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Sample records for induces loop structures

  1. Crowding-Induced Structural Alterations of Random-Loop Chromosome Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Soo; Backman, Vadim; Szleifer, Igal

    2011-04-01

    We investigate structural alterations of random-loop polymers due to changes in the crowding condition, as a model to study environmental effects on the structure of chromosome subcompartments. The polymer structure is changed in a nonmonotonic fashion with an increasing density of crowders: condensed at small volume fractions; decondensed at high crowding volume fractions. The nonmonotonic behavior is a manifestation of the nontrivial distance dependence of the depletion interactions. We also show that crowding-induced structural alterations affect the access of binding proteins to the surface of polymer segments and are distinguished from structural changes due to the increased number of specific polymer loops.

  2. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity.

  3. The Structure of Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely believed that the simple coronal loops observed by XUV imagers, such as EIT, TRACE, or XRT, actually have a complex internal structure consisting of many (perhaps hundreds) of unresolved, interwoven "strands". According to the nanoflare model, photospheric motions tangle the strands, causing them to reconnect and release the energy required to produce the observed loop plasma. Although the strands, themselves, are unresolved by present-generation imagers, there is compelling evidence for their existence and for the nanoflare model from analysis of loop intensities and temporal evolution. A problem with this scenario is that, although reconnection can eliminate some of the strand tangles, it cannot destroy helicity, which should eventually build up to observable scales. we consider, therefore, the injection and evolution of helicity by the nanoflare process and its implications for the observed structure of loops and the large-scale corona. we argue that helicity does survive and build up to observable levels, but on spatial and temporal scales larger than those of coronal loops. we discuss the implications of these results for coronal loops and the corona, in general .

  4. ModLoop: automated modeling of loops in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Fiser, András; Sali, Andrej

    2003-12-12

    ModLoop is a web server for automated modeling of loops in protein structures. The input is the atomic coordinates of the protein structure in the Protein Data Bank format, and the specification of the starting and ending residues of one or more segments to be modeled, containing no more than 20 residues in total. The output is the coordinates of the non-hydrogen atoms in the modeled segments. A user provides the input to the server via a simple web interface, and receives the output by e-mail. The server relies on the loop modeling routine in MODELLER that predicts the loop conformations by satisfaction of spatial restraints, without relying on a database of known protein structures. For a rapid response, ModLoop runs on a cluster of Linux PC computers. The server is freely accessible to academic users at http://salilab.org/modloop

  5. The 3-4 loop of an archaeal glutamate transporter homolog experiences ligand-induced structural changes and is essential for transport.

    PubMed

    Compton, Emma L R; Taylor, Erin M; Mindell, Joseph A

    2010-07-20

    Glutamatergic synaptic transmission is terminated by members of the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) family of proteins that remove glutamate from the synaptic cleft by transporting it into surrounding glial cells. Recent structures of a bacterial homolog suggest that major motions within the transmembrane domain translocate the substrate across the membrane. However, the events leading to this large structural rearrangement are much less clear. Two reentrant loops have been proposed to act as extracellular and intracellular gates, but whether other regions of these proteins play a role in the transport process is unknown. We hypothesized that transport-related conformational changes could change the solvent accessibilities of affected residues, as reflected in protease sensitivity or small-molecule reactivity. In the model system Glt(Ph), an archaeal EAAT homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii, limited trypsin proteolysis experiments initially identified a site in the long extracellular loop that stretches between helices 3 and 4 that becomes protected from proteolysis in the presence of a substrate, L-aspartate, or an inhibitor, DL-TBOA in the presence of Na(+), the cotransported ion. Using a combination of site-directed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis and fluorescein-5-maleimide labeling we found that positions throughout the loop experience these ligand-induced conformational changes. By selectively cleaving the 3-4 loop (via introduced Factor Xa sites) we demonstrate that it plays a vital role in the transport process; though structurally intact, the cleaved proteins are unable to transport aspartate. These results inculcate the 3-4 loop as an important player in the transport process, a finding not predicted by any of the available crystal structures of Glt(Ph).

  6. Involvement of the V1/V2 variable loop structure in the exposure of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 epitopes induced by receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, R; Moore, J; Accola, M; Desjardin, E; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1995-01-01

    The binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to the cellular receptor CD4 has been suggested to induce conformational changes in the viral envelope glycoproteins that promote virus entry. Conserved, discontinuous epitopes on the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein recognized by the 17b, 48d, and A32 antibodies are preferentially exposed upon the binding of soluble CD4 (sCD4). The binding of the 17b and 48d antibodies to the gp120 glycoprotein can also be enhanced by the binding of the A32 antibody. Here we constructed HIV-1 gp120 mutants in which the variable segments of the V1/V2 and V3 structures were deleted, individually or in combination, while the 17b, 48d, and A32 epitopes were retained. The effects of the variable loop deletions on the function of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins and on the exposure of epitopes induced by sCD4 or A32 binding to the monomeric gp120 glycoprotein were examined. The variable-loop-deleted envelope glycoproteins were able to mediate virus entry, albeit at lower efficiencies than those of the wild-type glycoproteins. Thus, the V1/V2 and V3 variable sequences contribute to the efficiency of HIV-1 entry but are not absolutely required for the process. Neither the V1/V2 nor V3 loops were necessary for the increase in exposure of the 17b/48d epitopes induced by binding of the A32 monoclonal antibody. By contrast, induction of the 17b, 48d, and A32 epitopes by sCD4 binding apparently involves a movement of the V1/V2 loops, which in the absence of CD4 partially mask these epitopes on the native gp120 monomer. The results obtained with a mutant glycoprotein containing a deletion of the V1 loop alone indicated that the contribution of the V2 loop to these phenomena was more significant than that of the V1 sequences. These results suggest that the V1/V2 loops, which have been previously implicated in CD4-modulated, postattachment steps in HIV-1 entry, contribute to CD4-induced gp120 conformational changes detected by the 17b, 48d, and A

  7. Detection and Characterization of R Loop Structures.

    PubMed

    Boque-Sastre, Raquel; Soler, Marta; Guil, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    R loops are special three stranded nucleic acid structures that comprise a nascent RNA hybridized with the DNA template strand, leaving a non-template DNA single-stranded. More specifically, R loops form in vivo as G-rich RNA transcripts invade the DNA duplex and anneal to the template strand to generate an RNA:DNA hybrid, leaving the non-template, G-rich DNA strand in a largely single-stranded conformation (Aguilera and Garcia-Muse, Mol Cell 46:115-124, 2012).DNA-RNA hybrids are a natural occurrence within eukaryotic cells, with levels of these hybrids increasing at sites with high transcriptional activity, such as during transcription initiation, repression, and elongation. RNA-DNA hybrids influence genomic instability, and growing evidence points to an important role for R loops in active gene expression regulation (Ginno et al., Mol Cell 45, 814-825, 2012; Sun et al., Science 340: 619-621, 2013; Bhatia et al., Nature 511, 362-365, 2014). Analysis of the occurrence of such structures is therefore of increasing relevance and herein we describe methods for the in vivo and in vitro identification and characterization of R loops in mammalian systems.R loops (DNA:RNA hybrids and the associated single-stranded DNA) have been traditionally associated with threats to genome integrity, making some regions of the genome more prone to DNA-damaging and mutagenic agents. Initially considered to be rare byproducts of transcription, over the last decade accumulating evidence has pointed to a new view in which R loops form more frequently than previously thought. The R loop field has become an increasingly expanded area of research, placing these structures as a major threat to genome stability but also as potential regulators of gene expression. Special interest has arisen as they have also been linked to a variety of diseases, including neurological disorders and cancer, positioning them as potential therapeutic targets [5].

  8. Sequence–structure relationships in RNA loops: establishing the basis for loop homology modeling

    PubMed Central

    Schudoma, Christian; May, Patrick; Nikiforova, Viktoria; Walther, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The specific function of RNA molecules frequently resides in their seemingly unstructured loop regions. We performed a systematic analysis of RNA loops extracted from experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of RNA molecules. A comprehensive loop-structure data set was created and organized into distinct clusters based on structural and sequence similarity. We detected clear evidence of the hallmark of homology present in the sequence–structure relationships in loops. Loops differing by <25% in sequence identity fold into very similar structures. Thus, our results support the application of homology modeling for RNA loop model building. We established a threshold that may guide the sequence divergence-based selection of template structures for RNA loop homology modeling. Of all possible sequences that are, under the assumption of isosteric relationships, theoretically compatible with actual sequences observed in RNA structures, only a small fraction is contained in the Rfam database of RNA sequences and classes implying that the actual RNA loop space may consist of a limited number of unique loop structures and conserved sequences. The loop-structure data sets are made available via an online database, RLooM. RLooM also offers functionalities for the modeling of RNA loop structures in support of RNA engineering and design efforts. PMID:19923230

  9. RNase H enables efficient repair of R-loop induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Amon, Jeremy D; Koshland, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    R-loops, three-stranded structures that form when transcripts hybridize to chromosomal DNA, are potent agents of genome instability. This instability has been explained by the ability of R-loops to induce DNA damage. Here, we show that persistent R-loops also compromise DNA repair. Depleting endogenous RNase H activity impairs R-loop removal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causing DNA damage that occurs preferentially in the repetitive ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA). We analyzed the repair kinetics of this damage and identified mutants that modulate repair. We present a model that the persistence of R-loops at sites of DNA damage induces repair by break-induced replication (BIR). This R-loop induced BIR is particularly susceptible to the formation of lethal repair intermediates at the rDNA because of a barrier imposed by RNA polymerase I. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20533.001 PMID:27938663

  10. Fundamental Structure of Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin; Ma, Yongge; Huang, Weiming

    In the recent twenty years, loop quantum gravity, a background independent approach to unify general relativity and quantum mechanics, has been widely investigated. The aim of loop quantum gravity is to construct a mathematically rigorous, background independent, non-perturbative quantum theory for a Lorentzian gravitational field on a four-dimensional manifold. In the approach, the principles of quantum mechanics are combined with those of general relativity naturally. Such a combination provides us a picture of, so-called, quantum Riemannian geometry, which is discrete on the fundamental scale. Imposing the quantum constraints in analogy from the classical ones, the quantum dynamics of gravity is being studied as one of the most important issues in loop quantum gravity. On the other hand, the semi-classical analysis is being carried out to test the classical limit of the quantum theory. In this review, the fundamental structure of loop quantum gravity is presented pedagogically. Our main aim is to help non-experts to understand the motivations, basic structures, as well as general results. It may also be beneficial to practitioners to gain insights from different perspectives on the theory. We will focus on the theoretical framework itself, rather than its applications, and do our best to write it in modern and precise langauge while keeping the presentation accessible for beginners. After reviewing the classical connection dynamical formalism of general relativity, as a foundation, the construction of the kinematical Ashtekar-Isham-Lewandowski representation is introduced in the content of quantum kinematics. The algebraic structure of quantum kinematics is also discussed. In the content of quantum dynamics, we mainly introduce the construction of a Hamiltonian constraint operator and the master constraint project. At last, some applications and recent advances are outlined. It should be noted that this strategy of quantizing gravity can also be extended to

  11. Fast loop modeling for protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiong; Nguyen, Son; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-03-01

    X-ray crystallography is the main method for determining 3D protein structures. In many cases, however, flexible loop regions of proteins cannot be resolved by this approach. This leads to incomplete structures in the protein data bank, preventing further computational study and analysis of these proteins. For instance, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of structure-function relationship require complete protein structures. To address this shortcoming, we have developed and implemented an efficient computational method for building missing protein loops. The method is database driven and uses deep learning and multi-dimensional scaling algorithms. We have implemented the method as a simple stand-alone program, which can also be used as a plugin in existing molecular modeling software, e.g., VMD. The quality and stability of the generated structures are assessed and tested via energy scoring functions and by equilibrium MD simulations. The proposed method can also be used in template-based protein structure prediction. Work supported by the National Institutes of Health [R01 GM100701]. Computer time was provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  12. The Fundamental Structure of Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy; Warren, Harry; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; hide

    2012-01-01

    During the past ten years, solar physicists have attempted to infer the coronal heating mechanism by comparing observations of coronal loops with hydrodynamic model predictions. These comparisons often used the addition of sub ]resolution strands to explain the observed loop properties. On July 11, 2012, the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi ]C) was launched on a sounding rocket. This instrument obtained images of the solar corona was 0.2 ]0.3'' resolution in a narrowband EUV filter centered around 193 Angstroms. In this talk, we will compare these high resolution images to simultaneous density measurements obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on Hinode to determine whether the structures observed with Hi ]C are resolved.

  13. Stem-loop structures in prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Mauro; Silvestro, Giustina; Di Nocera, Pier Paolo; Boccia, Angelo; Paolella, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Background Prediction of secondary structures in the expressed sequences of bacterial genomes allows to investigate spontaneous folding of the corresponding RNA. This is particularly relevant in untranslated mRNA regions, where base pairing is less affected by interactions with the translation machinery. Relatively large stem-loops significantly contribute to the formation of more complex secondary structures, often important for the activity of sequence elements controlling gene expression. Results Systematic analysis of the distribution of stem-loop structures (SLSs) in 40 wholly-sequenced bacterial genomes is presented. SLSs were searched as stems measuring at least 12 bp, bordering loops 5 to 100 nt in length. G-U pairing in the stems was allowed. SLSs found in natural genomes are constantly more numerous and stable than those expected to randomly form in sequences of comparable size and composition. The large majority of SLSs fall within protein-coding regions but enrichment of specific, non random, SLS sub-populations of higher stability was observed within the intergenic regions of the chromosomes of several species. In low-GC firmicutes, most higher stability intergenic SLSs resemble canonical rho-independent transcriptional terminators, but very frequently feature at the 5'-end an additional A-rich stretch complementary to the 3' uridines. In all species, a clearly biased SLS distribution was observed within the intergenic space, with most concentrating at the 3'-end side of flanking CDSs. Some intergenic SLS regions are members of novel repeated sequence families. Conclusion In depth analysis of SLS features and distribution in 40 different bacterial genomes showed the presence of non random populations of such structures in all species. Many of these structures are plausibly transcribed, and might be involved in the control of transcription termination, or might serve as RNA elements which can enhance either the stability or the turnover of cotranscribed

  14. Looping charged elastic rods: applications to protein-induced DNA loop formation.

    PubMed

    Cherstvy, A G

    2011-01-01

    We analyze looping of thin charged elastic filaments under applied torques and end forces, using the solution of linear elasticity theory equations. In application to DNA, we account for its polyelectrolyte character and charge renormalization, calculating electrostatic energies stored in the loops. We argue that the standard theory of electrostatic persistence is only valid when the loop's radius of curvature and close-contact distance are much larger than the Debye screening length. We predict that larger twist rates are required to trigger looping of charged rods as compared with neutral ones. We then analyze loop shapes formed on charged filaments of finite length, mimicking DNA looping by proteins with two DNA-binding domains. We find optimal loop shapes at different salt amounts, minimizing the sum of DNA elastic, DNA electrostatic, and protein elastic energies. We implement a simple model where intercharge repulsions do not affect the loop shape directly but can choose the energy-optimized shape from the allowed loop types. At low salt concentrations more open loops are favored due to enhanced repulsion of DNA charges, consistent with the results of computer simulations on formation of DNA loops by lac repressor. Then, we model the precise geometry of DNA binding by the lac tetramer and explore loop shapes, varying the confined DNA length and protein opening angle. The characteristics of complexes obtained, such as the total loop energy, stretching forces required to maintain its shape, and the reduction of electrostatic energy with increment of salt, are in good agreement with the outcomes of more elaborate numerical calculations for lac-repressor-induced DNA looping.

  15. Interferon-inducible ribonuclease ISG20 inhibits hepatitis B virus replication through directly binding to the epsilon stem-loop structure of viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanjie; Mao, Richeng; Mitra, Bidisha; Cai, Dawei; Yan, Ran; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M.; Mechti, Nadir

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicates its DNA genome through reverse transcription of a viral RNA pregenome. We report herein that the interferon (IFN) stimulated exoribonuclease gene of 20 KD (ISG20) inhibits HBV replication through degradation of HBV RNA. ISG20 expression was observed at basal level and was highly upregulated upon IFN treatment in hepatocytes, and knock down of ISG20 resulted in elevation of HBV replication and attenuation of IFN-mediated antiviral effect. The sequence element conferring the susceptibility of HBV RNA to ISG20-mediated RNA degradation was mapped at the HBV RNA terminal redundant region containing epsilon (ε) stem-loop. Furthermore, ISG20-induced HBV RNA degradation relies on its ribonuclease activity, as the enzymatic inactive form ISG20D94G was unable to promote HBV RNA decay. Interestingly, ISG20D94G retained antiviral activity against HBV DNA replication by preventing pgRNA encapsidation, resulting from a consequence of ISG20-ε interaction. This interaction was further characterized by in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and ISG20 was able to bind HBV ε directly in absence of any other cellular proteins, indicating a direct ε RNA binding capability of ISG20; however, cofactor(s) may be required for ISG20 to efficiently degrade ε. In addition, the lower stem portion of ε is the major ISG20 binding site, and the removal of 4 base pairs from the bottom portion of ε abrogated the sensitivity of HBV RNA to ISG20, suggesting that the specificity of ISG20-ε interaction relies on both RNA structure and sequence. Furthermore, the C-terminal Exonuclease III (ExoIII) domain of ISG20 was determined to be responsible for interacting with ε, as the deletion of ExoIII abolished in vitro ISG20-ε binding and intracellular HBV RNA degradation. Taken together, our study sheds light on the underlying mechanisms of IFN-mediated HBV inhibition and the antiviral mechanism of ISG20 in general. PMID:28399146

  16. Interferon-inducible ribonuclease ISG20 inhibits hepatitis B virus replication through directly binding to the epsilon stem-loop structure of viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanjie; Nie, Hui; Mao, Richeng; Mitra, Bidisha; Cai, Dawei; Yan, Ran; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M; Mechti, Nadir; Guo, Haitao

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicates its DNA genome through reverse transcription of a viral RNA pregenome. We report herein that the interferon (IFN) stimulated exoribonuclease gene of 20 KD (ISG20) inhibits HBV replication through degradation of HBV RNA. ISG20 expression was observed at basal level and was highly upregulated upon IFN treatment in hepatocytes, and knock down of ISG20 resulted in elevation of HBV replication and attenuation of IFN-mediated antiviral effect. The sequence element conferring the susceptibility of HBV RNA to ISG20-mediated RNA degradation was mapped at the HBV RNA terminal redundant region containing epsilon (ε) stem-loop. Furthermore, ISG20-induced HBV RNA degradation relies on its ribonuclease activity, as the enzymatic inactive form ISG20D94G was unable to promote HBV RNA decay. Interestingly, ISG20D94G retained antiviral activity against HBV DNA replication by preventing pgRNA encapsidation, resulting from a consequence of ISG20-ε interaction. This interaction was further characterized by in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and ISG20 was able to bind HBV ε directly in absence of any other cellular proteins, indicating a direct ε RNA binding capability of ISG20; however, cofactor(s) may be required for ISG20 to efficiently degrade ε. In addition, the lower stem portion of ε is the major ISG20 binding site, and the removal of 4 base pairs from the bottom portion of ε abrogated the sensitivity of HBV RNA to ISG20, suggesting that the specificity of ISG20-ε interaction relies on both RNA structure and sequence. Furthermore, the C-terminal Exonuclease III (ExoIII) domain of ISG20 was determined to be responsible for interacting with ε, as the deletion of ExoIII abolished in vitro ISG20-ε binding and intracellular HBV RNA degradation. Taken together, our study sheds light on the underlying mechanisms of IFN-mediated HBV inhibition and the antiviral mechanism of ISG20 in general.

  17. An Antibody Loop Replacement Design Feasibility Study and a Loop-Swapped Dimer Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.; Boriack-Sjodin, P; Day, E; Eldredge, J; Fitch, C; Jarpe, M; Miller, S; Li, Y; Simon, K; van Vlijmen, H

    2009-01-01

    A design approach was taken to investigate the feasibility of replacing single complementarity determining region (CDR) antibody loops. This approach may complement simpler mutation-based strategies for rational antibody design by expanding conformation space. Enormous crystal structure diversity is available, making CDR loops logical targets for structure-based design. A detailed analysis for the L1 loop shows that each loop length takes a distinct conformation, thereby allowing control on a length scale beyond that accessible to simple mutations. The L1 loop in the anti-VLA1 antibody was replaced with the L2 loop residues longer in an attempt to add an additional hydrogen bond and fill space on the antibody-antigen interface. The designs expressed well, but failed to improve affinity. In an effort to learn more, one design was crystallized and data were collected at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The designed L1 loop takes the qualitatively desired conformation; confirming that loop replacement by design is feasible. The crystal structure also shows that the outermost loop (residues Leu51-Ser68) is domain swapped with another monomer. Tryptophan fluorescence measurements were used to monitor unfolding as a function of temperature and indicate that the loop involved in domain swapping does not unfold below 60C. The domain-swapping is not directly responsible for the affinity loss, but is likely a side-effect of the structural instability which may contribute to affinity loss. A second round of design was successful in eliminating the dimerization through mutation of a residue (Leu51Ser) at the joint of the domain-swapped loop.

  18. Graph Structured Program Evolution: Evolution of Loop Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Shinichi; Nagao, Tomoharu

    Recently, numerous automatic programming techniques have been developed and applied in various fields. A typical example is genetic programming (GP), and various extensions and representations of GP have been proposed thus far. Complex programs and hand-written programs, however, may contain several loops and handle multiple data types. In this chapter, we propose a new method called Graph Structured Program Evolution (GRAPE). The representation of GRAPE is a graph structure; therefore, it can represent branches and loops using this structure. Each programis constructed as an arbitrary directed graph of nodes and a data set. The GRAPE program handles multiple data types using the data set for each type, and the genotype of GRAPE takes the form of a linear string of integers. We apply GRAPE to three test problems, factorial, exponentiation, and list sorting, and demonstrate that the optimum solution in each problem is obtained by the GRAPE system.

  19. Structure Prediction of RNA Loops with a Probabilistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Li, Wenfei; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the tertiary structure of RNA loops is important for understanding their functions. In this work we develop an efficient approach named RNApps, specifically designed for predicting the tertiary structure of RNA loops, including hairpin loops, internal loops, and multi-way junction loops. It includes a probabilistic coarse-grained RNA model, an all-atom statistical energy function, a sequential Monte Carlo growth algorithm, and a simulated annealing procedure. The approach is tested with a dataset including nine RNA loops, a 23S ribosomal RNA, and a large dataset containing 876 RNAs. The performance is evaluated and compared with a homology modeling based predictor and an ab initio predictor. It is found that RNApps has comparable performance with the former one and outdoes the latter in terms of structure predictions. The approach holds great promise for accurate and efficient RNA tertiary structure prediction. PMID:27494763

  20. Two-base DNA hairpin-loop structures in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Davison, A; Leach, D R

    1994-01-01

    In vitro studies have revealed that DNA hairpin-loops usually contain four unpaired bases. However, a small subset of sequences can form two-base loops. We have previously described an in vivo assay that is sensitive to tight loop formation and have set out to test whether DNA sequences known to form two-base loops in vitro also form tight loops in vivo. It is shown that the sequences 5'dCNNG and 5'dTNNA behave as predicted if they favour two-base loop formation in vivo, a result that is consistent with previously described in vitro studies. The ability of specific DNA sequences to form tight loops in vivo has implications for their potential to form transient structures involved in gene regulation, recombination and mutagenesis. PMID:7971265

  1. Mining protein loops using a structural alphabet and statistical exceptionality

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein loops encompass 50% of protein residues in available three-dimensional structures. These regions are often involved in protein functions, e.g. binding site, catalytic pocket... However, the description of protein loops with conventional tools is an uneasy task. Regular secondary structures, helices and strands, have been widely studied whereas loops, because they are highly variable in terms of sequence and structure, are difficult to analyze. Due to data sparsity, long loops have rarely been systematically studied. Results We developed a simple and accurate method that allows the description and analysis of the structures of short and long loops using structural motifs without restriction on loop length. This method is based on the structural alphabet HMM-SA. HMM-SA allows the simplification of a three-dimensional protein structure into a one-dimensional string of states, where each state is a four-residue prototype fragment, called structural letter. The difficult task of the structural grouping of huge data sets is thus easily accomplished by handling structural letter strings as in conventional protein sequence analysis. We systematically extracted all seven-residue fragments in a bank of 93000 protein loops and grouped them according to the structural-letter sequence, named structural word. This approach permits a systematic analysis of loops of all sizes since we consider the structural motifs of seven residues rather than complete loops. We focused the analysis on highly recurrent words of loops (observed more than 30 times). Our study reveals that 73% of loop-lengths are covered by only 3310 highly recurrent structural words out of 28274 observed words). These structural words have low structural variability (mean RMSd of 0.85 Å). As expected, half of these motifs display a flanking-region preference but interestingly, two thirds are shared by short (less than 12 residues) and long loops. Moreover, half of recurrent motifs exhibit a

  2. Protein short loop prediction in terms of a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Manoj; Bornot, Aurélie; Offmann, Bernard; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2009-08-01

    Loops connect regular secondary structures. In many instances, they are known to play crucial biological roles. To bypass the limitation of secondary structure description, we previously defined a structural alphabet composed of 16 structural prototypes, called Protein Blocks (PBs). It leads to an accurate description of every region of 3D protein backbones and has been used in local structure prediction. In the present study, we used our structural alphabet to predict the loops connecting two repetitive structures. Thus, we showed interest to take into account the flanking regions, leading to prediction rate improvement up to 19.8%, but we also underline the sensitivity of such an approach. This research can be used to propose different structures for the loops and to probe and sample their flexibility. It is a useful tool for ab initio loop prediction and leads to insights into flexible docking approach.

  3. Automated event generation for loop-induced processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschi, Valentin; Mattelaer, Olivier

    2015-10-22

    We present the first fully automated implementation of cross-section computation and event generation for loop-induced processes. This work is integrated in the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework. We describe the optimisations implemented at the level of the matrix element evaluation, phase space integration and event generation allowing for the simulation of large multiplicity loop-induced processes. Along with some selected differential observables, we illustrate our results with a table showing inclusive cross-sections for all loop-induced hadronic scattering processes with up to three final states in the SM as well as for some relevant 2 → 4 processes. Furthermore, many of these are computed here for the first time.

  4. Automated event generation for loop-induced processes

    DOE PAGES

    Hirschi, Valentin; Mattelaer, Olivier

    2015-10-22

    We present the first fully automated implementation of cross-section computation and event generation for loop-induced processes. This work is integrated in the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework. We describe the optimisations implemented at the level of the matrix element evaluation, phase space integration and event generation allowing for the simulation of large multiplicity loop-induced processes. Along with some selected differential observables, we illustrate our results with a table showing inclusive cross-sections for all loop-induced hadronic scattering processes with up to three final states in the SM as well as for some relevant 2 → 4 processes. Furthermore, many of these are computed heremore » for the first time.« less

  5. Control-structure interaction in precision pointing servo loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The control-structure interaction problem is addressed via stability analysis of a generic linear servo loop model. With the plant described by the rigid body mode and a single elastic mode, structural flexibility is categorized into one of three types: (1) appendage, (2) in-the-loop minimum phase, and (3) in-the-loop nonminimum phase. Closing the loop with proportional-derivative (PD) control action and introducing sensor roll-off dynamics in the feedback path, stability conditions are obtained. Trade studies are conducted with modal frequency, modal participation, modal damping, loop bandwidth, and sensor bandwidth treated as free parameters. Results indicate that appendage modes are most likely to produce instability if they are near the sensor rolloff, whereas in-the-loop modes are most dangerous near the loop bandwidth. The main goal of this paper is to provide a fundamental understanding of the control-structure interaction problem so that it may benefit the design of complex spacecraft and pointing system servo loops. In this framework, the JPL Pathfinder gimbal pointer is considered as an example.

  6. Observation of Nonlinear Looped Band Structure of Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Elizabeth; Koller, Silvio; Brown, Roger; Wyllie, Robert; Wilson, Ryan; Porto, Trey

    2016-05-01

    We study experimentally the stability of excited, interacting states of bosons in a double-well optical lattice in regimes where the nonlinear interactions are expected to induce ``swallow-tail'' looped band structure. By carefully preparing different initial coherent states and observing their subsequent decay, we observe distinct decay rates, which provide direct evidence for multi-valued band structure. The double well lattice both stabilizes the looped band structure and allows for dynamic preparation of different initial states, including states within the loop structure. We confirm our state preparation procedure with dynamic Gross-Pitaevskii calculations. The excited loop states are found to be more stable than dynamically unstable ground states, but decay faster than expected based on a mean-field stability calculation, indicating the importance of correlations beyond a mean-field description. Now at Georgia Tech Research Institute.

  7. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  8. Asymmetric structure of five and six membered DNA hairpin loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, U.; Chang, S.

    1995-01-01

    The tertiary structure of nucleic acid hairpins was elucidated by means of the accessibility of the single-strand-specific nuclease from mung bean. This molecular probe has proven especially useful in determining details of the structural arrangement of the nucleotides within a loop. In this study 3'-labeling is introduced to complement previously used 5'-labeling in order to assess and to exclude possible artifacts of the method. Both labeling procedures result in mutually consistent cleavage patterns. Therefore, methodological artifacts can be excluded and the potential of the nuclease as structural probe is increased. DNA hairpins with five and six membered loops reveal an asymmetric loop structure with a sharp bend of the phosphate-ribose backbone between the second and third nucleotide on the 3'-side of a loop. These hairpin structures differ from smaller loops with 3 or 4 members, which reveal this type of bend between the first and second 3' nucleotide, and resemble with respect to the asymmetry anticodon loops of tRNA.

  9. Modelling the Thermal Structure of Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R.

    1999-10-01

    The nature of the heating mechanism for solar coronal loops is still a fiercely debated topic. Recent interest has focussed on how the the spatial variation of the energy deposition can effect the thermal profile along a loop (Priest et al, 1997). A phase plane analysis (Walsh, Bell and Hood, 1995) of all possible thermal equilibria solutions is introduced. It is shown that the location where the heat is deposited preferentially along the loop has a dramatic effect on the overall thermal structure from the corona, through the transition region and down into the chromosphere. The advantages and limitations of this approach on observing the spatial variation in the loop temperature are discussed. References: Priest et al, 1997, Nature, 393, 545. Walsh, R.W., Bell, G.E. and Hood, A.W., 1995, Sol. Phys., 161, 83.

  10. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability.

    PubMed

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L; Paulsen, Renee D; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-12-18

    R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability; however, the mechanisms underlying R-loop-induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability.

  11. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L.; Paulsen, Renee D.; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability, however the mechanisms underlying R-loop induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability. PMID:25435140

  12. LINE-OF-SIGHT SHELL STRUCTURE OF THE CYGNUS LOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Katsuda, Satoru; Kimura, Masashi; Kosugi, Hiroko; Takahashi, Hiroaki

    2009-11-10

    We conducted a comprehensive study on the shell structure of the Cygnus Loop using 41 observation data obtained by the Suzaku and the XMM-Newton satellites. To investigate the detailed plasma structure of the Cygnus Loop, we divided our fields of view into 1042 box regions. From the spectral analysis, the spectra obtained from the limb of the Loop are well fitted by the single-component non-equilibrium ionization plasma model. On the other hand, the spectra obtained from the inner regions are well fitted by the two-component model. As a result, we confirmed that the low-temperature and high-temperature components originated from the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) and the ejecta of the Loop, respectively. From the best-fit results, we showed a flux distribution of the ISM component. The distribution clearly shows the limb-brightening structure, and we found out some low-flux regions. Among them, the south blowout region has the lowest flux. We also found other large low-flux regions at slightly west and northeast from the center. We estimated the former thin shell region to be approx1.{sup 0}3 in diameter and concluded that there exists a blowout along the line of sight in addition to the south blowout. We also calculated the emission measure distribution of the ISM component and showed that the Cygnus Loop is far from the result obtained by a simple Sedov evolution model. From the results, we support that the Cygnus Loop originated from a cavity explosion. The emission measure distribution also suggests that the cavity-wall density is higher in the northeast than that in the southwest. These results suggest that the thickness of the cavity wall surrounding the Cygnus Loop is not uniform.

  13. THERMAL STRUCTURE OF CORONAL LOOPS AS SEEN WITH NORIKURA CORONAGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Singh, Jagdev; Ichimoto, K.

    2013-03-10

    The thermal structure of a coronal loop, both along and across the loop, is vital in determining the exact plasma heating mechanism. High-resolution spectroscopic observations of the off-limb corona were made using the 25 cm Norikura coronagraph, located at Norikura, Japan. Observations on a number of days were made simultaneously in four forbidden iron emission lines, namely, the [Fe XI] 7892 A line, the [Fe XIII] 10747 A and 10798 A lines, and the [Fe XIV] 5303 A line and on some days made only in the [Fe XI] 7892 A and [Fe X] 6374 A lines. Using temperature sensitive emission line ratios [Fe XIV] 5303 A/[Fe XIII] 10747 A and [Fe XI] 7892 A/[Fe X] 6374 A, we compute the electron temperatures along 18 different loop structures observed on different days. We find a significant negative temperature gradient in all of the structures observed in Fe XIV and Fe XIII and a positive temperature gradient in the structures observed in Fe XI and Fe X. Combining these results with the previous investigations by Singh and his collaborators, we infer that the loop tops, in general, appear hotter when observed in colder lines and colder when observed in relatively hotter lines as compared to their coronal foot points. We suggest that this contrasting trend observed in the temperature variation along the loop structures can be explained by a gradual interaction of different temperature plasma. The exact mechanism responsible for this interaction must be investigated further and has the potential to constrain loop heating models.

  14. R-loops induce repressive chromatin marks over mammalian gene terminators.

    PubMed

    Skourti-Stathaki, Konstantina; Kamieniarz-Gdula, Kinga; Proudfoot, Nicholas J

    2014-12-18

    The formation of R-loops is a natural consequence of the transcription process, caused by invasion of the DNA duplex by nascent transcripts. These structures have been considered rare transcriptional by-products with potentially harmful effects on genome integrity owing to the fragility of the displaced DNA coding strand. However, R-loops may also possess beneficial effects, as their widespread formation has been detected over CpG island promoters in human genes. Furthermore, we have previously shown that R-loops are particularly enriched over G-rich terminator elements. These facilitate RNA polymerase II (Pol II) pausing before efficient termination. Here we reveal an unanticipated link between R-loops and RNA-interference-dependent H3K9me2 formation over pause-site termination regions in mammalian protein-coding genes. We show that R-loops induce antisense transcription over these pause elements, which in turn leads to the generation of double-stranded RNA and the recruitment of DICER, AGO1, AGO2 and the G9a histone lysine methyltransferase. Consequently, an H3K9me2 repressive mark is formed and heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ) is recruited, which reinforces Pol II pausing before efficient transcriptional termination. We predict that R-loops promote a chromatin architecture that defines the termination region for a substantial subset of mammalian genes.

  15. Structured Robust Loop shaping control for HIMAT System Using PSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitwanidvilai, Somyot; Jangwanitlert, Anuwat; Parnichkun, Manukid

    2009-01-01

    Robust loop shaping control is a feasible method for designing a robust controller; however, the controller designed by this method is complicated and difficult to implement practically. To overcome this problem, in this paper, a new design technique of a fixed-structure robust loop shaping controller for a highly maneuverable airplane, HIMAT, is proposed. The performance and robust stability conditions of the designed system satisfying H∞ loop shaping control are formulated as the objective function in the optimization problem. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique is adopted to solve this problem and to achieve the control parameters of the proposed controller. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach is numerically efficient and leads to performance comparable to that of the other method.

  16. Electrical resistance of complex two-dimensional structures of loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, M. A. F.; Hora, R. R.; Brito, V. P.

    2011-06-01

    This work presents a study of the dc electrical resistance of a recently discovered hierarchical two-dimensional system which has a complex topology consisting of a distribution of disordered macroscopic loops with no characteristic size and a distribution of several types of contacts between loops. In addition to its intrinsic interest in the important context of low-dimensional systems and crumpled systems, the structures under study are of relevance in a number of areas including soft condensed matter and packing of DNA in viral capsids. In the particular case discussed here, the loops are made of layers of graphite with a height of tens of nanometers deposited on a substrate of cellulose. Experiments with these systems indicate an anomalous electrical resistance of sub-diffusive type. The results reported here are explained with scaling arguments and computer simulation. A comparison with the dc electrical properties of percolation clusters is made, and some other experimental issues as future prospects are commented.

  17. Closed-loop control of flow-induced cavity oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qi

    Flow-induced cavity oscillations are a coupled flow-acoustic problem in which the inherent closed-loop system dynamics can lead to large unsteady pressure levels in and around the cavity, resulting in both broadband noise and discrete tones. This problem exists in many practical environments, such as landing gear bays and weapon delivery systems on aircraft, and automobile sunroofs and windows. Researchers in both fluid dynamics and controls have been working on this problem for more than fifty years. This is because not only is the physical nature of this problem rich and complex, but also it has become a standard test bed for controller deign and implementation in flow control. The ultimate goal of this research is to minimize the cavity acoustic tones and the broadband noise level over a range of freestream Mach numbers. Although open-loop and closed-loop control methodologies have been explored extensively in recent years, there are still some issues that need to be studied further. For example, a low-order theoretical model suitable for controller design does not exist. Most recent flow-induced cavity models are based either on Rossiter's semi-expirical formula or a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) based models. These models cannot be implemented in adaptive controller design directly. In addition, closed-loop control of high subsonic and supersonic flows remains an unexplored area. In order to achieve these objectives, an analytical system model is first developed in this research. This analytical model is a transfer function based model and it can be used as a potential model for controller design. Then, a MIMO system identification algorithm is derived and combined with the generalized prediction control (GPC) algorithm. The resultant integration of adaptive system ID and GPC algorithms can potentially track nonstationary cavity dynamics and reduce the flow-induced oscillations. A novel piezoelectric-driven synthetic jet actuator array is designed for

  18. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu·GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation. PMID:25566871

  19. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu.GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation.

  20. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-08

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu · GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation.

  1. Structural studies on an internal loop from a hairpin ribozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    Ribozymes, RNA enzymes, catalyze site-specific RNA cleavage and ligation reactions. We are studying the three-dimensional structure of a hairpin ribozyme derived from the minus strand of tobacco ring spot virus satellite RNA ((-)sTRSV), which has been engineering to specifically cleave the HIV-1 RNA. The minimum structure for the catalytic reaction involves a 50-nucleotide ribozyme and a 14-nucleotide substrate. The proposed secondary structure of the ribozyme-substrate complex consists of four short helices separated by two internal loops. The relatively large size (64-nucleotide) of the ribozyme-substrate complex presents formidable problems in solving the structure using NMR. Therefore we are studying smaller structural subunits of the complex. We are determining the high resolution structure of the symmetric internal loop involving the cleavage site and the flanking helices. One strand of the internal loop was selectively {sup 13}C-labeled at C8 of each purine and C6 of each pyrimidine. By using {sup 13}C-edited two-dimensional NMR, the proton NOESY spectrum was greatly simplified. This allowed unambiguous sequential proton resonance assignments along each strand. Three-dimensional {sup 1}-{sup 13}C HMQC-NOESY was used to further facilitate resonance assignments. We are also enzymatically synthesizing the entire 50-nucleotide ribozyme and will combine it with the {sup 13}C-labeled substrate. Through comparison of the NOE connectivities of the labeled nucleotides from the internal loop alone with those from the entire complex, the differences between the two structures can be elucidated.

  2. Predicting loop-helix tertiary structural contacts in RNA pseudoknots.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Giedroc, David P; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2010-03-01

    Tertiary interactions between loops and helical stems play critical roles in the biological function of many RNA pseudoknots. However, quantitative predictions for RNA tertiary interactions remain elusive. Here we report a statistical mechanical model for the prediction of noncanonical loop-stem base-pairing interactions in RNA pseudoknots. Central to the model is the evaluation of the conformational entropy for the pseudoknotted folds with defined loop-stem tertiary structural contacts. We develop an RNA virtual bond-based conformational model (Vfold model), which permits a rigorous computation of the conformational entropy for a given fold that contains loop-stem tertiary contacts. With the entropy parameters predicted from the Vfold model and the energy parameters for the tertiary contacts as inserted parameters, we can then predict the RNA folding thermodynamics, from which we can extract the tertiary contact thermodynamic parameters from theory-experimental comparisons. These comparisons reveal a contact enthalpy (DeltaH) of -14 kcal/mol and a contact entropy (DeltaS) of -38 cal/mol/K for a protonated C(+)*(G-C) base triple at pH 7.0, and (DeltaH = -7 kcal/mol, DeltaS = -19 cal/mol/K) for an unprotonated base triple. Tests of the model for a series of pseudoknots show good theory-experiment agreement. Based on the extracted energy parameters for the tertiary structural contacts, the model enables predictions for the structure, stability, and folding pathways for RNA pseudoknots with known or postulated loop-stem tertiary contacts from the nucleotide sequence alone.

  3. Leading logarithmic contribution to the second-order lamb shift induced by the loop-after-loop diagram.

    PubMed

    Yerokhin, V A

    2001-03-05

    The contribution of order alpha(2)(Zalpha)(6)ln (3)(Zalpha)(-2) to the ground-state Lamb shift in hydrogen induced by the loop-after-loop diagram is evaluated analytically. An additional contribution of this order is found compared to the previous calculation by Karshenboim [Sov. Phys. JETP 76, 541 (1993)]. As a result, agreement is achieved for this correction between different numerical and analytical methods.

  4. Collider study on the loop-induced dark matter mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-06-01

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For DM couplings involving light mediators, especially for the loop-mediated interactions, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory. In this note we discuss the study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, focusing on a model with anarchic dark flavor structure. By including the momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling - given by the Dark Penguin - in collider processes, we study bounds from monophoton, diphoton, and non-pointing photon searches at the LHC. We also compare our results to constraints from the direct detection experiments.

  5. Collider study on the loop-induced dark matter mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-06-21

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For DM couplings involving light mediators, especially for the loop-mediated interactions, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory. In this note we discuss the study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, focusing on a model with anarchic dark flavor structure. By including the momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling – given by the Dark Penguin – in collider processes, we study bounds from monophoton, diphoton, and non-pointing photon searches at the LHC. We also compare our results to constraints from the direct detection experiments.

  6. DNA looping by FokI: the impact of twisting and bending rigidity on protein-induced looping dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Laurens, Niels; Rusling, David A.; Pernstich, Christian; Brouwer, Ineke; Halford, Stephen E.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Protein-induced DNA looping is crucial for many genetic processes such as transcription, gene regulation and DNA replication. Here, we use tethered-particle motion to examine the impact of DNA bending and twisting rigidity on loop capture and release, using the restriction endonuclease FokI as a test system. To cleave DNA efficiently, FokI bridges two copies of an asymmetric sequence, invariably aligning the sites in parallel. On account of the fixed alignment, the topology of the DNA loop is set by the orientation of the sites along the DNA. We show that both the separation of the FokI sites and their orientation, altering, respectively, the twisting and the bending of the DNA needed to juxtapose the sites, have profound effects on the dynamics of the looping interaction. Surprisingly, the presence of a nick within the loop does not affect the observed rigidity of the DNA. In contrast, the introduction of a 4-nt gap fully relaxes all of the torque present in the system but does not necessarily enhance loop stability. FokI therefore employs torque to stabilise its DNA-looping interaction by acting as a ‘torsional’ catch bond. PMID:22373924

  7. DNA looping induced by a transcriptional enhancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Petrascheck, Michael; Escher, Dominik; Mahmoudi, Tokameh; Verrijzer, C. Peter; Schaffner, Walter; Barberis, Alcide

    2005-01-01

    Enhancers are DNA sequences that can activate gene transcription from remote positions. In yeast, regulatory sequences that are functionally equivalent to the metazoan enhancers are called upstream activating sequences (UASs). UASs show a lower degree of flexibility than their metazoan counterparts, but can nevertheless activate transcription from a distance of >1000 bp from the promoter. One of several models for the mechanism of action of transcriptional enhancers proposes that enhancer-bound activating proteins contact promoter-bound transcription factors and thereby get in close proximity to the promoter region with concomitant looping of the intervening DNA. We tested the mode of enhancer activity in yeast. A polymerase II-transcribed gene was paired with a remote, inducible enhancer. An independent reporter system was inserted next to the promoter to monitor the potential modes of enhancer activity. Our results show that the enhancer activated the reporter system only in the presence of a functional promoter. We also demonstrate that the heterologous expression of GAGA, a factor known to facilitate DNA loop formation, allows enhancer action in yeast over a distance of 3000 bp. PMID:16002789

  8. Recent advances in Cys-loop receptor structure and function.

    PubMed

    Sine, Steven M; Engel, Andrew G

    2006-03-23

    Throughout the nervous system, moment-to-moment communication relies on postsynaptic receptors to detect neurotransmitters and change the membrane potential. For the Cys-loop superfamily of receptors, recent structural data have catalysed a leap in our understanding of the three steps of chemical-to-electrical transduction: neurotransmitter binding, communication between the binding site and the barrier to ions, and opening and closing of the barrier. The emerging insights might be expected to explain how mutations of receptors cause neurological disease, but the opposite is generally true. Namely, analyses of disease-causing mutations have clarified receptor structure-function relationships as well as mechanisms governing the postsynaptic response.

  9. Band-structure loops and multistability in cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Venkatesh, B.; Larson, J.; O'Dell, D. H. J.

    2011-06-01

    We calculate the band structure of ultracold atoms located inside a laser-driven optical cavity. For parameters where the atom-cavity system exhibits bistability, the atomic band structure develops loop structures akin to the ones predicted for Bose-Einstein condensates in ordinary (noncavity) optical lattices. However, in our case the nonlinearity derives from the cavity back-action rather than from direct interatomic interactions. We find both bi- and tristable regimes associated with the lowest band, and show that the multistability we observe can be analyzed in terms of swallowtail catastrophes. Dynamic and energetic stability of the mean-field solutions is also discussed, and we show that the bistable solutions have, as expected, one unstable and two stable branches. The presence of loops in the atomic band structure has important implications for proposals concerning Bloch oscillations of atoms inside optical cavities [Peden , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.043803 80, 043803 (2009); Prasanna Venkatesh , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.063834 80, 063834 (2009)].

  10. Discrete state model and accurate estimation of loop entropy of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lin, Ming; Chen, Rong; Wang, Wei; Liang, Jie

    2008-03-28

    Conformational entropy makes important contribution to the stability and folding of RNA molecule, but it is challenging to either measure or compute conformational entropy associated with long loops. We develop optimized discrete k-state models of RNA backbone based on known RNA structures for computing entropy of loops, which are modeled as self-avoiding walks. To estimate entropy of hairpin, bulge, internal loop, and multibranch loop of long length (up to 50), we develop an efficient sampling method based on the sequential Monte Carlo principle. Our method considers excluded volume effect. It is general and can be applied to calculating entropy of loops with longer length and arbitrary complexity. For loops of short length, our results are in good agreement with a recent theoretical model and experimental measurement. For long loops, our estimated entropy of hairpin loops is in excellent agreement with the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model. However, for bulge loops and more complex secondary structures such as internal and multibranch loops, we find that the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model has large errors. Based on estimated entropy, we have developed empirical formulae for accurate calculation of entropy of long loops in different secondary structures. Our study on the effect of asymmetric size of loops suggest that loop entropy of internal loops is largely determined by the total loop length, and is only marginally affected by the asymmetric size of the two loops. Our finding suggests that the significant asymmetric effects of loop length in internal loops measured by experiments are likely to be partially enthalpic. Our method can be applied to develop improved energy parameters important for studying RNA stability and folding, and for predicting RNA secondary and tertiary structures. The discrete model and the program used to calculate loop entropy can be downloaded at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/resources/RNA.html.

  11. Investigation of Catalytic Loop Structure, Dynamics and Function Relationship of Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by Temperature-Jump Relaxation Spectroscopy and X-ray Structural Determination

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Shan; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zhadin, Nickolay; Deng, Hua; Callender, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (YopH) is the most efficient enzyme amongst all PTPases and YopH is hyperactive compared to human PTPases, interferes with mammalian cellular pathways to achieve the pathogenicity of Yersinia. Two properties related to the catalytic loop structure differences have been proposed to affect its dynamics and enzyme efficiency. One is the ability of the loop to form stabilizing interactions to bound ligand after loop closure, which has long been recognized. In addition, the loop flexibility/mobility was suggested in a previous study to be a factor as well, based on the observation that incremental changes in PTPase loop structure by single point mutations to alanine often induce incremental changes in enzyme catalytic efficiency. In this study, the temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy (T-jump) has been used to discern the subtle changes of the loop dynamics due to point loop mutations. As expected, our results suggest a correlation between loop dynamics and the size of the residue on the catalytic loop. The stabilization of the enzyme-ligand complex is often enthalpy driven, achieved by formation of additional favorable hydrogen bonding/ionic interactions after loop closure. Interestingly, our T-jump and X-ray crystallography studies on YopH suggest that the elimination of some ligand-protein interactions by mutation does not necessarily destabilize the ligand-enzyme complex after loop closure since the increased entropy in the forms of more mobile protein residues may be sufficient to compensate the free energy loss due to lost interactions and may even lead to enhanced efficiency of the enzyme catalysis. How these competing loop properties may affect loop dynamics and enzyme function are discussed. PMID:22564106

  12. Formation and evolution of structure in loop cosmology.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin; Kagan, Mikhail; Singh, Parampreet; Hernández, Hector H; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2007-01-19

    Inhomogeneous cosmological perturbation equations are derived in loop quantum gravity, taking into account corrections, in particular, in gravitational parts. This provides a framework for calculating the evolution of modes in structure formation scenarios related to inflationary or bouncing models. Applications here are corrections to the Newton potential and to the evolution of large scale modes which imply nonconservation of curvature perturbations possibly noticeable in a running spectral index. These effects are sensitive to quantization procedures and test the characteristic behavior of correction terms derived from quantum gravity.

  13. SELF-ORGANIZED BRAIDING AND THE STRUCTURE OF CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Mitchell A.; Asgari-Targhi, Mahboubeh E-mail: m.asgari@ucl.ac.u

    2009-11-01

    The Parker model for heating of the solar corona involves reconnection of braided magnetic flux elements. Much of this braiding is thought to occur at as yet unresolved scales, for example, braiding of threads within an extreme-ultraviolet or X-ray loop. However, some braiding may be still visible at scales accessible to TRACE or Hinode. We suggest that attempts to estimate the amount of braiding at these scales must take into account the degree of coherence of the braid structure. In this paper, we examine the effect of reconnection on the structure of a braided magnetic field. We demonstrate that simple models of braided magnetic fields which balance the input of topological structure with reconnection evolve to a self-organized critical state. An initially random braid can become highly ordered, with coherence lengths obeying power-law distributions. The energy released during reconnection also obeys a power law. Our model gives more frequent (but smaller) energy releases nearer to the ends of a coronal loop.

  14. Porous Foam Based Wick Structures for Loop Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an effort to identify cost efficient fabrication techniques for Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) construction, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Cryogenics and Fluids Branch collaborated with the U.S. Naval Academy s Aerospace Engineering Department in Spring 2012 to investigate the viability of carbon foam as a wick material within LHPs. The carbon foam was manufactured by ERG Aerospace and machined to geometric specifications at the U.S. Naval Academy s Materials, Mechanics and Structures Machine Shop. NASA GSFC s Fractal Loop Heat Pipe (developed under SBIR contract #NAS5-02112) was used as the validation LHP platform. In a horizontal orientation, the FLHP system demonstrated a heat flux of 75 Watts per square centimeter with deionized water as the working fluid. Also, no failed start-ups occurred during the 6 week performance testing period. The success of this study validated that foam can be used as a wick structure. Furthermore, given the COTS status of foam materials this study is one more step towards development of a low cost LHP.

  15. Loop substructure identification for shear structures of unknown structural mass using synthesized references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongyu; Li, Hui

    2017-08-01

    Shear structure is widely adopted to model the dynamics for building structures. Thus, developing accurate and efficient parameter identification methods for a shear structure plays a crucial role in structural health monitoring for building structures. In the authors’ previous studies, a loop substructure identification (LSI) method was proposed for shear structures, in which the dynamic equation of a two-story substructure is utilized to establish a loop identification sequence, directly estimating the substructure’s parameters. To ensure the convergence of the loop identification sequence, some structural control (SC) systems are needed to change the critical structural responses in a favorable way. However, the limited availability of SC systems in general buildings restrains the wide application of this controlled loop substructure identification (CLSI) method. In this paper, the original LSI method is first reformed, which can perform the LSI even if the structural mass is unknown. Then, a new reference selection method is proposed to make the LSI method converge without the help of SC systems. Different synthesized reference responses, formed by a weighted linear combination of measured structural responses, are used to formulate the LSI sequence. Next, an optimization strategy is proposed to determine the optimal weighting factors of the synthesized reference responses, which makes the LSI converged. Finally, the LSI is carried out for a 20-story shear structure, the identification results of which show that the proposed LSI method, combined with the proposed reference selection method, can very accurately estimate the substructure parameters of the shear structure.

  16. Protein Structure Classification and Loop Modeling Using Multiple Ramachandran Distributions.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Seyed Morteza; Maadooliat, Mehdi; Zhou, Lan; Huang, Jianhua Z; Gao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the study of protein structures using angular representations has attracted much attention among structural biologists. The main challenge is how to efficiently model the continuous conformational space of the protein structures based on the differences and similarities between different Ramachandran plots. Despite the presence of statistical methods for modeling angular data of proteins, there is still a substantial need for more sophisticated and faster statistical tools to model the large-scale circular datasets. To address this need, we have developed a nonparametric method for collective estimation of multiple bivariate density functions for a collection of populations of protein backbone angles. The proposed method takes into account the circular nature of the angular data using trigonometric spline which is more efficient compared to existing methods. This collective density estimation approach is widely applicable when there is a need to estimate multiple density functions from different populations with common features. Moreover, the coefficients of adaptive basis expansion for the fitted densities provide a low-dimensional representation that is useful for visualization, clustering, and classification of the densities. The proposed method provides a novel and unique perspective to two important and challenging problems in protein structure research: structure-based protein classification and angular-sampling-based protein loop structure prediction.

  17. Advancing viral RNA structure prediction: measuring the thermodynamics of pyrimidine-rich internal loops.

    PubMed

    Phan, Andy; Mailey, Katherine; Saeki, Jessica; Gu, Xiaobo; Schroeder, Susan J

    2017-05-01

    Accurate thermodynamic parameters improve RNA structure predictions and thus accelerate understanding of RNA function and the identification of RNA drug binding sites. Many viral RNA structures, such as internal ribosome entry sites, have internal loops and bulges that are potential drug target sites. Current models used to predict internal loops are biased toward small, symmetric purine loops, and thus poorly predict asymmetric, pyrimidine-rich loops with >6 nucleotides (nt) that occur frequently in viral RNA. This article presents new thermodynamic data for 40 pyrimidine loops, many of which can form UU or protonated CC base pairs. Uracil and protonated cytosine base pairs stabilize asymmetric internal loops. Accurate prediction rules are presented that account for all thermodynamic measurements of RNA asymmetric internal loops. New loop initiation terms for loops with >6 nt are presented that do not follow previous assumptions that increasing asymmetry destabilizes loops. Since the last 2004 update, 126 new loops with asymmetry or sizes greater than 2 × 2 have been measured. These new measurements significantly deepen and diversify the thermodynamic database for RNA. These results will help better predict internal loops that are larger, pyrimidine-rich, and occur within viral structures such as internal ribosome entry sites. © 2017 Phan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. Ab initio structure prediction of the antibody hypervariable H3 loop.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Day, Tyler

    2013-06-01

    Antibodies have the capability of binding a wide range of antigens due to the diversity of the six loops constituting the complementarity determining region (CDR). Among the six loops, the H3 loop is the most diverse in structure, length, and sequence identity. Prediction of the three-dimensional structures of antibodies, especially the CDR loops, is an important step in the computational design and engineering of novel antibodies for improved affinity and specificity. Although it has been demonstrated that the conformation of the five non-H3 loops can be accurately predicted by comparing their sequences against databases of canonical loop conformations, no such connection has been established for H3 loops. In this work, we present the results for ab initio structure prediction of the H3 loop using conformational sampling and energy calculations with the program Prime on a dataset of 53 loops ranging in length from 4 to 22 residues. When the prediction is performed in the crystal environment and including symmetry mates, the median backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) is 0.5 Å to the crystal structure, with 91% of cases having an RMSD of less than 2.0 Å. When the prediction is performed in a noncrystallographic environment, where the scaffold is constructed by swapping the H3 loops between homologous antibodies, 70% of cases have an RMSD below 2.0 Å. These results show promise for ab initio loop predictions applied to modeling of antibodies.

  19. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  20. The nutritive effect of glucose on teh structure and function of jejunal self-emptying blind loops in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Menge, H; Werner, H; Lorenz-Meyer, H; Riecken, E O

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to obtain further information on the influence of the intestinal contents on the development of mucosal structure and function, self-emptying blind loops of rat jejunum were constructed, and the oral end was exteriorized with a stoma to permit infusion of different solutions into the loop. Ringer solution or media containing glucose or galactose was instilled into the loops three times daily for 27 days before functional and structural examination of the loops. The body weight and food intake of the animals did not differ significantly from one group to another. Treatment with glucose, but not with galactose or Ringer solution alone, induced a significant increase in the villus height. Disaccharidase but not dipeptidase activity was concomitantly increased. Infusion of glucose or galactose both led to an increase in the transport capacity of the loop, as determined by glucose absorption in vivo. These results indicate that glucose has a nutritive effect, probably due to its intracellular metabolism, which is responsible for the structural alterations observed. On the other hand, the increase in transport capacity may be attributed to substrate-induced stimulation of the specific monosaccharide transport system in the epithelial cell. PMID:1150116

  1. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 RNA Crystal Structures Reveal Heterogeneous 1 × 1 Nucleotide UU Internal Loop Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-03-27

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5'CUG/3'GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5'r[{und UU}GGGC(C{und U}G){sub 3}GUCC]{sub 2}, refined to 2.20 and 1.52 {angstrom} resolution are disclosed. Here, differences in the orientation of the 5' dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that noncanonical 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 {angstrom} structure, CUGa, the 5' UU forms a one hydrogen-bonded pair with a 5' UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudoinfinite helix. The central 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one-hydrogen bond pair. In the 1.52 {angstrom} structure, CUGb, the 5' UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonically paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops now form two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in the major groove induced by the 5' UU dangling end alters noncanonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands.

  2. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 RNA crystal structures reveal heterogeneous 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loop conformations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W; Disney, Matthew D

    2011-11-15

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5'CUG/3'GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5'r[UUGGGC(CUG)(3)GUCC](2), refined to 2.20 and 1.52 Å resolution are disclosed. Here, differences in the orientation of the 5' dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that noncanonical 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 Å structure, CUGa, the 5' UU forms a one hydrogen-bonded pair with a 5' UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudoinfinite helix. The central 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one-hydrogen bond pair. In the 1.52 Å structure, CUGb, the 5' UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonically paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops now form two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in the major groove induced by the 5' UU dangling end alters noncanonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands.

  3. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 RNA Crystal Structures Reveal Heterogeneous 1×1 Nucleotide UU Internal Loop Conformations⊥

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5′CUG/3′GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures are disclosed of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5′r(UUGGGC(CUG)3GUCC)2, refined to 2.20 Å and 1.52 Å resolution. Here, differences in orientation of the 5′ dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that non-canonical 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 Å structure, CUGa, the 5′UU forms one hydrogen-bonded pairs with a 5′UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudo-infinite helix. The central 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one hydrogen-bonded pair. In the 1.52 Å structure, CUGb, the 5′ UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonical paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops form now two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in major groove induced by the 5′UU dangling end alters non-canonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands. PMID:21988728

  4. Short loop length and high thermal stability determine genomic instability induced by G-quadruplex-forming minisatellites

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Aurèle; Adrian, Michael; Samazan, Frédéric; Heddi, Brahim; Hamon, Florian; Serero, Alexandre; Lopes, Judith; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Phan, Anh Tuân; Nicolas, Alain

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are polymorphic four-stranded structures formed by certain G-rich nucleic acids, with various biological roles. However, structural features dictating their formation and/or functionin vivo are unknown. InS. cerevisiae, the pathological persistency of G4 within the CEB1 minisatellite induces its rearrangement during leading-strand replication. We now show that several other G4-forming sequences remain stable. Extensive mutagenesis of the CEB25 minisatellite motif reveals that only variants with very short (≤ 4 nt) G4 loops preferentially containing pyrimidine bases trigger genomic instability. Parallel biophysical analyses demonstrate that shortening loop length does not change the monomorphic G4 structure of CEB25 variants but drastically increases its thermal stability, in correlation with thein vivo instability. Finally, bioinformatics analyses reveal that the threat for genomic stability posed by G4 bearing short pyrimidine loops is conserved inC. elegans and humans. This work provides a framework explanation for the heterogeneous instability behavior of G4-forming sequencesin vivo, highlights the importance of structure thermal stability, and questions the prevailing assumption that G4 structures with short or longer loops are as likely to formin vivo. PMID:25956747

  5. Interaction of irradiation-induced prismatic dislocation loops with free surfaces in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikar, Jan; Gröger, Roman; Schäublin, Robin

    2017-02-01

    The prismatic dislocation loops appear in metals as a result of high-energy irradiation. Understanding their formation and interaction is important for quantification of irradiation-induced deterioration of mechanical properties. Characterization of dislocation loops in thin foils is commonly made using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), but the results are inevitably influenced by the proximity of free surfaces. The prismatic loops are attracted to free surfaces by image forces. Depending on the type, size and depth of the loop in the foil, they can escape to the free surface, thus invalidating TEM observations and conclusions. In this article small prismatic hexagonal and circular dislocation loops in tungsten with the Burgers vectors 1/2 < 1 1 1 > and < 1 0 0 > are studied by molecular statics simulations using three embedded atom method (EAM) potentials. The calculated image forces are compared to known elastic solutions. A particular attention is paid to the critical stress to move edge dislocations. The escape of the loop to the free surface is quantified by a combination of atomistic simulations and elastic calculations. For example, for the 1/2 < 1 1 1 > loop with diameter 7.4 nm in a 55 nm thick foil we calculated that about one half of the loops will escape to the free surface. This implies that TEM observations detect only approx. 50% of the loops that were originally present in the foil.

  6. Effect of self-induced magnetic force in a coronal loop transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, T.; Dryer, M.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of the self-induced magnetic force in a section of a model coronal loop is examined and it is found that an axial current produces a pointwise magnetic force in the direction toward the axis of the loop. The direction of the pointwise magnetic force indicates that the effect of this force, acting alone, is to cause a contraction of the cross section of the magnetic loop toward the axis, but not the translation motion of the loop as a whole. It is concluded that forces other than the self-induced magnetic force, such as thermal force of pressure gradient or extra-induced magnetic force of magnetic buoyancy, must be involved in the acceleration mechanisms for the heliocentrifugal motion of coronal transients.

  7. Structural families in loops of homologous proteins: automatic classification, modelling and application to antibodies.

    PubMed

    Martin, A C; Thornton, J M

    1996-11-15

    Loop regions of polypeptide in homologous proteins may be classified into structural families. A method is described by which this classification may be performed automatically and "key residue" templates, which may be responsible for the loop adopting a given conformation, are defined. The technique has been applied to the hypervariable loops of antibodies and the results are compared with the previous definition of canonical classes. We have extended these definitions and provide complete sets of structurally determining residues (SDRs) for the observed clusters including the first set of key residues for seven-residue CDR-H3 loops.

  8. A modular perspective of protein structures: application to fragment based loop modeling.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Fiser, Andras

    2013-01-01

    Proteins can be decomposed into supersecondary structure modules. We used a generic definition of supersecondary structure elements, so-called Smotifs, which are composed of two flanking regular secondary structures connected by a loop, to explore the evolution and current variety of structure building blocks. Here, we discuss recent observations about the saturation of Smotif geometries in protein structures and how it opens new avenues in protein structure modeling and design. As a first application of these observations we describe our loop conformation modeling algorithm, ArchPred that takes advantage of Smotifs classification. In this application, instead of focusing on specific loop properties the method narrows down possible template conformations in other, often not homologous structures, by identifying the most likely supersecondary structure environment that cradles the loop. Beyond identifying the correct starting supersecondary structure geometry, it takes into account information of fit of anchor residues, sterical clashes, match of predicted and observed dihedral angle preferences, and local sequence signal.

  9. Exact calculation of loop formation probability identifies folding motifs in RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Sloma, Michael F; Mathews, David H

    2016-12-01

    RNA secondary structure prediction is widely used to analyze RNA sequences. In an RNA partition function calculation, free energy nearest neighbor parameters are used in a dynamic programming algorithm to estimate statistical properties of the secondary structure ensemble. Previously, partition functions have largely been used to estimate the probability that a given pair of nucleotides form a base pair, the conditional stacking probability, the accessibility to binding of a continuous stretch of nucleotides, or a representative sample of RNA structures. Here it is demonstrated that an RNA partition function can also be used to calculate the exact probability of formation of hairpin loops, internal loops, bulge loops, or multibranch loops at a given position. This calculation can also be used to estimate the probability of formation of specific helices. Benchmarking on a set of RNA sequences with known secondary structures indicated that loops that were calculated to be more probable were more likely to be present in the known structure than less probable loops. Furthermore, highly probable loops are more likely to be in the known structure than the set of loops predicted in the lowest free energy structures. © 2016 Sloma and Mathews; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Oriented matroids—combinatorial structures underlying loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunnemann, Johannes; Rideout, David

    2010-10-01

    We analyze combinatorial structures which play a central role in determining spectral properties of the volume operator (Ashtekar A and Lewandowski J 1998 Adv. Theor. Math. Phys. 1 388) in loop quantum gravity (LQG). These structures encode geometrical information of the embedding of arbitrary valence vertices of a graph in three-dimensional Riemannian space and can be represented by sign strings containing relative orientations of embedded edges. We demonstrate that these signature factors are a special representation of the general mathematical concept of an oriented matroid (Ziegler G M 1998 Electron. J. Comb.; Björner A et al 1999 Oriented Matroids (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). Moreover, we show that oriented matroids can also be used to describe the topology (connectedness) of directed graphs. Hence, the mathematical methods developed for oriented matroids can be applied to the difficult combinatorics of embedded graphs underlying the construction of LQG. As a first application we revisit the analysis of Brunnemann and Rideout (2008 Class. Quantum Grav. 25 065001 and 065002), and find that enumeration of all possible sign configurations used there is equivalent to enumerating all realizable oriented matroids of rank 3 (Ziegler G M 1998 Electron. J. Comb.; Björner A et al 1999 Oriented Matroids (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)), and thus can be greatly simplified. We find that for 7-valent vertices having no coplanar triples of edge tangents, the smallest non-zero eigenvalue of the volume spectrum does not grow as one increases the maximum spin jmax at the vertex, for any orientation of the edge tangents. This indicates that, in contrast to the area operator, considering large jmax does not necessarily imply large volume eigenvalues. In addition we give an outlook to possible starting points for rewriting the combinatorics of LQG in terms of oriented matroids.

  11. RHESSI Microflares: II. Implications for Loop Structure and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoiser, S.; Brown, J. C.; Veronig, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    We present simple analytic models which predict the peak X-ray emission measure and temperature attained in flares in which the chromospheric evaporation process takes place either in a single ‘monolithic’ loop or in a loop consisting of several filaments that are created successively as the energy release process proceeds in time. As possible mechanisms driving chromospheric evaporation we consider both classical heat conduction from the loop top and non-thermal electron beams. The model predictions are tested for a set of 18 well studied RHESSI microflares. The results suggest beam driven evaporation in filamented loops as being capable of accounting for the observed emission measures and temperatures though there are issues with the very high beam densities needed. On the other hand, estimates of the emission measures achieved by conductive evaporation which are derived by using the Rosner Tucker Vaiana (RTV) scaling law are much larger than the observed ones. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  12. Hairpin loop structure of African swine fever virus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    González, A; Talavera, A; Almendral, J M; Viñuela, E

    1986-01-01

    The ends of African swine fever virus genome are formed by a 37 nucleotide-long hairpin loop composed, almost entirely, of incompletely paired A and T residues. The loops at each DNA end were present in two equimolar forms that, when compared in opposite polarities, were inverted and complementary (flip-flop), as in the case of poxvirus DNA. The hairpin loops of African swine fever and vaccinia virus DNAs had no homology, but both DNAs had a 16 nucleotide-long sequence, close to the hairpin loops, with an homology of about 80%. An analysis of African swine fever virus replicating DNA showed head-to-head and tail-to-tail linked molecules that may be replicative intermediates. Images PMID:3763393

  13. Inhibitory loop robustly induces anticipated synchronization in neuronal microcircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, Fernanda S.; Gollo, Leonardo L.; Carelli, Pedro V.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the synchronization properties between two excitatory coupled neurons in the presence of an inhibitory loop mediated by an interneuron. Dynamic inhibition together with noise independently applied to each neuron provide phase diversity in the dynamics of the neuronal motif. We show that the interplay between the coupling strengths and the external noise controls the phase relations between the neurons in a counterintuitive way. For a master-slave configuration (unidirectional coupling) we find that the slave can anticipate the master, on average, if the slave is subject to the inhibitory feedback. In this nonusual regime, called anticipated synchronization (AS), the phase of the postsynaptic neuron is advanced with respect to that of the presynaptic neuron. We also show that the AS regime survives even in the presence of unbalanced bidirectional excitatory coupling. Moreover, for the symmetric mutually coupled situation, the neuron that is subject to the inhibitory loop leads in phase.

  14. Structural and Functional Studies on the Marburg Virus GP2 Fusion Loop.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nina; Tao, Yisong; Brenowitz, Michael D; Girvin, Mark E; Lai, Jonathan R

    2015-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and the ebolaviruses belong to the family Filoviridae (the members of which are filoviruses) that cause severe hemorrhagic fever. Infection requires fusion of the host and viral membranes, a process that occurs in the host cell endosomal compartment and is facilitated by the envelope glycoprotein fusion subunit, GP2. The N-terminal fusion loop (FL) of GP2 is a hydrophobic disulfide-bonded loop that is postulated to insert and disrupt the host endosomal membrane during fusion. Here, we describe the first structural and functional studies of a protein corresponding to the MARV GP2 FL. We found that this protein undergoes a pH-dependent conformational change, as monitored by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, we report that, under low pH conditions, the MARV GP2 FL can induce content leakage from liposomes. The general aspects of this pH-dependent structure and lipid-perturbing behavior are consistent with previous reports on Ebola virus GP2 FL. However, nuclear magnetic resonance studies in lipid bicelles and mutational analysis indicate differences in structure exist between MARV and Ebola virus GP2 FL. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of MARV GP2-mediated cell entry.

  15. Solution structure of loop A from the hairpin ribozyme from tobacco ringspot virus satellite.

    PubMed

    Cai, Z; Tinoco, I

    1996-05-14

    The solution structure of loop A from the hairpin ribozyme found in the minus strand of tobacco ringspot virus satellite has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. The ribozyme consists of two internal loops flanked by short helices: loop A and helices I and II include the substrate and substrate binding site; loop B and helices III and IV are the catalytic domain. Loop A is a symmetric internal loop of eight nucleotides that contains the cleavage site. The 2-amino group of the guanine immediately 3' to the cleavage site is essential for catalysis. NMR results show that this guanine forms a sheared G.A base pair. The cytosine residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site forms an AH+.C base pair with an adenine whose pKa is shifted to 6.2 to allow partial protonation near neutral pH. Although the residues flanking the cleavage site are stacked in an A-form pattern, the phosphodiester backbone next to the cleavage site on the 3' side is splayed apart. This places the following base-a uracil-in the expanded major groove. The conformational flexibility and the lack of steric hindrance of the uracil as well as the unoccupied Watson-Crick positions on the sheared G.A base pair can allow loop A to specifically interact with the catalytic domain (loop B) without drastically changing its own conformation. The three-dimensional structure of loop A provides explanations for previously published mutation and structural mapping results.

  16. The NMR Structure of an Internal Loop from 23S Ribosomal RNA Differs from its Structure in Crystals of 50S Ribosomal Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Neelaabh; Kennedy, Scott D.; Chen, Gang; Krugh, Thomas R.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    Internal loops play an important role in structure and folding of RNA and in RNA recognition by other molecules such as proteins and ligands. An understanding of internal loops with propensities to form a particular structure will help predict RNA structure, recognition, and function. The structures of internal loops 5'1009CUAAG10133'3'1168GAAGC11645' and 5'998CUAAG10023'3'1157GAAGC11535' from helix 40 of the large subunit rRNA in Deinococcus radiodurans and Escherichia coli, respectively, are phylogenetically conserved, suggesting functional relevance. The energetics and NMR solution structure of the loop were determined in the duplex, 5'1GGCUAAGAC93'3'18CCGAAGCUG105' The internal loop forms a different structure in solution than in the crystal structures of the ribosomal subunits. In particular, the crystal structures have a bulged out adenine at the equivalent of position A15 and a reverse Hoogsteen UA pair (trans Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen UA) at the equivalent of U4 and A14, whereas the solution structure has a single hydrogen bond UA pair (cis Watson-Crick/sugar edge A15U4) between U4 and A15 and a sheared AA pair (trans Hoogsteen/sugar edge A14A5) between A5 and A14. There is cross-strand stacking between A6 and A14 (A6/A14/A15 stacking pattern) in the NMR structure. All three structures have a sheared GA pair (trans Hoogsteen/sugar edge A6G13) at the equivalent of A6 and G13. The internal loop has contacts with ribosomal protein L20 and other parts of the RNA in the crystal structures. These contacts presumably provide the free energy to rearrange the base pairing in the loop. Evidently, molecular recognition of this internal loop involves induced fit binding, which could confer several advantages. The predicted thermodynamic stability of the loop agrees with the experimental value, even though the thermodynamic model assumes a Watson–Crick UA pair. PMID:17002278

  17. Systematic U(1 ) B - L extensions of loop-induced neutrino mass models with dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shu-Yu; Toma, Takashi; Tsumura, Koji

    2016-08-01

    We study the gauged U(1 ) B - L extensions of the models for neutrino masses and dark matter. In this class of models, tiny neutrino masses are radiatively induced through the loop diagrams, while the origin of the dark matter stability is guaranteed by the remnant of the gauge symmetry. Depending on how the lepton number conservation is violated, these models are systematically classified. We present complete lists for the one-loop Z2 and the two-loop Z3 radiative seesaw models as examples of the classification. The anomaly cancellation conditions in these models are also discussed.

  18. Antibody structure determination using a combination of homology modeling, energy-based refinement, and loop prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Day, Tyler; Warshaviak, Dora; Murrett, Colleen; Friesner, Richard; Pearlman, David

    2014-08-01

    We present the blinded prediction results in the Second Antibody Modeling Assessment (AMA-II) using a fully automatic antibody structure prediction method implemented in the programs BioLuminate and Prime. We have developed a novel knowledge based approach to model the CDR loops, using a combination of sequence similarity, geometry matching, and the clustering of database structures. The homology models are further optimized with a physics-based energy function (VSGB2.0), which improves the model quality significantly. H3 loop modeling remains the most challenging task. Our ab initio loop prediction performs well for the H3 loop in the crystal structure context, and allows improved results when refining the H3 loops in the context of homology models. For the 10 human and mouse derived antibodies in this assessment, the average RMSDs for the homology model Fv and framework regions are 1.19 Å and 0.74 Å, respectively. The average RMSDs for five non-H3 CDR loops range from 0.61 Å to 1.05 Å, and the H3 loop average RMSD is 2.91 Å using our knowledge-based loop prediction approach. The ab initio H3 loop predictions yield an average RMSD of 1.28 Å when performed in the context of the crystal structure and 2.67 Å in the context of the homology modeled structure. Notably, our method for predicting the H3 loop in the crystal structure environment ranked first among the seven participating groups in AMA-II, and our method made the best prediction among all participants for seven of the ten targets.

  19. Arsenic Induces Polyadenylation of Canonical Histone mRNA by Down-regulating Stem-Loop-binding Protein Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Jason; Fang, Lei; Chervona, Yana; Chen, Danqi; Kiok, Kathrin; Sun, Hong; Tseng, Hsiang-Chi; Xu, Dazhong; Shamy, Magdy; Jin, Chunyuan; Costa, Max

    2014-01-01

    The replication-dependent histone genes are the only metazoan genes whose messenger RNA (mRNA) does not terminate with a poly(A) tail at the 3′-end. Instead, the histone mRNAs display a stem-loop structure at their 3′-end. Stem-loop-binding protein (SLBP) binds the stem-loop and regulates canonical histone mRNA metabolism. Here we report that exposure to arsenic, a carcinogenic metal, decreased cellular levels of SLBP by inducing its proteasomal degradation and inhibiting SLBP transcription via epigenetic mechanisms. Notably, arsenic exposure dramatically increased polyadenylation of canonical histone H3.1 mRNA possibly through down-regulation of SLBP expression. The polyadenylated H3.1 mRNA induced by arsenic was not susceptible to normal degradation that occurs at the end of S phase, resulting in continued presence into mitosis, increased total H3.1 mRNA, and increased H3 protein levels. Excess expression of canonical histones have been shown to increase sensitivity to DNA damage as well as increase the frequency of missing chromosomes and induce genomic instability. Thus, polyadenylation of canonical histone mRNA following arsenic exposure may contribute to arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25266719

  20. Heavy ion irradiation induced dislocation loops in AREVA's M5® alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengstler-Eger, R. M.; Baldo, P.; Beck, L.; Dorner, J.; Ertl, K.; Hoffmann, P. B.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Kirk, M. A.; Petry, W.; Pikart, P.; Rempel, A.

    2012-04-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) Zr-based alloy structural materials show creep and growth under neutron irradiation as a consequence of the irradiation induced microstructural changes in the alloy. A better scientific understanding of these microstructural processes can improve simulation programs for structural component deformation and simplify the development of advanced deformation resistant alloys. As in-pile irradiation leads to high material activation and requires long irradiation times, the objective of this work was to study whether ion irradiation is an applicable method to simulate typical PWR neutron damage in Zr-based alloys, with AREVA's M5® alloy as reference material. The irradiated specimens were studied by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at different dose levels and temperatures. The irradiation induced microstructure consisted of - and -type dislocation loops with their characteristics corresponding to typical neutron damage in Zr-based alloys; it can thus be concluded that heavy ion irradiation under the chosen conditions is an excellent method to simulate PWR neutron damage.

  1. Volumetric contributions of loop regions of G-quadruplex DNA to the formation of the tertiary structure.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shuntaro; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2017-02-06

    DNA guanine-quadruplexes (G-quadruplexes) are unique DNA structures formed by guanine-rich sequences. The loop regions of G-quadruplexes play key roles in stability and topology of G-quadruplexes. Here, we investigated volumetric changes induced by pressure in the folding of the G-quadruplex formed by the thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) with mutations within the loop regions. The change of partial molar volume in the transition from coil to G-quadruplex, ∆Vtr, of TBA with a mutation from T to A in the 5' most loop (TBA T3A) was 75.5cm(3)mol(-1), which was larger than that of TBA (54.6cm(3)mol(-1)). TBA with a G to T mutation in the central loop (TBA G8T) had thermal stability similar to TBA T3A but a smaller ∆Vtr of 41.1cm(3)mol(-1). In the presence of poly(ethylene)glycol 200 (PEG200), ∆Vtr values were 14.7cm(3)mol(-1) for TBA T3A and 13.2cm(3)mol(-1) for TBA G8T. These results suggest that the two mutations destabilize the G-quadruplex structure differently. Thus, volumetric data obtained using pressure-based thermodynamic analyses provides information about the dynamics of the loop regions and the roles of loops in the stabilities and folding of G-quadruplex structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Global structure of curves from generalized unitarity cut of three-loop diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauenstein, Jonathan D.; Huang, Rijun; Mehta, Dhagash; Zhang, Yang

    2015-02-01

    This paper studies the global structure of algebraic curves defined by generalized unitarity cut of four-dimensional three-loop diagrams with eleven propagators. The global structure is a topological invariant that is characterized by the geometric genus of the algebraic curve. We use the Riemann-Hurwitz formula to compute the geometric genus of algebraic curves with the help of techniques involving convex hull polytopes and numerical algebraic geometry. Some interesting properties of genus for arbitrary loop orders are also explored where computing the genus serves as an initial step for integral or integrand reduction of three-loop amplitudes via an algebraic geometric approach.

  3. Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin E in Complex with TCR Defines the Role of TCR Loop Positioning in Superantigen Recognition.

    PubMed

    Rödström, Karin E J; Regenthal, Paulina; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2015-01-01

    T cells are crucial players in cell-mediated immunity. The specificity of their receptor, the T cell receptor (TCR), is central for the immune system to distinguish foreign from host antigens. Superantigens are bacterial toxins capable of inducing a toxic immune response by cross-linking the TCR and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and circumventing the antigen specificity. Here, we present the structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE) in complex with a human T cell receptor, as well as the unligated T cell receptor structure. There are clear structural changes in the TCR loops upon superantigen binding. In particular, the HV4 loop moves to circumvent steric clashes upon complex formation. In addition, a predicted ternary model of SEE in complex with both TCR and MHC class II displays intermolecular contacts between the TCR α-chain and the MHC, suggesting that the TCR α-chain is of importance for complex formation.

  4. Introducing a rigid loop structure from deer into mouse prion protein increases its propensity for misfolding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Leah M; John, Theodore R; Schätzl, Hermann M; Lewis, Randolph V

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) into the disease-associated isoform (PrP(Sc)) that has increased β-sheet content and partial resistance to proteolytic digestion. Prion diseases from different mammalian species have varying propensities for transmission upon exposure of an uninfected host to the infectious agent. Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a highly transmissible prion disease that affects free ranging and farmed populations of cervids including deer, elk and moose, as well as other mammals in experimental settings. The molecular mechanisms allowing CWD to maintain comparatively high transmission rates have not been determined. Previous work has identified a unique structural feature in cervid PrP, a rigid loop between β-sheet 2 and α-helix 2 on the surface of the protein. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the rigid loop has a direct influence on the misfolding process. The rigid loop was introduced into murine PrP as the result of two amino acid substitutions: S170N and N174T. Wild-type and rigid loop murine PrP were expressed in E. coli and purified. Misfolding propensity was compared for the two proteins using biochemical techniques and cell free misfolding and conversion systems. Murine PrP with a rigid loop misfolded in cell free systems with greater propensity than wild type murine PrP. In a lipid-based conversion assay, rigid loop PrP converted to a PK resistant, aggregated isoform at lower concentrations than wild-type PrP. Using both proteins as substrates in real time quaking-induced conversion, rigid loop PrP adopted a misfolded isoform more readily than wild type PrP. Taken together, these findings may help explain the high transmission rates observed for CWD within cervids.

  5. Sampling Multiple Scoring Functions Can Improve Protein Loop Structure Prediction Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Rata, Ionel; Jakobsson, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Accurately predicting loop structures is important for understanding functions of many proteins. In order to obtain loop models with high accuracy, efficiently sampling the loop conformation space to discover reasonable structures is a critical step. In loop conformation sampling, coarse-grain energy (scoring) functions coupling with reduced protein representations are often used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom as well as sampling computational time. However, due to implicitly considering many factors by reduced representations, the coarse-grain scoring functions may have potential insensitivity and inaccuracy, which can mislead the sampling process and consequently ignore important loop conformations. In this paper, we present a new computational sampling approach to obtain reasonable loop backbone models, so-called the Pareto Optimal Sampling (POS) method. The rationale of the POS method is to sample the function space of multiple, carefully-selected scoring functions to discover an ensemble of diversified structures yielding Pareto optimality to all sampled conformations. POS method can efficiently tolerate insensitivity and inaccuracy in individual scoring functions and thereby lead to significant accuracy improvement in loop structure prediction. We apply the POS method to a set of 4- to 12-residue loop targets using a function space composed of backbone-only Rosetta, DFIRE, and a triplet backbone dihedral potential developed in our lab. Our computational results show that in 501 out of 502 targets, the model sets generated by POS contain structure models are within subangstrom resolution. Moreover, the top-ranked models have Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) less than 1A in 96.8%, 84.1%, and 72.2% of the short (4~6 residues), medium (7~9 residues), and long (10~12) targets, respectively, when the all-atom models are generated by local optimization from the backbone models and are ranked by our recently developed Pareto Optimal Consensus (POC

  6. Thermodynamics of DNA Loops with Long-Range Correlated Structural Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaillant, C.; Audit, B.; Arnéodo, A.

    2005-08-01

    We study the influence of a structural disorder on the thermodynamical properties of 2D-elastic chains submitted to mechanical/topological constraint as loops. The disorder is introduced via a spontaneous curvature whose distribution along the chain presents either no correlation or long-range correlations (LRC). The equilibrium properties of the one-loop system are derived numerically and analytically for weak disorder. LRC are shown to favor the formation of small loop, larger the LRC, smaller the loop size. We use the mean first passage time formalism to show that the typical short time loop dynamics is superdiffusive in the presence of LRC. Potential biological implications on nucleosome positioning and dynamics in eukaryotic chromatin are discussed.

  7. Fields induced by three-dimensional dislocation loops in anisotropic magneto-electro-elastic bimaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xueli; Pan, Ernie; Sangghaleh, Ali

    2013-08-01

    The coupled elastic, electric and magnetic fields produced by an arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional dislocation loop in general anisotropic magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) bimaterials are derived. First, we develop line-integral expressions for the fields induced by a general dislocation loop. Then, we obtain analytical solutions for the fields, including the extended Peach-Koehler force, due to some useful dislocation segments such as straight line and elliptic arc. The present solutions contain the piezoelectric, piezomagnetic and purely elastic solutions as special cases. As numerical examples, the fields induced by a square and an elliptic dislocation loop in MEE bimaterials are studied. Our numerical results show the coupling effects among different fields, along with various interesting features associated with the dislocation and interface.

  8. Structure of RNA Stem Loop B from the Picornavirus Replication Platform.

    PubMed

    Warden, Meghan S; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Liu, Dong; Hopersberger, Lorelei J; Ponniah, Komala; Pascal, Steven M

    2017-05-23

    The presumptive RNA cloverleaf at the start of the 5'-untranslated region of the picornavirus genome is an essential element in replication. Stem loop B (SLB) of the cloverleaf is a recognition site for the host polyC-binding protein, which initiates a switch from translation to replication. Here we present the solution structure of human rhinovirus isotype 14 SLB using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. SLB adopts a predominantly A-form helical structure. The stem contains five Watson-Crick base pairs and one wobble base pair and is capped by an eight-nucleotide loop. The wobble base pair introduces perturbations into the helical parameters but does not appear to introduce flexibility. However, the helix major groove appears to be accessible. Flexibility is seen throughout the loop and in the terminal nucleotides. The pyrimidine-rich region of the loop, the apparent recognition site for the polyC-binding protein, is the most disordered region of the structure.

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Cool Flare Loops Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuła, K.; Heinzel, P.; Liu, W.; Berlicki, A.

    2017-08-01

    Flare loops were well observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) during the gradual phase of two solar flares on 2014 March 29 and 2015 June 22. Cool flare loops are visible in various spectral lines formed at chromospheric and transition-region temperatures and exhibit large downflows which correspond to the standard scenario. The principal aim of this work is to analyze the structure and dynamics of cool flare loops observed in Mg ii lines. Synthetic profiles of the Mg ii h line are computed using the classical cloud model and assuming a uniform background intensity. In this paper, we study novel IRIS NUV observations of such loops in Mg ii h and k lines and also show the behavior of hotter lines detected in the FUV channel. We obtained the spatial evolution of the velocities: near the loop top, the flow velocities are small and they are increasing toward the loop legs. Moreover, from slit-jaw image (SJI) movies, we observe some plasma upflows into the loops, which are also detectable in Mg ii spectra. The brightness of the loops systematically decreases with increasing flow velocity, and we ascribe this to the effect of Doppler dimming, which works for Mg ii lines. Emission profiles of Mg ii were found to be extremely broad, and we explain this through the large unresolved non-thermal motions.

  10. Solution structure of loop A from the hairpin ribozyme from tobacco ringspot virus satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Tinoco, I. Jr. |

    1996-05-14

    The solution structure of loop A form the hairpin ribozyme fund in the minus strand of tobacco ringspot virus satellite has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. The ribozyme consists of two internal loops flanked by short helices: loop A and helices I and II include the substrate and substrate binding site; loop B and helices III and IV are the catalytic domain. Loop A is a symmetric internal loop of eight nucleotides that contains the cleavage site. The 2-amino group of the guanine immediately 3{prime} to the cleavage site is essential for catalysis. NMR results show that this guanine forms a sheared G{sm_bullet}A base pair. The cytosine residue immediately 5{prime} to the cleavage site forms an AH{sup +}{sm_bullet}C base pair with an adenine whose pK{sub a} is shifted to 6.2 to allow partial protonation near neutral pH. Although the residues flanking the cleavage site are stacked in an A-form pattern, the phosphodiester backbone next to the cleavage site on the 3{prime} side is splayed apart. This places the following base-a uracil-in the expanded major groove. The conformational flexibility and the lack of steric hindrance of the uracil as well as the unoccupied Watson-Crick positions on the sheared G{sm_bullet}A base pair can allow loop A to specifically interact with the catalytic domain (loop B) without drastically changing its own conformation. The three-dimensional structure of loop A provides explanations for previously published mutation and structural mapping results. 38 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Unresolved Fine-scale Structure in Solar Coronal Loop-tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, E.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Wedemeyer, S.; Antolin, P.

    2014-12-01

    New and advanced space-based observing facilities continue to lower the resolution limit and detect solar coronal loops in greater detail. We continue to discover even finer substructures within coronal loop cross-sections, in order to understand the nature of the solar corona. Here, we push this lower limit further to search for the finest coronal loop substructures, through taking advantage of the resolving power of the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope/CRisp Imaging Spectro-Polarimeter (CRISP), together with co-observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA). High-resolution imaging of the chromospheric Hα 656.28 nm spectral line core and wings can, under certain circumstances, allow one to deduce the topology of the local magnetic environment of the solar atmosphere where its observed. Here, we study post-flare coronal loops, which become filled with evaporated chromosphere that rapidly condenses into chromospheric clumps of plasma (detectable in Hα) known as a coronal rain, to investigate their fine-scale structure. We identify, through analysis of three data sets, large-scale catastrophic cooling in coronal loop-tops and the existence of multi-thermal, multi-stranded substructures. Many cool strands even extend fully intact from loop-top to footpoint. We discover that coronal loop fine-scale strands can appear bunched with as many as eight parallel strands within an AIA coronal loop cross-section. The strand number density versus cross-sectional width distribution, as detected by CRISP within AIA-defined coronal loops, most likely peaks at well below 100 km, and currently, 69% of the substructure strands are statistically unresolved in AIA coronal loops.

  12. Unresolved fine-scale structure in solar coronal loop-tops

    SciTech Connect

    Scullion, E.; Van der Voort, L. Rouppe; Wedemeyer, S.; Antolin, P.

    2014-12-10

    New and advanced space-based observing facilities continue to lower the resolution limit and detect solar coronal loops in greater detail. We continue to discover even finer substructures within coronal loop cross-sections, in order to understand the nature of the solar corona. Here, we push this lower limit further to search for the finest coronal loop substructures, through taking advantage of the resolving power of the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope/CRisp Imaging Spectro-Polarimeter (CRISP), together with co-observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA). High-resolution imaging of the chromospheric Hα 656.28 nm spectral line core and wings can, under certain circumstances, allow one to deduce the topology of the local magnetic environment of the solar atmosphere where its observed. Here, we study post-flare coronal loops, which become filled with evaporated chromosphere that rapidly condenses into chromospheric clumps of plasma (detectable in Hα) known as a coronal rain, to investigate their fine-scale structure. We identify, through analysis of three data sets, large-scale catastrophic cooling in coronal loop-tops and the existence of multi-thermal, multi-stranded substructures. Many cool strands even extend fully intact from loop-top to footpoint. We discover that coronal loop fine-scale strands can appear bunched with as many as eight parallel strands within an AIA coronal loop cross-section. The strand number density versus cross-sectional width distribution, as detected by CRISP within AIA-defined coronal loops, most likely peaks at well below 100 km, and currently, 69% of the substructure strands are statistically unresolved in AIA coronal loops.

  13. Blooming Knit Flowers: Loop-Linked Soft Morphing Structures for Soft Robotics.

    PubMed

    Han, Min-Woo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2017-04-01

    A loop-linked structure, which is capable of morphing in various modes, including volumetric transformation, is developed based on knitting methods. Morphing flowers (a lily-like, a daffodil-like, gamopetalous, and a calla-like flower) are fabricated using loop patterning, and their blooming motion is demonstrated by controlling a current that selectively actuates the flowers petals. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Hydration structure of antithrombin conformers and water transfer during reactive loop insertion.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J; McGee, M P

    1998-01-01

    The serine protease inhibitor antithrombin undergoes extensive conformational changes during functional interaction with its target proteases. Changes include insertion of the reactive loop region into a beta-sheet structure in the protein core. We explore the possibility that these changes are linked to water transfer. Volumes of water transferred during inhibition of coagulation factor Xa are compared to water-permeable volumes in the x-ray structure of two different antithrombin conformers. In one conformer, the reactive loop is largely exposed to solvent, and in the other, the loop is inserted. Hydration fingerprints of antithrombin (that is, water-permeable pockets) are analyzed to determine their location, volume, and size of access pores, using alpha shape-based methods from computational geometry. Water transfer during reactions is calculated from changes in rate with osmotic pressure. Hydration fingerprints prove markedly different in the two conformers. There is an excess of 61-76 water molecules in loop-exposed as compared to loop-inserted conformers. Quantitatively, rate increases with osmotic pressure are consistent with the transfer of 73 +/- 7 water molecules. This study demonstrates that conformational changes of antithrombin, including loop insertion, are linked to water transfer from antithrombin to bulk solution. It also illustrates the combined use of osmotic stress and analytical geometry as a new and effective tool for structure/function studies. PMID:9675160

  15. Getting in (and out of) the loop: regulating higher order telomere structures

    PubMed Central

    Luke-Glaser, Sarah; Poschke, Heiko; Luke, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The DNA at the ends of linear chromosomes (the telomere) folds back onto itself and forms an intramolecular lariat-like structure. Although the telomere loop has been implicated in the protection of chromosome ends from nuclease-mediated resection and unscheduled DNA repair activities, it potentially poses an obstacle to the DNA replication machinery during S-phase. Therefore, the coordinated regulation of telomere loop formation, maintenance, and resolution is required in order to establish a balance between protecting the chromosome ends and promoting their duplication prior to cell division. Until recently, the only factor known to influence telomere looping in human cells was TRF2, a component of the shelterin complex. Recent work in yeast and mouse cells has uncovered additional regulatory factors that affect the loop structure at telomeres. In the following “perspective” we outline what is known about telomere looping and highlight the latest results regarding the regulation of this chromosome end structure. We speculate about how the manipulation of the telomere loop may have therapeutic implications in terms of diseases associated with telomere dysfunction and uncontrolled proliferation. PMID:23226680

  16. F-actin structure destabilization and DNase I binding loop: fluctuations mutational cross-linking and electron microscopy analysis of loop states and effects on F-actin.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Sept, David; Kudryashov, Dmitri S; Reisler, Emil

    2010-01-22

    The conformational dynamics of filamentous actin (F-actin) is essential for the regulation and functions of cellular actin networks. The main contribution to F-actin dynamics and its multiple conformational states arises from the mobility and flexibility of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop; residues 40-50) on subdomain 2. Therefore, we explored the structural constraints on D-loop plasticity at the F-actin interprotomer space by probing its dynamic interactions with the hydrophobic loop (H-loop), the C-terminus, and the W-loop via mutational disulfide cross-linking. To this end, residues of the D-loop were mutated to cysteines on yeast actin with a C374A background. These mutants showed no major changes in their polymerization and nucleotide exchange properties compared to wild-type actin. Copper-catalyzed disulfide cross-linking was investigated in equimolar copolymers of cysteine mutants from the D-loop with either wild-type (C374) actin or mutant S265C/C374A (on the H-loop) or mutant F169C/C374A (on the W-loop). Remarkably, all tested residues of the D-loop could be cross-linked to residues 374, 265, and 169 by disulfide bonds, demonstrating the plasticity of the interprotomer region. However, each cross-link resulted in different effects on the filament structure, as detected by electron microscopy and light-scattering measurements. Disulfide cross-linking in the longitudinal orientation produced mostly no visible changes in filament morphology, whereas the cross-linking of D-loop residues >45 to the H-loop, in the lateral direction, resulted in filament disruption and the presence of amorphous aggregates on electron microscopy images. A similar aggregation was also observed upon cross-linking the residues of the D-loop (>41) to residue 169. The effects of disulfide cross-links on F-actin stability were only partially accounted for by the simulations of current F-actin models. Thus, our results present evidence for the high level of conformational plasticity in

  17. Structure-function relationships of lipoprotein lipase: mutation analysis and mutagenesis of the loop region.

    PubMed

    Henderson, H E; Ma, Y; Liu, M S; Clark-Lewis, I; Maeder, D L; Kastelein, J J; Brunzell, J D; Hayden, M R

    1993-09-01

    The molecular models of two microbial lipases and human pancreatic lipase (PL) have suggested the existence of common structural motifs including a buried active site shielded by an amphipathic surface loop. In an effort to explore the role of residues comprising the loop of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), we have used site-directed mutagenesis to generate three new LPL variants. In variant LPLM1 we deleted 18 amino acids leaving a loop of only 4 residues which resulted in an LPL protein inactive against triolein substrates. In contrast, two other LPL variants with only partial deletions, involving the apical section of the loop [LPLM2 (-8 amino acids) and LPLM3 (-2 amino acids)] manifested normal lipolytic activity. These findings indicate a critical requirement for the maintenance of charge and periodicity in the proximal and distal segments of the LPL loop in normal catalytic function. This is further highlighted by the detection of a mutation in the proximal section of the loop in a patient with LPL deficiency at position 225 which results in a substitution of threonine for isoleucine. The intact catalytic activity of the partial deletion variants (LPLM2 and LPLM3) further suggests that the apical residues of the loop contribute minimally to the functional motifs of the active site. We support this postulate by showing that the conserved glycine in the apical turn section (G229) can be substituted by glutamine, lysine, proline, or threonine without significantly affecting catalytic activity.

  18. Uptake inhibitors but not substrates induce protease resistance in extracellular loop two of the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Gaffaney, Jon D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2004-03-01

    Changes in protease sensitivity of extracellular loop two (EL2) of the dopamine transporter (DAT) during inhibitor and substrate binding were examined using trypsin proteolysis and epitope-specific immunoblotting. In control rat striatal membranes, proteolysis of DAT in a restricted region of EL2 was produced by 0.001 to 10 microg/ml trypsin. However, in the presence of the dopamine uptake blockers [2-(diphenylmethoxyl) ethyl]-4-(3phenylpropyl) piperazine (GBR 12909), mazindol, 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-flourophenyl)tropane (beta-CFT), nomifensine, benztropine, or (-)-cocaine, 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations of trypsin were required to produce comparable levels of proteolysis. Protease resistance induced by ligands was correlated with their affinity for DAT binding, was not observed with Zn2+, (+)-cocaine, or inhibitors of norepinephrine or serotonin transporters, and was not caused by altered catalytic activity of trypsin. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the interaction of uptake inhibitors with DAT induces a protease-resistant conformation in EL2. In contrast, binding of substrates did not induce protease resistance in EL2, suggesting that substrates and inhibitors interact with DAT differently during binding. To assess the effects of EL2 proteolysis on DAT function, the binding and transport properties of trypsin-digested DAT were assayed with [3H]CFT and [3H]dopamine. Digestion decreased the Bmax for binding and the Vmax for uptake in amounts that were proportional to the extent of proteolysis, indicating that the structural integrity of EL2 is required for maintenance of both DAT binding and transport functions. Together this data provides novel information about inhibitor and substrate interactions at EL2, possibly relating the protease resistant DAT conformation to a mechanism of transport inhibition.

  19. Dislocation dynamics simulations of interactions between gliding dislocations and radiation induced prismatic loops in zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet, Julie; Dupuy, Laurent; Onimus, Fabien; Mompiou, Frédéric; Perusin, Simon; Ambard, Antoine

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of Pressurized Water Reactor fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys is strongly affected by neutron irradiation due to the high density of radiation induced dislocation loops. In order to investigate the interaction mechanisms between gliding dislocations and loops in zirconium, a new nodal dislocation dynamics code, adapted to Hexagonal Close Packed metals, has been used. Various configurations have been systematically computed considering different glide planes, basal or prismatic, and different characters, edge or screw, for gliding dislocations with -type Burgers vectors. Simulations show various interaction mechanisms such as (i) absorption of a loop on an edge dislocation leading to the formation of a double super-jog, (ii) creation of a helical turn, on a screw dislocation, that acts as a strong pinning point or (iii) sweeping of a loop by a gliding dislocation. It is shown that the clearing of loops is more favorable when the dislocation glides in the basal plane than in the prismatic plane explaining the easy dislocation channeling in the basal plane observed after neutron irradiation by transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Structure of a cardiotoxic phospholipase A(2) from Ophiophagus hannah with the "pancreatic loop".

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Long; Xu, Su-Juan; Wang, Qiu-Yan; Song, Shi-Ying; Shu, Yu-Yan; Lin, Zheng-Jiong

    2002-06-01

    The crystal structure of an acidic phospholipase A(2) from Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) has been determined by molecular replacement at 2.6-A resolution to a crystallographic R factor of 20.5% (R(free)=23.3%) with reasonable stereochemistry. The venom enzyme contains an unusual "pancreatic loop." The conformation of the loop is well defined and different from those in pancreas PLA(2), showing its structural variability. This analysis provides the first structure of a PLA(2)-type cardiotoxin. The sites related to the cardiotoxic and myotoxic activities are explored and the oligomer observed in the crystalline state is described.

  1. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martínez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-07-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  2. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    PubMed Central

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martínez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light. PMID:27404551

  3. Prediction of Long Loops with Embedded Secondary Structure using the Protein Local Optimization Program

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Edward B.; Murrett, Colleen S.; Zhu, Kai; Zhao, Suwen; Goldfeld, Dahlia A.; Bylund, Joseph H.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Robust homology modeling to atomic-level accuracy requires in the general case successful prediction of protein loops containing small segments of secondary structure. Further, as loop prediction advances to success with larger loops, the exclusion of loops containing secondary structure becomes awkward. Here, we extend the applicability of the Protein Local Optimization Program (PLOP) to loops up to 17 residues in length that contain either helical or hairpin segments. In general, PLOP hierarchically samples conformational space and ranks candidate loops with a high-quality molecular mechanics force field. For loops identified to possess α-helical segments, we employ an alternative dihedral library composed of (ϕ,ψ) angles commonly found in helices. The alternative library is searched over a user-specified range of residues that define the helical bounds. The source of these helical bounds can be from popular secondary structure prediction software or from analysis of past loop predictions where a propensity to form a helix is observed. Due to the maturity of our energy model, the lowest energy loop across all experiments can be selected with an accuracy of sub-Ångström RMSD in 80% of cases, 1.0 to 1.5 Å RMSD in 14% of cases, and poorer than 1.5 Å RMSD in 6% of cases. The effectiveness of our current methods in predicting hairpin-containing loops is explored with hairpins up to 13 residues in length and again reaching an accuracy of sub-Ångström RMSD in 83% of cases, 1.0 to 1.5 Å RMSD in 10% of cases, and poorer than 1.5 Å RMSD in 7% of cases. Finally, we explore the effect of an imprecise surrounding environment, in which side chains, but not the backbone, are initially in perturbed geometries. In these cases, loops perturbed to 3Å RMSD from the native environment were restored to their native conformation with sub-Ångström RMSD. PMID:23814507

  4. Crystal structure of IMP-2 metallo-β-lactamase from Acinetobacter spp.: comparison of active-site loop structures between IMP-1 and IMP-2.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Matsueda, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Kazuyo; Takashio, Nobutoshi; Toma-Fukai, Sachiko; Yamagata, Yuriko; Shibata, Naohiro; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Shibayama, Keigo; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Kurosaki, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    IMP-2, a subclass B1 metallo-β-lactamase (MBL), is a Zn(II)-containing hydrolase. This hydrolase, involved in antibiotic resistance, catalyzes the hydrolysis of the C-N bond of the β-lactam ring in β-lactam antibiotics such as benzylpenicillin and imipenem. The crystal structure of IMP-2 MBL from Acinetobacter spp. was determined at 2.3 Å resolution. This structure is analogous to that of subclass B1 MBLs such as IMP-1 and VIM-2. Comparison of the structures of IMP-1 and IMP-2, which have an 85% amino acid identity, suggests that the amino acid substitution at position 68 on a β-strand (β3) (Pro in IMP-1 versus Ser in IMP-2) may be a staple factor affecting the flexibility of loop 1 (comprising residues at positions 60-66; EVNGWGV). In the IMP-1 structure, loop 1 adopts an open, disordered conformation. On the other hand, loop 1 of IMP-2 forms a closed conformation in which the side chain of Trp64, involved in substrate binding, is oriented so as to cover the active site, even though there is an acetate ion in the active site of both IMP-1 and IMP-2. Loop 1 of IMP-2 has a more flexible structure in comparison to IMP-1 due to having a Ser residue instead of the Pro residue at position 68, indicating that this difference in sequence may be a trigger to induce a more flexible conformation in loop 1.

  5. Structural consequences of cutting a binding loop: two circularly permuted variants of streptavidin

    SciTech Connect

    Le Trong, Isolde; Chu, Vano; Xing, Yi; Lybrand, Terry P.; Stayton, Patrick S.; Stenkamp, Ronald E.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of two circularly permuted streptavidins probe the role of a flexible loop in the tight binding of biotin. Molecular-dynamics calculations for one of the mutants suggests that increased fluctuations in a hydrogen bond between the protein and biotin are associated with cleavage of the binding loop. Circular permutation of streptavidin was carried out in order to investigate the role of a main-chain amide in stabilizing the high-affinity complex of the protein and biotin. Mutant proteins CP49/48 and CP50/49 were constructed to place new N-termini at residues 49 and 50 in a flexible loop involved in stabilizing the biotin complex. Crystal structures of the two mutants show that half of each loop closes over the binding site, as observed in wild-type streptavidin, while the other half adopts the open conformation found in the unliganded state. The structures are consistent with kinetic and thermodynamic data and indicate that the loop plays a role in enthalpic stabilization of the bound state via the Asn49 amide–biotin hydrogen bond. In wild-type streptavidin, the entropic penalties of immobilizing a flexible portion of the protein to enhance binding are kept to a manageable level by using a contiguous loop of medium length (six residues) which is already constrained by its anchorage to strands of the β-barrel protein. A molecular-dynamics simulation for CP50/49 shows that cleavage of the binding loop results in increased structural fluctuations for Ser45 and that these fluctuations destabilize the streptavidin–biotin complex.

  6. Structures of a CRISPR-Cas9 R-loop complex primed for DNA cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fuguo; Taylor, David W.; Chen, Janice S.; Kornfeld, Jack E.; Zhou, Kaihong; Thompson, Aubri J.; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptive immunity and genome engineering involving the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)–associated (Cas) protein Cas9 begin with RNA-guided DNA unwinding to form an RNA-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand inside the protein. The role of this R-loop structure in positioning each DNA strand for cleavage by the two Cas9 nuclease domains is unknown. We determine molecular structures of the catalytically active Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 R-loop that show the displaced DNA strand located near the RuvC nuclease domain active site. These protein-DNA interactions, in turn, position the HNH nuclease domain adjacent to the target DNA strand cleavage site in a conformation essential for concerted DNA cutting. Cas9 bends the DNA helix by 30°, providing the structural distortion needed for R-loop formation. PMID:26841432

  7. Structures of a CRISPR-Cas9 R-loop complex primed for DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fuguo; Taylor, David W; Chen, Janice S; Kornfeld, Jack E; Zhou, Kaihong; Thompson, Aubri J; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-02-19

    Bacterial adaptive immunity and genome engineering involving the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated (Cas) protein Cas9 begin with RNA-guided DNA unwinding to form an RNA-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand inside the protein. The role of this R-loop structure in positioning each DNA strand for cleavage by the two Cas9 nuclease domains is unknown. We determine molecular structures of the catalytically active Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 R-loop that show the displaced DNA strand located near the RuvC nuclease domain active site. These protein-DNA interactions, in turn, position the HNH nuclease domain adjacent to the target DNA strand cleavage site in a conformation essential for concerted DNA cutting. Cas9 bends the DNA helix by 30°, providing the structural distortion needed for R-loop formation.

  8. Aggregation and secondary loop structure of oligonucleotides do not determine their ability to inhibit TLR9.

    PubMed

    Ashman, Robert F; Goeken, J Adam; Lenert, Petar S

    2011-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is an endosomal DNA sensor that warns us of the presence of infectious danger and triggers a rapid pro-inflammatory response in dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. The consequences of uncontrolled TLR9 activation can be detrimental for the host, contributing to the pathogenesis of bacterial septic shock or autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Therefore, we need to develop TLR9 antagonists. We and others have created inhibitory oligonucleotides (INH-ODN) that are capable of sequence-dependent inhibition of TLR9-induced activation in both human and mouse cells. However, it is not clear whether marked differences in INH-ODN activity related to base sequence derived from polymerization of INH-ODNs or their ability to complex with stimulatory CpG-oligonucleotides (ST-ODN). Furthermore, the 5' end of INH-ODNs may assume a particular loop configuration that may be needed for binding to a critical site on TLR9. Here, we show that 1) G-tetrads required for ODN stacking were compatible with INH-ODN activity but were not necessary; 2) there was no relationship between activity and self-association at endosomal pH; 3) there was no evidence for direct binding between ST-ODNs and INH-ODNs; 4) when a 3G sequence was disrupted, despite a preserved stem-loop formation, INH-ODN activity was abolished. These results support the conclusion that certain features of the primary linear sequence are critical for TLR9 inhibition, but changes in secondary structure or in ODN aggregation are irrelevant.

  9. A systematic classification of Plasmodium falciparum P-loop NTPases: structural and functional correlation

    PubMed Central

    Gangwar, Deepti; Kalita, Mridul K; Gupta, Dinesh; Chauhan, Virander S; Mohmmed, Asif

    2009-01-01

    Background The P-loop NTPases constitute one of the largest groups of globular protein domains that play highly diverse functional roles in most of the organisms. Even with the availability of nearly 300 different Hidden Markov Models representing the P-loop NTPase superfamily, not many P-loop NTPases are known in Plasmodium falciparum. A number of characteristic attributes of the genome have resulted into the lack of knowledge about this functionally diverse, but important class of proteins. Method In the study, protein sequences with characteristic motifs of NTPase domain (Walker A and Walker B) are computationally extracted from the P. falciparum database. A detailed secondary structure analysis, functional classification, phylogenetic and orthology studies of the NTPase domain of repertoire of 97 P. falciparum P-loop NTPases is carried out. Results Based upon distinct sequence features and secondary structure profile of the P-loop domain of obtained sequences, a cladistic classification is also conceded: nucleotide kinases and GTPases, ABC and SMC family, SF1/2 helicases, AAA+ and AAA protein families. Attempts are made to identify any ortholog(s) for each of these proteins in other Plasmodium sp. as well as its vertebrate host, Homo sapiens. A number of P. falciparum P-loop NTPases that have no homologue in the host, as well as those annotated as hypothetical proteins and lack any characteristic functional domain are identified. Conclusion The study suggests a strong correlation between sequence and secondary structure profile of P-loop domains and functional roles of these proteins and thus provides an opportunity to speculate the role of many hypothetical proteins. The study provides a methodical framework for the characterization of biologically diverse NTPases in the P. falciparum genome. The efforts made in the analysis are first of its kind; and the results augment to explore the functional role of many of these proteins from the parasite that could

  10. Crystal Structures and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Thermophilic Malate Dehydrogenase Reveal Critical Loop Motion for Co-Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huei-Ru; Wu, Szu-Pei; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes the conversion of oxaloacetate and malate by using the NAD/NADH coenzyme system. The system is used as a conjugate for enzyme immunoassays of a wide variety of compounds, such as illegal drugs, drugs used in therapeutic applications and hormones. We elucidated the biochemical and structural features of MDH from Thermus thermophilus (TtMDH) for use in various biotechnological applications. The biochemical characterization of recombinant TtMDH revealed greatly increased activity above 60°C and specific activity of about 2,600 U/mg with optimal temperature of 90°C. Analysis of crystal structures of apo and NAD-bound forms of TtMDH revealed a slight movement of the binding loop and few structural elements around the co-substrate binding packet in the presence of NAD. The overall structures did not change much and retained all related positions, which agrees with the CD analyses. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at higher temperatures were used to reconstruct structures from the crystal structure of TtMDH. Interestingly, at the simulated structure of 353 K, a large change occurred around the active site such that with increasing temperature, a mobile loop was closed to co-substrate binding region. From biochemical characterization, structural comparison and MD simulations, the thermal-induced conformational change of the co-substrate binding loop of TtMDH may contribute to the essential movement of the enzyme for admitting NAD and may benefit the enzyme's activity. PMID:24386145

  11. Adaptive Sliding Mode Control of Dynamic Systems Using Double Loop Recurrent Neural Network Structure.

    PubMed

    Fei, Juntao; Lu, Cheng

    2017-03-06

    In this paper, an adaptive sliding mode control system using a double loop recurrent neural network (DLRNN) structure is proposed for a class of nonlinear dynamic systems. A new three-layer RNN is proposed to approximate unknown dynamics with two different kinds of feedback loops where the firing weights and output signal calculated in the last step are stored and used as the feedback signals in each feedback loop. Since the new structure has combined the advantages of internal feedback NN and external feedback NN, it can acquire the internal state information while the output signal is also captured, thus the new designed DLRNN can achieve better approximation performance compared with the regular NNs without feedback loops or the regular RNNs with a single feedback loop. The new proposed DLRNN structure is employed in an equivalent controller to approximate the unknown nonlinear system dynamics, and the parameters of the DLRNN are updated online by adaptive laws to get favorable approximation performance. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed controller, the designed adaptive sliding mode controller with the DLRNN is applied to a z-axis microelectromechanical system gyroscope to control the vibrating dynamics of the proof mass. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can achieve good tracking property, and the comparisons of the approximation performance between radial basis function NN, RNN, and DLRNN show that the DLRNN can accurately estimate the unknown dynamics with a fast speed while the internal states of DLRNN are more stable.

  12. Loop-length-dependent SVM prediction of domain linkers for high-throughput structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ebina, Teppei; Toh, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    The prediction of structural domains in novel protein sequences is becoming of practical importance. One important area of application is the development of computer-aided techniques for identifying, at a low cost, novel protein domain targets for large-scale functional and structural proteomics. Here, we report a loop-length-dependent support vector machine (SVM) prediction of domain linkers, which are loops separating two structural domains. (DLP-SVM is freely available at: http://www.tuat.ac.jp/ approximately domserv/cgi-bin/DLP-SVM.cgi.) We constructed three loop-length-dependent SVM predictors of domain linkers (SVM-All, SVM-Long and SVM-Short), and also built SVM-Joint, which combines the results of SVM-Short and SVM-Long into a single consolidated prediction. The performances of SVM-Joint were, in most aspects, the highest, with a sensitivity of 59.7% and a specificity of 43.6%, which indicated that the specificity and the sensitivity were improved by over 2 and 3% respectively, when loop-length-dependent characteristics were taken into account. Furthermore, the sensitivity and specificity of SVM-Joint were, respectively, 37.6 and 17.4% higher than those of a random guess, and also superior to those of previously reported domain linker predictors. These results indicate that SVMs can be used to predict domain linkers, and that loop-length-dependent characteristics are useful for improving SVM prediction performances.

  13. Sampling multiple scoring functions can improve protein loop structure prediction accuracy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaohang; Rata, Ionel; Jakobsson, Eric

    2011-07-25

    Accurately predicting loop structures is important for understanding functions of many proteins. In order to obtain loop models with high accuracy, efficiently sampling the loop conformation space to discover reasonable structures is a critical step. In loop conformation sampling, coarse-grain energy (scoring) functions coupling with reduced protein representations are often used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom as well as sampling computational time. However, due to implicitly considering many factors by reduced representations, the coarse-grain scoring functions may have potential insensitivity and inaccuracy, which can mislead the sampling process and consequently ignore important loop conformations. In this paper, we present a new computational sampling approach to obtain reasonable loop backbone models, so-called the Pareto optimal sampling (POS) method. The rationale of the POS method is to sample the function space of multiple, carefully selected scoring functions to discover an ensemble of diversified structures yielding Pareto optimality to all sampled conformations. The POS method can efficiently tolerate insensitivity and inaccuracy in individual scoring functions and thereby lead to significant accuracy improvement in loop structure prediction. We apply the POS method to a set of 4-12-residue loop targets using a function space composed of backbone-only Rosetta and distance-scale finite ideal-gas reference (DFIRE) and a triplet backbone dihedral potential developed in our lab. Our computational results show that in 501 out of 502 targets, the model sets generated by POS contain structure models are within subangstrom resolution. Moreover, the top-ranked models have a root mean square deviation (rmsd) less than 1 A in 96.8, 84.1, and 72.2% of the short (4-6 residues), medium (7-9 residues), and long (10-12 residues) targets, respectively, when the all-atom models are generated by local optimization from the backbone models and are ranked by our

  14. Propagation and localization of electromagnetic waves in quasiperiodic serial loop structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aynaou, H.; El Boudouti, E. H.; El Hassouani, Y.; Akjouj, A.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Vasseur, J.; Benomar, A.; Velasco, V. R.

    2005-11-01

    We study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in one-dimensional quasiperiodic photonic band gap structures made of serial loop structures separated by segments. Different quasiperiodic structures such as Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, Rudin-Shapiro, and double period are investigated with special focus on the Fibonacci structure. Depending on the lengths of the two arms constituting the loops, one can distinguish two particular cases. (i) There are symmetric loop structures, which are shown to be equivalent to impedance-modulated mediums. In this case, it is found that besides the existence of extended and forbidden modes, some narrow frequency bands appear as defect modes in the transmission spectrum inside the gaps. These modes are shown to be localized within only one of the two types of blocks constituting the structure. An analysis of the transmission phase time enables us to derive the group velocity as well as the density of states in these structures. In particular, the stop bands (localized modes) may give rise to unusual (strong normal) dispersion in the gaps, yielding fast (slow) group velocities above (below) the velocity of light. (ii) There are also asymmetric loop structures, where the loops play the role of resonators that may introduce transmission zeros and hence additional gaps unnoticed in the case of simple impedance-modulated mediums. A comparison of the transmission amplitude and phase time of Fibonacci systems with those of other quasiperiodic systems is also outlined. In particular, it was shown that these structures present similar behaviors in the transmission spectra inside the regions of extended modes, whereas they present different localized modes inside the gaps. Experiments and numerical calculations are in very good agreement.

  15. Observations and modeling of the fine structure of loops in the transition region and corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David

    2017-08-01

    The physical dimensions of loops hold important clues to the coronal heating process. Theoretical arguments universally indicate that coronal heating should operate on very small spatial scales and loops should be unresolvable by current instrumentation. There are a number of observational results, however, that suggest that coronal loops are organized on spatial scales of several hundred km. For example, recent observations from IRIS have discovered a new class of low-lying dynamic loops structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFS) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. Here we show that the properties of the UFS (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) are consistent with 1-D non-equilibrium ionization simulations of an impulsively heated single strand, suggesting that they are resolved, and that the distribution of UFS widths implies that like coronal loops they are also structured on a spatial scale of a few hundred km. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, but it is unclear whether the true distribution of loop widths is normalized around this scale, or whether it extends to much smaller scales - perhaps by a power-law - below the resolution of current instruments. We have extended our previous modeling of the cross-field intensity profiles of coronal loops observed by EIS and AIA, to investigate what the modeled profiles would look like at Hi-C resolution, what they would look like if loops are composed only of < 10km threads, and what they would look like if there is a power-law distribution of loop widths. We find that the models with strands on spatial scales of a few hundred km are most consistent with the data. Very small threads do not produce smooth profiles when their properties are driven by the measured temperatures and densities, and the intensity profiles from the power-law simulations are

  16. Effective protein model structure refinement by loop modeling and overall relaxation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu Rie; Heo, Lim; Seok, Chaok

    2016-09-01

    Protein structures predicted by state-of-the-art template-based methods may still have errors when the template proteins are not similar enough to the target protein. Overall target structure may deviate from the template structures owing to differences in sequences. Structural information for some local regions such as loops may not be available when there are sequence insertions or deletions. Those structural aspects that originate from deviations from templates can be dealt with by ab initio structure refinement methods to further improve model accuracy. In the CASP11 refinement experiment, we tested three different refinement methods that utilize overall structure relaxation, loop modeling, and quality assessment of multiple initial structures. From this experiment, we conclude that the overall relaxation method can consistently improve model quality. Loop modeling is the most useful when the initial model structure is high quality, with GDT-HA >60. The method that used multiple initial structures further refined the already refined models; the minor improvements with this method raise the issue of problem with the current energy function. Future research directions are also discussed. Proteins 2016; 84(Suppl 1):293-301. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Co-transcriptional R-loops are the main cause of estrogen-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Stork, Caroline Townsend; Bocek, Michael; Crossley, Madzia P; Sollier, Julie; Sanz, Lionel A; Chédin, Frédéric; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2016-08-23

    The hormone estrogen (E2) binds the estrogen receptor to promote transcription of E2-responsive genes in the breast and other tissues. E2 also has links to genomic instability, and elevated E2 levels are tied to breast cancer. Here, we show that E2 stimulation causes a rapid, global increase in the formation of R-loops, co-transcriptional RNA-DNA products, which in some instances have been linked to DNA damage. We show that E2-dependent R-loop formation and breast cancer rearrangements are highly enriched at E2-responsive genomic loci and that E2 induces DNA replication-dependent double-strand breaks (DSBs). Strikingly, many DSBs that accumulate in response to E2 are R-loop dependent. Thus, R-loops resulting from the E2 transcriptional response are a significant source of DNA damage. This work reveals a novel mechanism by which E2 stimulation leads to genomic instability and highlights how transcriptional programs play an important role in shaping the genomic landscape of DNA damage susceptibility.

  18. Co-transcriptional R-loops are the main cause of estrogen-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Caroline Townsend; Bocek, Michael; Crossley, Madzia P; Sollier, Julie; Sanz, Lionel A; Chédin, Frédéric; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2016-01-01

    The hormone estrogen (E2) binds the estrogen receptor to promote transcription of E2-responsive genes in the breast and other tissues. E2 also has links to genomic instability, and elevated E2 levels are tied to breast cancer. Here, we show that E2 stimulation causes a rapid, global increase in the formation of R-loops, co-transcriptional RNA-DNA products, which in some instances have been linked to DNA damage. We show that E2-dependent R-loop formation and breast cancer rearrangements are highly enriched at E2-responsive genomic loci and that E2 induces DNA replication-dependent double-strand breaks (DSBs). Strikingly, many DSBs that accumulate in response to E2 are R-loop dependent. Thus, R-loops resulting from the E2 transcriptional response are a significant source of DNA damage. This work reveals a novel mechanism by which E2 stimulation leads to genomic instability and highlights how transcriptional programs play an important role in shaping the genomic landscape of DNA damage susceptibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17548.001 PMID:27552054

  19. Determination of the secondary structure of group II bulge loops using the fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine

    PubMed Central

    Dishler, Abigael L.; McMichael, Elizabeth L.; Serra, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Eleven RNA hairpins containing 2-aminopurine (2-AP) in either base-paired or single nucleotide bulge loop positions were optically melted in 1 M NaCl; and, the thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔS°, ΔG°37, and TM for each hairpin were determined. Substitution of 2-AP for an A (adenosine) at a bulge position (where either the 2-AP or A is the bulge) in the stem of a hairpin, does not affect the stability of the hairpin. For group II bulge loops such as AA/U, where there is ambiguity as to which of the A residues is paired with the U, hairpins with 2-AP substituted for either the 5′ or 3′ position in the hairpin stem have similar stability. Fluorescent melts were performed to monitor the environment of the 2-AP. When the 2-AP was located distal to the hairpin loop on either the 5′ or 3′ side of the hairpin stem, the change in fluorescent intensity upon heating was indicative of an unpaired nucleotide. A database of phylogenetically determined RNA secondary structures was examined to explore the presence of naturally occurring bulge loops embedded within a hairpin stem. The distribution of bulge loops is discussed and related to the stability of hairpin structures. PMID:25805856

  20. Fast Protein Loop Sampling and Structure Prediction Using Distance-Guided Sequential Chain-Growth Monte Carlo Method

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ke; Zhang, Jinfeng; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Loops in proteins are flexible regions connecting regular secondary structures. They are often involved in protein functions through interacting with other molecules. The irregularity and flexibility of loops make their structures difficult to determine experimentally and challenging to model computationally. Conformation sampling and energy evaluation are the two key components in loop modeling. We have developed a new method for loop conformation sampling and prediction based on a chain growth sequential Monte Carlo sampling strategy, called Distance-guided Sequential chain-Growth Monte Carlo (DiSGro). With an energy function designed specifically for loops, our method can efficiently generate high quality loop conformations with low energy that are enriched with near-native loop structures. The average minimum global backbone RMSD for 1,000 conformations of 12-residue loops is Å, with a lowest energy RMSD of Å, and an average ensemble RMSD of Å. A novel geometric criterion is applied to speed up calculations. The computational cost of generating 1,000 conformations for each of the x loops in a benchmark dataset is only about cpu minutes for 12-residue loops, compared to ca cpu minutes using the FALCm method. Test results on benchmark datasets show that DiSGro performs comparably or better than previous successful methods, while requiring far less computing time. DiSGro is especially effective in modeling longer loops (– residues). PMID:24763317

  1. The influence of the local sequence environment on RNA loop structures.

    PubMed

    Schudoma, Christian; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Walther, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    RNA folding is assumed to be a hierarchical process. The secondary structure of an RNA molecule, signified by base-pairing and stacking interactions between the paired bases, is formed first. Subsequently, the RNA molecule adopts an energetically favorable three-dimensional conformation in the structural space determined mainly by the rotational degrees of freedom associated with the backbone of regions of unpaired nucleotides (loops). To what extent the backbone conformation of RNA loops also results from interactions within the local sequence context or rather follows global optimization constraints alone has not been addressed yet. Because the majority of base stacking interactions are exerted locally, a critical influence of local sequence on local structure appears plausible. Thus, local loop structure ought to be predictable, at least in part, from the local sequence context alone. To test this hypothesis, we used Random Forests on a nonredundant data set of unpaired nucleotides extracted from 97 X-ray structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to predict discrete backbone angle conformations given by the discretized η/θ-pseudo-torsional space. Predictions on balanced sets with four to six conformational classes using local sequence information yielded average accuracies of up to 55%, thus significantly better than expected by chance (17%-25%). Bases close to the central nucleotide appear to be most tightly linked to its conformation. Our results suggest that RNA loop structure does not only depend on long-range base-pairing interactions; instead, it appears that local sequence context exerts a significant influence on the formation of the local loop structure.

  2. Application of phase-lock loops to periodic disturbance rejection in smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algrain, Marcelo C.; Ehlers, Douglas E.; Hardt, Steven L.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents a simple, effective and economical system capable of suppressing periodic vibration (external or self induced) affecting a structure or payload. The approach used integrates piezoelectric materials/actuators, sensors, and low-cost electronics in a novel way. The key innovation is the use of phase-lock-loops (PLL) and switch capacitor filters (SCF) for the on-line identification, tracking and control of periodic vibration. This method concentrates its control action at those frequencies where periodic vibration is detected. Among the advantages of this approach are: it is conceptually simple, easily expandable and modular; the controller does not rely on a model of the structure, and it only needs some approximate notion of the frequency range where the periodic disturbances are expected to occur; it is robust and can be operated at high gain without loss of stability; it is not significantly affected by the presence of random vibration or sensor noise; and it can be implemented with inexpensive electronics. The effectiveness of this new approach was experimentally evaluated using a test unit consisting of a simple structure, accelerometers and Terfenol-D actuators. The structure was excited by driving one of the actuator with sinusoidal and random signals. The resulting periodic disturbances were measured using the accelerometers. The acceleration signals were passed though a bank of PLLs and associated SCFs to detect the fundamental frequency and harmonics. This information was used to drive another actuator that rejected the original disturbances, and attenuation levels as high as 30 dB were achieved.

  3. A phase-lock-loop-based control system for suppressing periodic vibration in smart structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algrain, Marcelo; Hardt, Steve; Ehlers, Douglas

    1997-02-01

    This paper presents a simple, effective and economical system capable of suppressing periodic vibration (external or self-induced) affecting a structure or payload. The approach used integrates piezoelectric materials/actuators, sensors and low-cost electronics in a novel way. The key innovation is the use of phase-lock loops (PLLs) and switch-capacitor filters (SCFs) for the on-line identification, tracking and control of periodic vibration. This method concentrates its control action at those frequencies where periodic vibration is detected. Among the advantages of this approach are the following: it is conceptually simple, easily expandable and modular; the controller does not rely on a model of the structure and it only needs some approximate notion of the frequency range where the periodic disturbances are expected to occur; it is robust and can be operated at high gain without loss of stability; it is not significantly affected by the presence of random vibration or sensor noise and it can be implemented with inexpensive electronics. The effectiveness of this new approach was experimentally evaluated using a test unit consisting of a simple structure, accelerometers and Terfenol-D actuators. The structure was excited by driving one of the actuators with sinusoidal and random signals. The resulting periodic disturbances were measured using the accelerometers. The acceleration signals were passed though a bank of PLLs and associated SCFs to detect the fundamental frequency and harmonics. This information was used to drive another actuator that rejected the original disturbances, and attenuation levels as high as 30 dB were achieved.

  4. Stem-loop structures of the repetitive DNA sequences located at human centromeres

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Garcia, A.E.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.K.; Catasti, P.; Hong, Lin; Yau, P.; Bradbury, E.M. |

    1993-09-01

    The presence of the highly conserved repetitive DNA sequences in the human centromeres argues for a special role of these sequences in their biological functions - most likely achieved by the formation of unusual structures. This prompted us to carry out quantitative one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (lD/2D NMR) spectroscopy to determine the structural properties of the human centromeric repeats, d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}. The studies on centromeric DNAs reveal that the complementary sequence, d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}, adopts the usual Watson-Crick B-DNA duplex and the pyrimidine-rich d(CCATT){sub n} strand is essentially a random coil. However, the purine-rich d(AATGG){sub n} strand is shown to adopt unusual stem-loop structures for repeat lengths, n=2,3,4, and 6. In addition to normal Watson-Crick A{center_dot}T pairs, the stem-loop structures are stabilized by mismatch A{center_dot}G and G{center_dot}G pairs in the stem and G-G-A stacking in the loop. Stem-loop structures of d(AATGG)n are independently verified by gel electrophoresis and nuclease digestion studies. Thermal melting studies show that the DNA repeats, d(AATGG){sub n}, are as stable as the corresponding Watson-Crick duplex d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}. Therefore, the sequence d(AATGG){sub n} can, indeed, nucleate a stem-loop structure at little free-energy cost and if, during mitosis, they are located on the chromosome surface they can provide specific recognition sites for kinetochore function.

  5. Closed-loop structural stability for linear-quadratic optimal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, P. K.; Athans, M.

    1976-01-01

    This paper contains an explicit parameterization of a subclass of linear constant gain feedback maps that will not destabilize an originally open-loop stable system. These results can then be used to obtain several new structural stability results for multi-input linear-quadratic feedback optimal designs.

  6. Towards the use of Structural Loop Analysis to Study System Behaviour of Socio-Ecological Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abram, Joseph; Dyke, James

    2016-04-01

    Maintaining socio-ecological systems in desirable states is key to developing a growing economy, alleviating poverty and achieving a sustainable future. While the driving forces of an environmental system are often well known, the dynamics impacting these drivers can be hidden within a tangled structure of causal chains and feedback loops. A lack of understanding of a system's dynamic structure and its influence on a system's behaviour can cause unforeseen side-effects during model scenario testing and policy implementation. Structural Loop analysis of socio-ecological system models identifies dominant feedback structures during times of behavioural shift, allowing the user to monitor key influential drivers during model simulation. This work carries out Loop Eigenvalue Elasticity Analysis (LEEA) on three system dynamic models, exploring tipping points in lake systems undergoing eutrophication. The purpose is to explore the potential benefits and limitations of the technique in the field of socio-ecology. The LEEA technique shows promise for socio-ecological systems which undergo regime shifts or express oscillatory trends, but shows limited usefulness with large models. The results of this work highlight changes in feedback loop dominance, years prior to eutrophic tipping events in lake systems. LEEA could be used as an early warning signal to impending system changes, complementary to other known early warning signals. This approach could improve our understanding during critical times of a system's behaviour, changing how we approach model analysis and the way scenario testing and policy implementation are addressed in socio-ecological system models.

  7. Nucleobase azide-ethynylribose click chemistry contributes to stabilizing oligonucleotide duplexes and stem-loop structures.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Asakura, Ryo; Terazawa, Koki; Shibata, Aya; Ikeda, Masato; Kitade, Yukio

    2017-06-15

    The formation of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles through copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) in oligonucleotides bearing 1-deoxy-1-ethynyl-β-d-ribofuranose (R(E)) can have a positive impact on the stability of oligonucleotide duplexes and stem-loop structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology in large elongate meander loops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although the dynamics of meandering rivers have been the focus of considerable research, few studies have examined the three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology within elongate loops of large meandering channels. The present study focuses on the spatial patterns of three-dimensional flow s...

  9. Exploring the Structure-Function Loop Adaptability of a (β/α)(8)-Barrel Enzyme through Loop Swapping and Hinge Variability.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián; Barona-Gómez, Francisco; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Verdel-Aranda, Karina; Sánchez, Filiberto; Soberón, Xavier

    2011-08-05

    Evolution of proteins involves sequence changes that are frequently localized at loop regions, revealing their important role in natural evolution. However, the development of strategies to understand and imitate such events constitutes a challenge to design novel enzymes in the laboratory. In this study, we show how to adapt loop swapping as semiautonomous units of functional groups in an enzyme with the (β/α)(8)-barrel and how this functional adaptation can be measured in vivo. To mimic the natural mechanism providing loop variability in antibodies, we developed an overlap PCR strategy. This includes introduction of sequence diversity at two hinge residues, which connect the new loops with the rest of the protein scaffold, and we demonstrate that this is necessary for a successful exploration of functional sequence space. This design allowed us to explore the sequence requirements to functional adaptation of each loop replacement that may not be sampled otherwise. Libraries generated following this strategy were evaluated in terms of their folding competence and their functional proficiency, an observation that was formalized as a Structure-Function Loop Adaptability value. Molecular details about the function and structure of some variants were obtained by enzyme kinetics and circular dichroism. This strategy yields functional variants that retain the original activity at higher frequencies, suggesting a new strategy for protein engineering that incorporates a more divergent sequence exploration beyond that limited to point mutations. We discuss how this approach may provide insights into the mechanism of enzyme evolution and function.

  10. Solar Corona Loop Studies with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. I. Cross-sectional Temperature Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Boerner, Paul

    2011-05-01

    We present a first systematic study on the cross-sectional temperature structure of coronal loops using the six coronal temperature filters of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We analyze a sample of 100 loop snapshots measured at 10 different locations and 10 different times in active region NOAA 11089 on 2010 July 24, 21:00-22:00 UT. The cross-sectional flux profiles are measured and a cospatial background is subtracted in six filters in a temperature range of T ≈ 0.5-16 MK, and four different parameterizations of differential emission measure (DEM) distributions are fitted. We find that the reconstructed DEMs consist predominantly of narrowband peak temperature components with a thermal width of σlog (T) <= 0.11 ± 0.02, close to the temperature resolution limit of the instrument, consistent with earlier triple-filter analysis from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer by Aschwanden & Nightingale and from EIS/Hinode by Warren et al. or Tripathi et al. We find that 66% of the loops could be fitted with a narrowband single-Gaussian DEM model, and 19% with a DEM consisting of two narrowband Gaussians (which mostly result from pairs of intersecting loops along the same line of sight). The mostly isothermal loop DEMs allow us also to derive an improved empirical response function of the AIA 94 Å filter, which needs to be boosted by a factor of q 94 = 6.7 ± 1.7 for temperatures at log (T) <~ 6.3. The main result of near-isothermal loop cross-sections is not consistent with the predictions of standard nanoflare scenarios, but can be explained by flare-like heating mechanisms that drive chromospheric evaporation and upflows of heated plasma coherently over loop cross-sections of w ≈ 2-4 Mm.

  11. Segmental movement: definition of the structural requirements for loop closure in catalysis by triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Sampson, N S; Knowles, J R

    1992-09-15

    To determine what drives the closure of the active-site loop in the reaction catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase, several residues involved in hydrogen bonding between the loop and the bulk of the protein have been altered. It was known from earlier work that the loop serves two functions: to stabilize the reaction intermediate (and the two transition states that flank it) and to prevent the loss of this unstable species into free solution. To discover what elements of the protein are necessary for proper closure of the loop, selective destabilization of the "open" and the "closed" forms of the enzyme with respect to one another has been attempted. The mutant Y164F isomerase has been prepared to evaluate the importance of the structure of the "open" form, and the mutant E129Q, Y208F, and S211A enzymes have allowed investigation of the "closed" form. The integrity of the loop itself has been destabilized by making the T172A isomerase. We have found that only those mutations that destabilize the "closed" form of the enzyme significantly perturb the catalytic properties of the isomerase. The second-order rate constants (kcat/Km) of the S211A and E129Q enzymes are reduced 30-fold, and that of the mutant Y208F enzyme is reduced 2000-fold, from the level of the wild-type enzyme. The dramatic drop in activity of the Y208F enzyme is accompanied by a 200-fold increase in the dissociation constant of the intermediate analogue phosphoglycolohydroxamate. The most important property of the mobile loop of triosephosphate isomerase lies, therefore, in the stability of the system when the active site contains ligand and the loop is closed.

  12. Structural basis of transcription: role of the trigger loop in substrate specificity and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Bushnell, David A.; Westover, Kenneth D.; Kaplan, Craig D.; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2007-01-01

    Summary New structures of RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcribing complexes reveal a likely key to transcription. The trigger loop swings beneath a correct nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) in the nucleotide addition site, closing off the active center, and forming an extensive network of interactions with the NTP base, sugar, phosphates, and additional pol II residues. A histidine side chain in the trigger loop, precisely positioned by these interactions, may literally “trigger” phosphodiester bond formation. Recognition and catalysis are thus coupled, ensuring the fidelity of transcription. PMID:17129781

  13. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section and length is developed for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  14. Structural basis of transcription: role of the trigger loop in substrate specificity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Bushnell, David A; Westover, Kenneth D; Kaplan, Craig D; Kornberg, Roger D

    2006-12-01

    New structures of RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcribing complexes reveal a likely key to transcription. The trigger loop swings beneath a correct nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) in the nucleotide addition site, closing off the active center and forming an extensive network of interactions with the NTP base, sugar, phosphates, and additional pol II residues. A histidine side chain in the trigger loop, precisely positioned by these interactions, may literally "trigger" phosphodiester bond formation. Recognition and catalysis are thus coupled, ensuring the fidelity of transcription.

  15. The DE and FG loops of the HPV major capsid protein contribute to the epitopes of vaccine-induced cross-neutralising antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Sara L.; Godi, Anna; Beddows, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines consist of major capsid protein (L1) virus-like particles (VLP) and are highly efficacious against the development of cervical cancer precursors attributable to oncogenic genotypes, HPV16 and HPV18. A degree of vaccine-induced cross-protection has also been demonstrated against genetically-related genotypes in the Alpha-7 (HPV18-like) and Alpha-9 (HPV16-like) species groups which is coincident with the detection of L1 cross-neutralising antibodies. In this study the L1 domains recognised by inter-genotype cross-neutralising antibodies were delineated. L1 crystallographic homology models predicted a degree of structural diversity between the L1 loops of HPV16 and the non-vaccine Alpha-9 genotypes. These structural predictions informed the design of chimeric pseudovirions with inter-genotype loop swaps which demonstrated that the L1 domains recognised by inter-genotype cross-neutralising antibodies comprise residues within the DE loop and the late region of the FG loop. These data contribute to our understanding of the L1 domains recognised by vaccine-induced cross-neutralising antibodies. Such specificities may play a critical role in vaccine-induced cross-protection. PMID:28004837

  16. The DE and FG loops of the HPV major capsid protein contribute to the epitopes of vaccine-induced cross-neutralising antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Sara L; Godi, Anna; Beddows, Simon

    2016-12-22

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines consist of major capsid protein (L1) virus-like particles (VLP) and are highly efficacious against the development of cervical cancer precursors attributable to oncogenic genotypes, HPV16 and HPV18. A degree of vaccine-induced cross-protection has also been demonstrated against genetically-related genotypes in the Alpha-7 (HPV18-like) and Alpha-9 (HPV16-like) species groups which is coincident with the detection of L1 cross-neutralising antibodies. In this study the L1 domains recognised by inter-genotype cross-neutralising antibodies were delineated. L1 crystallographic homology models predicted a degree of structural diversity between the L1 loops of HPV16 and the non-vaccine Alpha-9 genotypes. These structural predictions informed the design of chimeric pseudovirions with inter-genotype loop swaps which demonstrated that the L1 domains recognised by inter-genotype cross-neutralising antibodies comprise residues within the DE loop and the late region of the FG loop. These data contribute to our understanding of the L1 domains recognised by vaccine-induced cross-neutralising antibodies. Such specificities may play a critical role in vaccine-induced cross-protection.

  17. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops.

  18. Loop-induced photon spectral lines from neutralino annihilation in the NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalons, G.; Semenov, A.

    2011-12-01

    We have computed the loop-induced processes of neutralino annihilation into two photons and, for the first time, into a photon and a Z 0 boson in the framework of the NMSSM. The photons produced from these radiative modes are monochromatic and possess a clear "smoking gun" experimental signature. This numerical analysis has been done with the help of the SloopS code, initially developed for automatic one-loop calculation in the MSSM. We have computed the rates for different benchmark points coming from SUGRA and GMSB soft SUSY breaking scenarios and compared them with the MSSM. We comment on how this signal can be enhanced, with respect to the MSSM, especially in the low mass region of the neutralino. We also discuss the possibility of this observable to constrain the NMSSM parameter space, taking into account the latest limits from the FERMI collaboration on these two modes.

  19. Curcumin improves synaptic plasticity impairment induced by HIV-1gp120 V3 loop

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ling-ling; Jiang, Ming-liang; Liu, Si-si; Cai, Min-chun; Hong, Zhong-qiu; Lin, Li-qing; Xing, Yan-yan; Chen, Gui-lin; Pan, Rui; Yang, Li-juan; Xu, Ying; Dong, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has been shown to significantly improve spatial memory impairment induced by HIV-1 gp120 V3 in rats, but the electrophysiological mechanism remains unknown. Using extracellular microelectrode recording techniques, this study confirmed that the gp120 V3 loop could suppress long-term potentiation in the rat hippocampal CA1 region and synaptic plasticity, and that curcumin could antagonize these inhibitory effects. Using a Fura-2/AM calcium ion probe, we found that curcumin resisted the effects of the gp120 V3 loop on hippocampal synaptosomes and decreased Ca2+ concentration in synaptosomes. This effect of curcumin was identical to nimodipine, suggesting that curcumin improved the inhibitory effects of gp120 on synaptic plasticity, ameliorated damage caused to the central nervous system, and might be a potential neuroprotective drug. PMID:26199609

  20. The use of R-looping for structural gene identification and mRNA purification.

    PubMed Central

    Woolford, J L; Rosbash, M

    1979-01-01

    A method is presented for the purification of mRNAs and the identification of structural gene sequences in recombinant DNA molecules. RNA is hybridized to double-stranded linear DNA such that R-loops are formed between most DNAs and their complementary RNA sequences. These R-loops are purified from unhybridized RNAs by gel filtration chromatography in the presence of a high concentration of salt. The complementary RNAs are released from the R-loops by heating, and are assayed by gel electrophoresis or cell free translation to determine their purity and to identify the proteins for which they code. We have demonstrated that recombinant DNAs containing sequences for abundant or moderately abundant mRNAs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be identified by this means. Images PMID:379820

  1. Structure-Function Model for Kissing Loop Interactions That Initiate Dimerization of Ty1 RNA.

    PubMed

    Gamache, Eric R; Doh, Jung H; Ritz, Justin; Laederach, Alain; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Mathews, David H; Curcio, M Joan

    2017-04-26

    The genomic RNA of the retrotransposon Ty1 is packaged as a dimer into virus-like particles. The 5' terminus of Ty1 RNA harbors cis-acting sequences required for translation initiation, packaging and initiation of reverse transcription (TIPIRT). To identify RNA motifs involved in dimerization and packaging, a structural model of the TIPIRT domain in vitro was developed from single-nucleotide resolution RNA structural data. In general agreement with previous models, the first 326 nucleotides of Ty1 RNA form a pseudoknot with a 7-bp stem (S1), a 1-nucleotide interhelical loop and an 8-bp stem (S2) that delineate two long, structured loops. Nucleotide substitutions that disrupt either pseudoknot stem greatly reduced helper-Ty1-mediated retrotransposition of a mini-Ty1, but only mutations in S2 destabilized mini-Ty1 RNA in cis and helper-Ty1 RNA in trans. Nested in different loops of the pseudoknot are two hairpins with complementary 7-nucleotide motifs at their apices. Nucleotide substitutions in either motif also reduced retrotransposition and destabilized mini- and helper-Ty1 RNA. Compensatory mutations that restore base-pairing in the S2 stem or between the hairpins rescued retrotransposition and RNA stability in cis and trans. These data inform a model whereby a Ty1 RNA kissing complex with two intermolecular kissing-loop interactions initiates dimerization and packaging.

  2. Structure-Function Model for Kissing Loop Interactions That Initiate Dimerization of Ty1 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gamache, Eric R.; Doh, Jung H.; Ritz, Justin; Laederach, Alain; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Mathews, David H.; Curcio, M. Joan

    2017-01-01

    The genomic RNA of the retrotransposon Ty1 is packaged as a dimer into virus-like particles. The 5′ terminus of Ty1 RNA harbors cis-acting sequences required for translation initiation, packaging and initiation of reverse transcription (TIPIRT). To identify RNA motifs involved in dimerization and packaging, a structural model of the TIPIRT domain in vitro was developed from single-nucleotide resolution RNA structural data. In general agreement with previous models, the first 326 nucleotides of Ty1 RNA form a pseudoknot with a 7-bp stem (S1), a 1-nucleotide interhelical loop and an 8-bp stem (S2) that delineate two long, structured loops. Nucleotide substitutions that disrupt either pseudoknot stem greatly reduced helper-Ty1-mediated retrotransposition of a mini-Ty1, but only mutations in S2 destabilized mini-Ty1 RNA in cis and helper-Ty1 RNA in trans. Nested in different loops of the pseudoknot are two hairpins with complementary 7-nucleotide motifs at their apices. Nucleotide substitutions in either motif also reduced retrotransposition and destabilized mini- and helper-Ty1 RNA. Compensatory mutations that restore base-pairing in the S2 stem or between the hairpins rescued retrotransposition and RNA stability in cis and trans. These data inform a model whereby a Ty1 RNA kissing complex with two intermolecular kissing-loop interactions initiates dimerization and packaging. PMID:28445416

  3. Behaviour of oscillations in loop structures above active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, D. Y.; Kobanov, N. I.; Chelpanov, A. A.; Kochanov, A. A.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Chupin, S. A.; Myshyakov, I. I.; Tomin, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we combine the multiwavelength ultraviolet-optical (Solar Dynamics Observatory, SDO) and radio (Nobeyama Radioheliograph, NoRH) observations to get further insight into space-frequency distribution of oscillations at different atmospheric levels of the Sun. We processed the observational data on NOAA 11711 active region and found oscillations propagating from the photospheric level through the transition region upward into the corona. The power maps of low-frequency (1-2 mHz) oscillations reproduce well the fan-like coronal structures visible in the Fe IX 171 Å line. High frequency oscillations (5-7 mHz) propagate along the vertical magnetic field lines and concentrate inside small-scale elements in the umbra and at the umbra-penumbra boundary. We investigated the dependence of the dominant oscillation frequency upon the distance from the sunspot barycentre to estimate inclination of magnetic tubes in higher levels of sunspots where it cannot be measured directly, and found that this angle is close to 40° above the umbra boundaries in the transition region.

  4. NMR structure of the A730 loop of the Neurospora VS ribozyme: insights into the formation of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Legault, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    The Neurospora VS ribozyme is a small nucleolytic ribozyme with unique primary, secondary and global tertiary structures, which displays mechanistic similarities to the hairpin ribozyme. Here, we determined the high-resolution NMR structure of a stem–loop VI fragment containing the A730 internal loop, which forms part of the active site. In the presence of magnesium ions, the A730 loop adopts a structure that is consistent with existing biochemical data and most likely reflects its conformation in the VS ribozyme prior to docking with the cleavage site internal loop. Interestingly, the A730 loop adopts an S-turn motif that is also present in loop B within the hairpin ribozyme active site. The S-turn appears necessary to expose the Watson–Crick edge of a catalytically important residue (A756) so that it can fulfill its role in catalysis. The A730 loop and the cleavage site loop of the VS ribozyme display structural similarities to internal loops found in the active site of the hairpin ribozyme. These similarities provided a rationale to build a model of the VS ribozyme active site based on the crystal structure of the hairpin ribozyme. PMID:21266483

  5. Predicting structure and stability for RNA complexes with intermolecular loop–loop base-pairing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2014-01-01

    RNA loop–loop interactions are essential for genomic RNA dimerization and regulation of gene expression. In this article, a statistical mechanics-based computational method that predicts the structures and thermodynamic stabilities of RNA complexes with loop–loop kissing interactions is described. The method accounts for the entropy changes for the formation of loop–loop interactions, which is a notable advancement that other computational models have neglected. Benchmark tests with several experimentally validated systems show that the inclusion of the entropy parameters can indeed improve predictions for RNA complexes. Furthermore, the method can predict not only the native structures of RNA/RNA complexes but also alternative metastable structures. For instance, the model predicts that the SL1 domain of HIV-1 RNA can form two different dimer structures with similar stabilities. The prediction is consistent with experimental observation. In addition, the model predicts two different binding sites for hTR dimerization: One binding site has been experimentally proposed, and the other structure, which has a higher stability, is structurally feasible and needs further experimental validation. PMID:24751648

  6. Ricin A-chain substrate specificity in RNA, DNA, and hybrid stem-loop structures.

    PubMed

    Amukele, Tim K; Schramm, Vern L

    2004-05-04

    Ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) is the catalytic subunit of ricin, a heterodimeric toxin from castor beans. Its ribosomal inactivating activity arises from depurination of a single adenine from position A(4324) in a GAGA tetraloop from 28S ribosomal RNA. Minimal substrate requirements are the GAGA tetraloop and stem of two or more base pairs. Depurination activity also occurs on stem-loop DNA with the same sequence, but with the k(cat) reduced 200-fold. Systematic variation of RNA 5'-G(1)C(2)G(3)C(4)[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)]G(9)C(10)G(11)C(12)-3' 12mers via replacement of each nucleotide in the tetraloop with a deoxynucleotide showed a 16-fold increase in k(cat) for A(6) --> dA(6) but reduced k(cat) up to 300-fold for the other sites. Methylation of individual 2'-hydroxyls in a similar experiment reduced k(cat) by as much as 3 x 10(-3)-fold. In stem-loop DNA, replacement of d[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)] with individual ribonucleotides resulted in small kinetic changes, except for the dA(6) --> A(6) replacement for which k(cat) decreased 6-fold. Insertion of d[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)] into an RNA stem-loop or G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8) into a DNA stem-loop reduced k(cat) by 30- and 5-fold, respectively. Multiple substitutions of deoxyribonucleotides into RNA stem-loops in one case (dG(5),dG(7)) decreased k(cat)/K(m) by 10(5)-fold, while a second change (dG(5),dA(8)) decreased k(cat) by 100-fold. Mapping these interactions on the structure of GAGA stem-loop RNA suggests that all the loop 2'-hydroxyl groups play a significant role in the action of ricin A-chain. Improved binding of RNA-DNA stem-loop hybrids provides a scaffold for inhibitor design. Replacing the adenosine of the RTA depurination site with deoxyadenosine in a small RNA stem-loop increased k(cat) 20-fold to 1660 min(-1), a value similar to RTA's k(cat) on intact ribosomes.

  7. Experimental observations of the coupling between induced currents and mechanical motion in torsionally supported square loops and plates

    SciTech Connect

    Bialek, J.M.; Cargulia, G.J.; Ulrickson, M.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-11-01

    A series of experiments that were successfully conducted to investigate the coupling between induced currents and rigid body rotation in square loops and plates is presented. The experimental arrangement consisted of a conducting test piece, rigidly mounted in a nonconducting fixture that provided a controlled stiffness against rotation. Electric current were induced in the test loop/plate by pulsing a magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the test piece. This was done in the presence of a constant magnetic field oriented parallel to the loop/plate. The interaction of the induced currents and the background magnetic field produced a net torque about the axis of the test fixture. Measurements were made of the total current flowing around the test piece and the angular rotation versus time. The observed data exhibited the magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness effects that arise in coupled systems and agreed very well with the predicted responses for both the loops and plates.

  8. Flap loop of GluD2 binds to Cbln1 and induces presynaptic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Tomoaki; Hirano, Tomoo

    2010-07-30

    Glutamate receptor delta2 (GluD2) is selectively expressed on the postsynaptic spines at parallel-fiber (PF)-Purkinje neuron (PN) synapses. GluD2 knockout mice show a reduced number of PF-PN synapses, suggesting that GluD2 is involved in synapse formation. Recent studies revealed that GluD2 induces presynaptic differentiation in a manner dependent on its N-terminal domain (NTD) through binding of Cbln1 secreted from cerebellar granule neurons. However, the underlying mechanism of the specific binding of the NTD to Cbln1 remains elusive. Here, we have identified the flap loop (Arg321-Trp339) in the NTD of GluD2 (GluD2-NTD) as a crucial region for the binding to Cbln1 and the induction of presynaptic differentiation. Both induction of presynaptic differentiation and binding of Cbln1 were abolished in the HEK cells expressing not wild-type GluD2 but GluD2 with mutations in the flap loop. Especially, single amino acid substitution of either Arg321 or Trp323 to alanine was sufficient to disable the GluD2 function. Finally, a homology model of GluD2-NTD suggested that the flap loop is located at the distal end, which appears consistent with an interaction with Cbln1 and a presynaptic varicosity.

  9. Loop structures in the 5' untranslated region and antisense RNA mediate pilE gene expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thao L; Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A

    2016-11-01

    Regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilE gene is ill-defined. In this study, post-transcriptional effects on expression were assessed. In silico analysis predicts the formation of three putative stable stem-loop structures with favourable free energies within the 5' untranslated region of the pilE message. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analyses, we show that each loop structure forms, with introduced destabilizing stem-loop mutations diminishing loop stability. Utilizing a series of pilE translational fusions, deletion of either loop 1 or loop 2 caused a significant reduction of pilE mRNA resulting in reduced expression of the reporter gene. Consequently, the formation of the loops apparently protects the pilE transcript from degradation. Putative loop 3 contains the pilE ribosomal binding site. Consequently, its formation may influence translation. Analysis of a small RNA transcriptome revealed an antisense RNA being produced upstream of the pilE promoter that is predicted to hybridize across the 5' untranslated region loops. Insertional mutants were created where the antisense RNA is not transcribed. In these mutants, pilE transcript levels are greatly diminished, with any residual message apparently not being translated. Complementation of these insertion mutants in trans with the antisense RNA gene facilitates pilE translation yielding a pilus + phenotype. Overall, this study demonstrates a complex relationship between loop-dependent transcript protection and antisense RNA in modulating pilE expression levels.

  10. Determination of the acceleration region size in a loop-structured solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Emslie, A. G.; Kontar, E. P.; Benvenuto, F.; Massone, A. M.; Piana, M.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: To study the acceleration and propagation of bremsstrahlung-producing electrons in solar flares, we analyze the evolution of the flare loop size with respect to energy at a variety of times. A GOES M3.7 loop-structured flare starting around 23:55 on 2002 April 14 is studied in detail using Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations. Methods: We construct photon and mean-electron-flux maps in 2-keV energy bins by processing observationally-deduced photon and electron visibilities, respectively, through several image-processing methods: a visibility-based forward-fit (FWD) algorithm, a maximum entropy (MEM) procedure and the uv-smooth (UVS) approach. We estimate the sizes of elongated flares (i.e., the length and width of flaring loops) by calculating the second normalized moments of the intensity in any given map. Employing a collisional model with an extended acceleration region, we fit the loop lengths as a function of energy in both the photon and electron domains. Results: The resulting fitting parameters allow us to estimate the extent of the acceleration region which is between ~ 13 arcsec and ~19 arcsec. Both forward-fit and uv-smooth algorithms provide substantially similar results with a systematically better fit in the electron domain. Conclusions: The consistency of the estimates from these methods provides strong support that the model can reliably determine geometric parameters of the acceleration region. The acceleration region is estimated to be a substantial fraction (~1/2) of the loop extent, indicating that this dense flaring loop incorporates both acceleration and transport of electrons, with concurrent thick-target bremsstrahlung emission.

  11. Closed-Loop Performance Measures for Flight Controllers Subject to Neutron-Induced Upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, W. Steven; Zhang, Hong; Gonzalex, Oscar R.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed that atmospheric neutrons can produce single event upsets in digital flight control hardware. The phenomenon has been studied extensively at the chip level, and now system level experiments are underway. In this paper analytical closed-loop performance measures for the tracking error are developed for a plant that is stabilized by a recoverable computer system subject to neutron induced upsets. The underlying model is a Markov jump-linear system with process noise. The steady-state tracking error is expressed in terms of a generalized observability Gramian.

  12. Dissecting protein loops with a statistical scalpel suggests a functional implication of some structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the strategies for protein function annotation is to search particular structural motifs that are known to be shared by proteins with a given function. Results Here, we present a systematic extraction of structural motifs of seven residues from protein loops and we explore their correspondence with functional sites. Our approach is based on the structural alphabet HMM-SA (Hidden Markov Model - Structural Alphabet), which allows simplification of protein structures into uni-dimensional sequences, and advanced pattern statistics adapted to short sequences. Structural motifs of interest are selected by looking for structural motifs significantly over-represented in SCOP superfamilies in protein loops. We discovered two types of structural motifs significantly over-represented in SCOP superfamilies: (i) ubiquitous motifs, shared by several superfamilies and (ii) superfamily-specific motifs, over-represented in few superfamilies. A comparison of ubiquitous words with known small structural motifs shows that they contain well-described motifs as turn, niche or nest motifs. A comparison between superfamily-specific motifs and biological annotations of Swiss-Prot reveals that some of them actually correspond to functional sites involved in the binding sites of small ligands, such as ATP/GTP, NAD(P) and SAH/SAM. Conclusions Our findings show that statistical over-representation in SCOP superfamilies is linked to functional features. The detection of over-represented motifs within structures simplified by HMM-SA is therefore a promising approach for prediction of functional sites and annotation of uncharacterized proteins. PMID:21689388

  13. Alteration of Sugar-Induced Conformational Changes of the Melibiose Permease by Mutating Arg141 in Loop 4-5

    PubMed Central

    León, Xavier; Leblanc, Gérard; Padrós, Esteve

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The melibiose permease (MelB) from Escherichia coli couples the uptake of melibiose to that of Na+, Li+, or H+. In this work, we applied attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) difference spectroscopy to obtain information about the structural changes involved in substrate interaction with the R141C mutant and with the wild-type MelB reacted with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). These modified permeases have the ability to bind the substrates but fail to transport them. It is shown that the sugar-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectra of the R141C mutant are different from those corresponding to the Cys-less permease from which it is derived. There are alterations of peaks assigned to turns and β-structures located most likely in loop 4-5. In addition, and quite notably, a peak at 1659 cm−1, assigned to changes at the level of one α-helix subpopulation, disappears in the melibiose-induced difference spectrum in the presence of Na+, suggesting a reduction of the conformational change capacity of the mutated MelB. These helices may involve structural components that couple the cation- and sugar-binding sites. On the other hand, MelB-NEM difference spectra are proportionally less disrupted than the R141C ones. Hence, the transport cycle of these two permeases, modified at two different loops, is most likely impaired at a different stage. It is proposed that the R141C mutant leads to the generation of a partially defective ternary complex that is unable to catalyze the subsequent conformational change necessary for substrate translocation. PMID:19527646

  14. Characterizing the existing and potential structural space of proteins by large-scale multiple loop permutations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Liang; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide structural genomics projects are increasing structure coverage of sequence space but have not significantly expanded the protein structure space itself (i.e. number of unique structural folds) since 2007. Discovering new structural folds experimentally by directed evolution and random recombination of secondary-structure blocks is also proved rarely successful. Meanwhile, previous computational efforts for large-scale mapping of protein structure space are limited to simple model proteins and led to an inconclusive answer on the completeness of the existing, observed protein structure space. Here, we build novel protein structures by extending naturally occurring circular (single-loop) permutation to multiple-loop permutations (MLP). These structures are clustered by structural similarity measure called TM-Score. The computational technique allows us to produce different structural clusters on the same naturally occurring, packed, stable core but with alternatively connected secondary-structure segments. A large-scale MLP of 2936 SCOP domains reproduces those existing structural clusters (63%) mostly as hubs for many non-redundant sequences and illustrates newly discovered novel clusters as islands adopted by a few sequences only. Results further show that there exist a significant number of novel, potentially stable clusters for medium or large-size single-domain proteins, in particular (>100 amino-acid residues) that are either not yet adopted by nature or adopted only by a few sequences. This study suggests that MLP provides a simple yet highly effective tool for engineering and design of novel protein structures (including naturally knotted proteins). The implication of recovering CASP new-fold targets by MLP on template-based structure prediction is also discussed. Our MLP structures are available for download at the publication page of the website http://sparks.informatics.iupui.edu. PMID:21376059

  15. Determining the 3D Structure of the Corona Using Vertical Height Constraints on Observed Active Region Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Hu, Qiang; Lee, Jong Kwan; Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2014-10-01

    The corona associated with an active region is structured by high-temperature, magnetically dominated closed and open loops. The projected 2D geometry of these loops is captured in EUV filtergrams. In this study using SDO/AIA 171 Å filtergrams, we expand our previous method to derive the 3D structure of these loops, independent of heliostereoscopy. We employ an automated loop recognition scheme (Occult-2) and fit the extracted loops with 2D cubic Bézier splines. Utilizing SDO/HMI magnetograms, we extrapolate the magnetic field to obtain simple field models within a rectangular cuboid. Using these models, we minimize the misalignment angle with respect to Bézier control points to extend the splines to 3D (Gary, Hu, and Lee 2014). The derived Bézier control points give the 3D structure of the fitted loops. We demonstrate the process by deriving the position of 3D coronal loops in three active regions (AR 11117, AR 11158, and AR 11283). The numerical minimization process converges and produces 3D curves which are consistent with the height of the loop structures when the active region is seen on the limb. From this we conclude that the method can be important in both determining estimates of the 3D magnetic field structure and determining the best magnetic model among competing advanced magnetohydrodynamics or force-free magnetic-field computer simulations.

  16. Conserved 3' UTR stem-loop structure in L1 and Alu transposons in human genome: possible role in retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Grechishnikova, Daria; Poptsova, Maria

    2016-12-03

    In the process of retrotransposition LINEs use their own machinery for copying and inserting themselves into new genomic locations, while SINEs are parasitic and require the machinery of LINEs. The exact mechanism of how a LINE-encoded reverse transcriptase (RT) recognizes its own and SINE RNA remains unclear. However it was shown for the stringent-type LINEs that recognition of a stem-loop at the 3'UTR by RT is essential for retrotransposition. For the relaxed-type LINEs it is believed that the poly-A tail is a common recognition element between LINE and SINE RNA. However polyadenylation is a property of any messenger RNA, and how the LINE RT recognizes transposon and non-transposon RNAs remains an open question. It is likely that RNA secondary structures play an important role in RNA recognition by LINE encoded proteins. Here we selected a set of L1 and Alu elements from the human genome and investigated their sequences for the presence of position-specific stem-loop structures. We found highly conserved stem-loop positions at the 3'UTR. Comparative structural analyses of a human L1 3'UTR stem-loop showed a similarity to 3'UTR stem-loops of the stringent-type LINEs, which were experimentally shown to be recognized by LINE RT. The consensus stem-loop structure consists of 5-7 bp loop, 8-10 bp stem with a bulge at a distance of 4-6 bp from the loop. The results show that a stem loop with a bulge exists at the 3'-end of Alu. We also found conserved stem-loop positions at 5'UTR and at the end of ORF2 and discuss their possible role. Here we presented an evidence for the presence of a highly conserved 3'UTR stem-loop structure in L1 and Alu retrotransposons in the human genome. Both stem-loops show structural similarity to the stem-loops of the stringent-type LINEs experimentally confirmed as essential for retrotransposition. Here we hypothesize that both L1 and Alu RNA are recognized by L1 RT via the 3'-end RNA stem-loop structure. Other conserved stem-loop

  17. Atomic-Accuracy Prediction of Protein Loop Structures through an RNA-Inspired Ansatz

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rhiju

    2013-01-01

    Consistently predicting biopolymer structure at atomic resolution from sequence alone remains a difficult problem, even for small sub-segments of large proteins. Such loop prediction challenges, which arise frequently in comparative modeling and protein design, can become intractable as loop lengths exceed 10 residues and if surrounding side-chain conformations are erased. Current approaches, such as the protein local optimization protocol or kinematic inversion closure (KIC) Monte Carlo, involve stages that coarse-grain proteins, simplifying modeling but precluding a systematic search of all-atom configurations. This article introduces an alternative modeling strategy based on a ‘stepwise ansatz’, recently developed for RNA modeling, which posits that any realistic all-atom molecular conformation can be built up by residue-by-residue stepwise enumeration. When harnessed to a dynamic-programming-like recursion in the Rosetta framework, the resulting stepwise assembly (SWA) protocol enables enumerative sampling of a 12 residue loop at a significant but achievable cost of thousands of CPU-hours. In a previously established benchmark, SWA recovers crystallographic conformations with sub-Angstrom accuracy for 19 of 20 loops, compared to 14 of 20 by KIC modeling with a comparable expenditure of computational power. Furthermore, SWA gives high accuracy results on an additional set of 15 loops highlighted in the biological literature for their irregularity or unusual length. Successes include cis-Pro touch turns, loops that pass through tunnels of other side-chains, and loops of lengths up to 24 residues. Remaining problem cases are traced to inaccuracies in the Rosetta all-atom energy function. In five additional blind tests, SWA achieves sub-Angstrom accuracy models, including the first such success in a protein/RNA binding interface, the YbxF/kink-turn interaction in the fourth ‘RNA-puzzle’ competition. These results establish all-atom enumeration as an

  18. The structure of the third intracellular loop of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Susumu; Oka, Yoshiaki; Haga, Kazuko; Kojima, Shuichi; Tateishi, Yukihiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Haga, Tatsuya

    2006-01-09

    We have examined whether the long third intracellular loop (i3) of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype has a rigid structure. Circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of M2i3 expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli indicated that M2i3 consists mostly of random coil. In addition, the differential CD spectrum between the M2 and M2deltai3 receptors, the latter of which lacks most of i3 except N- and C-terminal ends, gave no indication of secondary structure. These results suggest that the central part of i3 of the M2 receptor has a flexible structure.

  19. Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias detected by an implantable loop recorder in a child with exercise-induced syncope.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Celal; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Saygi, Murat; Ergul, Yakup; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2013-01-01

    Syncope is common in the general population. Despite extensive evaluation, including tilt-table testing and electrophysiologic studies, approximately 30% of cases of recurrent syncope remain unexplained. An implantable loop recorder can be used for diagnosis when recurrent syncope has an idiopathic cause. We present the case of a 9-year-old boy who had a history of recurrent, exercise-induced syncope. Results of physical examination and noninvasive diagnostic testing were inconclusive, and an electrophysiologic study revealed no inducible supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias. Sixteen months after an implantable loop recorder was placed, the patient had a syncopal episode while swimming in a pool. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and data from the loop recorder revealed polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. A cardioverter-defibrillator was subsequently implanted. Implantable loop recorders can play an important role in the diagnosis of life-threatening arrhythmias in children whose syncope is otherwise unexplained.

  20. New insights into the structural bases of activation of Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors of the Cys-loop superfamily mediate rapid synaptic transmission throughout the nervous system, and include receptors activated by ACh, GABA, glycine and serotonin. They are involved in physiological processes, including learning and memory, and in neurological disorders, and they are targets for clinically relevant drugs. Cys-loop receptors assemble either from five copies of one type of subunit, giving rise to homomeric receptors, or from several types of subunits, giving rise to heteromeric receptors. Homomeric receptors are invaluable models for probing fundamental relationships between structure and function. Receptors contain a large extracellular domain that carries the binding sites and a transmembrane region that forms the ion pore. How the structural changes elicited by agonist binding are propagated through a distance of 50Å to the ion channel gate is central to understanding receptor function. Depending on the receptor subtype, occupancy of either two, as in the prototype muscle nicotinic receptor, or three binding sites, as in homomeric receptors, is required for full activation. The conformational changes initiated at the binding sites are propagated to the gate through the interface between the extracellular and transmembrane domains. This region forms a network that relays structural changes from the binding site towards the pore, and also contributes to open channel lifetime and rate of desensitization. Thus, this coupling region controls the beginning and duration of a synaptic response. Here we review recent advances in the molecular mechanism by which Cys-loop receptors are activated with particular emphasis on homomeric receptors.

  1. SiV center photoluminescence induced by C=O termination in nanocrystalline diamond and graphite loops hybridized films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yingshuang; Fan, Dong; Lu, Shaohua; Shen, Yaogen; Hu, Xiaojun

    2016-12-01

    We performed a series of thermal oxidation at different temperatures on nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films to construct various surface termination states of NCD grains and investigated their effects on silicon-vacancy (SiV) photoluminescence (PL) at 738 nm. Experiments and first principles calculations show that the negative electron affinity surface induced by C-H bond termination quenches the SiV PL, while the positive electron affinity surface originating from C=O bond termination removes this quenching. Moreover, oxidation at 600 °C results in the transition from amorphous carbon to graphite loops with an interlayer space of 0.4 nm, so that NCD and graphite loops' hybridized structure is formed. This allows oxygen atoms to contact with inside NCD grains to form more C=O bonds on the surface, producing much larger positive electron affinity in the surface. It traps the excited state electrons, lets them scatter back to the ground state, and emits SiV PL. These results reveal that C=O bonds play a crucial role in SiV PL of NCD grains and well explain the experimentally observed quenching effect. A novel way by changing the surface termination states is proposed to control the PL of NCD grains with SiV centers for potential quantum information processing and biological sensing.

  2. Modeling, mutagenesis, and structural studies on the fully conserved phosphate-binding loop (loop 8) of triosephosphate isomerase: toward a new substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Norledge, B V; Lambeir, A M; Abagyan, R A; Rottmann, A; Fernandez, A M; Filimonov, V V; Peter, M G; Wierenga, R K

    2001-02-15

    Loop 8 (residues 232-242) in triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is a highly conserved loop that forms a tight binding pocket for the phosphate moiety of the substrate. Its sequence includes the fully conserved, solvent-exposed Leu238. The tight phosphate-binding pocket explains the high substrate specificity of TIM being limited to the in vivo substrates dihydroxyacetone-phosphate and D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. Here we use the monomeric variant of trypanosomal TIM for exploring the structural consequences of shortening this loop. The mutagenesis, guided by extensive modeling calculations and followed up by crystallographic characterization, is aimed at widening the phosphate-binding pocket and, consequently, changing the substrate specificity. Two new variants were characterized. The crystal structures of these variants indicate that in monomeric forms of TIM, the Leu238 side-chain is nicely buried in a hydrophobic cluster. Monomeric forms of wild-type dimeric TIM are known to exist transiently as folding intermediates; our structural analysis suggests that in this monomeric form, Leu238 of loop 8 also adopts this completely buried conformation, which explains its full conservation across the evolution. The much wider phosphate-binding pocket of the new variant allows for the development of a new TIM variant with a different substrate specificity.

  3. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures at two loops

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Foreman, Simon; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-07-01

    Large scale structure surveys promise to be the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime of dark matter, where correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k of a mode over the wavenumber associated with the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. Since most of the information is contained at high wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute higher order corrections to correlation functions. After the one-loop correction to the matter power spectrum, we estimate that the next leading one is the two-loop contribution, which we compute here. At this order in k/k{sub NL}, there is only one counterterm in the EFTofLSS that must be included, though this term contributes both at tree-level and in several one-loop diagrams. We also discuss correlation functions involving the velocity and momentum fields. We find that the EFTofLSS prediction at two loops matches to percent accuracy the non-linear matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1}, requiring just one unknown coefficient that needs to be fit to observations. Given that Standard Perturbation Theory stops converging at redshift zero at k∼ 0.1 h Mpc{sup −1}, our results demonstrate the possibility of accessing a factor of order 200 more dark matter quasi-linear modes than naively expected. If the remaining observational challenges to accessing these modes can be addressed with similar success, our results show that there is tremendous potential for large scale structure surveys to explore the primordial universe.

  4. Crystal Structures of a Cysteine-modified Mutant in Loop D of Acetylcholine-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Brams, Marijke; Gay, Elaine A.; Sáez, José Colón; Guskov, Albert; van Elk, René; van der Schors, Roel C.; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Smit, August B.; Yakel, Jerrel L.; Ulens, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Covalent modification of α7 W55C nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) with the cysteine-modifying reagent [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate (MTSET+) produces receptors that are unresponsive to acetylcholine, whereas methyl methanethiolsulfonate (MMTS) produces enhanced acetylcholine-gated currents. Here, we investigate structural changes that underlie the opposite effects of MTSET+ and MMTS using acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP), a homolog of the extracellular domain of the nAChR. Crystal structures of Y53C AChBP show that MTSET+-modification stabilizes loop C in an extended conformation that resembles the antagonist-bound state, which parallels our observation that MTSET+ produces unresponsive W55C nAChRs. The MMTS-modified mutant in complex with acetylcholine is characterized by a contracted C-loop, similar to other agonist-bound complexes. Surprisingly, we find two acetylcholine molecules bound in the ligand-binding site, which might explain the potentiating effect of MMTS modification in W55C nAChRs. Unexpectedly, we observed in the MMTS-Y53C structure that ten phosphate ions arranged in two rings at adjacent sites are bound in the vestibule of AChBP. We mutated homologous residues in the vestibule of α1 GlyR and observed a reduction in the single channel conductance, suggesting a role of this site in ion permeation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that targeted modification of a conserved aromatic residue in loop D is sufficient for a conformational switch of AChBP and that a defined region in the vestibule of the extracellular domain contributes to ion conduction in anion-selective Cys-loop receptors. PMID:21115477

  5. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers. PMID:26456005

  6. Domain Hierarchy and closed Loops (DHcL): a server for exploring hierarchy of protein domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Koczyk, Grzegorz; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2008-01-01

    Domain hierarchy and closed loops (DHcL) (http://sitron.bccs.uib.no/dhcl/) is a web server that delineates energy hierarchy of protein domain structure and detects domains at different levels of this hierarchy. The server also identifies closed loops and van der Waals locks, which constitute a structural basis for the protein domain hierarchy. The DHcL can be a useful tool for an express analysis of protein structures and their alternative domain decompositions. The user submits a PDB identifier(s) or uploads a 3D protein structure in a PDB format. The results of the analysis are the location of domains at different levels of hierarchy, closed loops, van der Waals locks and their interactive visualization. The server maintains a regularly updated database of domains, closed loop and van der Waals locks for all X-ray structures in PDB. DHcL server is available at: http://sitron.bccs.uib.no/dhcl. PMID:18502776

  7. Shark IgNAR antibody mimotopes target a murine immunoglobulin through extended CDR3 loop structures.

    PubMed

    Simmons, David P; Streltsov, Victor A; Dolezal, Olan; Hudson, Peter J; Coley, Andrew M; Foley, Michael; Proll, David F; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2008-04-01

    Mimotopes mimic the three-dimensional topology of an antigen epitope, and are frequently recognized by antibodies with affinities comparable to those obtained for the original antibody-antigen interaction. Peptides and anti-idiotypic antibodies are two classes of protein mimotopes that mimic the topology (but not necessarily the sequence) of the parental antigen. In this study, we combine these two classes by selecting mimotopes based on single domain IgNAR antibodies, which display exceptionally long CDR3 loop regions (analogous to a constrained peptide library) presented in the context of an immunoglobulin framework with adjacent and supporting CDR1 loops. By screening an in vitro phage-display library of IgNAR variable domains (V(NAR)s) against the target antigen monoclonal antibody MAb5G8, we obtained four potential mimotopes. MAb5G8 targets a linear tripeptide epitope (AYP) in the flexible signal sequence of the Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1), and this or similar motifs were detected in the CDR loops of all four V(NAR)s. The V(NAR)s, 1-A-2, -7, -11, and -14, were demonstrated to bind specifically to this paratope by competition studies with an artificial peptide and all showed enhanced affinities (3-46 nM) compared to the parental antigen (175 nM). Crystallographic studies of recombinant proteins 1-A-7 and 1-A-11 showed that the SYP motifs on these V(NAR)s presented at the tip of the exposed CDR3 loops, ideally positioned within bulge-like structures to make contact with the MAb5G8 antibody. These loops, in particular in 1-A-11, were further stabilized by inter- and intra- loop disulphide bridges, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic interactions, and aromatic residue packing. We rationalize the higher affinity of the V(NAR)s compared to the parental antigen by suggesting that adjacent CDR1 and framework residues contribute to binding affinity, through interactions with other CDR regions on the antibody, though of course definitive support of

  8. Chromatin condensation is confined to the loop and involves an all-or-none structural change

    PubMed Central

    Balbi, C; Sanna, P; Barboro, P; Alberti, I; Barbesino, M; Patrone, E

    1999-01-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry in combination with pulsed field gel electrophoresis, we relate here the changes in the thermal profile of rat liver nuclei induced by very mild digestion of chromatin by endogenous nuclease with the chain length distribution of the DNA fragments. The enthalpy of the endotherm at 106 degrees C, which reflects the denaturation of the heterochromatic domains, decreases dramatically after the induction of a very small number of double-strand breaks per chromosome; the thermal transition disappears when the loops have undergone on average one DNA chain scission event. Quantitative analysis of the experimental data shows that the loop behaves like a topologically isolated domain. Also discussed is the process of heterochromatin formation, which occurs according to an all-or-none mechanism. In the presence of spermine, a strong condensation agent, only the loops that have undergone one break are able to refold, in confirmation of the extremely cooperative nature of the transition. Furthermore, our results suggest a relationship between the states that give rise to the endotherms at 90 degrees C and 106 degrees C and the morphologies referred to as class II and class III in a previous physicochemical study of the folding of chromatin fragments (. J. Mol. Biol. 190:411-424) and support the view that the overall process of condensation follows a sequential (two-step) pathway. PMID:10545372

  9. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section is developed and used for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the domain nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field within the material. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  10. A low-cost DAC BIST structure using a resistor loop

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jaewon; Kim, Heetae

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new DAC BIST (digital-to-analog converter built-in self-test) structure using a resistor loop known as a DDEM ADC (deterministic dynamic element matching analog-to-digital converter). Methods for both switch reduction and switch effect reduction are proposed for solving problems related to area overhead and accuracy of the conventional DAC BIST. The proposed BIST modifies the length of each resistor in the resistor loop via a merging operation and reduces the number of switches and resistors. In addition, the effect of switches is mitigated using the proposed switch effect reduction method. The accuracy of the proposed BIST is demonstrated by the reduction in the switch effect. The experimental results show that the proposed BIST reduces resource usages and the mismatch error caused by the switches. PMID:28212421

  11. The structure of n-point one-loop open superstring amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafra, Carlos R.; Schlotterer, Oliver

    2014-08-01

    In this article we investigate one-loop amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric superstring theory. The non-anomalous part of the worldsheet integrand is presented for any number of massless open-string states. The polarization dependence is organized into the same BRST-invariant kinematic combinations which also govern the leading string correction to tree-level amplitudes. The dimensions of the bases for both the kinematics and the associated worldsheet integrals is found to be the unsigned Stirling number of first kind. We explain why the same combinatorial structures govern on the one hand finite one-loop amplitudes of equal helicity states in pure Yang-Mills theory and on the other hand the color tensors at order α'2 of the color-dressed tree amplitude.

  12. A low-cost DAC BIST structure using a resistor loop.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jaewon; Kim, Heetae; Kang, Sungho

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new DAC BIST (digital-to-analog converter built-in self-test) structure using a resistor loop known as a DDEM ADC (deterministic dynamic element matching analog-to-digital converter). Methods for both switch reduction and switch effect reduction are proposed for solving problems related to area overhead and accuracy of the conventional DAC BIST. The proposed BIST modifies the length of each resistor in the resistor loop via a merging operation and reduces the number of switches and resistors. In addition, the effect of switches is mitigated using the proposed switch effect reduction method. The accuracy of the proposed BIST is demonstrated by the reduction in the switch effect. The experimental results show that the proposed BIST reduces resource usages and the mismatch error caused by the switches.

  13. Structure and Dynamics of Extracellular Loops in Human Aquaporin-1 from Solid-State NMR and Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenlin; Ing, Christopher; Emami, Sanaz; Jiang, Yunjiang; Liang, Hongjun; Pomès, Régis; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2016-09-22

    Multiple moderate-resolution crystal structures of human aquaporin-1 have provided a foundation for understanding the molecular mechanism of selective water translocation in human cells. To gain insight into the interfacial structure and dynamics of human aquaporin-1 in a lipid environment, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Using magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, we report a near complete resonance assignment of the human aquaporin-1. Chemical shift analysis of the secondary structure identified pronounced deviations from crystallographic structures in extracellular loops A and C, including the cis Y37-P38 bond in loop A, as well as ordering and immobilization of loop C. Site-specific H/D exchange measurements identify a number of protected nitrogen-bearing side chains and backbone amide groups, involved in stabilizing the loops. A combination of molecular dynamics simulations with NMR-derived restraints and filtering based on solvent accessibility allowed for the determination of a structural model of extracellular loops largely consistent with NMR results. The simulations reveal loop stabilizing interactions that alter the extracellular surface of human AQP1, with possible implications for water transport regulation through the channel. Modulation of water permeation may occur as a result of rearrangement of side chains from loop C in the extracellular vestibule of hAQP1, affecting the aromatic arginine selectivity filter.

  14. Polar structure of disclination loops in nematic liquid crystals probed by second-harmonic-light scattering.

    PubMed

    Pardaev, Shokir A; Williams, J C; Twieg, R J; Jakli, A; Gleeson, J T; Ellman, B; Sprunt, S

    2015-03-01

    Angle-resolved, second-harmonic-light scattering (SHLS) measurements are reported for three different classes of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (NLCs): polar and nonpolar rodlike compounds and a bent-core compound. Results revealing well-defined scattering peaks are interpreted in terms of the electric polarization induced by distortions of the nematic orientational field ("flexopolarity") associated with inversion wall defects, nonsingular disclinations, analogous to Neel walls in ferromagnets, that often exhibit a closed loop morphology in NLCs. Analysis of the SHLS patterns based on this model provides a "proof-of-concept" for a potentially useful method to probe the flexopolar properties of NLCs.

  15. Decoupling capabilities of split-loop resonator structure for 7 Tesla MRI surface array coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurshkainen, A.; Kurdjumov, S.; Simovski, C.; Glybovski, S.; Melchakova, I.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Raaijmakers, A.; Belov, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we studied electromagnetic properties of one-dimentional periodic structures composed of split-loop res-onators (SLRs) and investigated their capabilities in decoupling of two dipole antennas for full-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two different finite structures comprising a single-SLR and a double-SLR constitutive elements were studied. Numerical simulations of the structures were performed to evaluate their decoupling capabilities. As it was demonstrated two dipole antennas equipped with either a single or a double-SLR structure exhibit high isolation even for an electrically short distance between the dipoles. Double-SLR structure while dramatically improving isolation of the dipoles keeps the field created by each of the decoupled dipoles comparable with one of a single dipole inside the target area.

  16. Reinforced concrete structural corrosion monitoring using Hi-Bi photonic crystal fibres in a fiber loop structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, M.; McCague, C.; Fabian, M.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Mergo, P.; Lopez-Amo, M.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Sun, T.

    2014-05-01

    A novel sensing approach has been developed for in-situ corrosion monitoring of steel in reinforced concrete structures, using a fibre loop interferometer sensor system based on a Hi-Bi photonic crystal fibre (PCF). To do so an accurate fibre alignment procedure has been implemented in order to improve the performance of the sensor system embedded into the concrete structure when it is subjected to an accelerated corrosion test. The positive results obtained have confirmed the effectiveness of such a sensor system for applications in structural health monitoring.

  17. Heat removal from bipolar transistor by loop heat pipe with nickel and copper porous structures.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Patrik; Smitka, Martin; Malcho, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) are used in many branches of industry, mainly for cooling of electrical elements and systems. The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work was to develop porous structures from copper and nickel powder with different grain sizes. For experiment copper powder with grain size of 50 and 100 μm and nickel powder with grain size of 10 and 25 μm were used. Analysis of these porous structures and LHP design are described in the paper. And the measurements' influences of porous structures in LHP on heat removal from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) have been made.

  18. Heat Removal from Bipolar Transistor by Loop Heat Pipe with Nickel and Copper Porous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Smitka, Martin; Malcho, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) are used in many branches of industry, mainly for cooling of electrical elements and systems. The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work was to develop porous structures from copper and nickel powder with different grain sizes. For experiment copper powder with grain size of 50 and 100 μm and nickel powder with grain size of 10 and 25 μm were used. Analysis of these porous structures and LHP design are described in the paper. And the measurements' influences of porous structures in LHP on heat removal from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) have been made. PMID:24959622

  19. Response Current from Spin-Vortex-Induced Loop Current System to Feeding Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisaki, Tsubasa; Wakaura, Hikaru; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Koizumi, Hiroyasu

    2017-07-01

    The spin-vortex-induced loop current (SVILC) is a loop current generated around a spin-vortex formed by itinerant electrons. It is generated by a U(1) instanton created by the single-valued requirement of wave functions with respect to the coordinate, and protected by the topological number, "winding number". In a system with SVILCs, a macroscopic persistent current is generated as a collection of SVILCs. In the present work, we consider the situation where external currents are fed in the SVILC system and response currents are measured as spontaneous currents that flow through leads attached to the SVILC system. The response currents from SVILC systems are markedly different from the feeding currents in their directions and magnitude, and depend on the original current pattern of the SVILC system; thus, they may be used in the readout process in the recently proposed SVILC quantum computer, a quantum computer that utilizes SVILCs as qubits. We also consider the use of the response current to detect SVILCs.

  20. Radiation Enhanced Absorption of Frank Loops by Nanovoids in Cu

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Youxing; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Neutron and heavy ion irradiation generally induces voids in metallic materials, and continuous radiations typically result in void swelling and mechanical failure of the irradiated materials. Recent experiments showed that nanovoids in nanotwinned copper could act as sinks for radiation-induced Frank loops, significantly mitigating radiation damage [Y. Chen et al., Nat. Commun. 6:7036 (2015)]. In this paper, we report on structural evolution of Frank loops under cascades and address the role of nanovoids in absorbing Frank loops in detail by using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that a stand-alone Frank loop is stable under cascades. When Frank loops are adjacentmore » to nanovoids, the diffusion of a group of atoms from the loop into nanovoids is accomplished via the formation and propagation of dislocation loops. The loop-nanovoid interactions result in the shrinkage of the nanovoids and the Frank loops.« less

  1. Radiation Enhanced Absorption of Frank Loops by Nanovoids in Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Youxing; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Neutron and heavy ion irradiation generally induces voids in metallic materials, and continuous radiations typically result in void swelling and mechanical failure of the irradiated materials. Recent experiments showed that nanovoids in nanotwinned copper could act as sinks for radiation-induced Frank loops, significantly mitigating radiation damage [Y. Chen et al., Nat. Commun. 6:7036 (2015)]. In this paper, we report on structural evolution of Frank loops under cascades and address the role of nanovoids in absorbing Frank loops in detail by using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that a stand-alone Frank loop is stable under cascades. When Frank loops are adjacent to nanovoids, the diffusion of a group of atoms from the loop into nanovoids is accomplished via the formation and propagation of dislocation loops. The loop-nanovoid interactions result in the shrinkage of the nanovoids and the Frank loops.

  2. Radiation Enhanced Absorption of Frank Loops by Nanovoids in Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Zhang, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron and heavy ion irradiations generally induce voids in metallic materials, and continuous radiations typically result in void swelling and mechanical failure of the irradiated materials. Recent experiments showed that nanovoids in nanotwinned copper could act as sinks for radiation-induced Frank loops, significantly mitigating radiation damage. In this paper, we report on structural evolution of Frank loops under cascades and address the role of nanovoids in absorbing Frank loops in detail by using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that a stand-alone Frank loop is stable under cascades. When Frank loops are adjacent to nanovoids, the diffusion of a group of atoms from the loop into nanovoids is accomplished via the formation and propagation of dislocation loops. The loop-nanovoid interactions result in the shrinkage of the nanovoids and the Frank loops.

  3. Structural Study of a Flexible Active Site Loop in Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase and Its Functional Implications.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Lucía; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Roitberg, Adrián; Estrin, Darío A; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Marti, Marcelo A; Capece, Luciana

    2016-05-17

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, the initial and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Additionally, this enzyme has been identified as a possible target for cancer therapy. A 20-amino acid protein segment (the JK loop), which connects the J and K helices, was not resolved in the reported hIDO crystal structure. Previous studies have shown that this loop undergoes structural rearrangement upon substrate binding. In this work, we apply a combination of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments to characterize the structure and dynamics of this protein region. Our simulations show that the JK loop can be divided into two regions: the first region (JK loop(C)) displays specific and well-defined conformations and is within hydrogen bonding distance of the substrate, while the second region (JK loop(N)) is highly disordered and exposed to the solvent. The peculiar flexible nature of JK loop(N) suggests that it may function as a target for post-translational modifications and/or a mediator for protein-protein interactions. In contrast, hydrogen bonding interactions are observed between the substrate and Thr379 in the highly conserved "GTGG" motif of JK loop(C), thereby anchoring JK loop(C) in a closed conformation, which secures the appropriate substrate binding mode for catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm the key role of this residue, highlighting the importance of the JK loop(C) conformation in regulating the enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the existence of the partially and totally open conformations in the substrate-free form suggests a role of JK loop(C) in controlling substrate and product dynamics.

  4. Three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology in large elongate meander loops with different outer bank roughness characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konsoer, Kory M.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Best, James L.; Langendoen, Eddy J.; Abad, Jorge D.; Parsons, Dan R.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have examined the three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology within elongate loops of large meandering channels. The present study focuses on the spatial patterns of three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology within two elongate meander loops and examines how differences in outer bank roughness influence near-bank flow characteristics. Three-dimensional velocities were measured during two different events - a near-bankfull flow and an overbank event. Detailed data on channel bathymetry and bed form geometry were obtained during a near-bankfull event. Flow structure within the loops is characterized by strong topographic steering by the point bar, by the development of helical motion associated with flow curvature, and by acceleration of flow where bedrock is exposed along the outer bank. Near-bank velocities during the overbank event are less than those for the near-bankfull flow, highlighting the strong influence of the point bar on redistribution of mass and momentum of the flow at subbankfull stages. Multiple outer bank pools are evident within the elongate meander loop with low outer bank roughness, but are not present in the loop with high outer bank roughness, which may reflect the influence of abundant large woody debris on near-bank velocity characteristics. The positions of pools within both loops can be linked to spatial variations in planform curvature. The findings indicate that flow structure and bed morphology in these large elongate loops is similar to that in small elongate loops, but differs somewhat from flow structure and bed morphology reported for experimental elongate loops.

  5. Flow Induced Microvascular Network Formation of Therapeutic Relevant Arteriovenous (AV) Loop-Based Constructs in Response to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Volker J.; Covi, Jennifer M.; Koepple, Christoph; Hilgert, Johannes G.; Polykandriotis, Elias; Bigdeli, Amir K.; Distel, Luitpold V.; Horch, Raymund E.; Kneser, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Background The arteriovenous (AV) loop model enables axial vascularization to gain a functional microcirculatory system in tissue engineering constructs in vivo. These constructs might replace surgical flaps for the treatment of complex wounds in the future. Today, free flaps are often exposed to high-dose radiation after defect coverage, according to guideline-oriented treatment plans. Vascular response of AV loop-based constructs has not been evaluated after radiation, although it is of particular importance. It is further unclear whether the interposed venous AV loop graft is crucial for the induction of angiogenesis. Material/Methods We exposed the grafted vein to a single radiation dose of 2 Gy prior to loop construction to alter intrinsic and angio-inductive properties specifically within the graft. Vessel loops were embedded in a fibrin-filled chamber for 15 days and radiation-induced effects on flow-mediated vascularization were assessed by micro-CT and two-dimensional histological analysis. Results Vessel amount was significantly impaired when an irradiated vein graft was used for AV loop construction. However, vessel growth and differentiation were still present. In contrast to vessel density, which was homogeneously diminished in constructs containing irradiated veins, vessel diameter was primarily decreased in the more peripheral regions. Conclusions Vascular luminal sprouts were significantly diminished in irradiated venous grafts, suggesting that the interposing vein constitutes a vital part of the AV loop model and is essential to initiate flow-mediate angiogenesis. These results add to the current understanding of AV loop-based neovascularization and suggest clinical implications for patients requiring combined AV loop-based tissue transfer and adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:28199294

  6. Flow Induced Microvascular Network Formation of Therapeutic Relevant Arteriovenous (AV) Loop-Based Constructs in Response to Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Volker J; Covi, Jennifer M; Koepple, Christoph; Hilgert, Johannes G; Polykandriotis, Elias; Bigdeli, Amir K; Distel, Luitpold V; Horch, Raymund E; Kneser, Ulrich

    2017-02-15

    BACKGROUND The arteriovenous (AV) loop model enables axial vascularization to gain a functional microcirculatory system in tissue engineering constructs in vivo. These constructs might replace surgical flaps for the treatment of complex wounds in the future. Today, free flaps are often exposed to high-dose radiation after defect coverage, according to guideline-oriented treatment plans. Vascular response of AV loop-based constructs has not been evaluated after radiation, although it is of particular importance. It is further unclear whether the interposed venous AV loop graft is crucial for the induction of angiogenesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS We exposed the grafted vein to a single radiation dose of 2 Gy prior to loop construction to alter intrinsic and angio-inductive properties specifically within the graft. Vessel loops were embedded in a fibrin-filled chamber for 15 days and radiation-induced effects on flow-mediated vascularization were assessed by micro-CT and two-dimensional histological analysis. RESULTS Vessel amount was significantly impaired when an irradiated vein graft was used for AV loop construction. However, vessel growth and differentiation were still present. In contrast to vessel density, which was homogeneously diminished in constructs containing irradiated veins, vessel diameter was primarily decreased in the more peripheral regions. CONCLUSIONS Vascular luminal sprouts were significantly diminished in irradiated venous grafts, suggesting that the interposing vein constitutes a vital part of the AV loop model and is essential to initiate flow-mediate angiogenesis. These results add to the current understanding of AV loop-based neovascularization and suggest clinical implications for patients requiring combined AV loop-based tissue transfer and adjuvant radiotherapy.

  7. Structure and Variability of the Loop Current along the Yucatan Slope and Shelf Break.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinbaum, J.; Athie, G.; Candela, J.; Ochoa, J.; Romero, A.

    2016-02-01

    Yucatan Current and Loop Current variability is investigated using data from an array of moorings that was deployed during 2006-2011 at the western Yucatan Channel and two other strategic cross-sections further north over the Campeche Bank, where the core and western edge of the currents are usually located. Measurements show the cores of the Yucatan Current and Loop Current have a more offshore (onshore) position in summer (winter-spring) suggesting seasonality and a relation to transport variations. Some eastward displacements of the currents are associated with periods of positive horizontal shear (cyclonic vorticity anomalies) propagating northward from the Caribbean coast of Mexico into the Gulf. Ten of the thirteen Loop Current eddies released between 2006 and 2011 were found to be clearly related to these propagating cyclonic anomalies that after crossing the Yucatan Channel produce intense pulses of eddy kinetic energy in the mooring sections downstream. Current structure and variability above and below 1000 m depth have very different characteristics. Diffferences are also found between western and eastern mooring measurements at similar depths. Wind forcing, coastally trapped waves and small scale frontal eddies appear to be the source of this east-west asymmetry.

  8. Single laser pulse induces spin state transition within the hysteresis loop of an Iron compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freysz, E.; Montant, S.; Létard, S.; Létard, J.-F.

    2004-08-01

    Within the thermal hysteresis loop of the [Fe(PM-BiA) 2(NCS) 2] compound, a single laser pulse of 14 mJ cm -2 induces a photo-conversion from the low spin (LS, S = 0) to the high spin (HS, S = 2) state of the Fe 2+ metallic center. The temporal dynamic of this phenomena indicates that the system is firstly photo-excited into the HS state and then slowly relaxes to a mixture of HS/LS state. Subsequent laser pulses do not affect the HS/LS ratio. The system can be brought back to its initial LS state by adjusting the temperature of the compound. A simple model accounts qualitatively for the observed phenomenon.

  9. Loop-induced charmless B decays and B-B¯ mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilam, G.; Gronau, M.

    1988-07-01

    We calculate the rate of the inclusive loop-induced process b-->d+... for three and four families using the constraint of B-B¯ mixing on the quark masses and mixings. We find that the level of background which this process provides to the tree-level b-->u+. . . decay may reach 10% if ||Vub/Vcb||=0.2 and may grow to about 40% if ||Vub/Vcb||=0.07. The branching ratio of b-->d+. . . may reach its highest level of 0.5% if ||Vub/Vcb||=0.2 and 0.1% if Vub=0. In the latter case b-->d+. . . cannot account by itself for the charmless baryonic modes observed recently by the ARGUS collaboration.

  10. Dynamic response analysis of closed-loop control system for random intelligent truss structure under random forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Jianjun; Zhou, Yabin; Cui, Mingtao

    2004-07-01

    Considering the randomness of structural damping, physical parameters of structural materials, geometric dimensions of active bars and passive bars, applied loads and control forces simultaneously, the problems of dynamic response analysis of closed-loop control system based on probability for the random intelligent truss structures are studied in this paper. The computational expressions of numerical characteristics of structural dynamic response of closed-loop control system are derived by means of the mode superposition method. Through the engineering examples, the influences of the randomness of them on structural dynamic response are inspected and some significant conclusions are obtained.

  11. Crystal structures of recombinant human purple Acid phosphatase with and without an inhibitory conformation of the repression loop.

    PubMed

    Sträter, Norbert; Jasper, Beate; Scholte, Marcel; Krebs, Bernt; Duff, Anthony P; Langley, David B; Han, Runlin; Averill, Bruce A; Freeman, Hans C; Guss, J Mitchell

    2005-08-05

    The crystal structure of human purple acid phosphatase recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli (rHPAP(Ec)) and Pichia pastoris (rHPAP(Pp)) has been determined in two different crystal forms, both at 2.2A resolution. In both cases, the enzyme crystallized in its oxidized (inactive) state, in which both Fe atoms in the dinuclear active site are Fe(III). The main difference between the two structures is the conformation of the enzyme "repression loop". Proteolytic cleavage of this loop in vivo or in vitro results in significant activation of the mammalian PAPs. In the crystals obtained from rHPAP(Ec), the carboxylate side-chain of Asp145 of this loop acts as a bidentate ligand that bridges the two metal atoms, in a manner analogous to a possible binding mode for a phosphate ester substrate in the enzyme-substrate complex. The carboxylate side-chain of Asp145 and the neighboring Phe146 side-chain thus block the active site, thereby inactivating the enzyme. In the crystal structure of rHPAP(Pp), the enzyme "repression loop" has an open conformation similar to that observed in other mammalian PAP structures. The present structures demonstrate that the repression loop exhibits significant conformational flexibility, and the observed alternate binding mode suggests a possible inhibitory role for this loop.

  12. Immunophilins and HIV-1 V3 loop for structure-based anti-AIDS drug design.

    PubMed

    Andrianov, Alexander M

    2009-02-01

    The model of the structural complex of cyclophilin A (CycA) belonging to the immunophilins family with the HIV-MN gp120 V3 loop was generated, and the computer-aided design of the immunophilin-derived peptide able to mask the biologically crucial V3 segments was implemented. To this end, the following problems were solved: (i) the NMR-based conformational analysis of the HIV-MN V3 loop was put into effect, and its low energy structure fitting the input experimental observations was determined; (ii) molecular docking of this V3 structure with the X-ray conformation of CycA was carried out, and the energy refining the simulated structural complex was performed; (iii) the matrix of inter-atomic distances for the amino acids of the molecules forming part of the built over-molecular ensemble was computed, the types of interactions responsible for its stabilization were analyzed, and the CycA stretch, which accounts for the binding to V3, was identified; (iv) the most probable 3D structure for this stretch in the unbound state was predicted, and its collation with the X-ray structure for the corresponding site of CycA was performed; (v) the potential energy function and its constituents were studied for the structural complex generated by molecular docking of the V3 loop with the CycA peptide offering the virtual molecule that imitates the CycA segment, making a key contribution to the interactions of the native protein with the HIV-1 principal neutralizing determinant; (vi) as a result of the studies above, the designed molecule was shown to be capable of the efficacious blockading the functionally crucial V3 sites; and (vii) based on the joint analysis of the evidence obtained previously and in the present study, the composition of the peptide cocktail presenting the promising anti-AIDS pharmacological substance was developed. The molecules simulated here by molecular modeling methods may become the first representatives of a new class of the chemical compounds

  13. Structural delineation of stem-loop RNA binding by human TAF15 protein

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Maruthi; Ganguly, Akshay Kumar; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2015-01-01

    Human TATA binding protein associated factor 2 N (TAF15) and Fused in sarcoma (FUS) are nucleic acid binding proteins belonging to the conserved FET family of proteins. They are involved in diverse processes such as pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA transport, and DNA binding. The absence of information regarding the structural mechanism employed by the FET family in recognizing and discriminating their cognate and non-cognate RNA targets has hampered the attainment of consensus on modes of protein-RNA binding for this family. Our study provides a molecular basis of this RNA recognition using a combination of solution-state NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of TAF15-RRM solution structure and its binding with stem-loop RNA has yielded conclusive evidence of a non-canonical mode of RNA recognition. Rather than classical stacking interactions that occur across nitrogen bases and aromatic amino acids on ribonucleoprotein sites, moderate-affinity hydrogen bonding network between the nitrogen bases in the stem-loop RNA and a concave face on the RRM surface primarily mediate TAF15-RRM RNA interaction. We have compared the binding affinities across a set of single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides to conclusively establish that RNA binding is dependent upon structural elements in the RNA rather than sequence. PMID:26612539

  14. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J.; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A.; Norman, Richard A.; Scott, Andrew D.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S.; Breeze, Alexander L.

    2015-07-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called `DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a `DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and `molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1.

  15. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J.; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A.; Norman, Richard A.; Scott, Andrew D.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S.; Breeze, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp–Phe–Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called ‘DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a ‘DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and ‘molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1. PMID:26203596

  16. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A; Norman, Richard A; Scott, Andrew D; Higazi, Daniel R; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S; Breeze, Alexander L

    2015-07-23

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called 'DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a 'DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and 'molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1.

  17. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Implicate Flexibility of the Histidine Loop in Enzyme Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3-Å movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45 % identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10–50, primarily by decreasing kcat. Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens. PMID:22646091

  18. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Implicate Flexibility of the Histidine Loop in Enzyme Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J.

    2012-11-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3 {angstrom} movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45% identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10-50, primarily by decreasing k{sub cat}. Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens.

  19. R-loop induced stress response by second (p)ppGpp synthetase in Mycobacterium smegmatis: functional and domain interdependence.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Sushma; Petchiappan, Anushya; Singh, Albel; Bhatt, Apoorva; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2016-10-01

    Persistent R-loops lead to replicative stress due to RNA polymerase stalling and DNA damage. RNase H enzymes facilitate the organisms to survive in the hostile condition by removing these R-loops. MS_RHII-RSD was previously identified to be the second (p)ppGpp synthetase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The unique presence of an additional RNase HII domain raises an important question regarding the significance of this bifunctional protein. In this report, we demonstrate its ability to hydrolyze R-loops in Escherichia coli exposed to UV stress. MS_RHII-RSD gene expression was upregulated under UV stress, and this gene deleted strain showed increased R-loop accumulation as compared to the wild type. The domains in isolation are known to be inactive, and the full length protein is required for its function. Domain interdependence studies using active site mutants reveal the necessity of a hexamer form with high alpha helical content. In previous studies, bacterial RNase type HI has been mainly implicated in R-loop hydrolysis, but in this study, the RNase HII domain containing protein showed the activity. The prospective of this differential RNase HII activity is discussed. This is the first report to implicate a (p)ppGpp synthetase protein in R-loop-induced stress response. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The LD loop as an important structural element required for transmission of the allosteric signal in the HtrA (DegP) protease from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Figaj, Donata; Gieldon, Artur; Bartczak, Marlena; Koper, Tomasz; Zarzecka, Urszula; Lesner, Adam; Lipinska, Barbara; Skorko-Glonek, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    High-temperature requirement A (HtrA; DegP) from Escherichia coli, an important element of the extracytoplasmic protein quality-control system, is a member of the evolutionarily conserved family of serine proteases. The characteristic feature of this protein is its allosteric mode of activation. The regulatory loops, L3, L2, L1 and LD, play a crucial role in the transmission of the allosteric signal. Yet, the role of LD has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we undertook a study to explain the role of the individual LD residues in inducing and maintaining the proteolytic activity of HtrA. We investigated the influence of amino acid substitutions located within the LD loop on the kinetics of a model substrate cleavage as well as on the dynamics of the oligomeric structure of HtrA. We found that the mutations that were expected to disturb the loop's structure and/or interactions with the remaining regulatory loops severely diminished the proteolytic activity of HtrA. The opposite effect, that is, increased activity, was observed for G174S substitution, which was predicted to strengthen the interactions mediated by LD. HtrAG174S protein had an equilibrium shifted toward the active enzyme and formed preferentially high-order oligomeric forms.

  1. Dynamic structural analysis of a head assembly for a large loop-type LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Fiala, C.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is presented on the dynamic structural response of the primary vessel's head closure to slug impact loadings generated from a 1000 MJ source term. The reference reactor considered was designed in a loop configuration. The head structure consisted of a deck and a triple rotatable plug assembly. Two designs were considered for the deck structure: a reference design and an alternate design. The reference deck was designed as a single flat annular plate. For the alternate design, the deck plate was reinforced by adding an extender cylinder with a flange and flanged webs between the deck-plate and cylinder. The investigation showed that the reference design cannot maintain containment integrity when subjected to slug loading generated by a 1000 MJ source term. It was determined that the head deformed excessively.

  2. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; ...

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 hmore » Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.« less

  3. Antagonist-induced conformational changes in dopamine transporter extracellular loop two involve residues in a potential salt bridge.

    PubMed

    Gaffaney, Jon D; Shetty, Madhur; Felts, Bruce; Pramod, Akula-Bala; Foster, James D; Henry, L Keith; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2014-07-01

    Ligand-induced changes in the conformation of extracellular loop (EL) 2 in the rat (r) dopamine transporter (DAT) were examined using limited proteolysis with endoproteinase Asp-N and detection of cleavage products by epitope-specific immunoblotting. The principle N-terminal fragment produced by Asp-N was a 19kDa peptide likely derived by proteolysis of EL2 residue D174, which is present just past the extracellular end of TM3. Production of this fragment was significantly decreased by binding of cocaine and other uptake blockers, but was not affected by substrates or Zn(2+), indicating the presence of a conformational change at D174 that may be related to the mechanism of transport inhibition. DA transport activity and cocaine analog binding were decreased by Asp-N treatment, suggesting a requirement for EL2 integrity in these DAT functions. In a previous study we demonstrated that ligand-induced protease resistance also occurred at R218 on the C-terminal side of rDAT EL2. Here using substituted cysteine accessibility analysis of human (h) DAT we confirm cocaine-induced alterations in reactivity of the homologous R219 and identify conformational sensitivity of V221. Focused molecular modeling of D174 and R218 based on currently available Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter crystal structures places these residues within 2.9Å of one another, suggesting their proximity as a structural basis for their similar conformational sensitivities and indicating their potential to form a salt bridge. These findings extend our understanding of DAT EL2 and its role in transport and binding functions.

  4. Antagonist-Induced Conformational Changes in Dopamine Transporter Extracellular Loop Two Involve Residues in a Potential Salt Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Gaffaney, Jon D.; Shetty, Madhur; Felts, Bruce; Pramod, Akula-Bala; Foster, James D.; Henry, L. Keith; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2014-01-01

    Ligand-induced changes in the conformation of extracellular loop (EL) 2 in the rat (r) dopamine transporter (DAT) were examined using limited proteolysis with endoproteinase Asp-N and detection of cleavage products by epitope-specific immunoblotting. The principle N-terminal fragment produced by Asp-N was a 19 kDa peptide likely derived by proteolysis of EL2 residue D174, which is present just past the extracellular end of TM3. Production of this fragment was significantly decreased by binding of cocaine and other uptake blockers, but was not affected by substrates or Zn2+, indicating the presence of a conformational change at D174 that may be related to the mechanism of transport inhibition. DA transport activity and cocaine analog binding were decreased by Asp-N treatment, suggesting a requirement for EL2 integrity in these DAT functions. In a previous study we demonstrated that ligand-induced protease resistance also occurred at R218 on the C-terminal side of rDAT EL2. Here using substituted cysteine accessibility analysis of human (h) DAT we confirm cocaine-induced alterations in reactivity of the homologous R219 and identify conformational sensitivity of V221. Focused molecular modeling of D174 and R218 based on currently available Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter crystal structures places these residues within 2.9 Å of one another, suggesting their proximity as a structural basis for their similar conformational sensitivities and indicating their potential to form a salt bridge. These findings extend our understanding of DAT EL2 and its role in transport and binding functions. PMID:24269640

  5. X-ray crystal structure of MENT: evidence for functional loop-sheet polymers in chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Sheena; Buckle, Ashley M; Irving, James A; Ong, Poh Chee; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A; Kan, Wan-Ting; Henderson, Kate N; Bulynko, Yaroslava A; Popova, Evgenya Y; Smith, A Ian; Bottomley, Stephen P; Rossjohn, Jamie; Grigoryev, Sergei A; Pike, Robert N; Whisstock, James C

    2006-07-12

    Most serpins are associated with protease inhibition, and their ability to form loop-sheet polymers is linked to conformational disease and the human serpinopathies. Here we describe the structural and functional dissection of how a unique serpin, the non-histone architectural protein, MENT (Myeloid and Erythroid Nuclear Termination stage-specific protein), participates in DNA and chromatin condensation. Our data suggest that MENT contains at least two distinct DNA-binding sites, consistent with its simultaneous binding to the two closely juxtaposed linker DNA segments on a nucleosome. Remarkably, our studies suggest that the reactive centre loop, a region of the MENT molecule essential for chromatin bridging in vivo and in vitro, is able to mediate formation of a loop-sheet oligomer. These data provide mechanistic insight into chromatin compaction by a non-histone architectural protein and suggest how the structural plasticity of serpins has adapted to mediate physiological, rather than pathogenic, loop-sheet linkages.

  6. Argos transcription is induced by the Drosophila EGF receptor pathway to form an inhibitory feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Golembo, M; Schweitzer, R; Freeman, M; Shilo, B Z

    1996-01-01

    Argos is a secreted molecule with an atypical EGF motif. It was recently shown to function as an inhibitor of the signaling triggered by the Drosophila EGF receptor (DER). In this work, we determine the contribution of Argos to the establishment of cell fates in the embryonic ventral ectoderm. Graded activation of DER is essential for patterning the ventral ectoderm. argos mutant embryos show expansion of ventral cell fates suggesting hyperactivation of the DER pathway. In the embryonic ventral ectoderm, argos is expressed in the ventralmost row of cells. We show that argos expression in the ventral ectoderm is induced by the DER pathway: argos is not expressed in DER mutant embryos, while it is ectopically expressed in the entire ventral ectoderm following ubiquitous activation of the DER pathway. argos expression appears to be triggered directly by the DER pathway, since induction can also be observed in cell culture, following activation of DER by its ligand, Spitz. Argos therefore functions in a sequential manner, to restrict the duration and level of DER signaling. This type of inhibitory feedback loop may represent a general paradigm for signaling pathways inducing diverse cell fates within a population of non-committed cells.

  7. Conformational sampling and structure prediction of multiple interacting loops in soluble and β-barrel membrane proteins using multi-loop distance-guided chain-growth Monte Carlo method

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ke; Wong, Samuel W.K.; Liu, Jun S.; Zhang, Jinfeng; Liang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Loops in proteins are often involved in biochemical functions. Their irregularity and flexibility make experimental structure determination and computational modeling challenging. Most current loop modeling methods focus on modeling single loops. In protein structure prediction, multiple loops often need to be modeled simultaneously. As interactions among loops in spatial proximity can be rather complex, sampling the conformations of multiple interacting loops is a challenging task. Results: In this study, we report a new method called multi-loop Distance-guided Sequential chain-Growth Monte Carlo (M-DiSGro) for prediction of the conformations of multiple interacting loops in proteins. Our method achieves an average RMSD of 1.93 Å for lowest energy conformations of 36 pairs of interacting protein loops with the total length ranging from 12 to 24 residues. We further constructed a data set containing proteins with 2, 3 and 4 interacting loops. For the most challenging target proteins with four loops, the average RMSD of the lowest energy conformations is 2.35 Å. Our method is also tested for predicting multiple loops in β-barrel membrane proteins. For outer-membrane protein G, the lowest energy conformation has a RMSD of 2.62 Å for the three extracellular interacting loops with a total length of 34 residues (12, 12 and 10 residues in each loop). Availability and implementation: The software is freely available at: tanto.bioe.uic.edu/m-DiSGro. Contact: jinfeng@stat.fsu.edu or jliang@uic.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25861965

  8. Dual-Band Magnetic Loop Antenna with Monopolar Radiation Using Slot-Loaded Composite Right/Left-Handed Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Seongmin; Lee, Min-Jae; Lee, Kyoung-Joo; Kim, Young-Sik

    A novel dual-band magnetic loop antenna is proposed using slot-loaded composite right/left-handed (SL-CRLH) structures. Since each radiating element consists of a symmetrically-array of unit-cells, a dual-band magnetic loop source is obtained with unchanged beam patterns. Simulations and measurements show its good radiation performance with monopole-like radiation patterns in both operating bands.

  9. Low-order design and high-order simulation of active closed-loop control for aerospace structures under construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    Partially constructed/assembled structures in space are complicated enough but their dynamics will also be operating in closed-loop with feedback controllers. The dynamics of such structures are modeled by large-scale finite element models. The model dimension L is extremely large (approximately 10,000) while the numbers of actuators (M) and sensors (P) are small. The model parameters M(sub m) mass matrix, D(sub o) damping matrix, and K(sub o) stiffness matrix, are all symmetric and sparse (banded). Thus simulation of open-loop structure models of very large dimension can be accomplished by special integration techniques for sparse matrices. The problem of simulation of closed-loop control of such structures is complicated by the addition of controllers. Simulation of closed-loop controlled structures is an essential part of the controller design and evaluation process. Current research in the following areas is presented: high-order simulation of actively controlled aerospace structures; low-order controller design and SCI compensation for unmodeled dynamics; prediction of closed-loop stability using asymptotic eigenvalue series; and flexible robot manipulator control experiment.

  10. Stationary Vortex Loops Induced by Filament Interaction and Local Pinning in a Chemical Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Zulma A.; Steinbock, Oliver

    2012-08-01

    Scroll rings are three-dimensional excitation waves rotating around one-dimensional filament loops. In experiments with the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction we show that the collapse of these loops can be stopped by local pinning to only two unexcitable heterogeneities. The resulting vortices rotate around stationary but curved filaments. The absence of filament motion can be explained by repulsive interaction that counteracts the expected curvature-induced motion. The shape and key dependencies of the stationary filaments are well described by a curvature-flow model with additive interaction velocities that rapidly decrease with filament distance.

  11. Universal Quantum Computing with Measurement-Induced Continuous-Variable Gate Sequence in a Loop-Based Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shuntaro; Furusawa, Akira

    2017-09-01

    We propose a scalable scheme for optical quantum computing using measurement-induced continuous-variable quantum gates in a loop-based architecture. Here, time-bin-encoded quantum information in a single spatial mode is deterministically processed in a nested loop by an electrically programmable gate sequence. This architecture can process any input state and an arbitrary number of modes with almost minimum resources, and offers a universal gate set for both qubits and continuous variables. Furthermore, quantum computing can be performed fault tolerantly by a known scheme for encoding a qubit in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space of a single light mode.

  12. Structural-dynamical investigation of the ZnuA histidine-rich loop: involvement in zinc management and transport.

    PubMed

    Falconi, Mattia; Oteri, Francesco; Di Palma, Francesco; Pandey, Saurabh; Battistoni, Andrea; Desideri, Alessandro

    2011-02-01

    Comparative homology modelling techniques have been used to model the protein ZnuA from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium using the 3D structure of the homologous protein from Escherichia coli. These two-domain proteins bind one Zn(2+) atom, with high affinity, in the inter-domain cleft and possess a histidine-rich loop in the N-terminal domain. Alternative structures of the ZnuA histidine-rich loop, never resolved by the X-ray diffraction method, have been modelled. A model of the apo form, one with the histidine-rich loop deleted and two alternative structures with a second zinc ion bound to the histidine-rich loop, have been generated. In all the modelled proteins, investigated through molecular dynamics simulation, the histidine-rich loop is highly mobile and its fluctuations are correlated to the ligand stability observed in the zinc sites. Based on the plasticity of the histidine-rich loop and its significant effects on protein mobility a possible role in the capture and/or transfer of the zinc ions has been suggested.

  13. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops and cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Some results from a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops are presented. It is found that even though G x mu is required to be lower than 2 x 10 to the -6th (where mu is the mass per unit length of the string) to give a low enough autocorrelation amplitude, there is excessive power on smaller scales, so that galaxies would be more dense than observed. The large-scale structure does not include a filamentary or connected appearance and shares with more conventional models based on Gaussian perturbations the lack of cluster-cluster correlation at the mean cluster separation scale as well as excessively small bulk velocities at these scales.

  14. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops and cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Some results from a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops are presented. It is found that even though G x mu is required to be lower than 2 x 10 to the -6th (where mu is the mass per unit length of the string) to give a low enough autocorrelation amplitude, there is excessive power on smaller scales, so that galaxies would be more dense than observed. The large-scale structure does not include a filamentary or connected appearance and shares with more conventional models based on Gaussian perturbations the lack of cluster-cluster correlation at the mean cluster separation scale as well as excessively small bulk velocities at these scales.

  15. Structural changes in the 530 loop of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA in mutants with impaired translational fidelity.

    PubMed

    Van Ryk, D I; Dahlberg, A E

    1995-09-11

    The higher order structure of the functionally important 530 loop in Escherichia coli 16S rRNA was studied in mutants with single base changes at position 517, which significantly impair translational fidelity. The 530 loop has been proposed to interact with the EF-Tu-GTP-aatRNA ternary complex during decoding. The reactivity at G530, U531 and A532 to the chemical probes kethoxal, CMCT and DMS respectively was increased in the mutant 16S rRNA compared with the wild-type, suggesting a more open 530 loop structure in the mutant ribosomes. This was supported by oligonucleotide binding experiments in which probes complementary to positions 520-526 and 527-533, but not control probes, showed increased binding to the 517C mutant 70S ribosomes compared with the non-mutant control. Furthermore, enzymatic digestion of 70S ribosomes with RNase T1, specific for single-stranded RNA, substantially cleaved both wild-type and mutant rRNAs between G524 and C525, two of the nucleotides involved in the 530 loop pseudoknot. This site was also cleaved in the 517C mutant, but not wild-type rRNA, by RNase V1. Such a result is still consistent with a more open 530 loop structure in the mutant ribosomes, since RNase V1 can cut at appropriately stacked single-stranded regions of RNA. Together these data indicate that the 517C mutant rRNA has a rather extensively unfolded 530 loop structure. Less extensive structural changes were found in mutants 517A and 517U, which caused less misreading. A correlation between the structural changes in the 530 loop and impaired translational accuracy is proposed.

  16. The thermal structure of solar coronal loops and implications for physical models of coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, J. C.; Foukal, P.

    1982-01-01

    EUV spectra of three active region loops observed above the solar limb with the SO55 spectrometer on Skylab are analyzed. It is noted that the lengths, peak temperatures, and pressures of the loops are typical of the X-ray coronal loops to which static models have been applied. It is found that the physical parameters of the coronal loop plasma derived from EUV spectra and raster pictures are not well represented by the static models. Although the loops also contain a significant quantity of cool plasma, no physical reason is found to differentiate them from other active region loops of similar length, pressure, and temperature. Several line ratios in the loop spectrum suggest departures from ionization equilibrium caused by rapid cooling. The source of this cooling material is discussed with reference to several models of loop dynamics.

  17. Enzymatic properties of a GH19 chitinase isolated from rice lacking a major loop structure involved in chitin binding.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Jun; Fukamizo, Tamo; Ohnuma, Takayuki

    2017-05-01

    The catalytic domains of family GH19 chitinases have been found to consist of a conserved, α-helical core-region and different numbers (1-6) of loop structures, located at both ends of the substrate-binding groove and which extend over the glycon- and aglycon-binding sites. We expressed, purified and enzymatically characterized a GH19 chitinase from rice, Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare (OsChia2a), lacking a major loop structure (loop III) connected to the functionally important β-stranded region. The new enzyme thus contained the five remaining loop structures (loops I, II, IV, V and C-term). The OsChia2a recombinant protein catalyzed hydrolysis of chitin oligosaccharides, (GlcNAc)n (n = 3-6), with inversion of anomeric configuration, indicating that OsChia2a correctly folded without loop III. From thermal unfolding experiments and calorimetric titrations using the inactive OsChia2a mutant (OsChia2a-E68Q), in which the catalytic residue Glu68 was mutated to glutamine, we found that the binding affinities towards (GlcNAc)n (n = 2-6) were almost proportional to the degree of polymerization of (GlcNAc)n, but were much lower than those obtained for a moss GH19 chitinase having only loop III [Ohnuma T, Sørlie M, Fukuda T, Kawamoto N, Taira T, Fukamizo T. 2011. Chitin oligosaccharide binding to a family GH19 chitinase from the moss, Bryum coronatum. FEBS J. 278:3991-4001]. Nevertheless, OsChia2a exhibited significant antifungal activity. It appears that loop III connected to the β-stranded region is important for (GlcNAc)n binding, but is not essential for antifungal activity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limit protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside of the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  19. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limited protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  20. Mapping the Ca(2+) induced structural change in calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Boelt, Sanne Grundvad; Norn, Christoffer; Rasmussen, Morten Ib; André, Ingemar; Čiplys, Evaldas; Slibinskas, Rimantas; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2016-06-16

    Calreticulin is a highly conserved multifunctional protein implicated in many different biological systems and has therefore been the subject of intensive research. It is primarily present in the endoplasmatic reticulum where its main functions are to regulate Ca(2+) homeostasis, act as a chaperone and stabilize the MHC class I peptide-loading complex. Although several high-resolution structures of calreticulin exist, these only cover three-quarters of the entire protein leaving the extended structures unsolved. Additionally, the structure of calreticulin is influenced by the presence of Ca(2+). The conformational changes induced by Ca(2+) have not been determined yet as they are hard to study with traditional approaches. Here, we investigated the Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes with a combination of chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry, bioinformatics analysis and modelling in Rosetta. Using a bifunctional linker, we found a large Ca(2+)-induced change to the cross-linking pattern in calreticulin. Our results are consistent with a high flexibility in the P-loop, a stabilization of the acidic C-terminal and a relatively close interaction of the P-loop and the acidic C-terminal. The function of calreticulin, an endoplasmatic reticulin chaperone, is affected by fluctuations in Ca(2+)concentration, but the structural mechanism is unknown. The present work suggests that Ca(2+)-dependent regulation is caused by different conformations of a long proline-rich loop that changes the accessibility to the peptide/lectin-binding site. Our results indicate that the binding of Ca(2+) to calreticulin may thus not only just be a question of Ca(2+) storage but is likely to have an impact on the chaperone activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of Ligand‐induced Conformational Changes in the Activation Loop of Aurora‐A Kinase by PELDOR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Selena G.; Grazia Concilio, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The structure of protein kinases has been extensively studied by protein crystallography. Conformational movement of the kinase activation loop is thought to be crucial for regulation of activity; however, in many cases the position of the activation loop in solution is unknown. Protein kinases are an important class of therapeutic target and kinase inhibitors are classified by their effect on the activation loop. Here, we report the use of pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) and site‐directed spin labeling to monitor conformational changes through the insertion of MTSL [S‐(1‐oxyl‐2,2,5,5‐tetramethyl‐2,5‐dihydro‐1 H‐pyrrol‐3‐yl)methyl methanesulfonothioate] on the dynamic activation loop and a stable site on the outer surface of the enzyme. The action of different ligands such as microtubule‐associated protein (TPX2) and inhibitors could be discriminated as well as their ability to lock the activation loop in a fixed conformation. This study provides evidence for structural adaptations that could be used for drug design and a methodological approach that has potential to characterize inhibitors in development. PMID:28032021

  2. Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I inhibits R-loop formation by relaxing transcription-induced negative supercoiling.

    PubMed

    Massé, E; Drolet, M

    1999-06-04

    It has recently been shown that RNase H overproduction can partially compensate for the growth defect due to the absence of DNA topoisomerase I in Escherichia coli (Drolet, M., Phoenix, P., Menzel, R., Massé, E., Liu, L. F., and Crouch, R. J. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 92, 3526-3530). This result has suggested a model in which inhibitory R-loops occur during transcription in topA mutants. Results presented in this report further support this notion and demonstrate that transcription-induced supercoiling is involved in R-loop formation. First, we show that stable R-loop formation during in vitro transcription with E. coli RNA polymerase only occurs in the presence of DNA gyrase. Second, extensive R-loop formation in vivo, revealed by the production of RNase H-sensitive hypernegatively supercoiled plasmid DNAs, is observed under conditions where topA mutants fail to grow. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the coupling of transcription and translation in bacteria is an efficient way of preventing R-loop formation.

  3. The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

    1991-10-01

    Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. Two aspects of one loop structure: Unitarity delay in the Standard Model and modular invariance in string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, C.

    1989-08-01

    We study two aspects of one loop structures in quantum field theories which describe two different areas of particle physics: the one loop unitarity behavior of the Standard Model of electroweak interactions and modular invariance of string model theory. Loop expansion has its importance in that it contains quantum fluctuations due to all physical states in the theory. Therefore, by studying the various models to one loop, we can understand how the contents of the theory can contribute to physically measurable quantities and how the consistency at quantum level restricts the physical states of the theory, as well. In the first half of the thesis, we study one loop corrections to the process {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} {yields} {ital W}{sup +}{ital W}{sup {minus}}. In this process, there is a delicate unitarity-saving cancellation between s-channel and t-channel tree level Feynman diagrams. If the one loop contribution due to heavy particles corrects the channels asymmetrically, the cancellation, hence unitarity, will be delayed up to the mass scale of these heavy particles. We refer to this phenomena as the unitarity delay effect. Due to this effect, cross section below these mass scales can have significant radiative corrections which may provide an appropriate window through which we can see the high energy structure of the Standard Model from relatively low energy experiments. In the second half, we will show how quantum consistency can restrict the physical states in string theory. 53 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Properties and Modeling of Unresolved Fine Structure Loops Observed in the Solar Transition Region by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Reep, Jeffrey W.; Warren, Harry P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have discovered a new class of numerous low-lying dynamic loop structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFSs) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. In this letter, we combine IRIS measurements of the properties of a sample of 108 UFSs (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) with one-dimensional non-equilibrium ionization simulations, using the HYDRAD hydrodynamic model to examine whether the UFSs are now truly spatially resolved in the sense of being individual structures rather than being composed of multiple magnetic threads. We find that a simulation of an impulsively heated single strand can reproduce most of the observed properties, suggesting that the UFSs may be resolved, and the distribution of UFS widths implies that they are structured on a spatial scale of 133 km on average. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, and we conjecture that this could be an important clue for understanding the coronal heating process.

  6. Loop Heat Pipe Temperature Oscillation Induced by Gravity Assist and Reservoir Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Garrison, Matthew; Patel, Deepak; Robinson, Franklin; Ottenstein, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Laser Thermal Control System (LCTS) for the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) to be installed on NASA's Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat-2) consists of a constant conductance heat pipe and a loop heat pipe (LHP) with an associated radiator. During the recent thermal vacuum testing of the LTCS where the LHP condenser/radiator was placed in a vertical position above the evaporator and reservoir, it was found that the LHP reservoir control heater power requirement was much higher than the analytical model had predicted. Even with the control heater turned on continuously at its full power, the reservoir could not be maintained at its desired set point temperature. An investigation of the LHP behaviors found that the root cause of the problem was fluid flow and reservoir temperature oscillations, which led to persistent alternate forward and reversed flow along the liquid line and an imbalance between the vapor mass flow rate in the vapor line and liquid mass flow rate in the liquid line. The flow and temperature oscillations were caused by an interaction between gravity and reservoir heating, and were exacerbated by the large thermal mass of the instrument simulator which modulated the net heat load to the evaporator, and the vertical radiator/condenser which induced a variable gravitational pressure head. Furthermore, causes and effects of the contributing factors to flow and temperature oscillations intermingled.

  7. A novel approach to segregate and identify functional loop regions in protein structures using their Ramachandran maps.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mattaparthi Venkata Satish; Swaminathan, Rajaram

    2010-03-01

    The loops which connect or flank helices/sheets in protein structures are known to be functionally important. However, ironically they also belong to the part of protein whose structure is least accurately predicted. Here, a new method to isolate and analyze loop regions in protein structure is proposed using the spatial coordinates of the solved three-dimensional structure. The extent of dispersion among points of successive amino acid residues in the Ramachandran map of protein region is utilized to calculate the Mean Separation between these points in the Ramachandran Plot (MSRP). Based on analysis of 2935 protein secondary structure regions obtained using DSSP software, spanning a range from 2 to 64 residues, taken from a set of 170 proteins, it is shown that helices (MSRP < 17) and strands (MSRP < 64) stand effectively demarcated from the loop regions (MSRP > 130). Analysis of 43 DNA binding and 98 ligand binding proteins revealed several loop regions with clear change in MSRP subsequent to binding. The population of such loops correlated with the magnitude of backbone displacement in the protein subsequent to binding. Can changes in MSRP quantify the temporal oscillations in dihedral angles among structured/unstructured regions in proteins? Molecular dynamics simulations (10 ns) revealed that deviations in MSRP among different snapshots in the trajectory were at least twofold higher for unstructured proteins in comparison with ordered proteins. The above results validate the use of MSRP parameter as a tool to identify and investigate functionally active loops and unstructured regions in protein structures. Proteins 2010. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Cytosine deamination and base excision repair cause R-loop-induced CAG repeat fragility and instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaofeng A; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2017-09-18

    CAG/CTG repeats are structure-forming repetitive DNA sequences, and expansion beyond a threshold of ∼35 CAG repeats is the cause of several human diseases. Expanded CAG repeats are prone to breakage, and repair of the breaks can cause repeat contractions and expansions. In this study, we found that cotranscriptional R-loops formed at a CAG-70 repeat inserted into a yeast chromosome. R-loops were further elevated upon deletion of yeast RNaseH genes and caused repeat fragility. A significant increase in CAG repeat contractions was also observed, consistent with previous human cell studies. Deletion of yeast cytosine deaminase Fcy1 significantly decreased the rate of CAG repeat fragility and contractions in the rnh1Δrnh201Δ background, indicating that Fcy1-mediated deamination is one cause of breakage and contractions in the presence of R-loops. Furthermore, base excision repair (BER) is responsible for causing CAG repeat contractions downstream of Fcy1, but not fragility. The Rad1/XPF and Rad2/XPG nucleases were also important in protecting against contractions, but through BER rather than nucleotide excision repair. Surprisingly, the MutLγ (Mlh1/Mlh3) endonuclease caused R-loop-dependent CAG fragility, defining an alternative function for this complex. These findings provide evidence that breakage at expanded CAG repeats occurs due to R-loop formation and reveal two mechanisms for CAG repeat instability: one mediated by cytosine deamination of DNA engaged in R-loops and the other by MutLγ cleavage. Since disease-causing CAG repeats occur in transcribed regions, our results suggest that R-loop-mediated fragility is a mechanism that could cause DNA damage and repeat-length changes in human cells.

  9. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  10. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Senatore, Leonardo; Schmittfull, Marcel E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2015-10-01

    Given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/k{sub NL}, where k is the wavenumber of interest and k{sub NL} is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k≅ 0.3 h Mpc{sup −1} and k≅ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which k{sub NL} is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ{sub 8}=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k≅ 0.25 h Mpc{sup −1}, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k≅ 0.25 h Mpc{sup −1}, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  11. Removing the invariant salt bridge of parvalbumin increases flexibility in the AB-loop structure.

    PubMed

    Hoh, François; Cavé, Adrien; Strub, Marie Paule; Banères, Jean Louis; Padilla, André

    2009-08-01

    Parvalbumins (PVs) are calcium-buffer proteins that belong to the EF-hand family. Their N-terminal domain consists of two antiparallel helices A and B that make up a flat hydrophobic surface that is associated with the opposite side of the CD and EF binding sites. A single conserved Arg75-Glu81 salt bridge is buried in this hydrophobic interface. The structure of a rat PV mutant in which Arg75 was replaced by alanine was solved by molecular replacement. Unexpectedly, a large distance deviation of 7.8 A was observed for the AB loop but not for the residues that flank the R75A mutation. The thermal stability of the calcium-loaded form is lower (T(m) = 352.0 K; DeltaT(m) = -11.4 K) than that of the wild-type protein and the apo mutant is unfolded at room temperature. Weaker calcium or magnesium affinities were also measured for the R75A mutant (Ca(2+): K(1) = 4.21 x 10(7) M(-1), K(2) = 6.18 x 10(6) M(-1); Mg(2+): K(1) = 2.98 x 10(4) M(-1), K(2) = 3.09 x 10(3) M(-1)). Finally, comparison of the B factors showed an increase in the flexibility of the AB loop that is consistent with this region being more exposed to solvent in the mutant. The mutant structure therefore demonstrates the role of the salt bridge in attaching the nonbinding AB domain to the remaining protein core. Normal-mode analysis indeed indicated an altered orientation of the AB domain with regard to the CD-EF binding domains.

  12. Structure and function in bacteriorhodopsin: the effect of the interhelical loops on the protein folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Allen, S J; Kim, J M; Khorana, H G; Lu, H; Booth, P J

    2001-04-27

    The loops connecting the seven transmembrane helices of bacteriorhodopsin have each been replaced in turn by structureless linkers of Gly-Gly-Ser repeat sequences, and the effect on the protein folding kinetics has been determined. An SDS-denatured state of each loop mutant bacterio-opsin was folded in l-alpha-1,2-dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine/l-alpha-1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine micelles, containing retinal, to give functional bacteriorhodopsin. Stopped-flow mixing was used to initiate the folding reaction, giving a time resolution of milliseconds, and changes in protein fluorescence were used to monitor folding. All loop mutant proteins folded according to the same reaction scheme as wild-type protein. The folding kinetics of the AB, BC and DE loop mutants were the same as wild-type protein, despite the blue-shifted chromophore band of the BC loop mutant bR state. A partially folded apoprotein intermediate state of the AB loop mutant did however appear to decay in the absence of retinal. The most significant effects on the folding kinetics were seen for mutant protein with structureless linkers in place of the CD, EF and FG loops. The rate-limiting apoprotein folding step of the CD loop mutant was about ten times slower than wild-type, whilst that of the EF loop mutant was almost four times slower than wild-type. Wild-type behaviour was observed for the other folding and retinal binding events of the CD and EF loop mutant proteins. These effects of the CD and EF loop mutations on apoprotein folding correlate with the fact that these two loop mutants also have the least stable, partially folded apoprotein intermediate of all the loop mutants, and are the most affected by a decrease in lipid lateral pressure. In contrast, the FG loop mutant exhibited wild-type apoprotein folding, but altered covalent binding of retinal and final folding to bacteriorhodopsin. This correlates with the fact that the FG loop mutant bacteriorhodopsin is the most susceptible to

  13. Folding of a DNA Hairpin Loop Structure in Explicit Solvent Using Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2007-11-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Hairpin loop structures are common motifs in folded nucleic acids. The 59-GCGCAGC sequence in DNA forms a characteristic and stable trinucleotide hairpin loop flanked by a two basepair stem helix. To better understand the structure formation of this hairpin loop motif in atomic detail, we employed replica-exchange molecular dynamics (RexMD) simulations starting from a single-stranded DNA conformation. In two independent 36 ns RexMD simulations, conformations in very close agreement with the experimental hairpin structure were sampled as dominant conformations (lowest free energy state) during the final phase of the RexMDs (;35% at the lowest temperature replica). Simultaneous compaction and accumulation of folded structures were observed. Comparison of the GCA trinucleotides from early stages of the simulations with the folded topology indicated a variety of central loop conformations, but arrangements close to experiment that are sampled before the fully folded structure also appeared. Most of these intermediates included a stacking of the C2 and G3 bases, which was further stabilized by hydrogen bonding to the A5 base and a strongly bound water molecule bridging the C2 and A5 in the DNA minor groove. The simulations suggest a folding mechanism where these intermediates can rapidly proceed toward the fully folded hairpin and emphasize the importance of loop and stem nucleotide interactions for hairpin folding. In one simulation, a loop motif with G3 in syn conformation (dihedral flip at N-glycosidic bond) accumulated, resulting in a misfolded hairpin. Such conformations may correspond to long-lived trapped states that have been postulated to account for the folding kinetics of

  14. The role of salt concentration and magnesium binding in HIV-1 subtype-A and subtype-B kissing loop monomer structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taejin; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    The subtype-B monomers of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) have experimentally been shown to dimerize at high salt concentration or in the presence of magnesium, while the dimerization of the subtype-A monomers requires magnesium binding at the G273 or G274 phosphate groups regardless of salt concentration. We used explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the conformational changes in subtype-A and -B monomers in different salt concentrations, and we found that our MD simulation results are consistent with those of experiments. At low salt concentration, hairpin loop structures of both subtypes were deformed and bases in the hairpin loop were turned inside. At high salt concentrations, the subtype-B monomer maintained the hairpin loop shape and most bases in the hairpin loop pointed out, while the subtype-A monomer showed a severe deformation. We also found that the flanking bases in the subtype-B stabilize the hairpin loop, while the flanking base G273 in the subtype-A caused a significant deformation. However, a bound magnesium ion at the G273 or G274 phosphate groups controlled the behavior of the G273 base and prevented the subtype-A monomer from deformation. We also applied restraints to both subtypes to examine the role of high salt concentration or magnesium binding. While restraints were applied, both subtypes at 0 M salt concentration maintained their shapes. However, when restraints were removed, they deformed significantly. Therefore, we suggest that the dimerization of both subtypes requires the proper conformation of the monomers which is induced by the appropriate salt strength and magnesium ion binding.

  15. Fold classification based on secondary structure--how much is gained by including loop topology?

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jieun; Berman, Piotr; Przytycka, Teresa

    2006-03-08

    It has been proposed that secondary structure information can be used to classify (to some extend) protein folds. Since this method utilizes very limited information about the protein structure, it is not surprising that it has a higher error rate than the approaches that use full 3D fold description. On the other hand, the comparing of 3D protein structures is computing intensive. This raises the question to what extend the error rate can be decreased with each new source of information, especially if the new information can still be used with simple alignment algorithms. We consider the question whether the information about closed loops can improve the accuracy of this approach. While the answer appears to be obvious, we had to overcome two challenges. First, how to code and to compare topological information in such a way that local alignment of strings will properly identify similar structures. Second, how to properly measure the effect of new information in a large data sample. We investigate alternative ways of computing and presenting this information. We used the set of beta proteins with at most 30% pairwise identity to test the approach; local alignment scores were used to build a tree of clusters which was evaluated using a new log-odd cluster scoring function. In particular, we derive a closed formula for the probability of obtaining a given score by chance. Parameters of local alignment function were optimized using a genetic algorithm. Of 81 folds that had more than one representative in our data set, log-odds scores registered significantly better clustering in 27 cases and significantly worse in 6 cases, and small differences in the remaining cases. Various notions of the significant change or average change were considered and tried, and the results were all pointing in the same direction. We found that, on average, properly presented information about the loop topology improves noticeably the accuracy of the method but the benefits vary between

  16. Concerted loop motion triggers induced fit of FepA to ferric enterobactin.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Chuck R; Jordan, Lorne; Trinh, Vy; Schuerch, Daniel W; Gala, Amparo; Hanson, Mathew; Hanson, Matthew; Shipelskiy, Yan; Majumdar, Aritri; Newton, Salete M C; Klebba, Phillip E

    2014-07-01

    Spectroscopic analyses of fluorophore-labeled Escherichia coli FepA described dynamic actions of its surface loops during binding and transport of ferric enterobactin (FeEnt). When FeEnt bound to fluoresceinated FepA, in living cells or outer membrane fragments, quenching of fluorophore emissions reflected conformational motion of the external vestibular loops. We reacted Cys sulfhydryls in seven surface loops (L2, L3, L4, L5, L7 L8, and L11) with fluorophore maleimides. The target residues had different accessibilities, and the labeled loops themselves showed variable extents of quenching and rates of motion during ligand binding. The vestibular loops closed around FeEnt in about a second, in the order L3 > L11 > L7 > L2 > L5 > L8 > L4. This sequence suggested that the loops bind the metal complex like the fingers of two hands closing on an object, by individually adsorbing to the iron chelate. Fluorescence from L3 followed a biphasic exponential decay as FeEnt bound, but fluorescence from all the other loops followed single exponential decay processes. After binding, the restoration of fluorescence intensity (from any of the labeled loops) mirrored cellular uptake that depleted FeEnt from solution. Fluorescence microscopic images also showed FeEnt transport, and demonstrated that ferric siderophore uptake uniformly occurs throughout outer membrane, including at the poles of the cells, despite the fact that TonB, its inner membrane transport partner, was not detectable at the poles. © 2014 Smallwood et al.

  17. Concerted loop motion triggers induced fit of FepA to ferric enterobactin

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Chuck R.; Jordan, Lorne; Trinh, Vy; Schuerch, Daniel W.; Gala, Amparo; Hanson, Mathew; Shipelskiy, Yan; Majumdar, Aritri; Newton, Salete M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses of fluorophore-labeled Escherichia coli FepA described dynamic actions of its surface loops during binding and transport of ferric enterobactin (FeEnt). When FeEnt bound to fluoresceinated FepA, in living cells or outer membrane fragments, quenching of fluorophore emissions reflected conformational motion of the external vestibular loops. We reacted Cys sulfhydryls in seven surface loops (L2, L3, L4, L5, L7 L8, and L11) with fluorophore maleimides. The target residues had different accessibilities, and the labeled loops themselves showed variable extents of quenching and rates of motion during ligand binding. The vestibular loops closed around FeEnt in about a second, in the order L3 > L11 > L7 > L2 > L5 > L8 > L4. This sequence suggested that the loops bind the metal complex like the fingers of two hands closing on an object, by individually adsorbing to the iron chelate. Fluorescence from L3 followed a biphasic exponential decay as FeEnt bound, but fluorescence from all the other loops followed single exponential decay processes. After binding, the restoration of fluorescence intensity (from any of the labeled loops) mirrored cellular uptake that depleted FeEnt from solution. Fluorescence microscopic images also showed FeEnt transport, and demonstrated that ferric siderophore uptake uniformly occurs throughout outer membrane, including at the poles of the cells, despite the fact that TonB, its inner membrane transport partner, was not detectable at the poles. PMID:24981231

  18. Biochemical and X-ray crystallographic studies on shikimate kinase: The important structural role of the P-loop lysine

    PubMed Central

    Krell, Tino; Maclean, John; Boam, Deborah J.; Cooper, Alan; Resmini, Marina; Brocklehurst, Keith; Kelly, Sharon M.; Price, Nicholas C.; Lapthorn, Adrian J.; Coggins, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Shikimate kinase, despite low sequence identity, has been shown to be structurally a member of the nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase family, which includes adenylate kinase. In this paper we have explored the roles of residues in the P-loop of shikimate kinase, which forms the binding site for nucleotides and is one of the most conserved structural features in proteins. In common with many members of the P-loop family, shikimate kinase contains a cysteine residue 2 amino acids upstream of the essential lysine residue; the side chains of these residues are shown to form an ion pair. The C13S mutant of shikimate kinase was found to be enzymatically active, whereas the K15M mutant was inactive. However, the latter mutant had both increased thermostability and affinity for ATP when compared to the wild-type enzyme. The structure of the K15M mutant protein has been determined at 1.8 Å, and shows that the organization of the P-loop and flanking regions is heavily disturbed. This indicates that, besides its role in catalysis, the P-loop lysine also has an important structural role. The structure of the K15M mutant also reveals that the formation of an additional arginine/aspartate ion pair is the most likely reason for its increased thermostability. From studies of ligand binding it appears that, like adenylate kinase, shikimate kinase binds substrates randomly and in a synergistic fashion, indicating that the two enzymes have similar catalytic mechanisms. PMID:11369852

  19. Expanding and Contracting Coronal Loops as Evidence of Vortex Flows Induced by Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudík, J.; Zuccarello, F. P.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Démoulin, P.

    2017-07-01

    Eruptive solar flares were predicted to generate large-scale vortex flows at both sides of the erupting magnetic flux rope. This process is analogous to a well-known hydrodynamic process creating vortex rings. The vortices lead to advection of closed coronal loops located at the peripheries of the flaring active region. Outward flows are expected in the upper part and returning flows in the lower part of the vortex. Here, we examine two eruptive solar flares, the X1.1-class flare SOL2012-03-05T03:20 and the C3.5-class SOL2013-06-19T07:29. In both flares, we find that the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in its 171 Å, 193 Å, or 211 Å passbands show coexistence of expanding and contracting motions, in accordance with the model prediction. In the X-class flare, multiple expanding and contracting loops coexist for more than 35 minutes, while in the C-class flare, an expanding loop in 193 Å appears to be close by and cotemporal with an apparently imploding loop arcade seen in 171 Å. Later, the 193 Å loop also switches to contraction. These observations are naturally explained by vortex flows present in a model of eruptive solar flares.

  20. Amplification activation loop between caspase-8 and -9 dominates artemisinin-induced apoptosis of ASTC-a-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fenglian; Gao, Weijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2012-06-01

    Although caspases have been demonstrated to be involved in artemisinin (ARTE)-induced apoptosis, their exact functions are not well understood. The aim of this report is to explore the roles of caspase-8, -9 and -3 during ARTE-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. ARTE treatment induces a rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and ROS-dependent apoptosis as well as the activation of caspase-8, -9 and -3 via time- and dose-dependent fashion. Of upmost importance, inhibition of caspase-8 or -9, but not caspase-3, almost completely blocks the ARTE-induced not only activation of the caspase-8, -9 and -3 but also apoptosis. In addition, the apoptotic process triggered by ARTE does not involve the Bid cleavage, tBid translocation, significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Moreover, silencing Bax/Bak does not prevent the ATRE-induced cell death as well as the activation of caspase-8, -9 and -3. Collectively, our data firstly demonstrate that ARTE triggers a ROS-mediated positive feedback amplification activation loop between caspase-8 and -9 independent of mitochondria, which dominantly mediated the ARTE-induced apoptosis via a caspase-3-independent apoptotic pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells. Our findings imply a potential to develop new derivatives from artemisinin to effectively initiate the amplification activation loop of caspases.

  1. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  2. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2011-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-β (IFN-β) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-β promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1–L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding. PMID:21596780

  3. Structural insights into substrate recognition by the Neurospora Varkud satellite ribozyme: importance of U-turns at the kissing-loop junction.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Patricia; Legault, Pascale

    2014-01-14

    Substrate recognition by the Neurospora Varkud satellite ribozyme depends on the formation of a magnesium-dependent kissing-loop interaction between the stem-loop I (SLI) substrate and stem-loop V (SLV) of the catalytic domain. From mutagenesis studies, it has been established that this I/V kissing-loop interaction involves three Watson-Crick base pairs and is associated with a structural rearrangement of the SLI substrate that facilitates catalysis. Here, we report the NMR structural characterization of this I/V kissing-loop using isolated stem-loops. NMR studies were performed on different SLI/SLV complexes containing a common SLV and shiftable, preshifted, or double-stranded SLI variants. These studies confirm the presence of three Watson-Crick base pairs at the kissing-loop junction and provide evidence for the structural rearrangement of shiftable SLI variants upon SLV binding. NMR structure determination of an SLI/SLV complex demonstrates that both the SLI and SLV loops adopt U-turn structures, which facilitates intermolecular Watson-Crick base pairing. Several other interactions at the I/V interface, including base triples and base stacking, help create a continuously stacked structure. These NMR studies provide a structural basis to understand the stability of the I/V kissing-loop interaction and lead us to propose a kinetic model for substrate activation in the VS ribozyme.

  4. Structural Insights Into Substrate Recognition by the Neurospora Varkud Satellite Ribozyme: Importance of U-Turns at the Kissing-Loop Junction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Substrate recognition by the Neurospora Varkud satellite ribozyme depends on the formation of a magnesium-dependent kissing-loop interaction between the stem-loop I (SLI) substrate and stem-loop V (SLV) of the catalytic domain. From mutagenesis studies, it has been established that this I/V kissing-loop interaction involves three Watson–Crick base pairs and is associated with a structural rearrangement of the SLI substrate that facilitates catalysis. Here, we report the NMR structural characterization of this I/V kissing-loop using isolated stem-loops. NMR studies were performed on different SLI/SLV complexes containing a common SLV and shiftable, preshifted, or double-stranded SLI variants. These studies confirm the presence of three Watson–Crick base pairs at the kissing-loop junction and provide evidence for the structural rearrangement of shiftable SLI variants upon SLV binding. NMR structure determination of an SLI/SLV complex demonstrates that both the SLI and SLV loops adopt U-turn structures, which facilitates intermolecular Watson–Crick base pairing. Several other interactions at the I/V interface, including base triples and base stacking, help create a continuously stacked structure. These NMR studies provide a structural basis to understand the stability of the I/V kissing-loop interaction and lead us to propose a kinetic model for substrate activation in the VS ribozyme. PMID:24325625

  5. Identification of an evolutionary conserved structural loop that is required for the enzymatic and biological function of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Helen; Seinstra, Renée I.; Uitdehaag, Joost C. M.; Koopman, Mandy; van Faassen, Martijn; Martineau, Céline N.; Kema, Ido P.; Buijsman, Rogier; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme TDO (tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase; TDO-2 in Caenorhabditis elegans) is a potential therapeutic target to cancer but is also thought to regulate proteotoxic events seen in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. To better understand its function and develop specific compounds that target TDO we need to understand the structure of this molecule. In C. elegans we compared multiple different CRISPR/Cas9-induced tdo-2 deletion mutants and identified a motif of three amino acids (PLD) that is required for the enzymatic conversion of tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine. Loss of TDO-2’s enzymatic activity in PDL deletion mutants was accompanied by an increase in motility during aging and a prolonged lifespan, which is in line with the previously observed phenotypes induced by a knockdown of the full enzyme. Comparison of sequence structures suggests that blocking this motif might interfere with haem binding, which is essential for the enzyme’s activity. The fact that these three residues are situated in an evolutionary conserved structural loop of the enzyme suggests that the findings can be translated to humans. The identification of this specific loop region in TDO-2–essential for its catalytic function–will aid in the design of novel inhibitors to treat diseases in which the TDO enzyme is overexpressed or hyperactive. PMID:27995966

  6. Real-time Closed-loop Control in a Rodent Model of Medically-induced Coma Using Burst Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ching, ShiNung; Liberman, Max Y.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Westover, M. Brandon; Kenny, Jonathan; Solt, Ken; Purdon, Patrick L.; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-01-01

    Background A medically-induced coma is an anesthetic state of profound brain inactivation created to treat status epilepticus and to provide cerebral protection following traumatic brain injuries. We hypothesized that a closed-loop anesthetic delivery system could automatically and precisely control the electroencephalogram state of burst suppression and efficiently maintain a medically-induced coma. Methods In six rats, we implemented a closed-loop anesthetic delivery system for propofol consisting of: a computer-controlled pump infusion, a two-compartment pharmacokinetics model defining propofol’s electroencephalogram effects, the burst suppression probability algorithm to compute in real time from the electroencephalogram the brain’s burst suppression state, an on-line parameter estimation procedure and a proportional-integral controller. In the control experiment each rat was randomly assigned to one of the six burst suppression probability target trajectories constructed by permuting the burst suppression probability levels of 0.4, 0.65 and 0.9 with linear transitions between levels. Results In each animal the controller maintained approximately 60 min of tight, real-time control of burst suppression by tracking each burst suppression probability target level for 15 min and two between-level transitions for 5 to 10 min. The posterior probability that the closed-loop anesthetic delivery system was reliable across all levels was 0.94 [95% confidence interval; (0.77 to 1.00) n = 18] and that the system was accurate was 1.00 [95% confidence interval; (0.84 to 1.00) n = 18]. Conclusion Our findings establish the feasibility of using a closed-loop anesthetic delivery systems to achieve in real-time reliable and accurate control of burst suppression in rodents and suggest a paradigm to precisely control medically-induced coma in patients. PMID:23770601

  7. Real-time closed-loop control in a rodent model of medically induced coma using burst suppression.

    PubMed

    Ching, ShiNung; Liberman, Max Y; Chemali, Jessica J; Westover, M Brandon; Kenny, Jonathan D; Solt, Ken; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N

    2013-10-01

    A medically induced coma is an anesthetic state of profound brain inactivation created to treat status epilepticus and to provide cerebral protection after traumatic brain injuries. The authors hypothesized that a closed-loop anesthetic delivery system could automatically and precisely control the electroencephalogram state of burst suppression and efficiently maintain a medically induced coma. In six rats, the authors implemented a closed-loop anesthetic delivery system for propofol consisting of: a computer-controlled pump infusion, a two-compartment pharmacokinetics model defining propofol's electroencephalogram effects, the burst-suppression probability algorithm to compute in real time from the electroencephalogram the brain's burst-suppression state, an online parameter-estimation procedure and a proportional-integral controller. In the control experiment each rat was randomly assigned to one of the six burst-suppression probability target trajectories constructed by permuting the burst-suppression probability levels of 0.4, 0.65, and 0.9 with linear transitions between levels. In each animal the controller maintained approximately 60 min of tight, real-time control of burst suppression by tracking each burst-suppression probability target level for 15 min and two between-level transitions for 5-10 min. The posterior probability that the closed-loop anesthetic delivery system was reliable across all levels was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.77-1.00; n = 18) and that the system was accurate across all levels was 1.00 (95% CI, 0.84-1.00; n = 18). The findings of this study establish the feasibility of using a closed-loop anesthetic delivery systems to achieve in real time reliable and accurate control of burst suppression in rodents and suggest a paradigm to precisely control medically induced coma in patients.

  8. Common structural features of different viroids: serial arrangement of double helical sections and internal loops.

    PubMed

    Langowski, J; Henco, K; Riesner, D; Sänger, H L

    1978-05-01

    The thermodynamic parameters of five different highly purified viroid "species" were determined by applying UV-absorption melting analysis and temperature jump methods. Their thermal denaturation proved to be a highly cooperative process with midpoint-temperatures (Tm) between 48.5 and 51 degrees C in 0.01 M sodium cacodylate, 1 mM EDTA, pH 6.8. The values of the apparent reaction enthalpies of the different viroid species range between 3,140 and 3,770 kJ/mol. Although the cooperativity is as high as found in homogeneous RNA double helices the Tm-value of viroid melting is more than 30 degrees C lower than in the homogeneous RNA. In order to explain this deviation, melting curves were simulated for different models of the secondary structure of viroids using literature values of the thermodynamic parameters of nucleic acids. Our calculations show that the following refinement of our earlier model is in complete accordance with the experimental data: In their native conformation viroids exist as an extended rodlike structure characterized by a series of double helical sections and internal loops. In the different viroid species 250-300 nucleotides out of total 350 nucleotides are needed to interprete the thermodynamic behaviour.

  9. Common structural features of different viroids: serial arrangement of double helical sections and internal loops.

    PubMed Central

    Langowski, J; Henco, K; Riesner, D; Sänger, H L

    1978-01-01

    The thermodynamic parameters of five different highly purified viroid "species" were determined by applying UV-absorption melting analysis and temperature jump methods. Their thermal denaturation proved to be a highly cooperative process with midpoint-temperatures (Tm) between 48.5 and 51 degrees C in 0.01 M sodium cacodylate, 1 mM EDTA, pH 6.8. The values of the apparent reaction enthalpies of the different viroid species range between 3,140 and 3,770 kJ/mol. Although the cooperativity is as high as found in homogeneous RNA double helices the Tm-value of viroid melting is more than 30 degrees C lower than in the homogeneous RNA. In order to explain this deviation, melting curves were simulated for different models of the secondary structure of viroids using literature values of the thermodynamic parameters of nucleic acids. Our calculations show that the following refinement of our earlier model is in complete accordance with the experimental data: In their native conformation viroids exist as an extended rodlike structure characterized by a series of double helical sections and internal loops. In the different viroid species 250-300 nucleotides out of total 350 nucleotides are needed to interprete the thermodynamic behaviour. PMID:662695

  10. Insights into the Structure, Correlated Motions, and Electrostatic Properties of Two HIV-1 gp120 V3 Loops

    PubMed Central

    Kieslich, Chris A.; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    The V3 loop of the glycoprotein 120 (gp120) is a contact point for cell entry of HIV-1 leading to infection. Despite sequence variability and lack of specific structure, the highly flexible V3 loop possesses a well-defined role in recognizing and selecting cell-bound coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 through a mechanism of charge complementarity. We have performed two independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to gain insights into the dynamic character of two V3 loops with slightly different sequences, but significantly different starting crystallographic structures. We have identified highly populated trajectory-specific salt bridges between oppositely charged stem residues Arg9 and Glu25 or Asp29. The two trajectories share nearly identical correlated motions within the simulations, despite their different overall structures. High occupancy salt bridges play a key role in the major cross-correlated motions in both trajectories, and may be responsible for transient structural stability in preparation for coreceptor binding. In addition, the two V3 loops visit conformations with similarities in spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials, despite their inherent flexibility, which may play a role in coreceptor recognition. It is plausible that cooperativity between overall electrostatic potential, charged residue interactions, and correlated motions could be associated with a coreceptor selection and binding. PMID:23185486

  11. Chaperonin function depends on structure and disorder in co-chaperonin mobile loops.

    PubMed

    Landry, S J; Steede, N K; Garaudy, A M; Maskos, K; Viitanen, P V

    1999-01-01

    Co-chaperonins from diverse organisms exhibit mobile loops which fold into a beta hairpin conformation upon binding to the chaperonin. GroES, Gp31, and human Hsp10 mobile loops exhibit a preference for the beta hairpin conformation in the free co-chaperonins, and the conformational dynamics of the human Hsp10 mobile loop appear to be restricted by nascent hairpin formation. Backbone conformational entropy must weigh against binding of co-chaperonins to chaperonins, and thus the conformational preferences of the loops may strongly influence chaperonin-binding affinity. Indeed, subtle mutations in the loops change GroEL-binding affinity and cause defects in chaperonin function, and these defects can be suppressed by mutations in GroEL which compensate for the changes in affinity. The fact that high-affinity co-chaperonin binding impairs chaperonin function has implications for the mechanism of chaperonin-assisted protein folding.

  12. Mitochondrial D310 D-Loop instability and histological subtypes in radiation-induced cutaneous basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Paula; Pereira, Dina; Mendes, Adélia; Batista, Rui; da Silva, André Ferreira; Guimarães, Isabel; Honavar, Mrinalini; Teixeira-Gomes, José; Lopes, José Manuel; Máximo, Valdemar; Soares, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequent skin cancer. An elevated prevalence of BCC has been associated with radiation, namely after the Tinea capitis epilation treatment, being these tumors described as more aggressive. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been reported in many human tumors, but their occurrence in BCC is poorly documented. The purpose of this work was to evaluate BCC histological subtypes in individuals subjected to X-ray epilation for Tinea capitis treatment when compared to non-irradiated patients. Moreover we also wanted to evaluate mitochondrial D-Loop instability in both groups of BCCs in order to compare the frequency of D-Loop mutations in post-irradiation BCC versus sporadic BCC. 228 histological specimens corresponding to BCCs from 75 irradiated patients and 60 non-irradiated patients were re-evaluated for histological subtype. Subsequently, we sequenced the D-Loop 310 repeat in blood, oral mucosa, tumor lesions and, whenever available, non-tumoral adjacent tissue from these patients. The infiltrative subtype of BCC, considered to be more aggressive, was significantly more frequent in irradiated patients. BCC D-Loop D310 mutation rate was significantly higher in irradiated BCCs than in the non-irradiated ones. Moreover, it was associated with a higher irradiation dose. The presence of mtDNA heteroplasmy in patients' blood was associated with a higher mutation rate in the BCCs suggesting that a more unstable genotype could predispose to mtDNA somatic mutation. Our results suggest that radiation-induced BCCs may be considered to be more aggressive tumors. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of mtDNA D-Loop mutations in tumors from irradiated patients. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutation-induced loop opening and energetics for binding of tamiflu to influenza N8 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-05-31

    Tamiflu, also known as oseltamivir (OTV), binds to influenza A neuraminidase (H5N1) with very high affinity (0.32 nM). However, this inhibitor binds to other neuraminidases as well. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the mechanism underlying the binding of oseltamivir to N8 neuraminidase (NA) in "open" and "closed" conformations of the 150-loop through molecular dynamics simulations and the popular and well established molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann (MM-PBSA) free energy calculation method. Whereas the closed conformation is stable for wild type N8, it transforms into the open conformation for the mutants Y252H, H274Y, and R292K, indicating that bound to oseltamivir these mutants are preferentially in the open conformation. Our calculations show that the binding of wild type oseltamivir to the closed conformation of N8 neuraminidase is energetically favored compared to the binding to the open conformation. We observe water mediated binding of oseltamivir to the N8 neuraminidase in both conformations which is not seen in the case of binding of the same drug to the H5N1 neuraminidase. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the mechanisms underlying the binding and changes in affinity due to mutations. Considering the mutant N8 variants in the open conformation adopted during the simulations, we observe a significant loss in the size of the total binding free energy for the N8(Y252H)-OTV, N8(H274Y)-OTV, and N8(R292K)-OTV complexes compared to N8(WT)-OTV, mainly due to the decrease in the size of the intermolecular electrostatic energy. For R292K, an unfavorable shift in the van der Waals interactions also contributes to the drug resistance. The mutations cause a significant expansion in the active site cavity, increasing its solvent accessible surface compared to the crystal structures of both the open and closed conformations. Our study underscores the need to consider dynamics in rationalizing the

  14. Structure of force networks in tapped particulate systems of disks and pentagons. I. Clusters and loops.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Carlevaro, C Manuel; Kramár, M; Mischaikow, K; Kondic, L

    2016-06-01

    The force network of a granular assembly, defined by the contact network and the corresponding contact forces, carries valuable information about the state of the packing. Simple analysis of these networks based on the distribution of force strengths is rather insensitive to the changes in preparation protocols or to the types of particles. In this and the companion paper [Kondic et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062903 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062903], we consider two-dimensional simulations of tapped systems built from frictional disks and pentagons, and study the structure of the force networks of granular packings by considering network's topology as force thresholds are varied. We show that the number of clusters and loops observed in the force networks as a function of the force threshold are markedly different for disks and pentagons if the tangential contact forces are considered, whereas they are surprisingly similar for the network defined by the normal forces. In particular, the results indicate that, overall, the force network is more heterogeneous for disks than for pentagons. Such differences in network properties are expected to lead to different macroscale response of the considered systems, despite the fact that averaged measures (such as force probability density function) do not show any obvious differences. Additionally, we show that the states obtained by tapping with different intensities that display similar packing fraction are difficult to distinguish based on simple topological invariants.

  15. Statistical characterization of the internal structure of noiselike pulses using a nonlinear optical loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottiez, O.; Paez-Aguirre, R.; Cruz, J. L.; Andrés, M. V.; Kuzin, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we study statistically the internal structure of noiselike pulses generated by a passively mode-locked fiber laser. For this purpose, we use a technique that allows estimating the distribution of the amplitudes of the sub-pulses in the bunch. The technique takes advantage of the fast response of the optical Kerr effect in a fiber nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM). It requires the measurement of the energy transfer characteristic of the pulses through the NOLM, and the numerical resolution of a system of nonlinear algebraic equations. The results yield a strongly asymmetric distribution, with a high-amplitude tail that is compatible with the existence of extreme-intensity sub-pulses in the bunch. Following the recent discovery of pulse-energy rogue waves and spectral rogue waves in the noiselike pulse regime, we propose a new way to look for extreme events in this particular mode of operation of mode-locked fiber lasers, and confirm that rogue wave generation is a key ingredient in the complex dynamics of these unconventional pulses.

  16. Repetitive formation and decay of current sheets in magnetic loops: An origin of diverse magnetic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bhattacharyya, R.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2015-01-15

    In this work, evolution of an incompressible, thermally homogeneous, infinitely conducting, viscous magnetofluid is numerically explored as the fluid undergoes repeated events of magnetic reconnection. The initial magnetic field is constructed by a superposition of two linear force-free fields and has similar morphology as the magnetic loops observed in the solar corona. The results are presented for computations with three distinct sets of footpoint geometries. To onset reconnection, we rely on numerical model magnetic diffusivity, in the spirit of implicit large eddy simulation. It is generally expected that in a high Lundquist number fluid, repeated magnetic reconnections are ubiquitous and hence can lead to a host of magnetic structures with considerable observational importance. In particular, the simulations presented here illustrate formations of magnetic islands, rotating magnetic helices and rising flux ropes—depending on the initial footpoint geometry but through the common process of repeated magnetic reconnections. Further, we observe the development of extended current sheets in two case studies, where the footpoint reconnections generate favorable dynamics.

  17. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  18. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  19. Structure-function relationships of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and of a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein in their interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, T.L. )

    1991-11-12

    Peptides corresponding to portions of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and to a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein were synthetically modified in order to gain information on structure-function relationships of neurotoxin loop 2 interactions with the acetylcholine receptor. Binding of synthetic peptides to the acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo electric organ membranes was assessed by measuring their ability to inhibit the binding of {sup 125}I-{alpha}-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The peptides showing the highest affinity for the receptor were a peptide corresponding to the sequence of loop 2 (residues 25-44) of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) toxin b and the structurally similar segment of CVS rabies virus glycoprotein. These affinities were comparable to those of d-tubocurarine and suberyldicholine. These results demonstrate the importance of loop 2 in the neurotoxin interaction with the receptor. N- and C-terminal deletions of the loop 2 peptides and substitution of residues invariant or highly conserved among neurotoxins were performed in order to determine the role of individual residues in binding. Residues 25-40 are the most crucial in the interaction with the acetylcholine receptor. Since this region of the glycoprotein contains residues corresponding to all of the functionally invariant neurotoxin residues, it may interact with the acetylcholine receptor through a mechanism similar to that of the neurotoxins.

  20. Using the Theory of Elasticity to Model the Structure of DNA Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaeff, Alexander; Mahadevan, L.; Schulten, Klaus

    2000-03-01

    A fast computational method to study the conformation and energetics of short DNA loops is presented. The DNA is modeled as an electrically charged elastic rod. The ensemble of equilibrium conformations of the DNA loop, attainable for given boundary conditions, is generated as a set of numerical solutions to the equations of the Kirchhoff-Love theory of elasticity. The equations are augmented by electrostatic and van der Waals force terms. These modifications allow one to account for the DNA self-repulsion and to model the DNA loop interactions with other macromolecules, involved in a biomolecular system. We demonstrate the application of the method to the test system: the looped lac operon promoter of E. coli clamped by the repressor protein and stabilized by the catabolite gene activator protein. The developed coarse-grained modeling method provides the basis for multi-resolution modeling of protein-DNA complexes, e.g., in combination with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

  1. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C.H.; Lockshin, C.; Rich, A.

    1995-04-25

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-{angstrom} resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C-C{sup +} hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5{prime} thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5{prime} end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3{prime} end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1995-01-01

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-A resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C.C+ hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5' thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5' end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3' end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands.

  3. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1995-01-01

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-A resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C.C+ hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5' thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5' end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3' end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands.

  4. GABA(A) receptor M2-M3 loop secondary structure and changes in accessibility during channel gating.

    PubMed

    Bera, Amal K; Chatav, Maya; Akabas, Myles H

    2002-11-08

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor M2-M3 loop structure and its role in gating were investigated using the substituted cysteine accessibility method. Residues from alpha(1)Arg-273 to alpha(1)Ile-289 were mutated to cysteine, one at a time. MTSET(+) or MTSES(-) reacted with all mutants from alpha(1)R273C to alpha(1)Y281C, except alpha(1)P277C, in the absence and presence of GABA. The MTSET(+) closed-state reaction rate was >1000 liters/mol-s at alpha(1)N274C, alpha(1)S275C, alpha(1)K278C, and alpha(1)Y281C and was <300 liters/mol-s at alpha(1)R273C, alpha(1)L276C, alpha(1)V279C, alpha(1)A280C, and alpha(1)A284C. These two groups of residues lie on opposite sides of an alpha-helix. The fast reacting group lies on a continuation of the M2 segment channel-lining helix face. This suggests that the M2 segment alpha-helix extends about two helical turns beyond alpha(1)N274 (20'), aligned with the extracellular ring of charge. At alpha(1)S275C, alpha(1)V279C, alpha(1)A280C, and alpha(1)A284C the reaction rate was faster in the presence of GABA. The reagents had no functional effect on the mutants from alpha(1)A282C to alpha(1)I289C, except alpha(1)A284C. Access may be sterically hindered possibly by close interaction with the extracellular domain. We suggest that the M2 segment alpha-helix extends beyond the predicted extracellular end of the M2 segment and that gating induces a conformational change in and/or around the N-terminal half of the M2-M3 loop. Implications for coupling ligand-evoked conformational changes in the extracellular domain to channel gating in the membrane-spanning domain are discussed.

  5. Structures of native and complexed complement factor D: implications of the atypical His57 conformation and self-inhibitory loop in the regulation of specific serine protease activity.

    PubMed

    Jing, H; Babu, Y S; Moore, D; Kilpatrick, J M; Liu, X Y; Volanakis, J E; Narayana, S V

    1998-10-09

    Factor D is a serine protease essential for the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. The structures of native factor D and a complex formed with isatoic anhydride inhibitor were determined at resolution of 2.3 and 1.5 A, respectively, in an isomorphous monoclinic crystal form containing one molecule per asymmetric unit. The native structure was compared with structures determined previously in a triclinic cell containing two molecules with different active site conformations. The current structure shows greater similarity with molecule B in the triclinic cell, suggesting that this may be the dominant factor D conformation in solution. The major conformational differences with molecule A in the triclinic cell are located in four regions, three of which are close to the active site and include some of the residues shown to be critical for factor D catalytic activity. The conformational flexibility associated with these regions is proposed to provide a structural basis for the previously proposed substrate-induced reversible conformational changes in factor D. The high-resolution structure of the factor D/isatoic anhydride complex reveals the binding mode of the mechanism-based inhibitor. The higher specificity towards factor D over trypsin and thrombin is based on hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitor benzyl ring and the aliphatic side-chain of Arg218 that is salt bridged with Asp189 at the bottom of the primary specificity (S1) pocket. Comparison of factor D structural variants with other serine protease structures revealed the presence of a unique "self-inhibitory loop". This loop (214-218) dictates the resting-state conformation of factor D by (1) preventing His57 from adopting active tautomer conformation, (2) preventing the P1 to P3 residues of the substrate from forming anti-parallel beta-sheets with the non-specific substrate binding loop, and (3) blocking the accessibility of Asp189 to the positive1y charged P1 residue of the

  6. Toxin-neutralizing antibodies protect against Clostridium perfringens-induced necrosis in an intestinal loop model for bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Evy; Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Valgaeren, Bonnie R; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Schauvliege, Stijn; Rodrigo-Mocholí, Diego; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet R; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-06-13

    Bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis is caused by Clostridium perfringens type A. Due to the rapid progress and fatal outcome of the disease, vaccination would be of high value. In this study, C. perfringens toxins, either as native toxins or after formaldehyde inactivation, were evaluated as possible vaccine antigens. We determined whether antisera raised in calves against these toxins were able to protect against C. perfringens challenge in an intestinal loop model for bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis. Alpha toxin and perfringolysin O were identified as the most immunogenic proteins in the vaccine preparations. All vaccines evoked a high antibody response against the causative toxins, alpha toxin and perfringolysin O, as detected by ELISA. All antibodies were able to inhibit the activity of alpha toxin and perfringolysin O in vitro. However, the antibodies raised against the native toxins were more inhibitory to the C. perfringens-induced cytotoxicity (as tested on bovine endothelial cells) and only these antibodies protected against C. perfringens challenge in the intestinal loop model. Although immunization of calves with both native and formaldehyde inactivated toxins resulted in high antibody titers against alpha toxin and perfringolysin O, only antibodies raised against native toxins protect against C. perfringens challenge in an intestinal loop model for bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis.

  7. Possible use of spin-vortex-induced loop currents as qubits: A numerical simulation for two-qubit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaura, Hikaru; Koizumi, Hiroyasu

    2016-02-01

    We propose new qubits; they are nano-sized persistent loop currents called, the spin-vortex-induced loop currents (SVILCs), predicted to exist in hole doped cuprate superconductors in one of the proposed mechanisms of the cuprate superconductivity. In the SVILC theory for the cuprate superconductivity, the superconducting state arises when the network of SVILCs generates a macroscopic current as a collection of the loop currents. The predicted SVILC has a number of properties that are suitable for qubits: each SVILC is characterized by topological winding number, thus, expected to be robust against environmental perturbations; because of the smallness of their size, they can be assembled into a large qubit-number system in a small space. Energy levels of different current patterns of the SVILC system are split by an external inhomogeneous magnetic field, and they are used as qubit states. The quantum gate control is achieved by the Rabi oscillation using electric dipole transitions. We have calculated the transition dipole moments between different SVILC qubit states. Some of the calculated values are relatively large, around 10-30 C m. We have also performed a numerical simulation for the Glover's search algorithm using the two-qubit SVILC system. The search completes in a nanosecond order using the electromagnetic field with electric field amplitude 105 V/m. The present results indicate the quantum gate control capability of the SVILC qubits, and suggest the potentiality to satisfy DiVincenzo's criteria for quantum computers.

  8. Characterization of strain-induced martensite phase in austenitic stainless steel using a magnetic minor-loop scaling relation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Saito, Atsushi; Takahashi, Seiki; Kamada, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Hiroaki

    2008-05-05

    We propose a combined magnetic method using a scaling power-law rule and initial permeability in magnetic minor hysteresis loops for characterization of ferromagnetic {alpha}{sup '} martensites in austenitic stainless steel. The scaling power law between the hysteresis loss and remanence is universal, being independent of volume fraction of strain-induced {alpha}{sup '} martensites. A coefficient of the power law largely decreases with volume fraction, while the initial permeability linearly increases, reflecting a change in the morphology and quantity of martensites, respectively. The present method is highly effective for integrity assessment of austenitic stainless steels because of the sensitivity and extremely low measurement field.

  9. PANET: A GPU-Based Tool for Fast Parallel Analysis of Robustness Dynamics and Feed-Forward/Feedback Loop Structures in Large-Scale Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Hung-Cuong; Le, Duc-Hau; Kwon, Yung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    It has been a challenge in systems biology to unravel relationships between structural properties and dynamic behaviors of biological networks. A Cytoscape plugin named NetDS was recently proposed to analyze the robustness-related dynamics and feed-forward/feedback loop structures of biological networks. Despite such a useful function, limitations on the network size that can be analyzed exist due to high computational costs. In addition, the plugin cannot verify an intrinsic property which can be induced by an observed result because it has no function to simulate the observation on a large number of random networks. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel software tool, PANET. First, the time-consuming parts of NetDS were redesigned to be processed in parallel using the OpenCL library. This approach utilizes the full computing power of multi-core central processing units and graphics processing units. Eventually, this made it possible to investigate a large-scale network such as a human signaling network with 1,609 nodes and 5,063 links. We also developed a new function to perform a batch-mode simulation where it generates a lot of random networks and conducts robustness calculations and feed-forward/feedback loop examinations of them. This helps us to determine if the findings in real biological networks are valid in arbitrary random networks or not. We tested our plugin in two case studies based on two large-scale signaling networks and found interesting results regarding relationships between coherently coupled feed-forward/feedback loops and robustness. In addition, we verified whether or not those findings are consistently conserved in random networks through batch-mode simulations. Taken together, our plugin is expected to effectively investigate various relationships between dynamics and structural properties in large-scale networks. Our software tool, user manual and example datasets are freely available at http

  10. PANET: a GPU-based tool for fast parallel analysis of robustness dynamics and feed-forward/feedback loop structures in large-scale biological networks.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Hung-Cuong; Le, Duc-Hau; Kwon, Yung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    It has been a challenge in systems biology to unravel relationships between structural properties and dynamic behaviors of biological networks. A Cytoscape plugin named NetDS was recently proposed to analyze the robustness-related dynamics and feed-forward/feedback loop structures of biological networks. Despite such a useful function, limitations on the network size that can be analyzed exist due to high computational costs. In addition, the plugin cannot verify an intrinsic property which can be induced by an observed result because it has no function to simulate the observation on a large number of random networks. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel software tool, PANET. First, the time-consuming parts of NetDS were redesigned to be processed in parallel using the OpenCL library. This approach utilizes the full computing power of multi-core central processing units and graphics processing units. Eventually, this made it possible to investigate a large-scale network such as a human signaling network with 1,609 nodes and 5,063 links. We also developed a new function to perform a batch-mode simulation where it generates a lot of random networks and conducts robustness calculations and feed-forward/feedback loop examinations of them. This helps us to determine if the findings in real biological networks are valid in arbitrary random networks or not. We tested our plugin in two case studies based on two large-scale signaling networks and found interesting results regarding relationships between coherently coupled feed-forward/feedback loops and robustness. In addition, we verified whether or not those findings are consistently conserved in random networks through batch-mode simulations. Taken together, our plugin is expected to effectively investigate various relationships between dynamics and structural properties in large-scale networks. Our software tool, user manual and example datasets are freely available at http://panet-csc.sourceforge.net/.

  11. Contributions of Charged Residues in Structurally Dynamic Capsid Surface Loops to Rous Sarcoma Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Heyrana, Katrina J.; Goh, Boon Chong; Nguyen, Tam-Linh N.; England, Matthew R.; Bewley, Maria C.; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extensive studies of orthoretroviral capsids have shown that many regions of the CA protein play unique roles at different points in the virus life cycle. The N-terminal domain (NTD) flexible-loop (FL) region is one such example: exposed on the outer capsid surface, it has been implicated in Gag-mediated particle assembly, capsid maturation, and early replication events. We have now defined the contributions of charged residues in the FL region of the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA to particle assembly. Effects of mutations on assembly were assessed in vivo and in vitro and analyzed in light of new RSV Gag lattice models. Virus replication was strongly dependent on the preservation of charge at a few critical positions in Gag-Gag interfaces. In particular, a cluster of charges at the beginning of FL contributes to an extensive electrostatic network that is important for robust Gag assembly and subsequent capsid maturation. Second-site suppressor analysis suggests that one of these charged residues, D87, has distal influence on interhexamer interactions involving helix α7. Overall, the tolerance of FL to most mutations is consistent with current models of Gag lattice structures. However, the results support the interpretation that virus evolution has achieved a charge distribution across the capsid surface that (i) permits the packing of NTD domains in the outer layer of the Gag shell, (ii) directs the maturational rearrangements of the NTDs that yield a functional core structure, and (iii) supports capsid function during the early stages of virus infection. IMPORTANCE The production of infectious retrovirus particles is a complex process, a choreography of protein and nucleic acid that occurs in two distinct stages: formation and release from the cell of an immature particle followed by an extracellular maturation phase during which the virion proteins and nucleic acids undergo major rearrangements that activate the infectious potential of the virion. This

  12. Structural discrimination of robustness in transcriptional feedforward loops for pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-02-14

    Signaling pathways are interconnected to regulatory circuits for sensing the environment and expressing the appropriate genetic profile. In particular, gradients of diffusing molecules (morphogens) determine cell fate at a given position, dictating development and spatial organization. The feedforward loop (FFL) circuit is among the simplest genetic architectures able to generate one-stripe patterns by operating as an amplitude detection device, where high output levels are achieved at intermediate input ones. Here, using a heuristic optimization-based approach, we dissected the design space containing all possible topologies and parameter values of the FFL circuits. We explored the ability of being sensitive or adaptive to variations in the critical morphogen level where cell fate is switched. We found four different solutions for precision, corresponding to the four incoherent architectures, but remarkably only one mode for adaptiveness, the incoherent type 4 (I4-FFL). We further carried out a theoretical study to unveil the design principle for such structural discrimination, finding that the synergistic action and cooperative binding on the downstream promoter are instrumental to achieve absolute adaptive responses. Subsequently, we analyzed the robustness of these optimal circuits against perturbations in the kinetic parameters and molecular noise, which has allowed us to depict a scenario where adaptiveness, parameter sensitivity and noise tolerance are different, correlated facets of the robustness of the I4-FFL circuit. Strikingly, we showed a strong correlation between the input (environment-related) and the intrinsic (mutation-related) susceptibilities. Finally, we discussed the evolution of incoherent regulations in terms of multifunctionality and robustness.

  13. Structural Discrimination of Robustness in Transcriptional Feedforward Loops for Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Elena, Santiago F.

    2011-01-01

    Signaling pathways are interconnected to regulatory circuits for sensing the environment and expressing the appropriate genetic profile. In particular, gradients of diffusing molecules (morphogens) determine cell fate at a given position, dictating development and spatial organization. The feedforward loop (FFL) circuit is among the simplest genetic architectures able to generate one-stripe patterns by operating as an amplitude detection device, where high output levels are achieved at intermediate input ones. Here, using a heuristic optimization-based approach, we dissected the design space containing all possible topologies and parameter values of the FFL circuits. We explored the ability of being sensitive or adaptive to variations in the critical morphogen level where cell fate is switched. We found four different solutions for precision, corresponding to the four incoherent architectures, but remarkably only one mode for adaptiveness, the incoherent type 4 (I4-FFL). We further carried out a theoretical study to unveil the design principle for such structural discrimination, finding that the synergistic action and cooperative binding on the downstream promoter are instrumental to achieve absolute adaptive responses. Subsequently, we analyzed the robustness of these optimal circuits against perturbations in the kinetic parameters and molecular noise, which has allowed us to depict a scenario where adaptiveness, parameter sensitivity and noise tolerance are different, correlated facets of the robustness of the I4-FFL circuit. Strikingly, we showed a strong correlation between the input (environment-related) and the intrinsic (mutation-related) susceptibilities. Finally, we discussed the evolution of incoherent regulations in terms of multifunctionality and robustness. PMID:21340024

  14. Polarimetric fiber vibration sensor based on polarization-diversity loop structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungsoo; Kim, Young Suk; Jo, Songhyun; Lee, Yong Wook

    2015-07-01

    Here, we demonstrated a polarimetric fiber vibration sensor based on a polarization-diversity loop structure (PDLS) by using polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF). The PDLS is composed of a polarization beam splitter, PM-PCF, and polarization controllers, forming a Sagnac birefringence interferometer (SBI) that has periodic interference spectra. When static strain is applied to PM-PCF used as a sensor head, spectral shift is observed in the output interference spectrum of the SBI of the sensor. If a monochromatic light source such as a laser diode is introduced into the SBI, the output optical power of the SBI is determined by its wavelength-dependent transmittance. If the wavelength of the light source is properly located at a spectral region where the transmittance of the SBI linearly varies, therefore, the magnitude of strain applied to PM-PCF can be found by observing the output voltage variation of a photodetector connected to the output port of the SBI. To investigate the vibration response of the proposed sensor with respect to various types of vibration, vibration diverse in the amplitude and frequency was applied to 8-cm-long PM-PCF by using a cylindrical piezoelectric transducer or a metal cantilever. First, vibration characteristics were examined for single frequency vibration in a range of 1-3000 Hz. Then, the sensor response to naturally damped vibration was explored. It was experimentally observed that the cut-off frequency was ~1900 Hz in the frequency response, and the peak value of the sensor output signal increased with the amount of impulse for naturally damped vibration.

  15. Thermally induced flow oscillation in vertical two-phase natural circulation loop

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yong; Ishii, Mamoru

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the two-phase natural circulation during a small break loss of coolant accident in LWR, simulation experiments have been performed using Freon-113 boiling and condensation loop. In quasi-steady state, the flow became relatively stabilized and certain regular patterns of flow oscillations were detected with ranges of periods in 8-/approximately/35 seconds and 2.5-/approximately/4 minutes. In order to find out the nature of these oscillations, one-dimensional field equations for the single-phase (liquid) and two-phase region were set up, and these field equations were integrated along the loop. The homogeneous flow model was used for the two-phase region. Then the characteristic equation was derived using perturbation method. Thermal non-equilibrium and compressibility of each phase were not considered in the present analysis. The characteristic equation derived can be used to obtain the stability criteria. A simplified approach showed that the short-period oscillation were the manometer oscillation. The longer period oscillations were the density wave oscillation which had the period of oscillations close to the residence time of a fluid around the loop.

  16. Correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure behind an interplanetary shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Reinhard, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    From a survey of observations on ISEE-3, an example of correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure is presented. Bidirectional proton fluxes were observed for a period of 40 hours in the energy range 35-1600 keV approximately 12 hours after the passage of the interplanetary shock of December 11, 1980, and directly after the passage of a discontinuity. For each of the eight logarithmically spaced energy channels, a three-dimensional anisotropy analysis reveals streaming along both directions of the magnetic field. The magnetic field rotated slowly but steadily through approximately 180 deg during this same 40-hour period; this is consistent with the existence of a large-scale loop with extent greater than 0.5 AU. The observations suggest that the particles are being injected into the loop sunward of the spacecraft; they appear as bidirectional fluxes in the outermost regions of the loop arising from a combination of focusing and near scatter-free transport.

  17. Loop models of low coronal structures observed by the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope (NIXT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peres, G.; Reale, F.; Golub, L.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray pictures obtained with the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope (NIXT), apart from the ubiquitous coronal loops well known from previous X-ray observations, show a new and peculiar morphology: in many active regions there are wide and apparently low-lying areas of intense emission which resemble H alpha plages. By means of hydrostatic models of coronal arches, we analyze the distribution of temperature, density, emission measure, and plasma emissivity in the spectral band to which NIXT is sensitive, and we show that the above morphology can be explained by the characteristics of high pressure loops having a thin region of high surface brightness at the base. We therefore propose that this finding might help to identify high-pressure X-ray emitting coronal regions in NIXT images, and it is in principle applicable to any imaging instrument which has high sensitivity to 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 6) K plasma within a narrow coronal-temperature passband. As a more general result of this study, we propose that the comparison of NIXT observations with models of stationary loops might provide a new diagnostic: the determination of the loop plasma pressure from measurements of brightness distribution along the loop.

  18. Structural Characterization of an LPA1 Second Extracellular Loop Mimetic with a Self-Assembling Coiled-Coil Folding Constraint.

    PubMed

    Young, John K; Clayton, Benjamin T; Kikonyogo, Alexandra; Pham, Truc-Chi T; Parrill, Abby L

    2013-01-29

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structures are of interest as a means to understand biological signal transduction and as tools for therapeutic discovery. The growing number of GPCR crystal structures demonstrates that the extracellular loops (EL) connecting the membrane-spanning helices show tremendous structural variability relative to the more structurally-conserved seven transmembrane α-helical domains. The EL of the LPA(1) receptor have not yet been conclusively resolved, and bear limited sequence identity to known structures. This study involved development of a peptide to characterize the intrinsic structure of the LPA(1) GPCR second EL. The loop was embedded between two helices that assemble into a coiled-coil, which served as a receptor-mimetic folding constraint (LPA(1)-CC-EL2 peptide). The ensemble of structures from multi-dimensional NMR experiments demonstrated that a robust coiled-coil formed without noticeable deformation due to the EL2 sequence. In contrast, the EL2 sequence showed well-defined structure only near its C-terminal residues. The NMR ensemble was combined with a computational model of the LPA(1) receptor that had previously been validated. The resulting hybrid models were evaluated using docking. Nine different hybrid models interacted with LPA 18:1 as expected, based on prior mutagenesis studies, and one was additionally consistent with antagonist affinity trends.

  19. Induced-fit motion of a lid loop involved in catalysis in alginate lyase A1-III.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Bunzo; Ban, Mizuho; Suzuki, Sachiko; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Miyake, Osamu; Yamasaki, Masayuki; Ogura, Kohei; Maruyama, Yukie; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2012-09-01

    The structures of two mutants (H192A and Y246F) of a mannuronate-specific alginate lyase, A1-III, from Sphingomonas species A1 complexed with a tetrasaccharide substrate [4-deoxy-L-erythro-hex-4-ene-pyranosyluronate-(mannuronate)(2)-mannuronic acid] were determined by X-ray crystallography at around 2.2 Å resolution together with the apo form of the H192A mutant. The final models of the complex forms, which comprised two monomers (of 353 amino-acid residues each), 268-287 water molecules and two tetrasaccharide substrates, had R factors of around 0.17. A large conformational change occurred in the position of the lid loop (residues 64-85) in holo H192A and Y246F compared with that in apo H192A. The lid loop migrated about 14 Å from an open form to a closed form to interact with the bound tetrasaccharide and a catalytic residue. The tetrasaccharide was bound in the active cleft at subsites -3 to +1 as a substrate form in which the glycosidic linkage to be cleaved existed between subsites -1 and +1. In particular, the O(η) atom of Tyr68 in the closed lid loop forms a hydrogen bond to the side chain of a presumed catalytic residue, O(η) of Tyr246, which acts both as an acid and a base catalyst in a syn mechanism.

  20. The role of high loop gain induced by intermittent hypoxia in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Naomi L; Catcheside, Peter G

    2015-08-01

    Intermittent hypoxia and unstable breathing are key features of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), the most common pathological problem of breathing in sleep. Unstable ventilatory control is characterised by high loop gain (LG), and likely contributes to cyclical airway obstruction by promoting airway collapse during periods of low ventilatory drive. Potential new strategies to treat OSA include manipulations designed to lower LG. However, the contribution of inherent versus induced LG abnormalities in OSA remains unclear. Hence, a better understanding of the mechanisms causing high LG in OSA is needed to guide the design of LG based treatments. OSA patients exhibit abnormal chemoreflex control which contributes to increased LG. These abnormalities have been shown to normalise after continuous positive airway pressure treatment, suggesting induced rather than inherent trait abnormalities. Experimental intermittent hypoxia, mimicking OSA, increases hypoxic chemosensitivity and induces long term facilitation; a sustained increase in ventilatory neural output which outlasts the original stimulus. These neuroplastic changes induce the same abnormalities in chemoreflex control as seen in OSA patients. This review outlines the evidence to support that a key component of high LG in OSA is induced by intermittent hypoxia, and is reversed by simply preventing this inducing stimulus.

  1. The effects of magnetic structure on the conduction cooling of flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.

    1979-01-01

    A model of the sheared magnetic field in a coronal loop is used to evaluate the average cross-field suppression of axial thermal conduction. If the energy source is uniform in radius, this can lead to heat-flux reduction by a factor greater than three. When the source is annular, in a region of radius where the current density and shear are peaked, the effect can be significantly larger. In one extreme case, however, in which magnetic tearing provides the heating in a very narrow layer, the spatial resonance of the source excitation in a long loop leads to approximately axial conduction.

  2. Evidence for small-molecule-mediated loop stabilization in the structure of the isolated Pin1 WW domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mortenson, David E.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Yun, Hyun Gi; Gellman, Samuel H. Forest, Katrina T.

    2013-12-01

    Two structures of a small protein with a defined tertiary fold, the isolated Pin1 WW domain, have been determined via racemic crystallization with small-molecule additives. These additives, which are either racemic or achiral, appear to stabilize a dynamic loop region of the structure. The human Pin1 WW domain is a small autonomously folding protein that has been useful as a model system for biophysical studies of β-sheet folding. This domain has resisted previous attempts at crystallization for X-ray diffraction studies, perhaps because of intrinsic conformational flexibility that interferes with the formation of a crystal lattice. Here, the crystal structure of the human Pin1 WW domain has been obtained via racemic crystallization in the presence of small-molecule additives. Both enantiomers of a 36-residue variant of the Pin1 WW domain were synthesized chemically, and the l- and d-polypeptides were combined to afford diffracting crystals. The structural data revealed packing interactions of small carboxylic acids, either achiral citrate or a d,l mixture of malic acid, with a mobile loop region of the WW-domain fold. These interactions with solution additives may explain our success in crystallization of this protein racemate. Molecular-dynamics simulations starting from the structure of the Pin1 WW domain suggest that the crystal structure closely resembles the conformation of this domain in solution. The structural data presented here should provide a basis for further studies of this important model system.

  3. A divalent ion is crucial in the structure and dominant-negative function of ID proteins, a class of helix-loop-helix transcription regulators.

    PubMed

    Wong, Marie Vivian; Jiang, Sizun; Palasingam, Paaventhan; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of DNA binding and differentiation (ID) proteins, a dominant-negative group of helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription regulators, are well-characterized key players in cellular fate determination during development in mammals as well as Drosophila. Although not oncogenes themselves, their upregulation by various oncogenic proteins (such as Ras, Myc) and their inhibitory effects on cell cycle proteins (such as pRb) hint at their possible roles in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, their potency as inhibitors of cellular differentiation, through their heterodimerization with subsequent inactivation of the ubiquitous E proteins, suggest possible novel roles in engineering induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We present the high-resolution 2.1Å crystal structure of ID2 (HLH domain), coupled with novel biochemical insights in the presence of a divalent ion, possibly calcium (Ca2+), in the loop of ID proteins, which appear to be crucial for the structure and activity of ID proteins. These new insights will pave the way for new rational drug designs, in addition to current synthetic peptide options, against this potent player in tumorigenesis as well as more efficient ways for stem cells reprogramming.

  4. An adaptive and generalizable closed-loop system for control of medically induced coma and other states of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuxiao; Shanechi, Maryam M

    2016-12-01

    Design of closed-loop anesthetic delivery (CLAD) systems is an important topic, particularly for medically induced coma, which needs to be maintained for long periods. Current CLADs for medically induced coma require a separate offline experiment for model parameter estimation, which causes interruption in treatment and is difficult to perform. Also, CLADs may exhibit bias due to inherent time-variation and non-stationarity, and may have large infusion rate variations at steady state. Finally, current CLADs lack theoretical performance guarantees. We develop the first adaptive CLAD for medically induced coma, which addresses these limitations. Further, we extend our adaptive system to be generalizable to other states of anesthesia. We designed general parametric pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic and neural observation models with associated guidelines, and derived a novel adaptive controller. We further penalized large steady-state drug infusion rate variations in the controller. We derived theoretical guarantees that the adaptive system has zero steady-state bias. Using simulations that resembled real time-varying and noisy environments, we tested the closed-loop system for control of two different anesthetic states, burst suppression in medically induced coma and unconsciousness in general anesthesia. In 1200 simulations, the adaptive system achieved precise control of both anesthetic states despite non-stationarity, time-variation, noise, and no initial parameter knowledge. In both cases, the adaptive system performed close to a baseline system that knew the parameters exactly. In contrast, a non-adaptive system resulted in large steady-state bias and error. The adaptive system also resulted in significantly smaller steady-state infusion rate variations compared to prior systems. These results have significant implications for clinically viable CLAD design for a wide range of anesthetic states, with potential cost-saving and therapeutic benefits.

  5. An adaptive and generalizable closed-loop system for control of medically induced coma and other states of anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuxiao; Shanechi, Maryam M.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Design of closed-loop anesthetic delivery (CLAD) systems is an important topic, particularly for medically induced coma, which needs to be maintained for long periods. Current CLADs for medically induced coma require a separate offline experiment for model parameter estimation, which causes interruption in treatment and is difficult to perform. Also, CLADs may exhibit bias due to inherent time-variation and non-stationarity, and may have large infusion rate variations at steady state. Finally, current CLADs lack theoretical performance guarantees. We develop the first adaptive CLAD for medically induced coma, which addresses these limitations. Further, we extend our adaptive system to be generalizable to other states of anesthesia. Approach. We designed general parametric pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic and neural observation models with associated guidelines, and derived a novel adaptive controller. We further penalized large steady-state drug infusion rate variations in the controller. We derived theoretical guarantees that the adaptive system has zero steady-state bias. Using simulations that resembled real time-varying and noisy environments, we tested the closed-loop system for control of two different anesthetic states, burst suppression in medically induced coma and unconsciousness in general anesthesia. Main results. In 1200 simulations, the adaptive system achieved precise control of both anesthetic states despite non-stationarity, time-variation, noise, and no initial parameter knowledge. In both cases, the adaptive system performed close to a baseline system that knew the parameters exactly. In contrast, a non-adaptive system resulted in large steady-state bias and error. The adaptive system also resulted in significantly smaller steady-state infusion rate variations compared to prior systems. Significance. These results have significant implications for clinically viable CLAD design for a wide range of anesthetic states, with potential cost

  6. Density wave oscillations of a boiling natural circulation loop induced by flashing

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Masahiro; Inada, Fumio; Yasuo, Akira

    1995-09-01

    Experiments are conducted to investigate two-phase flow instabilities in a boiling natural circulation loop with a chimney due to flashing in the chimney at lower pressure. The test facility used in this experiment is designed to have non-dimensional values which are nearly equal to those of natural circulation BWR. Stability maps in reference to the heat flux, the inlet subcooling, the system pressure are presented. This instability is suggested to be density wave oscillations due to flashing in the chimney, and the differences from other phenomena such as flow pattern oscillations and geysering phenomena are discussed by investigating the dynamic characteristics, the oscillation period, and the transient flow pattern.

  7. G Clustering Is Important for the Initiation of Transcription-Induced R-Loops In Vitro, whereas High G Density without Clustering Is Sufficient Thereafter▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Deepankar; Lieber, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    R-loops form cotranscriptionally in vitro and in vivo at transcribed duplex DNA regions when the nascent RNA is G-rich, particularly with G clusters. This is the case for phage polymerases, as used here (T7 RNA polymerase), as well as RNA polymerases in bacteria, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, avians, mice, and humans. The nontemplate strand is left in a single-stranded configuration within the R-loop region. These structures are known to form at mammalian immunoglobulin class switch regions, thus exposing regions of single-stranded DNA for the action of AID, a single-strand-specific cytidine deaminase. R-loops form by thread-back of the RNA onto the template DNA strand, and here we report that G clusters are extremely important for the initiation phase of R-loop formation. Even very short regions with one GGGG sequence can initiate R-loops much more efficiently than random sequences. The high efficiencies observed with G clusters cannot be achieved by having a very high G density alone. Annealing of the transcript, which is otherwise disadvantaged relative to the nontemplate DNA strand because of unfavorable proximity while exiting the RNA polymerase, can offer greater stability if it occurs at the G clusters, thereby initiating an R-loop. R-loop elongation beyond the initiation zone occurs in a manner that is not as reliant on G clusters as it is on a high G density. These results lead to a model in which G clusters are important to nucleate the thread-back of RNA for R-loop initiation and, once initiated, the elongation of R-loops is primarily determined by the density of G on the nontemplate DNA strand. Without both a favorable R-loop initiation zone and elongation zone, R-loop formation is inefficient. PMID:19307304

  8. G clustering is important for the initiation of transcription-induced R-loops in vitro, whereas high G density without clustering is sufficient thereafter.

    PubMed

    Roy, Deepankar; Lieber, Michael R

    2009-06-01

    R-loops form cotranscriptionally in vitro and in vivo at transcribed duplex DNA regions when the nascent RNA is G-rich, particularly with G clusters. This is the case for phage polymerases, as used here (T7 RNA polymerase), as well as RNA polymerases in bacteria, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, avians, mice, and humans. The nontemplate strand is left in a single-stranded configuration within the R-loop region. These structures are known to form at mammalian immunoglobulin class switch regions, thus exposing regions of single-stranded DNA for the action of AID, a single-strand-specific cytidine deaminase. R-loops form by thread-back of the RNA onto the template DNA strand, and here we report that G clusters are extremely important for the initiation phase of R-loop formation. Even very short regions with one GGGG sequence can initiate R-loops much more efficiently than random sequences. The high efficiencies observed with G clusters cannot be achieved by having a very high G density alone. Annealing of the transcript, which is otherwise disadvantaged relative to the nontemplate DNA strand because of unfavorable proximity while exiting the RNA polymerase, can offer greater stability if it occurs at the G clusters, thereby initiating an R-loop. R-loop elongation beyond the initiation zone occurs in a manner that is not as reliant on G clusters as it is on a high G density. These results lead to a model in which G clusters are important to nucleate the thread-back of RNA for R-loop initiation and, once initiated, the elongation of R-loops is primarily determined by the density of G on the nontemplate DNA strand. Without both a favorable R-loop initiation zone and elongation zone, R-loop formation is inefficient.

  9. Flow-induced structured phase in nonionic micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Cardiel, Joshua J; Tonggu, Lige; de la Iglesia, Pablo; Zhao, Ya; Pozzo, Danilo C; Wang, Liguo; Shen, Amy Q

    2013-12-17

    In this work, we consider the flow of a nonionic micellar solution (precursor) through an array of microposts, with focus on its microstructural and rheological evolution. The precursor contains polyoxyethylene(20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween-80) and cosurfactant monolaurin (ML). An irreversible flow-induced structured phase (NI-FISP) emerges after the nonionic precursor flows through the hexagonal micropost arrays, when subjected to strain rates ~10(4) s(-1) and strain ~10(3). NI-FISP consists of close-looped micellar bundles and multiconnected micellar networks as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). We also conduct small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements in both precursor and NI-FISP to illustrate the structural transition. We propose a potential mechanism for the NI-FISP formation that relies on the micropost arrays and the flow kinematics in the microdevice to induce entropic fluctuations in the micellar solution. Finally, we show that the rheological variation from a viscous precursor solution to a viscoelastic micellar structured phase is associated with the structural evolution from the precursor to NI-FISP.

  10. Suppression of imbalance vibration for AMBs controlled driveline system using double-loop structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Liu, Gang; Zheng, Shiqiang

    2015-02-01

    Because of the couplings without off-line balancing and the uneven distribution of the rope, the equivalent residual unbalances in the active magnetic bearing (AMB) controlled driveline system are considerable. Therefore it is necessary to achieve suppressing the synchronous vibration force over the entire operating speed range. To completely achieve automatic balance of the rotor, a double-loop compensation design approach based on the AMB is proposed. Firstly, a dynamic model of the rotor with imbalance and the decentralized control system of magnetic bearing are established. Then the imbalance characteristic of the rotor system is identified by the generalized notch in which sign of the convergence coefficient needs to be changed according to the rotational speed. Finally, the second loop which is a simply feedforward loop at low speeds and switched to an adaptively tuning loop at high speeds is used to adjust the control current to achieve complete suppression of the imbalance vibration force. The method can achieve automatic balancing within the entire operating speed range and the effectiveness is unaffected by the attenuation of power amplifier at high speeds. Simulation and experiment results well demonstrate effectiveness of the approach, and the stability of the whole system is guaranteed.

  11. RNA Internal Loops with Tandem AG Pairs: The Structure of the 5′GAGU/3′UGAG Loop Can Be Dramatically Different from Others, Including 5′AAGU/3′UGAA†

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamic stabilities of 2 × 2 nucleotide tandem AG internal loops in RNA range from −1.3 to +3.4 kcal/mol at 37 °C and are not predicted well with a hydrogen-bonding model. To provide structural information to facilitate development of more sophisticated models for the sequence dependence of stability, we report the NMR solution structures of five RNA duplexes: (rGACGAGCGUCA)2, (rGACUAGAGUCA)2, (rGACAAGUGUCA)2, (rGGUAGGCCA)2, and (rGACGAGUGUCA)2. The structures of these duplexes are compared to that of the previously solved (rGGCAGGCC)2 (Wu, M., SantaLucia, J., Jr., and Turner, D. H. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 4449−4460). For loops bounded by Watson−Crick pairs, the AG and Watson−Crick pairs are all head-to-head imino-paired (cis Watson−Crick/Watson−Crick). The structures suggest that the sequence-dependent stability may reflect non-hydrogen-bonding interactions. Of the two loops bounded by G-U pairs, only the 5′UAGG/3′GGAU loop adopts canonical UG wobble pairing (cis Watson−Crick/Watson−Crick), with AG pairs that are only weakly imino-paired. Strikingly, the 5′GAGU/3′UGAG loop has two distinct duplex conformations, the major of which has both guanosine residues (G4 and G6 in (rGACGAGUGUCA)2) in a syn glycosidic bond conformation and forming a sheared GG pair (G4-G6*, GG trans Watson−Crick/Hoogsteen), both uracils (U7 and U7*) flipped out of the helix, and an AA pair (A5-A5*) in a dynamic or stacked conformation. These structures provide benchmarks for computational investigations into interactions responsible for the unexpected differences in loop free energies and structure. PMID:20481618

  12. Structure of the Neisserial Outer Membrane Protein Opa60: Loop Flexibility Essential to Receptor Recognition and Bacterial Engulfment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of Opa proteins, which we report herein, are responsible for the receptor-mediated engulfment of Neisseria gonorrheae or Neisseria meningitidis by human cells and can offer deep understanding into the molecular recognition of pathogen–host receptor interactions. Such interactions are vital to understanding bacterial pathogenesis as well as the mechanism of foreign body entry to a human cell, which may provide insights for the development of targeted pharmaceutical delivery systems. The size and dynamics of the extracellular loops of Opa60 required a hybrid refinement approach wherein membrane and distance restraints were used to generate an initial NMR structural ensemble, which was then further refined using molecular dynamics in a DMPC bilayer. The resulting ensemble revealed that the extracellular loops, which bind host receptors, occupy compact conformations, interact with each other weakly, and are dynamic on the nanosecond time scale. We predict that this conformational sampling is critical for enabling diverse Opa loop sequences to engage a common set of receptors. PMID:24813921

  13. A sandwich-type DNA electrochemical biosensor for hairpin-stem-loop structure based on multistep temperature-controlling method

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Guolin; Liu, Yinhuan; Chen, Wei; Weng, Shaohuang; Liu, Qicai; Liu, Ailin; Zheng, Daoxin; Lin, Xinhua

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive and selective method for amplified electrochemical detection for hairpin-stem-loop structured target sequences was developed based on the temperature regulation of DNA hybrids on a sandwich-type electrochemical DNA sensor. Multistep hybridization was applied to promote the hybridization efficiency of each section of sandwich structure. The results showed that both multistep and temperature-controlling hybridization techniques were both especially made to fabricate the sensor for the tendency of internal hybridization of target gene sequences. This strategy provides significantly enhanced hybridization efficiency and sequence specificity of electrochemical detection. PMID:23028223

  14. Loop quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolau, A.

    1988-10-01

    Loop unwinding is a known technique for reducing loop overhead, exposing parallelism, and increasing the efficiency of pipelining. Traditional loop unwinding is limited to the innermost loop in a group of nested loops and the amount of unwinding either is fixed or must be specified by the user, on a case by case basis. In this paper the authors present a general technique for automatically unwinding multiply nested loops, explain its advantages over other transformation techniques, and illustrate its practical effectiveness. Lopp Quantization could be beneficial by itself or coupled with other loop transformations.

  15. Viscoelastic phenomenology based structure assignment for closed-loop vibration control of a beam with sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadiraja, G. K.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we incorporate a novel approach to synthesize a class of closed-loop feedback control, based on the variational structure assignment. Properties of a viscoelastic system are used to design an active feedback controller for an undamped structural system with distributed sensor, actuator and controller. Wave dispersion properties of onedimensional beam system have been studied. Efficiency of the chosen viscoelastic model in enhancing damping and stability properties of one-dimensional viscoelastic bar have been analyzed. The variational structure is projected on a solution space of a closed-loop system involving a weakly damped structure with distributed sensor and actuator with controller. These assign the phenomenology based internal strain rate damping parameter of a viscoelastic system to the usual elastic structure but with active control. In the formulation a model of cantilever beam with non-collocated actuator and sensor has been considered. The formulation leads to the matrix identification problem of two dynamic stiffness matrices. The method has been simplified to obtain control system gains for the free vibration control of a cantilever beam system with collocated actuator-sensor, using quadratic optimal control and pole-placement methods.

  16. Structure-function relationships of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and of a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein in their interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L

    1991-11-12

    Peptides corresponding to portions of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and to a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein were synthetically modified in order to gain information on structure-function relationships of neurotoxin loop 2 interactions with the acetylcholine receptor. Binding of synthetic peptides to the acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo electric organ membranes was assessed by measuring their ability to inhibit the binding of 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The peptides showing the highest affinity for the receptor were a peptide corresponding to the sequence of loop 2 (residues 25-44) of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) toxin b (IC50 = 5.7 x 10(-6) M) and the structurally similar segment (residues 173-203) of CVS rabies virus glycoprotein (IC50 = 2.6 x 10(-6) M). These affinities were comparable to those of d-tubocurarine (IC50 = 3.4 x 10(-6) M) and suberyldicholine (IC50 = 2.5 x 10(-6) M). These results demonstrate the importance of loop 2 in the neurotoxin interaction with the receptor. N- and C-terminal deletions of the loop 2 peptides and substitution of residues invariant or highly conserved among neurotoxins were performed in order to determine the role of individual residues in binding. Residues 25-40 are the most crucial in the interaction with the acetylcholine receptor. Modifications involving Lys-27, Trp-29, Phe-33, Arg-37, and Gly-38 reduced affinity of binding. R37D and F33T modifications reduced the affinity of alpha-bungarotoxin residues 28-40 by an order of magnitude. Arg-37 may correspond to the positively charged quaternary ammonium group and Phe-33 to the hydrophobic acetyl methyl group of acetylcholine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Distance-Guided Forward and Backward Chain-Growth Monte Carlo Method for Conformational Sampling and Structural Prediction of Antibody CDR-H3 Loops.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ke; Zhang, Jinfeng; Liang, Jie

    2017-01-10

    Antibodies recognize antigens through the complementary determining regions (CDR) formed by six-loop hypervariable regions crucial for the diversity of antigen specificities. Among the six CDR loops, the H3 loop is the most challenging to predict because of its much higher variation in sequence length and identity, resulting in much larger and complex structural space, compared to the other five loops. We developed a novel method based on a chain-growth sequential Monte Carlo method, called distance-guided sequential chain-growth Monte Carlo for H3 loops (DiSGro-H3). The new method samples protein chains in both forward and backward directions. It can efficiently generate low energy, near-native H3 loop structures using the conformation types predicted from the sequences of H3 loops. DiSGro-H3 performs significantly better than another ab initio method, RosettaAntibody, in both sampling and prediction, while taking less computational time. It performs comparably to template-based methods. As an ab initio method, DiSGro-H3 offers satisfactory accuracy while being able to predict any H3 loops without templates.

  18. Stem-loop structures can effectively substitute for an RNA pseudoknot in -1 ribosomal frameshifting.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Noteborn, Mathieu H; Pleij, Cornelis W A; Olsthoorn, René C L

    2011-11-01

    -1 Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) in synthesizing the gag-pro precursor polyprotein of Simian retrovirus type-1 (SRV-1) is stimulated by a classical H-type pseudoknot which forms an extended triple helix involving base-base and base-sugar interactions between loop and stem nucleotides. Recently, we showed that mutation of bases involved in triple helix formation affected frameshifting, again emphasizing the role of the triple helix in -1 PRF. Here, we investigated the efficiency of hairpins of similar base pair composition as the SRV-1 gag-pro pseudoknot. Although not capable of triple helix formation they proved worthy stimulators of frameshifting. Subsequent investigation of ∼30 different hairpin constructs revealed that next to thermodynamic stability, loop size and composition and stem irregularities can influence frameshifting. Interestingly, hairpins carrying the stable GAAA tetraloop were significantly less shifty than other hairpins, including those with a UUCG motif. The data are discussed in relation to natural shifty hairpins.

  19. Production implementation of fully automated, closed loop cure control for advanced composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Sean A.; Roberts, Nancy K.

    Economic of advanced composite part production requires development and use of the most aggressive cure cycles possible without sacrificing quality. As cure cycles are shortened and heating rates increase, tolerance windows for process parameters become increasingly narrow. These factors are intensified by condensation curing systems which generate large amounts of volatiles. Management of the situation requires fully automated, closed loop process control and a fundamental understanding of the material system used for the application. No turnkey system for this application is currently available. General Dynamics Pomona Division (GD/PD) has developed an integrated closed loop control system which is now being proofed in production. Realization of this system will enable cure time reductions of nearly 50 percent, while increasing yield and maintaining quality.

  20. The nucleotides on the stem-loop RNA structure in the junction region of the hepatitis E virus genome are critical for virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dianjun; Huang, Yao-Wei; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2010-12-01

    The roles of conserved nucleotides on the stem-loop (SL) structure in the intergenic region of the hepatitis E virus (HEV) genome in virus replication were determined by using Huh7 cells transfected with HEV SL mutant replicons containing reporter genes. One or two nucleotide mutations of the AGA motif on the loop significantly reduced HEV replication, and three or more nucleotide mutations on the loop abolished HEV replication. Mutations on the stem and of the subgenome start sequence also significantly inhibited HEV replication. The results indicated that both the sequence and the SL structure in the junction region play important roles in HEV replication.

  1. Closed-loop control of flow-induced sound in a flow duct with downstream resonant cavities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z B; Halim, D; Cheng, L

    2013-03-01

    A closed-loop-controlled surface perturbation technique was developed for controlling the flow-induced sound in a flow duct and acoustic resonance inside downstream cavities. The surface perturbation was created by piezo-ceramic THUNDER (THin layer composite UNimorph Driver and sEnsoR) actuators embedded underneath the surface of a test model with a semi-circular leading edge. A modified closed-loop control scheme based on the down-sampling theory was proposed and implemented due to the practical vibration characteristic limitation of THUNDER actuators. The optimally tuned control achieved a sound pressure reduction of 17.5 dB in the duct and 22.6 dB inside the cavity at the vortex shedding frequency, respectively. Changes brought up by the control in both flow and acoustic fields were analyzed in terms of the spectrum phase shift of the flow field over the upper surface of the test model, and a shift in the vortex shedding frequency. The physical mechanism behind the control was investigated in the view of developing an optimal control strategy.

  2. Collision-Induced Dissociation Fragmentation Inside Disulfide C-Terminal Loops of Natural Non-Tryptic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samgina, Tatiana Y.; Vorontsov, Egor A.; Gorshkov, Vladimir A.; Artemenko, Konstantin A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Ytterberg, Jimmy A.; Lebedev, Albert T.

    2013-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of long non-tryptic peptides are usually quite complicated and rather difficult to interpret. Disulfide bond formed by two cysteine residues at C-terminus of frog skin peptides precludes one to determine sequence inside the forming loop. Thereby, chemical modification of S-S bonds is often used in "bottom up" sequencing approach. However, low-energy CID spectra of natural non-tryptic peptides with C-terminal disulfide cycle demonstrate an unusual fragmentation route, which may be used to elucidate the "hidden" C-terminal sequence. Low charge state protonated molecules experience peptide bond cleavage at the N-terminus of C-terminal cysteine. The forming isomeric acyclic ions serve as precursors for a series of b-type ions revealing sequence inside former disulfide cycle. The reaction is preferable for peptides with basic lysine residues inside the cycle. It may also be activated by acidic protons of Asp and Glu residues neighboring the loop. The observed cleavages may be quite competitive, revealing the sequence inside disulfide cycle, although S-S bond rupture does not occur in this case.

  3. Collision-induced dissociation fragmentation inside disulfide C-terminal loops of natural non-tryptic peptides.

    PubMed

    Samgina, Tatiana Y; Vorontsov, Egor A; Gorshkov, Vladimir A; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Zubarev, Roman A; Ytterberg, Jimmy A; Lebedev, Albert T

    2013-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of long non-tryptic peptides are usually quite complicated and rather difficult to interpret. Disulfide bond formed by two cysteine residues at C-terminus of frog skin peptides precludes one to determine sequence inside the forming loop. Thereby, chemical modification of S-S bonds is often used in "bottom up" sequencing approach. However, low-energy CID spectra of natural non-tryptic peptides with C-terminal disulfide cycle demonstrate an unusual fragmentation route, which may be used to elucidate the "hidden" C-terminal sequence. Low charge state protonated molecules experience peptide bond cleavage at the N-terminus of C-terminal cysteine. The forming isomeric acyclic ions serve as precursors for a series of b-type ions revealing sequence inside former disulfide cycle. The reaction is preferable for peptides with basic lysine residues inside the cycle. It may also be activated by acidic protons of Asp and Glu residues neighboring the loop. The observed cleavages may be quite competitive, revealing the sequence inside disulfide cycle, although S-S bond rupture does not occur in this case.

  4. Dynameomics: data-driven methods and models for utilizing large-scale protein structure repositories for improving fragment-based loop prediction.

    PubMed

    Rysavy, Steven J; Beck, David A C; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-11-01

    Protein function is intimately linked to protein structure and dynamics yet experimentally determined structures frequently omit regions within a protein due to indeterminate data, which is often due protein dynamics. We propose that atomistic molecular dynamics simulations provide a diverse sampling of biologically relevant structures for these missing segments (and beyond) to improve structural modeling and structure prediction. Here we make use of the Dynameomics data warehouse, which contains simulations of representatives of essentially all known protein folds. We developed novel computational methods to efficiently identify, rank and retrieve small peptide structures, or fragments, from this database. We also created a novel data model to analyze and compare large repositories of structural data, such as contained within the Protein Data Bank and the Dynameomics data warehouse. Our evaluation compares these structural repositories for improving loop predictions and analyzes the utility of our methods and models. Using a standard set of loop structures, containing 510 loops, 30 for each loop length from 4 to 20 residues, we find that the inclusion of Dynameomics structures in fragment-based methods improves the quality of the loop predictions without being dependent on sequence homology. Depending on loop length, ∼ 25-75% of the best predictions came from the Dynameomics set, resulting in lower main chain root-mean-square deviations for all fragment lengths using the combined fragment library. We also provide specific cases where Dynameomics fragments provide better predictions for NMR loop structures than fragments from crystal structures. Online access to these fragment libraries is available at http://www.dynameomics.org/fragments. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  5. Dynameomics: Data-driven methods and models for utilizing large-scale protein structure repositories for improving fragment-based loop prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rysavy, Steven J; Beck, David AC; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Protein function is intimately linked to protein structure and dynamics yet experimentally determined structures frequently omit regions within a protein due to indeterminate data, which is often due protein dynamics. We propose that atomistic molecular dynamics simulations provide a diverse sampling of biologically relevant structures for these missing segments (and beyond) to improve structural modeling and structure prediction. Here we make use of the Dynameomics data warehouse, which contains simulations of representatives of essentially all known protein folds. We developed novel computational methods to efficiently identify, rank and retrieve small peptide structures, or fragments, from this database. We also created a novel data model to analyze and compare large repositories of structural data, such as contained within the Protein Data Bank and the Dynameomics data warehouse. Our evaluation compares these structural repositories for improving loop predictions and analyzes the utility of our methods and models. Using a standard set of loop structures, containing 510 loops, 30 for each loop length from 4 to 20 residues, we find that the inclusion of Dynameomics structures in fragment-based methods improves the quality of the loop predictions without being dependent on sequence homology. Depending on loop length, ∼25–75% of the best predictions came from the Dynameomics set, resulting in lower main chain root-mean-square deviations for all fragment lengths using the combined fragment library. We also provide specific cases where Dynameomics fragments provide better predictions for NMR loop structures than fragments from crystal structures. Online access to these fragment libraries is available at http://www.dynameomics.org/fragments. PMID:25142412

  6. Distinct Second Extracellular Loop Structures of the Brain Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor: Implication in Ligand Binding and Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Rudd, James; Ding, Tomas T.

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) second extracellular loop (E2) is known to play an important role in receptor structure and function. The brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is unique in that it lacks the inter-loop E2 disulfide linkage to the transmembrane (TM) helical bundle, a characteristic of many GPCRs. Recent mutation studies of the CB1 receptor, however, suggest the presence of an alternative intra-loop disulfide bond between two E2 Cys residues. Considering the oxidation state of these Cys residues, we determine the molecular structures of the 17-residue E2 in the dithiol form (E2dithiol) and in the disulfide form (E2disulfide) of the CB1 receptor in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer, employing a combination of simulated annealing (SA) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approaches. We characterize the CB1 receptor models with these two E2 forms, CB1(E2dithiol) and CB1(E2disulfide), by analyzing interaction energy, contact number, core crevice and cross-correlation. The results show that the distinct E2 structures interact differently with the TM helical bundle and uniquely modify the TM helical topology, suggesting that E2 plays a critical role in stabilizing receptor structure, regulating ligand binding, and ultimately modulating receptor activation. Further studies on the role of E2 of the CB1 receptor are warranted; particularly comparisons of the ligand-bound form with the present ligand-free form. PMID:21120862

  7. The NMR structure of dematin headpiece reveals a dynamic loop that is conformationally altered upon phosphorylation at a distal site.

    PubMed

    Frank, Benjamin S; Vardar, Didem; Chishti, Athar H; McKnight, C James

    2004-02-27

    Dematin (band 4.9) is found in the junctional complex of the spectrin cytoskeleton that supports the erythrocyte cell membrane. Dematin is a member of the larger class of cytoskeleton-associated proteins that contain a modular "headpiece" domain at their extreme C termini. The dematin headpiece domain provides the second F-actin-binding site required for in vitro F-actin bundling. The dematin headpiece is found in two forms in the cell, one of 68 residues (DHP) and one containing a 22-amino acid insert near its N terminus (DHP+22). In addition, dematin contains the only headpiece domain that is phosphorylated, in vivo. The 22-amino acid insert in DHP+22 appeared unstructured in NMR spectra; therefore, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of DHP by multidimensional NMR methods. Although the overall three-dimensional structure of DHP is similar to that of the villin headpiece, there are two novel characteristics revealed by this structure. First, unlike villin headpiece that contains a single buried salt bridge, DHP contains a buried charged cluster comprising residues Glu(39), Arg(66), Lys(70), and the C-terminal carboxylate of Phe(76). Second, (15)N relaxation experiments indicate that the longer "variable loop" region near the N terminus of DHP (residues 20-29) is dynamic, undergoing significantly greater motions that the rest of the structure. Furthermore, NMR chemical shift changes indicate that the conformation of the dynamic variable loop is altered by phosphorylation of serine 74, which is far in the sequence from the variable loop region. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of the dematin headpiece acts as a conformational switch within this headpiece domain.

  8. An investigation of coronal active region loop structures using AS&E rocket X-ray images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous high spatial resolution observations at 6 cm in soft X-rays, in photospheric magnetograms, and in optical filtergrams were used to compare the most intense sources of centimetric emission in two active regions to coronal loops, sunspots, chromospheric structures, and photospheric magnetic fields. Results show that the majority of the bright microwave components are not associated with sunspots or X-ray emission. A nonthermal mechanism appears necessary to explain the brightest microwave components, discrete regions of continuous particle acceleration may be common in active regions. Studies of the plasma parameters of selected loops imply that the radio emission is consistent with gyro-resonance absorption at the third and fourth harmonic, at least from part of each loop. Results are presented for: (1) X-ray and microwave observations of active regions; (2) comparison of coronal holes observed in soft X-rays and Hel 10830 A spectrosheliograms; and (3) the reappearance of polar coronal holes and the evolution of the solar magnetic field.

  9. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  10. Thumb-loops up for catalysis: a structure/function investigation of a functional loop movement in a GH11 xylanase

    PubMed Central

    Paës, Gabriel; Cortés, Juan; Siméon, Thierry; O'Donohue, Michael J.; Tran, Vinh

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics is a key feature of enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, current experimental and computational techniques do not yet provide a comprehensive understanding and description of functional macromolecular motions. In this work, we have extended a novel computational technique, which combines molecular modeling methods and robotics algorithms, to investigate functional motions of protein loops. This new approach has been applied to study the functional importance of the so-called thumb-loop in the glycoside hydrolase family 11 xylanase from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus (Tx-xyl). The results obtained provide new insight into the role of the loop in the glycosylation/deglycosylation catalytic cycle, and underline the key importance of the nature of the residue located at the tip of the thumb-loop. The effect of mutations predicted in silico has been validated by in vitro site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Overall, we propose a comprehensive model of Tx-xyl catalysis in terms of substrate and product dynamics by identifying the action of the thumb-loop motion during catalysis. PMID:24688637

  11. Structural determinants for activation or inhibition of ryanodine receptors by basic residues in the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop.

    PubMed Central

    Casarotto, M G; Green, D; Pace, S M; Curtis, S M; Dulhunty, A F

    2001-01-01

    The structures of peptide A, and six other 7-20 amino acid peptides corresponding to sequences in the A region (Thr671- Leu690) of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop have been examined, and are correlated with the ability of the peptides to activate or inhibit skeletal ryanodine receptor calcium release channels. The peptides adopted either random coil or nascent helix-like structures, which depended upon the polarity of the terminal residues as well as the presence and ionisation state of two glutamate residues. Enhanced activation of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, and activation of current flow through single ryanodine receptor channels (at -40 mV), was seen with peptides containing the basic residues 681Arg Lys Arg Arg Lys685, and was strongest when the residues were a part of an alpha-helix. Inhibition of channels (at +40 mV) was also seen with peptides containing the five positively charged residues, but was not enhanced in helical peptides. These results confirm the hypothesis that activation of ryanodine receptor channels by the II-III loop peptides requires both the basic residues and their participation in helical structure, and show for the first time that inhibition requires the basic residues, but is not structure-dependent. These findings imply that activation and inhibition result from peptide binding to separate sites on the ryanodine receptor. PMID:11371447

  12. Structural polymorphism in the L1 loop regions of human H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Sato, Koichi; Shimada, Keisuke; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Iwasaki, Wakana; Kagawa, Wataru; Harata, Masahiko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The histone H2A.Z variant is widely conserved among eukaryotes. Two isoforms, H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, have been identified in vertebrates and may have distinct functions in cell growth and gene expression. However, no structural differences between H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2 have been reported. In the present study, the crystal structures of nucleosomes containing human H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2 were determined. The structures of the L1 loop regions were found to clearly differ between H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, although their amino-acid sequences in this region are identical. This structural polymorphism may have been induced by a substitution that evolutionally occurred at the position of amino acid 38 and by the flexible nature of the L1 loops of H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2. It was also found that in living cells nucleosomal H2A.Z.1 exchanges more rapidly than H2A.Z.2. A mutational analysis revealed that the amino-acid difference at position 38 is at least partially responsible for the distinctive dynamics of H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2. These findings provide important new information for understanding the differences in the regulation and functions of H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2 in cells. PMID:24311584

  13. Stem-Loop V of Varkud Satellite RNA Exhibits Characteristics of the Mg2+ Bound Structure in the Presence of Monovalent Ions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Varkud Satellite RNA contains a self-cleaving ribozyme that has been shown to function independently of its surroundings. This 160 nucleotide ribozyme adopts a catalytically active tertiary structure that includes a kissing hairpin complex formed by stem-loop I and stem-loop V (SLV). The five-nucleotide 5′-rUGACU loop of the isolated SLV has been shown to adopt a Mg2+-dependent U-turn structure by solution NMR. This U-turn hairpin is examined here by molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of monovalent and divalent ions. Simulations confirm on an all-atom level the hypotheses for the role of the Mg2+ ions in stabilizing the loop, as well as the role of the solvent exposed U700 base. Additionally, these simulations suggest the Mg2+-free stem-loop adopts a wide range of structures, including energetically favorable structures similar to the Mg2+-bound loop structure. We propose this structure is a “gatekeeper” or precursor to Mg2+ binding when those ions are present. PMID:26328924

  14. Dark-matter production through loop-induced processes at the LHC: the s-channel mediator case.

    PubMed

    Mattelaer, Olivier; Vryonidou, Eleni

    We show how studies relevant for mono-X searches at the LHC in simplified models featuring a dark-matter candidate and an s-channel mediator can be performed within the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework. We focus on gluon-initiated loop-induced processes, mostly relevant to the case where the mediator couples preferentially to third generation quarks and in particular to the top quark. Our implementation allows us to study signatures at hadron colliders involving missing transverse energy plus jets or plus neutral bosons ([Formula: see text]), possibly including the effects of extra radiation by multi-parton merging and matching to the parton shower.

  15. Forces measured with micro-fabricated cantilevers during actomyosin interactions produced by filaments containing different myosin isoforms and loop 1 structures.

    PubMed

    Kalganov, Albert; Shalabi, Nabil; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kachmar, Linda Hussein; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Rassier, Dilson E

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that the actin-activated ATP kinetics and the mechanical work produced by muscle myosin molecules are regulated by two surface loops, located near the ATP binding pocket (loop 1), and in a region that interfaces with actin (loop 2). These loops regulate force and velocity of contraction, and have been investigated mostly in single molecules. There is a lack of information of the work produced by myosin molecules ordered in filaments and working cooperatively, which is the actual muscle environment. We use micro-fabricated cantilevers to measure forces produced by myosin filaments isolated from mollusk muscles, skeletal muscles, and smooth muscles containing variations in the structure of loop 1 (tonic and phasic myosins). We complemented the experiments with in-vitro assays to measure the velocity of actin motility. Smooth muscle myosin filaments produced more force than skeletal and mollusk myosin filaments when normalized per filament overlap. Skeletal muscle myosin propelled actin filaments in a higher sliding velocity than smooth muscle myosin. The values for force and velocity were consistent with previous studies using myosin molecules, and suggest a close correlation with the myosin isoform and structure of surface loop 1. The technique using micro-fabricated cantilevers to measure force of filaments allows for the investigation of the relation between myosin structure and contractility, allowing experiments to be conducted with an array of different myosin isoforms. Using the technique we observed that the work produced by myosin molecules is regulated by amino-acid sequences aligned in specific loops.

  16. Plastic Changes in Human Motor Cortical Output Induced by Random but not Closed-Loop Peripheral Stimulation: the Curse of Causality

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kenneth I.; Williams, Elizabeth R.; de Carvalho, Felipe; Baker, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed that repetitive peripheral nerve stimulation can induce plastic changes in motor cortical output. Triggering electrical stimulation of central structures from natural activity can also generate plasticity. In this study, we tested whether triggering peripheral nerve stimulation from muscle activity would likewise induce changes in motor output. We developed a wearable electronic device capable of recording electromyogram (EMG) and delivering electrical stimulation under closed-loop control. This allowed paired stimuli to be delivered over longer periods than standard laboratory-based protocols. We tested this device in healthy human volunteers. Motor cortical output in relaxed thenar muscles was first assessed via the recruitment curve of responses to contralateral transcranial magnetic stimulation. The wearable device was then configured to record thenar EMG and stimulate the median nerve at the wrist (intensity around motor threshold, rate ~0.66 Hz). Subjects carried out normal daily activities for 4–7 h, before returning to the laboratory for repeated recruitment curve assessment. Four stimulation protocols were tested (9–14 subjects each): No Stim, no stimuli delivered; Activity, stimuli triggered by EMG activity above threshold; Saved, stimuli timed according to a previous Activity session in the same subject; Rest, stimuli given when EMG was silent. As expected, No Stim did not modify the recruitment curve. Activity and Rest conditions produced no significant effects across subjects, although there were changes in some individuals. Saved produced a significant and substantial increase, with average responses 2.14 times larger at 30% stimulator intensity above threshold. We argue that unavoidable delays in the closed loop feedback, due mainly to central and peripheral conduction times, mean that stimuli in the Activity paradigm arrived too late after cortical activation to generate consistent plastic changes. By contrast, stimuli

  17. Plastic Changes in Human Motor Cortical Output Induced by Random but not Closed-Loop Peripheral Stimulation: the Curse of Causality.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kenneth I; Williams, Elizabeth R; de Carvalho, Felipe; Baker, Stuart N

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed that repetitive peripheral nerve stimulation can induce plastic changes in motor cortical output. Triggering electrical stimulation of central structures from natural activity can also generate plasticity. In this study, we tested whether triggering peripheral nerve stimulation from muscle activity would likewise induce changes in motor output. We developed a wearable electronic device capable of recording electromyogram (EMG) and delivering electrical stimulation under closed-loop control. This allowed paired stimuli to be delivered over longer periods than standard laboratory-based protocols. We tested this device in healthy human volunteers. Motor cortical output in relaxed thenar muscles was first assessed via the recruitment curve of responses to contralateral transcranial magnetic stimulation. The wearable device was then configured to record thenar EMG and stimulate the median nerve at the wrist (intensity around motor threshold, rate ~0.66 Hz). Subjects carried out normal daily activities for 4-7 h, before returning to the laboratory for repeated recruitment curve assessment. Four stimulation protocols were tested (9-14 subjects each): No Stim, no stimuli delivered; Activity, stimuli triggered by EMG activity above threshold; Saved, stimuli timed according to a previous Activity session in the same subject; Rest, stimuli given when EMG was silent. As expected, No Stim did not modify the recruitment curve. Activity and Rest conditions produced no significant effects across subjects, although there were changes in some individuals. Saved produced a significant and substantial increase, with average responses 2.14 times larger at 30% stimulator intensity above threshold. We argue that unavoidable delays in the closed loop feedback, due mainly to central and peripheral conduction times, mean that stimuli in the Activity paradigm arrived too late after cortical activation to generate consistent plastic changes. By contrast, stimuli delivered

  18. Quantum Structure of Field Theory and Standard Model Based on Infinity-Free Loop Regularization/renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2014-04-01

    To understand better the quantum structure of field theory and standard model in particle physics, it is necessary to investigate carefully the divergence structure in quantum field theories (QFTs) and work out a consistent framework to avoid infinities. The divergence has got us into trouble since developing quantum electrodynamics in 1930s. Its treatment via the renormalization scheme is satisfied not by all physicists, like Dirac and Feynman who have made serious criticisms. The renormalization group analysis reveals that QFTs can in general be defined fundamentally with the meaningful energy scale that has some physical significance, which motivates us to develop a new symmetry-preserving and infinity-free regularization scheme called loop regularization (LORE). A simple regularization prescription in LORE is realized based on a manifest postulation that a loop divergence with a power counting dimension larger than or equal to the space-time dimension must vanish. The LORE method is achieved without modifying original theory and leads the divergent Feynman loop integrals well-defined to maintain the divergence structure and meanwhile preserve basic symmetries of original theory. The crucial point in LORE is the presence of two intrinsic energy scales which play the roles of ultraviolet cutoff Mc and infrared cutoff μs to avoid infinities. As Mc can be made finite when taking appropriately both the primary regulator mass and number to be infinity to recover the original integrals, the two energy scales Mc and μs in LORE become physically meaningful as the characteristic energy scale and sliding energy scale, respectively. The key concept in LORE is the introduction of irreducible loop integrals (ILIs) on which the regularization prescription acts, which leads to a set of gauge invariance consistency conditions between the regularized tensor-type and scalar-type ILIs. An interesting observation in LORE is that the evaluation of ILIs with ultraviolet

  19. Quantum Structure of Field Theory and Standard Model Based on Infinity-Free Loop Regularization/renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2014-02-01

    To understand better the quantum structure of field theory and standard model in particle physics, it is necessary to investigate carefully the divergence structure in quantum field theories (QFTs) and work out a consistent framework to avoid infinities. The divergence has got us into trouble since developing quantum electrodynamics in 1930s. Its treatment via the renormalization scheme is satisfied not by all physicists, like Dirac and Feynman who have made serious criticisms. The renormalization group analysis reveals that QFTs can in general be defined fundamentally with the meaningful energy scale that has some physical significance, which motivates us to develop a new symmetry-preserving and infinity-free regularization scheme called loop regularization (LORE). A simple regularization prescription in LORE is realized based on a manifest postulation that a loop divergence with a power counting dimension larger than or equal to the space-time dimension must vanish. The LORE method is achieved without modifying original theory and leads the divergent Feynman loop integrals well-defined to maintain the divergence structure and meanwhile preserve basic symmetries of original theory. The crucial point in LORE is the presence of two intrinsic energy scales which play the roles of ultraviolet cutoff Mc and infrared cutoff μs to avoid infinities. As Mc can be made finite when taking appropriately both the primary regulator mass and number to be infinity to recover the original integrals, the two energy scales Mc and μs in LORE become physically meaningful as the characteristic energy scale and sliding energy scale, respectively. The key concept in LORE is the introduction of irreducible loop integrals (ILIs) on which the regularization prescription acts, which leads to a set of gauge invariance consistency conditions between the regularized tensor-type and scalar-type ILIs. An interesting observation in LORE is that the evaluation of ILIs with ultraviolet

  20. A closed-loop synthetic gene circuit for the treatment of diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rössger, Katrin; Charpin-El-Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity is a lifestyle-associated medical condition that increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. Here we report the design of a closed-loop genetic circuit that constantly monitors blood fatty acid levels in the setting of diet-associated hyperlipidemia and coordinates reversible and adjustable expression of the clinically licensed appetite-suppressing peptide hormone pramlintide. Grafting of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α onto the phloretin-responsive repressor TtgR produces a synthetic intracellular lipid-sensing receptor (LSR) that reversibly induces chimeric TtgR-specific promoters in a fatty acid-adjustable manner. Mice with diet-induced obesity in which microencapsulated cells engineered for LSR-driven expression of pramlintide are implanted show significant reduction in food consumption, blood lipid levels and body weight when put on a high-fat diet. Therapeutic designer circuits that monitor levels of pathologic metabolites and link these with the tailored expression of protein pharmaceuticals may provide new opportunities for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:24281397

  1. Gravitational steady states of solar coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda E.; Asgari-Targhi, M.

    2017-02-01

    Coronal loops on the surface of the sun appear to consist of curved, plasma-confining magnetic flux tubes or "ropes," anchored at both ends in the photosphere. Toroidal loops carrying current are inherently unstable to expansion in the major radius due to toroidal-curvature-induced imbalances in the magnetic and plasma pressures. An ideal MHD analysis of a simple isolated loop with density and pressure higher than the surrounding corona, based on the theory of magnetically confined toroidal plasmas, shows that the radial force balance depends on the loop internal structure and varies over parameter space. It provides a unified picture of simple loop steady states in terms of the plasma beta βo, the inverse aspect ratio ɛ =a /Ro , and the MHD gravitational parameter G ̂≡g a /vA2 , all at the top of the loop, where g is the acceleration due to gravity, a the average minor radius, and vA the shear Alfvén velocity. In the high and low beta tokamak orderings, βo=2 noT /(Bo2/2 μo)˜ɛ1 and ɛ2 , that fit many loops, the solar gravity can sustain nonaxisymmetric steady states at G ̂˜ɛ βo that represent the maximum stable height. At smaller G ̂≤ɛ2βo , the loop is axisymmetric to leading order and stabilized primarily by the two fixed loop ends. Very low beta, nearly force-free, steady states with βo˜ɛ3 may also exist, with or without gravity, depending on higher order effects. The thin coronal loops commonly observed in solar active regions have ɛ ≃0.02 and fit the high beta steady states. G ̂ increases with loop height. Fatter loops in active regions that form along magnetic neutral lines and may lead to solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections have ɛ ≃0.1 -0.2 and may fit the low beta ordering. Larger loops tend to have G ̂>ɛ βo and be unstable to radial expansion because the exponential hydrostatic reduction in the density at the loop-top reduces the gravitational force -ρG ̂ R ̂ below the level that balances expansion, in agreement with

  2. Enhancement of surface nonwettability by grafting loops.

    PubMed

    Pei, Han-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Li; Liu, Hong; Zhu, You-Liang; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2017-02-08

    We present a computer simulation study on the nonwettability of a flat surface tethered with deformable looped polymer chains. Two kinds of loops are studied: monodispersed loops (loops with the same length) and polydispersed loops (loops with different lengths). Both kinds of loops include two arrangements: with regularly tethered sites and with randomly tethered sites. Regularly grafted loops form typical grooves on the surface, while randomly grafted loops form a more rugged surface. For monodispersed loops, we analyze the factors that influence the nonwettability when varying the rigidity of the loops. The loops are divided into two categories based on their rigidity according to our previous analysis procedure (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18767-18775): rigid loops and flexible loops. It is found that the loop can partially form a re-entrant-like structure, which is helpful to increase the nonwettability of the surface. The surfaces with grafted loops have increased nonwettability, especially those grafted with flexible chains. However, the contact angle on the loop structure cannot further increase for the rigid chains due to a large top layer density (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18767-18775). For polydispersed loops, the contact angle is highly related to the rigidity of the long loops that contact the droplet. Different from monodispersed loops, the mechanism of the nonwettability of polydispersed loops is attributed to the supporting ability (rigidity) of long loops.

  3. Loop Motions Important to Product Expulsion in the Thermobifida fusca Glycoside Hydrolase Family 6 Cellobiohydrolase from Structural and Computational Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miao; Bu, Lintao; Vuong, Thu V.; Wilson, David B.; Crowley, Michael F.; Sandgren, Mats; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Beckham, Gregg T.; Hansson, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) are typically major components of natural enzyme cocktails for biomass degradation. Their active sites are enclosed in a tunnel, enabling processive hydrolysis of cellulose chains. Glycoside hydrolase Family 6 (GH6) CBHs act from nonreducing ends by an inverting mechanism and are present in many cellulolytic fungi and bacteria. The bacterial Thermobifida fusca Cel6B (TfuCel6B) exhibits a longer and more enclosed active site tunnel than its fungal counterparts. Here, we determine the structures of two TfuCel6B mutants co-crystallized with cellobiose, D274A (catalytic acid), and the double mutant D226A/S232A, which targets the putative catalytic base and a conserved serine that binds the nucleophilic water. The ligand binding and the structure of the active site are retained when compared with the wild type structure, supporting the hypothesis that these residues are directly involved in catalysis. One structure exhibits crystallographic waters that enable construction of a model of the α-anomer product after hydrolysis. Interestingly, the product sites of TfuCel6B are completely enclosed by an “exit loop” not present in fungal GH6 CBHs and by an extended “bottom loop”. From the structures, we hypothesize that either of the loops enclosing the product subsites in the TfuCel6B active site tunnel must open substantially for product release. With simulation, we demonstrate that both loops can readily open to allow product release with equal probability in solution or when the enzyme is engaged on cellulose. Overall, this study reveals new structural details of GH6 CBHs likely important for functional differences among enzymes from this important family. PMID:24085303

  4. Lipopolysaccharide induces the expression of an autocrine prolactin loop enhancing inflammatory response in monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolactin from pituitary gland helps maintain homeostasis but it is also released in immune cells where its function is not completely understood. Pleiotropic functions of prolactin (PRL) might be mediated by different isoforms of its receptor (PRLr). Methods The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the eventual synthesis of PRL and PRLr isoforms with the inflammatory response in monocytes. We used THP-1 and monocytes isolated from healthy subjects stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Western blot, real time PCR and immunocytochemistry were performed to identify both molecules. The bioactivity of the PRL was assessed using a bioassay and ELISA to detect pro inflammatory cytokines. Results PRLr mRNA and PRL mRNA were synthesized in THP-1 monocytes activated with LPS with peaks of 300-fold and 130-fold, respectively. The long (100 kDa) and the intermediate (50 kDa) isoforms of PRLr and big PRL (60 kDa) were time-dependent upregulated for monocytes stimulated with LPS. This expression was confirmed in monocytes from healthy subjects. The PRLr intermediate isoform and the big PRL were found soluble in the culture media and later in the nucleus in THP-1 monocytes stimulated with LPS. Big PRL released by monocytes showed bioactivity in Nb2 Cells, and both PRL and PRLr, synthesized by monocytes were related with levels of nitrites and proinflammatory citokines. Conclusions Our results suggest the expression of a full-autocrine loop of PRL enhances the inflammatory response in activated monocytes. This response mediated by big PRL may contribute to the eradication of potential pathogens during innate immune response in monocytes but may also contribute to inflammatory disorders. PMID:23731754

  5. Structural and functional properties of the membranotropic HIV-1 glycoprotein gp41 loop region are modulated by its intrinsic hydrophobic core.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiayin; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Liu, Shuwen; Shai, Yechiel

    2013-10-04

    The gp41 disulfide loop region switches from a soluble state to a membrane-bound state during the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope-mediated membrane fusion process. The loop possesses a hydrophobic core at the center of the region with an unusual basic residue (Lys-601). Furthermore, two loop core mutations, K601A and L602A, are found to inhibit HIV-1 infectivity while keeping wild type-like levels of the envelope, implying that they exert an inhibitory effect on gp41 during the membrane fusion event. Here, we investigated the mode of action of these mutations on the loop region. We show that the K601A mutation, but not the L602A mutation, abolished the binding of a loop-specific monoclonal antibody to a loop domain peptide. Additionally, the K601A, but not the L602A, impaired disulfide bond formation in the peptides. This was correlated with changes in the circular dichroism spectrum imposed by the K601A mutation. In the membrane, however, the L602A, but not the K601A, reduced the lipid mixing ability of the loop peptides, which was correlated with decreased α-helical content of the L602A mutant. The results suggest that the Lys-601 residue provides a moderate hydrophobicity level within the gp41 loop core that contributes to the proper structure and function of the loop inside and outside the membrane. Because basic residues are found between the loop Cys residues of several lentiviral fusion proteins, the findings may contribute to understanding the fusion mechanism of other viruses as well.

  6. Structural and Functional Properties of the Membranotropic HIV-1 Glycoprotein gp41 Loop Region Are Modulated by Its Intrinsic Hydrophobic Core*

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jiayin; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Liu, Shuwen; Shai, Yechiel

    2013-01-01

    The gp41 disulfide loop region switches from a soluble state to a membrane-bound state during the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope-mediated membrane fusion process. The loop possesses a hydrophobic core at the center of the region with an unusual basic residue (Lys-601). Furthermore, two loop core mutations, K601A and L602A, are found to inhibit HIV-1 infectivity while keeping wild type-like levels of the envelope, implying that they exert an inhibitory effect on gp41 during the membrane fusion event. Here, we investigated the mode of action of these mutations on the loop region. We show that the K601A mutation, but not the L602A mutation, abolished the binding of a loop-specific monoclonal antibody to a loop domain peptide. Additionally, the K601A, but not the L602A, impaired disulfide bond formation in the peptides. This was correlated with changes in the circular dichroism spectrum imposed by the K601A mutation. In the membrane, however, the L602A, but not the K601A, reduced the lipid mixing ability of the loop peptides, which was correlated with decreased α-helical content of the L602A mutant. The results suggest that the Lys-601 residue provides a moderate hydrophobicity level within the gp41 loop core that contributes to the proper structure and function of the loop inside and outside the membrane. Because basic residues are found between the loop Cys residues of several lentiviral fusion proteins, the findings may contribute to understanding the fusion mechanism of other viruses as well. PMID:23960077

  7. Experimental observations of the coupling between induced currents and mechanical motion in torsionally supported square loops and plates. Part 2. Data inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenburger, D.W.; Bialek, J.M.; Cargulia, G.J.; Ulrickson, M.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1984-12-01

    A series of experiments was successfully conducted to investigate the coupling between induced currents and rigid body rotation in square loops and plates. The experiments were performed with the Fusion Electromagnetic Induction Experiment (FELIX) facility at the Argonne National Laboratory. The observed data exhibited the magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness effects ehich arise in coupled systems and agreed very well with previous analytic calculations.

  8. Aircraft propeller induced structure-borne noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory-based test apparatus employing components typical of aircraft construction was developed that would allow the study of structure-borne noise transmission due to propeller induced wake/vortex excitation of in-wake structural appendages. The test apparatus was employed to evaluate several aircraft installation effects (power plant placement, engine/nacelle mass loading, and wing/fuselage attachment methods) and several structural response modifications for structure-borne noise control (the use of wing blocking mass/fuel, wing damping treaments, and tuned mechanical dampers). Most important was the development of in-flight structure-borne noise transmission detection techniques using a combination of ground-based frequency response function testing and in-flight structural response measurement. Propeller wake/vortex excitation simulation techniques for improved ground-based testing were also developed to support the in-flight structure-borne noise transmission detection development.

  9. The LA loop as an important regulatory element of the HtrA (DegP) protease from Escherichia coli: structural and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Figaj, Donata; Gieldon, Artur; Polit, Agnieszka; Sobiecka-Szkatula, Anna; Koper, Tomasz; Denkiewicz, Milena; Banecki, Bogdan; Lesner, Adam; Ciarkowski, Jerzy; Lipinska, Barbara; Skorko-Glonek, Joanna

    2014-05-30

    Bacterial HtrAs are serine proteases engaged in extracytoplasmic protein quality control and are required for the virulence of several pathogenic species. The proteolytic activity of HtrA (DegP) from Escherichia coli, a model prokaryotic HtrA, is stimulated by stressful conditions; the regulation of this process is mediated by the LA, LD, L1, L2, and L3 loops. The precise mechanism of action of the LA loop is not known due to a lack of data concerning its three-dimensional structure as well as its mode of interaction with other regulatory elements. To address these issues we generated a theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of the LA loop as per the resting state of HtrA and subsequently verified its correctness experimentally. We identified intra- and intersubunit contacts that formed with the LA loops; these played an important role in maintaining HtrA in its inactive conformation. The most significant proved to be the hydrophobic interactions connecting the LA loops of the hexamer and polar contacts between the LA' (the LA loop on an opposite subunit) and L1 loops on opposite subunits. Disturbance of these interactions caused the stimulation of HtrA proteolytic activity. We also demonstrated that LA loops contribute to the preservation of the integrity of the HtrA oligomer and to the stability of the monomer. The model presented in this work explains the regulatory role of the LA loop well; it should also be applicable to numerous Enterobacteriaceae pathogenic species as the amino acid sequences of the members of this bacterial family are highly conserved.

  10. Thermally induced all-optical inverter and dynamic hysteresis loops in graphene oxide dispersions.

    PubMed

    Melle, Sonia; Calderón, Oscar G; Egatz-Gómez, Ana; Cabrera-Granado, E; Carreño, F; Antón, M A

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally study the temporal dynamics of amplitude-modulated laser beams propagating through a water dispersion of graphene oxide sheets in a fiber-to-fiber U-bench. Nonlinear refraction induced in the sample by thermal effects leads to both phase reversing of the transmitted signals and dynamic hysteresis in the input-output power curves. A theoretical model including beam propagation and thermal lensing dynamics reproduces the experimental findings.

  11. Muscle enhancement using closed-loop electrical stimulation: volitional versus induced torque.

    PubMed

    Langzam, E; Nemirovsky, Y; Isakov, E; Mizrahi, J

    2007-06-01

    In cases of partial deficiency of muscle activation capacity, force augmentation can be achieved by hybrid activation, i.e., by combining electrical stimulation (ES) with volitional activation. In this activation modality the shares of the volitional and induced torques within the overall hybrid torque are unknown. The purpose of this study was to suggest a computational approach to parcel out the volitional and stimulation induced components of joint torque generated during combined voluntary and electrical activation of the Tibialis Anterior muscle (TA). For this purpose, isometric contraction of the TA was studied on 5 healthy subjects, using an activation protocol involving ES alone, volitional activation alone and hybrid activation. Ankle torque and TA EMG were measured. A computational algorithm was developed to dissociate the volitional from the overall torque, based on EMG filtering and on pre-measured calibration curves of volitional torque versus EMG. The results indicated that for a certain hybrid torque there is a linear decaying relationship between the induced torque and the volitional torque shares. Moreover, based on a defined enhancement ratio, the results indicate that within the range of stimulation intensities, there exist regions of increased facilitation, in which the stimulation efficiency is higher under combined compared to isolated conditions.

  12. PROPERTIES OF THE ACCELERATION REGIONS IN SEVERAL LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Jingnan; Piana, Michele; Gordon Emslie, A.; Massone, Anna Maria E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it E-mail: annamaria.massone@cnr.it

    2012-08-10

    Using RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy observations, we analyze electron flux maps for a number of extended coronal loop flares. For each event, we fit a collisional model with an extended acceleration region to the observed variation of loop length with electron energy E, resulting in estimates of the plasma density in, and longitudinal extent of, the acceleration region. These quantities in turn allow inference of the number of particles within the acceleration region and hence the filling factor f-the ratio of the emitting volume to the volume that encompasses the emitting region(s). We obtain values of f that lie mostly between 0.1 and 1.0; the (geometric) mean value is f = 0.20 Multiplication-Sign / Division-Sign 3.9, somewhat less than, but nevertheless consistent with, unity. Further, coupling information on the number of particles in the acceleration region with information on the total rate of acceleration of particles above a certain reference energy (obtained from spatially integrated hard X-ray data) also allows inference of the specific acceleration rate (electron s{sup -1} per ambient electron above the chosen reference energy). We obtain a (geometric) mean value of the specific acceleration rate {eta}(20 keV) =(6.0 Multiplication-Sign / Division-Sign 3.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron; this value has implications both for the global electrodynamics associated with replenishment of the acceleration region and for the nature of the particle acceleration process.

  13. THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES-IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON ACCELERATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jingnan; Emslie, A. Gordon; Piana, Michele E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it

    2013-03-20

    We analyze electron flux maps based on RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data for a number of extended coronal-loop flare events. For each event, we determine the variation of the characteristic loop length L with electron energy E, and we fit this observed behavior with models that incorporate an extended acceleration region and an exterior 'propagation' region, and which may include collisional modification of the accelerated electron spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density n in, and the longitudinal extent L{sub 0} of, the acceleration region. Determination of the best-fit values of these parameters permits inference of the volume that encompasses the acceleration region and of the total number of particles within it. It is then straightforward to compute values for the emission filling factor and for the specific acceleration rate (electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron above a chosen reference energy). For the 24 events studied, the range of inferred filling factors is consistent with a value of unity. The inferred mean value of the specific acceleration rate above E{sub 0} = 20 keV is {approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} spread of about a half-order-of-magnitude above and below this value. We compare these values with the predictions of several models, including acceleration by large-scale, weak (sub-Dreicer) fields, by strong (super-Dreicer) electric fields in a reconnecting current sheet, and by stochastic acceleration processes.

  14. Contribution of intertwined loop to membrane association revealed by Zika virus full-length NS1 structure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoying; Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Liu, Yuqian; Wang, Haiyuan; Su, Chao; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-10-17

    The association of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections with microcephaly and neurological diseases has highlighted an emerging public health concern. Here, we report the crystal structure of the full-length ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), a major host-interaction molecule that functions in flaviviral replication, pathogenesis, and immune evasion. Of note, a long intertwined loop is observed in the wing domain of ZIKV NS1, and forms a hydrophobic "spike", which can contribute to cellular membrane association. For different flaviviruses, the amino acid sequences of the "spike" are variable but their common characteristic is either hydrophobic or positively charged, which is a beneficial feature for membrane binding. Comparative studies with West Nile and Dengue virus NS1 structures reveal conserved features, but diversified electrostatic characteristics on both inner and outer faces. Our results suggest different mechanisms of flavivirus pathogenesis and should be considered during the development of diagnostic tools.

  15. Functional and structural roles of the highly conserved Trp120 loop region of glucoamylase from Aspergillus awamori.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, S; Sierks, M R

    1996-03-05

    The functional role of a loop region, highly conserved among glucoamylase and other starch hydrolases which also includes the essential Trp120 of Aspergillus awamori, is investigated. Residues 121-125 of A. awamori glucoamylase were singly substituted, and their individual effects on catalytic activity and thermal stability were determined. The Arg122-->Tyr mutation displayed opposing effects for shorter and longer maltooligosaccharide substrates, K(m) decreasing for shorter substrates but increasing for longer substrates. The Pro123-->Gly mutation decreases the thermal stability of glucoamylase by 19 degrees C with little effect on activity. The Gln124-->His substitution decreases k(cat) for all substrates 10-15-fold. Gly121-->Thr and Arg125-->Lys had only minor effects on glucoamylase activity. While Arg122-->Tyr, Gln124-->His, and the previously constructed Trp120-->Phe [Sierks, M. R., Svensson, B., Ford, C., & Reilly, P. J. (1989) Protein Eng. 2, 621-625] glucoamylases have significantly reduced activity toward maltose hydrolysis, all mutations in the Trp120 loop region retain wild-type level activity toward alpha-D-glucosyl fluoride hydrolysis. The Trp120 loop region therefore plays a major role in directing conformational changes controlling the postulated rate-limiting product release step, even though only Trp120 is indicated to interact with acarbose in the crystal structure [Aleshin, A. E., Firsov, L. M., & Honzatko, R. B. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 15631-15639]. Side chains of residues 116, 120, 122, and 124 oriented in one direction play crucial roles in the enzyme mechanism, while side chains of residues 119, 121, 123, and 125, oriented in the opposite direction, play only minor roles.

  16. A Rapid, Manual Method to Map Coronal-Loop Structures of an Active Region Using Cubic Bézier Curves and Its Applications to Misalignment Angle Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Hu, Qiang; Lee, Jong Kwan

    2014-03-01

    A rapid and flexible manual method is described that maps individual coronal loops of a 2D EUV image as Bézier curves using only four points per loop. Using the coronal loops as surrogates of magnetic-field lines, the mapping results restrict the magnetic-field models derived from extrapolations of magnetograms to those admissible and inadmissible via a fitness parameter. We outline explicitly how the coronal loops can be employed in constraining competing magnetic-field models by transforming 2D coronal-loop images into 3D field lines. The magnetic-field extrapolations must satisfy not only the lower boundary conditions of the vector field (the vector magnetogram) but also must have a set of field lines that satisfies the mapped coronal loops in the volume, analogous to an upper boundary condition. This method uses the minimization of the misalignment angles between the magnetic-field model and the best set of 3D field lines that match a set of closed coronal loops. The presented method is an important tool in determining the fitness of magnetic-field models for the solar atmosphere. The magnetic-field structure is crucial in determining the overall dynamics of the solar atmosphere.

  17. Comparing model-based adaptive LMS filters and a model-free hysteresis loop analysis method for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cong; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Rodgers, Geoffrey W.; Xu, Chao

    2017-02-01

    The model-free hysteresis loop analysis (HLA) method for structural health monitoring (SHM) has significant advantages over the traditional model-based SHM methods that require a suitable baseline model to represent the actual system response. This paper provides a unique validation against both an experimental reinforced concrete (RC) building and a calibrated numerical model to delineate the capability of the model-free HLA method and the adaptive least mean squares (LMS) model-based method in detecting, localizing and quantifying damage that may not be visible, observable in overall structural response. Results clearly show the model-free HLA method is capable of adapting to changes in how structures transfer load or demand across structural elements over time and multiple events of different size. However, the adaptive LMS model-based method presented an image of greater spread of lesser damage over time and story when the baseline model is not well defined. Finally, the two algorithms are tested over a simpler hysteretic behaviour typical steel structure to quantify the impact of model mismatch between the baseline model used for identification and the actual response. The overall results highlight the need for model-based methods to have an appropriate model that can capture the observed response, in order to yield accurate results, even in small events where the structure remains linear.

  18. Loopβ3αC plays an important role in the structure and function of isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanxia; Li, Shanze; Gao, Yadan; Tong, Li; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao; Jiang, Guohua; Wei, Qun

    2016-09-01

    This work aims to investigate the role of the loopβ3αC amino acids in the structure and function of isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase (AceK). The results demonstrate that the precise configuration of loopβ3αC is very important for AceK structure and function: structural changes alter the affinity of the enzyme for the isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), which modifies enzyme activity. Intriguingly, D340 is significant for the retention of kinase and phosphatase activities, for the conformational stability of AceK and for binding ICDH. The deletion Δ341-345 increases enzyme activity by increasing the maximum velocity and affinity for ICDH. The β3αC loop is thus critical for the structure and function of AceK. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Structure of the Ebola virus envelope protein MPER/TM domain and its interaction with the fusion loop explains their fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Nyenhuis, David A; Nelson, Elizabeth A; Cafiso, David S; White, Judith M; Tamm, Lukas K

    2017-09-19

    Ebolavirus (EBOV), an enveloped filamentous RNA virus causing severe hemorrhagic fever, enters cells by macropinocytosis and membrane fusion in a late endosomal compartment. Fusion is mediated by the EBOV envelope glycoprotein GP, which consists of subunits GP1 and GP2. GP1 binds to cellular receptors, including Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein, and GP2 is responsible for low pH-induced membrane fusion. Proteolytic cleavage and NPC1 binding at endosomal pH lead to conformational rearrangements of GP2 that include exposing the hydrophobic fusion loop (FL) for insertion into the cellular target membrane and forming a six-helix bundle structure. Although major portions of the GP2 structure have been solved in pre- and postfusion states and although current models place the transmembrane (TM) and FL domains of GP2 in close proximity at critical steps of membrane fusion, their structures in membrane environments, and especially interactions between them, have not yet been characterized. Here, we present the structure of the membrane proximal external region (MPER) connected to the TM domain: i.e., the missing parts of the EBOV GP2 structure. The structure, solved by solution NMR and EPR spectroscopy in membrane-mimetic environments, consists of a helix-turn-helix architecture that is independent of pH. Moreover, the MPER region is shown to interact in the membrane interface with the previously determined structure of the EBOV FL through several critical aromatic residues. Mutation of aromatic and neighboring residues in both binding partners decreases fusion and viral entry, highlighting the functional importance of the MPER/TM-FL interaction in EBOV entry and fusion.

  20. Germinal-center kinase-like kinase co-crystal structure reveals a swapped activation loop and C-terminal extension.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, Douglas; Rushe, Mia; M Arduini, Robert; Lukacs, Christine; Atkins, Kateri; Sun, Xin; Little, Kevin; Cullivan, Michael; Paramasivam, Murugan; Patterson, Thomas A; Hesson, Thomas; D McKee, Timothy; May-Dracka, Tricia L; Xin, Zhili; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea; Bhisetti, Govinda R; Lyssikatos, Joseph P; Silvian, Laura F

    2017-02-01

    Germinal-center kinase-like kinase (GLK, Map4k3), a GCK-I family kinase, plays multiple roles in regulating apoptosis, amino acid sensing, and immune signaling. We describe here the crystal structure of an activation loop mutant of GLK kinase domain bound to an inhibitor. The structure reveals a weakly associated, activation-loop swapped dimer with more than 20 amino acids of ordered density at the carboxy-terminus. This C-terminal PEST region binds intermolecularly to the hydrophobic groove of the N-terminal domain of a neighboring molecule. Although the GLK activation loop mutant crystallized demonstrates reduced kinase activity, its structure demonstrates all the hallmarks of an "active" kinase, including the salt bridge between the C-helix glutamate and the catalytic lysine. Our compound displacement data suggests that the effect of the Ser170Ala mutation in reducing kinase activity is likely due to its effect in reducing substrate peptide binding affinity rather than reducing ATP binding or ATP turnover. This report details the first structure of GLK; comparison of its activation loop sequence and P-loop structure to that of Map4k4 suggests ideas for designing inhibitors that can distinguish between these family members to achieve selective pharmacological inhibitors.

  1. Reducing the two-loop large-scale structure power spectrum to low-dimensional, radial integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2016-11-01

    Modeling the large-scale structure of the universe on nonlinear scales has the potential to substantially increase the science return of upcoming surveys by increasing the number of modes available for model comparisons. One way to achieve this is to model nonlinear scales perturbatively. Unfortunately, this involves high-dimensional loop integrals that are cumbersome to evaluate. Trying to simplify this, we show how two-loop (next-to-next-to-leading order) corrections to the density power spectrum can be reduced to low-dimensional, radial integrals. Many of those can be evaluated with a one-dimensional fast Fourier transform, which is significantly faster than the five-dimensional Monte-Carlo integrals that are needed otherwise. The general idea of this fast fourier transform perturbation theory method is to switch between Fourier and position space to avoid convolutions and integrate over orientations, leaving only radial integrals. This reformulation is independent of the underlying shape of the initial linear density power spectrum and should easily accommodate features such as those from baryonic acoustic oscillations. We also discuss how to account for halo bias and redshift space distortions.

  2. Reducing the two-loop large-scale structure power spectrum to low-dimensional, radial integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2016-11-28

    Modeling the large-scale structure of the universe on nonlinear scales has the potential to substantially increase the science return of upcoming surveys by increasing the number of modes available for model comparisons. One way to achieve this is to model nonlinear scales perturbatively. Unfortunately, this involves high-dimensional loop integrals that are cumbersome to evaluate. Here, trying to simplify this, we show how two-loop (next-to-next-to-leading order) corrections to the density power spectrum can be reduced to low-dimensional, radial integrals. Many of those can be evaluated with a one-dimensional fast Fourier transform, which is significantly faster than the five-dimensional Monte-Carlo integrals that are needed otherwise. The general idea of this fast fourier transform perturbation theory method is to switch between Fourier and position space to avoid convolutions and integrate over orientations, leaving only radial integrals. This reformulation is independent of the underlying shape of the initial linear density power spectrum and should easily accommodate features such as those from baryonic acoustic oscillations. We also discuss how to account for halo bias and redshift space distortions.

  3. Reducing the two-loop large-scale structure power spectrum to low-dimensional, radial integrals

    DOE PAGES

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2016-11-28

    Modeling the large-scale structure of the universe on nonlinear scales has the potential to substantially increase the science return of upcoming surveys by increasing the number of modes available for model comparisons. One way to achieve this is to model nonlinear scales perturbatively. Unfortunately, this involves high-dimensional loop integrals that are cumbersome to evaluate. Here, trying to simplify this, we show how two-loop (next-to-next-to-leading order) corrections to the density power spectrum can be reduced to low-dimensional, radial integrals. Many of those can be evaluated with a one-dimensional fast Fourier transform, which is significantly faster than the five-dimensional Monte-Carlo integrals thatmore » are needed otherwise. The general idea of this fast fourier transform perturbation theory method is to switch between Fourier and position space to avoid convolutions and integrate over orientations, leaving only radial integrals. This reformulation is independent of the underlying shape of the initial linear density power spectrum and should easily accommodate features such as those from baryonic acoustic oscillations. We also discuss how to account for halo bias and redshift space distortions.« less

  4. The plasma structure of the north-east rim of the Cygnus Loop as observed with ASCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyata, Emi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Pisarski, Ryszard; Kissel, Steve E.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first results from Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCAS) observations of the Cygnus Loop. A 22 min square of the north-east rim was observed. The imaging capability of ASCA permits clear indentification of the shock front structure. The energy resolving power of ASCA in the energy band between 0.5 keV to 10 keV reveals several emission lines from oxygen to silicon. The intensity ratio between the O VIII and O VII emission lines demonstrates that the plasma has not reached collisional ionization equilibrium. A nonequilibrium ionization model is applied to determine the gradients both in electron temperature T(sub e), and in electron density n(sub e). T(sub e) ranges from 0.22 keV at the shock front to 0.30 keV at 17 min inside the shock front. n(sub e) can be represented as a power law function of radius with an index of about 6 at an ambient gas density of 0.5 cm(exp -3). The plasma parameter n(sub e)t is about 2 x 10(exp 11) cm(exp -3), resulting in an age of about 20000 yr for the Loop.

  5. The hypoxia-inducible miR-429 regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in human endothelial cells through a negative feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Bartoszewska, Sylwia; Kochan, Kinga; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Ochocka, Renata J.; Collawn, James F.; Bartoszewski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) 1 and 2 are dimeric α/β transcription factors that regulate cellular responses to low oxygen. HIF-1 is induced first, whereas HIF-2 is associated with chronic hypoxia. To determine how HIF1A mRNA, the inducible subunit of HIF-1, is regulated during hypoxia, we followed HIF1A mRNA levels in primary HUVECs over 24 hours using quantitative PCR. HIF1A and VEGF A (VEGFA) mRNA, a transcriptional target of HIF-1, increased ∼2.5- and 8-fold at 2–4 hours, respectively. To determine how the mRNAs were regulated, we identified a microRNA (miRNA), miR-429, that destabilized HIF1A message and decreased VEGFA mRNA by inhibiting HIF1A. Target protector analysis, which interferes with miRNA-mRNA complex formation, confirmed that miR-429 targeted HIF1A message. Desferoxamine treatment, which inhibits the hydroxylases that promote HIF-1α protein degradation, stabilized HIF-1 activity during normoxic conditions and elevated miR-429 levels, demonstrating that HIF-1 promotes miR-429 expression. RNA-sequencing-based transcriptome analysis indicated that inhibition of miRNA-429 in HUVECs up-regulated 209 mRNAs, a number of which regulate angiogenesis. The results demonstrate that HIF-1 is in a negative regulatory loop with miR-429, that miR-429 attenuates HIF-1 activity by decreasing HIF1A message during the early stages of hypoxia before HIF-2 is activated, and this regulatory network helps explain the HIF-1 transition to HIF-2 during chronic hypoxia in endothelial cells.—Bartoszewska, S., Kochan, K., Piotrowski, A., Kamysz, W., Ochocka, R. J., Collawn, J. F., Bartoszewski, R. The hypoxia-inducible miR-429 regulates hypoxia hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in human endothelial cells through a negative feedback loop. PMID:25550463

  6. Structure of three-loop contributions to the β-function of N = 1 supersymmetric QED with N f flavors regularized by the dimensional reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, S. S.; Kataev, A. L.; Stepanyantz, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the case of using the higher derivative regularization for N = 1 supersymmetric quantum electrodynamics (SQED) with N f flavors, the loop integrals giving the β-function are integrals of double total derivatives in themomentum space. This feature allows reducing one of the loop integrals to an integral of the δ-function and deriving the Novikov-Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov relation for the renormalization group functions defined in terms of the bare coupling constant. We consider N = 1 SQED with N f flavors regularized by the dimensional reduction in the overline {DR} -scheme. Evaluating the scheme-dependent three-loop contribution to the β-function proportional to ( N f)2 we find the structures analogous to integrals of the δ-singularities. After adding the schemeindependent terms proportional to ( N f)1, we obtain the known result for the three-loop β-function.

  7. Properties of a large-scale interplanetary loop structure as deduced from low-energy proton anisotropy and magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tranquille, C.; Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Correlated particle and magnetic field measurements by the ISEE 3 spacecraft are presented for the loop structure behind the interplanetary traveling shock event of Nov. 12, 1978. Following the passage of the turbulent shock region, strong bidirectional streaming of low-energy protons is observed for approximately 6 hours, corresponding to a loop thickness of about 0.07 AU. This region is also characterized by a low relative variance of the magnetic field, a depressed proton intensity, and a reduction in the magnetic power spectral density. Using quasi-linear theory applied to a slab model, a value of 3 AU is derived for the mean free path during the passage of the closed loop. It is inferred from this observation that the proton regime associated with the loop structure is experiencing scatter-free transport and that either the length of the loop is approximately 3 AU between the sun and the earth or else the protons are being reflected at both ends of a smaller loop.

  8. Properties of a large-scale interplanetary loop structure as deduced from low-energy proton anisotropy and magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tranquille, C.; Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Correlated particle and magnetic field measurements by the ISEE 3 spacecraft are presented for the loop structure behind the interplanetary traveling shock event of Nov. 12, 1978. Following the passage of the turbulent shock region, strong bidirectional streaming of low-energy protons is observed for approximately 6 hours, corresponding to a loop thickness of about 0.07 AU. This region is also characterized by a low relative variance of the magnetic field, a depressed proton intensity, and a reduction in the magnetic power spectral density. Using quasi-linear theory applied to a slab model, a value of 3 AU is derived for the mean free path during the passage of the closed loop. It is inferred from this observation that the proton regime associated with the loop structure is experiencing scatter-free transport and that either the length of the loop is approximately 3 AU between the sun and the earth or else the protons are being reflected at both ends of a smaller loop.

  9. Bimodal loop-gap resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, W.; Froncisz, W.; Hyde, James S.

    1996-05-01

    A bimodal loop-gap resonator for use in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at S band is described. It consists of two identical one-loop-one-gap resonators in coaxial juxtaposition. In one mode, the currents in the two loops are parallel and in the other antiparallel. By introducing additional capacitors between the loops, the frequencies of the two modes can be made to coincide. Details are given concerning variable coupling to each mode, tuning of the resonant frequency of one mode to that of the other, and adjustment of the isolation between modes. An equivalent circuit is given and network analysis carried out both experimentally and theoretically. EPR applications are described including (a) probing of the field distributions with DPPH, (b) continuous wave (cw) EPR with a spin-label line sample, (c) cw electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR), (d) modulation of saturation, and (e) saturation-recovery (SR) EPR. Bloch induction experiments can be performed when the sample extends half way through the structure, but microwave signals induced by Mx and My components of magnetization cancel when it extends completely through. This latter situation is particularly favorable for SR, modulation of saturation, and ELDOR experiments, which depend on observing Mz indirectly using a second weak observing microwave source.

  10. Generation of a flare loop structure and ejection of magnetic flux from an erupting laboratory arched magnetic flux rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2011-12-01

    A laboratory plasma experiment has been built to generate an arched magnetic flux rope (AMFR) which is essentially an arch-shaped, current-carrying, magnetized plasma structure. Coronal loops and prominences are the main examples of solar AMFRs that frequently erupt and evolve into more energetic events such as flares and coronal mass ejections. Numerous small-scale AMFRs are also observed in the solar corona. In order to capture the important micro-physics of an erupting AMFR, the laboratory experiment has been designed by careful scaling of the solar plasma parameters. The laboratory AMFR (n ~ 1019 m-3, Te ~ 10 eV, L ~ 0.5 m) is produced using a LaB6 plasma source in presence of an arched vacuum magnetic field (B ~ 1 kG) and it evolves in a large magnetized plasma (1.0 m diameter, 4.5 m long, n ~ 1018 m-3, Te ~ 4 eV, B = 25-150 G). Two laser beams (1064 nm, ~0.5 J/pulse) strike movable carbon targets placed behind the electrodes to generate controlled plasma flows from the footpoints of the AMFR. The laser generated flows can mimic a variety of plasma flow conditions that exist on the sun and they can trigger the AMFR eruption by injecting dense plasma and magnetic flux in the AMFR. The experiment runs continuously with a 0.5 Hz repetition rate and is highly reproducible. Thus, several thousands of identical eruptions are routinely generated and evolution of the magnetic field, density, and plasma temperature is recorded in 3D with a high spatiotemporal resolution ( dx = 1 mm, dt= 20 ns) using movable diagnostic probes. Fast-camera images of the erupting AMFR demonstrate striking similarities between laboratory and solar plasma structures, most notably the observation of a flare-loop like structure following the eruption of the laboratory AMFR. The eruption of the AMFR can be initiated either by the laser generated intense flows or by the presence of a strong background magnetic field (B > 50 G ~ magnetic field at the leading edge of the AMFR). In both scenarios

  11. Unlike the quaternary structure transition, the tertiary structure change of the 240s loop in allosteric aspartate transcarbamylase requires active site saturation by substrate for completion.

    PubMed

    Fetler, L; Vachette, P; Hervé, G; Ladjimi, M M

    1995-12-05

    The quaternary structural change associated with the homotropic cooperative interactions in Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamylase (ATCase) is accompanied by various tertiary structural modifications; the most notable one involves the 240s loop formed by residues 230--245 of the catalytic chain. In order to monitor local conformational changes in this region by fluorescence spectroscopy, Tyr-240 has been replaced by a Trp residue, in a mutant enzyme, in which both naturally occurring Trp residues in positions 209 and 284 of the catalytic chains had previously been substituted by Phe residues. This F209F284W240-ATCase still displays homotropic cooperativity for aspartate and undergoes the same T to R quaternary structure change as does the wild-type enzyme. Upon binding of the bisubstrate analogue N-(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate, the fluorescence emission spectrum of this mutant shows a red shift directly proportional to the fraction of catalytic sites occupied by this compound, a maximum value of 4 nm being attained when all six active sites are ligated. An identical shift is observed with the catalytic subunits of this modified enzyme, when all three active sites are occupied. In contrast, the quaternary structural change of the F209F284W240-ATCase, monitored by small-angle X-ray scattering, is complete when only four out of six catalytic sites are occupied. Thus, the 240s loop adopts its final conformation only when the neighboring active site is bound.

  12. Functional Probes of Drug–Receptor Interactions Implicated by Structural Studies: Cys-Loop Receptors Provide a Fertile Testing Ground

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structures of integral membrane receptors provide valuable models for drug–receptor interactions across many important classes of drug targets and have become much more widely available in recent years. However, it remains to be determined to what extent these images are relevant to human receptors in their biological context and how subtle issues such as subtype selectivity can be informed by them. The high precision structural modifications enabled by unnatural amino acid mutagenesis on mammalian receptors expressed in vertebrate cells allow detailed tests of predictions from structural studies. Using the Cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels, we show that functional studies lead to detailed binding models that, at times, are significantly at odds with the structural studies on related invertebrate proteins. Importantly, broad variations in binding interactions are seen for very closely related receptor subtypes and for varying drugs at a given binding site. These studies highlight the essential interplay between structural studies and functional studies that can guide efforts to develop new pharmaceuticals. PMID:24568098

  13. Functional probes of drug-receptor interactions implicated by structural studies: Cys-loop receptors provide a fertile testing ground.

    PubMed

    Van Arnam, Ethan B; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2014-08-14

    Structures of integral membrane receptors provide valuable models for drug-receptor interactions across many important classes of drug targets and have become much more widely available in recent years. However, it remains to be determined to what extent these images are relevant to human receptors in their biological context and how subtle issues such as subtype selectivity can be informed by them. The high precision structural modifications enabled by unnatural amino acid mutagenesis on mammalian receptors expressed in vertebrate cells allow detailed tests of predictions from structural studies. Using the Cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels, we show that functional studies lead to detailed binding models that, at times, are significantly at odds with the structural studies on related invertebrate proteins. Importantly, broad variations in binding interactions are seen for very closely related receptor subtypes and for varying drugs at a given binding site. These studies highlight the essential interplay between structural studies and functional studies that can guide efforts to develop new pharmaceuticals.

  14. Phase transition and hysteresis loop in structured games with global updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Guanrong; Hui, P. M.

    2008-04-01

    We present a global payoff-based strategy updating model for studying cooperative behavior of a networked population. We adopt the Prisoner’s Dilemma game and the snowdrift game as paradigms for characterizing the interactions among individuals. We investigate the model on regular, small-world, and scale-free networks, and find multistable cooperation states depending on the initial cooperator density. In particular for the snowdrift game on small-world and scale-free networks, there exist a discontinuous phase transition and hysteresis loops of cooperator density. We explain the observed properties by theoretical predictions and simulation results of the average number of neighbors of cooperators and defectors, respectively. Our work indicates that individuals with more neighbors have a trend to preserve their initial strategies, which has strong impacts on the strategy updating of individuals with fewer neighbors; while the fact that individuals with few neighbors have to become cooperators to avoid gaining the lowest payoff plays significant roles in maintaining and spreading of cooperation strategy.

  15. A stem-loop structure directs oskar mRNA to microtubule minus ends.

    PubMed

    Jambor, Helena; Mueller, Sandra; Bullock, Simon L; Ephrussi, Anne

    2014-04-01

    mRNA transport coupled with translational control underlies the intracellular localization of many proteins in eukaryotic cells. This is exemplified in Drosophila, where oskar mRNA transport and translation at the posterior pole of the oocyte direct posterior patterning of the embryo. oskar localization is a multistep process. Within the oocyte, a spliced oskar localization element (SOLE) targets oskar mRNA for plus end-directed transport by kinesin-1 to the posterior pole. However, the signals mediating the initial minus end-directed, dynein-dependent transport of the mRNA from nurse cells into the oocyte have remained unknown. Here, we show that a 67-nt stem-loop in the oskar 3' UTR promotes oskar mRNA delivery to the developing oocyte and that it shares functional features with the fs(1)K10 oocyte localization signal. Thus, two independent cis-acting signals, the oocyte entry signal (OES) and the SOLE, mediate sequential dynein- and kinesin-dependent phases of oskar mRNA transport during oogenesis. The OES also promotes apical localization of injected RNAs in blastoderm stage embryos, another dynein-mediated process. Similarly, when ectopically expressed in polarized cells of the follicular epithelium or salivary glands, reporter RNAs bearing the oskar OES are apically enriched, demonstrating that this element promotes mRNA localization independently of cell type. Our work sheds new light on how oskar mRNA is trafficked during oogenesis and the RNA features that mediate minus end-directed transport.

  16. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  17. Novel method for inducing rapid, controllable therapeutic hypothermia in rats using a perivascular implanted closed-loop cooling circuit.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Jessica A; Rajput, Padmesh S; Lyden, Patrick D

    2016-07-15

    Hypothermia is the most potent protective therapy available for cerebral ischemia. In experimental models, cooling the brain even a single degree Celsius alters outcome after global and focal ischemia. Difficulties translating therapeutic hypothermia to patients with stroke or after cardiac arrest include: uncertainty as to the optimal treatment duration; best target-depth temperature; and longest time delay after which therapeutic hypothermia won't benefit. Recent results from human clinical trials suggest that cooling with surface methods provides insufficient cooling speed or control over target temperature. Available animal models incorporate surface cooling methods that are slow, and do not allow for precise control of the target temperature. To address this need, we developed a rapid, simple, inexpensive model for inducing hypothermia using a perivascular implanted closed-loop cooling circuit. The method allows precise control of the target temperature. Using this method, target temperature for therapeutic hypothermia was reached within 13±1.07min (Mean±SE). Once at target, the temperature was maintained within 0.09°C for 4h. This method will allow future experiments to determine under what conditions therapeutic hypothermia is effective, determine the optimal relationship among delay, duration, and depth, and provide the research community with a new model for conducting further research into mechanistic questions underlying the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Varietal Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-15

    A series of active regions stretched along the right side of the sun exhibited a wide variety of loops cascading above them (Sept. 12-14, 2016). The active region near the center has tightly coiled loops, while the region rotating over the right edge has some elongated and some very stretched loops above it. The loops are actually charged particles spiraling along magnetic field lines, observed here in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Near the middle of the video the Earth quickly passes in front of a portion of the sun as viewed by SDO. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16997

  19. Strategies for recognition of stem-loop RNA structures by synthetic ligands: application to the HIV-1 frameshift stimulatory sequence.

    PubMed

    Palde, Prakash B; Ofori, Leslie O; Gareiss, Peter C; Lerea, Jaclyn; Miller, Benjamin L

    2010-08-26

    Production of the Gag-Pol polyprotein in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) requires a -1 ribosomal frameshift, which is directed by a highly conserved RNA stem-loop. Building on our discovery of a set of disulfide-containing peptides that bind this RNA, we describe medicinal chemistry efforts designed to begin to understand the structure-activity relationships and RNA sequence-selectivity relationships associated with these compounds. Additionally, we have prepared analogues incorporating an olefin or saturated hydrocarbon bioisostere of the disulfide moiety, as a first step toward enhancing biostability. The olefin-containing compounds exhibit affinity comparable to the lead disulfide and, importantly, have no discernible toxicity when incubated with human fibroblasts at concentrations up to 1 mM.

  20. Analysis of a new structure Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser based on fiber grating loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Haiwen; Xia, Jiangzhen; Chen, Gaoting; Fang, Zujie; Kim, Insoo S.; Kim, Yohee

    2001-10-01

    In this paper a new structure all fiber Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber laser by using all-fiber wavelength selective intensity modulator based on fiber grating loop mirror (FGLM) was reported. This Q-switched scheme not only modulates loss of the cavity but also selects wavelength. Stable optical pulse with 3 dB linewidth of 0.07 nm, pulse width of 1.4 microsecond(s) , average power of 14.2 mW, and peak power of 1.267 W at 80 mW pump power and 8 KHz repetition rates was obtained in experiments. The generation of single laser pulses and its stability were discussed.

  1. A stem–loop structure directs oskar mRNA to microtubule minus ends

    PubMed Central

    Jambor, Helena; Mueller, Sandra; Bullock, Simon L.; Ephrussi, Anne

    2014-01-01

    mRNA transport coupled with translational control underlies the intracellular localization of many proteins in eukaryotic cells. This is exemplified in Drosophila, where oskar mRNA transport and translation at the posterior pole of the oocyte direct posterior patterning of the embryo. oskar localization is a multistep process. Within the oocyte, a spliced oskar localization element (SOLE) targets oskar mRNA for plus end-directed transport by kinesin-1 to the posterior pole. However, the signals mediating the initial minus end-directed, dynein-dependent transport of the mRNA from nurse cells into the oocyte have remained unknown. Here, we show that a 67-nt stem–loop in the oskar 3′ UTR promotes oskar mRNA delivery to the developing oocyte and that it shares functional features with the fs(1)K10 oocyte localization signal. Thus, two independent cis-acting signals, the oocyte entry signal (OES) and the SOLE, mediate sequential dynein- and kinesin-dependent phases of oskar mRNA transport during oogenesis. The OES also promotes apical localization of injected RNAs in blastoderm stage embryos, another dynein-mediated process. Similarly, when ectopically expressed in polarized cells of the follicular epithelium or salivary glands, reporter RNAs bearing the oskar OES are apically enriched, demonstrating that this element promotes mRNA localization independently of cell type. Our work sheds new light on how oskar mRNA is trafficked during oogenesis and the RNA features that mediate minus end-directed transport. PMID:24572808

  2. Artemisinin induces A549 cell apoptosis dominantly via a reactive oxygen species-mediated amplification activation loop among caspase-9, -8 and -3.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weijie; Xiao, Fenglian; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2013-10-01

    This report is designed to explore the roles of caspase-8, -9 and -3 in artemisinin (ARTE)-induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549 cells). ARTE induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in dose- and time-dependent fashion. Although ARTE treatment did not induce Bid cleavage and significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, it induced release of Smac and AIF but not cytochrome c from mitochondria, and silencing of Bak but not Bax significantly prevented ARTE-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, ARTE treatment induced ROS-dependent activation of caspase-9, -8 and -3. Of the utmost importance, silencing or inhibiting any one of caspase-8, -9 and -3 almost completely prevented ARTE-induced activation of all the three caspases and remarkably abrogated the cytotoxicity of ARTE, suggesting that ARTE triggered an amplification activation loop among caspase-9, -8 and -3. Collectively, our data demonstrate that ARTE induces a ROS-mediated amplification activation loop among caspase-9, -8 and -3 to dominantly mediate the apoptosis of A549 cells.

  3. Investigation of Deterioration Behavior of Hysteretic Loops in Nonlinear Static Procedure Analysis of Concrete Structures with Shear Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodrati Amiri, G.; Amidi, S.; Khorasani, M.

    2008-07-08

    In the recent years, scientists developed the seismic rehabilitation of structures and their view points were changed from sufficient strength to the performance of structures (Performance Base Design) to prepare a safe design. Nonlinear Static Procedure analysis (NSP) or pushover analysis is a new method that is chosen for its speed and simplicity in calculations. 'Seismic Rehabilitation Code for Existing Buildings' and FEMA 356 considered this method. Result of this analysis is a target displacement that is the base of the performance and rehabilitation procedure of the structures. Exact recognition of that displacement could develop the workability of pushover analysis. In these days, Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis (NDP) is only method can exactly apply the seismic ground motions. In this case because it consumes time, costs very high and is more difficult than other methods, is not applicable as much as NSP. A coefficient used in NSP for determining the target displacement is C2 (Stiffness and Strength Degradations Coefficient) and is applicable for correcting the errors due to eliminating the stiffness and strength degradations in hysteretic loops. In this study it has been tried to analysis three concrete frames with shear walls by several accelerations that scaled according to FEMA 273 and FEMA 356. These structures were designed with Iranian 2800 standard (vers.3). Finally after the analyzing by pushover method and comparison results with dynamic analysis, calculated C2 was comprised with values in rehabilitation codes.

  4. Distinct second extracellular loop structures of the brain cannabinoid CB(1) receptor: implication in ligand binding and receptor function.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Rudd, James; Ding, Tomas T

    2011-02-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) second extracellular loop (E2) is known to play an important role in receptor structure and function. The brain cannabinoid (CB(1)) receptor is unique in that it lacks the interloop E2 disulfide linkage to the transmembrane (TM) helical bundle, a characteristic of many GPCRs. Recent mutation studies of the CB(1) receptor, however, suggest the presence of an alternative intraloop disulfide bond between two E2 Cys residues. Considering the oxidation state of these Cys residues, we determine the molecular structures of the 17-residue E2 in the dithiol form (E2(dithiol)) and in the disulfide form (E2(disulfide)) of the CB(1) receptor in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, using a combination of simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. We characterize the CB(1) receptor models with these two E2 forms, CB(1)(E2(dithiol)) and CB(1)(E2(disulfide)), by analyzing interaction energy, contact number, core crevice, and cross correlation. The results show that the distinct E2 structures interact differently with the TM helical bundle and uniquely modify the TM helical topology, suggesting that E2 of the CB(1) receptor plays a critical role in stabilizing receptor structure, regulating ligand binding, and ultimately modulating receptor activation. Further studies on the role of E2 of the CB(1) receptor are warranted, particularly comparisons of the ligand-bound form with the present ligand-free form.

  5. Structure of a C. perfringens enterotoxin mutant in complex with a modified Claudin-2 extracellular loop 2.

    PubMed

    Yelland, Tamas S; Naylor, Claire E; Bagoban, Tannya; Savva, Christos G; Moss, David S; McClane, Bruce A; Blasig, Ingolf E; Popoff, M; Basak, Ajit K

    2014-09-09

    CPE (Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin) is the major virulence determinant for C. perfringens type-A food poisoning, the second most common bacterial food-borne illness in the UK and USA. After binding to its receptors, which include particular human claudins, the toxin forms pores in the cell membrane. The mature pore apparently contains a hexamer of CPE, claudin and, possibly, occludin. The combination of high binding specificity with cytotoxicity has resulted in CPE being investigated, with some success, as a targeted cytotoxic agent for oncotherapy. In this paper, we present the X-ray crystallographic structure of CPE in complex with a peptide derived from extracellular loop 2 of a modified, CPE-binding Claudin-2, together with high-resolution native and pore-formation mutant structures. Our structure provides the first atomic-resolution data on any part of a claudin molecule and reveals that claudin's CPE-binding fingerprint (NPLVP) is in a tight turn conformation and binds, as expected, in CPE's C-terminal claudin-binding groove. The leucine and valine residues insert into the binding groove while the first residue, asparagine, tethers the peptide via an interaction with CPE's aspartate 225 and the two prolines are required to maintain the tight turn conformation. Understanding the structural basis of the contribution these residues make to binding will aid in engineering CPE to target tumor cells.

  6. Gallstone ileus inducing obstructive jaundice at the afferent loop of Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy after bile duct cancer surgery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Gu; Hwang, Shin; Joo, Yo-Han; Cho, Yu-Jeong; Choi, Kyunghak

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of gallstone ileus is occasionally challenging due to the variability of its presentation. We herein present a very rare case of gallstone ileus inducing obstructive jaundice at the afferent loop of Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy after 10 years of bile duct cancer surgery. We describe the case of a 74-year-old Korean woman with obstructive jaundice, treated conservatively. She showed severely impaired liver function test and obstructive jaundice. The computed tomography (CT) scan led to a diagnosis of very rare type of gallstones ileus at the afferent jejunal loop. Since the clinical manifestation was improved, we decided to observe her closely. On the next follow-up CT scan, the gallstone disappeared with mild distension of the afferent bowel loop, implicating spontaneous passage of the gallstone. She recovered and returned to normal life after 10 days of initiation of clinical manifestations. We presume that the gallstone may enter the afferent jejunal loop through the hepaticojejunostomy and later increase in size. The presence of narrow tract of intestine may facilitate the incidence of gallstone ileus. It appears to be the first report on this rare type of gallstone ileus inducing obstructive jaundice.

  7. Telomere targeting with a novel G-quadruplex-interactive ligand BRACO-19 induces T-loop disassembly and telomerase displacement in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangtong; Liu, Xinrui; Li, Yunqian; Xu, Songbai; Ma, Chengyuan; Wu, Xinmin; Cheng, Ye; Yu, Zhiyun; Zhao, Gang; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interference with telomerase and telomere maintenance is emerging as an attractive target for anticancer therapies. Ligand-induced stabilization of G-quadruplex formation by the telomeric DNA 3′-overhang inhibits telomerase from catalyzing telomeric DNA synthesis and from capping telomeric ends, making these ligands good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. BRACO-19 is one of the most effective and specific ligand for telomeric G4. It is shown here that BRACO-19 suppresses proliferation and reduces telomerase activity in human glioblastoma cells, paralleled by the displacement of telomerase from nuclear to cytoplasm. Meanwhile, BRACO-19 triggers extensive DNA damage response at telomere, which may result from uncapping and disassembly of telomeric T-loop structure, characterized by the formation of anaphase bridge and telomere fusion, as well as the release of telomere-binding protein from telomere. The resulting dysfunctional telomere ultimately provokes p53 and p21-mediated cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence. Notably, normal primary astrocytes do not respond to the treatment of BRACO-19, suggesting the agent's good selectivity for cancer cells. These results reinforce the notion that G-quadruplex binding compounds can act as broad inhibitors of telomere-related processes and have potential as selective antineoplastic drugs for various tumors including malignant gliomas. PMID:26908447

  8. The Minimum M3-M4 Loop Length of Neurotransmitter-activated Pentameric Receptors Is Critical for the Structural Integrity of Cytoplasmic Portals*

    PubMed Central

    Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Deeb, Tarek Z.; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Peters, John A.; Hales, Tim G.

    2013-01-01

    The 5-HT3A receptor homology model, based on the partial structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata, reveals an asymmetric ion channel with five portals framed by adjacent helical amphipathic (HA) stretches within the 114-residue loop between the M3 and M4 membrane-spanning domains. The positive charge of Arg-436, located within the HA stretch, is a rate-limiting determinant of single channel conductance (γ). Further analysis reveals that positive charge and volume of residue 436 are determinants of 5-HT3A receptor inward rectification, exposing an additional role for portals. A structurally unresolved stretch of 85 residues constitutes the bulk of the M3-M4 loop, leaving a >45-Å gap in the model between M3 and the HA stretch. There are no additional structural data for this loop, which is vestigial in bacterial pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and was largely removed for crystallization of the Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-activated pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. We created 5-HT3A subunit loop truncation mutants, in which sequences framing the putative portals were retained, to determine the minimum number of residues required to maintain their functional integrity. Truncation to between 90 and 75 amino acids produced 5-HT3A receptors with unaltered rectification. Truncation to 70 residues abolished rectification and increased γ. These findings reveal a critical M3-M4 loop length required for functions attributable to cytoplasmic portals. Examination of all 44 subunits of the human neurotransmitter-activated Cys-loop receptors reveals that, despite considerable variability in their sequences and lengths, all M3-M4 loops exceed 70 residues, suggesting a fundamental requirement for portal integrity. PMID:23740249

  9. The minimum M3-M4 loop length of neurotransmitter-activated pentameric receptors is critical for the structural integrity of cytoplasmic portals.

    PubMed

    Baptista-Hon, Daniel T; Deeb, Tarek Z; Lambert, Jeremy J; Peters, John A; Hales, Tim G

    2013-07-26

    The 5-HT3A receptor homology model, based on the partial structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata, reveals an asymmetric ion channel with five portals framed by adjacent helical amphipathic (HA) stretches within the 114-residue loop between the M3 and M4 membrane-spanning domains. The positive charge of Arg-436, located within the HA stretch, is a rate-limiting determinant of single channel conductance (γ). Further analysis reveals that positive charge and volume of residue 436 are determinants of 5-HT3A receptor inward rectification, exposing an additional role for portals. A structurally unresolved stretch of 85 residues constitutes the bulk of the M3-M4 loop, leaving a >45-Å gap in the model between M3 and the HA stretch. There are no additional structural data for this loop, which is vestigial in bacterial pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and was largely removed for crystallization of the Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-activated pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. We created 5-HT3A subunit loop truncation mutants, in which sequences framing the putative portals were retained, to determine the minimum number of residues required to maintain their functional integrity. Truncation to between 90 and 75 amino acids produced 5-HT3A receptors with unaltered rectification. Truncation to 70 residues abolished rectification and increased γ. These findings reveal a critical M3-M4 loop length required for functions attributable to cytoplasmic portals. Examination of all 44 subunits of the human neurotransmitter-activated Cys-loop receptors reveals that, despite considerable variability in their sequences and lengths, all M3-M4 loops exceed 70 residues, suggesting a fundamental requirement for portal integrity.

  10. Structure-guided Design and Immunological Characterization of Immunogens Presenting the HIV-1 gp120 V3 Loop on a CTB Scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    M Totrov; X Jiang; X Kong; S Cohen; C Krachmarov; A Salomon; C Williams; M Seaman; R Abagyan; et al.

    2011-12-31

    V3 loop is a major neutralizing determinant of the HIV-1 gp120. Using 3D structures of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), complete V3 in the gp120 context, and V3 bound to a monoclonal antibody (mAb), we designed two V3-scaffold immunogen constructs (V3-CTB). The full-length V3-CTB presenting the complete V3 in a structural context mimicking gp120 was recognized by the large majority of our panel of 24 mAbs. The short V3-CTB presenting a V3 fragment in the conformation observed in the complex with the 447-52D Fab, exhibited high-affinity binding to this mAb. The immunogens were evaluated in rabbits using DNA-prime/protein-boost protocol. Boosting with the full-length V3-CTB induced high anti-V3 titers in sera that potently neutralize multiple HIV virus strains. The short V3-CTB was ineffective. The results suggest that very narrow antigenic profile of an immunogen is associated with poor Ab response. An immunogen with broader antigenic activity elicits robust Ab response.

  11. NMR structure and dynamics of the RNA-binding site for the histone mRNA stem-loop binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Eric S; Marzluff, William F; Nikonowicz, Edward P

    2002-01-01

    The 3' end of replication-dependent histone mRNAs terminate in a conserved sequence containing a stem-loop. This 26-nt sequence is the binding site for a protein, stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), that is involved in multiple aspects of histone mRNA metabolism and regulation. We have determined the structure of the 26-nt sequence by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. There is a 16-nt stem-loop motif, with a conserved 6-bp stem and a 4-nt loop. The loop is closed by a conserved U.A base pair that terminates the canonical A-form stem. The pyrimidine-rich 4-nt loop, UUUC, is well organized with the three uridines stacking on the helix, and the fourth base extending across the major groove into the solvent. The flanking nucleotides at the base of the hairpin stem do not assume a unique conformation, despite the fact that the 5' flanking nucleotides are a critical component of the SLBP binding site. PMID:11871662

  12. Allosteric binding site in a Cys-loop receptor ligand-binding domain unveiled in the crystal structure of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Mieke; Wijckmans, Eveline; Farinha, Ana; Yoluk, Özge; Andersson, Magnus; Brams, Marijke; Spurny, Radovan; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Lindahl, Erik; Ulens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels or Cys-loop receptors are responsible for fast inhibitory or excitatory synaptic transmission. The antipsychotic compound chlorpromazine is a widely used tool to probe the ion channel pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, which is a prototypical Cys-loop receptor. In this study, we determine the molecular determinants of chlorpromazine binding in the Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC). We report the X-ray crystal structures of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine or its brominated derivative bromopromazine. Unexpectedly, we do not find a chlorpromazine molecule in the channel pore of ELIC, but behind the β8–β9 loop in the extracellular ligand-binding domain. The β8–β9 loop is localized downstream from the neurotransmitter binding site and plays an important role in coupling of ligand binding to channel opening. In combination with electrophysiological recordings from ELIC cysteine mutants and a thiol-reactive derivative of chlorpromazine, we demonstrate that chlorpromazine binding at the β8–β9 loop is responsible for receptor inhibition. We further use molecular-dynamics simulations to support the X-ray data and mutagenesis experiments. Together, these data unveil an allosteric binding site in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of ELIC. Our results extend on previous observations and further substantiate our understanding of a multisite model for allosteric modulation of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:27791038

  13. Ligand-induced changes in hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase structure.

    PubMed

    Rigat, Karen; Wang, Yi; Hudyma, Thomas W; Ding, Min; Zheng, Xiaofan; Gentles, Robert G; Beno, Brett R; Gao, Min; Roberts, Susan B

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) is required for viral replication. Crystal structures of the NS5B apoprotein show that the finger and thumb domains interact to encircle the active site, and that inhibitors defined by P495 resistance that bind to the thumb-finger interface displace the Δ1 finger loop and disrupt this structure. Since crystal structures may not reveal all of the conformations of a protein in solution we have developed an alternative method, using limited trypsin protease digestion, to investigate the impact of inhibitors as well as substrates on the movement of the Δ1 loop. This assay can be used to study NS5B under conditions that support enzymatic activity. In the absence of inhibitors, no specific region of NS5B was hypersensitive to trypsin, and no specific intermediate cleavage products were formed. Binding of P495-site inhibitors to NS5B induced specific trypsin hypersensitivity at lysine residues 50 and 51. Previously characterized inhibitors and mutant polymerases were used to link this specific trypsin hypersensitivity to movement of the Δ1 loop. Trypsin hypersensitivity identical to the inhibitor pattern was also induced by the binding of the RNA template. The addition of primer to the NS5B-template complex eliminated the hypersensitivity. The data are consistent with displacement of the Δ1 finger loop from the thumb by the binding of template, and reversal by the addition of primer or NTP. Our results complement inhibitor-enzyme co-crystal studies, and the assay provides a rapid and sensitive method to study dynamic changes in HCV NS5B polymerase conformation under conditions that support functional activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dissecting the chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures governing RNA polymerase II trigger loop closure by synthetic nucleic acid analogues

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Butler, Kyle Vincent; Chong, Jenny; Wengel, Jesper; Kool, Eric T.; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    The trigger loop (TL) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a conserved structural motif that is crucial for Pol II catalytic activity and transcriptional fidelity. The TL remains in an inactive open conformation when the mismatched substrate is bound. In contrast, TL switches from an inactive open state to a closed active state to facilitate nucleotide addition upon the binding of the cognate substrate to the Pol II active site. However, a comprehensive understanding of the specific chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures that are essential to this TL conformational change remains elusive. Here we employed synthetic nucleotide analogues as ‘chemical mutation’ tools coupling with α-amanitin transcription inhibition assay to systematically dissect the key chemical interactions and structural signatures governing the substrate-coupled TL closure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol II. This study reveals novel insights into understanding the molecular basis of TL conformational transition upon substrate binding during Pol II transcription. This synthetic chemical biology approach may be extended to understand the mechanisms of other RNA polymerases as well as other nucleic acid enzymes in future studies. PMID:24692664

  15. Dissecting the chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures governing RNA polymerase II trigger loop closure by synthetic nucleic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Butler, Kyle Vincent; Chong, Jenny; Wengel, Jesper; Kool, Eric T; Wang, Dong

    2014-05-01

    The trigger loop (TL) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a conserved structural motif that is crucial for Pol II catalytic activity and transcriptional fidelity. The TL remains in an inactive open conformation when the mismatched substrate is bound. In contrast, TL switches from an inactive open state to a closed active state to facilitate nucleotide addition upon the binding of the cognate substrate to the Pol II active site. However, a comprehensive understanding of the specific chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures that are essential to this TL conformational change remains elusive. Here we employed synthetic nucleotide analogues as 'chemical mutation' tools coupling with α-amanitin transcription inhibition assay to systematically dissect the key chemical interactions and structural signatures governing the substrate-coupled TL closure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol II. This study reveals novel insights into understanding the molecular basis of TL conformational transition upon substrate binding during Pol II transcription. This synthetic chemical biology approach may be extended to understand the mechanisms of other RNA polymerases as well as other nucleic acid enzymes in future studies. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Utilising a loop structure to allow a microfiber coupler with larger taper diameters to be used for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fangfang; Farrell, Gerald; Wu, Qiang; Semenova, Yuliya

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines a technique that utilizes a Sagnac loop with a microfiber coupler (MFC) as a coupler which allows the MFC to operate effectively as a sensor but with larger than normal tapered fiber diameters. The proposed structure is found to be suitable for temperature and refractive index (RI) sensing. It is shown that a variation in the surrounding of the MFC RI results in a shift of the output spectrum, while a temperature variation leads to changes in the intensity of the interference dips. A decrease in the waist diameter of the MFC results in an increase in the sensitivity to temperature. For MFC structures based on a 5.6 μm and a 3 μm fiber waist diameter, the minimum transmission power level of a selected spectral dip decreases by 1.7 dB and 5.03 dB respectively, as the temperature changes from 18 °C to 44 °C. A change in the surrounding RI from 1.334 to 1.395 results in the spectral redshift of 8 nm using a 5.6 μm fiber waist diameter. By functionalizing the surface of the MFC with various materials, the structure could potentially be used for sensing of other parameters.

  17. Reovirus FAST Proteins Drive Pore Formation and Syncytiogenesis Using a Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Fusion-Inducing Lipid Packing Sensor.

    PubMed

    Read, Jolene; Clancy, Eileen K; Sarker, Muzaddid; de Antueno, Roberto; Langelaan, David N; Parmar, Hiren B; Shin, Kyungsoo; Rainey, Jan K; Duncan, Roy

    2015-06-01

    Pore formation is the most energy-demanding step during virus-induced membrane fusion, where high curvature of the fusion pore rim increases the spacing between lipid headgroups, exposing the hydrophobic interior of the membrane to water. How protein fusogens breach this thermodynamic barrier to pore formation is unclear. We identified a novel fusion-inducing lipid packing sensor (FLiPS) in the cytosolic endodomain of the baboon reovirus p15 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein that is essential for pore formation during cell-cell fusion and syncytiogenesis. NMR spectroscopy and mutational studies indicate the dependence of this FLiPS on a hydrophobic helix-loop-helix structure. Biochemical and biophysical assays reveal the p15 FLiPS preferentially partitions into membranes with high positive curvature, and this partitioning is impeded by bis-ANS, a small molecule that inserts into hydrophobic defects in membranes. Most notably, the p15 FLiPS can be functionally replaced by heterologous amphipathic lipid packing sensors (ALPS) but not by other membrane-interactive amphipathic helices. Furthermore, a previously unrecognized amphipathic helix in the cytosolic domain of the reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein can functionally replace the p15 FLiPS, and is itself replaceable by a heterologous ALPS motif. Anchored near the cytoplasmic leaflet by the FAST protein transmembrane domain, the FLiPS is perfectly positioned to insert into hydrophobic defects that begin to appear in the highly curved rim of nascent fusion pores, thereby lowering the energy barrier to stable pore formation.

  18. Reovirus FAST Proteins Drive Pore Formation and Syncytiogenesis Using a Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Fusion-Inducing Lipid Packing Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Muzaddid; de Antueno, Roberto; Langelaan, David N.; Parmar, Hiren B.; Shin, Kyungsoo; Rainey, Jan K.; Duncan, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Pore formation is the most energy-demanding step during virus-induced membrane fusion, where high curvature of the fusion pore rim increases the spacing between lipid headgroups, exposing the hydrophobic interior of the membrane to water. How protein fusogens breach this thermodynamic barrier to pore formation is unclear. We identified a novel fusion-inducing lipid packing sensor (FLiPS) in the cytosolic endodomain of the baboon reovirus p15 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein that is essential for pore formation during cell-cell fusion and syncytiogenesis. NMR spectroscopy and mutational studies indicate the dependence of this FLiPS on a hydrophobic helix-loop-helix structure. Biochemical and biophysical assays reveal the p15 FLiPS preferentially partitions into membranes with high positive curvature, and this partitioning is impeded by bis-ANS, a small molecule that inserts into hydrophobic defects in membranes. Most notably, the p15 FLiPS can be functionally replaced by heterologous amphipathic lipid packing sensors (ALPS) but not by other membrane-interactive amphipathic helices. Furthermore, a previously unrecognized amphipathic helix in the cytosolic domain of the reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein can functionally replace the p15 FLiPS, and is itself replaceable by a heterologous ALPS motif. Anchored near the cytoplasmic leaflet by the FAST protein transmembrane domain, the FLiPS is perfectly positioned to insert into hydrophobic defects that begin to appear in the highly curved rim of nascent fusion pores, thereby lowering the energy barrier to stable pore formation. PMID:26061049

  19. Effects of the antiferromagnetic spin structure on antiferromagnetically induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo-Yao; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Huang, Chun-Wei; Shih, Chun-Wei; Chen, Chia-Ju; Lin, Kai; Li, Jin-Jhuan; Jih, Nae-Yeou; Lu, Chun-I.; Chuang, Tzu-Hung; Wei, Der-Hsin

    2017-09-01

    Antiferromagnetic (AFM) thin films are promising materials for inducing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in adjacent ferromagnetic (FM) films. This study demonstrates that in a selected AFM spin structure with out-of-plane uncompensated moments, the magnitude of the induced PMA in its neighboring Co/Ni film could be significantly enhanced by the establishment of a collinearlike exchange interaction between the volume moments of the AFM film and the perpendicular magnetic FM film. Detailed magnetic hysteresis loops and x-ray analysis revealed a quench of perpendicular surface anisotropy in a monolayered Fe50Mn50/Co /Ni film due to the formation of antiparallel-like coupled Fe and Mn moments. By contrast, the establishment of a three-dimensional quadratic-type AFM spin structure of an Fe50Mn50 film triggered parallel-like out-of-plane uncompensated Fe and Mn moments at the interface and reinforced the PMA induced in the Co/Ni film.

  20. The Thai Phase III HIV Type 1 Vaccine Trial (RV144) Regimen Induces Antibodies That Target Conserved Regions Within the V2 Loop of gp120

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Erik; Rao, Mangala; Williams, Constance; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Bailer, Robert T.; Koup, Richard A.; Madnote, Sirinan; Arworn, Duangnapa; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Currier, Jeffrey R.; Jiang, Mike; Magaret, Craig; Andrews, Charla; Gottardo, Raphael; Gilbert, Peter; Cardozo, Timothy J.; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Paris, Robert; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Gurunathan, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Sinangil, Faruk; Korber, Bette T.; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.; Robb, Merlin L.; Haynes, Barton F.; Ngauy, Viseth; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; de Souza, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Thai Phase III clinical trial (RV144) showed modest efficacy in preventing HIV-1 acquisition. Plasma collected from HIV-1-uninfected trial participants completing all injections with ALVAC-HIV (vCP1521) prime and AIDSVAX B/E boost were tested for antibody responses against HIV-1 gp120 envelope (Env). Peptide microarray analysis from six HIV-1 subtypes and group M consensus showed that vaccination induced antibody responses to the second variable (V2) loop of gp120 of multiple subtypes. We further evaluated V2 responses by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance using cyclic (Cyc) and linear V2 loop peptides. Thirty-one of 32 vaccine recipients tested (97%) had antibody responses against Cyc V2 at 2 weeks postimmunization with a reciprocal geometric mean titer (GMT) of 1100 (range: 200–3200). The frequency of detecting plasma V2 antibodies declined to 19% at 28 weeks post-last injection (GMT: 110, range: 100–200). Antibody responses targeted the mid-region of the V2 loop that contains conserved epitopes and has the amino acid sequence KQKVHALFYKLDIVPI (HXB2 Numbering sequence 169–184). Valine at position 172 was critical for antibody binding. The frequency of V3 responses at 2 weeks postimmunization was modest (18/32, 56%) with a GMT of 185 (range: 100–800). In contrast, naturally infected HIV-1 individuals had a lower frequency of antibody responses to V2 (10/20, 50%; p=0.003) and a higher frequency of responses to V3 (19/20, 95%), with GMTs of 400 (range: 100–3200) and 3570 (range: 200–12,800), respectively. RV144 vaccination induced antibodies that targeted a region of the V2 loop that contains conserved epitopes. Early HIV-1 transmission events involve V2 loop interactions, raising the possibility that anti-V2 antibodies in RV144 may have contributed to viral inhibition. PMID:23035746

  1. Induced cycle structures of the hyperoctahedral group

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.Y.C.

    1992-06-01

    The hyperoctahedral group B{sub n} is treated as the automorphism group of the n-dimensional hypercube, denoted Q{sub n}, which is nowadays understood to be a graph on 2{sup n} vertices. It is well-known that B{sub n} can be represented by the group of signed permutations. In other words, any signed permutation induces a permutation on the vertices of Q{sub n} which preserves adjacencies. Moreover, signed permutations also a permutation group on the edge of Q{sub n}, denoted H{sub n}. We study the cycle structures of both B{sub n} and H{sub n}. The technique proposed here is to determine the induced cycle structure of a signed permutation by the number of fixed vertices or fixed edges of a signed permutation in the cyclic group generated by a signed permutation of given type. Here we directly define the type of a signed permutation by a double partition based on its signed cycle decomposition. In this way, we obtain explicit formulas for the number of induced cycles on vertices as well as edges of Q{sub n} of a signed permutation in terms of its type. By further exploring the connection between cycle indices and the structure of fixed points, we obtain the cycle indices of both B{sub n} and H{sub n}. Our formula for the cycle index of B{sub n}is much more natural and considerably simpler than that of Harrison and High. Meanwhile, the cycle structure of H{sub n} seems to have been untouched before, although it is well motivated by nonisomorphic edge colorings of Q{sub n} as well as by the recent interest in symmetries of computer networks.

  2. Vortex induced motion in compliant structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Arnold; Tuttman, Max; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-11-01

    The coupling of the unsteady shedding of vortices from the leading and trailing edges of a flat plate can lead to large scale oscillations of a structure. Examples of these large motions abound in engineered structures (Traffic signs vibrating in the wind, wing flutter, chattering venetian blinds, etc.) and in nature (the rustling of leaves on a tree in the wind). In all of these examples, the efficiency of energy extraction from the flow to the structure increases dramatically as the vortex shedding and structural vibrations near resonance. As the motion becomes more exaggerated, the fluid-structure interaction becomes increasingly nonlinear as the motion of the plate becomes increasingly important to the vortex shedding dynamics. We present experimental results from two related systems tested in a low speed wind tunnel (using high-speed videography, PIV and hotwire anemometry) (i) a rectangular cantilevered flat plate free to bend and twist, and (ii) a flexible ribbon pinned at its two ends and exposed to the flow. In both systems, a rich phase map of vortex-induced vibrations is described in which both mechanisms for vortex shedding and structural vibration can be tuned independently using geometry, material properties and flow conditions.

  3. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P2{sub 1} revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family. Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1} with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P2{sub 1} crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family.

  4. Antisense oligonucleotide binding to U5 snRNP induces a conformational change that exposes the conserved loop of U5 snRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ast, G; Weiner, A M

    1997-01-01

    Conformational rearrangements of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (U snRNAs) are essential for proper assembly of the active site prior to the first catalytic step of splicing. We have previously shown that conformational changes caused by binding of an antisense 2'-O-methyl RNA oligonucleotide (BU5Ae) to U5 snRNA nt 68-88 disrupted the U4/U5/U6 complex and induced formation of the U1/U4/U5 and U2/U6 complexes. Here we show that the conformational change induced by BU5Ae exposes the invariant loop of U5 that binds the 5'exon and also reorganizes internal loop 1 (IL1) and the top of stem 2. Interestingly, we have also previously found that the U1/U4/U5 complex induced by BU5Ae brings the invariant loop of U5 into close proximity with the 5'-end of U1. Taken together, these data suggest that U1 and U5 may both contribute to the ability of the U1/U4/U5 complex to bind the 5' splice site. PMID:9254712

  5. YghJ, the secreted metalloprotease of pathogenic E. coli induces hemorrhagic fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop.

    PubMed

    Tapader, Rima; Bose, Dipro; Pal, Amit

    2017-04-01

    YghJ, also known as SslE (Secreted and surface associated lipoprotein) is a cell surface associated and secreted lipoprotein harbouring M60 metalloprotease domain. Though the gene is known to be conserved among both pathogenic and commensal Escherichia coli isolates, the expression and secretion of YghJ was found to be higher among diverse E. coli pathotypes. YghJ, secreted from intestinal pathogens such as enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) has been demonstrated to possess mucinase activity and hence facilitates colonization of these enteric pathogens to intestinal epithelial cells. Importantly, YghJ is also reported to be secreted from extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates. In our previous study we have shown that YghJ, purified from a neonatal septicemic E. coli isolate could trigger induction of various proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. This led us to investigate the role of YghJ in causing in vivo tissue hemorrhage. In the present study, we validate the earlier in vitro finding and have showed that YghJ can cause extensive tissue damage in mouse ileum and is also able to induce significant fluid accumulation in a dose dependent manner in a mouse ileal loop (MIL) assay. Hence, our present study not only confirms the pathogenic potential of YghJ in sepsis pathophysiology but also indicates the enterotoxic ability of YghJ which makes it an important virulence determinant of intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  6. Closed coronal structures. V - Gasdynamic models of flaring loops and comparison with SMM observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peres, G.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G.; Acton, L.; Leibacher, J.; Rosner, R.; Pallavicini, R.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional code incorporating energy, momentum and mass conservation equations, and taking the entire solar atmospheric structure into account, is used to investigate the hydrodynamic response of confined magnetic structures to strong heating perturbations. Model calculation results are compared with flare observations which include the light curves of spectral lines formed over a wide range of coronal flare temperatures, as well as determinations of Doppler shifts for the high temperature plasma. It is shown that the numerical simulation predictions are in good overall agreement with the observed flare coronal plasma evolution, correctly reproducing the temporal profile of X-ray spectral lines and their relative intensities. The predicted upflow velocities support the interpretation of the blueshifts as due to evaporation of chromospheric material.

  7. Closed coronal structures. V - Gasdynamic models of flaring loops and comparison with SMM observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peres, G.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G.; Acton, L.; Leibacher, J.; Rosner, R.; Pallavicini, R.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional code incorporating energy, momentum and mass conservation equations, and taking the entire solar atmospheric structure into account, is used to investigate the hydrodynamic response of confined magnetic structures to strong heating perturbations. Model calculation results are compared with flare observations which include the light curves of spectral lines formed over a wide range of coronal flare temperatures, as well as determinations of Doppler shifts for the high temperature plasma. It is shown that the numerical simulation predictions are in good overall agreement with the observed flare coronal plasma evolution, correctly reproducing the temporal profile of X-ray spectral lines and their relative intensities. The predicted upflow velocities support the interpretation of the blueshifts as due to evaporation of chromospheric material.

  8. Large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops in a baryon-dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure in a universe with Omega(0) = 0.2 and h = 0.5 dominated by baryons in which cosmic strings provide the initial density perturbations. The numerical model yields a power spectrum. Nonlinear evolution confirms that the model can account for 700 km/s bulk flows and a strong cluster-cluster correlation, but does rather poorly on smaller scales. There is no visual 'filamentary' structure, and the two-point correlation has too steep a logarithmic slope. The value of G mu = 4 x 10 to the -6th is significantly lower than previous estimates for the value of G mu in baryon-dominated cosmic string models.

  9. Reconstruction of structural evolution in the trnL intron P6b loop of symbiotic Nostoc (Cyanobacteria).

    PubMed

    Olsson, Sanna; Kaasalainen, Ulla; Rikkinen, Jouko

    2012-02-01

    In this study we reconstruct the structural evolution of the hyper-variable P6b region of the group I trnLeu intron in a monophyletic group of lichen-symbiotic Nostoc strains and establish it as a useful marker in the phylogenetic analysis of these organisms. The studied cyanobacteria occur as photosynthetic and/or nitrogen-fixing symbionts in lichen species of the diverse Nephroma guild. Phylogenetic analyses and secondary structure reconstructions are used to improve the understanding of the replication mechanisms in the P6b stem-loop and to explain the observed distribution patterns of indels. The variants of the P6b region in the Nostoc clade studied consist of different combinations of five sequence modules. The distribution of indels together with the ancestral character reconstruction performed enables the interpretation of the evolution of each sequence module. Our results indicate that the indel events are usually associated with single nucleotide changes in the P6b region and have occurred several times independently. In spite of their homoplasy, they provide phylogenetic information for closely related taxa. Thus we recognize that features of the P6b region can be used as molecular markers for species identification and phylogenetic studies involving symbiotic Nostoc cyanobacteria.

  10. Viscosity-dependent structural fluctuation of the M80-containing Ω-loop of horse ferrocytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jain, Rishu; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-06-01

    To determine the effect of solvent viscosity on low-frequency local motions that control the slow changes in structural dynamics of proteins, we have studied the effects of solvent viscosity on the structural fluctuation of presumably the M80-containing Ω-loop by measuring the rate of thermally-driven CO-dissociation from a natively-folded carbonmonoxycytochrome c (NCO-state) in the 0.65-92.5 cP range of viscosity at pH 7.0. At low viscosities (⩽8 cP), the rate coefficient, kdiss for dissociation of CO from the NCO-state varies inversely with the viscosity, but saturates at high viscosities, suggesting that CO-dissociation reaction involves sequential stages that depend differently on solvent friction, i.e., solvent coupled and nonsolvent-coupled stages of the process. In the low viscosity regime (0.65 ⩽ ηs ⩽ 8.0 cP), the rate-viscosity data were fitted to modified Kramers model, kdiss = [A'/(σ + ηs)n]exp(-ΔG/RT), which produced internal friction, σ = 1.35 cP (±0.88), which suggests that the speed of CO-dissociation from NCO at ηs ⩽ 8.0 cP is controlled by internal friction.

  11. GlnK, a PII-homologue: structure reveals ATP binding site and indicates how the T-loops may be involved in molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Cheah, E; Carr, P D; van Heeswijk, W C; Westerhoff, H V; Vasudevan, S G; Ollis, D L

    1998-09-11

    GlnK is a recently discovered homologue of the PII signal protein, an indicator of the nitrogen status of bacteria. PII occupies a central position in the dual cascade that regulates the activity of glutamine synthetase and the transcription of its gene. The complete role of Escherichia coli GlnK is yet to be determined, but already it is known that GlnK behaves like PII and can substitute for PII under some circumstances thereby adding to the subtleties of nitrogen regulation. There are also indications that the roles of the two proteins differ; the expression of PII is constitutive while that of GlnK is linked to the level of nitrogen in the cell. The discovery of GlnK begs the question of why E. coli has both GlnK and PII. Clearly, the structural similarities and differences of GlnK and PII will lead to a better understanding of how PII-like proteins function in E. coli and other organisms. We have crystallised and solved the X-ray structure of GlnK at 2.0 A resolution. The asymmetric unit has two independent copies of the GlnK subunit and both pack around 3-fold axes to form trimers. The trimers have a barrel-like core with recognition loops (the T-loops) that protrude from the top of the molecule. The two GlnK molecules have similar core structures to PII but differ significantly at the C terminus and the loops. The T-loops of the two GlnK molecules also differ from each other; one is disordered while the conformation of the other is stabilised by lattice contacts. The conformation of the ordered T-loop of GlnK differs from that observed in the PII structure despite the fact that their sequences are very similar. The structures suggest that the T-loops do not have a rigid structure and that they may be flexible in solution. The presence of a turn of 310 helix in the middle of the T-loop suggests that secondary structure could form when it interacts with soluble receptor enzymes.Co-crystals of GlnK and ATP were used to determine the structure of the complex. In

  12. Impaired Acid Catalysis by Mutation of a Protein Loop Hinge Residue in a YopH Mutant Revealed by Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, T.; Robinson, H; Johnson, S; Hengge, A

    2009-01-01

    Catalysis by the Yersinia protein-tyrosine phosphatase YopH is significantly impaired by the mutation of the conserved Trp354 residue to Phe. Though not a catalytic residue, this Trp is a hinge residue in a conserved flexible loop (the WPD-loop) that must close during catalysis. To learn why this seemingly conservative mutation reduces catalysis by 2 orders of magnitude, we have solved high-resolution crystal structures for the W354F YopH in the absence and in the presence of tungstate and vanadate. Oxyanion binding to the P-loop in W354F is analogous to that observed in the native enzyme. However, the WPD-loop in the presence of oxyanions assumes a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the fully closed state observed in structures of the native enzyme. This observation provides an explanation for the impaired general acid catalysis observed in kinetic experiments with Trp mutants. A 1.4 Angstroms structure of the W354F mutant obtained in the presence of vanadate reveals an unusual divanadate species with a cyclic [VO]2 core, which has precedent in small molecules but has not been previously reported in a protein crystal structure.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Lactose Operon Repressor and Its Complexes with DNA and Inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mitchell; Chang, Geoffrey; Horton, Nancy C.; Kercher, Michele A.; Pace, Helen C.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Brennan, Richard G.; Lu, Ponzy

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor, a product of the lacI gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21-base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in a stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quaternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites on the genomic DNA.

  14. NMR structure of the noncytotoxic α-sarcin mutant Δ(7-22): The importance of the native conformation of peripheral loops for activity

    PubMed Central

    García-Mayoral, Ma Flor; García-Ortega, Lucia; Lillo, Ma Pilar; Santoro, Jorge; Martínez Del Pozo, Álvaro; Gavilanes, José G.; Rico, Manuel; Bruix, Marta

    2004-01-01

    The deletion mutant Δ(7-22) of α-sarcin, unlike its wild-type protein counterpart, lacks the specific ability to degrade rRNA in intact ribosomes and exhibits an increased unspecific ribonuclease activity and decreased interaction with lipid vesicles. In trying to shed light on these differences, we report here on the three-dimensional structure of the Δ(7-22) α-sarcin mutant using NMR methods. We also evaluated its dynamic properties on the basis of theoretical models and measured its correlation time (6.2 nsec) by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The global fold characteristic of ribotoxins is preserved in the mutant. The most significant differences with respect to the α-sarcin structure are concentrated in (1) loop 2, (2) loop 3, which adopts a new orientation, and (3) loop 5, which shows multiple conformations and an altered dynamics. The interactions between loop 5 and the N-terminal hairpin are lost in the mutant, producing increased solvent accessibility of the active-site residues. The degree of solvent exposure of the catalytic His 137 is similar to that shown by His 92 in RNase T1. Additionally, the calculated order parameters of residues belonging to loop 5 in the mutant correspond to an internal dynamic behavior more similar to RNase T1 than α-sarcin. On the other hand, changes in the relative orientation of loop 3 move the lysine-rich region 111–114, crucial for substrate recognition, away from the active site. All of the structural and dynamic data presented here reveal that the mutant is a hybrid of ribotoxins and noncytotoxic ribonucleases, consistent with its biological properties. PMID:15044731

  15. Importance of lipid-pore loop interface for potassium channel structure and function.

    PubMed

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Nand, Deepak; Weingarth, Markus; Prokofyev, Alexander; Hornig, Sönke; Cukkemane, Abhishek Arun; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Becker, Stefan; Hulse, Raymond E; Perozo, Eduardo; Pongs, Olaf; Baldus, Marc

    2013-08-06

    Potassium (i.e., K(+)) channels allow for the controlled and selective passage of potassium ions across the plasma membrane via a conserved pore domain. In voltage-gated K(+) channels, gating is the result of the coordinated action of two coupled gates: an activation gate at the intracellular entrance of the pore and an inactivation gate at the selectivity filter. By using solid-state NMR structural studies, in combination with electrophysiological experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the turret region connecting the outer transmembrane helix (transmembrane helix 1) and the pore helix behind the selectivity filter contributes to K(+) channel inactivation and exhibits a remarkable structural plasticity that correlates to K(+) channel inactivation. The transmembrane helix 1 unwinds when the K(+) channel enters the inactivated state and rewinds during the transition to the closed state. In addition to well-characterized changes at the K(+) ion coordination sites, this process is accompanied by conformational changes within the turret region and the pore helix. Further spectroscopic and computational results show that the same channel domain is critically involved in establishing functional contacts between pore domain and the cellular membrane. Taken together, our results suggest that the interaction between the K(+) channel turret region and the lipid bilayer exerts an important influence on the selective passage of potassium ions via the K(+) channel pore.

  16. Accumulation of dislocation loops in the α phase of Zr Excel alloy under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbing; Yao, Zhongwen; Idrees, Yasir; Zhang, He K.; Kirk, Mark A.; Daymond, Mark R.

    2017-08-01

    In-situ heavy ion irradiations were performed on the high Sn content Zr alloy 'Excel', measuring type dislocation loop accumulation up to irradiation damage doses of 10 dpa at a range of temperatures. The high content of Sn, which diffuses slowly, and the thin foil geometry of the sample provide a unique opportunity to study an extreme case where displacement cascades dominate the loop formation and evolution. The dynamic observation of dislocation loop evolution under irradiation at 200 °C reveals that type dislocation loops can form at very low dose (0.0025 dpa). The size of the dislocation loops increases slightly with irradiation damage dose. The mechanism controlling loop growth in this study is different from that in neutron irradiation; in this study, larger dislocation loops can condense directly from the interaction of displacement cascades and the high concentration of point defects in the matrix. The size of the dislocation loop is dependent on the point defect concentration in the matrix. A negative correlation between the irradiation temperature and the dislocation loop size was observed. A comparison between cascade dominated loop evolution (this study), diffusion dominated loop evolution (electron irradiation) and neutron irradiation suggests that heavy ion irradiation alone may not be enough to accurately reproduce neutron irradiation induced loop structures. An alternative method is proposed in this paper. The effects of Sn on the displacement cascades, defect yield, and the diffusion behavior of point defects are established.

  17. Defect Induced Electronic Structure of Uranofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Xin, Minsi; Huai, Ping; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the inner atoms/cluster and the outer fullerene cage is the source of various novel properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. Herein, we introduce an adatom-type spin polarization defect on the surface of a typical endohedral stable U2@C60 to predict the associated structure and electronic properties of U2@C61 based on the density functional theory method. We found that defect induces obvious changes in the electronic structure of this metallofullerene. More interestingly, the ground state of U2@C61 is nonet spin in contrast to the septet of U2@C60. Electronic structure analysis shows that the inner U atoms and the C ad-atom on the surface of the cage contribute together to this spin state, which is brought about by a ferromagnetic coupling between the spin of the unpaired electrons of the U atoms and the C ad-atom. This discovery may provide a possible approach to adapt the electronic structure properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. PMID:23439318

  18. Effects of T-loop modification on the PII-signalling protein: structure of uridylylated Escherichia coli GlnB bound to ATP.

    PubMed

    Palanca, Carles; Rubio, Vicente

    2017-03-26

    To adapt to environments with variable nitrogen sources and richness, the widely distributed homotrimeric PII signalling proteins bind their allosteric effectors ADP/ATP/2-oxoglutarate, and experience nitrogen-sensitive uridylylation of their flexible T-loops at Tyr51, regulating their interactions with effector proteins. To clarify whether uridylylation triggers a given T-loop conformation, we determined the crystal structure of the classical paradigm of PII protein, Escherichia coli GlnB (EcGlnB), in fully uridylylated form (EcGlnB-UMP3 ). This is the first structure of a postranslationally modified PII protein. This required recombinant production and purification of the uridylylating enzyme GlnD and its use for full uridylylation of large amounts of recombinantly produced pure EcGlnB. Unlike crystalline non-uridylylated EcGlnB, in which T-loops are fixed, uridylylation rendered the T-loop highly mobile because of loss of contacts mediated by Tyr51, with concomitant abolition of T-loop anchoring via Arg38 on the ATP site. This site was occupied by ATP, providing the first, long-sought snapshot of the EcGlnB-ATP complex, connecting ATP binding with T-loop changes. Inferences are made on the mechanisms of PII selectivity for ATP and of PII-UMP3 signalling, proposing a model for the architecture of the complex of EcGlnB-UMP3 with the uridylylation-sensitive PII target ATase (which adenylylates/deadenylylates glutamine synthetase [GS]) and with GS.

  19. A Structural and Mutagenic Blueprint for Molecular Recognition of Strychnine and d-Tubocurarine by Different Cys-Loop Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Dmitry; van Elk, René; Krijnen, Liz; Yakel, Jerrel L.; Tsetlin, Victor; Smit, August B.; Ulens, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors (CLR) are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast excitatory or inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Strychnine and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) are neurotoxins that have been highly instrumental in decades of research on glycine receptors (GlyR) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), respectively. In this study we addressed the question how the molecular recognition of strychnine and d-TC occurs with high affinity and yet low specificity towards diverse CLR family members. X-ray crystal structures of the complexes with AChBP, a well-described structural homolog of the extracellular domain of the nAChRs, revealed that strychnine and d-TC adopt multiple occupancies and different ligand orientations, stabilizing the homopentameric protein in an asymmetric state. This introduces a new level of structural diversity in CLRs. Unlike protein and peptide neurotoxins, strychnine and d-TC form a limited number of contacts in the binding pocket of AChBP, offering an explanation for their low selectivity. Based on the ligand interactions observed in strychnine- and d-TC-AChBP complexes we performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis in the binding pocket of the human α1 GlyR and α7 nAChR and showed the functional relevance of these residues in conferring high potency of strychnine and d-TC, respectively. Our results demonstrate that a limited number of ligand interactions in the binding pocket together with an energetic stabilization of the extracellular domain are key to the poor selective recognition of strychnine and d-TC by CLRs as diverse as the GlyR, nAChR, and 5-HT3R. PMID:21468359

  20. A structural and mutagenic blueprint for molecular recognition of strychnine and d-tubocurarine by different cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Brams, Marijke; Pandya, Anshul; Kuzmin, Dmitry; van Elk, René; Krijnen, Liz; Yakel, Jerrel L; Tsetlin, Victor; Smit, August B; Ulens, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Cys-loop receptors (CLR) are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast excitatory or inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Strychnine and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) are neurotoxins that have been highly instrumental in decades of research on glycine receptors (GlyR) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), respectively. In this study we addressed the question how the molecular recognition of strychnine and d-TC occurs with high affinity and yet low specificity towards diverse CLR family members. X-ray crystal structures of the complexes with AChBP, a well-described structural homolog of the extracellular domain of the nAChRs, revealed that strychnine and d-TC adopt multiple occupancies and different ligand orientations, stabilizing the homopentameric protein in an asymmetric state. This introduces a new level of structural diversity in CLRs. Unlike protein and peptide neurotoxins, strychnine and d-TC form a limited number of contacts in the binding pocket of AChBP, offering an explanation for their low selectivity. Based on the ligand interactions observed in strychnine- and d-TC-AChBP complexes we performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis in the binding pocket of the human α1 GlyR and α7 nAChR and showed the functional relevance of these residues in conferring high potency of strychnine and d-TC, respectively. Our results demonstrate that a limited number of ligand interactions in the binding pocket together with an energetic stabilization of the extracellular domain are key to the poor selective recognition of strychnine and d-TC by CLRs as diverse as the GlyR, nAChR, and 5-HT(3)R.

  1. Dark matter, muon g -2 , electric dipole moments, and Z →ℓi+ℓj- in a one-loop induced neutrino model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Okada, Hiroshi; Senaha, Eibun

    2017-07-01

    We study a simple one-loop induced neutrino mass model that contains both bosonic and fermionic dark matter candidates and has the capacity to explain the muon anomalous magnetic moment anomaly. We perform a comprehensive analysis by taking into account the relevant constraints of charged lepton flavor violation, electric dipole moments, and neutrino oscillation data. We examine the constraints from lepton flavor-changing Z boson decays at the one-loop level, particularly when the involved couplings contribute to the muon g -2 . It is found that BR (Z →μ τ )≃(10-7- 10-6) while BR (τ →μ γ )≲10-11 in the fermionic dark matter scenario. The former can be probed by the precision measurement of the Z boson at future lepton colliders.

  2. Continuously tunable polarization-independent zeroth-order fiber comb filter based on polarization-diversity loop structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Yong Wook

    2017-04-01

    By selecting some optimal wave retarder combination (WRC) groups, we propose and experimentally implement a continuously tunable polarization-independent zeroth-order fiber comb filter based on a polarization-diversity loop structure. The selected WRC groups contain a set of two quarter-wave retarders (QWRs), a set of a QWR and a half-wave retarder (HWR), and a set of an HWR and a QWR. The filter was formed using a polarization beam splitter (PBS), one of the three selected WRC groups, and high birefringence fiber (HBF). One end of HBF was butt-coupled to the PBS so that its slow axis should be oriented at 45° for the horizontal axis of the PBS, and the other end was connected to the WRC group. Three kinds of comb filters were fabricated with the three selected WRC groups. Through theoretical analysis on light polarization conditions for continuous spectral tuning and filter transmittances, eight special azimuth angle sets of two wave retarders, which gave the transmittance function eight different phase shifts of 0 to -7 π/4 with a -π/4 step, were found for each WRC group. Theoretical prediction was verified by experimental demonstration. It was also confirmed that the filter could be continuously tuned by the appropriate control of wave retarders.

  3. Chromospheric magnetic field and density structure measurements using hard X-rays in a flaring coronal loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, E. P.; Hannah, I. G.; MacKinnon, A. L.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: A novel method of using hard X-rays as a diagnostic for chromospheric density and magnetic structures is developed to infer sub-arcsecond vertical variation of magnetic flux tube size and neutral gas density. Methods: Using Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) X-ray data and the newly developed X-ray visibilities forward fitting technique we find the FWHM and centroid positions of hard X-ray sources with sub-arcsecond resolution (~0.2'') for a solar limb flare. We show that the height variations of the chromospheric density and the magnetic flux densities can be found with an unprecedented vertical resolution of ~150 km by mapping 18-250 keV X-ray emission of energetic electrons propagating in the loop at chromospheric heights of 400-1500 km. Results: Our observations suggest that the density of the neutral gas is in good agreement with hydrostatic models with a scale height of around 140 ± 30 km. FWHM sizes of the X-ray sources decrease with energy suggesting the expansion (fanning out) of magnetic flux tubes in the chromosphere with height. The magnetic scale height B(z)(dB/dz)-1 is found to be of the order of 300 km and a strong horizontal magnetic field is associated with noticeable flux tube expansion at a height of ~900 km.

  4. Structures induced by companions in galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyziropoulos, P. E.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Gravvanis, G. A.; Patsis, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the structures induced on a galactic disc by repeated flybys of a companion in decaying eccentric orbit around the disc. Our system is composed of a stellar disc, bulge and live dark matter halo, and we study the system's dynamical response to a sequence of a companion's flybys, when we vary (i) the disc's temperature (parametrized by Toomre's Q-parameter) and (ii) the companion's mass and initial orbit. We use a new 3D Cartesian grid code: MAIN (Mesh-adaptive Approximate Inverse N-body solver). The main features of MAIN are reviewed, with emphasis on the use of a new Symmetric Factored Approximate Sparse Inverse matrix in conjunction with the multigrid method that allows the efficient solution of Poisson's equation in three space variables. We find that (i) companions need to be assigned initial masses in a rather narrow window of values in order to produce significant and more long-standing non-axisymmetric structures (bars and spirals) in the main galaxy's disc by the repeated flyby mechanism. (ii) A crucial phenomenon is the antagonism between companion-excited and self-excited modes on the disc. Values of Q > 1.5 are needed in order to allow for the growth of the companion-excited modes to prevail over the growth of the disc's self-excited modes. (iii) We give evidence that the companion-induced spiral structure is best represented by a density wave with pattern speed nearly constant in a region extending from the inner Lindblad resonance to a radius close to, but inside, corotation.

  5. A positive feedback loop between ROS and Mxi1-0 promotes hypoxia-induced VEGF expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenzhen; Dong, Na; Lu, Dian; Jiang, Xiuqin; Xu, Jinjin; Wu, Zhiwei; Zheng, Datong; Wechsler, Daniel S

    2017-02-01

    VEGF expression induced by hypoxia plays a critical role in promoting tumor angiogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism that modulates VEGF expression under hypoxia is still poorly understood. In this study, we found that VEGF induction in hypoxic HepG2 cells is ROS-dependent. ROS mediates hypoxia-induced VEGF by upregulation of Mxi1-0. Furthermore, PI3K/AKT/HIF-1α signaling pathway is involved in ROS-mediated Mxi1-0 and VEGF expression in hypoxic HepG2 cells. Finally, Mxi1-0 could in turn regulate ROS generation in hypoxic HepG2 cells, creating a positive feedback loop. Taken together, this study demonstrate a positive regulatory feedback loop in which ROS mediates hypoxia-induced Mxi1-0 via activation of PI3K/AKT/HIF-1α pathway, events that in turn elevate ROS generation and promote hypoxia-induced VEGF expression. These findings could provide a rationale for designing new therapies based on inhibition of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) angiogenesis.

  6. Performance Comparison of BPL, EtherLoop and SHDSL technology performance on existing pilot cable circuits under the presence of induced voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Y. X.; Ong, H. S.; Lai, L. C.; Karuppiah, S.; Ong, X. J.; Do, N. Q.

    2013-06-01

    Pilot cable is originally used for utility protection. Then, pilot cable is further utilized for SCADA communication with low frequency PSK modem in the early 1990. However, the quality of pilot cable communication drops recently. Pilot cable starts to deteriorate due to aging and other unknown factors. It is also believed that the presence of induced voltage causes interference to existing modem communication which operates at low frequency channel. Therefore, BPL (Broadband Power Line), EtherLoop and SHDSL (Symmetrical High-speed Digital Subscriber Line) modem technology are proposed as alternative communication solutions for pilot cable communication. The performance of the 3 selected technologies on existing pilot cable circuits under the presence of induced voltage are measured and compared. Total of 11 pilot circuits with different length and level of induced voltage influence are selected for modem testing. The performance of BPL, EtherLoop and SHDSL modem technology are measured by the delay, bandwidth, packet loss and the long term usability SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) application. The testing results are presented and discussed in this paper. The results show that the 3 selected technologies are dependent on distance and independent on the level of induced voltage.

  7. Structural and inhibitory effects of hinge loop mutagenesis in serpin-2 from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Meekins, David A; An, Chunju; Zolkiewski, Michal; Battaile, Kevin P; Kanost, Michael R; Lovell, Scott; Michel, Kristin

    2015-01-30

    Serpin-2 (SRPN2) is a key negative regulator of the melanization response in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. SRPN2 irreversibly inhibits clip domain serine proteinase 9 (CLIPB9), which functions in a serine proteinase cascade culminating in the activation of prophenoloxidase and melanization. Silencing of SRPN2 in A. gambiae results in spontaneous melanization and decreased life span and is therefore a promising target for vector control. The previously determined structure of SRPN2 revealed a partial insertion of the hinge region of the reactive center loop (RCL) into β sheet A. This partial hinge insertion participates in heparin-linked activation in other serpins, notably antithrombin III. SRPN2 does not contain a heparin binding site, and any possible mechanistic function of the hinge insertion was previously unknown. To investigate the function of the SRPN2 hinge insertion, we developed three SRPN2 variants in which the hinge regions are either constitutively expelled or inserted and analyzed their structure, thermostability, and inhibitory activity. We determined that constitutive hinge expulsion resulted in a 2.7-fold increase in the rate of CLIPB9Xa inhibition, which is significantly lower than previous observations of allosteric serpin activation. Furthermore, we determined that stable insertion of the hinge region did not appreciably decrease the accessibility of the RCL to CLIPB9. Together, these results indicate that the partial hinge insertion in SRPN2 does not participate in the allosteric activation observed in other serpins and instead represents a molecular trade-off between RCL accessibility and efficient formation of an inhibitory complex with the cognate proteinase. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. 2.0 A crystal structure of a four-domain segment of human fibronectin encompassing the RGD loop and synergy region.

    PubMed

    Leahy, D J; Aukhil, I; Erickson, H P

    1996-01-12

    We have determined the 2.0 A crystal structure of a fragment of human fibronectin encompassing the seventh through the RGD-containing tenth type III repeats (FN7-10). The structure reveals an extended rod-like molecule with a long axis of approximately 140 A and highly variable relationships between adjacent domains. An unusually small rotation between domains 9 and 10 creates a distinctive binding site, in which the RGD loop from domain 10 and the "synergy" region from domain 9 are on the same face of FN7-10 and thus easily accessible to a single integrin molecule. The cell-binding RGD loop is well-ordered in this structure and extends approximately 10 A away from the FN7-10 core.

  9. The P-loop region of Schlafen 3 acts within the cytosol to induce differentiation of human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmishankar; Sun, Kelian; Walsh, Mary F; Kuhn, Leslie A; Basson, Marc D

    2014-12-01

    Schlafen 3 (Slfn3) mediates rodent enterocyte differentiation in vitro and in vivo, required for intestinal function. Little is known about Schlafen protein structure-function relationships. To define the Slfn3 domain that promotes differentiation, we studied villin and sucrase isomaltase (SI) promoter activity in Slfn3-null human Caco-2BBE cells transfected with full-length rat Slfn3 DNA or truncated constructs. Confocal microscopy and Western blots showed that Slfn3 is predominantly cytosolic. Villin promoter activity, increased by wild type Slfn3, was further enhanced by adding a nuclear exclusion sequence, suggesting that Slfn3 does not affect transcription by direct nuclear action. We therefore sought to dissect the region in Slfn3 stimulating promoter activity. Since examination of the Slfn3 N-terminal region revealed sequences similar to both an aminopeptidase (App) and a divergent P-loop resembling those in NTPases, we initially divided Slfn3 into an N-terminal domain containing the App and P-loop regions, and a C-terminal region. Only the N-terminal construct stimulated promoter activity. Further truncation indicated that both the App and the smaller P-loop constructs enhanced promoter activity similarly to the N-terminal sequence. Point mutations within the N-terminal region (R128L, altering a critical active site residue in the App domain, and L212D, conserved in Schlafens but variable in P-loop proteins) did not affect activity. These results show that Slfn3 acts in the cytosol to trigger a secondary signal cascade that elicits differentiation marker expression and narrows the active domain to the third of the Slfn3 sequence homologous to P-loop NTPases, a first step in understanding its mechanism of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The P-loop region of Schlafen 3 acts within the cytosol to induce differentiation of human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmishankar; Sun, Kelian; Walsh, Mary F.; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Basson, Marc D.

    2014-01-01

    Schlafen 3 (Slfn3) mediates rodent enterocyte differentiation in vitro and in vivo, required for intestinal function. Little is known about Schlafen protein structure-function relationships. To define the Slfn3 domain that promotes differentiation, we studied villin and sucrase isomaltase (SI) promoter activity in Slfn3-null human Caco-2BBE cells transfected with full-length rat Slfn3 DNA or truncated constructs. Confocal microscopy and Western blots showed that Slfn3 is predominantly cytosolic. Villin promoter activity, increased by wild type Slfn3, was further enhanced by adding a nuclear exclusion sequence, suggesting that Slfn3 does not affect transcription by direct nuclear action. We therefore sought to dissect the region in Slfn3 stimulating promoter activity. Since examination of the Slfn3 N-terminal region revealed sequences similar to both an aminopeptidase (App) and a divergent P-loop resembling those in NTPases, we initially divided Slfn3 into an N-terminal domain containing the App and P-loop regions, and a C-terminal region. Only the N-terminal construct stimulated promoter activity. Further truncation indicated that both the App and the smaller P-loop constructs enhanced promoter activity similarly to the N-terminal sequence. Point mutations within the N-terminal region (R128L, altering a critical active site residue in the App domain, and L212D, conserved in Schlafens but variable in P-loop proteins) did not affect activity. These results show that Slfn3 acts in the cytosol to trigger a secondary signal cascade that elicits differentiation marker expression and narrow the active domain to the third of the Slfn3 sequence homologous to P-loop NTPases, a first step in understanding its mechanism of action. PMID:25261706

  11. The 1.59Å resolution structure of the minor pseudopilin EpsH of Vibrio cholerae reveals a long flexible loop.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Kannan; Vago, Frank S; Grindem, David; Ball, Terry; Wedemeyer, William J; Bagdasarian, Michael; Arvidson, Dennis N

    2014-02-01

    The type II secretion complex exports folded proteins from the periplasm to the extracellular milieu. It is used by the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae to export several proteins, including its major virulence factor, cholera toxin. The pseudopilus is an essential component of the type II secretion system and likely acts as a piston to push the folded proteins across the outer membrane through the secretin pore. The pseudopilus is composed of the major pseudopilin, EpsG, and four minor pseudopilins, EpsH, EpsI, EpsJ and EpsK. We determined the x-ray crystal structure of the head domain of EpsH at 1.59Å resolution using molecular replacement with the previously reported EpsH structure, 2qv8, as the template. Three additional N-terminal amino acids present in our construct prevent an artifactual conformation of residues 160-166, present in one of the two monomers of the 2qv8 structure. Additional crystal contacts stabilize a long flexible loop comprised of residues 104-135 that is more disordered in the 2qv8 structure but is partially observed in our structure in very different positions for the two EpsH monomers in the asymmetric unit. In one of the conformations the loop is highly extended. Modeling suggests the highly charged loop is capable of contacting EpsG and possibly secreted protein substrates, suggesting a role in specificity of pseudopilus assembly or secretion function.

  12. Binding Characteristics of Small Molecules that Mimic Nucleocapsid Protein-induced Maturation of Stem-loop-1 of HIV-1 RNA†

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Janet; Ulyanov, Nikolai B.; Guilbert, Christophe; Mujeeb, Anwer; James, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    As a retrovirus, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) packages two copies of the RNA genome as a dimer in the infectious virion. Dimerization is initiated at the dimer initiation site (DIS) which encompasses stem-loop 1 (SL1) in the 5’-UTR of the genome. Study of genomic dimerization has been facilitated by the discovery that short RNA fragments containing SL1 can dimerize spontaneously without any protein factors. Based on the palindromic nature of SL1, a kissing loop model has been proposed. First, a metastable kissing dimer is formed via standard Watson-Crick base pairs and then converted into a more stable extended dimer by the viral nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). This dimer maturation in vitro is believed to mimic initial steps in the RNA maturation in vivo, which is correlated with viral infectivity. We previously discovered a small molecule activator, Lys-Ala-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin (KA-AMC), which facilitates dimer maturation in vitro, and determined aspects of its structure-activity relationship. In this report, we present measurements of the binding affinity of the activators and characterization of their interactions with the SL1 RNA. Guanidinium groups and increasing positive charge on the side chain enhance affinity and activity, but features in the aromatic ring at least partially decouple affinity from activity. Although KA-AMC can bind to multiple structural motifs, NMR study showed KA-AMC preferentially binds to unique structural motifs, such as the palindromic loop and the G-rich internal loop in the SL1 RNA. NCp7 binds to SL1 only an order of magnitude tighter than the best small molecule ligand tested. The study presented here provides guidelines for design of superior small molecule binders to the SL1 RNA that have the potential of being developed as an antiviral by either interfering with SL1-NCp7 interaction at the packaging and/or maturation stages. PMID:20565056

  13. Crystal structure and mutagenesis of a protein phosphatase-1:calcineurin hybrid elucidate the role of the beta12-beta13 loop in inhibitor binding.

    PubMed

    Maynes, Jason T; Perreault, Kathleen R; Cherney, Maia M; Luu, Hue Anh; James, Michael N G; Holmes, Charles F B

    2004-10-08

    Protein phosphatase-1 and protein phosphatase-2B (calcineurin) are eukaryotic serine/threonine phosphatases that share 40% sequence identity in their catalytic subunits. Despite the similarities in sequence, these phosphatases are widely divergent when it comes to inhibition by natural product toxins, such as microcystin-LR and okadaic acid. The most prominent region of non-conserved sequence between these phosphatases corresponds to the beta12-beta13 loop of protein phosphatase-1, and the L7 loop of toxin-resistant calcineurin. In the present study, mutagenesis of residues 273-277 of the beta12-beta13 loop of the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP-1c) to the corresponding residues in calcineurin (312-316), resulted in a chimeric mutant that showed a decrease in sensitivity to microcystin-LR, okadaic acid, and the endogenous PP-1c inhibitor protein inhibitor-2. A crystal structure of the chimeric mutant in complex with okadaic acid was determined to 2.0-A resolution. The beta12-beta13 loop region of the mutant superimposes closely with that of wild-type PP-1c bound to okadaic acid. Systematic mutation of each residue in the beta12-beta13 loop of PP-1c showed that a single amino acid change (C273L) was the most influential in mediating sensitivity of PP-1c to toxins. Taken together, these data indicate that it is an individual amino acid residue substitution and not a change in the overall beta12-beta13 loop conformation of protein phosphatase-1 that contributes to disrupting important interactions with inhibitors such as microcystin-LR and okadaic acid.

  14. Induction of autoimmune response to the extracellular loop of the HERG channel pore induces QTc prolongation in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Frank; Yue, Yuankun; Qu, Yongxia; Chahine, Mohamed; Sobie, Eric; Lee, Peng; Wieczorek, Rosemary; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Capecchi, Pier-Leopoldo; Laghi-Pasini, Franco; Lazzerini, Pietro-Enea; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Channelopathies of autoimmune origin are novel and are associated with corrected QT (QTc) prolongation and complex ventricular arrhythmias. We have recently demonstrated that anti-SSA/Ro antibodies from patients with autoimmune diseases and with QTc prolongation on the ECG target the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (HERG) K(+) channel by inhibiting the corresponding current, IKr , at the pore region. Immunization of guinea-pigs with a peptide (E-pore peptide) corresponding to the extracellular loop region connecting the S5 and S6 segments of the HERG channel induces high titres of antibodies that inhibit IKr , lengthen the action potential and cause QTc prolongation on the surface ECG. In addition, anti-SSA/Ro-positive sera from patients with connective tissue diseases showed high reactivity to the E-pore peptide. The translational impact is the development of a peptide-based approach for the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune-associated long QT syndrome. We recently demonstrated that anti-SSA/52 kDa Ro antibodies (Abs) from patients with autoimmune diseases and corrected QT (QTc) prolongation directly target and inhibit the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (HERG) K(+) channel at the extracellular pore (E-pore) region, where homology with SSA/52 kDa Ro antigen was demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that immunization of guinea-pigs with a peptide corresponding to the E-pore region (E-pore peptide) will generate pathogenic inhibitory Abs and cause QTc prolongation. Guinea-pigs were immunized with a 31-amino-acid peptide corresponding to the E-pore region of HERG. On days 10-62 after immunization, ECGs were recorded and blood was sampled for the detection of E-pore peptide Abs. Serum samples from patients with autoimmune diseases were evaluated for reactivity to E-pore peptide by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and histology was performed on hearts using Masson's Trichrome. Inhibition of the HERG channel was assessed by electrophysiology and by

  15. Assembly induced delaminations in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, J.; Bohlmann, R.; Wanthal, S.; Kautz, E.; Neri, Lawrence M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the development of delaminations around fastener holes in composite structures are presented. This type of delamination is known to occur in composite skins that are mechanically fastened to a poorly mating substructure. Results of an experimental study to determine the resistance of laminates to the initiation of assembly induced delaminations and the residual strength of assembly damaged coupons are presented for AS4/3501-6, IM7/8551-7A, and AS4/PEEK material systems. A survey of existing analytical models for predicting the residual strength and stability of delaminations is presented, and the development of a new model for predicting the initiation of delaminations around a fastener hole is outlined. The fastener hole damage initiation model utilizes a finite element based Fourier series solution, and is validated through comparisons of analytical and experimental results.

  16. Stretched Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-16

    When an active region rotated over to the edge of the sun, it presented us with a nice profile view of its elongated loops stretching and swaying above it (Mar. 8-9, 2017). These loops are actually charged particles (made visible in extreme ultraviolet light) swirling along the magnetic field lines of the active region. The video covers about 30 hours of activity. Also of note is a darker twisting mass of plasma to the left of the active region being pulled and spun about by magnetic forces. Video is available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21562

  17. Structure and variability of the Yucatan and loop currents along the slope and shelf break of the Yucatan channel and Campeche bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinbaum, Julio; Athié, Gabriela; Candela, Julio; Ochoa, José; Romero-Arteaga, Angélica

    2016-12-01

    Three years (2008-2011) of direct current measurements from a mooring array deployed at the western Yucatan Channel (defined west of 85.6°W) and along the eastern Campeche Bank captured the main characteristics of the Yucatan and Loop Currents and the eddies associated with them. The array was deployed to provide upstream conditions in support of the Loop Current Dynamics Experiment. A substantial portion (60-80%) of the variance at the mooring sections is related to horizontal shifts of the currents due to meanders and eddies. Time-frequency analysis indicates that the velocity time-series are "event dominated", with higher variability at low-frequencies (40-100 days or longer periods) but with a substantial contribution at higher frequencies (5-25 days periods) particularly strong from October to March. The vertical structure and time evolution of the eddy kinetic energy in a developing Campeche Bank cyclone suggest baroclinic instability dynamics are relevant for its development. Four Loop Current eddies (Cameron, Darwin, Ekman and Franklin) separated during 2008-2011. Ekman and Franklin were particularly dominated by a cyclone associated with a meander trough of the southward flowing branch of the Loop Current (Donohue et al., 2016a,b) and weaker Campeche Bank cyclones. For Cameron and Darwin, Campeche Bank cyclonic anomalies appear to be nearly as strong as the ones coming from the eastern side of the Loop Current. Eastward shifts of the Yucatan and Loop Currents observed over the sections appear to be linked to vorticity perturbations propagating from the Caribbean and precede several eddy detachments; their significance for the generation of Campeche Bank cyclones and eddy shedding remains to be determined. Time-series of Yucatan Current transport, vorticity fluctuations and Loop Current northward extension during the 3 deployment periods only depict positive correlation in two of them. Given the wide spectrum of variability, much more data are required to

  18. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  19. Suggestive Evidence for the Involvement of the Second Calcium and Surface Loop in Interfacial Binding: Monoclinci and Trigonal Crystal Structures of a Quadruple Mutant of Phospholipase A2

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar,K.; Yogavel, M.; Kanaujia, S.; Sharma, A.; Velmurugan, D.; Poi, M.; Dauter, Z.; Tsai, M.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of the monoclinic and trigonal forms of the quadruple mutant K53,56,120,121M of recombinant bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) have been solved and refined at 1.9 and 1.1 Angstroms resolution, respectively. Interestingly, the monoclinic form reveals the presence of the second calcium ion. Furthermore, the surface-loop residues are ordered and the conformation of residues 62-66 is similar to that observed in other structures containing the second calcium ion. On the other hand, in the trigonal form the surface loop is disordered and the second calcium is absent. Docking studies suggest that the second calcium and residues Lys62 and Asp66 from the surface loop could be involved in the interaction with the polar head group of the membrane phospholipid. It is hypothesized that the two structures of the quadruple mutant, monoclinic and trigonal, represent the conformations of PLA2 at the lipid interface and in solution, respectively. A docked structure with a phospholipid molecule and with a transition-state analogue bound, one at the active site coordinating to the catalytic calcium and the other at the second calcium site, but both at the i-face, is presented.

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of hepatocellular carcinoma via an MMP-7/syndecan-1/TGF-β autocrine loop

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ye; Yao, Xinghong; Chen, Li; Yan, Zhiping; Liu, Jingxia; Zhang, Yingying; Feng, Tang; Wu, Jiang; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the correlation between S1P and syndecan-1 in HCC, the molecular mechanism involved, as well as their roles in EMT of HCC. Results revealed a high serum S1P level presents in patients with HCC, which positively correlated with the serum syndecan-1 level. A significant inverse correlation existed between S1P1 and syndecan-1 in HCC tissues. S1P elicits activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathways via S1P1, which triggers HPSE, leading to increases in expression and activity of MMP-7 and leading to shedding and suppression of syndecan-1. The loss of syndecan-1 causes an increase in TGF-β1 production. The limited chronic increase in TGF-β1 can convert HCC cells into a mesenchymal phenotype via establishing an MMP-7/Syndecan-1/TGF-β autocrine loop. Finally, TGF-β1 and syndecan-1 are essential for S1P-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Taken together, our study demonstrates that S1P induces advanced tumor phenotypes of HCC via establishing an MMP-7/syndecan-1/TGF-β1 autocrine loop, and implicates targetable S1P1-PI3K/AKT-HPSE-MMP-7 signaling axe in HCC metastasis. PMID:27556509

  1. Studies on an acetylcholine binding protein identify a basic residue in loop G on the β1 strand as a new structural determinant of neonicotinoid actions.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Makoto; Okajima, Toshihide; Yamashita, Atsuko; Oda, Takuma; Asano, Takuya; Matsui, Mikana; Sattelle, David B; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2014-12-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides target insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Their widespread use and possible risks to pollinators make it extremely urgent to understand the mechanisms underlying their actions on insect nAChRs. We therefore elucidated X-ray crystal structures of the Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine binding protein (Ls-AChBP) and its Gln55Arg mutant, more closely resembling insect nAChRs, in complex with a nitromethylene imidacloprid analog (CH-IMI) and desnitro-imidacloprid metabolite (DN-IMI) as well as commercial neonicotinoids, imidacloprid, clothianidin, and thiacloprid. Unlike imidacloprid, clothianidin, and CH-IMI, thiacloprid did not stack with Tyr185 in the wild-type Ls-AChBP, but did in the Gln55Arg mutant, interacting electrostatically with Arg55. In contrast, DN-IMI lacking the NO2 group was directed away from Lys34 and Arg55 to form hydrogen bonds with Tyr89 in loop A and the main chain carbonyl of Trp143 in loop B. Unexpectedly, we found that several neonicotinoids interacted with Lys34 in loop G on the β1 strand in the crystal structure of the Gln55Arg mutant. Basic residues introduced into the α7 nAChR at positions equivalent to AChBP Lys34 and Arg55 enhanced agonist actions of neonicotinoids, while reducing the actions of acetylcholine, (-)-nicotine, and DN-IMI. Thus, not only the basic residues in loop D, but also those in loop G determine the actions of neonicotinoids. These novel findings provide new insights into the modes of action of neonicotinoids and emerging derivatives.

  2. miR-29b sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to bortezomib-induced apoptosis through the activation of a feedback loop with the transcription factor Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, N; Di Martino, M T; Foresta, U; Leone, E; Lionetti, M; Leotta, M; Gullà, A M; Pitari, M R; Conforti, F; Rossi, M; Agosti, V; Fulciniti, M; Misso, G; Morabito, F; Ferrarini, M; Neri, A; Caraglia, M; Munshi, N C; Anderson, K C; Tagliaferri, P; Tassone, P

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) with tumor-suppressor potential might have therapeutic applications in multiple myeloma (MM) through the modulation of still undiscovered molecular pathways. Here, we investigated the effects of enforced expression of miR-29b on the apoptotic occurrence in MM and highlighted its role in the context of a new transcriptional loop that is finely tuned by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. In details, in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis of MM cells was induced by either transient expression of synthetic miR-29b or its stable lentivirus-enforced expression. We identified Sp1, a transcription factor endowed with oncogenic activity, as a negative regulator of miR-29b expression in MM cells. Since Sp1 expression and functions are regulated via the 26S proteasome, we investigated the effects of bortezomib on miR-29b-Sp1 loop, showing that miR-29b levels were indeed upregulated by the drug. At the same time, the bortezomib/miR-29b combination produced significant pro-apoptotic effects. We also demonstrated that the PI3K/AKT pathway plays a major role in the regulation of miR-29b-Sp1 loop and induction of apoptosis in MM cells. Finally, MM xenografts constitutively expressing miR-29b showed significant reduction of their tumorigenic potential. Our findings indicate that miR-29b is involved in a regulatory loop amenable of pharmacologic intervention and modulates the anti-MM activity of bortezomib in MM cells. PMID:23190608

  3. MiR-192-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop Controls the Robustness of Stress-Induced p53 Oscillations in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Moore, Richard; Ooi, Hsu Kiang; Kang, Taek; Bleris, Leonidas; Ma, Lan

    2015-12-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a critical role in cellular stress and cancer prevention. A number of post-transcriptional regulators, termed microRNAs, are closely connected with the p53-mediated cellular networks. While the molecular interactions among p53 and microRNAs have emerged, a systems-level understanding of the regulatory mechanism and the role of microRNAs-forming feedback loops with the p53 core remains elusive. Here we have identified from literature that there exist three classes of microRNA-mediated feedback loops revolving around p53, all with the nature of positive feedback coincidentally. To explore the relationship between the cellular performance of p53 with the microRNA feedback pathways, we developed a mathematical model of the core p53-MDM2 module coupled with three microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops involving miR-192, miR-34a, and miR-29a. Simulations and bifurcation analysis in relationship to extrinsic noise reproduce the oscillatory behavior of p53 under DNA damage in single cells, and notably show that specific microRNA abrogation can disrupt the wild-type cellular phenotype when the ubiquitous cell-to-cell variability is taken into account. To assess these in silico results we conducted microRNA-perturbation experiments in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Time-lapse microscopy of cell-population behavior in response to DNA double-strand breaks, together with image classification of single-cell phenotypes across a population, confirmed that the cellular p53 oscillations are compromised after miR-192 perturbations, matching well with the model predictions. Our study via modeling in combination with quantitative experiments provides new evidence on the role of microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops in conferring robustness to the system performance of stress-induced response of p53.

  4. MiR-192-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop Controls the Robustness of Stress-Induced p53 Oscillations in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bleris, Leonidas; Ma, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a critical role in cellular stress and cancer prevention. A number of post-transcriptional regulators, termed microRNAs, are closely connected with the p53-mediated cellular networks. While the molecular interactions among p53 and microRNAs have emerged, a systems-level understanding of the regulatory mechanism and the role of microRNAs-forming feedback loops with the p53 core remains elusive. Here we have identified from literature that there exist three classes of microRNA-mediated feedback loops revolving around p53, all with the nature of positive feedback coincidentally. To explore the relationship between the cellular performance of p53 with the microRNA feedback pathways, we developed a mathematical model of the core p53-MDM2 module coupled with three microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops involving miR-192, miR-34a, and miR-29a. Simulations and bifurcation analysis in relationship to extrinsic noise reproduce the oscillatory behavior of p53 under DNA damage in single cells, and notably show that specific microRNA abrogation can disrupt the wild-type cellular phenotype when the ubiquitous cell-to-cell variability is taken into account. To assess these in silico results we conducted microRNA-perturbation experiments in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Time-lapse microscopy of cell-population behavior in response to DNA double-strand breaks, together with image classification of single-cell phenotypes across a population, confirmed that the cellular p53 oscillations are compromised after miR-192 perturbations, matching well with the model predictions. Our study via modeling in combination with quantitative experiments provides new evidence on the role of microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops in conferring robustness to the system performance of stress-induced response of p53. PMID:26642352

  5. A Small Stem Loop Structure Of The Ebola Virus Trailer Is Essential For Replication And Interacts With Heat Shock Protein A8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-02

    sense RNA viruses , such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) (22), hepatitis A virus (23), poliovirus type 1 (24), dengue viruses (25), bovine coronavirus (26... viruses . Previously, the La autoantigen (Sjögren syndrome antigen B) was shown to interact with the leader of ra- bies virus (30), vesicular...Nucleic Acids Research, 2016 1–15 doi: 10.1093/nar/gkw825 A small stem-loop structure of the Ebola virus trailer is essential for replication and

  6. Modification of CusSR bacterial two-component systems by the introduction of an inducible positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Sambandam; Pham, Van Dung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-06-01

    The CusSR two-component system (TCS) is a copper-sensing apparatus of E. coli that is responsible for regulating the copper-related homeostatic system. The dynamic characteristics of the CusSR network were modified by the introduction of a positive feedback loop. To construct the feedback loop, the CusR, which is activated by the cusC promoter, was cloned downstream of the cusC promoter and reporter protein. The feedback loop system, once activated by environmental copper, triggers the activation of the cusC promoter, which results in the amplification of a reporter protein and CusR expression. The threshold copper concentration for the activation of the modified CusSR TCS network was lowered from 2,476.5 μg/l to 247.7 μg/l, which indicates a tenfold increase in sensitivity. The intensity of the output signal was increased twofold, and was maintained for 16 h. The strategy proposed in this study can also be applied to modify the dynamic characteristics of other TCSs.

  7. Hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site RNA contains a tertiary structural element in a functional domain of stem–loop II

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Alita J.; Lytle, J. Robin; Gomez, Jordi; Robertson, Hugh D.

    2001-01-01

    The internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA contains >300 bases of highly conserved 5′-terminal sequence, most of it in the uncapped 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) upstream from the single AUG initiator triplet at which translation of the HCV polyprotein begins. Although progress has been made in defining singularities like the RNA pseudoknot near this AUG, the sequence and structural features of the HCV IRES which stimulate accurate and efficient initiation of protein synthesis are only partially defined. Here we report that a region further upstream from the AUG, stem–loop II of the HCV IRES, also contains an element of local tertiary structure which we have detected using RNase H cleavage and have mapped using the singular ability of two bases therein to undergo covalent intra-chain crosslinking stimulated by UV light. This pre-existing element maps to two non-contiguous stretches of the HCV IRES sequence, residues 53–68 and 103–117. Several earlier studies have shown that the correct sequence between bases 45 and 70 of the HCV IRES stem–loop II domain is required for initiation of protein synthesis. Because features of local tertiary structure like the one we report here are often associated with protein binding, we propose that the HCV stem–loop II element is directly involved in IRES action. PMID:11410661

  8. Evolution in a Braided Loop Ensemble

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This braided loop has several loops near the 'base' that appear to be unwinding with significant apparent outflow. This is evidence of untwisting, and the braided structure also seeming to unwind w...

  9. Crystal packing effects on protein loops.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Chaya S; Pollack, Rena M

    2005-07-01

    The effects of crystal packing on protein loop structures are examined by (1) a comparison of loops in proteins that have been crystallized in alternate packing arrangements, and (2) theoretical prediction of loops both with and without the inclusion of the crystal environment. Results show that in a minority of cases, loop geometries are dependent on crystal packing effects. Explicit representation of the crystal environment in a loop prediction algorithm can be used to model these effects and to reconstruct the structures, and relative energies, of a loop in alternative packing environments. By comparing prediction results with and without the inclusion of the crystal environment, the loop prediction algorithm can further be used to identify cases in which a crystal structure does not represent the most stable state of a loop in solution. We anticipate that this capability has implications for structural biology.

  10. Protein Loop Closure Using Orientational Restraints from NMR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Chittaranjan; Zeng, Jianyang; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce Randall

    Protein loops often play important roles in biological functions such as binding, recognition, catalytic activities and allosteric regulation. Modeling loops that are biophysically sensible is crucial to determining the functional specificity of a protein. A variety of algorithms ranging from robotics-inspired inverse kinematics methods to fragmentbased homology modeling techniques have been developed to predict protein loops. However, determining the 3D structures of loops using global orientational restraints on internuclear vectors, such as those obtained from residual dipolar coupling (RDC) data in solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, has not been well studied. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm that determines the protein loop conformations using a minimal amount of RDC data. Our algorithm exploits the interplay between the sphero-conics derived from RDCs and the protein kinematics, and formulates the loop structure determination problem as a system of low-degree polynomial equations that can be solved exactly and in closed form. The roots of these polynomial equations, which encode the candidate conformations, are searched systematically, using efficient and provable pruning strategies that triage the vast majority of conformations, to enumerate or prune all possible loop conformations consistent with the data. Our algorithm guarantees completeness by ensuring that a possible loop conformation consistent with the data is never missed. This data-driven algorithm provides a way to assess the structural quality from experimental data with minimal modeling assumptions. We applied our algorithm to compute the loops of human ubiquitin, the FF Domain 2 of human transcription elongation factor CA150 (FF2), the DNA damage inducible protein I (DinI) and the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G (GB3) from experimental RDC data. A comparison of our results versus those obtained by using traditional structure determination protocols on the

  11. Flexibility of the P-loop of Pim-1 kinase: observation of a novel conformation induced by interaction with an inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lorien J; Watanabe, Hisami; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Handa, Noriko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yuki, Hitomi; Honma, Teruki; Ogawa, Naoko; Nagano, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko

    2012-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1 is emerging as a promising target for cancer therapeutics. Much attention has recently been focused on identifying potential Pim-1 inhibitor candidates for the treatment of haematopoietic malignancies. The outcome of a rational drug-design project has recently been reported [Nakano et al. (2012), J. Med. Chem. 55, 5151-5156]. The report described the process of optimization of the structure-activity relationship and detailed from a medicinal chemistry perspective the development of a low-potency and nonselective compound initially identified from in silico screening into a potent, selective and metabolically stable Pim-1 inhibitor. Here, the structures of the initial in silico hits are reported and the noteworthy features of the Pim-1 complex structures are described. A particular focus was placed on the rearrangement of the glycine-rich P-loop region that was observed for one of the initial compounds, (Z)-7-(azepan-1-ylmethyl)-2-[(1H-indol-3-yl)methylidene]-6-hydroxy-1-benzofuran-3(2H)-one (compound 1), and was also found in all further derivatives. This novel P-loop conformation, which appears to be stabilized by an additional interaction with the β3 strand located above the binding site, is not usually observed in Pim-1 structures.

  12. The i-Motif in the bcl-2 P1 Promoter Forms an Unexpectedly Stable Structure with a Unique 8:5:7 Loop Folding Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, Samantha; Akiyama, Yoshitsugu; Hecht, Sidney M.; Hurley, Laurence H.

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the bcl-2 proto-oncogene is highly complex, with the majority of transcription driven by the P1 promoter site and the interaction of multiple regulatory proteins. A guanine- and cytosine-rich (GC-rich) region directly upstream of the P1 site has been shown to be integral to bcl-2 promoter activity, as deletion or mutation of this region significantly increases transcription. This GC-rich element consists of six contiguous runs of guanines and cytosines that have the potential to adopt DNA secondary structures, the G-quadruplex and i-motif, respectively. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that the polypurine-rich strand of the bcl-2 promoter can form a mixture of three different G-quadruplex structures. In this current study, we demonstrate that the complementary polypyrimidine-rich strand is capable of forming one major intramolecular i-motif DNA secondary structure with a transition pH of 6.6. Characterization of the i-motif folding pattern using mutational studies coupled with circular dichroic spectra and thermal stability analyses revealed an 8:5:7 loop conformation as the predominant structure at pH 6.1. The folding pattern was further supported by chemical footprinting with bromine. In addition, a novel assay involving the sequential incorporation of a fluorescent thymine analog at each thymine position provided evidence of a capping structure within the top loop region of the i-motif. The potential of the GC-rich element within the bcl-2 promoter region to form DNA secondary structures suggests that the transition from the B-DNA to non-B-DNA conformation may play an important role in bcl-2 transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the two adjacent large lateral loops in the i-motif structure provide an unexpected opportunity for protein and small molecule recognition. PMID:19908860

  13. Structural integration in hypoxia-inducible factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Lu, Jingping; Kim, Youngchang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2015-08-20

    The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) coordinate cellular adaptations to low oxygen stress by regulating transcriptional programs in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and metabolism. These programs promote the growth and progression of many tumours, making HIFs attractive anticancer targets. Transcriptionally active HIFs consist of HIF-alpha and ARNT (also called HIF-1 beta) subunits. Here we describe crystal structures for each of mouse HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT heterodimers in states that include bound small molecules and their hypoxia response element. A highly integrated quaternary architecture is shared by HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT, wherein ARNT spirals around the outside of each HIF-alpha subunit. Five distinct pockets are observed that permit small-molecule binding, including PAS domain encapsulated sites and an interfacial cavity formed through subunit heterodimerization. The DNA-reading head rotates, extends and cooperates with a distal PAS domain to bind hypoxia response elements. HIF-alpha mutations linked to human cancers map to sensitive sites that establish DNA binding and the stability of PAS domains and pockets.

  14. HTLV-1 induces a Th1-like state in CD4(+)CCR4(+) T cells that produces an inflammatory positive feedback loop via astrocytes in HAM/TSP.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Yoshihisa; Coler-Reilly, Ariella

    2017-03-15

    The main feature of Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) -associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) pathogenesis is a virus-induced hyperactive immune response that produces chronic inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS), but the mechanism by which HTLV-1 deregulates the immune response is unknown. We recently reported a high frequency of HTLV-1-infected CCR4(+) cells, including regulatory T cells. We showed that HTLV-1 induces a Th1-like state in these CCR4(+) cells via T-bet expression. We have also found that CXCL10 plays an important role in a positive feedback loop that maintains inflammation in the CNS. Astrocytes, which were found to be the main producers of CXCL10 in the CNS, are another key player in the loop. In short, we postulate that infected CCR4(+) Th1-like T cells produce interferon-γ, which stimulates astrocytes to produce CXCL10. We now have a much better understanding of the molecular mechanisms at play in HAM/TSP pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA adenine methyltransferase facilitated diffusion is enhanced by protein-DNA "roadblock" complexes that induce DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Adam J; Reich, Norbert O

    2015-04-07

    The genomes of all cells are intimately associated with proteins, which are important for compaction, scaffolding, and gene regulation. Here we show that pre-existing protein-DNA complexes (roadblocks) diminish and-interestingly-enhance the ability of particular sequence-specific proteins to move along DNA to locate their binding sites. We challenge the bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam, recognizes 5'-GATC-3') with tightly bound EcoRV ENase-DNA complexes, which bend DNA. A single EcoRV roadblock does not alter processive (multiple modifications) methylation by Dam. This result disfavors a reliance on heavily touted mechanisms involving sliding or short hops for Dam. Specific conformations of two EcoRV roadblocks cause an increase in processivity. The histone-like leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) binds DNA nonspecifically as an octamer, and also increases Dam's processivity. These results can be explained by our prior demonstration that Dam moves over large regions (>300 bp) within a single DNA molecule using an "intersegmental hopping" mechanism. This mechanism involves the protein hopping between looped DNA segments. Both roadblock systems can cause the DNA to loop and therefore facilitate intersegmental hopping. For Lrp, this only occurs when the Dam sites are separated (by >134bp) such that they can be looped around the protein. Intersegmental hopping may well be a general mechanism for proteins that navigate long distances along compacted DNA. Unlike Dam, EcoRI ENase (recognizes 5'-GAATTC-3') relies extensively on a sliding mechanism, and as expected, Lrp decreases its processivity. Our systematic use of protein roadblocks provides a powerful strategy to differentiate between site location mechanisms.

  16. Structural insights into quinolone antibiotic resistance mediated by pentapeptide repeat proteins: conserved surface loops direct the activity of a Qnr protein from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Bromley, Elizabeth H. C.; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Woolfson, Derek N.; Spencer, James

    2011-01-01

    Quinolones inhibit bacterial type II DNA topoisomerases (e.g. DNA gyrase) and are among the most important antibiotics in current use. However, their efficacy is now being threatened by various plasmid-mediated resistance determinants. Of these, the pentapeptide repeat-containing (PRP) Qnr proteins are believed to act as DNA mimics and are particularly prevalent in Gram-negative bacteria. Predicted Qnr-like proteins are also present in numerous environmental bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that one such, Aeromonas hydrophila AhQnr, is soluble, stable, and relieves quinolone inhibition of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase, thus providing an appropriate model system for Gram-negative Qnr proteins. The AhQnr crystal structure, the first for any Gram-negative Qnr, reveals two prominent loops (1 and 2) that project from the PRP structure. Deletion mutagenesis demonstrates that both contribute to protection of E. coli DNA gyrase from quinolones. Sequence comparisons indicate that these are likely to be present across the full range of Gram-negative Qnr proteins. On this basis we present a model for the AhQnr:DNA gyrase interaction where loop1 interacts with the gyrase A ‘tower’ and loop2 with the gyrase B TOPRIM domains. We propose this to be a general mechanism directing the interactions of Qnr proteins with DNA gyrase in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:21227918

  17. The conserved glycine/alanine residue of the active-site loop containing the putative acetylCoA-binding motif is essential for the overall structural integrity of Mesorhizobium loti arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Atmane, Noureddine; Dairou, Julien; Flatters, Delphine; Martins, Marta; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Derreumaux, Philippe; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2007-09-14

    The arylamine N-acetyltransferases are important xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze an acetyl group transfer from acetylCoA to arylamine substrates. NAT enzymes possess an active-site loop (the active-site P-loop) involved in substrate binding and selectivity. The Gly/Ala residue present at the start of the active-site P-loop, although conserved in all NAT enzymes, is not involved in the catalytic mechanism or substrate binding. Here we show that a small amino acid (such as Gly or Ala) at this position is important not only for maintaining the functions of the active-site P-loop but, more surprisingly, also important for maintaining the overall structural integrity of NAT enzymes. Our data thus suggest that in addition to its role in substrate binding and selectivity, the active-site P-loop could play a wider structural role in NAT enzymes.

  18. Structural variation and functional importance of a D-loop–T-loop interaction in valine-accepting tRNA-like structures of plant viral RNAs

    PubMed Central

    de Smit, Maarten H.; Gultyaev, Alexander P.; Hilge, Mark; Bink, Hugo H. J.; Barends, Sharief; Kraal, Barend; Pleij, Cornelis W. A.

    2002-01-01

    Valine-accepting tRNA-like structures (TLSs) are found at the 3′ ends of the genomic RNAs of most plant viruses belonging to the genera Tymovirus, Furovirus, Pomovirus and Pecluvirus, and of one Tobamovirus species. Sequence alignment of these TLSs suggests the existence of a tertiary D-loop–T-loop interaction consisting of 2 bp, analogous to those in the elbow region of canonical tRNAs. The conserved G18·Ψ55 pair of regular tRNAs is found to covary in these TLSs between G·U (possibly also modified to G·Ψ) and A·G. We have mutated the relevant bases in turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) and examined the mutants for symptom development on Chinese cabbage plants and for accumulation of genetic reversions. Development of symptoms is shown to rely on the presence of either A·G or G·U in the original mutants or in revertants. This finding supports the existence and functional importance of this tertiary interaction. The fact that only G·U and A·G are accepted at this position appears to result from steric and energetic limitations related to the highly compact nature of the elbow region. We discuss the implications of these findings for the various possible functions of the valine-accepting TLS. PMID:12364602

  19. Flexibility of the P-loop of Pim-1 kinase: observation of a novel conformation induced by interaction with an inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Lorien J.; Watanabe, Hisami; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Handa, Noriko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yuki, Hitomi; Honma, Teruki; Ogawa, Naoko; Nagano, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko

    2012-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1 is emerging as a promising target for cancer therapeutics. Much attention has recently been focused on identifying potential Pim-1 inhibitor candidates for the treatment of haematopoietic malignancies. The outcome of a rational drug-design project has recently been reported [Nakano et al. (2012 ▶), J. Med. Chem. 55, 5151–5156]. The report described the process of optimization of the structure–activity relationship and detailed from a medicinal chemistry perspective the development of a low-potency and nonselective compound initially identified from in silico screening into a potent, selective and metabolically stable Pim-1 inhibitor. Here, the structures of the initial in silico hits are reported and the noteworthy features of the Pim-1 complex structures are described. A particular focus was placed on the rearrangement of the glycine-rich P-loop region that was observed for one of the initial compounds, (Z)-7-(azepan-1-ylmethyl)-2-[(1H-indol-3-­yl)methylidene]-6-hydroxy-1-benzofuran-3(2H)-one (compound 1), and was also found in all further derivatives. This novel P-loop conformation, which appears to be stabilized by an additional interaction with the β3 strand located above the binding site, is not usually observed in Pim-1 structures. PMID:22869110

  20. Effects of the positive feedback loop in polymerization on the reaction-induced phase separation of polymer mixturesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furubayashi, Y.; Kawakubo, R.; Nakanishi, H.; Norisuye, T.; Tran-Cong-Miyata, Q.

    2015-06-01

    Phase separation of mixtures composed of a guest polymer dissolved in monomer of a host polymer was induced by photopolymerization. From the polymerization kinetics, it was found that for the host polymer with the glass transition temperature (Tg) higher than the experimental temperature, the Trommsdorff-Norrish effect emerges, providing a method to terminate the phase separation at various intermediate stages of the process and thereby a variety of morphologies can be constructed. For the host polymers with (Tg) lower than the experimental temperature, the freezing process of morphology is not complete, leading to the secondary phase separation inside the domains already generated by the primary process. The kinetics of this secondary phase separation indicates that the peculiar morphology like "sunny-side-up egg"-like structures was generated via spinodal decomposition. The experimental results obtained in this study show that the competition between photopolymerization and phase separation can provide a useful method of materials design in the micro- and sub-micrometer scales.

  1. A Homology Model Reveals Novel Structural Features and an Immunodominant Surface Loop/Opsonic Target in the Treponema pallidum BamA Ortholog TP_0326

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit; Anand, Arvind; Hawley, Kelly L.; LeDoyt, Morgan; La Vake, Carson J.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently demonstrated that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses characteristic BamA bipartite topology. Herein, we used immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) to show that only the β-barrel domain of TP_0326 contains surface-exposed epitopes in intact T. pallidum. Using the solved structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae BamA, we generated a homology model of full-length TP_0326. Although the model predicts a typical BamA fold, the β-barrel harbors features not described in other BamAs. Structural modeling predicted that a dome comprised of three large extracellular loops, loop 4 (L4), L6, and L7, covers the barrel's extracellular opening. L4, the dome's major surface-accessible loop, contains mainly charged residues, while L7 is largely neutral and contains a polyserine tract in a two-tiered conformation. L6 projects into the β-barrel but lacks the VRGF/Y motif that anchors L6 within other BamAs. IFA and opsonophagocytosis assay revealed that L4 is surface exposed and an opsonic target. Consistent with B cell epitope predictions, immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed that L4 is an immunodominant loop in T. pallidum-infected rabbits and humans with secondary syphilis. Antibody capture experiments using Escherichia coli expressing OM-localized TP_0326 as a T. pallidum surrogate further established the surface accessibility of L4. Lastly, we found that a naturally occurring substitution (Leu593 → Gln593) in the L4 sequences of T. pallidum strains affects antibody binding in sera from syphilitic patients. Ours is the first study to employ a “structure-to-pathogenesis” approach to map the surface topology of a T. pallidum OMP within the context of syphilitic infection. IMPORTANCE Previously, we reported that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses the bipartite topology characteristic of a BamA ortholog

  2. LOOP IIId of the HCV IRES is essential for the structural rearrangement of the 40S-HCV IRES complex.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Jenniffer; Ulryck, Nathalie; Deforges, Jules; Chamond, Nathalie; Lopez-Lastra, Marcelo; Masquida, Benoît; Sargueil, Bruno

    2016-02-18

    As obligatory intracellular parasites, viruses rely on cellular machines to complete their life cycle, and most importantly they recruit the host ribosomes to translate their mRNA. The Hepatitis C viral mRNA initiates translation by directly binding the 40S ribosomal subunit in such a way that the initiation codon is correctly positioned in the P site of the ribosome. Such a property is likely to be central for many viruses, therefore the description of host-pathogen interaction at the molecular level is instrumental to provide new therapeutic targets. In this study, we monitored the 40S ribosomal subunit and the viral RNA structural rearrangement induced upon the formation of the binary complex. We further took advantage of an IRES viral mutant mRNA deficient for translation to identify the interactions necessary to promote translation. Using a combination of structure probing in solution and molecular modeling we establish a whole atom model which appears to be very similar to the one obtained recently by cryoEM. Our model brings new information on the complex, and most importantly reveals some structural rearrangement within the ribosome. This study suggests that the formation of a 'kissing complex' between the viral RNA and the 18S ribosomal RNA locks the 40S ribosomal subunit in a conformation proficient for translation.

  3. LOOP IIId of the HCV IRES is essential for the structural rearrangement of the 40S-HCV IRES complex

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Jenniffer; Ulryck, Nathalie; Deforges, Jules; Chamond, Nathalie; Lopez-Lastra, Marcelo; Masquida, Benoît; Sargueil, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    As obligatory intracellular parasites, viruses rely on cellular machines to complete their life cycle, and most importantly they recruit the host ribosomes to translate their mRNA. The Hepatitis C viral mRNA initiates translation by directly binding the 40S ribosomal subunit in such a way that the initiation codon is correctly positioned in the P site of the ribosome. Such a property is likely to be central for many viruses, therefore the description of host-pathogen interaction at the molecular level is instrumental to provide new therapeutic targets. In this study, we monitored the 40S ribosomal subunit and the viral RNA structural rearrangement induced upon the formation of the binary complex. We further took advantage of an IRES viral mutant mRNA deficient for translation to identify the interactions necessary to promote translation. Using a combination of structure probing in solution and molecular modeling we establish a whole atom model which appears to be very similar to the one obtained recently by cryoEM. Our model brings new information on the complex, and most importantly reveals some structural rearrangement within the ribosome. This study suggests that the formation of a ‘kissing complex’ between the viral RNA and the 18S ribosomal RNA locks the 40S ribosomal subunit in a conformation proficient for translation. PMID:26626152

  4. Improvement of the treatment of loop structures in the UNRES force field by inclusion of coupling between backbone- and side-chain-local conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Maciej; Ołldziej, Stanisław; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam; Czaplewski, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    The UNited RESidue (UNRES) coarse-grained model of polypeptide chains, developed in our laboratory, enables us to carry out millisecond-scale molecular-dynamics simulations of large proteins effectively. It performs well in ab initio predictions of protein structure, as demonstrated in the last Community Wide Experiment on the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP10). However, the resolution of the simulated structure is too coarse, especially in loop regions, which results from insufficient specificity of the model of local interactions. To improve the representation of local interactions, in this work we introduced new side-chain-backbone correlation potentials, derived from a statistical analysis of loop regions of 4585 proteins. To obtain sufficient statistics, we reduced the set of amino-acid-residue types to five groups, derived in our earlier work on structurally optimized reduced alphabets, based on a statistical analysis of the properties of amino-acid structures. The new correlation potentials are expressed as one-dimensional Fourier series in the virtual-bond-dihedral angles involving side-chain centroids. The weight of these new terms was determined by a trial-and-error method, in which Multiplexed Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (MREMD) simulations were run on selected test proteins. The best average root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) of the calculated structures from the experimental structures below the folding-transition temperatures were obtained with the weight of the new side-chain-backbone correlation potentials equal to 0.57. The resulting conformational ensembles were analyzed in detail by using the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM) and Ward's minimum-variance clustering. This analysis showed that the RMSDs from the experimental structures dropped by 0.5 Å on average, compared to simulations without the new terms, and the deviation of individual residues in the loop region of the computed

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of an 8 × 8 Nucleotide RNA Internal Loop Flanked on Each Side by Three Watson-Crick Pairs and Comparison to Three-Dimensional Predictions.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Andrew D; Kennedy, Scott D; Zhao, Jianbo; Turner, Douglas H

    2017-07-25

    The prediction of RNA three-dimensional structure from sequence alone has been a long-standing goal. High-resolution, experimentally determined structures of simple noncanonical pairings and motifs are critical to the development of prediction programs. Here, we present the nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the (5'CCAGAAACGGAUGGA)2 duplex, which contains an 8 × 8 nucleotide internal loop flanked by three Watson-Crick pairs on each side. The loop is comprised of a central 5'AC/3'CA nearest neighbor flanked by two 3RRs motifs, a known stable motif consisting of three consecutive sheared GA pairs. Hydrogen bonding patterns between base pairs in the loop, the all-atom root-mean-square deviation for the loop, and the deformation index were used to compare the structure to automated predictions by MC-sym, RNA FARFAR, and RNAComposer.

  6. High glucose concentration induces the overexpression of transforming growth factor-beta through the activation of a platelet-derived growth factor loop in human mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, S.; Gesualdo, L.; Ranieri, E.; Grandaliano, G.; Schena, F. P.

    1996-01-01

    High glucose concentration has been shown to induce the overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 mRNA and protein in different cell types, including murine mesangial cells, thus possibly accounting for the expansion of mesangial extracellular matrix observed in diabetic glomerulopathy. In the present study, we evaluated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain and PDGF-beta receptor gene expression in human mesangial cells (HMCs) exposed to different concentrations of glucose and then sought a possible relationship between a PDGF loop and the modulation of TGF-beta 1 expression. HMC [3H]thymidine incorporation was upregulated by 30 mmol/L glucose (HG) up to 24 hours, whereas it was significantly inhibited at later time points. Neutralizing antibodies to PDGF BB abolished the biphasic response to HG, whereas anti-TGF-beta antibodies reversed only the late inhibitory effect of hyperglycemic medium. HG induced an early and persistent increase of PDGF B-chain gene expression, as evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, whereas PDGF-beta receptor mRNA increased by twofold after 6 hours, thereafter declining at levels 70% lower than in controls after 24 hours. 125I-Labeled PDGF BB binding studies in HMCs exposed to HG for 24 hours confirmed the decrease of PDGF-beta receptor expression. TGF-beta 1-specific transcripts showed 43 and 78% increases after 24 and 48 hours of incubation in HG, respectively, which was markedly diminished by anti-PDGF BB neutralizing antibodies or suramin. We conclude that HG induces an early activation of a PDGF loop that, in turn, causes an increase of TGF-beta 1 gene expression, thus modulating both HMC proliferation and mesangial matrix production. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8952542

  7. Reversible S-glutathionylation of Cys 374 regulates actin filament formation by inducing structural changes in the actin molecule.

    PubMed

    Dalle-Donne, I; Giustarini, D; Rossi, R; Colombo, R; Milzani, A

    2003-01-01

    S-glutathionylation, the reversible formation of mixed disulphides of cysteinyl residues in target proteins with glutathione, occurs under conditions of oxidative stress; this could be a posttranslational mechanism through which protein function is regulated by the cellular redox status. A novel physiological relevance of actin polymerization regulated by glutathionylation of Cys(374) has been recently suggested. In the present study we showed that glutathionylated actin (GS-actin) has a decreased capacity to polymerize compared to native actin, filament elongation being the polymerization step actually inhibited. Actin polymerizability recovers completely after dethiolation, indicating that S-glutathionylation does not induce any protein denaturation and is therefore a reversible oxidative modification. The increased exposure of hydrophobic regions of protein surface observed upon S-glutathionylation indicates changes in actin conformation. Structural alterations are confirmed by the increased rate of ATP exchange as well as by the decreased susceptibility to proteolysis of the subtilisin cleavage site between Met(47) and Gly(48), in the DNase-I-binding loop of the actin subdomain 2. Structural changes in the surface loop 39-51 induced by S-glutathionylation could influence actin polymerization in view of the involvement of the N-terminal portion of this loop in intermonomer interactions, as predicted by the atomic models of F-actin.

  8. A feedback regulatory loop between G3P and lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1 mediates azelaic-acid-induced systemic immunity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Keshun; Soares, Juliana Moreira; Mandal, Mihir Kumar; Wang, Caixia; Chanda, Bidisha; Gifford, Andrew N; Fowler, Joanna S; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2013-04-25

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a highly desirable form of plant defense, provides broad-spectrum immunity against diverse pathogens. The recent identification of seemingly unrelated chemical inducers of SAR warrants an investigation of their mutual interrelationships. We show that SAR induced by the dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid (AA) requires the phosphorylated sugar derivative glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). Pathogen inoculation induced the release of free unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) and thereby triggered AA accumulation, because these FAs serve as precursors for AA. AA accumulation in turn increased the levels of G3P, which is required for AA-conferred SAR. The lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1, both of which are required for G3P- and AA-induced SAR, were essential for G3P accumulation. Conversely, reduced G3P resulted in decreased AZI1 and DIR1 transcription. Our results demonstrate that an intricate feedback regulatory loop among G3P, DIR1, and AZI1 regulates SAR and that AA functions upstream of G3P in this pathway. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel hypoxia-induced miR-147a regulates cell proliferation through a positive feedback loop of stabilizing HIF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fan; Zhang, Haoxi