ser{sup 15}, and Ser{sup 20}, which are all key residues involved in the activation and stabilization of p53. Consistent with these findings, KCG165 increased level of p53 protein and led to the accumulation of transcriptionally active p53 in the nucleus with the increased occupancy of p53 in the endogenous promoter region of its downstream target gene, p21{sup WAF1/CIP}. Notably, KCG165-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Furthermore, we suggested topoisomerase II as the molecular target of KCG165. Together, these results indicate that KCG165 may have potential applications as an antitumor agent.

  12. Interconnection of Salt-induced Hydrophobic Compaction and Secondary Structure Formation Depends on Solution Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2012-01-01

    What happens in the early stage of protein folding remains an interesting unsolved problem. Rapid kinetics measurements with cytochrome c using submillisecond continuous flow mixing devices suggest simultaneous formation of a compact collapsed state and secondary structure. These data seem to indicate that collapse formation is guided by specific short and long range interactions (heteropolymer collapse). A contrasting interpretation also has been proposed, which suggests that the collapse formation is rapid, nonspecific, and a trivial solvent related compaction, which could as well be observed by a homopolymer (homopolymer collapse). We address this controversy using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which enables us to monitor the salt-induced compaction accompanying collapse formation and the associated time constant directly at single molecule resolution. In addition, we follow the formation of secondary structure using far UV CD. The data presented here suggest that both these models (homopolymer and heteropolymer) could be applicable depending on the solution conditions. For example, the formation of secondary structure and compact state is not simultaneous in aqueous buffer. In aqueous buffer, formation of the compact state occurs through a two-state co-operative transition following heteropolymer formalism, whereas secondary structure formation takes place gradually. In contrast, in the presence of urea, a compaction of the protein radius occurs gradually over an extended range of salt concentration following homopolymer formalism. The salt-induced compaction and the formation of secondary structure take place simultaneously in the presence of urea. PMID:22303014

  13. [A case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by ingestion of orange].

    PubMed

    Ono, Rintaro; Motomura, Chikako; Takamatsu, Nobue; Kondo, Yasuto; Akamine, Yuko; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Murakami, Yoko; Amimoto, Yuko; Taba, Naohiko; Honjyo, Satoshi; Shibata, Rumiko; Odajima, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    The patient was a 10-year-old girl who presented with a history of anaphylactic episodes on three occasions, that developed in association with exercise after she ate citrus fruit. She underwent tolerance tests, as food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) induced by citrus fruit was suspected. The result of the test for the combination of intake of oranges and exercise was negative. The patient presented with swollen eyelid and wheezing following combined intake of orange and aspirin, based on which she was diagnosed as having FDEIA. Many patients developing an allergic reaction to fruit are diagnosed as having oral allergy syndrome (OAS), and only few cases of FDEIA are reported. Immunoblot tests revealed antigens of 9 kDa, 39 kDa and 53 kDa in this patient, and an inhibition study with oranges revealed that the 39 kDa and 53 kDa antigens were probably antigen-specific allergens. Although the studied patient showed a strongly positive result for IgE antibodies specifically directed at cedar pollen, no common antigenicity with cedar pollen could be recognized. The final diagnosis was a type of FDEIA caused by 39 kDa and 53 kDa proteins, which are different from antigens previously identified in patients with citrus fruits allergy. It should be the first report of such a case. PMID:25924908

  14. Temperature-Dependent Nanofabrication on Silicon by Friction-Induced Selective Etching.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chenning; Yu, Bingjun; Xiao, Chen; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2016-12-01

    Friction-induced selective etching provides a convenient and practical way for fabricating protrusive nanostructures. A further understanding of this method is very important for establishing a controllable nanofabrication process. In this study, the effect of etching temperature on the formation of protrusive hillocks and surface properties of the etched silicon surface was investigated. It is found that the height of the hillock produced by selective etching increases with the etching temperature before the collapse of the hillock. The temperature-dependent selective etching rate can be fitted well by the Arrhenius equation. The etching at higher temperature can cause rougher silicon surface with a little lower elastic modulus and hardness. The contact angle of the etched silicon surface decreases with the etching temperature. It is also noted that no obvious contamination can be detected on silicon surface after etching at different temperatures. As a result, the optimized condition for the selective etching was addressed. The present study provides a new insight into the control and application of friction-induced selective nanofabrication. PMID:27119157

  15. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  16. NP24 induces apoptosis dependent on caspase-like activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Naoki; Ito, Yasuhiro; Kato, Jun; Ogihara, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2016-06-01

    Tomato NP24 is a homolog of osmotin, a PR-5 protein from tobacco that can initiate apoptosis in yeast via PHO36 in the plasma membrane. We cloned and sequenced NP24 from tomato cv. Momotaro. Based on phylogenetic analysis, NP24 from Momotaro belonged to the Solanaceae clade. The amino acid sequence was identical to that of cv. Ailsa Craig including signal peptide, but the residues predicted to interact with the adiponectin receptor, ADIPOR, were slightly different from osmotin. Recombinant NP24 (rNP24) was expressed in a reductase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli as host cell, and purified from cell extract by affinity chromatography. Purified rNP24 significantly inhibited growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type spheroplasts. In contrast, growth of PHO36 deletion mutant (ΔIzh2) spheroplasts was not inhibited. Moreover, rNP24 induced significant activity of reactive oxygen species, caspase-like activity, and also nuclear fragmentation in wild-type spheroplast cells. These results demonstrated that rNP24 from Momotaro greatly influenced cell viability due to triggering apoptosis through PHO36. Notably, apoptosis induced by NP24 was caspase-like protease dependent. PMID:26589784

  17. [Clinical courses of 18 cases with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Kano, H; Juji, F; Shibuya, N; Narita, M; Naritaka, S; Suko, M; Morita, Y; Iwata, T

    2000-06-01

    Eighteen cases (7 males and 11 females) of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis were observed for several years. The age of the patients at the first visit to our hospital ranged from 9 to 43 years (average 24.3 years). The offending foods were wheat in 9 cases, shrimp in 2 cases, shellfish in 1 case, fish in 1 case, and unknown foods in 5 cases. The inducing exercises were ball play games, running, riding a bicycle, swimming, kendo (Japanese fencing), walking, and so on. We advised these patients to avoid eating offending foods or taking exercises, or to take antiallergic medicine such as DSCG, and repirinast. We observed their clinical courses and laboratory data for 2 to 10 years. Only a few cases relapsed anaphylactoid reactions, but all cases have improved until now. In some cases, IgE RAST scores for wheat decreased. In other cases, the rate of histamine release on anti-IgE stimulation decreased after taking DSCG.

  18. Chalcone-Induced Apoptosis through Caspase-Dependent Intrinsic Pathways in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo; Escobar, Carlos A; Romero, Valentina; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisén, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Jeldes, Emanuel; Pizarro, Luis; Simon, Felipe; Echeverria, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. Chemoprevention of HCC can be achieved through the use of natural or synthetic compounds that reverse, suppress or prevent the development of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effects and the mechanism of action of two compounds, 2,3,4'-trimethoxy-2'-hydroxy-chalcone (CH1) and 3'-bromo-3,4-dimethoxy-chalcone (CH2), over human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and Huh-7) and cultured mouse hepatocytes (HepM). Cytotoxic effects were observed over the HepG2 and Huh-7, and no effects were observed over the HepM. For HepG2 cells, treated separately with each chalcone, typical apoptotic laddering and nuclear condensation were observed. Additionally, the caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins activation by using Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were studied. Caspase-8 was not activated, but caspase-3 and -9 were both activated by chalcones in HepG2 cells. Chalcones also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after 4, 8 and 24 h of treatment in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that apoptosis in HepG2 was induced through: (i) a caspase-dependent intrinsic pathway; and (ii) by alterations in the cellular levels of Bcl-2 family proteins, and also, that the chalcone moiety could be a potent candidate as novel anticancer agents acting on human hepatomas. PMID:26907262

  19. Treadmill exercise induces age and protocol-dependent epigenetic changes in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cechinel, Laura Reck; Basso, Carla Giovana; Bertoldi, Karine; Schallenberger, Bruna; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have linked age-related beneficial effects of exercise and epigenetic mechanisms. Although, the impact of treadmill exercise on histone acetylation, histone and DNA methylation marks in aged cortices yet remains poorly understood. Considering the role of frontal cortex on brain functions, we investigated the potential of different exercise protocols, single session and daily exercise, to modulate epigenetic marks, namely global H4 acetylation, histone methyltransferase activity (HMT H3K27) and levels of DNA methytransferase (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) in prefrontal cortices from 3 and 21-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two treadmill exercise protocols, single session (20min) or daily moderate (20min/day during 14days). The daily exercise protocol induced an increased in histone H4 acetylation levels in prefrontal cortices of 21-months-old rats, without any effects in young adult group. DNMT3b levels were increased in aged cortices of animals submitted to single session of exercise. These results indicate that prefrontal cortex is susceptible to epigenetic changes in a protocol dependent-manner and that H4 acetylation levels and DNMT3b content changes might be linked at least in part to exercise-induced effects on brain functions.

  20. Changes in falling risk depending on induced axis directions of astigmatism on static posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Yeob; Moon, Byeong-Yeon; Cho, Hyun Gug

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To assess the changes in falling risk depending on the induced axis direction of astigmatism using cylindrical lenses in a static posture. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects (10 males, 10 females; mean age, 23.4 ± 2.70 years) fully corrected by subjective refraction participated. To induce myopic simple astigmatism conditions, cylindrical lenses of +0.50, +1.00, +1.50, +2.00, +3.00, +4.00, and +5.00 D were used. The direction of astigmatic axes were induced under five conditions with increased cylindrical powers:, 180°, 90°, and 45° on both eyes; 180°/90° right/left eye, and 45°/135° right/left eye. Changes in the fall risk index were analyzed using the TETRAX biofeedback system. Measurements were performed for 32 seconds for each condition. [Results] The fall risk index increased significantly from C+4.00 D in 180°/90° right/left eye, C+3.00 D in 45°/135° right/left eye, and C+3.00 D in 45° on both eyes versus corrected emmetropia. Among the five axis conditions with the same cylindrical power lenses, the increase in the fall risk index was highest at 45° in both eyes. [Conclusion] Uncorrected oblique astigmatism may increase falling risk compared to with-the-rule and against-the-rule astigmatism. Clinical specialists should consider appropriate correction of astigmatism for preventing falls, especially for uncorrected oblique astigmatism. PMID:26180360

  1. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197148

  2. Ozone-Induced Nasal Type 2 Immunity in Mice Is Dependent on Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lewandowski, Ryan; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Li, Ning; Van Dyken, Steven J; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that elevated ambient concentrations of ozone are associated with activation of eosinophils in the nasal airways of atopic and nonatopic children. Mice repeatedly exposed to ozone develop eosinophilic rhinitis and type 2 immune responses. In this study, we determined the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced eosinophilic rhinitis by using lymphoid-sufficient C57BL/6 mice, Rag2(-/-) mice that are devoid of T cells and B cells, and Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice that are depleted of all lymphoid cells including ILCs. The animals were exposed to 0 or 0.8 ppm ozone for 9 consecutive weekdays (4 h/d). Mice were killed 24 hours after exposure, and nasal tissues were selected for histopathology and gene expression analysis. ILC-sufficient C57BL/6 and Rag2(-/-) mice exposed to ozone developed marked eosinophilic rhinitis and epithelial remodeling (e.g., epithelial hyperplasia and mucous cell metaplasia). Chitinase-like proteins and alarmins (IL-33, IL-25, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also increased morphometrically in the nasal epithelium of ozone-exposed C57BL/6 and Rag2(-/-) mice. Ozone exposure elicited increased expression of Il4, Il5, Il13, St2, eotaxin, MCP-2, Gob5, Arg1, Fizz1, and Ym2 mRNA in C57BL/6 and Rag2(-/-) mice. In contrast, ozone-exposed ILC-deficient Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice had no nasal lesions or overexpression of Th2- or ILC2-related transcripts. These results indicate that ozone-induced eosinophilic rhinitis, nasal epithelial remodeling, and type 2 immune activation are dependent on ILCs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that ILCs play an important role in the nasal pathology induced by repeated ozone exposure.

  3. Glyphosate-rich air samples induce IL-33, TSLP and generate IL-13 dependent airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Khodoun, Marat; Kettleson, Eric M; McKnight, Christopher; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin

    2014-11-01

    Several low weight molecules have often been implicated in the induction of occupational asthma. Glyphosate, a small molecule herbicide, is widely used in the world. There is a controversy regarding a role of glyphosate in developing asthma and rhinitis among farmers, the mechanism of which is unexplored. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms of glyphosate induced pulmonary pathology by utilizing murine models and real environmental samples. C57BL/6, TLR4-/-, and IL-13-/- mice inhaled extracts of glyphosate-rich air samples collected on farms during spraying of herbicides or inhaled different doses of glyphosate and ovalbumin. The cellular response, humoral response, and lung function of exposed mice were evaluated. Exposure to glyphosate-rich air samples as well as glyphosate alone to the lungs increased: eosinophil and neutrophil counts, mast cell degranulation, and production of IL-33, TSLP, IL-13, and IL-5. In contrast, in vivo systemic IL-4 production was not increased. Co-administration of ovalbumin with glyphosate did not substantially change the inflammatory immune response. However, IL-13-deficiency resulted in diminished inflammatory response but did not have a significant effect on airway resistance upon methacholine challenge after 7 or 21 days of glyphosate exposure. Glyphosate-rich farm air samples as well as glyphosate alone were found to induce pulmonary IL-13-dependent inflammation and promote Th2 type cytokines, but not IL-4 for glyphosate alone. This study, for the first time, provides evidence for the mechanism of glyphosate-induced occupational lung disease. PMID:25172162

  4. Glyphosate–rich air samples induce IL–33, TSLP and generate IL–13 dependent airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudhir; Khodoun, Marat; Kettleson, Eric M.; McKnight, Christopher; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Adhikari, Atin

    2014-01-01

    Several low weight molecules have often been implicated in the induction of occupational asthma. Glyphosate, a small molecule herbicide, is widely used in the world. There is a controversy regarding a role of glyphosate in developing asthma and rhinitis among farmers, the mechanism of which is unexplored. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms of glyphosate induced pulmonary pathology by utilizing murine models and real environmental samples. C57BL/6, TLR4−/−, and IL-13−/− mice inhaled extracts of glyphosate-rich air samples collected on farms during spraying of herbicides or inhaled different doses of glyphosate and ovalbumin. The cellular response, humoral response, and lung function of exposed mice were evaluated. Exposure to glyphosate-rich air samples as well as glyphosate alone to the lungs increased: eosinophil and neutrophil counts, mast cell degranulation, and production of IL-33, TSLP, IL-13, and IL-5. In contrast, in vivo systemic IL-4 production was not increased. Co-administration of ovalbumin with glyphosate did not substantially change the inflammatory immune response. However, IL-13-deficiency resulted in diminished inflammatory response but did not have a significant effect on airway resistance upon methacholine challenge after 7 or 21 days of glyphosate exposure. Glyphosate-rich farm air samples as well as glyphosate alone were found to induce pulmonary IL-13-dependent inflammation and promote Th2 type cytokines, but not IL-4 for glyphosate alone. This study, for the first time, provides evidence for the mechanism of glyphosate-induced occupational lung disease. PMID:25172162

  5. Glyphosate-rich air samples induce IL-33, TSLP and generate IL-13 dependent airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Khodoun, Marat; Kettleson, Eric M; McKnight, Christopher; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin

    2014-11-01

    Several low weight molecules have often been implicated in the induction of occupational asthma. Glyphosate, a small molecule herbicide, is widely used in the world. There is a controversy regarding a role of glyphosate in developing asthma and rhinitis among farmers, the mechanism of which is unexplored. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms of glyphosate induced pulmonary pathology by utilizing murine models and real environmental samples. C57BL/6, TLR4-/-, and IL-13-/- mice inhaled extracts of glyphosate-rich air samples collected on farms during spraying of herbicides or inhaled different doses of glyphosate and ovalbumin. The cellular response, humoral response, and lung function of exposed mice were evaluated. Exposure to glyphosate-rich air samples as well as glyphosate alone to the lungs increased: eosinophil and neutrophil counts, mast cell degranulation, and production of IL-33, TSLP, IL-13, and IL-5. In contrast, in vivo systemic IL-4 production was not increased. Co-administration of ovalbumin with glyphosate did not substantially change the inflammatory immune response. However, IL-13-deficiency resulted in diminished inflammatory response but did not have a significant effect on airway resistance upon methacholine challenge after 7 or 21 days of glyphosate exposure. Glyphosate-rich farm air samples as well as glyphosate alone were found to induce pulmonary IL-13-dependent inflammation and promote Th2 type cytokines, but not IL-4 for glyphosate alone. This study, for the first time, provides evidence for the mechanism of glyphosate-induced occupational lung disease.

  6. Roles of thioredoxin in nitric oxide-dependent preconditioning-induced tolerance against MPTP neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Chiueh, C.C. . E-mail: chiueh@tmu.edu.tw; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Chock, P. Boon

    2005-09-01

    Hormesis, a stress tolerance, can be induced by ischemic preconditioning stress. In addition to preconditioning, it may be induced by other means, such as gas anesthetics. Preconditioning mechanisms, which may be mediated by reprogramming survival genes and proteins, are obscure. A known neurotoxicant, 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), causes less neurotoxicity in the mice that are preconditioned. Pharmacological evidences suggest that the signaling pathway of {center_dot}NO-cGMP-PKG (protein kinase G) may mediate preconditioning phenomenon. We developed a human SH-SY5Y cell model for investigating {sup {center_dot}}NO-mediated signaling pathway, gene regulation, and protein expression following a sublethal preconditioning stress caused by a brief 2-h serum deprivation. Preconditioned human SH-SY5Y cells are more resistant against severe oxidative stress and apoptosis caused by lethal serum deprivation and 1-mehtyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +}). Both sublethal and lethal oxidative stress caused by serum withdrawal increased neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS/NOS1) expression and {sup {center_dot}}NO levels to a similar extent. In addition to free radical scavengers, inhibition of nNOS, guanylyl cyclase, and PKG blocks hormesis induced by preconditioning. S-nitrosothiols and 6-Br-cGMP produce a cytoprotection mimicking the action of preconditioning tolerance. There are two distinct cGMP-mediated survival pathways: (i) the up-regulation of a redox protein thioredoxin (Trx) for elevating mitochondrial levels of antioxidant protein Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, and (ii) the activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels [K(ATP)]. Preconditioning induction of Trx increased tolerance against MPP{sup +}, which was blocked by Trx mRNA antisense oligonucleotide and Trx reductase inhibitor. It is concluded that Trx plays a pivotal role in {sup {center_dot}}NO-dependent preconditioning hormesis against

  7. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Luteolin inhibits lysophosphatidylcholine-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells by a calcium/mitocondrion/caspases-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Junna; Liu, Kang; Yi, Jiali; Zhu, Deqiu; Liu, Gaolin; Liu, Baolin

    2010-03-01

    Luteolin, a naturally occurring polyphenol flavonoid, has demonstrated some beneficial modulation toward the endothelium. This study aims to investigate the effects of luteolin on lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC)-induced apoptosis, a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in endothelial cells. Luteolin reduced not only LPC-induced cell death but also lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. Luteolin inhibition of LPC-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells demonstrated its protection against the cytotoxicity of LPC. LPC-induced apoptosis is characterized by a calcium-dependent mitochondrial pathway, involving calcium influx, activation of calpains, cytochrome C release and caspases activation. Luteolin reduced calcium influx. It also inhibited calpains activation and prevented the release of cytochrome C from mitochondrion. The inhibition of cytochrome C release by luteolin blocked the activation of caspase-3 and thus prevented subsequent endothelial cell apoptosis. These results suggested that luteolin inhibits LPC-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells through the blockage of the calcium-dependent mitochondrial pathway. PMID:19830654

  9. Strophalloside induces apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells through the mitochondrion-dependent caspase-3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Jiao; Mei, Wen-Li; Tan, Guang-Hong; Wang, Cai-Chun; Zhou, Song-Lin; Huang, Feng-Ru; Chen, Bin; Dai, Hao-Fu; Huang, Feng-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Cardenolides with special chemical structures have been considered as effective anti-cancer drugs in clinic trials. Strophalloside is a cardenolide we recently isolated from Antiaris toxicaria obtained from Hainan, China. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anticancer effects induced by strophalloside and the underlying molecular mechanism. Gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 cells were treated with strophalloside at various concentrations for different times, and resulting cell viability was determined by the MTT assay, and the motility and invasion of tumor cells were assessed by the Transwell chamber assay. Apoptosis were measured by Annexin V-FITC/PI and Hoechst staining. The changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential were examined by a JC-1 kit. The expressions of pro-apoptotic protein cytochrome c, caspase-3 and caspase-9 were detected by western blotting analysis. The results showed that strophalloside was capable of reducing cell viability, inhibiting cell growth, and suppressing cell migration and invasion in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mitochondrial membrane potential declined and the concentration of cytochrome c increased in cytoplasm and caspase-3 and caspase-9 were cleaved into activated states, suggesting that cytochrome c was released from the mitochondrion to cytoplasm and finally activated the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway. Our results indicate that strophalloside is a potential anticancer drug.

  10. Energy dependence of nuclear charge distribution in neutron induced fission of Z-even nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchenko, V. A.; Piksaikin, V. M.; Isaev, S. G.; Goverdovski, A. A.

    2006-07-01

    For the first time the distribution of nuclear charge of fission products with mass numbers 87, 88, 89, 91, 93, 94, 95, 137, 138, 139, and 140 and their complementary products have been studied for neutron induced fission of U235 and Pu239 in the energy range from thermal up to 1.2 MeV. The energy dependences of the cumulative yields of Br87, Br88, Br89, Br91, Kr93, Rb94, Rb95, I137, I138, I139, and I140 have been obtained by delayed neutron measurements. The most probable charge ZP(A)in the appropriate isobaric β-decay chains was estimated. The results were analyzed in terms of the deviation ΔZP(A') of the most probable charge of isobaric β-decay chains from the unchanged charge distribution before prompt neutron emission (nuclear charge polarization) and they are compared with experimental data of other authors and with predictions from Nethaway's ZP-formula and Wahl's ZP-model. We show that the nuclear charge polarization of primary fission fragments <ΔZP(A')> before prompt neutron evaporation decreases as the excitation energy of the compound nucleus increases. This decrease is more pronounced for fission of U235. The energy dependencies of ΔZP(A') and ΔZP(ZP) obtained in the present work show an attenuation of the odd-even effects in the charge distribution as the excitation energy of the compound nucleus increases.

  11. Procaspase-activating compound 1 induces a caspase-3-dependent cell death in cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Gulzeb; Akselsen, Oyvind W.; Hansen, Trond V.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2010-09-15

    Procaspase-activating compound 1, PAC-1, has been introduced as a direct activator of procaspase-3 and has been suggested as a therapeutic agent against cancer. Its activation of procaspase-3 is dependent on the chelation of zinc. We have tested PAC-1 and an analogue of PAC-1 as zinc chelators in vitro as well as their ability to activate caspase-3 and induce cell death in chicken cerebellar granule neuron cultures. These neurons are non-dividing, primary cells with normal caspase-3. The results reported herein show that PAC-1 chelates zinc, activates procaspase-3, and leads to caspase-3-dependent cell death in neurons, as the specific caspase-3-inhibitor Ac-DEVD-cmk inhibited both the caspase-3 activity and cell death. Thus, chicken cerebellar granule neurons is a suitable model to study mechanisms of interference with apoptosis of PAC-1 and similar compounds. Furthermore, the present study also raises concern about potential neurotoxicity of PAC-1 if used in cancer therapy.

  12. Gap state charge induced spin-dependent negative differential resistance in tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, X.-G.; Han, X. F.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate through first-principles calculation a new spin-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) with cubic cation disordered crystals (CCDC) AlO x or Mg1-x Al x O as barrier materials. The CCDC is a class of insulators whose band gap can be changed by cation doping. The gap becomes arched in an ultrathin layer due to the space charge formed from metal-induced gap states. With an appropriate combination of an arched gap and a bias voltage, NDR can be produced in either spin channel. This mechanism is applicable to 2D and 3D ultrathin junctions with a sufficiently small band gap that forms a large space charge. It provides a new way of controlling the spin-dependent transport in spintronic devices by an electric field. A generalized Simmons formula for tunneling current through junction with an arched gap is derived to show the general conditions under which ultrathin junctions may exhibit NDR.

  13. Wall-Thickness Dependence of Cooling-Induced Deformation of Polystyrene Spherical Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Goto, K.; Yasuda, M.; Fujima, Y.

    2003-05-15

    Experiments on the wall-thickness dependence of the cooling-induced deformation (CID) of polystyrene (PS) spherical shells were carried out. For the experiments, the PS shells were fabricated by the density-matched emulsion method using the hand-shaken microencapsulation technique. The number-averaged and weight-averaged molecular weights of the PS were M{sub n} 1.1 x 10{sup 5} and M{sub w} = 4.0 x 10{sup 5}, respectively. The diameter of the PS shells was {approx}400-550 {mu}m. To investigate the wall-thickness dependence of the CID, the wall thickness of the PS shells was varied between 5 and 60 {mu}m. In the experiments, the PS shells were cooled by using liquid nitrogen, and their images were captured at 0 and -190 deg. C. For the investigation of the CID, two shapes of each shell that were measured at 0 and -190 deg. C were compared. The thinner PS shells showed larger CID. The maximum deformation was almost 1% of the outer radius when the shell aspect ratio (outer radius)/(wall thickness) was higher than 20. The repeatability of the CID was studied, and the results implied that residual stress in the PS shells had an influence on the CID.

  14. Cannabinoids inhibit energetic metabolism and induce AMPK-dependent autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dando, I; Donadelli, M; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; D'Alessandro, A; Zolla, L; Palmieri, M

    2013-01-01

    The anti-tumoral effects of cannabinoids have been described in different tumor systems, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but their mechanism of action remains unclear. We used cannabinoids specific for the CB1 (ACPA) and CB2 (GW) receptors and metabolomic analyses to unravel the potential pathways mediating cannabinoid-dependent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. Panc1 cells treated with cannabinoids show elevated AMPK activation induced by a ROS-dependent increase of AMP/ATP ratio. ROS promote nuclear translocation of GAPDH, which is further amplified by AMPK, thereby attenuating glycolysis. Furthermore, ROS determine the accumulation of NADH, suggestive of a blockage in the respiratory chain, which in turn inhibits the Krebs cycle. Concomitantly, inhibition of Akt/c-Myc pathway leads to decreased activity of both the pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2), further downregulating glycolysis, and glutamine uptake. Altogether, these alterations of pancreatic cancer cell metabolism mediated by cannabinoids result in a strong induction of autophagy and in the inhibition of cell growth. PMID:23764845

  15. Cannabinoids inhibit energetic metabolism and induce AMPK-dependent autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dando, I; Donadelli, M; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; D'Alessandro, A; Zolla, L; Palmieri, M

    2013-06-13

    The anti-tumoral effects of cannabinoids have been described in different tumor systems, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but their mechanism of action remains unclear. We used cannabinoids specific for the CB1 (ACPA) and CB2 (GW) receptors and metabolomic analyses to unravel the potential pathways mediating cannabinoid-dependent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. Panc1 cells treated with cannabinoids show elevated AMPK activation induced by a ROS-dependent increase of AMP/ATP ratio. ROS promote nuclear translocation of GAPDH, which is further amplified by AMPK, thereby attenuating glycolysis. Furthermore, ROS determine the accumulation of NADH, suggestive of a blockage in the respiratory chain, which in turn inhibits the Krebs cycle. Concomitantly, inhibition of Akt/c-Myc pathway leads to decreased activity of both the pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2), further downregulating glycolysis, and glutamine uptake. Altogether, these alterations of pancreatic cancer cell metabolism mediated by cannabinoids result in a strong induction of autophagy and in the inhibition of cell growth.

  16. Gap state charge induced spin-dependent negative differential resistance in tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, X.-G.; Han, X. F.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate through first-principles calculation a new spin-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) with cubic cation disordered crystals (CCDC) AlO x or Mg1‑x Al x O as barrier materials. The CCDC is a class of insulators whose band gap can be changed by cation doping. The gap becomes arched in an ultrathin layer due to the space charge formed from metal-induced gap states. With an appropriate combination of an arched gap and a bias voltage, NDR can be produced in either spin channel. This mechanism is applicable to 2D and 3D ultrathin junctions with a sufficiently small band gap that forms a large space charge. It provides a new way of controlling the spin-dependent transport in spintronic devices by an electric field. A generalized Simmons formula for tunneling current through junction with an arched gap is derived to show the general conditions under which ultrathin junctions may exhibit NDR.

  17. Comparison of dependent measures used to quantify radiation-induced taste aversion

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, A.C.; Smith, J.C.; Hollander, G.R. . Dept. of Psychology)

    1981-11-01

    Several commonly used measures of conditioned taste aversion were compared under a variety of experimental conditions. In the first experiment an aversion to a saccharin solution (0.1%) was conditioned by pairing this taste substance with a single 100 R exposure to Cobalt-60. Comparisons were performed between the following measures: a short-term single-bottle test, a 22-hour two-bottle preference test, a measure quantifying recovery from the aversion along with other measures derived from these tests. Appropriate control groups received saccharin and sham exposure, water and sham exposure, and water and radiation exposure in order to measure both neophobia and enhanced neophobia. In Experiment 2 the total whole body radiation exposure used to condition the taste aversion was varied in different groups from 50 to 300 R exposures and the effect on conditioning was measured using the dependent variables described in Experiment 1. In Experiment 3 radiation-induced taste aversion was studied in rats which had prior exposures to the saccharin solution. In all three studies it was shown that different interpretations result from measuring the conditioned aversion with the different dependent variables commonly used, and several measures are needed to give a fair and accurate description of learned taste aversion.

  18. Crystal orientation dependence of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure on (100) silicon.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lan; Han, Weina; Li, Xiaowei; Wang, Qingsong; Meng, Fantong; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-06-01

    It is widely believed that laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are independent of material crystal structures. This Letter reports an abnormal phenomenon of strong dependence of the anisotropic formation of periodic ripples on crystal orientation, when Si (100) is processed by a linearly polarized femtosecond laser (800 nm, 50 fs, 1 kHz). LIPSS formation sensitivity with a π/2 modulation is found along different crystal orientations with a quasi-cosinusoid function when the angle between the crystal orientation and polarization direction is changed from 0° to 180°. Our experiments indicate that it is much easier (or more difficult) to form ripple structures when the polarization direction is aligned with the lattice axis [011]/[011¯] (or [001]). The modulated nonlinear ionization rate along different crystal orientations, which arises from the direction dependence of the effective mass of the electron is proposed to interpret the unexpected anisotropic LIPSS formation phenomenon. Also, we demonstrate that the abnormal phenomenon can be applied to control the continuity of scanned ripple lines along different crystal orientations.

  19. Stretch-induced myoblast proliferation is dependent on the COX2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, Jeffrey S.; Burkholder, Thomas J.; Pavlath, Grace K. . E-mail: gpavlat@emory.edu

    2005-11-01

    Skeletal muscle increases in size due to weight bearing loads or passive stretch. This growth response is dependent in part upon myoblast proliferation. Although skeletal muscles are responsive to mechanical forces, the effect on myoblast proliferation remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical stretch on myoblast proliferation, primary myoblasts isolated from Balb/c mice were subjected to 25% cyclical uniaxial stretch for 5 h at 0.5 Hz. Stretch stimulated myoblast proliferation by 32% and increased cell number by 41% 24 and 48 h after stretch, respectively. COX2 mRNA increased 3.5-fold immediately poststretch. Prostaglandin E2 and F{sub 2{alpha}} increased 2.4- and 1.6-fold 6 h after stretch, respectively. Because COX2 has been implicated in regulating muscle growth and regeneration, we hypothesized that stretched myoblasts may proliferate via a COX2-dependent mechanism. We employed two different models to disrupt COX2 activity: (1) treatment with a COX2-selective drug, and (2) transgenic mice null for COX2. Treating myoblasts with a COX2-specific inhibitor blocked stretch-induced proliferation. Likewise, stretched COX2{sup -/-} myoblasts failed to proliferate compared to controls. However, supplementing stretched, COX2{sup -/-} myoblasts with prostaglandin E2 or fluprostenol increased proliferation. These data suggest that the COX2 pathway is critical for myoblast proliferation in response to stretch.

  20. Rhododendrol, a depigmentation-inducing phenolic compound, exerts melanocyte cytotoxicity via a tyrosinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Minoru; Kondo, Masatoshi; Sato, Kohji; Umeda, Mai; Kawabata, Keigo; Takahashi, Yoshito; Suzuki, Tamio; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Inoue, Shintaro

    2014-09-01

    Rhododendrol, an inhibitor of melanin synthesis developed for lightening/whitening cosmetics, was recently reported to induce a depigmentary disorder principally at the sites of repeated chemical contact. Rhododendrol competitively inhibited mushroom tyrosinase and served as a good substrate, while it also showed cytotoxicity against cultured human melanocytes at high concentrations sufficient for inhibiting tyrosinase. The cytotoxicity was abolished by phenylthiourea, a chelator of the copper ions at the active site, and by specific knockdown of tyrosinase with siRNA. Hence, the cytotoxicity appeared to be triggered by the enzymatic conversion of rhododendrol to active product(s). No reactive oxygen species were detected in the treated melanocytes, but up-regulation of the CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein gene responsible for apoptosis and/or autophagy and caspase-3 activation were found to be tyrosinase dependent. These results suggest that a tyrosinase-dependent accumulation of ER stress and/or activation of the apoptotic pathway may contribute to the melanocyte cytotoxicity. PMID:24890809

  1. Computation of time-dependent transition probabilities in excimer molecules induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsalakis, Ioannis D.; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    1994-12-01

    We have computed the time-dependent probabilities of exciting and deexciting the bound states of the excimer molecules NeH, ArH and HeF, via the interaction of these systems with femtosecond laser pulses. The method involves the expansion of the time-dependent wavefunction in terms of stationary states with time-dependent coefficients and complex energies, whose imaginary parts represent the lifetimes of the collision complex on the initial repulsive ground state and of the excited states which are coupled by the field. The resulting system of differential equations is solved by a Taylor series expansion method. We have studied the efficiency of laser-induced molecular formation (LIMP) from the ground repulsive surfaces as a function of frequency and intensity, for trapezoidal pulses. Given the shortness of the pulse and the characteristics of the spectra of these molecules, for reasons of economy the bulk of the calculations was carried out in a 'frozen nuclei' approximation. Additional calculations for NeH, using a wavepacket representation of the initial state on the repulsive curve produced similar results as regards the possibility of LIMF. Additional information has been obtained regarding transitions among excited states. For example, starting the photoreaction in HeF from the first excited repulsive state 1 2Π with a pulse frequency of 4 eV allows an experimentally verifiable probability of obtaining bound-continuum emission at about 1320 Å (9.4 eV). For resonance conditions, the probabilities are appreciable during the pulse and go through maxima as a function of intensity of the order of 10 11 W/cm 2-10 14W/cm 2.

  2. Chlorpromazine-induced hepatotoxicity during inflammation is mediated by TIRAP-dependent signaling pathway in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Adarsh; Guo, Tao; Shah, Pranav; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2013-02-01

    Inflammation is a major component of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs). To understand the molecular mechanism of inflammation-mediated IADRs, we determined the role of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway in idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of the anti-psychotic drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ). Activation of TLRs recruits the first adaptor protein, Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) to the TIR domain of TLRs leading to the activation of the downstream kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). Prolonged activation of JNK leads to cell-death. We hypothesized that activation of TLR2 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) will augment the hepatotoxicity of CPZ by TIRAP-dependent mechanism involving prolonged activation of JNK. Adult male C57BL/6, TIRAP{sup +/+} and TIRAP{sup −/−} mice were pretreated with saline, LPS (2 mg/kg) or LTA (6 mg/kg) for 30 min or 16 h followed by CPZ (5 mg/kg) or saline (vehicle) up to 24 h. We found that treatment of mice with CPZ in presence of LPS or LTA leads to ∼ 3–4 fold increase in serum ALT levels, a marked reduction in hepatic glycogen content, significant induction of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and prolonged JNK activation, compared to LPS or LTA alone. Similar results were observed in TIRAP{sup +/+} mice, whereas the effects of LPS or LTA on CPZ-induced hepatotoxicity were attenuated in TIRAP{sup −/−} mice. For the first time, we show that inflammation-mediated hepatotoxicity of CPZ is dependent on TIRAP, and involves prolonged JNK activation in vivo. Thus, TIRAP-dependent pathways may be targeted to predict and prevent inflammation-mediated IADRs. -- Highlights: ► Inflammation augments the toxicity of an idiosyncratic hepatotoxin chlorpromazine. ► Activation of Toll-like receptors by LPS or LTA induces chlorpromazine toxicity. ► Sustained stress kinase (JNK) activation is associated with chlorpromazine toxicity. ► These studies

  3. Radiation quality dependence of signal transmission and bystander induced cell killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Bertolotti, Alessia; Facoetti, Angelica; Grande, Sveva; Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Ranza, Elena; Simone, Giustina; Sorrentino, Eugenio; Antonella Tabocchini, Maria

    Low dose radiobiological studies have shown effects, observable in cells that are in the vicinity of irradiated cells, which are due to the release by irradiated cells of several cellular mediators among which Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS, NRS), and cytokines are likely to play a key role. Despite the large number in the literature of studies on bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation the results are still conflicting, and further studies are therefore needed on the possible underlying mechanisms. The dependence on radiation quality deserve particular attention because bystander mechanisms are probably more important with high-LET irradi-ations, where many cells are not hit (bystander). Moreover, due to the different patterns of energy deposition, the cellular response to low LET and high LET radiation can be different. Understanding whether these cells can contribute to the adverse effects of low radiation doses in a radiation quality-dependent fashion might have important implications in risk estimates for both cancer induction and non-cancer diseases. In this context, we addressed to the study of the bystander induced cell killing after incubation with "conditioned medium" from primary human fibroblasts irradiated with 0.1 and 0.5 Gy of α-particles or γ-rays. Medium transfer was performed after 1h incubation from irradiation. The results have confirmed a reduction in clonogenic survival after incubation with medium from α-irradiated cells, independently of the dose; similar results were obtained after γ-irradiation, although in this case a slight dose depen-dence could be envisaged. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels were measured in the conditioned medium collected up to 20 hours after irradiation with α-particles and γ-rays in the dose-range of 0.1-1.0 Gy, in parallel with evaluation of their receptor expression in irradi-ated and bystander cells. Concerning IL-6, we observed the strongest modulation of its release

  4. Extracellular alpha-synuclein induces calpain-dependent overactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Czapski, Grzegorz A; Gąssowska, Magdalena; Wilkaniec, Anna; Cieślik, Magdalena; Adamczyk, Agata

    2013-09-17

    Extracellular alpha-synuclein (ASN) could be involved in the pathomechanism of Parkinson's disease (PD) via disturbances of calcium homeostasis, activation of nitric oxide synthase and oxidative/nitrosative stress. In this study we analyzed the role of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in the molecular mechanism(s) of ASN toxicity. We found that exposure of PC12 cells to ASN increases Cdk5 activity via calpain-dependent p25 formation and by enhancement of Cdk5 phosphorylation at Tyr15. Cdk5 and calpain inhibitors prevented ASN-evoked cell death. Our findings, indicating the participation of Cdk5 in ASN toxicity, provide new insight into how extracellular ASN may trigger dopaminergic cell dysfunction in PD.

  5. IGF-1R inhibition induces schedule-dependent sensitization of human melanoma to temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Ramcharan, Roger; Aleksic, Tamara; Kamdoum, Wilfride Petnga; Gao, Shan; Pfister, Sophia X; Tanner, Jordan; Bridges, Esther; Asher, Ruth; Watson, Amanda J; Margison, Geoffrey P; Woodcock, Mick; Repapi, Emmanouela; Li, Ji-Liang; Middleton, Mark R; Macaulay, Valentine M

    2015-11-24

    Prior studies implicate type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) in mediating chemo-resistance. Here, we investigated whether IGF-1R influences response to temozolomide (TMZ), which generates DNA adducts that are removed by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), or persist causing replication-associated double-strand breaks (DSBs). Initial assessment in 10 melanoma cell lines revealed that TMZ resistance correlated with MGMT expression (r = 0.79, p = 0.009), and in MGMT-proficient cell lines, with phospho-IGF-1R (r = 0.81, p = 0.038), suggesting that TMZ resistance associates with IGF-1R activation. Next, effects of IGF-1R inhibitors (IGF-1Ri) AZ3801 and linsitinib (OSI-906) were tested on TMZ-sensitivity, cell cycle progression and DSB induction. IGF-1Ri sensitized BRAF wild-type and mutant melanoma cells to TMZ in vitro, an effect that was independent of MGMT. Cells harboring wild-type p53 were more sensitive to IGF-1Ri, and showed schedule-dependent chemo-sensitization that was most effective when IGF-1Ri followed TMZ. This sequence sensitized to clinically-achievable TMZ concentrations and enhanced TMZ-induced apoptosis. Simultaneous or prior IGF-1Ri caused less effective chemo-sensitization, associated with increased G1 population and reduced accumulation of TMZ-induced DSBs. Clinically relevant sequential (TMZ → IGF-1Ri) treatment was tested in mice bearing A375M (V600E BRAF, wild-type p53) melanoma xenografts, achieving peak plasma/tumor IGF-1Ri levels comparable to clinical Cmax, and inducing extensive intratumoral apoptosis. TMZ or IGF-1Ri caused minor inhibition of tumor growth (gradient reduction 13%, 25% respectively), while combination treatment caused supra-additive growth delay (72%) that was significantly different from control (p < 0.01), TMZ (p < 0.01) and IGF-1Ri (p < 0.05) groups. These data highlight the importance of scheduling when combining IGF-1Ri and other targeted agents with drugs that induce replication-associated DNA damage. PMID

  6. IGF-1R inhibition induces schedule-dependent sensitization of human melanoma to temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Ramcharan, Roger; Aleksic, Tamara; Kamdoum, Wilfride Petnga; Gao, Shan; Pfister, Sophia X.; Tanner, Jordan; Bridges, Esther; Asher, Ruth; Watson, Amanda J.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Woodcock, Mick; Repapi, Emmanouela; Li, Ji-Liang; Middleton, Mark R.; Macaulay, Valentine M.

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies implicate type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) in mediating chemo-resistance. Here, we investigated whether IGF-1R influences response to temozolomide (TMZ), which generates DNA adducts that are removed by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), or persist causing replication-associated double-strand breaks (DSBs). Initial assessment in 10 melanoma cell lines revealed that TMZ resistance correlated with MGMT expression (r = 0.79, p = 0.009), and in MGMT-proficient cell lines, with phospho-IGF-1R (r = 0.81, p = 0.038), suggesting that TMZ resistance associates with IGF-1R activation. Next, effects of IGF-1R inhibitors (IGF-1Ri) AZ3801 and linsitinib (OSI-906) were tested on TMZ-sensitivity, cell cycle progression and DSB induction. IGF-1Ri sensitized BRAF wild-type and mutant melanoma cells to TMZ in vitro, an effect that was independent of MGMT. Cells harboring wild-type p53 were more sensitive to IGF-1Ri, and showed schedule-dependent chemo-sensitization that was most effective when IGF-1Ri followed TMZ. This sequence sensitized to clinically-achievable TMZ concentrations and enhanced TMZ-induced apoptosis. Simultaneous or prior IGF-1Ri caused less effective chemo-sensitization, associated with increased G1 population and reduced accumulation of TMZ-induced DSBs. Clinically relevant sequential (TMZ → IGF-1Ri) treatment was tested in mice bearing A375M (V600E BRAF, wild-type p53) melanoma xenografts, achieving peak plasma/tumor IGF-1Ri levels comparable to clinical Cmax, and inducing extensive intratumoral apoptosis. TMZ or IGF-1Ri caused minor inhibition of tumor growth (gradient reduction 13%, 25% respectively), while combination treatment caused supra-additive growth delay (72%) that was significantly different from control (p < 0.01), TMZ (p < 0.01) and IGF-1Ri (p < 0.05) groups. These data highlight the importance of scheduling when combining IGF-1Ri and other targeted agents with drugs that induce replication-associated DNA damage. PMID

  7. MECHANISMS OF SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE INDUCED AKT DEPENDENT SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL MIGRATION

    PubMed Central

    Roztocil, Elisa; Nicholl, Suzanne M.; Davies, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S-1-P) is a bioactive sphingolipid released from activated platelets, which stimulates migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in vitro. S-1-P will activate akt, which can regulate multiple cellular functions including cell migration. Akt activation is downstream of phosphatidyl-inositol 3′ kinase (PI3-K) and Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1). Objective To examine the regulation of akt signaling during smooth muscle cell migration in response to S-1-P. Methods Murine arterial SMCs were cultured in vitro. Linear wound and Boyden microchemotaxis assays of migration were performed in the presence of S-1-P with and without an akt inhibitor (aktI). Assays were performed for PI3-K, PDK1, akt and GSK3β activation in the presence of various inhibitors and after transfection with the Gβγ inhibitor. βARKCT. Results S-1-P induced time dependent PI3-K, PDK1 and akt activation. The migratory responses in both assays to S-1-P were blocked by akt inhibitor (aktI). Activation of akt and dephosphorylation of its downstream kinase, GSK3 β, were inhibited by aktI. Inhibition of PI3-K with LY294002 significantly reduced both PI3-K and akt activation. Inhibition of G βγ inhibited akt activation through a reduction in both PI3-K and PDK1 activation. While inhibition of the ras with manumycin A had no effect, inhibition of rho with C3 limited both PI3K and akt activation. PDK1 responses were unchanged by inhibition of GTPases. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation with N-acetylcysteine and of EGFR with AG1478 inhibited PDK1 activation in response to S-1-P. Conclusion S-1-P mediated migration is akt dependent. S-1-P mediated akt phosphorylation is controlled by G βγ dependent, PI3-K activation, which requires the GTPase rho and Gβγ. PDK1 activation requires Gβγ reactive oxygen species generation and EGFR activation. PMID:19081473

  8. Dipyrone metabolite 4-MAA induces hypothermia and inhibits PGE2-dependent and -independent fever while 4-AA only blocks PGE2-dependent fever

    PubMed Central

    Malvar, David do C; Aguiar, Fernando A; Vaz, Artur de L L; Assis, Débora C R; de Melo, Miriam C C; Jabor, Valquíria A P; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Clososki, Giuliano C; de Souza, Glória E P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The antipyretic and hypothermic prodrug dipyrone prevents PGE2-dependent and -independent fever induced by LPS from Escherichia coli and Tityus serrulatus venom (Tsv) respectively. We aimed to identify the dipyrone metabolites responsible for the antipyretic and hypothermic effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Male Wistar rats were treated i.p. with indomethacin (2 mg·kg−1), dipyrone, 4-methylaminoantipyrine (4-MAA), 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA) (60–360 mg·kg−1), 4-formylaminoantipyrine, 4-acethylaminoantipyrine (120–360 mg·kg−1) or vehicle 30 min before i.p. injection of LPS (50 μg·kg−1), Tsv (150 μg·kg−1) or saline. Rectal temperatures were measured by tele-thermometry and dipyrone metabolite concentrations determined in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus by LC-MS/MS. PGE2 concentrations were determined in the CSF and hypothalamus by elisa. KEY RESULTS In contrast to LPS, Tsv-induced fever was not followed by increased PGE2 in the CSF or hypothalamus. The antipyretic time-course of 4-MAA and 4-AA on LPS-induced fever overlapped with the period of the highest concentrations of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the hypothalamus, CSF and plasma. These metabolites reduced LPS-induced fever and the PGE2 increase in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus. Only 4-MAA inhibited Tsv-induced fever. The higher doses of dipyrone and 4-MAA also induced hypothermia. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The presence of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the CSF and hypothalamus was associated with PGE2 synthesis inhibition and a decrease in LPS-induced fever. 4-MAA was also shown to be an antipyretic metabolite for PGE2-independent fever induced by Tsv suggesting that it is responsible for the additional antipyretic mechanism of dipyrone. Moreover, 4-MAA is the hypothermic metabolite of dipyrone. PMID:24712707

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  10. Training-Dependent Associative Learning Induced Neocortical Structural Plasticity: A Trace Eyeblink Conditioning Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Lily S.; Prakapenka, Alesia V.; Zendeli, Liridon; Davis, Ashley S.; Galvez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Studies utilizing general learning and memory tasks have suggested the importance of neocortical structural plasticity for memory consolidation. However, these learning tasks typically result in learning of multiple different tasks over several days of training, making it difficult to determine the synaptic time course mediating each learning event. The current study used trace-eyeblink conditioning to determine the time course for neocortical spine modification during learning. With eyeblink conditioning, subjects are presented with a neutral, conditioned stimulus (CS) paired with a salient, unconditioned stimulus (US) to elicit an unconditioned response (UR). With multiple CS-US pairings, subjects learn to associate the CS with the US and exhibit a conditioned response (CR) when presented with the CS. Trace conditioning is when there is a stimulus free interval between the CS and the US. Utilizing trace-eyeblink conditioning with whisker stimulation as the CS (whisker-trace-eyeblink: WTEB), previous findings have shown that primary somatosensory (barrel) cortex is required for both acquisition and retention of the trace-association. Additionally, prior findings demonstrated that WTEB acquisition results in an expansion of the cytochrome oxidase whisker representation and synaptic modification in layer IV of barrel cortex. To further explore these findings and determine the time course for neocortical learning-induced spine modification, the present study utilized WTEB conditioning to examine Golgi-Cox stained neurons in layer IV of barrel cortex. Findings from this study demonstrated a training-dependent spine proliferation in layer IV of barrel cortex during trace associative learning. Furthermore, findings from this study showing that filopodia-like spines exhibited a similar pattern to the overall spine density further suggests that reorganization of synaptic contacts set the foundation for learning-induced neocortical modifications through the different

  11. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Carotid Body Chemosensory Potentiation and Hypertension Are Critically Dependent on Peroxynitrite Formation.

    PubMed

    Moya, Esteban A; Arias, Paulina; Varela, Carlos; Oyarce, María P; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the development of carotid body (CB) chemosensory potentiation and systemic hypertension induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the main feature of obstructive sleep apnea. We tested whether peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), a highly reactive nitrogen species, is involved in the enhanced CB oxygen chemosensitivity and the hypertension during CIH. Accordingly, we studied effects of Ebselen, an ONOO(-) scavenger, on 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity (3-NT-ir) in the CB, the CB chemosensory discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) in rats exposed to CIH. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH (5% O2, 12 times/h, 8 h/day) for 7 days. Ebselen (10 mg/kg/day) was administrated using osmotic minipumps and BP measured with radiotelemetry. Compared to the sham animals, CIH-treated rats showed increased 3-NT-ir within the CB, enhanced CB chemosensory responses to hypoxia, increased BP response to acute hypoxia, and hypertension. Rats treated with Ebselen and exposed to CIH displayed a significant reduction in 3-NT-ir levels (60.8 ± 14.9 versus 22.9 ± 4.2 a.u.), reduced CB chemosensory response to 5% O2 (266.5 ± 13.4 versus 168.6 ± 16.8 Hz), and decreased mean BP (116.9 ± 13.2 versus 82.1 ± 5.1 mmHg). Our results suggest that CIH-induced CB chemosensory potentiation and hypertension are critically dependent on ONOO(-) formation.

  12. A time-dependent degeneration manner of condyle in rat CFA-induced inflamed TMJ

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liqin; Guo, Huilin; Li, Cheng; Xu, Jie; Fang, Wei; Long, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation is a potential risk factor of osteoarthritis (OA) but the detailed degenerative changes in the inflamed TMJ remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the changes of condylar cartilage and subchondral bone in rat inflamed TMJ induced by Freund’s complete adjuvant (CFA). Articular cavity was injected with CFA and the TMJ samples were collected 1, 2, 3, and 4-week post-injection. Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) staining, toluidine blue (TB) staining, Safranin O (S.O) staining, Masson trichrome staining and micro-CT were used to assess TMJ degeneration during inflammation. Osteoclast and osteoblast activities were analyzed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and osteocalcin (OCN) immunohistochemistry staining respectively. The expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in condylar cartilage and subchondral bone was also evaluated through immunohistochemistry and RANKL/OPG ratio was evaluated. Reduced cartilage thickness, decreased number of chondrocytes, and down-regulated proteoglycan expression were observed in the condylar cartilage in the inflamed TMJ. Enhanced osteoclast activity, and expanded bone marrow cavity were reached the peak in the 2-week after CFA-injection. Meanwhile the RANKL/OPG ratio in the cartilage and subchondral bone also increased in the 2-week CFA-injection. Immature, unmineralized new bones with irregular trabecular bone structure, atypical condylar shape, up-regulated OCN expression, and decreased bone mineral density (BMD) were found in the inflamed TMJ. The time-dependent degeneration manner of TMJ cartilage and subchondral bone was found in CFA-induced arthritis rat model. The degeneration in the TMJ with inflammation might be a risk factor and should be concerned. PMID:27158347

  13. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Carotid Body Chemosensory Potentiation and Hypertension Are Critically Dependent on Peroxynitrite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Esteban A.; Arias, Paulina; Varela, Carlos; Oyarce, María P.; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the development of carotid body (CB) chemosensory potentiation and systemic hypertension induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the main feature of obstructive sleep apnea. We tested whether peroxynitrite (ONOO−), a highly reactive nitrogen species, is involved in the enhanced CB oxygen chemosensitivity and the hypertension during CIH. Accordingly, we studied effects of Ebselen, an ONOO− scavenger, on 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity (3-NT-ir) in the CB, the CB chemosensory discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) in rats exposed to CIH. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH (5% O2, 12 times/h, 8 h/day) for 7 days. Ebselen (10 mg/kg/day) was administrated using osmotic minipumps and BP measured with radiotelemetry. Compared to the sham animals, CIH-treated rats showed increased 3-NT-ir within the CB, enhanced CB chemosensory responses to hypoxia, increased BP response to acute hypoxia, and hypertension. Rats treated with Ebselen and exposed to CIH displayed a significant reduction in 3-NT-ir levels (60.8 ± 14.9 versus 22.9 ± 4.2 a.u.), reduced CB chemosensory response to 5% O2 (266.5 ± 13.4 versus 168.6 ± 16.8 Hz), and decreased mean BP (116.9 ± 13.2 versus 82.1 ± 5.1 mmHg). Our results suggest that CIH-induced CB chemosensory potentiation and hypertension are critically dependent on ONOO− formation. PMID:26798430

  14. Ablation of galectin-3 induces p27KIP1-dependent premature senescence without oncogenic stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S-J; Lee, H-W; Gu Kang, H; La, S-H; Choi, Il Ju; Ro, J Y; Bresalier, R S; Song, J; Chun, K-H

    2014-01-01

    Premature senescence induced by oncogenic stimuli or tumor suppressor activation plays opposing roles in tumorigenesis. Here, we propose that galectin-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, regulates premature senescence without oncogenic stress. We detected premature senescence, decreased Skp2, and increased p27KIP1 expression in galectin-3 knockout MEFs and galectin-3-depleted gastric cancer cells. Interestingly, galectin-3 depletion did not affect other senescence inducers such as p14ARF, p16INK4A, and p21WAF1/CIP1, suggesting that galectin-3-regulated senescence is p27KIP1 dependent. We demonstrate that galectin-3 depletion decreases retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation (Ser780, Ser807/811), cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression, and E2F1 transcriptional activation. Galectin-3 directly interacts with the cyclin D1/CDK4 complex and promotes hyperphosphorylation of Rb. It also blocks the inhibition of E2F1 transcription, thereby increasing the expression of Skp2 and reducing the stability of p27KIP1 to promote the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. Xenograft mice with galectin-3-depleted gastric cancer cells display tumor growth retardation that is reversed by Skp2 overexpression. Increased expression of galectin-3 is also associated with the advanced TNM (tumor, lymph node, metastasis) system, clinicopathological stage, and lymph node metastases. The probability of survival was significantly decreased in gastric cancer patients with galectin-3high p27KIP1-lowcells. Taken together, our results show that galectin-3 may accelerate gastric tumorigenesis by inhibiting premature senescence. PMID:24971481

  15. Apoptosis Inducing Effect of Plumbagin on Colonic Cancer Cells Depends on Expression of COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniya, Bharathi Raja; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Mohammed Sadullah, Sakeena Sadullah; Davis, Nimitha; Baddi Reddi Subhadara, Lakshmi; Halagowder, Devaraj; Sivasitambaram, Niranjali Devaraj

    2011-01-01

    Plumbagin, a quinonoid found in the plants of the Plumbaginaceae, possesses medicinal properties. In this study we investigated the anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity of plumbagin by using two human colonic cancer cell lines, HT29 and HCT15. IC50 of Plumbagin for HCT15 and HT29 cells (22.5 µM and 62.5 µM, respectively) were significantly different. To study the response of cancer cells during treatment strategies, cells were treated with two different concentrations, 15 µM, 30 µM for HCT15 and 50 µM, 75 µM for HT29 cells. Though activation of NFκB, Caspases-3, elevated levels of TNF-α, cytosolic Cytochrome C were seen in both HCT15 cells HT29 treated with plumbagin, aberrant apoptosis with decreased level of pEGFR, pAkt, pGsk-3β, PCNA and Cyclin D1was observed only in 15 µM and 30 µM plumbagin treated HCT15 and 75 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells. This suggests that plumbagin induces apoptosis in both HCT15 cells and HT29 treated, whereas, proliferation was inhibited only in 15 µM and 30 µM plumbagin treated HCT15 and 75 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells, but not in 50 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells. Expression of COX-2 was decreased in 75 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells when compared to 50 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells, whereas HCT15 cells lack COX. Hence the observed resistance to induction of apoptosis in 50 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells are attributed to the expression of COX-2. In conclusion, plumbagin induces apoptosis in colonic cancer cells through TNF-α mediated pathway depending on expression of COX-2 expression. PMID:21559086

  16. Paeoniflorin abrogates DSS-induced colitis via a TLR4-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Dou, Wei; Zhang, Eryun; Sun, Aning; Ding, Lili; Wei, Xiaohui; Chou, Guixin; Mani, Sridhar; Wang, Zhengtao

    2014-01-01

    Paeonia lactiflora Pall is one of the most well-known herbs in China, Korea, and Japan for more than 1,200 years. Paeoniflorin, the major bioactive component of peony root, has recently been reported to have anticolitic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. The present study was to explore the possible mechanism of paeoniflorin in attenuating dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Pre- and coadministration of paeoniflorin significantly reduced the severity of colitis and resulted in downregulation of several inflammatory parameters in the colon, including the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, and the mRNA expression of proinflammatory mediators (MCP-1, Cox2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17). The decline in the activation of NF-κB p65, ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK correlated with a decrease in mucosal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) but not TLR2 or TLR5 expression. In accordance with the in vivo results, paeoniflorin downregulated TLR4 expression, blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, and reduced the production of IL-6 in LPS-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Transient transfection assay performed in LPS-stimulated human colon cancer HT-29 cells indicated that paeoniflorin inhibits NF-κB transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. TLR4 knockdown and overexpression experiments demonstrated a requirement for TLR4 in paeoniflorin-mediated downregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Thus, for the first time, the present study indicates that paeoniflorin abrogates DSS-induced colitis via decreasing the expression of TLR4 and suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways. PMID:24232001

  17. Citreoviridin Induces Autophagy-Dependent Apoptosis through Lysosomal-Mitochondrial Axis in Human Liver HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexia; Liu, Yanan; Liu, Xiaofang; Jiang, Liping; Yang, Guang; Sun, Xiance; Geng, Chengyan; Li, Qiujuan; Yao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Min

    2015-01-01

    Citreoviridin (CIT) is a mycotoxin derived from fungal species in moldy cereals. In our previous study, we reported that CIT stimulated autophagosome formation in human liver HepG2 cells. Here, we aimed to explore the relationship of autophagy with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and apoptosis in CIT-treated cells. Our data showed that CIT increased the expression of LC3-II, an autophagosome biomarker, from the early stage of treatment (6 h). After treatment with CIT for 12 h, lysosomal membrane permeabilization occurred, followed by the release of cathepsin D in HepG2 cells. Inhibition of autophagosome formation with siRNA against Atg5 attenuated CIT-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In addition, CIT induced collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential as assessed by JC-1 staining. Furthermore, caspase-3 activity assay showed that CIT induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Inhibition of autophagosome formation attenuated CIT-induced apoptosis, indicating that CIT-induced apoptosis was autophagy-dependent. Cathepsin D inhibitor, pepstatin A, relieved CIT-induced apoptosis as well, suggesting the involvement of the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis in CIT-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our data demonstrated that CIT induced autophagy-dependent apoptosis through the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis in HepG2 cells. The study thus provides essential mechanistic insight, and suggests clues for the effective management and treatment of CIT-related diseases. PMID:26258792

  18. Stachyose-induced apoptosis of Caco-2 cells via the caspase-dependent mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guidong; Mao, Jian; Ji, Zhongwei; Ailati, Aisikaer

    2015-03-01

    Some studies have shown that stachyose, as prebiotics, can prevent indirectly colon cancer cell growth by promoting the proliferation of probiotics or producing beneficial materials in the intestine. However, its direct inhibitory effects on cancer cells are still unclear. Thus, this study aims to investigate the direct inhibitory effect of stachyose on human colon cancer cells and determine the molecular mechanism underlying this effect. The MTT assay was used to assess the inhibitory effect of stachyose on Caco-2 cells. Apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) measurements were analyzed using flow cytometry. The activities and mRNA expressions of caspases 3 and 9 were determined using caspase assay kits and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The apoptotic protein expressions of Bcl-2, Bax, and cytochrome C (Cyt C) were detected through western blotting. Results showed that stachyose inhibits Caco-2 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. After pretreatment with 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 mg mL(-1) stachyose, cell inhibitory rates of 15.31% ± 3.20%, 28.45% ± 2.10%, 40.23% ± 5.70%, and 55.67% ± 4.50% were respectively obtained. Compared with the control, decreases in ΔΨm, increases in caspase 3 and 9 activities and mRNA expressions, down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein expression, up-regulation of the Bax protein and Cyt C release of Caco-2 cells were clearly observed upon exposure to different stachyose concentrations. The inhibitory mechanism of stachyose on Caco-2 cells involves the caspase-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. PMID:25578308

  19. Generation and characterization of LIF-dependent canine induced pluripotent stem cells from adult dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Wolvetang, Ernst J

    2012-08-10

    Dogs provide a more clinically relevant model of human disease than rodents, particularly with respect to hereditary diseases. Thus, the availability of canine stem cells will greatly facilitate the use of the dog in the development of stem cell-based gene therapies and regenerative medicine. In this study we describe the production of canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) from adult dermal fibroblasts. These cells have a morphology resembling previously described canine embryonic stem cells, a normal karyotype, and express pluripotency markers including alkaline phosphatase, Nanog, Oct4, Telomerase, SSEA1, SSEA4, TRA1-60, TRA1-81, and Rex1. Furthermore, the inactive X chromosome is reactivated indicating a ground-state pluripotency. In culture they readily form embryoid bodies, which in turn give rise to cell types from all 3 embryonic germ layers, as indicated by expression of the definitive endoderm markers Cxcr4 and α-fetoprotein, mesoderm markers Collagen IIA and Gata2, and ectoderm markers βIII-tubulin, Enolase, and Nestin. Of particular significance is the observation that these ciPSCs are dependent only on leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), making them similar to mouse and canine embryonic stem cells, but strikingly unlike the ciPSCs recently described in two other studies, which were dependent on both basic fibroblast growth factor and LIF in order to maintain their pluripotency. Thus, our ciPSCs closely resemble mouse ESCs derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation embryos, while the previously described ciPSCs appear to be more representative of cells from the epiblast of mouse postimplantation embryos.

  20. Study on the bias-dependent effects of proton-induced damage in CdZnTe radiation detectors using ion beam induced charge microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Na; Guo, Rongrong; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao; Xi, Shouzhi

    2016-09-01

    The influence of damage induced by 2MeV protons on CdZnTe radiation detectors is investigated using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy. Charge collection efficiency (CCE) in irradiated region is found to be degraded above a fluence of 3.3×10(11)p/cm(2) and the energy spectrum is severely deteriorated with increasing fluence. Moreover, CCE maps obtained under the applied biases from 50V to 400V suggests that local radiation damage results in significant degradation of CCE uniformity, especially under low bias, i. e., 50V and 100V. The CCE nonuniformity induced by local radiation damage, however, can be greatly improved by increasing the detector applied bias. This bias-dependent effect of 2MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe detectors is attributed to the interaction of electron cloud and radiation-induced displacement defects. PMID:27399802

  1. Cannabidiol stimulates Aml-1a-dependent glial differentiation and inhibits glioma stem-like cells proliferation by inducing autophagy in a TRPV2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nabissi, Massimo; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Amantini, Consuelo; Liberati, Sonia; Santoni, Matteo; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-10-15

    Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) correspond to a tumor cell subpopulation, involved in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor initiation and acquired chemoresistance. Currently, drug-induced differentiation is considered as a promising approach to eradicate this tumor-driving cell population. Recently, the effect of cannabinoids (CBs) in promoting glial differentiation and inhibiting gliomagenesis has been evidenced. Herein, we demonstrated that cannabidiol (CBD) by activating transient receptor potential vanilloid-2 (TRPV2) triggers GSCs differentiation activating the autophagic process and inhibits GSCs proliferation and clonogenic capability. Above all, CBD and carmustine (BCNU) in combination overcome the high resistance of GSCs to BCNU treatment, by inducing apoptotic cell death. Acute myeloid leukemia (Aml-1) transcription factors play a pivotal role in GBM proliferation and differentiation and it is known that Aml-1 control the expression of several nociceptive receptors. So, we evaluated the expression levels of Aml-1 spliced variants (Aml-1a, b and c) in GSCs and during their differentiation. We found that Aml-1a is upregulated during GSCs differentiation, and its downregulation restores a stem cell phenotype in differentiated GSCs. Since it was demonstrated that CBD induces also TRPV2 expression and that TRPV2 is involved in GSCs differentiation, we evaluated if Aml-1a interacted directly with TRPV2 promoters. Herein, we found that Aml-1a binds TRPV2 promoters and that Aml-1a expression is upregulated by CBD treatment, in a TRPV2 and PI3K/AKT dependent manner. Altogether, these results support a novel mechanism by which CBD inducing TRPV2-dependent autophagic process stimulates Aml-1a-dependent GSCs differentiation, abrogating the BCNU chemoresistance in GSCs.

  2. Accounting for Dependence Induced by Weighted KNN Imputation in Paired Samples, Motivated by a Colorectal Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Suyundikov, Anvar; Stevens, John R.; Corcoran, Christopher; Herrick, Jennifer; Wolff, Roger K.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Missing data can arise in bioinformatics applications for a variety of reasons, and imputation methods are frequently applied to such data. We are motivated by a colorectal cancer study where miRNA expression was measured in paired tumor-normal samples of hundreds of patients, but data for many normal samples were missing due to lack of tissue availability. We compare the precision and power performance of several imputation methods, and draw attention to the statistical dependence induced by K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) imputation. This imputation-induced dependence has not previously been addressed in the literature. We demonstrate how to account for this dependence, and show through simulation how the choice to ignore or account for this dependence affects both power and type I error rate control. PMID:25849489

  3. TEL/ETV6 induces apoptosis in 32D cells through p53-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagata, Tetsuya; Maki, Kazuhiro; Waga, Kazuo; Mitani, Kinuko . E-mail: kinukom-tky@umin.ac.jp

    2006-08-25

    TEL is an ETS family transcription factor that is critical for maintaining hematopoietic stem cells in adult bone marrow. To investigate the roles of TEL in myeloid proliferation and differentiation, we introduced TEL cDNA into mouse myeloid 32Dcl3 cells. Overexpression of TEL repressed interleukin-3-dependent proliferation through blocking cell cycle progression. Also, the presence of TEL triggered apoptosis through the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway on exposure to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. We found an increase in p53 protein and its DNA binding in the TEL-overexpressing cells. Forced expression of TEL stimulated transcription via the p53-responsive element and increased the expression of cellular target genes for p53 such as cell cycle regulator p21 and apoptosis inducer Puma. Consistently, induction of apoptosis was delayed by pifithrin-{alpha} treatment and completely blocked by increased expression of Bcl-2 in the TEL-overexpressing cells. These data collectively suggest that TEL exerts a tumor suppressive function through augmenting the p53 pathway and facilitates normal development of myelopoiesis.

  4. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-09-24

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα(-/-) male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand.

  5. Nanodiamond for hydrogen storage: temperature-dependent hydrogenation and charge-induced dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S

    2012-02-21

    Carbon-based hydrogen storage materials are one of hottest research topics in materials science. Although the majority of studies focus on highly porous loosely bound systems, these systems have various limitations including use at elevated temperature. Here we propose, based on computer simulations, that diamond nanoparticles may provide a new promising high temperature candidate with a moderate storage capacity, but good potential for recyclability. The hydrogenation of nanodiamonds is found to be easily achieved, in agreement with experiments, though we find the stability of hydrogenation is dependent on the morphology of nanodiamonds and surrounding environment. Hydrogenation is thermodynamically favourable even at high temperature in pure hydrogen, ammonia, and methane gas reservoirs, whereas water vapour can help to reduce the energy barrier for desorption. The greatest challenge in using this material is the breaking of the strong covalent C-H bonds, and we have identified that the spontaneous release of atomic hydrogen may be achieved through charging of hydrogenated nanodiamonds. If the degree of induced charge is properly controlled, the integrity of the host nanodiamond is maintained, which indicates that an efficient and recyclable approach for hydrogen release may be possible. PMID:22089370

  6. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P.; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα−/− male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand. PMID:27669233

  7. Measurements of the temperature dependence of radiation induced conductivity in polymeric dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Jodie

    This study measures Radiation Induced Conductivity (RIC) in five insulating polymeric materials over temperatures ranging from ~110 K to ~350 K: polyimide (PI or Kapton HN(TM) and Kapton E(TM)), polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE or Teflon(TM)), ethylene-tetraflouroethylene (ETFE or Tefzel(TM)), and Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE). RIC occurs when incident ionizing radiation deposits energy and excites electrons into the conduction band of insulators. Conductivity was measured when a voltage was applied across vacuum-baked, thin film polymer samples in a parallel plate geometry. RIC was calculated as the difference in sample conductivity under no incident radiation and under an incident ~4 MeV electron beam at low incident dose rates of 0.01 rad/sec to 10 rad/sec. The steady-state RIC was found to agree well with the standard power law relation, sigmaRIC(D˙) = kRIC(T) D˙Delta(T) between conductivity, sigmaRIC and adsorbed dose rate, D˙. Both the proportionality constant, kRIC, and the power, Delta, were found to be temperature-dependent above ~250 K, with behavior consistent with photoconductivity models developed for localized trap states in disordered semiconductors. Below ~250 K, kRIC and Delta exhibited little change in any of the materials.

  8. [SIX CASES OF WHEAT-DEPENDENT EXERCISE-INDUCED ANAPHYLAXIS IN CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Sakai, Kazunori; Hayashi, Naofumi; Sato, Arisa; Sasaki, Kemal; Matsui, Teruaki; Sugiura, Shiro; Kando, Naoyuki; Ito, Komei

    2015-08-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is often reported in adults for whom the specific IgE to ω-5 gliadin can be a useful diagnostic test. However, few cases of WDEIA in children have been reported. We herein report six cases (aged 7-16 years) of children with WDEIA, who had no clinical history of immediate-type wheat allergy but who were diagnosed by a wheat ingestion + exercise provocation test. The specific IgE to wheat ranged <0.35-3.49 (median 1.64) UA/ml. Skin prick tests using wheat extract were performed on 3 patients who showed either a negative or low specific IgE titer to wheat, and all of them resulted in negative findings. The specific IgE to ω-5 gliadin was below the detection limit in all cases. Aspirin-supplemented provocation tests were performed to 4 cases who had negative results in the wheat + exercise test. All of these resulted in a positive reaction, and two of them provoked the occurrence of anaphylactic shock, which was relieved by the intramuscular injection of adrenaline. WDEIA in children cannot be ruled out by serological tests alone. On the other hand, severe symptoms might be provoked by the provocation test. Therefore, a safe procedure is warranted for the diagnosis of WDEIA in children.

  9. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα(-/-) male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand. PMID:27669233

  10. Artemisinin Induces Calcium-Dependent Protein Secretion in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nagamune, Kisaburo; Beatty, Wandy L.; Sibley, L. David

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular calcium controls several crucial cellular events in apicomplexan parasites, including protein secretion, motility, and invasion into and egress from host cells. The plant compound thapsigargin inhibits the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), resulting in elevated calcium and induction of protein secretion in Toxoplasma gondii. Artemisinins are natural products that show potent and selective activity against parasites, making them useful for the treatment of malaria. While the mechanism of action is uncertain, previous studies have suggested that artemisinin may inhibit SERCA, thus disrupting calcium homeostasis. We cloned the single-copy gene encoding SERCA in T. gondii (TgSERCA) and demonstrate that the protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum in the parasite. In extracellular parasites, TgSERCA partially relocalized to the apical pole, a highly active site for regulated secretion of micronemes. TgSERCA complemented a calcium ATPase-defective yeast mutant, and this activity was inhibited by either thapsigargin or artemisinin. Treatment of T. gondii with artemisinin triggered calcium-dependent secretion of microneme proteins, similar to the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin. Artemisinin treatment also altered intracellular calcium in parasites by increasing the periodicity of calcium oscillations and inducing recurrent, strong calcium spikes, as imaged using Fluo-4 labeling. Collectively, these results demonstrate that artemisinin perturbs calcium homeostasis in T. gondii, supporting the idea that Ca2+-ATPases are potential drug targets in parasites. PMID:17766463

  11. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development. PMID:25681390

  12. Dose dependency of time of onset of radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, P.E.; Shalet, S.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was assessed on 133 occasions in 82 survivors of childhood malignant disease. All had received cranial irradiation with a dose range to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of 27 to 47.5 Gy (estimated by a schedule of 16 fractions over 3 weeks) and had been tested on one or more occasions between 0.2 and 18.9 years after treatment. Results of one third of the GH tests were defined as normal (GH peak response, greater than 15 mU/L) within the first 5 years, in comparison with 16% after 5 years. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that dose (p = 0.007) and time from irradiation (p = 0.03), but not age at therapy, had a significant influence on peak GH responses. The late incidence of GH deficiency was similar over the whole dose range (4 of 26 GH test results normal for less than 30 Gy and 4 of 25 normal for greater than or equal to 30 Gy after 5 years), but the speed of onset over the first years was dependent on dose. We conclude that the requirement for GH replacement therapy and the timing of its introduction will be influenced by the dose of irradiation received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  13. Nigrostriatal proteomics of cypermethrin-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration: microglial activation-dependent and -independent regulations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand Kumar; Tiwari, Manindra Nath; Dixit, Anubhuti; Upadhyay, Ghanshyam; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Dhirendra; Prakash, Om; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2011-08-01

    The study aimed to identify the differentially expressed nigrostriatal proteins in cypermethrin-induced neurodegeneration and to investigate the role of microglial activation therein. Proteomic approaches were used to identify the differentially expressed proteins. Microglial activation, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity (TH-IR), dopamine content, and neurobehavioral changes were measured according to the standard procedures. The expressions of α-internexin intermediate filament (α-IIF), ATP synthase D chain (ATP-SD), heat shock protein (Hsp)-70, truncated connexin-47, Hsp-60, mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated kinase-5, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 24k chain precursor, platelet-activating factor acetyl hydrolase 1b-α2 (PAF-AH 1b-α2), and synaptosomal-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25) were altered in the substantia nigra and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide- specific isocitrate dehydrogenase, phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein-1, prohibitin, protein disulfide isomerase-endoplasmic reticulum 60 protease, stathmin, and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme in the striatum along with motor impairment, decreased dopamine and TH-IR, and increased microglial activation after cypermethrin exposure. Minocycline restored α-IIF, ATP-SD chain, truncated connexin-47, Hsp-60, PAF-AH 1b-α2, stathmin and SNAP-25 expressions, motor impairment, dopamine, TH-IR, and microglial activation. The results suggest that cypermethrin produces microglial activation-dependent and -independent changes in the expression patterns of the nigrostriatal proteins leading to dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  14. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-02-13

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development.

  15. [SIX CASES OF WHEAT-DEPENDENT EXERCISE-INDUCED ANAPHYLAXIS IN CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Sakai, Kazunori; Hayashi, Naofumi; Sato, Arisa; Sasaki, Kemal; Matsui, Teruaki; Sugiura, Shiro; Kando, Naoyuki; Ito, Komei

    2015-08-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is often reported in adults for whom the specific IgE to ω-5 gliadin can be a useful diagnostic test. However, few cases of WDEIA in children have been reported. We herein report six cases (aged 7-16 years) of children with WDEIA, who had no clinical history of immediate-type wheat allergy but who were diagnosed by a wheat ingestion + exercise provocation test. The specific IgE to wheat ranged <0.35-3.49 (median 1.64) UA/ml. Skin prick tests using wheat extract were performed on 3 patients who showed either a negative or low specific IgE titer to wheat, and all of them resulted in negative findings. The specific IgE to ω-5 gliadin was below the detection limit in all cases. Aspirin-supplemented provocation tests were performed to 4 cases who had negative results in the wheat + exercise test. All of these resulted in a positive reaction, and two of them provoked the occurrence of anaphylactic shock, which was relieved by the intramuscular injection of adrenaline. WDEIA in children cannot be ruled out by serological tests alone. On the other hand, severe symptoms might be provoked by the provocation test. Therefore, a safe procedure is warranted for the diagnosis of WDEIA in children. PMID:26522419

  16. Wavelength dependence of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) on questioned document investigation.

    PubMed

    Elsherbiny, Nany; Aied Nassef, O

    2015-07-01

    The fast and nearly non-destructive criteria of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been exploited for forensic purposes, specifically, document investigation. The dependence of the optical emission spectra of different black gel ink samples on the excitation laser wavelength, namely the visible wavelength at λ=532 nm and the IR wavelength at λ=1064 nm, was studied. The inks of thirty black gel-ink pens comprising ten brands were analyzed to determine the variation of the chemical composition of ink and to discriminate among them with minimum mass removal and minimum damage to the document's paper. Under the adopted experimental conditions, the ability of the visible LIBS to differentiate among the different ink samples was successful compared to IR LIBS at the same laser pulse energy (~25 mJ/pulse, laser fluence is ~1400J·cm(-2) for visible laser and ~1100J·cm(-2) for IR laser) which could be attributed to the IR absorption effects by the black ink. However, the visible LIBS produces deeper crater with respect to that produced by IR LIBS. Applying IR LIBS with higher pulse energy of ~87mJ (laser fluence is ~4100J·cm(-2)), identification and differentiation of the adopted samples was performed with producing a larger-diameter but superficial crater. The plasma parameters are discussed at the adopted experimental conditions. The results support the potential of LIBS technique using both the visible and IR lasers to be commercially developed for forensic document examination. PMID:26087873

  17. Membrane depolarization induces calcium-dependent secretion of tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Gualandris, A; Jones, T E; Strickland, S; Tsirka, S E

    1996-04-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to active plasmin, is produced in the rat and mouse hippocampus and participates in neuronal plasticity. To help define the role of tPA in the nervous system, we have analyzed the regulation of its expression in the neuronal cell line PC12. In control cultures, tPA activity is exclusively cell-associated, and no activity is measurable in the culture medium. When the cells are treated with depolarizing agents, such as KCI, tPA activity becomes detectable in the medium. The increased secreted tPA activity is not accompanied by an increase in tPA mRNA levels, and it is not blocked by protein synthesis inhibitors. In contrast, tPA release is abolished by Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that chemically induced membrane depolarization stimulates the secretion of preformed enzyme. Moreover, KCI has a similar effect in vivo when administered to the murine brain via an osmotic pump: tPA activity increases along the CA2-CA3 regions and dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. These results demonstrate a neuronal activity-dependent secretory mechanism that can rapidly increase the amount of tPA in neuronal tissue.

  18. Involvement of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 in goniothalamin-induced TP53-dependent and -independent apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma-derived cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Lih-Ren; Li, Chien-Feng; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to investigate the upstream apoptotic mechanisms that were triggered by a styrylpyrone derivative, goniothalamin (GTN), in tumor protein p53 (TP53)-positive and -negative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-derived cells. Effects of GTN were evaluated by the flow cytometry, alkaline comet assay, immunocytochemistry, small-hairpin RNA interference, mitochondria/cytosol fractionation, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting analysis and caspase 3 activity assays in two HCC-derived cell lines. Results indicated that GTN triggered phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1, also known as NOXA)-mediated apoptosis via TP53-dependent and -independent pathways. In TP53-positive SK-Hep1 cells, GTN furthermore induced TP53 transcription-dependent and -independent apoptosis. After GTN treatment, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, formation of DNA double-strand breaks, transactivation of TP53 and/or PMAIP1 gene, translocation of TP53 and/or PMAIP1 proteins to mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, cleavage of caspases and induction of apoptosis in both cell lines were sustained. GTN might represent a novel class of anticancer drug that induces apoptosis in HCC-derived cells through PMAIP1 transactivation regardless of the status of TP53 gene. - Highlights: > Goniothalamin (GTN) induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinomas-derived cells. > The apoptosis induced by GTN is PMAIP1-dependent, regardless of TP53 status. > The apoptosis induced by GTN might be TP53 transcription-dependent or -independent. > GTN-induced apoptosis is mitochondria- and caspases-mediated.

  19. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity in rats bearing human adenovirus type 12-induced primary retinoblastoma-like tumor in the eye.

    PubMed

    Nishida, T; Mukai, N; Solish, S P

    1981-01-01

    Using an animal model of retinoblastoma in inbred rats and cultured human adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor cells (RAO 188), complement-dependent cytotoxicity was determined by measuring release of 3H-uridine labelled RNA. Sera from rats in which tumors did not grow after adenovirus type 12 inoculation had higher cytotoxicity against RAO 188 cells than sera from rats bearing primary adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor. These results showed that the rat which could raise antibodies against adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor cells did not allow the tumor growth in the eye after virus inoculation.

  20. Reactive oxygen species burst induced by aluminum stress triggers mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death in peanut root tip cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjing; Yang, Xudong; Yao, Shaochang; LwinOo, Thet; He, Huyi; Wang, Aiqin; Li, Chuangzhen; He, Longfei

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies had certified that aluminum (Al) induced ROS production and programmed cell death (PCD) in higher plants. The relationship between ROS production and PCD occurrence under Al stress is uncovered. The results showed that root elongation inhibition and PCD occurrence was induced by 100 μM AlCl3. Al stress induced ROS burst, up-regulated Rboh and COX gene expression, increased mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening, decreased inner mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), released cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytoplasm, activated caspase 3-like protease activity. Exogenous H2O2 aggravated the changes caused by Al and accelerated PCD occurrence, but ROS scavenger CAT and AsA reversed the changes caused by Al and inhibited PCD production. A potential cascade of cellular events during Al induced PCD via mitochondria dependent pathway and the mechanism of ROS on regulating PCD induced by Al is proposed.

  1. Cancer-causing mutations in a novel transcription-dependent nuclear export motif of VHL abrogate oxygen-dependent degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor.

    PubMed

    Khacho, Mireille; Mekhail, Karim; Pilon-Larose, Karine; Payette, Josianne; Lee, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    It is thought that degradation of nuclear proteins by the ubiquitylation system requires nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of E3 ubiquitin ligases. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein is the substrate recognition component of a Cullin-2-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that recruits hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) for oxygen-dependent degradation. We demonstrated that VHL engages in nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking that requires ongoing transcription to promote efficient HIF degradation. Here, we report the identification of a discreet motif, DXGX(2)DX(2)L, that directs transcription-dependent nuclear export of VHL and which is targeted by naturally occurring mutations associated with renal carcinoma and polycythemia in humans. The DXGX(2)DX(2)L motif is also found in other proteins, including poly(A)-binding protein 1, to direct its transcription-dependent nuclear export. We define DXGX(2)DX(2)L as TD-NEM (transcription-dependent nuclear export motif), since inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole abrogates its nuclear export activity. Disease-causing mutations of key residues of TD-NEM restrain the ability of VHL to efficiently mediate oxygen-dependent degradation of HIF by altering its nuclear export dynamics without affecting interaction with its substrate. These results identify a novel nuclear export motif, further highlight the role of nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of E3 ligases in degradation of nuclear substrates, and provide evidence that disease-causing mutations can target subcellular trafficking.

  2. Osteocalcin attenuates high fat diet-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation through Akt/eNOS-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated a protective effect of osteocalcin (OCN) on glucose homeostasis and metabolic syndrome. However, its role in vascular function remains unknown. This study investigated the contribution of OCN to the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction in the thoracic aorta of apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-KO) mice. Methods Eight-week-old ApoE–KO mice were given chow or high fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks with or without daily intraperitoneal injection of OCN. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), insulin tolerance test (ITT),measurement of serum lipid profiles and blood pressure were carried out. Endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) was measured by wire myography. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to study the role of OCN on eNOS levels in vitro. PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) and Akt inhibitor V were used ex-vivo to determine whether PI3K/Akt/eNOS contributes to the beneficial effect of OCN for the vascular or not. Results Daily injections of OCN can significantly improve lipid metabolism, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in ApoE-KO mice. In ApoE-KO mice fed with HFD, the OCN-treated mice displayed an improved acetylcholine-stimulated EDR compared to the vehicle-treated group. In addition, compared to vehicle-treated HUVECs, OCN-treated HUVECs displayed increased activation of the Akt-eNOS signaling pathway, as evidenced by significantly higher levels of phosphorylated Akt and eNOS. Furthermore, a similar beneficial effect of OCN on thoracic aorta was observed using ex vivo organ culture of isolated mouse aortic segment. However, this effect was attenuated upon co-incubation with PI3K inhibitor or Akt inhibitor V. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that OCN has an endothelial-protective effect in atherosclerosis through mediating the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:24708830

  3. Glutathionylation Mediates Angiotensin II–Induced eNOS Uncoupling, Amplifying NADPH Oxidase‐Dependent Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia‐Chi; Gentile, Carmine; Kok, Cindy; Nunez, Andrea; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A. S.; Davies, Michael J.; Hawkins, Clare L.; Rasmussen, Helge H.; Figtree, Gemma A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathionylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) “uncouples” the enzyme, switching its function from nitric oxide (NO) to O2•− generation. We examined whether this reversible redox modification plays a role in angiotensin II (Ang II)‐induced endothelial dysfunction. Methods and Results Ang II increased eNOS glutathionylation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), rabbit aorta, and human arteries in vitro. This was associated with decreased NO bioavailability and eNOS activity as well as increased O2•− generation. Ang II‐induced decrease in eNOS activity was mediated by glutathionylation, as shown by restoration of function by glutaredoxin‐1. Moreover, Ang II‐induced increase in O2•− and decrease in NO were abolished in HUVECs transiently transfected, with mutant eNOS rendered resistant to glutathionylation. Ang II effects were nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase dependent because preincubation with gp 91ds‐tat, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, abolished the increase in eNOS glutathionylation and loss of eNOS activity. Functional significance of glutathionylation in intact vessels was supported by Ang II‐induced impairment of endothelium‐dependent vasorelaxation that was abolished by the disulfide reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Furthermore, attenuation of Ang II signaling in vivo by administration of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor reduced eNOS glutathionylation, increased NO, diminished O2•−, improved endothelium‐dependent vasorelaxation and reduced blood pressure. Conclusions Uncoupling of eNOS by glutathionylation is a key mediator of Ang II‐induced endothelial dysfunction, and its reversal is a mechanism for cardiovascular protection by ACE inhibition. We suggest that Ang II‐induced O2•− generation in endothelial cells, although dependent on NADPH oxidase, is amplified by glutathionylation‐dependent eNOS uncoupling. PMID:24755153

  4. β-Catenin/CBP–Dependent Signaling Regulates TGF-β–Induced Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition of Lens Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taiyab, Aftab; Korol, Anna; Deschamps, Paula A.; West-Mays, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor-β–induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one of the main causes of posterior capsular opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract; however, the signaling events involved in TGF-β–induced PCO have not been fully characterized. Here, we focus on examining the role of β-catenin/cyclic AMP response element–binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent signaling in regulating cytoskeletal dynamics during TGF-β–induced EMT in lens epithelial explants. Methods Rat lens epithelial explants were cultured in medium M199 in the absence of serum. Explants were treated with TGF-β2 in the presence or absence of the β-catenin/CBP interaction inhibitor, ICG-001, or the β-catenin/TCF interaction inhibitor, PNU-74654. Western blot and immunofluorescence experiments were carried out and analyzed. Results An increase in the expression of fascin, an actin-bundling protein, was observed in the lens explants upon stimulation with TGF-β, and colocalized with F-actin filaments. Inhibition of β-catenin/CBP interactions, but not β-catenin/TCF interactions, led to a decrease in TGF-β–induced fascin and stress fiber formation, as well as a decrease in the expression of known markers of EMT, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9). In addition, inhibition of β-catenin/CBP–dependent signaling also prevented TGF-β–induced downregulation of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) in lens explants. Conclusions We show that β-catenin/CBP–dependent signaling regulates fascin, MMP9, and α-SMA expression during TGF-β–induced EMT. We demonstrate that β-catenin/CBP–dependent signaling is crucial for TGF-β–induced EMT in the lens. PMID:27787561

  5. α-Terpineol attenuates morphine-induced physical dependence and tolerance in mice: role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Parvardeh, Siavash; Moghimi, Mahsa; Eslami, Pegah; Masoudi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Dependence and tolerance to opioid analgesics are major problems limiting their clinical application. α-Terpineol is a monoterpenoid alcohol with neuroprotective effects which is found in several medicinal plants such as Myrtus communis, Laurus nobilis, and Stachys byzantina. It has been shown that some of these medicinal plants such as S. byzantina attenuate dependence and tolerance to morphine. Since α-terpineol is one of the bioactive phytochemical constituent of these medicinal plants, the present study was conducted to investigate the effects of α-terpineol on morphine-induced dependence and tolerance in mice. Materials and Methods: The mice were rendered dependent or tolerant to morphine by a 3-day administration schedule. The hot-plate test and naloxone-induced withdrawal syndrome were used to evaluate tolerance and dependence on morphine, respectively. To investigate a possible role for nitric oxide (NO) in the protective effect of α-terpineol, the NO synthase inhibitor, L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and NO precursor, L-arginine, were used. Results: Administration of α-terpineol (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, IP) significantly decreased the number of jumps in morphine dependent animals. Moreover, α-terpineol (20 and 40 mg/kg, IP) attenuated tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine. The inhibitory effects of α-terpineol on morphine-induced dependence and tolerance were enhanced by pretreatment with L-NAME (10 mg/kg, IP). However, L-arginine (300 mg/kg, IP) antagonized the protective effects of α-terpineol on dependence and tolerance to morphine. Conclusion: These findings indicate that α-terpineol prevents the development of dependence and tolerance to morphine probably through the influence on NO production. PMID:27081466

  6. Cell swelling-induced ATP release is tightly dependent on intracellular calcium elevations

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Francis; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical stresses release ATP from a variety of cells by a poorly defined mechanism(s). Using custom-designed flow-through chambers, we investigated the kinetics of cell swelling-induced ATP secretion, cell volume and intracellular calcium changes in epithelial A549 and 16HBE14o− cells, and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Fifty per cent hypotonic shock triggered transient ATP release from cell confluent monolayers, which consistently peaked at around 1 min 45 s for A549 and NIH/3T3, and at 3 min for 16HBE14o− cells, then declined to baseline within the next 15 min. Whereas the release time course had a similar pattern for the three cell types, the peak rates differed significantly (294 ± 67, 70 ± 22 and 17 ± 2.8 pmol min−1 (106 cells)−1, for A549, 16HBE14o− and NIH/3T3, respectively). The concomitant volume changes of substrate-attached cells were analysed by a 3-dimensional cell shape reconstruction method based on images acquired from two perpendicular directions. The three cell types swelled at a similar rate, reaching maximal expansion in 1 min 45 s, but differed in the duration of the volume plateau and regulatory volume decrease (RVD). These experiments revealed that ATP release does not correlate with either cell volume expansion and the expected activation of stretch-sensitive channels, or with the activation of volume-sensitive, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid-inhibitable anion channels during RVD. By contrast, ATP release was tightly synchronized, in all three cell types, with cytosolic calcium elevations. Furthermore, loading A549 cells with the calcium chelator BAPTA significantly diminished ATP release (71% inhibition of the peak rate), while the calcium ionophore ionomycin triggered ATP release in the absence of cell swelling. Lowering the temperature to 10°C almost completely abolished A549 cell swelling-induced ATP release (95% inhibition of the peak rate). These results strongly suggest that calcium-dependent exocytosis plays a

  7. Cytotoxicity of atropine to human corneal epithelial cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cheng-Lei; Wen, Qian; Fan, Ting-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Atropine is an anticholinergic drug for mydriasis in eye clinic, and its abuse might be cytotoxic to the cornea and result in blurred vision. However, the cytotoxicity of atropine to the cornea and its cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of atropine to corneal epithelium and its underlying mechanisms using an in vitro model of non-transfected human corneal epithelial (HCEP) cells. Our results showed that atropine, above the concentration of 0.3125 g/l (1/32 of its therapeutic dosage in eye clinic), had a dose- and time-dependent toxicity to HCEP cells by inducing morphological abnormality, cytopathic effect, viability decline, and proliferation retardation. Moreover, the proliferation-retarding effect of atropine on the cells was achieved by inducing G1/S phase arrest and downregulation of E-cadherin and β-catenin. Besides, atropine also had an apoptosis-inducing effect on the cells by inducing phosphatidylserine externalization, plasma membrane permeability elevation, DNA fragmentation and apoptotic body formation. Furthermore, atropine could also induce activations of caspase-2, -3 and -9, disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, upregulation of Bax and Bad, and upregulation of cytoplasmic cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor, implying a death receptor-mediated mitochondrion-dependent pathway is most probably involved in the apoptosis of HCEP cells induced by atropine. Taken together, our results suggest that atropine has remarkable cytotoxicity to HCEP cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and death receptor-mediated mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

  8. Carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction: role of IgE-dependent basophil activation and FcεRI.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takuya; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Natsuki; Sugimoto, Hiroko; Tabata, Tsutomu; Okuda, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Basophil activation was observed in patients with a history of carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction (HR). However, the precise mechanism by which carboplatin induces basophil activation and the associated surrogate markers remains to be elucidated. To investigate whether IgE-dependent mechanisms, including the overexpression of FcεRI, participate in carboplatin-induced basophil activation, 13 ovarian cancer patients were enrolled: 5 with a history of carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction within the past 2 years, and 8 with no such history. The expression levels of FcεRI, IgE, and CD203c on basophils were measured using a flow cytometer. Immunoglobulin E-dependent basophil activation was evaluated by testing for IgE passive sensitization using lactic acid, and by testing for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition, using wortmannin. In three patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity, pretreatment with wortmannin almost completely inhibited carboplatin-induced basophil activation (P < 0.05). In a healthy control subject, whose own IgE showed no response to carboplatin, acquired reactivity to carboplatin when exposed to plasma from patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity. This did not occur when the same experiment was carried out using plasma from the patients negative for carboplatin hypersensitivity. Moreover, pretreatment with omalizumab, a monoclonal anti-IgE antibody, almost completely blocked carboplatin-induced basophil activation in the plasma of patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity. On further investigation, the HR-positive group had significantly higher levels of FcεRI compared with the negative group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, an IgE-dependent mechanism incorporating FcεRI overexpression participates in carboplatin-induced severe HR. These results establish the relevance of monitoring the pharmacodynamic changes of basophils to prevent carboplatin-induced severe HR.

  9. Inhibition of autophagy enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis by disrupting CHK1-dependent S phase arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, Jong-Shian; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yen, Wen-Yen; Tang, Yu-Shuan; Kakadiya, Rajesh B.; Su, Tsann-Long; Yih, Ling-Huei

    2014-08-01

    DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, but the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cell fate is not fully understood. BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene, is a potent DNA interstrand cross-linking agent with anticancer activity. In this study, BO-1012 was found to reduce DNA synthesis, inhibit S phase progression, and induce phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) exclusively in S phase cells. Both CHK1 and CHK2 were phosphorylated in response to BO-1012 treatment, but only depletion of CHK1, but not CHK2, impaired BO-1012-induced S phase arrest and facilitated the entry of γH2AX-positive cells into G2 phase. CHK1 depletion also significantly enhanced BO-1012-induced cell death and apoptosis. These results indicate that BO-1012-induced S phase arrest is a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. BO-1012 also resulted in marked induction of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing and redistribution, features characteristic of autophagy. Depletion of ATG7 or co-treatment of cells with BO-1012 and either 3-methyladenine or bafilomycin A1, two inhibitors of autophagy, not only reduced CHK1 phosphorylation and disrupted S phase arrest, but also increased cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP, and cell death. These results suggest that cells initiate S phase arrest and autophagy as pro-survival responses to BO-1012-induced DNA damage, and that suppression of autophagy enhances BO-1012-induced apoptosis via disruption of CHK1-dependent S phase arrest. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibitors enhanced the cytotoxicity of a DNA alkylating agent, BO-1012. • BO-1012-induced S phase arrest was a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. • Autophagy inhibition enhanced BO-1012 cytotoxicity via disrupting the S phase arrest.

  10. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV mediates acute nicotine-induced antinociception in acute thermal pain tests

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kia J.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    Calcium activated second messengers such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II have been implicated in drug-induced antinociception. The less abundant calcium activated second messenger, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), mediates emotional responses to pain and tolerance to morphine analgesia; however its role in nicotine-mediated antinociception is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of CaMKIV in the acute effects of nicotine, primarily acute nicotine- induced antinociception. CaMKIV knockout (−/−), heterozygote (+/−), and wild-type (+/+) mice were injected with various doses of nicotine and evaluated in a battery of tests, including the tail-flick and hot-plate tests for antinociception, body temperature, and locomotor activity. Our results show a genotype-dependent reduction in tail-flick and hot- plate latency in CaMKIV (+/−) and (−/−) mice after acute nicotine treatment, while no difference was observed between genotypes in the body temperature and locomotor activity assessments. The results of this study support a role for CaMKIV in acute nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal pain mechanisms, and further implicate involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms in drug-induced antinociception. PMID:24196027

  11. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  12. Function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II in volume load-induced diuresis.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Andrea; Schinner, Elisabeth; Huettner, Johannes P; Kees, Frieder; Tauber, Philipp; Hofmann, Franz; Schlossmann, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)/cGMPs cause diuresis and natriuresis. Their downstream effectors beyond cGMP remain unclear. To elucidate a probable function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII), we investigated renal parameters in different conditions (basal, salt diets, starving, water load) using a genetically modified mouse model (cGKII-KO), but did not detect any striking differences between WT and cGKII-KO. Thus, cGKII is proposed to play only a marginal role in the adjustment of renal concentration ability to varying salt loads without water restriction or starving conditions. When WT mice were subjected to a volume load (performed by application of a 10-mM glucose solution (3% of BW) via feeding needle), they exhibited a potent diuresis. In contrast, urine volume was decreased significantly in cGKII-KO. We showed that AQP2 plasma membrane (PM) abundance was reduced for about 50% in WT upon volume load, therefore, this might be a main cause for the enhanced diuresis. In contrast, cGKII-KO mice almost completely failed to decrease AQP2-PM distribution. This significant difference between both genotypes is not induced by an altered p-Ser256-AQP2 phosphorylation, as phosphorylation at this site decreases similarly in WT and KO. Furthermore, sodium excretion was lowered in cGKII-KO mice during volume load. In summary, cGKII is only involved to a minor extent in the regulation of basal renal concentration ability. By contrast, cGKII-KO mice are not able to handle an acute volume load. Our results suggest that membrane insertion of AQP2 is inhibited by cGMP/cGKII.

  13. Featured Article: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α dependent nuclear entry of factor inhibiting HIF-1

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke; Ding, Xue-qin; Lin, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcriptional activity in the nucleus is related to factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH-1). FIH-1 hydrolyzes asparagine at the C-terminal of HIF-1α, preventing the interaction between HIF-1α and its associated cofactors, and leading to suppressed activation of HIF-1. FIH-1 is a cytosolic protein and its entry to the nucleus has to be coordinated with HIF-1α. The present study was undertaken to examine the correlation between HIF-1α and FIH-1 in their nuclear entry. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with dimethyloxalylglycine at a final concentration of 100 µM for 4 h, resulting in an accumulation of HIF-1α and an increase of FIH-1 in the nucleus as determined by Western blot analysis. Pretreatment of the cells with copper (Cu) chelator tetraethylenepentamine at 50 µM in cultures for 24 h reduced both HIF-1α protein levels and the HIF-1α entry to the nucleus, along with decreased FIH-1 protein levels in the nucleus but no changes in the total FIH-1 protein levels in the cells. These effects were prevented by simultaneous addition of 50 µM CuSO4 with tetraethylenepentamine. Gene-silencing of HIF-1α significantly inhibited FIH-1 entry to the nucleus, but did not affect the total protein levels of FIH-1 in the cells. This work demonstrates that the nuclear entry of FIH-1 depends on HIF-1α. Cu deficiency caused a decrease of HIF-1α, leading to suppression of FIH-1 entry to the nucleus. PMID:25687434

  14. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Müller, D.; Rieger, S.; Schmidl, G.; Triebel, W.; Paa, W.

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (414 absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure.

  15. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Burkert, A; Müller, D; Rieger, S; Schmidl, G; Triebel, W; Paa, W

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (41 (4) absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure. PMID:26724008

  16. Autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins induce joint pain independent of inflammation via a chemokine-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wigerblad, Gustaf; Bas, Duygu B; Fernades-Cerqueira, Cátia; Krishnamurthy, Akilan; Rogoz, Katarzyna; Kato, Jungo; Sandor, Katalin; Su, Jie; Jimenez–Andrade, Juan Miguel; Finn, Anja; Bersellini Farinotti, Alex; Amara, Khaled; Lundberg, Karin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Malmström, Vivianne; Catrina, Anca I; Klareskog, Lars; Svensson, Camilla I

    2016-01-01

    Objective An interesting and so far unexplained feature of chronic pain in autoimmune disease is the frequent disconnect between pain and inflammation. This is illustrated well in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) where pain in joints (arthralgia) may precede joint inflammation and persist even after successful anti-inflammatory treatment. In the present study, we have addressed the possibility that autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA), present in RA, may be directly responsible for the induction of pain, independent of inflammation. Methods Antibodies purified from human patients with RA, healthy donors and murinised monoclonal ACPA were injected into mice. Pain-like behaviour was monitored for up to 28 days, and tissues were analysed for signs of pathology. Mouse osteoclasts were cultured and stimulated with antibodies, and supernatants analysed for release of factors. Mice were treated with CXCR1/2 (interleukin (IL) 8 receptor) antagonist reparixin. Results Mice injected with either human or murinised ACPA developed long-lasting pronounced pain-like behaviour in the absence of inflammation, while non-ACPA IgG from patients with RA or control monoclonal IgG were without pronociceptive effect. This effect was coupled to ACPA-mediated activation of osteoclasts and release of the nociceptive chemokine CXCL1 (analogue to human IL-8). ACPA-induced pain-like behaviour was reversed with reparixin. Conclusions The data suggest that CXCL1/IL-8, released from osteoclasts in an autoantibody-dependent manner, produces pain by activating sensory neurons. The identification of this new pain pathway may open new avenues for pain treatment in RA and also in other painful diseases associated with autoantibody production and/or osteoclast activation. PMID:26613766

  17. Wind induced errors on solid precipitation measurements: an evaluation using time-dependent turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Matteo; Lanza, Luca Giovanni; Rasmussen, Roy; Mireille Thériault, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Among the different environmental sources of error for ground based solid precipitation measurements, wind is the main responsible for a large reduction of the catching performance. This is due to the aero-dynamic response of the gauge that affects the originally undisturbed airflow causing the deformation of the snowflakes trajectories. The application of composite gauge/wind shield measuring configurations allows the improvements of the collection efficiency (CE) at low wind speeds (Uw) but the performance achievable under severe airflow velocities and the role of turbulence still have to be explained. This work is aimed to assess the wind induced errors of a Geonor T200B vibrating wires gauge equipped with a single Alter shield. This is a common measuring system for solid precipitation, which constitutes of the R3 reference system in the ongoing WMO Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment (SPICE). The analysis is carried out by adopting advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools for the numerical simulation of the turbulent airflow realized in the proximity of the catching section of the gauge. The airflow patterns were computed by running both time-dependent (Large Eddies Simulation) and time-independent (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) simulations. on the Yellowstone high performance computing system of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The evaluation of CE under different Uw conditions was obtained by running a Lagrangian model for the calculation of the snowflakes trajectories building on the simulated airflow patterns. Particular attention has been paid to the sensitivity of the trajectories to different snow particles sizes and water content (corresponding to dry and wet snow). The results will be illustrated in comparative form between the different methodologies adopted and the existing infield CE evaluations based on double shield reference gauges.

  18. Chronic uranium exposure dose-dependently induces glutathione in rats without any nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Poisson, C; Stefani, J; Manens, L; Delissen, O; Suhard, D; Tessier, C; Dublineau, I; Guéguen, Y

    2014-10-01

    Uranium is a heavy metal naturally found in the earth's crust that can contaminate the general public population when ingested. The acute effect and notably the uranium nephrotoxicity are well known but knowledge about the effect of chronic uranium exposure is less clear. In a dose-response study we sought to determine if a chronic exposure to uranium is toxic to the kidneys and the liver, and what the anti-oxidative system plays in these effects. Rats were contaminated for 3 or 9 months by uranium in drinking water at different concentrations (0, 1, 40, 120, 400, or 600 mg/L). Uranium tissue content in the liver, kidneys, and bones was linear and proportional to uranium intake after 3 and 9 months of contamination; it reached 6 μg per gram of kidney tissues for the highest uranium level in drinking water. Nevertheless, no histological lesions of the kidney were observed, nor any modification of kidney biomarkers such as creatinine or KIM-1. After 9 months of contamination at and above the 120-mg/L concentration of uranium, lipid peroxidation levels decreased in plasma, liver, and kidneys. Glutathione concentration increased in the liver for the 600-mg/L group, in the kidney it increased dose dependently, up to 10-fold, after 9 months of contamination. Conversely, chronic uranium exposure irregularly modified gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and activities in the liver and kidneys. In conclusion, chronic uranium exposure did not induce nephrotoxic effects under our experimental conditions, but instead reinforced the antioxidant system, especially by increasing glutathione levels in the kidneys.

  19. Negative pressure induces p120-catenin-dependent adherens junction disassembly in keratinocytes during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Chow, Shu-Er; Wang, Jong-Shyan; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Lu, Mu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    A negative-pressure of 125mmHg (NP) has been widely used to treat chronic wounds in modern medicine. Keratinocytes under NP treatment have shown accelerated cell movement and decreased E-cadherin expression. However, the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin regulation under NP remains incompletely understood. Therefore, we investigated the E-cadherin regulation in keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) under NP. HaCaT cells were treated at ambient pressure (AP) and NP for 12h. Cell movement was measured by traditional and electric wound healing assays at the 2 different pressures. Mutants with overexpression of p120-catenin (p120(ctn)) were used to observe the effect of NP on p120(ctn) and E-cadherin expression during wound healing. Cell fractionation and immunoblotting data showed that NP increased Y228-phosphorylated p120(ctn) level and resulted in the translocation of p120(ctn) from the plasma membrane to cytoplasm. Immunofluorescence images revealed that NP decreased the co-localization of p120(ctn) and E-cadherin on the plasma membrane. Knockdown of p120(ctn) reduced E-cadherin expression and accelerated cell movement under AP. Overexpression of the Y228-phosphorylation-mimic p120(ctn) decreased E-cadherin membrane expression under both AP and NP. Phosphorylation-deficient mutants conferred restored adherens junctions (AJs) under NP. The Src inhibitor blocked the phosphorylation of p120(ctn) and impeded cell migration under NP. In conclusion, Src-dependent phosphorylation of p120(ctn) can respond rapidly to NP and contribute to E-cadherin downregulation. The NP-induced disassembly of the AJ further accelerates wound healing.

  20. Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Induces Autophagy-Dependent Apoptosis through Spinster 1-Mediated lysosomal-Mitochondrial Axis and Impaired Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaofeng; Sha, Shanshan; Wang, Yuexia; Sun, Xiance; Cao, Jun; Kang, Jian; Jiang, Liping; Chen, Min; Ma, Yufang

    2016-09-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequently impaired autophagosome degradation was induced in HepG2 cells after treatment with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 24 h in our previous studies. We found that treatment of HepG2 cells with PFOS-induced autophagosome formation at earlier stage (6 h) of treatment in this study. The autophagosome formation inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was able to relieve PFOS-induced LMP and release of cathepsin D in HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Spinster 1, a lysosomal membrane permease, attenuated PFOS-induced LMP in HepG2 cells. We proposed that Spinster 1 might work as a specific molecule that linked autophagy with LMP. PFOS-induced collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential was cathepsin D and autophagy dependent. Addition of 3-MA relieved PFOS-induced apoptosis, which was evidenced by Hoechst assay, AV/PI staining and caspase-3 activity assay. Inhibition of autophagosome formation by Atg5 siRNA attenuated PFOS-induced apoptosis. Treatment of HepG2 cells with PFOS for 24 h impaired mitophagy, as evidenced by an increase of cells with giant mitochondria and impairment of colocalization of PINK1 with light chain 3. In summary, we report that PFOS induces autophagy-dependent apoptosis in HepG2 cells through the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis and impairment of mitophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a primary target for PFOS toxicity. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into PFOS-induced hepatotoxicity.

  1. Cytotoxic L-amino-acid oxidases from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa induce caspase-dependent apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pišlar, A; Sabotič, J; Šlenc, J; Brzin, J; Kos, J

    2016-01-01

    L-amino-acid oxidases (LAO) purified from fungi induce cell death in various mammalian cells including human tumor cell lines. The mechanism, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to define a precise mechanism of cell death induced in Jurkat and MCF7 cancer cell lines by ApLAO and CgLAO, LAOs isolated from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa, respectively. Cell death induced by both LAOs is shown to be concentration- and time-dependent, with higher toxic effects in Jurkat cells. LAO activity is required for the cytotoxicity. Detailed study on Jurkat cells further demonstrated that ApLAO and CgLAO both induce the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a time-dependent depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Treatment with the LAOs resulted in an increased ratio of the expression of proapoptotic Bax to that of antiapoptotic Bcl-2, subsequently leading to the activation of caspase-9 and -3. However, the pancaspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, did not completely abolish the cell death induced by either ApLAO or CgLAO, suggesting an alternative pathway for LAO-induced apoptosis. Indeed, caspase-8 activity in ApLAO- and CgLAO-treated cells was increased. Further, Fas/FasL (Fas ligand) antagonist caused a slight reduction in toxin-induced cell death, supporting the involvement of ApLAO and CgLAO in death-receptor-mediated apoptosis. These results thus provide new evidence that ApLAO and CgLAO induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells via both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, although the significantly higher increase of caspase-9 over caspase-8 activity suggests that it is the intrinsic pathway that is the predominant mode of ApLAO- and CgLAO-induced apoptosis. PMID:27551514

  2. Cytotoxic L-amino-acid oxidases from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa induce caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pišlar, A; Sabotič, J; Šlenc, J; Brzin, J; Kos, J

    2016-01-01

    L-amino-acid oxidases (LAO) purified from fungi induce cell death in various mammalian cells including human tumor cell lines. The mechanism, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to define a precise mechanism of cell death induced in Jurkat and MCF7 cancer cell lines by ApLAO and CgLAO, LAOs isolated from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa, respectively. Cell death induced by both LAOs is shown to be concentration- and time-dependent, with higher toxic effects in Jurkat cells. LAO activity is required for the cytotoxicity. Detailed study on Jurkat cells further demonstrated that ApLAO and CgLAO both induce the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a time-dependent depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Treatment with the LAOs resulted in an increased ratio of the expression of proapoptotic Bax to that of antiapoptotic Bcl-2, subsequently leading to the activation of caspase-9 and -3. However, the pancaspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, did not completely abolish the cell death induced by either ApLAO or CgLAO, suggesting an alternative pathway for LAO-induced apoptosis. Indeed, caspase-8 activity in ApLAO- and CgLAO-treated cells was increased. Further, Fas/FasL (Fas ligand) antagonist caused a slight reduction in toxin-induced cell death, supporting the involvement of ApLAO and CgLAO in death-receptor-mediated apoptosis. These results thus provide new evidence that ApLAO and CgLAO induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells via both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, although the significantly higher increase of caspase-9 over caspase-8 activity suggests that it is the intrinsic pathway that is the predominant mode of ApLAO- and CgLAO-induced apoptosis. PMID:27551514

  3. Corticotropin Releasing Factor–Induced Amygdala Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Release Plays a Key Role in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Marisa; Cruz, Maureen T.; Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Sabino, Valentina; Schweitzer, Paul; Bajo, Michal; Cottone, Pietro; Madamba, Samuel G.; Stouffer, David G.; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.; Siggins, George R.; Parsons, Loren H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems in the central amygdala (CeA) are implicated in the high-anxiety, high-drinking profile associated with ethanol dependence. Ethanol augments CeA GABA release in ethanol-naive rats and mice. Methods Using naive and ethanol-dependent rats, we compared electrophysiologic effects and interactions of CRF and ethanol on CeA GABAergic transmission, and we measured GABA dialyzate in CeA after injection of CRF1 antagonists and ethanol. We also compared mRNA expression in CeA for CRF and CRF1 using real-time polymerase chain reaction. We assessed effects of chronic treatment with a CRF1 antagonist on withdrawal-induced increases in alcohol consumption in dependent rats. Results CRF and ethanol augmented CeA GABAergic transmission in naive rats via increased GABA release. Three CRF1 receptor (CRF1) antagonists decreased basal GABAergic responses and abolished ethanol effects. Ethanol-dependent rats exhibited heightened sensitivity to CRF and CRF1 antagonists on CeA GABA release. Intra-CeA CRF1 antagonist administration reversed dependence–related elevations in GABA dialysate and blocked ethanol-induced increases in GABA dialyzate in both dependent and naive rats. Polymerase chain reaction studies indicate increased expression of CRF and CRF1 in CeA of dependent rats. Chronic CRF1 antagonist treatment blocked withdrawal-induced increases in alcohol drinking by dependent rats and tempered moderate increases in alcohol consumption by nondependent rats in intermittent testing. Conclusions These combined findings suggest a key role for specific presynaptic CRF-GABA interactions in CeA in the development and maintenance of ethanol dependence. PMID:20060104

  4. Curcumin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Inorganic Arsenite-Induced Acute Cytotoxicity through an NRF2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Yang, Bei; Wang, Linlin; Xue, Peng; Deng, Baocheng; Zhang, Guohua; Jiang, Shukun; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Min; Pi, Jingbo; Guan, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    Human exposure to inorganic arsenic leads to various dermal disorders, including hyperkeratosis and skin cancer. Curcumin is demonstrated to induce remarkable antioxidant activity in a variety of cells and tissues. The present study aimed at identifying curcumin as a potent activator of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and demonstrating its protective effect against inorganic arsenite- (iAs3+-) induced cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes. We found that curcumin led to nuclear accumulation of NRF2 protein and increased the expression of antioxidant response element- (ARE-) regulated genes in HaCaT keratinocytes in concentration- and time-dependent manners. High concentration of curcumin (20 μM) also increased protein expression of long isoforms of NRF1. Treatment with low concentrations of curcumin (2.5 or 5 μM) effectively increased the viability and survival of HaCaT cells against iAs3+-induced cytotoxicity as assessed by the MTT assay and flow cytometry and also attenuated iAs3+-induced expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP protein. Selective knockdown of NRF2 or KEAP1 by lentiviral shRNAs significantly diminished the cytoprotection conferred by curcumin, suggesting that the protection against iAs3+-induced cytotoxicity is dependent on the activation of NRF2. Our results provided a proof of the concept of using curcumin to activate the NRF2 pathway to alleviate arsenic-induced dermal damage. PMID:23710286

  5. Mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of con A-activated T lymphocytes induced by asiatic acid for preventing murine fulminant hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenjie; Liu, Wen; Hong, Shaocheng; Liu, Hailiang; Qian, Cheng; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xuefeng; Sun, Yang; Xu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Selectively facilitating apoptosis of activated T cells is essential for the clearance of pathogenic injurious cells and subsequent efficient resolution of inflammation. However, few chemicals have been reported to trigger apoptosis of activated T cells for the treatment of hepatitis without affecting quiescent T cells. In the present study, we found that asiatic acid, a natural triterpenoid, selectively triggered apoptosis of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated T cells in a mitochondria-dependent manner indicated by the disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, caspases activation, and cleavage of PARP. In addition, asiatic acid also induced the cleavage of caspase 8 and Bid and augmented Fas expression in Con A-activated T cells. However, following activation of T cells from MRL(lpr/lpr) mice with mutation of Fas demonstrated a similar susceptibility to asiatic acid-induced apoptosis compared with normal T cells, suggesting that Fas-mediated death-receptor apoptotic pathway does not mainly contribute to asiatic acid-induced cell death. Furthermore, asiatic acid significantly alleviated Con A-induced T cell-dependent fulminant hepatitis in mice, as assessed by reduced serum transaminases, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and pathologic parameters. Consistent with the in vitro results, asiatic acid also induced apoptosis of activated CD4(+) T cells in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the ability of asiatic acid to induce apoptosis of activated T cells and its potential use in the treatment of T-cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  6. Effect of angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension on the voltage-dependent contractions of mouse arteries.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2016-02-01

    Arterial hypertension (AHT) affects the voltage dependency of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes. We analyzed the effect of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AHT on L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated isometric contractions in conduit arteries. AHT was induced in C57Bl6 mice with AngII-filled osmotic mini-pumps (4 weeks). Normotensive mice treated with saline-filled osmotic mini-pumps were used for comparison. Voltage-dependent contractions mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels were studied in vaso-reactive studies in vitro in isolated aortic and femoral arteries by using extracellular K(+) concentration-response (KDR) experiments. In aortic segments, AngII-induced AHT significantly sensitized isometric contractions induced by elevated extracellular K(+) and depolarization. This sensitization was partly prevented by normalizing blood pressure with hydralazine, suggesting that it was caused by AHT rather than by direct AngII effects on aortic smooth muscle cells. The EC50 for extracellular K(+) obtained in vitro correlated significantly with the rise in arterial blood pressure induced by AngII in vivo. The AHT-induced sensitization persisted when aortic segments were exposed to levcromakalim or to inhibitors of basal nitric oxide release. Consistent with these observations, AngII-treatment also sensitized the vaso-relaxing effects of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem during K(+)-induced contractions. Unlike aorta, AngII-treatment desensitized the isometric contractions to depolarization in femoral arteries pointing to vascular bed specific responses of arteries to hypertension. AHT affects the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of conduit arteries. This effect may contribute to the decreased vascular compliance in AHT and explain the efficacy of Ca(2+) channel blockers to reduce vascular stiffness and central blood pressure in AHT.

  7. Stimulation of calcium-sensing receptors induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations via nitric oxide production and activation of IKCa channels

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Harry Z.E.; Shi, Jian; Jahan, Kazi S.; Martinucci, Matthew C.; Gilbert, Steven J.; Vanessa Ho, W.-S.; Albert, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of vascular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) is reported to induce both constrictions and relaxations. However, cellular mechanisms involved in these responses remain unclear. The present study investigates the effect of stimulating CaSRs on vascular contractility and focuses on the role of the endothelium, nitric oxide (NO) and K+ channels in these responses. In wire myography studies, increasing [Ca2 +]o from 1 mM to 6 mM induced concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine pre-contracted rabbit mesenteric arteries. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were dependent on a functional endothelium, and were inhibited by the negative allosteric CaSR modulator Calhex-231. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were reduced by inhibitors of endothelial NO synthase, guanylate cyclase, and protein kinase G. CaSR activation also induced NO production in freshly isolated endothelial cells (ECs) in experiments using the fluorescent NO indicator DAF-FM. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of large (BKCa) and intermediate (IKCa) Ca2 +-activated K+ channels (iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin), and Kv7 channels (linopirdine) also reduced [Ca2 +]o-induced vasorelaxations. Increasing [Ca2 +]o also activated IKCa currents in perforated-patch recordings of isolated mesenteric artery ECs. These findings indicate that stimulation of CaSRs induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations which are mediated by two separate pathways involving production of NO and activation of IKCa channels. NO stimulates PKG leading to BKCa activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas IKCa activity contributes to endothelium-derived hyperpolarisations. PMID:26772767

  8. Induced Alpha-Band Oscillations Reflect Ratio-Dependent Number Discrimination in the Infant Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Pruitt, Laura B.; Woldorff, Marty G.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral studies show that infants are capable of discriminating the number of objects or events in their environment, while also suggesting that number discrimination in infancy may be ratio-dependent. However, due to limitations of the dependent measures used with infant behavioral studies, the evidence for ratio dependence falls short of the…

  9. Partial characterization of a barbiturate-induced cytochrome P-450-dependent fatty acid monooxygenase from Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Narhi, L O; Kim, B H; Stevenson, P M; Fulco, A J

    1983-11-15

    A soluble cytochrome P-450-dependent fatty acid monooxygenase activity obtained from Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 can be induced by at least 13 different barbiturates. In general, the potency of these compounds as inducers increases with their increasing lipophilicity. We have now shown that at least 4 of these barbiturates (phenobarbital, secobarbital, pentobarbital and methohexital) seem to induce the same active cytochrome P-450-containing enzyme by a non-substrate type mechanism. The partially purified enzymes obtained from cultures induced with each of the 4 barbiturates tested were all of similar molecular size (Mr = 130,000 +/- 10,000) and had similar turnover numbers (1400-1800 +/- 300) with either palmitoleate or myristate as substrates. None of the tested barbiturates served as substrates, activators or inhibitors of any of the monooxygenase preparations, nor did they appear to interact in any way with the monooxygenase enzyme or the P-450 component. PMID:6418173

  10. Serratia marcescens induces apoptotic cell death in host immune cells via a lipopolysaccharide- and flagella-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Imamura, Katsutoshi; Takano, Shinya; Usui, Kimihito; Suzuki, Kazushi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2012-10-19

    Injection of Serratia marcescens into the blood (hemolymph) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, induced the activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), followed by caspase activation and apoptosis of blood cells (hemocytes). This process impaired the innate immune response in which pathogen cell wall components, such as glucan, stimulate hemocytes, leading to the activation of insect cytokine paralytic peptide. S. marcescens induced apoptotic cell death of silkworm hemocytes and mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. We searched for S. marcescens transposon mutants with attenuated ability to induce apoptosis of silkworm hemocytes. Among the genes identified, disruption mutants of wecA (a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis), and flhD and fliR (essential genes in flagella synthesis) showed reduced motility and impaired induction of mouse macrophage cell death. These findings suggest that S. marcescens induces apoptosis of host immune cells via lipopolysaccharide- and flagella-dependent motility, leading to the suppression of host innate immunity.

  11. Sodium fluoride induces apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells through ROS-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Ngoc, Tam Dan; Son, Young-Ok; Lim, Shin-Saeng; Shi, Xianglin; Kim, Jong-Ghee; Heo, Jung Sun; Choe, Youngji; Jeon, Young-Mi; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2012-03-15

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) is used as a source of fluoride ions in diverse applications. Fluoride salt is an effective prophylactic for dental caries and is an essential element required for bone health. However, fluoride is known to cause cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, no information is available on the effects of NaF on mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We investigated the mode of cell death induced by NaF and the mechanisms involved. NaF treatment greater than 1 mM reduced viability and DNA synthesis in mESCs and induced cell cycle arrest in the G{sub 2}/M phase. The addition of NaF induced cell death mainly by apoptosis rather than necrosis. Catalase (CAT) treatment significantly inhibited the NaF-mediated cell death and also suppressed the NaF-mediated increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) levels. Pre-treatment with SP600125 or z-VAD-fmk significantly attenuated the NaF-mediated reduction in cell viability. In contrast, intracellular free calcium chelator, but not of sodium or calcium ion channel blockers, facilitated NaF-induced toxicity in the cells. A JNK specific inhibitor (SP600125) prevented the NaF-induced increase in growth arrest and the DNA damage-inducible protein 45α. Further, NaF-mediated loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was apparently inhibited by pifithrin-α or CAT inhibitor. These findings suggest that NaF affects viability of mESCs in a concentration-dependent manner, where more than 1 mM NaF causes apoptosis through hydroxyl radical-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways. -- Highlights: ► The mode of NaF-induced cell death and the mechanisms involved were examined. ► NaF induced mainly apoptotic death of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). ► NaF induced mitochondrial-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. ► JNK- and p53-mediated pathways are involved in NaF-mediated apoptosis in the cells. ► ROS are the up-stream effector in NaF-mediated activation of JNK and p53 in mESCs.

  12. Stress-induced sensitization to amphetamine and morphine psychomotor effects depend on stress-induced corticosterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Deroche, V; Piazza, P V; Casolini, P; Maccari, S; Le Moal, M; Simon, H

    1992-12-11

    Repeated exposure to stressful situations has been shown to increase individual reactivity to addictive drugs. However, the biological factors involved in such stress-induced changes are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of corticosterone in the effects of restraint stress on the response to psychostimulants and opioids. The effects of repeated stress on amphetamine- and morphine-induced locomotor activity were compared in: (i) animals with an intact hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis; (ii) animals in which stress-induced corticosterone secretion was blocked by adrenalectomy, but who received exogenous corticosterone from a subcutaneous implant. The implanted pellets (50 mg) slowly release corticosterone producing a stable plasma level within the normal physiological range over a period of 20 days. Restraint stress increased the locomotor response to both amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg i.p.) and morphine (2 mg/kg s.c.) in animals with an intact HPA axis, but not in animals in which stress-induced corticosterone secretion was suppressed. These results suggest that corticosterone secretion may be one of the mechanisms by which repeated stress amplifies behavioral responses to amphetamine and morphine. Since an enhanced locomotor reactivity to addictive drugs has been found to be frequently associated with an enhanced vulnerability to drug self-administration, these findings point to a role for glucocorticoids in the susceptibility to drug abuse. PMID:1486498

  13. Endotoxin induces fibrosis in vascular endothelial cells through a mechanism dependent on transient receptor protein melastatin 7 activity.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Cesar; Montorfano, Ignacio; Hermosilla, Tamara; Armisén, Ricardo; Velásquez, Luis A; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic inflammatory diseases, including endotoxemia-derived sepsis syndrome, is characterized by endothelial dysfunction. It has been demonstrated that the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the conversion of endothelial cells (ECs) into activated fibroblasts through endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition mechanism. Fibrogenesis is highly dependent on intracellular Ca2+ concentration increases through the participation of calcium channels. However, the specific molecular identity of the calcium channel that mediates the Ca2+ influx during endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is still unknown. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a calcium channel that is expressed in many cell types, including ECs. TRPM7 is involved in a number of crucial processes such as the conversion of fibroblasts into activated fibroblasts, or myofibroblasts, being responsible for the development of several characteristics of them. However, the role of the TRPM7 ion channel in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is unknown. Thus, our aim was to study whether the TRPM7 calcium channel participates in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Using primary cultures of ECs, we demonstrated that TRPM7 is a crucial protein involved in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Suppression of TRPM7 expression protected ECs from the fibrogenic process stimulated by endotoxin. Downregulation of TRPM7 prevented the endotoxin-induced endothelial markers decrease and fibrotic genes increase in ECs. In addition, TRPM7 downregulation abolished the endotoxin-induced increase in ECM proteins in ECs. Furthermore, we showed that intracellular Ca2+ levels were greatly increased upon LPS challenge in a mechanism dependent on TRPM7 expression. These results demonstrate that TRPM7 is a key protein involved in the mechanism underlying endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis.

  14. Endotoxin Induces Fibrosis in Vascular Endothelial Cells through a Mechanism Dependent on Transient Receptor Protein Melastatin 7 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Echeverría, Cesar; Montorfano, Ignacio; Hermosilla, Tamara; Armisén, Ricardo; Velásquez, Luis A.; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic inflammatory diseases, including endotoxemia-derived sepsis syndrome, is characterized by endothelial dysfunction. It has been demonstrated that the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the conversion of endothelial cells (ECs) into activated fibroblasts through endothelial­to­mesenchymal transition mechanism. Fibrogenesis is highly dependent on intracellular Ca2+ concentration increases through the participation of calcium channels. However, the specific molecular identity of the calcium channel that mediates the Ca2+ influx during endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is still unknown. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a calcium channel that is expressed in many cell types, including ECs. TRPM7 is involved in a number of crucial processes such as the conversion of fibroblasts into activated fibroblasts, or myofibroblasts, being responsible for the development of several characteristics of them. However, the role of the TRPM7 ion channel in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is unknown. Thus, our aim was to study whether the TRPM7 calcium channel participates in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Using primary cultures of ECs, we demonstrated that TRPM7 is a crucial protein involved in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Suppression of TRPM7 expression protected ECs from the fibrogenic process stimulated by endotoxin. Downregulation of TRPM7 prevented the endotoxin-induced endothelial markers decrease and fibrotic genes increase in ECs. In addition, TRPM7 downregulation abolished the endotoxin-induced increase in ECM proteins in ECs. Furthermore, we showed that intracellular Ca2+ levels were greatly increased upon LPS challenge in a mechanism dependent on TRPM7 expression. These results demonstrate that TRPM7 is a key protein involved in the mechanism underlying endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. PMID:24710004

  15. Endotoxin induces fibrosis in vascular endothelial cells through a mechanism dependent on transient receptor protein melastatin 7 activity.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Cesar; Montorfano, Ignacio; Hermosilla, Tamara; Armisén, Ricardo; Velásquez, Luis A; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic inflammatory diseases, including endotoxemia-derived sepsis syndrome, is characterized by endothelial dysfunction. It has been demonstrated that the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the conversion of endothelial cells (ECs) into activated fibroblasts through endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition mechanism. Fibrogenesis is highly dependent on intracellular Ca2+ concentration increases through the participation of calcium channels. However, the specific molecular identity of the calcium channel that mediates the Ca2+ influx during endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is still unknown. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a calcium channel that is expressed in many cell types, including ECs. TRPM7 is involved in a number of crucial processes such as the conversion of fibroblasts into activated fibroblasts, or myofibroblasts, being responsible for the development of several characteristics of them. However, the role of the TRPM7 ion channel in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is unknown. Thus, our aim was to study whether the TRPM7 calcium channel participates in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Using primary cultures of ECs, we demonstrated that TRPM7 is a crucial protein involved in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Suppression of TRPM7 expression protected ECs from the fibrogenic process stimulated by endotoxin. Downregulation of TRPM7 prevented the endotoxin-induced endothelial markers decrease and fibrotic genes increase in ECs. In addition, TRPM7 downregulation abolished the endotoxin-induced increase in ECM proteins in ECs. Furthermore, we showed that intracellular Ca2+ levels were greatly increased upon LPS challenge in a mechanism dependent on TRPM7 expression. These results demonstrate that TRPM7 is a key protein involved in the mechanism underlying endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. PMID:24710004

  16. Accumulation of stress and inducer-dependent plant-cell-wall-degrading enzymes during asexual development in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Prade, R A; Ayoubi, P; Krishnan, S; Macwana, S; Russell, H

    2001-01-01

    Determination and interpretation of fungal gene expression profiles based on digital reconstruction of expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) are reported. A total of 51,524 DNA sequence files processed with PipeOnline resulted in 9775 single and 5660 contig unique ESTs, 31.2% of a typical fungal transcriptome. Half of the unique ESTs shared homology with genes in public databases, 35.8% of which are functionally defined and 64.2% are unclear or unknown. In Aspergillus nidulans 86% of transcripts associate with intermediate metabolism functions, mainly related to carbohydrate, amino acid, protein, and peptide biosynthesis. During asexual development, A. nidulans unexpectedly accumulates stress response and inducer-dependent transcripts in the absence of an inducer. Stress response genes in A. nidulans ESTs total 1039 transcripts, contrasting with 117 in Neurospora crassa, a 14.3-fold difference. A total of 5.6% of A. nidulans ESTs implicate inducer-dependent cell wall degradation or amino acid acquisition, 3.5-fold higher than in N. crassa. Accumulation of stress response and inducer-dependent transcripts suggests general derepression of cis-regulation during terminal asexual development. PMID:11238386

  17. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  18. Cytokinin-induced parthenocarpic fruit development in tomato is partly dependent on enhanced gibberellin and auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiangang; Chen, Biwei; Xia, Xiaojian; Mao, Weihua; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan

    2013-01-01

    Fruit set of plants largely depends on the biosynthesis and crosstalk of phytohormones. To date the role of cytokinins (CKs) in the fruit development is less understood. Here, we showed that parthenocarpic fruit could be induced by 1-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-3-phenylurea (CPPU, an active CK) in tomato (Solanumlycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom). The fresh weight of CPPU-induced parthenocarpic fruits was comparable with that induced by GA3. Importantly, CPPU-induced parthenocarpy was found to be compromised by simultaneous application of paclobutrazol (a GA biosynthesis inhibitor), and this effect could be restored by exogenous GA3. Like pollination, CPPU-induced fruit showed enhanced accumulation of GA1+3 and indole-3-acetic (IAA), which were accompanied by elevated expression of GA biosynthesis genes like SlGPS, SlGA20ox1, SlGA20ox2 and SlGA3ox1, and IAA biosynthesis gene ToFZY. Elevated GAs level in CPPU-induced fruits was also associated with down-regulation of GA inactivation genes, namely SlGA2ox1,2,3,4,5 in comparison with untreated control. These results suggested that CKs may induce parthenocarpy in tomato partially through modulation of GA and IAA metabolisms. PMID:23922914

  19. Cytokinin-Induced Parthenocarpic Fruit Development in Tomato Is Partly Dependent on Enhanced Gibberellin and Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiangang; Chen, Biwei; Xia, Xiaojian; Mao, Weihua; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan

    2013-01-01

    Fruit set of plants largely depends on the biosynthesis and crosstalk of phytohormones. To date the role of cytokinins (CKs) in the fruit development is less understood. Here, we showed that parthenocarpic fruit could be induced by 1-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-3-phenylurea (CPPU, an active CK) in tomato (Solanumlycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom). The fresh weight of CPPU-induced parthenocarpic fruits was comparable with that induced by GA3. Importantly, CPPU-induced parthenocarpy was found to be compromised by simultaneous application of paclobutrazol (a GA biosynthesis inhibitor), and this effect could be restored by exogenous GA3. Like pollination, CPPU-induced fruit showed enhanced accumulation of GA1+3 and indole-3-acetic (IAA), which were accompanied by elevated expression of GA biosynthesis genes like SlGPS, SlGA20ox1, SlGA20ox2 and SlGA3ox1, and IAA biosynthesis gene ToFZY. Elevated GAs level in CPPU-induced fruits was also associated with down-regulation of GA inactivation genes, namely SlGA2ox1,2,3,4,5 in comparison with untreated control. These results suggested that CKs may induce parthenocarpy in tomato partially through modulation of GA and IAA metabolisms. PMID:23922914

  20. Reactive oxygen species-dependent necroptosis in Jurkat T cells induced by pathogenic free-living Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Song, K-J; Jang, Y S; Lee, Y A; Kim, K A; Lee, S K; Shin, M H

    2011-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba, is the causative pathogen of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans and experimental mice. N. fowleri is capable of destroying tissues and host cells through lytic necrosis. However, the mechanism by which N. fowleri induces host cell death is unknown. Electron microscopy indicated that incubation of Jurkat T cells with N. fowleri trophozoites induced necrotic morphology of the Jurkat T cells. N. fowleri also induced cytoskeletal protein cleavage, extensive poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase hydrolysis and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Although no activation of caspase-3 was observed in Jurkat T cells co-incubated with amoebae, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were strongly generated by NADPH oxidase (NOX). Pretreating cells with necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 or NOX inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) strongly inhibited amoeba-induced ROS generation and Jurkat cell death, whereas pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. N. fowleri-derived secretory products (NfSP) strongly induced intracellular ROS generation and cell death. Necroptotic effects of NfSP were effectively inhibited by pretreating NfSP with proteinase K. Moreover, NfSP-induced LDH release and intracellular ROS accumulation were inhibited by pretreating Jurkat T cells with DPI or necrostatin-1. These results suggest that N. fowleri induces ROS-dependent necroptosis in Jurkat T cells. PMID:21535020

  1. Reactive oxygen species-dependent necroptosis in Jurkat T cells induced by pathogenic free-living Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Song, K-J; Jang, Y S; Lee, Y A; Kim, K A; Lee, S K; Shin, M H

    2011-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba, is the causative pathogen of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans and experimental mice. N. fowleri is capable of destroying tissues and host cells through lytic necrosis. However, the mechanism by which N. fowleri induces host cell death is unknown. Electron microscopy indicated that incubation of Jurkat T cells with N. fowleri trophozoites induced necrotic morphology of the Jurkat T cells. N. fowleri also induced cytoskeletal protein cleavage, extensive poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase hydrolysis and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Although no activation of caspase-3 was observed in Jurkat T cells co-incubated with amoebae, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were strongly generated by NADPH oxidase (NOX). Pretreating cells with necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 or NOX inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) strongly inhibited amoeba-induced ROS generation and Jurkat cell death, whereas pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. N. fowleri-derived secretory products (NfSP) strongly induced intracellular ROS generation and cell death. Necroptotic effects of NfSP were effectively inhibited by pretreating NfSP with proteinase K. Moreover, NfSP-induced LDH release and intracellular ROS accumulation were inhibited by pretreating Jurkat T cells with DPI or necrostatin-1. These results suggest that N. fowleri induces ROS-dependent necroptosis in Jurkat T cells.

  2. Adrenal Activity during Repeated Long-Access Cocaine Self-Administration is Required for Later CRF-Induced and CRF-Dependent Stressor-Induced Reinstatement in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Evan N; Hoks, Michael A; Baumgardner, Jean; Sierra, Jose; Vranjkovic, Oliver; Bohr, Colin; Baker, David A; Mantsch, John R

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the neurobiological processes that contribute to the establishment and expression of stress-induced regulation of cocaine use in addicted individuals is important for the development of new and better treatment approaches. It has been previously shown that rats self-administering cocaine under long-access conditions (6 h daily) display heightened susceptibility to the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking by a stressor, electric footshock, or i.c.v. administration of the stressor-responsive neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). This study tested the hypothesis that adrenal responsiveness during earlier long-access cocaine self-administration (SA) is necessary for the establishment of later CRF-dependent stress-induced reinstatement. Reinstatement by footshock, but not a cocaine challenge (10 mg/kg, i.p.) following long-access SA, was blocked by i.c.v. administration of the CRF receptor antagonist, α-helical CRF9−41 (10 μg). Elimination of SA-induced adrenal responses through surgical adrenalectomy and diurnal corticosterone replacement (ADX/C) before 14 days of SA under long-access conditions had minimal impact on cocaine SA, but blocked later footshock-induced reinstatement. By contrast, ADX/C after SA, but before extinction and reinstatement testing, failed to reduce footshock-induced reinstatement. Likewise, ADX/C before 14 days long-access SA prevented later reinstatement by i.c.v. CRF (0.5 or 1.0 μg). However, significant CRF-induced reinstatement was observed when rats underwent ADX/C following SA, but before extinction and reinstatement testing, although a modest but statistically nonsignificant reduction in sensitivity to CRF's reinstating effects was observed. Taken together, these findings suggest that adrenal-dependent neuroadaptations in CRF responsiveness underlie the increased susceptibility to stress-induced relapse that emerges with repeated cocaine use. PMID:21412222

  3. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor P1446A Induces Apoptosis in a JNK/p38 MAPK-Dependent Manner in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Cody; Godbersen, J. Claire; Soderquist, Ryan S.; Rowland, Taylor; Kilmarx, Sumner; Spurgeon, Stephen E.; Brown, Jennifer R.; Srinivasa, Sreesha P.; Danilov, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitors have shown remarkable activity in CLL, where its efficacy has been linked to inhibition of the transcriptional CDKs (7 and 9) and deregulation of RNA polymerase and short-lived pro-survival proteins such as MCL1. Furthermore, ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress has been implicated in CDK inhibition in CLL. Here we conducted a pre-clinical study of a novel orally active kinase inhibitor P1446A in CLL B-cells. P1446A inhibited CDKs at nanomolar concentrations and induced rapid apoptosis of CLL cells in vitro, irrespective of chromosomal abnormalities or IGHV mutational status. Apoptosis preceded inactivation of RNA polymerase, and was accompanied by phosphorylation of stress kinases JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Pharmacologic inhibitors of JNK/p38 MAPK conferred protection from P1446A-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with P1446A led to a dramatic induction of NOXA in a JNK-dependent manner, and sensitized CLL cells to ABT-737, a BH3-mimetic. We observed concurrent activation of apoptosis stress-inducing kinase 1 (ASK1) and its interaction with inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) in CLL cells treated with P1446A, providing insights into upstream regulation of JNK in this setting. Consistent with previous reports on limited functionality of ER stress mechanism in CLL cells, treatment with P1446A failed to induce an extensive unfolded protein response. This study provides rationale for additional investigations of P1446A in CLL. PMID:26606677

  4. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor P1446A Induces Apoptosis in a JNK/p38 MAPK-Dependent Manner in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cells.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Cody; Godbersen, J Claire; Soderquist, Ryan S; Rowland, Taylor; Kilmarx, Sumner; Spurgeon, Stephen E; Brown, Jennifer R; Srinivasa, Sreesha P; Danilov, Alexey V

    2015-01-01

    CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitors have shown remarkable activity in CLL, where its efficacy has been linked to inhibition of the transcriptional CDKs (7 and 9) and deregulation of RNA polymerase and short-lived pro-survival proteins such as MCL1. Furthermore, ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress has been implicated in CDK inhibition in CLL. Here we conducted a pre-clinical study of a novel orally active kinase inhibitor P1446A in CLL B-cells. P1446A inhibited CDKs at nanomolar concentrations and induced rapid apoptosis of CLL cells in vitro, irrespective of chromosomal abnormalities or IGHV mutational status. Apoptosis preceded inactivation of RNA polymerase, and was accompanied by phosphorylation of stress kinases JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Pharmacologic inhibitors of JNK/p38 MAPK conferred protection from P1446A-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with P1446A led to a dramatic induction of NOXA in a JNK-dependent manner, and sensitized CLL cells to ABT-737, a BH3-mimetic. We observed concurrent activation of apoptosis stress-inducing kinase 1 (ASK1) and its interaction with inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) in CLL cells treated with P1446A, providing insights into upstream regulation of JNK in this setting. Consistent with previous reports on limited functionality of ER stress mechanism in CLL cells, treatment with P1446A failed to induce an extensive unfolded protein response. This study provides rationale for additional investigations of P1446A in CLL.

  5. Stress-induced hyperthermia depends on both time of day and light condition.

    PubMed

    Peloso, Elizabeth; Wachulec, Maciej; Satinoff, Evelyn

    2002-04-01

    Rats placed in an environment other than their home cage increase their body temperature (Tb) by more than 1 degree C. This stress-induced hyperthermia is considered to be a fever, in the sense that the Tb rise seems to reflect an upward shift in the level of regulated Tb (set point). The circadian rhythm of Tb also reflects changes in set point. One might therefore expect to see differences in response to such stress during various phases of the light-dark (LD) cycle as Tb fluctuates between L and D. To test this, 3- to 6-month-old male Long-Evans rats were taken from their home cages (12:12 LD) and placed individually in a Plexiglas container for 30 min. Tb and activity were measured via telemetry. In the first experiment, rats were placed in the container during day (from 1 to 3 h after lights on) and night (from 1 to 3 h after lights off), with light on or off during the test. There was a significant Tb rise in response to placement in the container at all times except when the rats were tested during the night with light on in the container; in that condition there was no Tb rise. In the second experiment, the authors determined that 30 min of light in the home cage before the test did not affect Tb: If the light was on in the test situation, hyperthermia was inhibited, and if it was off, hyperthermia was as high as control levels. In the third experiment, to determine whether this effect was time dependent, the test was performed at 4-h intervals, with light on or off during the test. The strongest inhibiting effect of light was in early night. In the fourth experiment, the authors turned the lights on during early night while the rats were in their home cages. This reduced their Tb significantly by less than 0.3 degrees C. The authors conclude that both clock time and light condition during testing are factors affecting the Tb rise in response to stress. PMID:12002163

  6. Brazilin isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L induces endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation of rat aortic rings

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yu; Chen, Yu-cai; Lin, Yi-huang; Guo, Jing; Niu, Zi-ran; Li, Li; Wang, Shou-bao; Fang, Lian-hua; Du, Guan-hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Brazilin is one of the major constituents of Caesalpinia sappan L with various biological activities. This study sought to investigate the vasorelaxant effect of brazilin on isolated rat thoracic aorta and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Endothelium-intact and -denuded aortic rings were prepared from rats. The tension of the preparations was recorded isometrically with a force displacement transducer connected to a polygraph. The phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and myosin light chain (MLC) were analyzed using Western blotting assay. Results: Application of brazilin (10–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently relaxed the NE- or high K+-induced sustained contraction of endothelium-intact aortic rings (the EC50 was 83.51±5.6 and 79.79±4.57 μmol/L, respectively). The vasorelaxant effect of brazilin was significantly attenuated by endothelium removal or by pre-incubation with L-NAME, methylene blue or indomethacin. In addition, pre-incubation with brazilin dose-dependently attenuated the vasoconstriction induced by KCl, NE or Ang II. Pre-incubation with brazilin also markedly suppressed the high K+-induced extracellular Ca2+ influx and NE-induced intracellular Ca2+ release in endothelium-denuded aortic rings. Pre-incubation with brazilin dose-dependently inhibited the NE-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and MLC in both endothelium-intact and -denuded aortic rings. Conclusion: Brazilin induces relaxation in rat aortic rings via both endothelium-dependent and -independent ways as well as inhibiting NE-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and MLC. Brazilin also attenuates vasoconstriction via blocking voltage- and receptor-operated Ca2+ channels. PMID:26564314

  7. Febuxostat exerts dose-dependent renoprotection in rats with cisplatin-induced acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Alaa N A; Shehatou, George S G; Shebl, Abdelhadi M; Salem, Hatem A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate possible renoprotective effects of febuxostat, a highly potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor, against cisplatin (CIS)-induced acute kidney injury in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into four groups of six rats each, as follows: normal control; CIS, received a single intraperitoneal injection of CIS (7.5 mg/kg); [febuxostat 10 + CIS] and [febuxostat 15 + CIS], received febuxostat (10 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively, orally) for 14 days, starting 7 days before CIS injection. At the end of experiment, 24-h urine output was collected and serum was separated for biochemical assessments. Kidney tissue homogenate was prepared for determination of oxidative stress-related parameters, nitric oxide (NO), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Moreover, histological alterations of kidney tissues were evaluated. Serum creatinine, blood urea, and urinary total protein were significantly elevated, while serum albumin and creatinine clearance were significantly reduced, in CIS-intoxicated rats, indicating depressed renal function. CIS administration also elicited renal oxidative stress, evidenced by increased malondialdehyde content and depleted levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, enhancement of renal levels of the pro-inflammatory TNF-α indicated renal inflammation. CIS-administered rats also showed increased serum lactate dehydrogenase activity and reduced renal NO bioavailability. Febuxostat dose-dependently improved or restored these changes to near-normal (e.g., mean ± SD of serum creatinine levels in control, CIS, [febuxostat 10 + CIS] and [febuxostat 15 + CIS] groups were 0.78 ± 0.19, 3.28 ± 2.0 (P < 0.01 versus control group), 1.03 ± 0.36 (P < 0.01 versus CIS group), and 0.93 ± 0.21 (P < 0.01 versus CIS group) mg/dl, respectively, and blood urea levels for the different groups were 36.80 ± 4.36, 236.10 ± 89.19 (P < 0

  8. Neuropeptide Y protects kidney against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by regulating p53-dependent apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namoh; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Min Hee; Lee, Jong Kil; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-sung

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug for treating various types of cancers. However, the use of cisplatin is limited by its negative effect on normal tissues, particularly nephrotoxicity. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis are involved in the adverse effect induced by cisplatin treatment. Several studies have suggested that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in neuroprotection as well as restoration of bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy induced nerve injury. However, the role of NPY in chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity has not been studied. Here, we show that NPY rescues renal dysfunction by reducing the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity through Y1 receptor, suggesting that NPY can protect kidney against cisplatin nephrotoxicity as a possible useful agent to prevent and treat cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 288-292] PMID:26728272

  9. Stable extracellular RNA fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induce early apoptosis in human monocytes via a caspase-8 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Duque-Correa, María A; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F; Brennan, Patrick J; Ortiz, Blanca L; Belisle, John T

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of pathogen-induced host cell apoptosis is well characterized for a number of microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to induce apoptosis and it was shown that live but not heat killed M. tuberculosis stimulates this biological pathway in monocytes. The dependence of this activity on live bacilli led us to hypothesize that products released or secreted by M. tuberculosis are the primary apoptotic factors for human monocytes. Thus, the culture filtrate of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was fractioned by conventional chromatography and the apoptosis-inducing activity of individual fractions was measured on human monocytes. The tests employed included measurement of cell membrane damage, caspase activation, and cytokine release. Small molecular weight RNAs of M. tuberculosis were recognized as the predominant apoptosis inducing factors. The RNA was comprised primarily of tRNA and rRNA fragments that stably accumulate in the culture filtrate during early log-phase growth. The RNA fragments signaled through a caspase-8 dependent, caspase-1 and TNF-α independent pathway that ultimately compromised the human monocytes' ability to control M. tuberculosis infection. These studies provide the first report of bacterial RNA inducing apoptosis. They also provide a foundation to pursue pathways for secretion or release of nucleic acids from M. tuberculosis and the impact of secreted RNA fragments on pathogenesis.

  10. Stable Extracellular RNA Fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induce Early Apoptosis in Human Monocytes via a Caspase-8 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Duque-Correa, María A.; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Ortiz, Blanca L.; Belisle, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of pathogen-induced host cell apoptosis is well characterized for a number of microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to induce apoptosis and it was shown that live but not heat killed M. tuberculosis stimulates this biological pathway in monocytes. The dependence of this activity on live bacilli led us to hypothesize that products released or secreted by M. tuberculosis are the primary apoptotic factors for human monocytes. Thus, the culture filtrate of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was fractioned by conventional chromatography and the apoptosis-inducing activity of individual fractions was measured on human monocytes. The tests employed included measurement of cell membrane damage, caspase activation, and cytokine release. Small molecular weight RNAs of M. tuberculosis were recognized as the predominant apoptosis inducing factors. The RNA was comprised primarily of tRNA and rRNA fragments that stably accumulate in the culture filtrate during early log-phase growth. The RNA fragments signaled through a caspase-8 dependent, caspase-1 and TNF-α independent pathway that ultimately compromised the human monocytes' ability to control M. tuberculosis infection. These studies provide the first report of bacterial RNA inducing apoptosis. They also provide a foundation to pursue pathways for secretion or release of nucleic acids from M. tuberculosis and the impact of secreted RNA fragments on pathogenesis. PMID:22253841

  11. Effect of crystal axis in temperature dependence of laser-induced damage thresholds by nanosecond near-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Katsuhiro; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Azumi, Minako; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2015-10-01

    Laser-induced damage thresholds in crystalline quartz were evaluated using a single-mode Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse width 4 ns) at temperatures ranging from 123 K to 473 K. In this experiment, three kinds of crystalline quartz different in the cut direction were prepared. The damage morphologies were coincident with the crystal structure. The laser induced damage thresholds in crystalline quartz differed according to the cutting direction. The laser-induced damage thresholds expect in the case of Z-cut sample increased with decreasing temperature. The cutting direction of the Z-cut of crystalline quartz was parallel to the crystal axis. A tendency of the temperature dependence was the same with in the case of the glass materials. In contrast, the laser-induced damage threshold of the Z-cut sample decreased with decreasing temperature. The difference in the temperature-dependent behaviors of crystalline quartz is explained using physical models. The crystal axis influenced strongly to the electron resistivity and the electron avalanche process in laser-induced damage mechanisms was affected in the result.

  12. Chloride Secretion Induced by Rotavirus Is Oxidative Stress-Dependent and Inhibited by Saccharomyces boulardii in Human Enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Laudiero, Gabriella; Russo, Carla; Miele, Erasmo; Sofia, Morena; Monini, Marina; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Guarino, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) infection causes watery diarrhea via multiple mechanisms, primarily chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cell. The chloride secretion largely depends on non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) enterotoxic activity in human enterocytes through mechanisms that have not been defined. Redox imbalance is a common event in cells infected by viruses, but the role of oxidative stress in RV infection is unknown. RV SA11 induced chloride secretion in association with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Caco-2 cells. The ratio between reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione was decreased by RV. The same effects were observed when purified NSP4 was added to Caco-2 cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, strongly inhibited the increase in ROS and GSH imbalance. These results suggest a link between oxidative stress and RV-induced diarrhea. Because Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) has been effectively used to treat RV diarrhea, we tested its effects on RV-infected cells. Sb supernatant prevented RV-induced oxidative stress and strongly inhibited chloride secretion in Caco-2 cells. These results were confirmed in an organ culture model using human intestinal biopsies, demonstrating that chloride secretion induced by RV-NSP4 is oxidative stress-dependent and is inhibited by Sb, which produces soluble metabolites that prevent oxidative stress. The results of this study provide novel insights into RV-induced diarrhea and the efficacy of probiotics. PMID:24918938

  13. Calcium-dependent trichosanthin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species involved in apoptosis of human choriocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunyang; Ma, Hui; Chen, Die Yan

    2001-04-01

    The type-I ribosome-inactivating protein trichosanthin (TCS) has a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities, including abortifacient, anti-tumor and anti-HIV. We found for the first time that TCS induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in JAR cells by using fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate with confocal laser scanning microscopy. TCS-induced ROS showed dependence on the increase in intracellular calcium and on the presence of extracellular calcium. The production of ROS increased rapidly after the application of TCS, which paralleled TCS-indued increase in intracellular calcium monitored using fluo 3-AM, suggesting that TCS-induced ROS might mediate by the increase in intracellular Ca2PLU concentration. Simultaneous observation of the nuclear morphological changes and production of ROS in JAR cells with two-photon laser scanning microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells, which was confirmed by that antioxidant (alpha) -tocopherol prevented TCS-induced ROS formation and cell death. The finding that calcium-dependent TCS-induced ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells might provide new insight into the anti-tumor and anti-HIV mechanism of TCS.

  14. cGMP-dependent ABA-induced stomatal closure in the ABA-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant abi1-1.

    PubMed

    Dubovskaya, Lyudmila V; Bakakina, Yulia S; Kolesneva, Ekaterina V; Sodel, Dmitry L; McAinsh, Martin R; Hetherington, Alistair M; Volotovski, Igor D

    2011-07-01

    • The drought hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is widely known to produce reductions in stomatal aperture in guard cells. The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) is thought to form part of the signalling pathway by which ABA induces stomatal closure. • We have examined the signalling events during cGMP-dependent ABA-induced stomatal closure in wild-type Arabidopsis plants and plants of the ABA-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant abi1-1. • We show that cGMP acts downstream of hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2) ) and nitric oxide (NO) in the signalling pathway by which ABA induces stomatal closure. H(2) O(2) - and NO-induced increases in the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+) ](cyt) ) were cGMP-dependent, positioning cGMP upstream of [Ca(2+) ](cyt) , and involved the action of the type 2C protein phosphatase ABI1. Increases in cGMP were mediated through the stimulation of guanylyl cyclase by H(2) O(2) and NO. We identify nucleoside diphosphate kinase as a new cGMP target protein in Arabidopsis. • This study positions cGMP downstream of ABA-induced changes in H(2) O(2) and NO, and upstream of increases in [Ca(2+) ](cyt) in the signalling pathway leading to stomatal closure.

  15. JNK-dependent Atg4 upregulation mediates asperphenamate derivative BBP-induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanchun; Luo, Qiyu; Yuan, Lei; Miao, Caixia; Mu, Xiaoshuo; Xiao, Wei; Li, Jianchun; Sun, Tiemin; Ma, Enlong

    2012-08-15

    N-Benzoyl-O-(N'-(1-benzyloxycarbonyl-4-piperidiylcarbonyl)-D-phenylalanyl)-D-phenylalaninol (BBP), a novel synthesized asperphenamate derivative with the increased solubility, showed growth inhibitory effect on human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The growth inhibitory effect of BBP was associated with induction of autophagy, which was demonstrated by the development of acidic vesicular organelles, cleavage of LC3 and upregulation of Atg4 in BBP-treated MCF-7 cells. Since the application of Atg4 siRNA totally blocked the cleavage of LC3, we demonstrated a central role of Atg4 in BBP-induced autophagy. The further studies showed that BBP increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and pretreatment with NAC effectively blocked the accumulation of ROS, autophagy and growth inhibition triggered by BBP. Moreover, BBP induced the activation of JNK, and JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed autophagy, the increase of Atg4 levels, conversion of LC3 and growth inhibition induced by BBP. Knockdown of JNK by siRNA efficiently inhibited ROS production and autophagy, but antioxidant NAC failed to block JNK activation induced by BBP, indicating that JNK activation may be a upstream signaling of ROS and should be a core component in BBP-induced autophagic signaling pathway. These results suggest that BBP produces its growth inhibitory effect through induction of the autophagic cell death in MCF-7 cells, which is modulated by a JNK-dependent Atg4 upregulation involving ROS production. PMID:22668848

  16. UV-B-Induced CPD Photolyase Gene Expression is Regulated by UVR8-Dependent and -Independent Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Teranishi, Mika; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Matsushita, Tomonao; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Li, Shao-Shan; Hidema, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Plants have evolved various mechanisms that protect against the harmful effects of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) on growth and development. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, the repair enzyme for UV-B-induced CPDs, is essential for protecting cells from UV-B radiation. Expression of the CPD photolyase gene (PHR) is controlled by light with various wavelengths including UV-B, but the mechanisms of this regulation remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the regulation of PHR expression by light with various wavelengths, in particular low-fluence UV-B radiation (280 nm, 0.2 µmol m(-2) s(-1)), in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown under light-dark cycles for 7 d and then adapted to the dark for 3 d. Low-fluence UV-B radiation induced CPDs but not reactive oxygen species. AtPHR expression was effectively induced by UV-B, UV-A (375 nm) and blue light. Expression induced by UV-A and blue light was predominantly regulated by the cryptochrome-dependent pathway, whereas phytochromes A and B played a minor but noticeable role. Expression induced by UV-B was predominantly regulated by the UVR8-dependent pathway. AtPHR expression was also mediated by a UVR8-independent pathway, which is correlated with CPD accumulation induced by UV-B radiation. These results indicate that Arabidopsis has evolved diverse mechanisms to regulate CPD photolyase expression by multiple photoreceptor signaling pathways, including UVR8-dependent and -independent pathways, as protection against harmful effects of UV-B radiation. PMID:26272552

  17. UV-B-Induced CPD Photolyase Gene Expression is Regulated by UVR8-Dependent and -Independent Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Teranishi, Mika; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Matsushita, Tomonao; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Li, Shao-Shan; Hidema, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Plants have evolved various mechanisms that protect against the harmful effects of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) on growth and development. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, the repair enzyme for UV-B-induced CPDs, is essential for protecting cells from UV-B radiation. Expression of the CPD photolyase gene (PHR) is controlled by light with various wavelengths including UV-B, but the mechanisms of this regulation remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the regulation of PHR expression by light with various wavelengths, in particular low-fluence UV-B radiation (280 nm, 0.2 µmol m(-2) s(-1)), in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown under light-dark cycles for 7 d and then adapted to the dark for 3 d. Low-fluence UV-B radiation induced CPDs but not reactive oxygen species. AtPHR expression was effectively induced by UV-B, UV-A (375 nm) and blue light. Expression induced by UV-A and blue light was predominantly regulated by the cryptochrome-dependent pathway, whereas phytochromes A and B played a minor but noticeable role. Expression induced by UV-B was predominantly regulated by the UVR8-dependent pathway. AtPHR expression was also mediated by a UVR8-independent pathway, which is correlated with CPD accumulation induced by UV-B radiation. These results indicate that Arabidopsis has evolved diverse mechanisms to regulate CPD photolyase expression by multiple photoreceptor signaling pathways, including UVR8-dependent and -independent pathways, as protection against harmful effects of UV-B radiation.

  18. JNK-dependent Atg4 upregulation mediates asperphenamate derivative BBP-induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanchun; Luo, Qiyu; Yuan, Lei; Miao, Caixia; Mu, Xiaoshuo; Xiao, Wei; Li, Jianchun; Sun, Tiemin; Ma, Enlong

    2012-08-15

    N-Benzoyl-O-(N′-(1-benzyloxycarbonyl-4-piperidiylcarbonyl) -D-phenylalanyl)-D-phenylalaninol (BBP), a novel synthesized asperphenamate derivative with the increased solubility, showed growth inhibitory effect on human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The growth inhibitory effect of BBP was associated with induction of autophagy, which was demonstrated by the development of acidic vesicular organelles, cleavage of LC3 and upregulation of Atg4 in BBP-treated MCF-7 cells. Since the application of Atg4 siRNA totally blocked the cleavage of LC3, we demonstrated a central role of Atg4 in BBP-induced autophagy. The further studies showed that BBP increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and pretreatment with NAC effectively blocked the accumulation of ROS, autophagy and growth inhibition triggered by BBP. Moreover, BBP induced the activation of JNK, and JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed autophagy, the increase of Atg4 levels, conversion of LC3 and growth inhibition induced by BBP. Knockdown of JNK by siRNA efficiently inhibited ROS production and autophagy, but antioxidant NAC failed to block JNK activation induced by BBP, indicating that JNK activation may be a upstream signaling of ROS and should be a core component in BBP-induced autophagic signaling pathway. These results suggest that BBP produces its growth inhibitory effect through induction of the autophagic cell death in MCF-7 cells, which is modulated by a JNK-dependent Atg4 upregulation involving ROS production. -- Highlights: ► Asperphenamate derivative BBP with increased solubility was synthesized. ► BBP selectively inhibited the growth of human breast tumor cells. ► The growth inhibitory effect of BBP was associated with induction of autophagy. ► JNK-dependent Atg4 upregulation mediated BBP-induced autophagy.

  19. A comparison of independent depression and substance-induced depression in cannabis-, cocaine-, and opioid-dependent treatment seekers.

    PubMed

    Dakwar, Elias; Nunes, Edward V; Bisaga, Adam; Carpenter, Kenneth C; Mariani, John P; Sullivan, Maria A; Raby, Wilfrid N; Levin, Frances R

    2011-01-01

    Depressive symptoms often coexist with substance use disorders (SUDs). The DSM-IV has identified two distinct categories for depression coexisting with SUDs-independent depression and substance-induced depression. While this distinction has important therapeutic and prognostic implications, it remains difficult to make in clinical practice; the differentiation is often guided by chronological and symptom severity criteria that patients may be unable to precisely provide. Furthermore, it is unclear whether the various substances commonly abused-cannabis, cocaine, and opioids-are equally associated with the two types of depression. Predictors, associations, and other markers may be helpful in guiding the diagnostic process. We, therefore, examined the differences between cannabis-, cocaine-, and opioid-dependent individuals contending with independent depression and those contending with substance-induced depression in regard to several variables, hypothesizing that independent depression is more commonly found in females, and that it is associated with higher symptom severity and psychiatric comorbidity. Cocaine-, cannabis-, and/or opioid-dependent, treatment-seeking individuals underwent a structured clinical interview for DSM-IV-TR disorders after providing consent at our clinical research site; those with co-existing primary depression or substance-induced depression diagnoses were provided with further questionnaires and were entered into this analysis (n= 242). Pair-wise comparisons were conducted between the groups classified as independent versus substance-induced depression with 2-by-2 tables and chi-square tests for dichotomous independent variables, and t-tests for continuous variables. Binomial logistic regression was performed in order to ascertain which of the variables were significant predictors. Women were more likely than men to have independent depression (p< .005). Cannabis dependence was highly associated with independent depression (p< .001

  20. A Comparison of Independent Depression and Substance-Induced Depression in Cannabis, Cocaine, and Opioid Dependent Treatment Seekers

    PubMed Central

    Dakwar, Elias; Nunes, Edward V.; Bisaga, Adam; Carpenter, Kenneth C.; Mariani, John P.; Sullivan, Maria A.; Raby, Wilfrid N.; Levin, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    Depressive symptoms often co-exist with substance use disorders (SUDs). The DSM-IV has identified two distinct categories for depression coexisting with SUDs – independent depression and substance-induced depression. While this distinction has important therapeutic and prognostic implications, it remains difficult to make in clinical practice; the differentiation is often guided by chronological and symptom severity criteria that patients may be unable to precisely provide. Furthermore, it is unclear whether the various substances commonly abused – cannabis, cocaine, and opioids – are equally associated with the two types of depression. Predictors, associations, and other markers may be helpful in guiding the diagnostic process. We therefore examined the differences between cannabis, cocaine, and opioid dependent individuals contending with independent depression and those contending with substance-induced depression in regards to several variables, hypothesizing that independent depression is more commonly found in females, and that it is associated with higher symptom severity and psychiatric comorbidity. Cocaine, cannabis, and/or opioid dependent, treatment-seeking individuals underwent a SCID after providing consent at our clinical research site; those with coexisting primary depression or substance-induced depression diagnoses were provided with further questionnaires and were entered into this analysis (n=242). Pair-wise comparisons were conducted between the groups classified as independent versus substance induced depression with 2 by 2 tables and chi-square tests for dichotomous independent variables, and t-tests for continuous variables. Binomial logistic regression was performed in order to ascertain which of the variables were significant predictors. Women were more likely than men to have independent depression (p<0.005). Cannabis dependence was highly associated with independent depression (p<0.001), while cocaine dependence was highly

  1. Early LPS-induced ERK activation in retinal pigment epithelium cells is dependent on PIP 2 -PLC.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Melina V; Kamerbeek, Constanza B; Giusto, Norma M; Salvador, Gabriela A

    2016-06-01

    This article presents additional data regarding the study "The phospholipase D pathway mediates the inflammatory response of the retinal pigment epithelium" [1]. The new data presented here show that short exposure of RPE cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces an early and transient activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). This early ERK1/2 activation is dependent on phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate-phospholipase C (PIP2-PLC). On the contrary, neither the phospholipase D 1 (PLD1) nor the PLD2 inhibition is able to modulate the early ERK1/2 activation induced by LPS in RPE cells.

  2. Crosstalk between Beclin-1-dependent autophagy and caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by tanshinone IIA in human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Zhang, Chuan; Huang, Man-Yu; Guo, Yan-Xing; Hu, Guo-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether or not autophagy is induced by tanshinone IIA (TanIIA), and to explore the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis in regards to the antitumor effects of TanIIA on MG-63 cells and the potential mechanism. MG-63 cells were cultured in vitro with various concentrations of TanIIA (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 mg/l) for 0, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide MTT assay was used to evaluate the inhibition of the proliferation of osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by TanIIA or in the presence/absence of chloroquine (CQ). Autophagic vacuoles and characteristic autophagosomes were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TanIIA-induced autophagy in MG-63 cells was confirmed by GFP-LC3 punctate fluorescence. The expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 and cleaved-PARP and autophagy-related proteins LC3II/LC3I and Beclin-1 were detected by western blotting. FITC-Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) staining, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining were used to analyze the apoptotic rate. Fluorescence intensity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was examined under a fluorescence microscope using an analysis software system. Cell proliferation was obviously inhibited by TanIIA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Generation of autophagy was triggered by TanIIA (0–20 mg/l) treatment, and in a Beclin-1-dependent manner. Compared with the control group, the apoptosis ratio following treatment with 2.5 mg/l TanIIA failed to achieve statistical significance. Expression of caspase-3, -8 and -9, and cleaved-PARP in the other groups was gradually enhanced in dose-dependent manner. Our analysis also suggested that the influence of autophagy on TanIIA cytotoxicity had a phase effect; with low-dose drugs and shorter treatment periods, autophagy functioned as a damage repair mechanism. In conrast, when the cells were treated with higher doses of Tan

  3. Preventive Effects of Forced Exercise against Alcohol-induced Physical Dependency and Reduction of Pain Perception Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Ghaleni, Majid Asadi; Motaghinejad, Ozra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of postabstinence syndrome of alcohol is one of the major strategies of alcoholism treatment. Exercise can be modulated major brain pathways such as a reward system and pain perception centers. The aim of this study was to evaluation the effects of forced exercise in the management of alcohol dependence and pain perception alteration which induced by alcoholism. Methods: 72 adult male rats were divided into 2 major groups: (1) 40 of them was divided into groups of positive control (alcohol dependent) negative control and alcohol dependent groups under treatment by forced exercise, diazepam (0.4 mg/kg) and forced exercise in combination with diazepam and alcohol withdrawal signs, and blood cortisols, were measured in this groups. (2) 32 rats were divided into control, alcohol dependent (without treatment), and alcohol-dependent groups under treatment by forced exercise or indometacin (5 mg/kg) and then pain perception was assessed by using writhing test, tail-flick and hot plate test. Results: Forced exercise, diazepam, and their combinations significantly attenuates withdrawal syndrome to 20 ± 2, 22 ± 1.3 and 16 ± 2 and blood cortisol level to 6.8 ± 1.3,7.9 ± 1.2 and 5.8 ± 1.1, respectively, in comparison with the positive control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001). In alcohol dependent animal under treatment by forced exercise, pain response significantly inhibited with 37%, 57% and 38% decreases in writhing test, hot plate, and tail-flick test, respectively, in comparison with alcohol dependent (without treatment) group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study suggested that forced exercise can be useful as adjunct therapy in alcoholism patient and also can be effective in modulation of pain threshold reduction that was induced by alcohol dependency. PMID:25400889

  4. ROS-dependent HMGA2 upregulation mediates Cd-induced proliferation in MRC-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huaying; Wang, Jiayue; Jiang, Liping; Geng, Chengyan; Li, Qiujuan; Mei, Dan; Zhao, Lian; Cao, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal widely found in a number of environmental matrices, and the exposure to Cd is increasing nowadays. In this study, the role of high mobility group A2 (HMGA2) in Cd-induced proliferation was investigated in MRC-5 cells. Exposure to Cd (2μM) for 48h significantly enhanced the growth of MRC-5 cells, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and induced both mRNA and protein expression of HMGA2. Evidence for Cd-induced reduction of the number of G0/G1 phase cells and an increase in the number of cells in S phase and G2/M phase was sought by flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis showed that cyclin D1, cyclin B1, and cyclin E were upregulated in Cd-treated cells. Further study revealed that N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) markedly prevented Cd-induced proliferation of MRC-5 cells, ROS generation, and the increasing protein level of HMGA2. Silencing of HMGA2 gene by siRNA blocked Cd-induced cyclin D1, cyclin B1, and cyclin E expression and reduction of the number of G0/G1 phase cells. Combining, our data showed that Cd-induced ROS formation provoked HMGA2 upregulation, caused cell cycle changes, and led to cell proliferation. This suggests that HMGA2 might be an important biomarker in Cd-induced cell proliferation.

  5. Prevention of UV radiation-induced immunosuppression by IL-12 is dependent on DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Agatha; Maeda, Akira; Kernebeck, Kerstin; van Steeg, Harry; Beissert, Stefan; Schwarz, Thomas

    2005-01-17

    The immunostimulatory cytokine IL-12 is able to antagonize immunosuppression induced by solar/ultraviolet (UV) radiation via yet unknown mechanisms. IL-12 was recently found to induce deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair. UV-induced DNA damage is an important molecular trigger for UV-mediated immunosuppression. Thus, we initiated studies into immune restoration by IL-12 to discern whether its effects are linked to DNA repair. IL-12 prevented both UV-induced suppression of the induction of contact hypersensitivity and the depletion of Langerhans cells, the primary APC of the skin, in wild-type but not in DNA repair-deficient mice. IL-12 did not prevent the development of UV-induced regulatory T cells in DNA repair-deficient mice. In contrast, IL-12 was able to break established UV-induced tolerance and inhibited the activity of regulatory T cells independent of DNA repair. These data identify a new mechanism by which IL-12 can restore immune responses and also demonstrate a link between DNA repair and the prevention of UV-induced immunosuppression by IL-12.

  6. Plant induced defenses depend more on plant age than previous history of damage: implications for plant-herbivore interactions.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Carolina; Bowers, M Deane

    2011-09-01

    Herbivore-induced plant responses can significantly change as a function of plant developmental stage and previous history of damage. Yet, empirical tests that assess the combined role of multiple damage events and age-dependent constraints on the ability of plants to induce defenses within and among tissues are scarce. This question is of particular interest for annual and/or short-lived perennial plant species, whose responses to single or multiple damage events over a growing season are likely to interact with ontogenetic constraints in affecting a plant's ability to respond to herbivory. Using Plantago lanceolata and one of its specialist herbivores, Junonia coenia, we examined the effect of plant ontogeny (juvenile vs. mature developmental stages) and history of damage (single and multiple damage events early and/or late in the season) on plant responses to leaf damage. Plant responses to herbivory were assessed as induced chemical defenses (iridoid glycosides) and compensatory regrowth, in both above- and below-ground tissues. We found that constitutive concentration of iridoid glycosides markedly increased as plants matured, but plant ability to induce chemical defenses was limited to juvenile, but not mature, plant stages. In addition, induced defenses observed 7 d following herbivory in juvenile plants disappeared 5 wk after the first herbivory event, and mature plants that varied considerably in the frequency and intensity of damage received over 5 wk, did not differ significantly in their levels of chemical defenses. Also, only small changes in compensatory regrowth were detected. Finally, we did not observe changes in below-ground tissues' defenses or biomass a week following 50% removal of leaf tissues at either age class or history of damage. Together, these results suggest that in P. lanceolata and perhaps other systems, ontogenetic trajectories in plant growth and defenses leading to strong age-dependent induced responses may prevail over

  7. Leptin induces macrophage lipid body formation by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase- and mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Almeida, Patricia E; D'Avila, Heloisa; Martins, Aline S; Rezende, Ana Paula; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo; Bozza, Patricia T

    2008-01-25

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone/cytokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Lipid bodies (lipid droplets) are emerging as dynamic organelles with roles in lipid metabolism and inflammation. Here we investigated the roles of leptin in signaling pathways involved in cytoplasmic lipid body biogenesis and leukotriene B(4) synthesis in macrophages. Our results demonstrated that leptin directly activated macrophages and induced the formation of adipose differentiation-related protein-enriched lipid bodies. Newly formed lipid bodies were sites of 5-lipoxygenase localization and correlated with an enhanced capacity of leukotriene B(4) production. We demonstrated that leptin-induced macrophage activation was dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, since the lipid body formation was inhibited by LY294002 and was absent in the PI3K knock-out mice. Leptin induces phosphorylation of p70(S6K) and 4EBP1 key downstream signaling intermediates of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in a rapamycin-sensitive mechanism. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibited leptin-induced lipid body formation, both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, rapamycin inhibited leptin-induced adipose differentiation-related protein accumulation in macrophages and lipid body-dependent leukotriene synthesis, demonstrating a key role for mTOR in lipid body biogenesis and function. Our results establish PI3K/mTOR as an important signaling pathway for leptin-induced cytoplasmic lipid body biogenesis and adipose differentiation-related protein accumulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized link between intracellular (mTOR) and systemic (leptin) nutrient sensors in macrophage lipid metabolism. Leptin-induced increased formation of cytoplasmic lipid bodies and enhanced inflammatory mediator production in macrophages may have implications for obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:18039669

  8. Cdk2 deficiency decreases ras/CDK4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2007-10-15

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development, causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also shown that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin, loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induced epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decreased incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathologic analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2-/- tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report of K5Myc/CDK4-/-, K5Myc/CDK2-/- mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall, we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved.

  9. Inhibitory effect of BMAP-28 on Leptospiral Lipopolysaccharide-Induced TLR2-Dependent Immune Response in Bovine Cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, Yijie; Ding, Cuiping; Zhang, Bo; XU, Jun; XUN, Meng; XU, Jiru

    2016-01-01

    Background Bovine leptospirosis is a widespread zoonotic disease, leading to serious economic losses in animal production and causing potential hazards to human health. Leptospiral lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) plays an important role in leptospirosis pathogenicity. Objectives With respect to L-LPS endotoxin-like activity, we examined bovine immune response to L-LPS and the inhibitory ability of bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-28 (BMAP-28) against L-LPS-induced immune activation in bovine cells. Materials and Methods In this study, L-LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in bovine cells was quantitatively measured with real-time PCR and ELISA, and we determined which cell membrane receptors (toll-like receptor [TLR]2 and TLR4) played a major role. In addition, the ability of BMAP-28 to inhibit L-LPS-induced endotoxin-like immune activation in bovine cells was determined by the decrease in cytokine secretion. Results L-LPS showed the ability to induce cytokine production in bovine cells, and its induction was TLR2-dependent. BMAP-28 was used to inhibit L-LPS-induced endotoxin-like activity. The function of BMAP-28 was to inhibit LPS-induced TLR2 expression and cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, the L-LPS immune response of bovine cells was significant, indicating that TLR2 is the predominant receptor for L-LPS. Due to L-LPS endotoxin-like activity, we found a strategy through using BMAP-28 to prevent L-LPS-induced TLR2-dependent immune activation in bovine cells.

  10. Inhibitory effect of BMAP-28 on Leptospiral Lipopolysaccharide-Induced TLR2-Dependent Immune Response in Bovine Cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, Yijie; Ding, Cuiping; Zhang, Bo; XU, Jun; XUN, Meng; XU, Jiru

    2016-01-01

    Background Bovine leptospirosis is a widespread zoonotic disease, leading to serious economic losses in animal production and causing potential hazards to human health. Leptospiral lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) plays an important role in leptospirosis pathogenicity. Objectives With respect to L-LPS endotoxin-like activity, we examined bovine immune response to L-LPS and the inhibitory ability of bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-28 (BMAP-28) against L-LPS-induced immune activation in bovine cells. Materials and Methods In this study, L-LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in bovine cells was quantitatively measured with real-time PCR and ELISA, and we determined which cell membrane receptors (toll-like receptor [TLR]2 and TLR4) played a major role. In addition, the ability of BMAP-28 to inhibit L-LPS-induced endotoxin-like immune activation in bovine cells was determined by the decrease in cytokine secretion. Results L-LPS showed the ability to induce cytokine production in bovine cells, and its induction was TLR2-dependent. BMAP-28 was used to inhibit L-LPS-induced endotoxin-like activity. The function of BMAP-28 was to inhibit LPS-induced TLR2 expression and cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, the L-LPS immune response of bovine cells was significant, indicating that TLR2 is the predominant receptor for L-LPS. Due to L-LPS endotoxin-like activity, we found a strategy through using BMAP-28 to prevent L-LPS-induced TLR2-dependent immune activation in bovine cells. PMID:27635213

  11. Cdk2 deficiency decrease ras/cdk4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also demonstrated that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induce epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decrease incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathological analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2−/− tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report K5Myc/CDK4−/− mice, K5Myc/CDK2−/− mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved. PMID:17942901

  12. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is robustly

  13. Laser-induced electron emission from a tungsten nanotip: identifying above threshold photoemission using energy-resolved laser power dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bionta, M. R.; Chalopin, B.; Champeaux, J. P.; Faure, S.; Masseboeuf, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Chatel, B.

    2014-06-01

    We present an experiment studying the interaction of a strongly focused 25 fs laser pulse with a tungsten nanotip, investigating the different regimes of laser-induced electron emission. We study the dependence of the electron yield with respect to the static electric field applied to the tip. Photoelectron spectra are recorded using a retarding field spectrometer and peaks separated by the photon energy are observed with a 45% contrast. They are a clear signature of above threshold photoemission (ATP), and are confirmed by extensive spectrally resolved studies of the laser power dependence. Understanding these mechanisms opens the route to control experiment in the strong-field regime on nanoscale objects.

  14. Electromagnetically induced transparency and lasing without inversion in three-level atoms imbedded in a frequency-dependent environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeonychev, Y. V.; Erukhimova, M. A.; Kocharovskaya, O. A.; Vilaseca, R.

    2004-10-01

    The response of a three-level atomic system driven by a resonant coherent field acting on a transition near the photonic band-edge of a photonic band-gap material as well as the general case of a frequency-dependent reservoir is studied. The strong frequency dependence of the radiation mode spectral density on the scale of the driving field Rabi frequency is shown to lead to essential and controllable changes in the refractive index, as well as to effects of electromagnetically induced transparency and lasing without inversion. Such an effective dynamic control of the atomic response enables for applications in nonlinear optics and optical computing and communications.

  15. Atherogenic diet-induced hepatitis is partially dependent on murine TLR4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diets high in cholesterol and cholate such as the Paigen diet have been used to study atherogenesis, lithogenesis, and proinflammatory microvascular changes induced by nutritional hypercholesterolemia. Although these diets lead to chronic hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, the early inflammatory cha...

  16. Evolution of the linear-polarization-angle-dependence of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations with microwave power

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2014-11-10

    We examine the role of the microwave power in the linear polarization angle dependence of the microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system. The diagonal resistance R{sub xx} was measured at the fixed magnetic fields of the photo-excited oscillatory extrema of R{sub xx} as a function of both the microwave power, P, and the linear polarization angle, θ. Color contour plots of such measurements demonstrate the evolution of the lineshape of R{sub xx} versus θ with increasing microwave power. We report that the non-linear power dependence of the amplitude of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations distorts the cosine-square relation between R{sub xx} and θ at high power.

  17. Platelets prevent IFN-alpha/beta-induced lethal hemorrhage promoting CTL-dependent clearance of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Matteo; Sitia, Giovanni; Isogawa, Masanori; Whitmire, Jason K; Marchese, Patrizia; Chisari, Francis V; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Guidotti, Luca G

    2008-01-15

    We found that mice infected with different isolates of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) develop a mild hemorrhagic anemia, which becomes severe and eventually lethal in animals depleted of platelets or lacking integrin beta3. Lethal hemorrhagic anemia is mediated by virus-induced IFN-alpha/beta that causes platelet dysfunction, mucocutaneous blood loss and suppression of erythropoiesis. In addition to the life-threatening hemorrhagic anemia, platelet-depleted mice fail to mount an efficient cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response and cannot clear LCMV. Transfusion of functional platelets into these animals reduces hemorrhage, prevents death and restores CTL-induced viral clearance in a manner partially dependent on CD40 ligand (CD40L). These results indicate that, upon activation, platelets expressing integrin beta3 and CD40L are required for protecting the host against the induction of an IFN-alpha/beta-dependent lethal hemorrhagic diathesis and for clearing LCMV infection through CTLs.

  18. Hepatoprotective properties of kombucha tea against TBHP-induced oxidative stress via suppression of mitochondria dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Gachhui, Ratan; Sil, Parames C

    2011-06-01

    Kombucha, a fermented tea (KT) is claimed to possess many beneficial properties. Recent studies have suggested that KT prevents paracetamol and carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity. We investigated the beneficial role of KT was against tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) induced cytotoxicity and cell death in murine hepatocytes. TBHP is a well known reactive oxygen species (ROS) inducer, and it induces oxidative stress in organ pathophysiology. In our experiments, TBHP caused a reduction in cell viability, enhanced the membrane leakage and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries while simultaneous treatment of the cells with KT and this ROS inducer maintained membrane integrity and prevented the alterations in the cellular antioxidant status. These findings led us to explore the detailed molecular mechanisms involved in the protective effect of KT. TBHP introduced apoptosis as the primary phenomena of cell death as evidenced by flow cytometric analyses. In addition, ROS generation, changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, activation of caspases (3 and 9) and Apaf-1 were detected confirming involvement of mitochondrial pathway in this pathophysiology. Simultaneous treatment of KT with TBHP, on the other hand, protected the cells against oxidative injury and maintained their normal physiology. In conclusion, KT was found to modulate the oxidative stress induced apoptosis in murine hepatocytes probably due to its antioxidant activity and functioning via mitochondria dependent pathways and could be beneficial against liver diseases, where oxidative stress is known to play a crucial role.

  19. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  20. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in SCC-4 human tongue cancer cells through mitochondria-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ip, Siu-Wan; Lan, Sheng-Hui; Huang, An-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chen, Ya-Yin; Huang, Hui-Ying; Lin, Zen-Pin; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Yang, Mei-Due; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-05-01

    Although there have been advances in the fields of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy of tongue cancer, the cure rates are still not substantially satisfactory. Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the major pungent ingredient of hot chili pepper and has been reported to have an antitumor effect on many human cancer cell types. The molecular mechanisms of the antitumor effect of capsaicin are not yet completely understood. Herein, we investigated whether capsaicin induces apoptosis in human tongue cancer cells. Capsaicin decreased the percentage of viable cells in a dose-dependent manner in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells. In addition, capsaicin produced DNA fragmentation, decreased the DNA contents (sub-G1 phase), and induced G0/G1 phase arrest in SCC-4 cells. We demonstrated that capsaicin-induced apoptosis is associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species and Ca²⁺ generations and a disruption of the mitochondrial transmenbrane potential (ΔΨ(m)). Treatment with capsaicin induced a dramatic increase in caspase-3 and -9 activities, as assessed by flow cytometric methods. A possible mechanism of capsaicin-induced apoptosis is involved in the activation of caspase-3 (one of the apoptosis-executing enzyme). Confocal laser microscope examination also showed that capsaicin induced the releases of AIF, ATF-4, and GADD153 from mitochondria of SCC-4 cells.

  1. Time-Dependent Theory of Laser-Induced Desorption of Small Molecules from Metals, and Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfrank, Peter

    1998-03-01

    As an alternative to ``ordinary'', i.e., thermally induced chemistry at the interface of a molecular gas and a solid substrate, surface photochemistry has gained importance in recent years. In this talk, we describe our efforts towards a quantum--dynamical theory of laser--induced elementary processes at adsorbate--covered metal surfaces. First, using time--dependent open--system reduced density matrix theory and nuclear wave packet methods, the indirect (``hot--electron mediated''), ultraviolet/visible--laser induced desorption of small molecules (nitric oxide or ammonia) from metal substrates (platinum or copper) will be addressed. We model both the single-- (DIET, ``desorption induced by electronic transitions'' -- use of continuous wave lasers) and multiple--excitation limits (DIMET, M=``multiple'' -- use of femtosecond lasers). Based on our simulations, the lifetimes of adsorbate electronic states will be estimated, experimental observations will be rationalized, and strategies for the active control of photochemical reactions at surfaces will be proposed. For the example system ammonia/copper, alternatives to the UV/visible--laser induced adsorbate photochemistry will be explored in which the adsorbate remains electronically unexcited. For instance, using laser pulses in the infrared, desorption can also be enforced by ``vibrational ladder climbing''. An analogous, modified strategy can be used to achieve isomerization of adsorbed species. Finally, as the reverse process to desorption, IR laser--induced adsorption will be considered.

  2. Activation of Rac1-dependent redox signaling is critically involved in staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Du Sik; An, Jeong Mi; Lee, Han Gil; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Seon Sook; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kang, Jeong Wan; Bae, Yun Soo; Seo, Jeong Taeg

    2013-02-01

    Staurosporine, a non-specific protein kinase inhibitor, has been shown to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, but the mechanism by which staurosporine induces neurite outgrowth is still obscure. In the present study, we investigated whether the activation of Rac1 was responsible for the neurite outgrowth triggered by staurosporine. Staurosporine caused rapid neurite outgrowth independent of the ERK signaling pathways. In contrast, neurite outgrowth in response to staurosporine was accompanied by activation of Rac1, and the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated the staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, suppression of Rac1 activity by expression of the dominant negative mutant Rac1N17 also blocked the staurosporine-induced morphological differentiation of PC12 cells. Staurosporine caused an activation of NADPH oxidase and increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was prevented by NSC23766 and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth was attenuated by pretreatment with DPI and exogenous addition of sublethal concentration of H2O2 accelerated neurite outgrowth triggered by staurosporine. These results indicate that activation of Rac1, which leads to ROS generation, is required for neurite outgrowth induced by staurosporine in PC12 cells.

  3. Agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity requires shear and a Rac1-dependent signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Michael Keegan; Liu, Junling; Kim, Kyungho; Shen, Bo; Stojanovic-Terpo, Aleksandra; Zheng, Yi; Cho, Jaehyung

    2014-01-01

    Activated platelets facilitate blood coagulation by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS) and releasing microvesicles (MVs). However, the potent physiological agonists thrombin and collagen poorly induce PS exposure when a single agonist is used. To obtain a greater procoagulant response, thrombin is commonly used in combination with glycoprotein VI agonists. However, even under these conditions, only a percentage of platelets express procoagulant activity. To date, it remains unclear why platelets poorly expose PS even when stimulated with multiple agonists and what the signaling pathways are of soluble agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity. Here we show that physiological levels of shear present in blood significantly enhance agonist-induced platelet PS exposure and MV release, enabling low doses of a single agonist to induce full-scale platelet procoagulant activity. PS exposed on the platelet surface was immediately released as MVs, revealing a tight coupling between the 2 processes under shear. Using platelet-specific Rac1−/− mice, we discovered that Rac1 plays a common role in mediating the low-dose agonist-induced procoagulant response independent of platelet aggregation, secretion, and the apoptosis pathway. Platelet-specific Rac1 function was not only important for coagulation in vitro but also for fibrin accumulation in vivo following laser-induced arteriolar injury. PMID:25079357

  4. Ghrelin-induced growth hormone release from goldfish pituitary cells is nitric oxide dependent.

    PubMed

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2012-11-01

    Ghrelin (GRLN) is an important neuroendocrine regulator of growth hormone (GH) release in vertebrates. Previous studies show goldfish (g)GRLN(19)-induced GH from the goldfish pituitary involves voltage sensitive Ca(2+) channels, increases in intracellular Ca(2+) and the PKC signalling pathway. We set out to examine the role of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in gGLRN(19)-induced GH release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells using pharmacological regulators in cell column perifusion systems. The NO scavenger PTIO abolished gGRLN(19)-induced GH release and co-treatment with the NO donor SNP and GRLN did not produce additive GH release responses. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors 1400 W and 7-Ni abolished GRLN-induced GH release while treatment with another NOS inhibitor, AGH, had no significant effect. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the NOS/NO is an integral component of gGRLN(19)-induced signalling within the goldfish pituitary cells, and given the relative specificity of AGH for inducible NOS and endothelial NOS isoforms, suggests that neuronal NOS is the likely NOS isoform utilized in goldfish somatotropes by this physiological regulator.

  5. Vanadium induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase Cdelta dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms: Relevance to etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Song, Chunjuan; Witte, Travis; Houk, Robert; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2009-10-15

    Environmental exposure to neurotoxic metals through various sources including exposure to welding fumes has been linked to an increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Welding fumes contain many different metals including vanadium typically present as particulates containing vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}). However, possible neurotoxic effects of this metal oxide on dopaminergic neuronal cells are not well studied. In the present study, we characterized vanadium-induced oxidative stress-dependent cellular events in cell culture models of PD. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was neurotoxic to dopaminergic neuronal cells including primary nigral dopaminergic neurons and the EC{sub 50} was determined to be 37 {mu}M in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cell model. The neurotoxic effect was accompanied by a time-dependent uptake of vanadium and upregulation of metal transporter proteins Tf and DMT1 in N27 cells. Additionally, vanadium resulted in a threefold increase in reactive oxygen species generation, followed by release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm and subsequent activation of caspase-9 (> fourfold) and caspase-3 (> ninefold). Interestingly, vanadium exposure induced proteolytic cleavage of native protein kinase Cdelta (PKC{delta}, 72-74 kDa) to yield a 41 kDa catalytically active fragment resulting in a persistent increase in PKC{delta} kinase activity. Co-treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK significantly blocked vanadium-induced PKC{delta} proteolytic activation, indicating that caspases mediate PKC{delta} cleavage. Also, co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK almost completely inhibited V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-induced DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, PKC{delta} knockdown using siRNA protected N27 cells from V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-induced apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that vanadium can exert neurotoxic effects in dopaminergic neuronal cells via caspase-3-dependent PKC{delta} cleavage, suggesting that metal exposure may promote nigral

  6. Vanadium Induces Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity Via Protein Kinase C-Delta Dependent Oxidative Signaling Mechanisms: Relevance to Etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Song, Chunjuan; Witte, Travis; Houk, R. S.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental exposure to neurotoxic metals through various sources including exposure to welding fumes has been linked to an increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Welding fumes contain many different metals including vanadium typically present as particulates containing vanadium pentoxide (V2O5). However, possible neurotoxic effects of this metal oxide on dopaminergic neuronal cells are not well studied. In the present study, we characterized vanadium-induced oxidative stress-dependent cellular events in cell culture models of PD. V2O5 was neurotoxic to dopaminergic neuronal cells including primary nigral dopaminergic neurons and the EC50 was determined to be 37 μM in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cell model. The neurotoxic effect was accompanied by a time-dependent uptake of vanadium and upregulation of metal transporter proteins Tf and DMT1 in N27 cells. Additionally, vanadium resulted in a threefold increase in reactive oxygen species generation, followed by release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm and subsequent activation of caspase-9 (>fourfold) and caspase-3 (>ninefold). Interestingly, vanadium exposure induced proteolytic cleavage of native protein kinase Cdelta (PKCδ, 72-74 kDa) to yield a 41 kDa catalytically active fragment resulting in a persistent increase in PKCδ kinase activity. Co-treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor ZVAD-FMK significantly blocked vanadium-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation, indicating that caspases mediate PKCδ cleavage. Also, co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK almost completely inhibited V2O5-induced DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, PKCδ knockdown using siRNA protected N27 cells from V2O5-induced apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate vanadium can exert neurotoxic effects in dopaminergic neuronal cells via caspase-3-dependent PKCδ cleavage, suggesting that metal exposure may promote nigral dopaminergic degeneration. PMID:19646462

  7. Legionella pneumophila induces cathepsin B-dependent necrotic cell death with releasing high mobility group box1 in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila (LPN) can cause a lethal infectious disease with a marked inflammatory response in humans. However, the mechanism of this severe inflammation remains poorly understood. Since necrosis is known to induce inflammation, we investigated whether LPN induces necrosis in macrophages. We also analyzed the involvement of lysosomal cathepsin B in LPN-induced cell death. Methods The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was infected with LPN, NUL1 strain. MG132-treated cells were used as apoptotic control cells. After infection, the type of cell death was analyzed by using microscopy, LDH release and flow cytometry. As a proinflammatory mediator, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1), was measured. Cathepsin B activity was also measured and the inhibitory effects of cathepsin B on LPN-induced cell death were analyzed. Results THP-1 cells after treatment with high dose of LPN showed necrotic features with releasing HMGB-1. This necrosis and the HMGB-1 release were inhibited by a specific lysosomal cathepsin B inhibitor and were characterized by a rapid and high activation of cathepsin B that was not observed in apoptotic control cells. The necrosis was also accompanied by cathepsin B-dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Conclusions We demonstrate here that L. pneumophila rapidly induces cathepsin B-dependent necrosis in a dose-dependent manner and releases a proinflammatory mediator, HMGB-1, from macrophages. This report describes a novel aspect of the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease and provides a possible therapeutic target for the regulation of inflammation. PMID:21092200

  8. Thalidomide induces limb anomalies by PTEN stabilization, Akt suppression, and stimulation of caspase-dependent cell death.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Schmitz, Ingo; Götz, Katrin; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Rüther, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Thalidomide, a drug used for the treatment of multiple myeloma and inflammatory diseases, is also a teratogen that causes birth defects, such as limb truncations and microphthalmia, in humans. Thalidomide-induced limb truncations result from increased cell death during embryonic limb development and consequential disturbance of limb outgrowth. Here we demonstrate in primary human embryonic cells and in the chicken embryo that thalidomide-induced signaling through bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmps) protects active PTEN from proteasomal degradation, resulting in suppression of Akt signaling. As a consequence, caspase-dependent cell death is stimulated by the intrinsic and Fas death receptor apoptotic pathway. Most importantly, thalidomide-induced limb deformities and microphthalmia in chicken embryos could be rescued by a pharmacological PTEN inhibitor as well as by insulin, a stimulant of Akt signaling. We therefore conclude that perturbation of PTEN/Akt signaling and stimulation of caspase activity is central to the teratogenic effects of thalidomide.

  9. Size-dependent mortality induces life-history changes mediated through population dynamical feedbacks.

    PubMed

    van Kooten, Tobias; Persson, Lennart; de Roos, André M

    2007-08-01

    The majority of taxa grow significantly during life history, which often leads to individuals of the same species having different ecological roles, depending on their size or life stage. One aspect of life history that changes during ontogeny is mortality. When individual growth and development are resource dependent, changes in mortality can affect the outcome of size-dependent intraspecific resource competition, in turn affecting both life history and population dynamics. We study the outcome of varying size-dependent mortality on two life-history types, one that feeds on the same resource throughout life history and another that can alternatively cannibalize smaller conspecifics. Compensatory responses in the life history dampen the effect of certain types of size-dependent mortality, while other types of mortality lead to dramatic changes in life history and population dynamics, including population (de-)stabilization, and the growth of cannibalistic giants. These responses differ strongly among the two life-history types. Our analysis provides a mechanistic understanding of the population-level effects that come about through the interaction between individual growth and size-dependent mortality, mediated by resource dependence in individual vital rates. PMID:17874376

  10. Prolonged mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response at telomeres that determines cell survival.

    PubMed

    Hain, Karolina O; Colin, Didier J; Rastogi, Shubhra; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2016-05-27

    A delay in the completion of metaphase induces a stress response that inhibits further cell proliferation or induces apoptosis. This response is thought to protect against genomic instability and is important for the effects of anti-mitotic cancer drugs. Here, we show that mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) at telomeres in non-apoptotic cells. This pathway is under the control of Mcl-1 and other Bcl-2 family proteins and requires caspase-9, caspase-3/7 and the endonuclease CAD/DFF40. The gradual caspase-dependent loss of the shelterin complex protein TRF2 from telomeres promotes a DDR that involves DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Suppression of mitotic telomere damage by enhanced expression of TRF2, or the inhibition of either caspase-3/7 or DNA-PK during mitotic arrest, promotes subsequent cell survival. Thus, we demonstrate that mitotic stress is characterised by the sub-apoptotic activation of a classical caspase pathway, which promotes telomere deprotection, activates DNA damage signalling, and determines cell fate in response to a prolonged delay in mitosis.

  11. Prolonged mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response at telomeres that determines cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Hain, Karolina O.; Colin, Didier J.; Rastogi, Shubhra; Allan, Lindsey A.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    A delay in the completion of metaphase induces a stress response that inhibits further cell proliferation or induces apoptosis. This response is thought to protect against genomic instability and is important for the effects of anti-mitotic cancer drugs. Here, we show that mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) at telomeres in non-apoptotic cells. This pathway is under the control of Mcl-1 and other Bcl-2 family proteins and requires caspase-9, caspase-3/7 and the endonuclease CAD/DFF40. The gradual caspase-dependent loss of the shelterin complex protein TRF2 from telomeres promotes a DDR that involves DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Suppression of mitotic telomere damage by enhanced expression of TRF2, or the inhibition of either caspase-3/7 or DNA-PK during mitotic arrest, promotes subsequent cell survival. Thus, we demonstrate that mitotic stress is characterised by the sub-apoptotic activation of a classical caspase pathway, which promotes telomere deprotection, activates DNA damage signalling, and determines cell fate in response to a prolonged delay in mitosis. PMID:27230693</