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Sample records for induces multipolar mitoses

  1. 1,2:3,4-Diepoxybutane Induces Multipolar Mitosis in Cultured Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Barajas Torres, Reyna Lucía; Domínguez Cruz, Martín Daniel; Borjas Gutiérrez, César; Ramírez Dueñas, María de Lourdes; Magaña Torres, María Teresa; González García, Juan Ramón

    2016-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, a colorless gas regularly used in the production of plastics, thermoplastic resins, and styrene-butadiene rubber, poses an increased leukemia mortality risk to workers in this field. 1,3-Butadiene is also produced by incomplete combustion of motor fuels or by tobacco smoking. It is absorbed principally through the respiratory system and metabolized by several enzymes rendering 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB), which has the highest genotoxic potency of all metabolites of 1,3-butadiene. DEB is considered a carcinogen mainly due to its high potential as clastogen, which induces structural chromosome aberrations such as sister chromatid exchanges, chromosomal breaks, and micronuclei. Due to its clastogenic effect, DEB is one of the most used agents for diagnostic studies of Fanconi anemia, a recessively inherited disease related to mutations affecting several genes involved in a common DNA repair pathway. When performing Fanconi anemia diagnostic tests in our laboratory, we have observed occasional multipolar mitosis (MM) in lymphocyte cultures exposed to 0.1 μg/ml of DEB and harvested in the absence of any mitotic spindle inhibitor. Although previous studies reported an aneugenic effect (i.e. it induces aneuploidy) of DEB, no mechanism was suggested to explain such observations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to 0.1 μg/ml of DEB is significantly associated with the occurrence of MM. We blindly assessed the frequency of MM in lymphocyte cultures from 10 nonsmoking healthy individuals. Two series of 3 cultures were performed from each sample under different conditions: A, without DEB; B, with 0.1 μg/ml of DEB, and C, with 25 μM of mitomycin C as positive control. Cultures exposed to DEB showed higher frequencies of MM (23 of 2,000 cells) than did the unexposed ones (3 of 2,000 cells). PMID:27193269

  2. Detection of mitoses in embryonic epithelia using motion field analysis.

    PubMed

    Siva, Parthipan; Wayne Brodland, G; Clausi, David

    2009-04-01

    Although computer simulations indicate that mitosis may be important to the mechanics of morphogenetic movements, algorithms to identify mitoses in bright field images of embryonic epithelia have not previously been available. Here, the authors present an algorithm that identifies mitoses and their orientations based on the motion field between successive images. Within this motion field, the algorithm seeks 'mitosis motion field prototypes' characterised by convergent motion in one direction and divergent motion in the orthogonal direction, the local motions produced by the division process. The algorithm uses image processing, vector field analyses and pattern recognition to identify occurrences of this prototype and to determine its orientation. When applied to time-lapse images of gastrulation and neurulation-stage amphibian (Ambystoma mexicanum) embryos, the algorithm achieves identification accuracies of 68 and 67%, respectively and angular accuracies of the order of 30 degrees , values sufficient to assess the role of mitosis in these developmental processes. PMID:19051076

  3. Bisphenol A disrupts microtubules and induces multipolar spindles in dividing root tip cells of the gymnosperm Abies cephalonica.

    PubMed

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2016-04-01

    The effects of bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine chemical disruptor extensively used in the plastic and epoxy resin industry, on dividing root tip cells of the gymnosperm Abies cephalonica Loudon were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after tubulin and endoplasmic reticulum immunolocalization and DNA staining. Microtubule arrays of all mitotic stages were disrupted within a few hours of treatment: preprophase bands exhibited asymmetric width; prometaphase, metaphase and anaphase spindles appeared sharply pointed, sigmoid or multipolar; phragmoplast microtubules were elongated and occasionally bended toward the daughter nuclei. Depending on the mitotic stage, the chromosomes appeared condensed at prophase, as a compact mass at metaphase and anaphase, unsegregated or bridged at telophase. Endoplasmic reticulum patterns were also affected, reflecting those of the respective microtubule arrays. Recovery of the microtubules after oryzalin treatment was more effective in a BPA solution than in water. It is concluded that the plant mitotic apparatus microtubules are very sensitive to BPA, the effect of which depends on the specific cell cycle stage. The formation of multipolar spindles is reminiscent of animal cells and is ascribed to the induction of multiple microtubule nucleation sites, deriving from the centrosomal properties of gymnosperms. PMID:26855225

  4. Detecting mitoses in time-lapse images of embryonic epithelia using intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Siva, Parthipan; Brodland, G Wayne; Clausi, David

    2009-12-01

    Although the frequency and orientation of mitoses can significantly affect the mechanics of early embryo development, these data have not been available due to a shortage of suitable automated techniques. Fluorescence imaging, though popular, requires biochemical intervention and is not always possible or desirable. Here, a new technique that takes advantage of a localized intensity change that occurs in bright field images is used to identify mitoses. The algorithm involves mapping a deformable, sub-cellular triangular mesh from one time-lapse image to the next so that corresponding regions can be identified. Triangles in the mesh that undergo darkening of a sufficient degree over a period consistent with mitosis are flagged. Mitoses are assumed to occur along the short axis of elliptical areas fit to suitably sized clusters of flagged triangles. The algorithm is less complex than previous approaches and it has strong discrimination characteristics. When applied to 15 image sets from neurulation-stage axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) embryos, it was able to correctly detect 86% of the manually identified mitoses, had less than 5% false positives and produced average angular errors of only 15 degrees . The new algorithm is simpler to implement than those previously available, is substantially more accurate, and provides data that is important for understanding the mechanics of morphogenetic movements. PMID:19757061

  5. Multipolar structures in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, S.

    2002-12-01

    In addition to the main nebular shells, planetary nebulae (PNe) are now known to possess secondary shell structures called crowns and haloes. These structures can be satisfactorily explained by coupled dynamical and stellar evolutionary models based on the interacting winds scenario. By introducing time-variability in the fast wind, these models also have some success in accounting for other microsctructures such as jets and FLIERs. A more surprising development has been the discovery of multipolar structures in PNe. A number of bipolar nebulae have been found to have 2 or 3 bipolar axes, sometimes superimposed with multiple 2-dimensional rings and concentric circular arcs. The existence of these features suggests that the fast wind may be changing in direction in addition to varying in magnitude. In this paper, we will summarize the current observations of multipolar nebulae and discuss their possible origins. This work is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and by a Killam Fellowship from the Canada Council for the Arts.

  6. Optical multipolar spread functions of an aplanatic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, Jérémy R.; Toury, Timothée

    2016-07-01

    The electromagnetic field near the focus of a perfect imaging system is calculated for different multipolar sources that play an important role in the radiation of nanostructures. Those multipoles are the exact and extended multipoles occurring in electrodynamics. The theory of diffraction of vector waves is reviewed rigorously for a dipolar radiation and applied to the imaging of multipolar sources. Different geometries are considered in order to connect with experiments and the multipolar spread functions are given in a ready-to-use format up to the octupolar order, in the general case and in the paraxial approximation. Defocus imaging is finally considered to provide a first step toward multipolar imaging.

  7. Classification of spin and multipolar squeezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukawa, Emi; Nemoto, Kae

    2016-06-01

    We investigate various types of squeezing in a collective su(2J+1) system consisting of spin-J particles (J\\gt 1/2). We show that squeezing in the collective su(2J+1) system can be classified into unitary equivalence classes, each of which is characterized by a set of squeezed and anti-squeezed observables forming an su(2) subalgebra in the su(2J+1) algebra. The dimensionality of the unitary equivalence class is found to be fundamentally related to its squeezing limit. We also demonstrate the classification of squeezing among the spin and multipolar observables in a collective su(4) system.

  8. Induction of Aneuploidy, Centrosome Abnormality, Multipolar Spindle, and Multipolar Division in Cultured Mammalian Cells Exposed to an Arsenic Metabolite, Dimethylarsinate.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Toxicological studies of arsenic compounds were conducted in cultured mammalian cells to investigate the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. Dimethylarsinate DMA(V) was not cytotoxic in cells depleted of GSH, but was found to be cytotoxic when GSH was present outside the cells. The results suggested that a reactive form of DMA(V) was generated through interaction with GSH. Dimethylarsine iodide DMI(III) was used as a model compound of DMA(III), and the biological effects were investigated. DMI(III) was about 10000 times more toxic to the cells than DMA(V). Chromosome structural aberrations and numerical changes, such as aneuploidy, were induced by DMI(III). DMA(V) induced multiple foci of the centrosome protein, γ-tubulin, which were colocalized with multipolar spindles in mitotic cells. The multiple foci coalesced into a single dot on disruption of the microtubules (MT). However, reorganization of the MT caused multiple foci of γ-tubulin, suggesting that the induction of centrosome abnormalities by DMA(V) required intact MT. Inhibition of the MT-dependent motor, kinesin, prevented formation of multiple foci of γ-tubulin, which pointed to the involvement of the MT-dependent mitotic motor, kinesin, in the maintenance of centrosome abnormalities. DMI(III) caused abnormal cytokinesis (multipolar division). In addition, DMI(III) caused morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Consideration of the overall process following the centrosome abnormalities caused by DMA(V) suggested a mode of cytotoxicity in which the mitotic centrosome is a critical target. PMID:27252065

  9. Forest discrimination with multipolarization imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Wickland, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The relations between polarization signatures and biophysical characteristics through a range of different forest environments were investigated using airborne synthetic-aperture (SAR) images acquired at L-band on March 1, 1984 in South Carolina. SAR data acquired in four linear polarization states with 10-m spatial resolution were encoded as color composite images and compared to US Forest Service forest stand data. The most useful correlative forest data were stand basal area, forest age, site condition index, and forest management type. It is found that the multipolarization images discriminate variation in tree density or difference in the amount of understory, but no evidence has been found for discrimination between evergreen and deciduous forest types.

  10. Forest discrimination with multipolarization imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Wickland, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of radar polarization diversity for discriminating forest canopy variables on airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images is evaluated. SAR images were acquired at L-Band (24.6 cm) simultaneously in four linear polarization states (HH, HV, VH, and VV) in South Carolina on March 1, 1984. In order to relate the polarization signatures to biophysical properties, false-color composite images were compared to maps of forest stands in the timber compartment. In decreasing order, the most useful correlative forest data are stand basal area, forest age, site condition index, and forest management type. It is found that multipolarization images discriminate variation in tree density and difference in the amount of understory, but do not discriminate between evergreen and deciduous forest types.

  11. MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULAE: NOT AS GEOMETRICALLY DIVERSIFIED AS THOUGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.-N.; Imai, H.; Chibueze, J.; Kwok, Sun; Tafoya, D. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2012-12-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) have diverse morphological shapes, including point-symmetric and multipolar structures. Many PNe also have complicated internal structures such as tori, lobes, knots, and ansae. A complete accounting of all the morphological structures through physical models is difficult. A first step toward such an understanding is to derive the true three-dimensional structure of the nebulae. In this paper, we show that a multipolar nebula with three pairs of lobes can explain many such features, if orientation and sensitivity effects are taken into account. Using only six parameters-the inclination and position angles of each pair-we are able to simulate the observed images of 20 PNe with complex structures. We suggest that multipolar structure is an intrinsic structure of PNe and the statistics of multipolar PNe have been severely underestimated in the past.

  12. Plasma etching in a multipolar discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicker, T. E.; Mantei, T. D.

    1985-03-01

    Etching of silicon and SiO2 has been investigated in a dc plasma discharge confined by a multipolar surface magnetic field layer. The reactive plasma is produced by primary ionizing electrons drawn from heated tungsten filaments and confined by permanent magnets. Electrical probe measurements show that a uniform high-density plasma (1010-1011 cm-3) is sustained in SF6-O2 at very low pressure (0.2-2.0×10-3 Torr). Substrates are biased independently of plasma production by a low-frequency alternating voltage (0-400 V) applied to the substrate through a blocking capacitor. Anisotropic profiles are etched into Si in SF6-20% O2 with etch rates in excess of 1 μm/min at 2×10-3 Torr. The etch rate increases with increasing primary electron current (up to 3 A) and energy (up to 60 eV), gas pressure (up to 2.0×10-3 Torr), substrate bias voltage, and the addition of up to 20% O2. For higher ionizing electron energies (>60 eV) and higher gas pressure (>2.0×10-3 Torr), etching is partially blocked by residue formation. The etch anisotropy depends mainly on substrate bias, increasing for higher values of bias voltage. The Si:SiO2 etch selectivity is typically 10-20, becoming large with decreasing substrate bias and plasma ion density.

  13. On MEG forward modelling using multipolar expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerbi, K.; Mosher, J. C.; Baillet, S.; Leahy, R. M.

    2002-02-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive functional imaging modality based on the measurement of the external magnetic field produced by neural current sources within the brain. The reconstruction of the underlying sources is a severely ill-posed inverse problem typically tackled using either low-dimensional parametric source models, such as an equivalent current dipole (ECD), or high-dimensional minimum-norm imaging techniques. The inability of the ECD to properly represent non-focal sources and the over-smoothed solutions obtained by minimum-norm methods underline the need for an alternative approach. Multipole expansion methods have the advantages of the parametric approach while at the same time adequately describing sources with significant spatial extent and arbitrary activation patterns. In this paper we first present a comparative review of spherical harmonic and Cartesian multipole expansion methods that can be used in MEG. The equations are given for the general case of arbitrary conductors and realistic sensor configurations and also for the special cases of spherically symmetric conductors and radially oriented sensors. We then report the results of computer simulations used to investigate the ability of a first-order multipole model (dipole and quadrupole) to represent spatially extended sources, which are simulated by 2D and 3D clusters of elemental dipoles. The overall field of a cluster is analysed using singular value decomposition and compared to the unit fields of a multipole, centred in the middle of the cluster, using subspace correlation metrics. Our results demonstrate the superior utility of the multipolar source model over ECD models in providing source representations of extended regions of activity.

  14. Excitation of dark multipolar plasmonic resonances at terahertz frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Wei, YuMing; Zang, XiaoFei; Zhu, YiMing; Zhuang, SongLin

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally observe the excitation of dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances in a hybrid structure consisting of a corrugated metallic disk coupled with a C-shaped dipole resonator. The uncoupled corrugated metallic disk only supports a dipolar resonance in the transmission spectrum due to perfect symmetry of the structure. However, the dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances emerge when coupled with a bright C-shaped resonator which is placed in the vicinity of the corrugated metallic disk. These excited multipolar resonances show minimum influence on the coupling distance between the C-shaped resonator and corrugated metallic disk. The resonance frequencies of the radiative modes are controlled by varying the angle of the C-shaped resonator and the inner disk radius, both of which play dominant roles in the excitation of the spoof localized surface plasmons. Observation of such a transition from the dark to radiative nature of multipolar spoof localized plasmon resonances would find potential applications in terahertz based resonant plasmonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:26903382

  15. Strategies for Business Schools in a Multi-Polar World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dameron, Stephanie; Durand, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the contours of the emerging business education and institutions in a multi-polar world and to identify the causes of the strategic convergence of management education, to explore the limitations of the dominant models of management education and to propose a range of strategic alternatives for…

  16. Tailoring unidirectional angular radiation through multipolar interference in a single-element subwavelength all-dielectric stair-like nanoantenna.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingyi; Li, Qiang; Yang, Yuanqing; Qiu, Min

    2016-02-21

    The study of all-dielectric nanoantennas has become an emerging branch of the study of optical nanoantennas in recent years, with all-dielectric nanoantennas having an outstanding ability to tailor forward and backward unidirectional scattering arising from interference mainly between electric dipoles and magnetic dipoles induced simultaneously inside a nanoparticle. To further control their radiation properties, we demonstrate the off-normal scattering, by a silicon stair-like nanoantenna, of an incident near-infrared plane wave due to multipolar interference. The radiation angle could be tailored over a 20-degree range by tuning the geometric parameters of the nanoantenna. A multipolar model was adopted to interpret the interference among one electric dipole, two magnetic dipoles and one electric quadrupole induced inside the nanoantenna. The maximum radiation angle reached 20° at a wavelength near 1550 nm. Such a stair-like nanoantenna sets a good example for further flexible manipulation of multipolar resonances inside all-dielectric nanoparticles, which is an essential step towards practical application of all-dielectric nanoantennas in the near future.

  17. Beam engineering for selective and enhanced coupling to multipolar resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanya; Iyer, Prasad P.; DeCrescent, Ryan A.; Schuller, Jon A.

    2015-12-01

    Multipolar electromagnetic phenomena in subwavelength resonators are at the heart of metamaterial science and technology. In this Rapid Communication, we demonstrate selective and enhanced coupling to specific multipole resonances via beam engineering. We first derive an analytical method for determining the scattering and absorption of spherical nanoparticles (NPs) that depends only on the local electromagnetic field quantities within an inhomogeneous beam. Using this analytical technique, we demonstrate the ability to drastically manipulate the scattering properties of a spherical NP by varying illumination properties and demonstrate the excitation of a longitudinal quadrupole mode that cannot be accessed with conventional illumination. This work enhances the understanding of fundamental light-matter interactions in metamaterials and lays the foundation for researchers to identify, quantify, and manipulate multipolar light-matter interactions through optical beam engineering.

  18. From dipolar to multipolar interactions between ultracold Feshbach molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéméner, Goulven; Lepers, Maxence; Luc-Koenig, Eliane; Dulieu, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Using the multipolar expansion of electrostatic and magnetostatic potential energies, we characterize the long-range interactions between two weakly-bound diatomic molecules, taking as an example the paramagnetic Er2 Feshbach molecules which were produced recently. The interaction between atomic magnetic dipoles gives rise to the usual R-3 leading term of the multipolar expansion, where R is the intermolecular distance. We show that additional terms scaling as R-5, R-7 and so on also appear, which are strongly anisotropic with respect to the orientation of the molecules. These terms can be seen as effective molecular multipole moments reflecting the spatial extension of the molecules which is non-negligible compared to R. We acknowledge the financial support of the COPOMOL project (ANR-13-IS04-0004) from Agence Nationale de la Recherche.

  19. Multipolar radiation of quantum emitters with nanowire optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Curto, Alberto G; Taminiau, Tim H; Volpe, Giorgio; Kreuzer, Mark P; Quidant, Romain; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-01-01

    Multipolar transitions other than electric dipoles are generally too weak to be observed at optical frequencies in single quantum emitters. For example, fluorescent molecules and quantum dots have dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of light and therefore emit predominantly as electric dipoles. Here we demonstrate controlled emission of a quantum dot into multipolar radiation through selective coupling to a linear nanowire antenna. The antenna resonance tailors the interaction of the quantum dot with light, effectively creating a hybrid nanoscale source beyond the simple Hertz dipole. Our findings establish a basis for the controlled driving of fundamental modes in nanoantennas and metamaterials, for the understanding of the coupling of quantum emitters to nanophotonic devices such as waveguides and nanolasers, and for the development of innovative quantum nano-optics components with properties not found in nature.

  20. The emerging multi-polar world and China's grand game

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rajan

    2011-01-19

    This talk outlines a scenario describing an emerging multipolar world that is aligned with geographical regions. The stability and security of this multipolar world is examined with respect to demographics, trade (economics), resource constraints, and development. In particular I focus on Asia which has two large countries, China and India, competing for resources and markets and examine the emerging regional relations, opportunities and threats. These relationships must overcome many hurdles - the Subcontinent is in a weak position politically and strategically and faces many threats, and China's growing power could help stabilize it or create new threats. Since the fate of 1.5 billion (2.4 billion by 2050) people depends on how the Subcontinent evolves, this talk is meant to initiates a discussion of what China and India can do to help the region develop and stabilize.

  1. Mapping diverse forest cover with multipolarization airborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Wickland, D. E.; Sharitz, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging radar backscatter in continuously forested areas contains information about the forest canopy; it also contains data about topography, landforms, and terrain texture. For purposes of radar image interpretation and geologic mapping researchers were interested in identifying and separating forest canopy effects from geologic or geomorphic effects on radar images. The objectives of this investigation was to evaluate forest canopy variables in multipolarization radar images under conditions where geologic and topographic variables are at a minimum. A subsidiary objective was to compare the discriminatory capabilities of the radar images with corresponding optical images of similar spatial resolution. It appears that the multipolarization images discriminate variation in tree density, but no evidence was found for discrimination between evergreen and deciduous forest types.

  2. Requirement of mitoses for the reversal of X-inactivation in cell hybrids between murine embryonal carcinoma cells and normal female thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, N. )

    1988-04-01

    By means of a 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and acridine orange fluorescence staining method the authors studied reactivation of the inactivated X chromosome (X{sub i}) in newly formed cell hybrids between the near-diploid HPRT-deficient OTF9-63 murine embryonal carcinoma cell (ECC) with an XO sex chromosome constitution and the normal female mouse thymocyte. Synchronization of the late replicating S chromosome in such hybrid cells, indicative of reactivation, was found for the first time on Day 3, and the frequency of reactivation was attained 90% on Day 5. Inhibition of cell cycle progression either by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of polyamine metabolism, or by isoleucine-deficient medium after cell fusion delayed reactivation of the X{sub i}, which implied that the number of cell division cycles traversed by individual cells rather than the length of time after cell fusion is critical for the reactivation. Double-labeling experiments using ({sup 3}H)thymidine and BrdU indicated that hybrid cells had undergone three or four mitoses before reactivation of the X{sub i}. Most probably reactivation of the X{sub i} is consequent to reversion of the thymocyte genome to an undifferentiated state under the influence of OTF9 genome. DNA demethylation or dilution of X{sub i}-specific factors by mitoses may be involved in this process.

  3. Dynamic FoxG1 expression coordinates the integration of multipolar pyramidal neuron precursors into the cortical plate.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Goichi; Fishell, Gord

    2012-06-21

    Pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex are born in the ventricular zone and migrate through the intermediate zone to enter into the cortical plate. In the intermediate zone, these migrating precursors move tangentially and initiate the extension of their axons by transiently adopting a characteristic multipolar morphology. We observe that expression of the forkhead transcription factor FoxG1 is dynamically regulated during this transitional period. By utilizing conditional genetic strategies, we show that the downregulation of FoxG1 at the beginning of the multipolar cell phase induces Unc5D expression, the timing of which ultimately determines the laminar identity of pyramidal neurons. In addition, we demonstrate that the re-expression of FoxG1 is required for cells to transit out of the multipolar cell phase and to enter into the cortical plate. Thus, the dynamic expression of FoxG1 during migration within the intermediate zone is essential for the proper assembly of the cerebral cortex.

  4. Multipolar equations of motion for extended test bodies in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, Jan; Puetzfeld, Dirk

    2010-02-15

    We derive the equations of motion of an extended test body in the context of Einstein's theory of gravitation. The equations of motion are obtained via a multipolar approximation method and are given up to the quadrupolar order. Special emphasis is put on the explicit construction of the so-called canonical form of the energy-momentum density. The set of gravitational multipolar moments and the corresponding equations of motion allow for a systematic comparison to competing multipolar approximation schemes.

  5. Structural and functional classes of multipolar cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Doucet, John R; Ryugo, David K

    2006-04-01

    Multipolar cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) are a structurally and functionally diverse group of projection neurons. Understanding their role in the ascending pathway involves partitioning multipolar cells into distinct populations and determining where in the brain each sends its coded messages. In this study, we used retrograde labeling techniques in rats to identify multipolar neurons that project their axons to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), the contralateral CN, or both structures. Three rats received injections of biotinylated dextran amine in the ipsilateral DCN and diamidino yellow in the contralateral CN. Several radiate multipolar neurons (defined by their axonal projections to the ipsilateral DCN and their dendrites that traverse VCN isofrequency sheets) were double-labeled but over 70% were not. This result suggests two distinct populations: (1) radiate-commissural (RC) multipolar cells that project to the ipsilateral DCN and the contralateral CN, and (2) radiate multipolar cells that project exclusively (in this context) to the ipsilateral DCN. In a different group of animals, we retrogradely labeled multipolar neurons that project their axons to the contralateral CN and measured the size of their cell bodies. The mean size of this population (266 +/- 156 microm2) was significantly smaller than those of RC-multipolar cells (418 +/- 140 microm2). We conclude that the CN commissural pathway is composed of at least two components: (1) RC multipolar cells and (2) commissural multipolar cells that are small- and medium-sized neurons that project exclusively (in this context) to the contralateral CN. These results identify separate structural groups of multipolar cells that may correspond to physiological unit types described in the literature. They also provide protocols for isolating and studying different populations of multipolar cells to determine the neural mechanisms that govern their responses to sound.

  6. Impact of polydispersity on multipolar resonant scattering in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Benoit; Brunet, Thomas; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Raffy, Simon; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Leng, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    The influence of size polydispersity on the resonant acoustic properties of dilute emulsions, made of fluorinated-oil droplets, is quantitatively investigated. Ultrasound attenuation and dispersion measurements on various samples with controlled size polydispersities, ranging from 1% to 13%, are found to be in excellent agreement with predictions based on the independent scattering approximation. By relating the particle-size distribution of the synthesized emulsions to the quality factor of the predicted multipolar resonances, the number of observable acoustic resonances is shown to be imposed by the sample polydispersity. These results are briefly discussed into the context of metamaterials for which scattering resonances are central to their effective properties. PMID:23556570

  7. First-principles theory of multipolar order in neptunium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.-T.; Magnani, N.; Oppeneer, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    We provide a first-principles, materials-specific theory of multipolar order and superexchange in NpO2 by means of a noncollinear local-density approximation +U (LDA+U) method. Our calculations offer a precise microscopic description of the triple- q antiferro ordered phase in the absence of any dipolar moment. We find that, while the most common nondipolar degrees of freedom (e.g., electric quadrupoles and magnetic octupoles) are active in the ordered phase, both the usually neglected higher-order multipoles (electric hexadecapoles and magnetic triakontadipoles) have at least an equally significant effect.

  8. Multipolar Electrode and Preamplifier Design for ENG-Signal Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulier, Fabien; Gouyet, Lionel; Cathébras, Guy; Bernard, Serge; Guiraud, David; Bertrand, Yves

    Cuff electrodes have several advantages for in situ recording ENG signal. They are easy to implant and not very invasive for the patient. Nevertheless, they are subject to background parasitic noise, especially the EMG generated by the muscles. We show that the use of cuff electrodes with large numbers of poles can increase their sensitivity and their selectivity with respect to an efficient noise rejection. We investigate several configurations and compare the performances of a tripolar cuff electrode versus a multipolar one in numerical simulation.

  9. JPL multipolarization workstation - Hardware, software and examples of data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnette, Fred; Norikane, Lynne

    1987-01-01

    A low-cost stand-alone interactive image processing workstation has been developed for operations on multipolarization JPL aircraft SAR data, as well as data from future spaceborne imaging radars. A recently developed data compression technique is used to reduce the data volume to 10 Mbytes, for a typical data set, so that interactive analysis may be accomplished in a timely and efficient manner on a supermicrocomputer. In addition to presenting a hardware description of the work station, attention is given to the software that has been developed. Three illustrative examples of data analysis are presented.

  10. Lithologic mapping in a sedimentary environment using multipolarization SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.; Schenck, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    Multipolarization Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from the NASA/JPL aircraft SAR were used in conjunction with LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM), Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data as part of a three-year research program to evaluate the utility of remote sensing measurements for analysis of sedimentary basins. The purpose of this research effort is to construct stratigraphic columns, map variations in the lithology, geometry, and structure of sedimentary rocks in the Wind River/Bighorn Basin area, Wyoming, and to integrate remote sensing data with conventional rain models of basin formation and evolution.

  11. The Role of Angular Momentum in the Construction of Electromagnetic Multipolar Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tischler, Nora; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Multipolar solutions of Maxwell's equations are used in many practical applications and are essential for the understanding of light-matter interactions at the fundamental level. Unlike the set of plane wave solutions of electromagnetic fields, the multipolar solutions do not share a standard derivation or notation. As a result, expressions…

  12. Molecules and mechanisms that regulate multipolar migration in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Most neurons migrate with an elongated, "bipolar" morphology, extending a long leading process that explores the environment. However, when immature projection neurons enter the intermediate zone (IZ) of the neocortex they become "multipolar". Multipolar cells extend and retract cytoplasmic processes in different directions and move erratically-sideways, up and down. Multipolar cells extend axons while they are in the lower half of the IZ. Remarkably, the cells then resume radial migration: they reorient their centrosome and Golgi apparatus towards the pia, transform back to bipolar morphology, and commence locomotion along radial glia (RG) fibers. This reorientation implies the existence of directional signals in the IZ that are ignored during the multipolar stage but sensed after axonogenesis. In vivo genetic manipulation has implicated a variety of candidate directional signals, cell surface receptors, and signaling pathways, that may be involved in polarizing multipolar cells and stabilizing a pia-directed leading process for radial migration. Other signals are implicated in starting multipolar migration and triggering axon outgrowth. Here we review the molecules and mechanisms that regulate multipolar migration, and also discuss how multipolar migration affects the orderly arrangement of neurons in layers and columns in the developing neocortex.

  13. Anatomy of the Binary Black Hole Recoil: A Multipolar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Buonanno, Alessandra; vanMeter, James R.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the recoil velocity computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including 1 = 4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (= 98%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (2 95%). We describe how the relative amplitude, and more importantly, the relative phase, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ring-down phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced, to a high level of accuracy, by an effective Newtonian formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing in the Newtonian formula the radial separation with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes. Analytic formulae, obtained by expressing the multipole moments in terms of the fundamental QNMs of a Kerr BH, are able to explain the onset and amount of '.anti-kick" for each of the simulations. Lastly, we apply this multipolar analysis to understand the remarkable difference between the amplitudes of planar and non-planar kicks for equal-mass spinning black holes.

  14. Spermatogenesis and auxospore structure in the multipolar centric diatom Hydrosera.

    PubMed

    Idei, Masahiko; Sato, Shinya; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo; Toyoda, Kensuke; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Mann, David G

    2015-02-01

    Spermatogenesis and auxospore development were studied in the freshwater centric diatom Hydrosera triquetra. Spermatogenesis was unusual, lacking depauperating cell divisions within the spermatogonangium. Instead, a series of mitoses occurred within an undivided cell to produce a multinucleate plasmodium with peripheral nuclei, which then underwent meiosis. 32 or 64 sperm budded off from the plasmodium leaving a large residual cell containing all the chloroplasts. Similar development apparently occurs in Pleurosira, Aulacodiscus, and Guinardia, these being so distantly related that independent evolution of plasmodial spermatogenesis seems likely. After presumed fertilization, the Hydrosera egg cell expanded distally to form a triangular end part. However, unlike in other triangular diatoms (Lithodesmium, Triceratium), the development of triradiate symmetry was not controlled by the "canonical" method of a perizonium that constrains expansion to small terminal areas of the auxospore wall. Instead, the auxospore wall lacked a perizonium and possessed only scales and a dense mat of thin, apparently entangled strips of imperforate silica. No such structures have been reported from any other centric diatoms, the closest analogs being instead the incunabular strips of some raphid diatoms (Nitzschia and Pinnularia). Whether these silica structures are formed by the normal method (intracellular deposition within a silica deposition vesicle) is unknown. As well as being more rounded than vegetative cells, the initial cell is aberrant in its structure, since it has a less polarized distribution of the "triptych" pores characteristic of the species. PMID:26986265

  15. Astronomical relativistic reference systems with multipolar expansion: the global one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yi

    2014-09-01

    With the rapid development of techniques for astronomical observations, the precision of measurements has been significantly increasing. Theories describing astronomical relativistic reference systems, which are the foundation for processing and interpreting these data now and in the future, may require extensions to satisfy the needs of these trends. Besides building a framework compatible with alternative theories of gravity and the pursuit of higher order post-Newtonian approximation, it will also be necessary to make the first order post-Newtonian multipole moments of celestial bodies be explicitly expressed in the astronomical relativistic reference systems. This will bring some convenience into modeling the observations and experiments and make it easier to distinguish different contributions in measurements. As a first step, the global solar system reference system is expressed as a multipolar expansion and the post-Newtonian mass and spin moments are shown explicitly in the metric which describes the coordinates of the system. The full expression of the global metric is given.

  16. Multipolar interference for non-reciprocal nonlinear generation

    PubMed Central

    Poutrina, Ekaterina; Urbas, Augustine

    2016-01-01

    We show that nonlinear multipolar interference allows achieving not only unidirectional, but also non-reciprocal nonlinear generation from a nanoelement, with the direction of the produced light decoupled from the direction of at least one of the excitation beams. Alternatively, it may allow inhibiting the specified nonlinear response in a nanoelement or in its periodic arrangement by reversing the direction of one of the pumps. These general phenomena exploit the fact that, contrary to the linear response case, nonlinear magneto-electric interference stems from a combination of additive and multiplicative processes and includes an interference between various terms within the electric and magnetic partial waves themselves. We demonstrate the introduced concept numerically using an example of a plasmonic dimer geometry with realistic material parameters. PMID:27126209

  17. Multipolar Coupling in Hybrid Metal–Dielectric Metasurfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Rui; Rusak, Evgenia; Staude, Isabelle; Dominguez, Jason; Decker, Manuel; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Brener, Igal; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-03-02

    In this paper, we study functional hybrid metasurfaces consisting of metal–dielectric nanoantennas that direct light from an incident plane wave or from localized light sources into a preferential direction. The directionality is obtained by carefully balancing the multipolar contributions to the scattering response from the constituents of the metasurface. The hybrid nanoantennas are composed of a plasmonic gold nanorod acting as a feed element and a silicon nanodisk acting as a director element. In order to experimentally realize this design, we have developed a two-step electron-beam lithography process in combination with a precision alignment step. Finally, the optical response ofmore » the fabricated sample is measured and reveals distinct signatures of coupling between the plasmonic and the dielectric nanoantenna elements that ultimately leads to unidirectional radiation of light.« less

  18. Multipolar functions of BCL-2 proteins link energetics to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, J. Marie; Chen, Ying-bei; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Classical apoptotic cell death is now sufficiently well understood to be interrogated with mathematical modeling and to be skillfully manipulated with targeted drugs for clinical benefit. However, a biological black hole has emerged with the realization that apoptosis regulators are functionally multipolar. BCL-2 family proteins appear to have much greater effects on cells than can be explained by their known roles in apoptosis. While these effects may be observable simply because the cell is not dead, the general assumption is that BCL-2 proteins have yet undiscovered biochemical activities. Conversely, these yet uncharacterized day-jobs may underlie their profound effects on cell survival, challenging current assumptions about classical apoptosis. Even their sub-mitochondrial localizations remain controversial. Here we attempt to integrate seemingly conflicting information with the prospect that BCL-2 proteins themselves may be the critical crosstalk between life and death. PMID:22560661

  19. A global optimization approach to multi-polarity sentiment analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinmiao; Li, Jing; Wu, Yukeng

    2015-01-01

    Following the rapid development of social media, sentiment analysis has become an important social media mining technique. The performance of automatic sentiment analysis primarily depends on feature selection and sentiment classification. While information gain (IG) and support vector machines (SVM) are two important techniques, few studies have optimized both approaches in sentiment analysis. The effectiveness of applying a global optimization approach to sentiment analysis remains unclear. We propose a global optimization-based sentiment analysis (PSOGO-Senti) approach to improve sentiment analysis with IG for feature selection and SVM as the learning engine. The PSOGO-Senti approach utilizes a particle swarm optimization algorithm to obtain a global optimal combination of feature dimensions and parameters in the SVM. We evaluate the PSOGO-Senti model on two datasets from different fields. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti model can improve binary and multi-polarity Chinese sentiment analysis. We compared the optimal feature subset selected by PSOGO-Senti with the features in the sentiment dictionary. The results of this comparison indicated that PSOGO-Senti can effectively remove redundant and noisy features and can select a domain-specific feature subset with a higher-explanatory power for a particular sentiment analysis task. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti approach is effective and robust for sentiment analysis tasks in different domains. By comparing the improvements of two-polarity, three-polarity and five-polarity sentiment analysis results, we found that the five-polarity sentiment analysis delivered the largest improvement. The improvement of the two-polarity sentiment analysis was the smallest. We conclude that the PSOGO-Senti achieves higher improvement for a more complicated sentiment analysis task. We also compared the results of PSOGO-Senti with those of the genetic algorithm (GA) and grid search method. From

  20. Multipolar mitosis and aneuploidy after chrysotile treatment: a consequence of abscission failure and cytokinesis regression

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Beatriz Araujo; Teixeira, Paula Rezende; Redick, Sambra; Doxsey, Stephen; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Chrysotile, like other types of asbestos, has been associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis. However, the cellular abnormalities induced by these fibers involved in cancer development have not been elucidated yet. Previous works show that chrysotile fibers induce features of cancer cells, such as aneuploidy, multinucleation and multipolar mitosis. In the present study, normal and cancer derived human cell lines were treated with chrysotile and the cellular and molecular mechanisms related to generation of aneuploid cells was elucidated. The first alteration observed was cytokinesis regression, the main cause of multinucleated cells formation and centrosome amplification. The multinucleated cells formed after cytokinesis regression were able to progress through cell cycle and generated aneuploid cells after abnormal mitosis. To understand the process of cytokinesis regression, localization of cytokinetic proteins was investigated. It was observed mislocalization of Anillin, Aurora B, Septin 9 and Alix in the intercellular bridge, and no determination of secondary constriction and abscission sites. Fiber treatment also led to overexpression of genes related to cancer, cytokinesis and cell cycle. The results show that chrysotile fibers induce cellular and molecular alterations in normal and tumor cells that have been related to cancer initiation and progression, and that tetraploidization and aneuploid cell formation are striking events after fiber internalization, which could generate a favorable context to cancer development. PMID:26788989

  1. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jérôme; Kociak, Mathieu; Mahfoud, Zackaria; Proust, Julien; Gérard, Davy; Plain, Jérôme

    2014-10-01

    We report on the high resolution imaging of multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Plasmonic resonances ranging from near-infrared to ultraviolet (UV) are measured. The spatial distributions of the multipolar resonant modes are mapped and their energy dispersion is retrieved. The losses in the aluminum antennas are studied through the full width at half-maximum of the resonances, unveiling the weight of both interband and radiative damping mechanisms of the different multipolar resonances. In the blue-UV spectral range, high order resonant modes present a quality factor up to 8, two times higher than low order resonant modes at the same energy. This study demonstrates that near-infrared to ultraviolet tunable multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas with relatively high quality factors can be engineered. Aluminum nanoantennas are thus an appealing alternative to gold or silver ones in the visible and can be efficiently used for UV plasmonics.

  2. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jérôme; Kociak, Mathieu; Mahfoud, Zackaria; Proust, Julien; Gérard, Davy; Plain, Jérôme

    2014-10-01

    We report on the high resolution imaging of multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Plasmonic resonances ranging from near-infrared to ultraviolet (UV) are measured. The spatial distributions of the multipolar resonant modes are mapped and their energy dispersion is retrieved. The losses in the aluminum antennas are studied through the full width at half-maximum of the resonances, unveiling the weight of both interband and radiative damping mechanisms of the different multipolar resonances. In the blue-UV spectral range, high order resonant modes present a quality factor up to 8, two times higher than low order resonant modes at the same energy. This study demonstrates that near-infrared to ultraviolet tunable multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas with relatively high quality factors can be engineered. Aluminum nanoantennas are thus an appealing alternative to gold or silver ones in the visible and can be efficiently used for UV plasmonics. PMID:25207386

  3. Prdm8 regulates the morphological transition at multipolar phase during neocortical development.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mayuko; Kuroda, Takao; Honda, Aya; Komabayashi-Suzuki, Mariko; Komai, Tae; Shinkai, Yoichi; Mizutani, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that the PR domain protein Prdm8 serves as a key regulator of the length of the multipolar phase by controlling the timing of morphological transition. We used a mouse line with expression of Prdm8-mVenus reporter and found that Prdm8 is predominantly expressed in the middle and upper intermediate zone during both the late and terminal multipolar phases. Prdm8 expression was almost coincident with Unc5D expression, a marker for the late multipolar phase, although the expression of Unc5D was found to be gradually down-regulated to the point at which mVenus expression was gradually up-regulated. This expression pattern suggests the possible involvement of Prdm8 in the control of the late and terminal multipolar phases, which controls the timing for morphological transition. To test this hypothesis, we performed gain- and loss-of-function analysis of neocortical development by using in utero electroporation. We found that the knockdown of Prdm8 results in premature change from multipolar to bipolar morphology, whereas the overexpression of Prdm8 maintained the multipolar morphology. Additionally, the postnatal analysis showed that the Prdm8 knockdown stimulated the number of early born neurons, and differentiated neurons located more deeply in the neocortex, however, majority of those cells could not acquire molecular features consistent with laminar location. Furthermore, we found the candidate genes that were predominantly utilized in both the late and terminal multipolar phases, and these candidate genes included those encoding for guidance molecules. In addition, we also found that the expression level of these guidance molecules was inhibited by the introduction of the Prdm8 expression vector. These results indicate that the Prdm8-mediated regulation of morphological changes that normally occur during the late and terminal multipolar phases plays an important role in neocortical development.

  4. A Global Optimization Approach to Multi-Polarity Sentiment Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinmiao; Li, Jing; Wu, Yukeng

    2015-01-01

    Following the rapid development of social media, sentiment analysis has become an important social media mining technique. The performance of automatic sentiment analysis primarily depends on feature selection and sentiment classification. While information gain (IG) and support vector machines (SVM) are two important techniques, few studies have optimized both approaches in sentiment analysis. The effectiveness of applying a global optimization approach to sentiment analysis remains unclear. We propose a global optimization-based sentiment analysis (PSOGO-Senti) approach to improve sentiment analysis with IG for feature selection and SVM as the learning engine. The PSOGO-Senti approach utilizes a particle swarm optimization algorithm to obtain a global optimal combination of feature dimensions and parameters in the SVM. We evaluate the PSOGO-Senti model on two datasets from different fields. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti model can improve binary and multi-polarity Chinese sentiment analysis. We compared the optimal feature subset selected by PSOGO-Senti with the features in the sentiment dictionary. The results of this comparison indicated that PSOGO-Senti can effectively remove redundant and noisy features and can select a domain-specific feature subset with a higher-explanatory power for a particular sentiment analysis task. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti approach is effective and robust for sentiment analysis tasks in different domains. By comparing the improvements of two-polarity, three-polarity and five-polarity sentiment analysis results, we found that the five-polarity sentiment analysis delivered the largest improvement. The improvement of the two-polarity sentiment analysis was the smallest. We conclude that the PSOGO-Senti achieves higher improvement for a more complicated sentiment analysis task. We also compared the results of PSOGO-Senti with those of the genetic algorithm (GA) and grid search method. From

  5. Multipolar Ewald Methods, 1: Theory, Accuracy, and Performance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Ewald, Particle Mesh Ewald (PME), and Fast Fourier–Poisson (FFP) methods are developed for systems composed of spherical multipole moment expansions. A unified set of equations is derived that takes advantage of a spherical tensor gradient operator formalism in both real space and reciprocal space to allow extension to arbitrary multipole order. The implementation of these methods into a novel linear-scaling modified “divide-and-conquer” (mDC) quantum mechanical force field is discussed. The evaluation times and relative force errors are compared between the three methods, as a function of multipole expansion order. Timings and errors are also compared within the context of the quantum mechanical force field, which encounters primary errors related to the quality of reproducing electrostatic forces for a given density matrix and secondary errors resulting from the propagation of the approximate electrostatics into the self-consistent field procedure, which yields a converged, variational, but nonetheless approximate density matrix. Condensed-phase simulations of an mDC water model are performed with the multipolar PME method and compared to an electrostatic cutoff method, which is shown to artificially increase the density of water and heat of vaporization relative to full electrostatic treatment. PMID:25691829

  6. Multipolar Ewald methods, 1: theory, accuracy, and performance.

    PubMed

    Giese, Timothy J; Panteva, Maria T; Chen, Haoyuan; York, Darrin M

    2015-02-10

    The Ewald, Particle Mesh Ewald (PME), and Fast Fourier–Poisson (FFP) methods are developed for systems composed of spherical multipole moment expansions. A unified set of equations is derived that takes advantage of a spherical tensor gradient operator formalism in both real space and reciprocal space to allow extension to arbitrary multipole order. The implementation of these methods into a novel linear-scaling modified “divide-and-conquer” (mDC) quantum mechanical force field is discussed. The evaluation times and relative force errors are compared between the three methods, as a function of multipole expansion order. Timings and errors are also compared within the context of the quantum mechanical force field, which encounters primary errors related to the quality of reproducing electrostatic forces for a given density matrix and secondary errors resulting from the propagation of the approximate electrostatics into the self-consistent field procedure, which yields a converged, variational, but nonetheless approximate density matrix. Condensed-phase simulations of an mDC water model are performed with the multipolar PME method and compared to an electrostatic cutoff method, which is shown to artificially increase the density of water and heat of vaporization relative to full electrostatic treatment.

  7. Vegetation canopy discrimination and biomass assessment using multipolarized airborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Held, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    Multipolarized airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data were acquired over a largely agricultural test site near Macomb, Illinois, in conjunction with the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B) experiment in October 1984. The NASA/JPL L-band SAR operating at 1.225 GHz made a series of daily overflights with azimuth view angles both parallel and orthogonal to those of SIR-B. The SAR data was digitally recorded in the quadpolarization configuration. An extensive set of ground measurements were obtained throughout the test site and include biophysical and soil measurements of approximately 400 agricultural fields. Preliminary evaluation of some of the airborne SAR imagery indicates a great potential for crop discrimination and assessment of canopy condition. False color composites constructed from the combination of three linear polarizations (HH, VV, and HV) were found to be clearly superior to any single polarization for purposes of crop classification. In addition, an image constructed using the HH return to modulate intensity and the phase difference between HH and VV returns to modulate chroma indicates a clear capability for assessment of canopy height and/or biomass. In particular, corn fields heavily damaged by infestations of corn borer are readily distinguished from noninfested fields.

  8. Relationships between multipolarized radar backscatter and slash pine stand parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussin, Yousif Ali; Hoffer, Roger M.

    1989-01-01

    Multipolarized L-band (24.5 cm) aircraft radar data was obtained for a primarily forested area in northern Florida. Based on the results of previous studies by Hoffer and Hussin (1989), a swath of medium incidence angle (35-25 deg) data was defined. Three groups of slash pine stands were located in the data: 4- to 17-year-old plantations, 18- to 48-year-old plantations, and 16- to 53-year-old natural stands. Stand data obtained from the forest-products companies operating in the area include age, tree height, diameter-at-breast height, basal area, volume (cords/acre), and density (trees/acre). Each of these stand parameters were compared to each of the four polarizations (HH, VV, VH, and HV) of the radar data for each group of stands. Statistically significant relationships were found between the radar backscatter and the forest stand parameters only for the 4- to 17-year-old slash pine plantation stands. In general, the cross-polarized radar backscatter was more highly correlated with the various stand parameters than the like-polarized backscatter, and the VV-polarized data were more highly correlated than the HH-polarized data.

  9. Two-site fluctuations and multipolar intersite exchange interactions in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourovskii, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    An approach is proposed for evaluating dipolar and multipolar intersite interactions in strongly correlated materials. This approach is based on the single-site dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) in conjunction with the atomic approximation for the local self-energy. Starting from the local-moment paramagnetic state described by DMFT, we derive intersite interactions by considering the response of the DMFT grand potential to small fluctuations of atomic configurations on two neighboring sites. The present method is validated by applying it to one-band and two-band eg Hubbard models on the simple-cubic 3 d lattice. It is also applied to study the spin-orbital order in the parent cubic structure of ternary chromium fluoride KCrF3. We obtain the onset of a G-type antiferro-orbital order at a significantly lower temperature compared to that in real distorted KCrF3. In contrast, its layered A-type antiferromagnetic order and Néel temperature are rather well reproduced. The calculated full Kugel-Khomskii Hamiltonian contains spin-orbital coupling terms inducing a misalignment in the antiferro-orbital order upon the onset of antiferromagnetism.

  10. Electrophysiological channel interactions using focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Speech intelligibility with existing multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) is thought to be limited by poor spatial selectivity and interactions between CI channels caused by overlapping activation with monopolar (MP) stimulation. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation in the inferior colliculus (IC), compared to MP stimulation. Approach. This study explored interactions in the IC produced by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels. We recorded multi-unit neural activity in the IC of anaesthetized cats with normal and severely degenerated spiral ganglion neuron populations in response to FMP, TP and MP stimulation from a 14 channel CI. Stimuli were applied to a ‘fixed’ CI channel, chosen toward the middle of the cochlear electrode array, and the effects of simultaneously stimulating a more apical ‘test’ CI channel were measured as a function of spatial separation between the two stimulation channels and stimulus level of the fixed channel. Channel interactions were quantified by changes in neural responses and IC threshold (i.e., threshold shift) elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels, compared to stimulation of the test channel alone. Main results. Channel interactions were significantly lower for FMP and TP than for MP stimulation (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed between FMP and TP stimulation. With MP stimulation, threshold shifts increased with decreased inter-electrode spacing and increased stimulus levels of the fixed channel. For FMP and TP stimulation, channel interactions were found to be similar for different inter-electrode spacing and stimulus levels of the fixed channel. Significance. The present study demonstrates how the degree of channel interactions in a CI can be controlled using stimulation configurations such as FMP and TP; such knowledge is essential in enhancing CI function in complex

  11. Do DNA double-strand breaks induced by Alu I lead to development of novel aberrations in the second and third post-treatment mitoses?

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, A.; Bonk, K.; Mueller, M.U.; Streffer, C.; Obe, G.

    1996-02-01

    Several authors have reported that ionizing radiation can give rise to novel aberrations several mitotic divisions after the exposure. At our institute this phenomenon has been observed in mouse preimplantation embryos. This cell system is uniquely well suited for such investigations because the first three cell divisions show a high degree of synchrony. Thus the expression of chromosomal aberrations at the first, second and third mitosis after irradiation can be scored unambiguously. To investigate whether DNA double-strand breaks may be the lesions responsible for the delayed expression of chromosomal aberrations, we have studied the frequencies of aberrations in the first, second and third mitosis after treatment of one-cell mouse embryos with the restriction enzyme Alu I. Embryos were permeabilized with Streptolysin-O. The results indicate that the induction of double-strand breaks does not lead to novel aberrations in the third post-treatment mitosis. Several embryos scored at the second mitosis showed very high numbers of aberrations, indicating that Alu I may remain active in the cells for a period of one cell cycle. After treatment with Streptolysin-O alone, enhanced aberration frequencies were observed in the third post-treatment mitosis, suggesting that membrane damage has a delayed effect on the cellular integrity. 44 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. AN OPTICAL-INFRARED STUDY OF THE YOUNG MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 6644

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Chih Hao; Kwok Sun; Zhang Yong; Koning, Nico; Volk, Kevin E-mail: sunkwok@hku.h E-mail: nkoning@iras.ucalgary.c

    2010-12-10

    High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the compact planetary nebula NGC 6644 has revealed two pairs of bipolar lobes and a central ring lying close to the plane of the sky. From mid-infrared imaging obtained with the Gemini Telescope, we have found a dust torus which is oriented nearly perpendicular to one pair of the lobes. We suggest that NGC 6644 is a multipolar nebula and construct a three-dimensional model that allows the visualization of the object from different lines of sight. These results suggest that NGC 6644 may have similar intrinsic structures as other multipolar nebulae and the phenomenon of multipolar nebulosity may be more common than previously believed.

  13. Potential application of multipolarization SAR for pine-plantation biomass estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shih-Tseng

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the technique and the potential utility of multipolarization Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for pine-plantation biomass estimation. Three channels of SAR data, one from the Shuttle Imaging Radar SIR-A and the other two from the aircraft SAR, were acquired over the Baldwin County, Alabama, study area. The SIR-A data were acquired with HH polarization and the aircraft SAR data with VV and VH polarizations. Linear regression techniques are used to estimate the pine-plantation biomass, tree height, and age using 21 test plots. The results indicate that the multipolarization data are highly related to the plantation biomass. The results suggest a potential application of multipolarization SAR for pine-plantation biomass estimation.

  14. Planar multipolar cells in the cochlear nucleus project to medial olivocochlear neurons in mouse.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Keith N; Benson, Thane E; Brown, M Christian

    2012-05-01

    Medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons originate in the superior olivary complex and project to the cochlea, where they act to reduce the effects of noise masking and protect the cochlea from damage. MOC neurons respond to sound via a reflex pathway; however, in this pathway the cochlear nucleus cell type that provides input to MOC neurons is not known. We investigated whether multipolar cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus have projections to MOC neurons by labeling them with injections into the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The projections of one type of labeled multipolar cell, planar neurons, were traced into the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, where they were observed terminating on MOC neurons (labeled in some cases by a second cochlear injection of FluoroGold). These terminations formed what appear to be excitatory synapses, i.e., containing small, round vesicles and prominent postsynaptic densities. These data suggest that cochlear nucleus planar multipolar neurons drive the MOC neuron's response to sound.

  15. Soil moisture estimation in cereal fields using multipolarized SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Mozos, J.; Izagirre, A.; Larrañaga, A.

    2012-04-01

    The retrieval of soil moisture from remote sensing data is an extremely active research topic with applications on a wide range of disciplines. Microwave observations represent the most viable approach due to the influence of soils' dielectric constant (and thus soil moisture) on both the emission and backscatter of waves in this region of the spectrum. Passive observations provide higher temporal resolutions, whereas active (SAR) observations have a higher spatial detail. Even if operational moisture products, based on passive data, exist, retrieval algorithms using active observations still face several problems. Surface roughness and vegetation cover are probably the disturbing factors most affecting the accuracy of soil moisture retrievals. In this communication the influence of vegetation cover is investigated and a retrieval technique based on multipolarized C band SAR observations is proposed. With this aim a dedicated field campaign was carried out in La Tejería watershed (north of Spain) from January to August 2010. Eight RADARSAT-2 Fine-Quadpol scenes were acquired in order to investigate the role of vegetation cover on the retrieval of soil moisture, as well as the sensitivity of different polarimetric parameters to vegetation cover condition. Coinciding with image acquisitions soil moisture, plant density and crop height measurements were acquired in eight control fields (cultivated with barley and wheat crops). The sensitivity of backscatter coefficients (in HH, HV and VV polarizations) and backscatter ratios (p=HH/VV and q=HV/VV) to soil moisture and crop condition were evaluated and the semi-empirical Water Cloud Model was fitted to the observations. The results obtained showed that the contribution of the cereal vegetation cover was minimal in HH and HV polarizations, whereas the VV channel appeared to be significantly attenuated by the cereal cover, so its value decreased as the crops grew. As a result, the ratios p and q showed a very good

  16. Gold Nanobipyramid-Directed Growth of Length-Variable Silver Nanorods with Multipolar Plasmon Resonances.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaolu; Zhu, Xingzhong; Li, Qian; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Jianfang

    2015-07-28

    We report on a method for the preparation of uniform and length-variable Ag nanorods through anisotropic Ag overgrowth on high-purity Au nanobipyramids. The rod diameters can be roughly tailored from ∼20 nm to ∼50 nm by judicious selection of differently sized Au nanobipyramids. The rod lengths can be tuned from ∼150 nm to ∼550 nm by varying the Ag precursor amount during the overgrowth process and/or by anisotropic shortening through mild oxidation. The controllable aspect ratios, high purity, and high dimensional uniformity of these Ag nanorods enable the observation of Fabry-Pérot-like multipolar plasmon resonance modes in the colloidal suspensions at the ensemble level, which has so far been demonstrated only on Au nanorods prepared electrochemically with anodic aluminum oxide templates. Depending on the mode order and geometry of the Ag nanorods, the multipolar plasmon wavelengths can be readily tailored over a wide spectral range from the visible to near-infrared region. We have further elucidated the relationships between the multipolar plasmon wavelengths and the geometric dimensions of the Ag nanorods at both the ensemble and single-particle levels. Our results indicate that the Au nanobipyramid-directed, dimensionally controllable Ag nanorods will be an attractive and promising candidate for developing multipolar plasmon-based devices and applications.

  17. Connexin 43 controls the multipolar phase of neuronal migration to the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuxin; Sun, Lin; Torii, Masaaki; Rakic, Pasko

    2012-05-22

    The prospective pyramidal neurons, migrating from the proliferative ventricular zone to the overlaying cortical plate, assume multipolar morphology while passing through the transient subventricular zone. Here, we show that this morphogenetic transformation, from the bipolar to the mutipolar and then back to bipolar again, is associated with expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) and, that knockdown of Cx43 retards, whereas its overexpression enhances, this morphogenetic process. In addition, we have observed that knockdown of Cx43 reduces expression of p27, whereas overexpression of p27 rescues the effect of Cx43 knockdown in the multipolar neurons. Furthermore, functional gap junction/hemichannel domain, and the C-terminal domain of Cx43, independently enhance the expression of p27 and promote the morphological transformation and migration of the multipolar neurons in the SVZ/IZ. Collectively, these results indicate that Cx43 regulates the passage of migrating neurons through their multipolar stage via p27 signaling and that interference with this process, by either genetic and/or environmental factors, may cause cortical malformations. PMID:22566616

  18. Gold Nanobipyramid-Directed Growth of Length-Variable Silver Nanorods with Multipolar Plasmon Resonances.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaolu; Zhu, Xingzhong; Li, Qian; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Jianfang

    2015-07-28

    We report on a method for the preparation of uniform and length-variable Ag nanorods through anisotropic Ag overgrowth on high-purity Au nanobipyramids. The rod diameters can be roughly tailored from ∼20 nm to ∼50 nm by judicious selection of differently sized Au nanobipyramids. The rod lengths can be tuned from ∼150 nm to ∼550 nm by varying the Ag precursor amount during the overgrowth process and/or by anisotropic shortening through mild oxidation. The controllable aspect ratios, high purity, and high dimensional uniformity of these Ag nanorods enable the observation of Fabry-Pérot-like multipolar plasmon resonance modes in the colloidal suspensions at the ensemble level, which has so far been demonstrated only on Au nanorods prepared electrochemically with anodic aluminum oxide templates. Depending on the mode order and geometry of the Ag nanorods, the multipolar plasmon wavelengths can be readily tailored over a wide spectral range from the visible to near-infrared region. We have further elucidated the relationships between the multipolar plasmon wavelengths and the geometric dimensions of the Ag nanorods at both the ensemble and single-particle levels. Our results indicate that the Au nanobipyramid-directed, dimensionally controllable Ag nanorods will be an attractive and promising candidate for developing multipolar plasmon-based devices and applications. PMID:26135608

  19. A Novel, Computationally Efficient Multipolar Model Employing Distributed Charges for Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Devereux, Mike; Raghunathan, Shampa; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-10-14

    A truncated multipole expansion can be re-expressed exactly using an appropriate arrangement of point charges. This means that groups of point charges that are shifted away from nuclear coordinates can be used to achieve accurate electrostatics for molecular systems. We introduce a multipolar electrostatic model formulated in this way for use in computationally efficient multipolar molecular dynamics simulations with well-defined forces and energy conservation in NVE (constant number-volume-energy) simulations. A framework is introduced to distribute torques arising from multipole moments throughout a molecule, and a refined fitting approach is suggested to obtain atomic multipole moments that are optimized for accuracy and numerical stability in a force field context. The formulation of the charge model is outlined as it has been implemented into CHARMM, with application to test systems involving H2O and chlorobenzene. As well as ease of implementation and computational efficiency, the approach can be used to provide snapshots for multipolar QM/MM calculations in QM/MM-MD studies and easily combined with a standard point-charge force field to allow mixed multipolar/point charge simulations of large systems. PMID:26588121

  20. Distinctions in growth cone morphology and motility between monopolar and multipolar neurons in Drosophila CNS cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y T; Wu, C F

    1991-04-01

    Growth cones play a central role in determining neurite extension, pathfinding and branching, and in establishing synaptic connections. This paper describes an initial characterization of growth cone morphology and behavior in dissociated larval central nervous system (CNS) cultures of Drosophila. Contrast-enhanced video images of growth cones in monopolar and multipolar neurons were characterized by employing morphometric parameters such as the number and length of filopodia, and the area and roundness of the lamellipodia. Behavior of growth cones was analyzed by a motility index and boundary flow plots originally devised for measuring motility in other cellular systems. We found that separate CNS regions yielded cultures of different major cell types with distinct neuritic patterns that could be correlated with the morphology and motility of the associated growth cones. Monopolar neurons were the major cell type in brain cultures, whereas multipolar neurons were predominant in ventral ganglion cultures. Moreover, the growth cones of monopolar neurons, which are likely to be associated with the axonal processes, differed from those of multipolar neurons, which might be related to dendritic terminals. Growth cones in monopolar neurons had larger lamellipodia of less erratic shape accompanied by fewer and shorter filopodia, and, when active, displayed much higher motility and less directionality in motion. Alternatively, these morphological and behavioral distinctions between monopolar and multipolar neurons may result from intrinsic differences in membrane adhesion and intracellular transport properties.

  1. Connexin 43 controls the multipolar phase of neuronal migration to the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuxin; Sun, Lin; Torii, Masaaki; Rakic, Pasko

    2012-05-22

    The prospective pyramidal neurons, migrating from the proliferative ventricular zone to the overlaying cortical plate, assume multipolar morphology while passing through the transient subventricular zone. Here, we show that this morphogenetic transformation, from the bipolar to the mutipolar and then back to bipolar again, is associated with expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) and, that knockdown of Cx43 retards, whereas its overexpression enhances, this morphogenetic process. In addition, we have observed that knockdown of Cx43 reduces expression of p27, whereas overexpression of p27 rescues the effect of Cx43 knockdown in the multipolar neurons. Furthermore, functional gap junction/hemichannel domain, and the C-terminal domain of Cx43, independently enhance the expression of p27 and promote the morphological transformation and migration of the multipolar neurons in the SVZ/IZ. Collectively, these results indicate that Cx43 regulates the passage of migrating neurons through their multipolar stage via p27 signaling and that interference with this process, by either genetic and/or environmental factors, may cause cortical malformations.

  2. Spherical tensor multipolar electrostatics and smooth particle mesh Ewald summation: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, François; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-07-01

    The point-charge approximation, typically used by classical molecular mechanics force-fields, can be overcome by a multipolar expansion. For decades multipole moments were only used in the context of the rigid body approximation but recently it has become possible to combine multipolar electrostatics with molecular flexibility. The program DL_MULTI, which is derived from DL_POLY_2, includes efficient multipolar Ewald functionality up to the hexadecapole moment but the code is restricted to rigid bodies. The incorporation of flexibility into DL_MULTI would cause too large an impact on its architecture whereas the package DL_POLY_4 offers a more attractive and sustainable route to handle multipolar electrostatics. This package inherently handles molecular flexibility, which warrants sufficiently transferable atoms or atoms that are "knowledgeable" about their chemical environment (as made possible by quantum chemical topology and machine learning). DL_MULTI uses the spherical multipole formalism, which is mathematically more involved than the Cartesian one but which is more compact. DL_POLY_4 uses the computationally efficient method of smooth particle mesh Ewald (SPME) summation, which has also been parallellized by others. Therefore, combining the strengths of DL_POLY_4 and DL_MULTI poses the challenge of merging SPME with multipolar electrostatics by spherical multipole. In an effort to recast as clearly as possible the principles behind DL_MULTI, its key equations have been reformulated by the more streamlined route involving the algebra of complex numbers, and some of these equations' peculiarities clarified. This article explores theoretically the repercussions of the merging of SPME with spherical multipole electrostatics (as implemented in DL_MULTI). Difficulties in design and implementation of possible future code are discussed.

  3. Hubble space telescope observations and geometric models of compact multipolar planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chau, Wayne; Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun E-mail: wwlljj1314@gmail.com E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2014-05-20

    We report high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations of 10 compact planetary nebulae (PNs). Many interesting internal structures, including multipolar lobes, arcs, two-dimensional rings, tori, and halos, are revealed for the first time. These results suggest that multipolar structures are common among PNs, and these structures develop early in their evolution. From three-dimensional geometric models, we have determined the intrinsic dimensions of the lobes. Assuming the lobes are the result of interactions between later-developed fast winds and previously ejected asymptotic giant branch winds, the geometric structures of these PNs suggest that there are multiple phases of fast winds separated by temporal variations and/or directional changes. A scenario of evolution from lobe-dominated to cavity-dominated stages is presented. The results reported here will provide serious constraints on any dynamical models of PNs.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Observations and Geometric Models of Compact Multipolar Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chau, Wayne; Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun

    2014-05-01

    We report high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations of 10 compact planetary nebulae (PNs). Many interesting internal structures, including multipolar lobes, arcs, two-dimensional rings, tori, and halos, are revealed for the first time. These results suggest that multipolar structures are common among PNs, and these structures develop early in their evolution. From three-dimensional geometric models, we have determined the intrinsic dimensions of the lobes. Assuming the lobes are the result of interactions between later-developed fast winds and previously ejected asymptotic giant branch winds, the geometric structures of these PNs suggest that there are multiple phases of fast winds separated by temporal variations and/or directional changes. A scenario of evolution from lobe-dominated to cavity-dominated stages is presented. The results reported here will provide serious constraints on any dynamical models of PNs.

  5. Wnt signaling regulates multipolar-to-bipolar transition of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Boitard, Michael; Bocchi, Riccardo; Egervari, Kristof; Petrenko, Volodymyr; Viale, Beatrice; Gremaud, Stéphane; Zgraggen, Eloisa; Salmon, Patrick; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2015-03-01

    The precise timing of pyramidal cell migration from the ventricular germinal zone to the cortical plate is essential for establishing cortical layers, and migration errors can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders underlying psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here, we report that Wnt canonical as well as non-canonical signaling is active in pyramidal precursors during radial migration. We demonstrate using constitutive and conditional genetic strategies that transient downregulation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during the multipolar stage plays a critical role in polarizing and orienting cells for radial migration. In addition, we show that reduced canonical Wnt signaling is triggered cell autonomously by time-dependent expression of Wnt5A and activation of non-canonical signaling. We identify ephrin-B1 as a canonical Wnt-signaling-regulated target in control of the multipolar-to-bipolar switch. These findings highlight the critical role of Wnt signaling activity in neuronal positioning during cortical development. PMID:25732825

  6. Wnt signaling regulates multipolar-to-bipolar transition of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Boitard, Michael; Bocchi, Riccardo; Egervari, Kristof; Petrenko, Volodymyr; Viale, Beatrice; Gremaud, Stéphane; Zgraggen, Eloisa; Salmon, Patrick; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2015-03-01

    The precise timing of pyramidal cell migration from the ventricular germinal zone to the cortical plate is essential for establishing cortical layers, and migration errors can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders underlying psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here, we report that Wnt canonical as well as non-canonical signaling is active in pyramidal precursors during radial migration. We demonstrate using constitutive and conditional genetic strategies that transient downregulation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during the multipolar stage plays a critical role in polarizing and orienting cells for radial migration. In addition, we show that reduced canonical Wnt signaling is triggered cell autonomously by time-dependent expression of Wnt5A and activation of non-canonical signaling. We identify ephrin-B1 as a canonical Wnt-signaling-regulated target in control of the multipolar-to-bipolar switch. These findings highlight the critical role of Wnt signaling activity in neuronal positioning during cortical development.

  7. Multipolar tensor analysis of second-order nonlinear optical response of surface and bulk of glass.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisco J; Wang, Fu X; Canfield, Brian K; Cattaneo, Stefano; Kauranen, Martti

    2007-07-01

    We use two-beam second-harmonic generation to perform a quantitative tensor analysis of the effective dipolar surface nonlinearity and the separable multipolar bulk nonlinearity for BK7 glass. The most straightforward, self-consistent interpretation of the results is obtained when the effective surface response is assumed to have approximate Kleinman symmetry and the bulk contribution is dominated by magnetic, rather than quadrupole, effects.

  8. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. I. Fully and partially open eruptions of flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-04-01

    We propose a catastrophic eruption model for the enormous energy release of magnetars during giant flares, in which a toroidal and helically twisted flux rope is embedded within a force-free magnetosphere. The flux rope stays in stable equilibrium states initially and evolves quasi-statically. Upon the loss of equilibrium, the flux rope cannot sustain the stable equilibrium states and erupts catastrophically. During the process, the magnetic energy stored in the magnetosphere is rapidly released as the result of destabilization of global magnetic topology. The magnetospheric energy that could be accumulated is of vital importance for the outbursts of magnetars. We carefully establish the fully open fields and partially open fields for various boundary conditions at the magnetar surface and study the relevant energy thresholds. By investigating the magnetic energy accumulated at the critical catastrophic point, we find that it is possible to drive fully open eruptions for dipole-dominated background fields. Nevertheless, it is hard to generate fully open magnetic eruptions for multipolar background fields. Given the observational importance of the multipolar magnetic fields in the vicinity of the magnetar surface, it would be worthwhile to explore the possibility of the alternative eruption approach in multipolar background fields. Fortunately, we find that flux ropes may give rise to partially open eruptions in the multipolar fields, which involve only partial opening of background fields. The energy release fractions are greater for cases with central-arcaded multipoles than those with central-caved multipoles that emerged in background fields. Eruptions would fail only when the centrally caved multipoles become extremely strong.

  9. Force-balance model of suppression of multipolar division in cancer cells with extra centrosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie

    2013-03-01

    Cancer cells often possess extra centrosomes which have the potential to cause cell death due to catastrophic multipolar division. Many cancer cells, however, are able to escape multipolar mitosis by clustering the extra centrosomes to form bipolar spindles. The mechanism of centrosome clustering is therefore of great interest to the development of anti-cancer drugs because the de-clustering of extra centrosomes provides an appealing way to eliminate cancer cells while keeping healthy cells intact. We present a physical model assuming 1) dynamic centrosomal microtubules interact with chromosomes by both pushing on chromosome arms and pulling along kinetochores; 2) these microtubules interact with force generators associated with actin/adhesion structures at the cell boundary; and 3) motors act on anti-parallel microtubules from different centrosomes. We find via computer simulations that chromosomes tend to aggregate near the cell center while centrosomes can be either clustered to form bipolar spindles or scattered to form multipolar spindles, depending on the strengths of relative forces, cell shape and adhesion geometry. The model predictions agree with data from cells plated on adhesive micropatterns and from biochemically or genetically perturbed cells. Furthermore, our model is able to explain various microtubule distributions in interphase cells on patterned substrates. This work was supported by NSF

  10. Multipolar Effects in the Optical Active Second Harmonic Generation from Sawtooth Chiral Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huimin; Guo, Yuxiang; Gao, Wensheng; Ma, Jie; Zhong, Yongchun; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C. T.; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-01-01

    Based on the facts that chiral molecules response differently to left- and right-handed circular polarized light, chiroptical effects are widely employed for determining structure chirality, detecting enantiomeric excess, or controlling chemical reactions of molecules. Compared to those in natural materials, chiroptical behaviors can be significantly amplified in chiral plasmonic metamaterials due to the concentrated local fields in the structure. The on-going research towards giant chiroptical effects in metamaterial generally focus on optimizing the field-enhancement effects. However, the observed chiroptical effects in metamaterials rely on more complicated factors and various possibilities towards giant chiroptical effects remains unexplored. Here we study the optical-active second harmonic generation (SHG) behaviors in a pair of planar sawtooth gratings with mirror-imaged patterns. Significant multipolar effects were observed in the polarization-dependent SHG curves. We show that the chirality of the nanostructure not only give rise to nonzero chiral susceptibility tensor components within the electric-dipole approximation, but also lead to different levels of multipolar interactions for the two orthogonal circular polarizations that further enhance the nonlinear optical activity of the material. Our results thus indicate novel ways to optimize nonlinear plasmonic structures and achieve giant chiroptical response via multipolar interactions. PMID:26911449

  11. Multipolar Effects in the Optical Active Second Harmonic Generation from Sawtooth Chiral Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Su, Huimin; Guo, Yuxiang; Gao, Wensheng; Ma, Jie; Zhong, Yongchun; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-02-25

    Based on the facts that chiral molecules response differently to left- and right-handed circular polarized light, chiroptical effects are widely employed for determining structure chirality, detecting enantiomeric excess, or controlling chemical reactions of molecules. Compared to those in natural materials, chiroptical behaviors can be significantly amplified in chiral plasmonic metamaterials due to the concentrated local fields in the structure. The on-going research towards giant chiroptical effects in metamaterial generally focus on optimizing the field-enhancement effects. However, the observed chiroptical effects in metamaterials rely on more complicated factors and various possibilities towards giant chiroptical effects remains unexplored. Here we study the optical-active second harmonic generation (SHG) behaviors in a pair of planar sawtooth gratings with mirror-imaged patterns. Significant multipolar effects were observed in the polarization-dependent SHG curves. We show that the chirality of the nanostructure not only give rise to nonzero chiral susceptibility tensor components within the electric-dipole approximation, but also lead to different levels of multipolar interactions for the two orthogonal circular polarizations that further enhance the nonlinear optical activity of the material. Our results thus indicate novel ways to optimize nonlinear plasmonic structures and achieve giant chiroptical response via multipolar interactions.

  12. Phosphorylation of SCG10/stathmin-2 determines multipolar stage exit and neuronal migration rate.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Nina; Zdrojewska, Justyna; Padzik, Artur; Komulainen, Emilia; Björkblom, Benny; Rannikko, Emmy; Tararuk, Tanya; Garcia-Frigola, Cristina; Sandholm, Jouko; Nguyen, Laurent; Kallunki, Tuula; Courtney, Michael J; Coffey, Eleanor T

    2011-03-01

    Cell migration is the consequence of the sum of positive and negative regulatory mechanisms. Although appropriate migration of neurons is a principal feature of brain development, the negative regulatory mechanisms remain obscure. We found that JNK1 was highly active in developing cortex and that selective inhibition of JNK in the cytoplasm markedly increased both the frequency of exit from the multipolar stage and radial migration rate and ultimately led to an ill-defined cellular organization. Moreover, regulation of multipolar-stage exit and radial migration in Jnk1(-/-) (also known as Mapk8) mice, resulted from consequential changes in phosphorylation of the microtubule regulator SCG10 (also called stathmin-2). Expression of an SCG10 mutant that mimics the JNK1-phosphorylated form restored normal migration in the brains of Jnk1(-/-) mouse embryos. These findings indicate that the phosphorylation of SCG10 by JNK1 is a fundamental mechanism that governs the transition from the multipolar stage and the rate of neuronal cell movement during cortical development.

  13. RP58 regulates the multipolar-bipolar transition of newborn neurons in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Hirai, Shinobu; Miwa, Akiko; Heng, Julian Ik-Tsen; Shitara, Hiroshi; Ishii, Rie; Taya, Choji; Kawano, Hitoshi; Kasai, Masataka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Okado, Haruo

    2013-02-21

    Accumulating evidence suggests that many brain diseases are associated with defects in neuronal migration, suggesting that this step of neurogenesis is critical for brain organization. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal migration remain largely unknown. Here, we identified the zinc-finger transcriptional repressor RP58 as a key regulator of neuronal migration via multipolar-to-bipolar transition. RP58(-/-) neurons exhibited severe defects in the formation of leading processes and never shifted to the locomotion mode. Cre-mediated deletion of RP58 using in utero electroporation in RP58(flox/flox) mice revealed that RP58 functions in cell-autonomous multipolar-to-bipolar transition, independent of cell-cycle exit. Finally, we found that RP58 represses Ngn2 transcription to regulate the Ngn2-Rnd2 pathway; Ngn2 knockdown rescued migration defects of the RP58(-/-) neurons. Our findings highlight the critical role of RP58 in multipolar-to-bipolar transition via suppression of the Ngn2-Rnd2 pathway in the developing cerebral cortex.

  14. Rational Design of Orthogonal Multipolar Interactions with Fluorine in Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Jonathan; Borkin, Dmitry; Lund, George; Purohit, Trupta; Dyguda-Kazimierowicz, Edyta; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-09-24

    Multipolar interactions involving fluorine and the protein backbone have been frequently observed in protein-ligand complexes. Such fluorine-backbone interactions may substantially contribute to the high affinity of small molecule inhibitors. Here we found that introduction of trifluoromethyl groups into two different sites in the thienopyrimidine class of menin-MLL inhibitors considerably improved their inhibitory activity. In both cases, trifluoromethyl groups are engaged in short interactions with the backbone of menin. In order to understand the effect of fluorine, we synthesized a series of analogues by systematically changing the number of fluorine atoms, and we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the complexes with menin. We found that introduction of fluorine at favorable geometry for interactions with backbone carbonyls may improve the activity of menin-MLL inhibitors as much as 5- to 10-fold. In order to facilitate the design of multipolar fluorine-backbone interactions in protein-ligand complexes, we developed a computational algorithm named FMAP, which calculates fluorophilic sites in proximity to the protein backbone. We demonstrated that FMAP could be used to rationalize improvement in the activity of known protein inhibitors upon introduction of fluorine. Furthermore, FMAP may also represent a valuable tool for designing new fluorine substitutions and support ligand optimization in drug discovery projects. Analysis of the menin-MLL inhibitor complexes revealed that the backbone in secondary structures is particularly accessible to the interactions with fluorine. Considering that secondary structure elements are frequently exposed at protein interfaces, we postulate that multipolar fluorine-backbone interactions may represent a particularly attractive approach to improve inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  15. Post-Newtonian factorized multipolar waveforms for spinning, nonprecessing black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Buonanno, Alessandra; Fujita, Ryuichi; Racine, Etienne; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2011-03-01

    We generalize the factorized resummation of multipolar waveforms introduced by Damour, Iyer, and Nagar to spinning black holes. For a nonspinning test particle spiraling a Kerr black hole in the equatorial plane, we find that factorized multipolar amplitudes which replace the residual relativistic amplitude fℓm with its ℓth root, ρℓm=fℓm1/ℓ, agree quite well with the numerical amplitudes up to the Kerr-spin value q≤0.95 for orbital velocities v≤0.4. The numerical amplitudes are computed solving the Teukolsky equation with a spectral code. The agreement for prograde orbits and large spin values of the Kerr black-hole can be further improved at high velocities by properly factoring out the lower-order post-Newtonian contributions in ρℓm. The resummation procedure results in a better and systematic agreement between numerical and analytical amplitudes (and energy fluxes) than standard Taylor-expanded post-Newtonian approximants. This is particularly true for higher-order modes, such as (2,1), (3,3), (3,2), and (4,4), for which less spin post-Newtonian terms are known. We also extend the factorized resummation of multipolar amplitudes to generic mass-ratio, nonprecessing, spinning black holes. Lastly, in our study we employ new, recently computed, higher-order post-Newtonian terms in several subdominant modes and compute explicit expressions for the half and one-and-half post-Newtonian contributions to the odd-parity (current) and even-parity (odd) multipoles, respectively. Those results can be used to build more accurate templates for ground-based and space-based gravitational-wave detectors.

  16. Rational Design of Orthogonal Multipolar Interactions with Fluorine in Protein–Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multipolar interactions involving fluorine and the protein backbone have been frequently observed in protein–ligand complexes. Such fluorine–backbone interactions may substantially contribute to the high affinity of small molecule inhibitors. Here we found that introduction of trifluoromethyl groups into two different sites in the thienopyrimidine class of menin–MLL inhibitors considerably improved their inhibitory activity. In both cases, trifluoromethyl groups are engaged in short interactions with the backbone of menin. In order to understand the effect of fluorine, we synthesized a series of analogues by systematically changing the number of fluorine atoms, and we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the complexes with menin. We found that introduction of fluorine at favorable geometry for interactions with backbone carbonyls may improve the activity of menin–MLL inhibitors as much as 5- to 10-fold. In order to facilitate the design of multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions in protein–ligand complexes, we developed a computational algorithm named FMAP, which calculates fluorophilic sites in proximity to the protein backbone. We demonstrated that FMAP could be used to rationalize improvement in the activity of known protein inhibitors upon introduction of fluorine. Furthermore, FMAP may also represent a valuable tool for designing new fluorine substitutions and support ligand optimization in drug discovery projects. Analysis of the menin–MLL inhibitor complexes revealed that the backbone in secondary structures is particularly accessible to the interactions with fluorine. Considering that secondary structure elements are frequently exposed at protein interfaces, we postulate that multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions may represent a particularly attractive approach to improve inhibitors of protein–protein interactions. PMID:26288158

  17. Post-Newtonian factorized multipolar waveforms for spinning, nonprecessing black-hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yi; Buonanno, Alessandra; Racine, Etienne; Fujita, Ryuichi; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2011-03-15

    We generalize the factorized resummation of multipolar waveforms introduced by Damour, Iyer, and Nagar to spinning black holes. For a nonspinning test particle spiraling a Kerr black hole in the equatorial plane, we find that factorized multipolar amplitudes which replace the residual relativistic amplitude f{sub lm} with its lth root, {rho}{sub lm}=f{sub lm}{sup 1/l}, agree quite well with the numerical amplitudes up to the Kerr-spin value q{<=}0.95 for orbital velocities v{<=}0.4. The numerical amplitudes are computed solving the Teukolsky equation with a spectral code. The agreement for prograde orbits and large spin values of the Kerr black-hole can be further improved at high velocities by properly factoring out the lower-order post-Newtonian contributions in {rho}{sub lm}. The resummation procedure results in a better and systematic agreement between numerical and analytical amplitudes (and energy fluxes) than standard Taylor-expanded post-Newtonian approximants. This is particularly true for higher-order modes, such as (2,1), (3,3), (3,2), and (4,4), for which less spin post-Newtonian terms are known. We also extend the factorized resummation of multipolar amplitudes to generic mass-ratio, nonprecessing, spinning black holes. Lastly, in our study we employ new, recently computed, higher-order post-Newtonian terms in several subdominant modes and compute explicit expressions for the half and one-and-half post-Newtonian contributions to the odd-parity (current) and even-parity (odd) multipoles, respectively. Those results can be used to build more accurate templates for ground-based and space-based gravitational-wave detectors.

  18. Optical Photometry of BY Cam Modeled Using a Multipolar Magnetic Field Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, John; Mason, P. A.; Zhilkin, A.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Robinson, E. L.

    2014-01-01

    We present new high-speed broad-band optical photometry of the asynchronous polar (magnetic cataclysmic variable) BY Cam. Observations were obtained at the 2.1-m Otto Struve Telescope of McDonald observatory with 3s integration times. In an attempt to understand the complex changes in accretion flow geometry, we performed full 3D MHD simulations assuming a variety of white dwarf magnetic field structures including both aligned and non-aligned dipole plus quadrupole field components. We compare model predictions with photometry and various phases of the beat cycle and find that synthetic light curves derived from a multipolar field structure are consistent with the optical photometry.

  19. DISCOVERY OF A MULTIPOLAR STRUCTURE WITH AN EQUATORIAL DISK IN NGC 6072

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Sun; Chong, Sze-Ning; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Zhang Yong; Koning, Nico

    2010-01-01

    From near-infrared and molecular hydrogen imaging observations, we have discovered that the planetary nebula NGC 6072 has a multipolar structure with a prominent equatorial ring. We have modeled the object by a double bipolar system, each with an equatorial ring and a pair of bipolar lobes. The bipolar axes of the two systems are estimated to be separated by 47 deg. The existence of such a double bipolar system suggests that the object has undergone separate fast outflow episodes separated by several thousand years.

  20. MEG (Magnetoencephalography) multipolar modeling of distributed sources using RAP-MUSIC (Recursively Applied and Projected Multiple Signal Characterization)

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J. C.; Baillet, S.; Jerbi, K.; Leahy, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the use of truncated multipolar expansions for producing dynamic images of cortical neural activation from measurements of the magnetoencephalogram. We use a signal-subspace method to find the locations of a set of multipolar sources, each of which represents a region of activity in the cerebral cortex. Our method builds up an estimate of the sources in a recursive manner, i.e. we first search for point current dipoles, then magnetic dipoles, and finally first order multipoles. The dynamic behavior of these sources is then computed using a linear fit to the spatiotemporal data. The final step in the procedure is to map each of the multipolar sources into an equivalent distributed source on the cortical surface. The method is illustrated through an application to epileptic interictal MEG data.

  1. Ocean surface slick characterization by multi-polarization Radarsat-2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrunes, Stine; Brekke, Camilla; Eltoft, Torbjørn

    2012-09-01

    Marine oil spills are an important environmental problem, and satellite SAR remote sensing have become a valuable tool for the detection and monitoring of these spills. Natural phenomena with similar appearance as oil in SAR images, producing false detections, compose a challenge for oil spill observation services. One such lookalike phenomena is biogenic slicks produced by marine organisms. In this study we evaluate multi-polarization features for oil spill characterization and oil versus biogenic slick discrimination. During large-scale oil-on-water exercises conducted in the North Sea in June 2011 and June 2012, both mineral oil and plant oil were released and imaged by Radarsat-2 in Fine Quad-polarization mode. The plant oil will form a lm resembling biogenic slicks. The mineral oil spill and simulated look-alike are in this study compared based on multi-polarization features, combining the information in HH and VV channels. The polarimetric measurements from 2011 have earlier been analysed, and a potential for discrimination between mineral oil and biogenic slicks is found. The aim of the current study is to repeat the polarimetric analysis on the new independent data set from 2012. Preliminary results of the 2012 data set reveal both internal and between slick type variations, giving support to our previous findings from 2011.

  2. An axosomatic and axodendritic multipolar neuron in the lizard cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, A; Martinez-Guijarro, F J; de la Iglesia, J A; Lopez-Garcia, C

    1994-06-01

    The morphology and synaptic organisation of a type of multipolar neuron of the lizard cerebral cortex were studied by Golgi impregnation, intracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase, electron microscopy, and immunocytochemistry. It is a GABA-immunoreactive interneuron and most likely parvalbumin-immunoreactive. Its conspicuous axonal arbor is characterised by an initial segment arising from the soma or from a juxtasomatic dendritic segment. The initial axon segment ramifies and gives rise to thick myelinated segments that terminate in short unmyelinated branches studded with thick boutons 'en passant' that (1) make axosomatic synapses on bipyramidal neuronal somata and (2) synapse on initial apical dendritic segments of bipyramidal neurons forming climbing-like cartridges. The dendrites extend throughout the thickness of the cortex, receiving synaptic input from a variety of sources of which the most prominent is that of zinc-positive boutons coming from granule cells of the medial cortex. According to its synaptology, this interneuron may play a role in regulating the activity of bipyramidal neurons by both feed-forward and feed-back inhibition mechanisms. From a comparative standpoint, it may be related to the sparsely spiny or nonspiny multipolar neurons of the stratum oriens of the mammalian hippocampus.

  3. Multipolarization P-, L-, and C-band radar for coastal zone mapping - The Louisiana example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shih-Tseng

    1989-01-01

    Multipolarization P-, L-, and C-band airborne SAR data sets were acquired over a coastal zone and a forested wetland of southern Louisiana. The data sets were used with field-collected surface-parameter data in order to determine the value of SAR systems in assessing and mapping coastal-zone surface features. The coastal-zone surface features in this study are sediments, sediment distribution, and the formation of new isles and banks. Results of the data analysis indicate that the P-band radar with 68-cm wavelength is capable of detecting the submerged sediment if the area is very shallow (i.e., a water depth of less than one meter). The penetration capability of P-band radar is also demonstrated in the forested wetland area. The composition and condition of the ground surface can be detected, as well as the standing water beneath dense tree leaves.

  4. LICHEM: A QM/MM program for simulations with multipolar and polarizable force fields.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Eric G; Walker, Alice R; Lagardère, Louis; Lipparini, Filippo; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Andrés Cisneros, G

    2016-04-30

    We introduce an initial implementation of the LICHEM software package. LICHEM can interface with Gaussian, PSI4, NWChem, TINKER, and TINKER-HP to enable QM/MM calculations using multipolar/polarizable force fields. LICHEM extracts forces and energies from unmodified QM and MM software packages to perform geometry optimizations, single-point energy calculations, or Monte Carlo simulations. When the QM and MM regions are connected by covalent bonds, the pseudo-bond approach is employed to smoothly transition between the QM region and the polarizable force field. A series of water clusters and small peptides have been employed to test our initial implementation. The results obtained from these test systems show the capabilities of the new software and highlight the importance of including explicit polarization. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26781073

  5. Comparisons of wind speed retrieval methods on C-band multi-polarization SAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Juan; Wang, Difeng

    2014-10-01

    This paper compares the wind speed retrieval methods on C-band multi-polarization SAR measurements to find out the most appropriate one for each polarization data. The RADARSAT-2 SAR quad-polarization (VV+HH+VH+HV) data and NDBC buoy wind data were collocated. For VVpolarization, the retrieved wind speed are compared among four geophysical model function (GMF). For HH polarization, the retrieved wind speed are compared among four polarization ratio model (PR) based on CMOD5 GMF. For VH polarization, the retrieved wind speed are compared between two linear models. Comparisons show all of three polarimetric SAR data have the ability of retrieving wind speed. Based on the error analysis, the commendatory methods are proposed for each polarization.

  6. Estimation of Soil Moisture with L-band Multi-polarization Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, J.; Chen, K. S.; Kim, Chung-Li Y.; Van Zyl, J. J.; Njoku, E.; Sun, G.; O'Neill, P.; Jackson, T.; Entekhabi, D.

    2004-01-01

    Through analyses of the model simulated data-base, we developed a technique to estimate surface soil moisture under HYDROS radar sensor (L-band multi-polarizations and 40deg incidence) configuration. This technique includes two steps. First, it decomposes the total backscattering signals into two components - the surface scattering components (the bare surface backscattering signals attenuated by the overlaying vegetation layer) and the sum of the direct volume scattering components and surface-volume interaction components at different polarizations. From the model simulated data-base, our decomposition technique works quit well in estimation of the surface scattering components with RMSEs of 0.12,0.25, and 0.55 dB for VV, HH, and VH polarizations, respectively. Then, we use the decomposed surface backscattering signals to estimate the soil moisture and the combined surface roughness and vegetation attenuation correction factors with all three polarizations.

  7. Distributed Multipolar Expansion Approach to Calculation of Excitation Energy Transfer Couplings.

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Maj, Michał; Cho, Minhaeng; Góra, Robert W

    2015-07-14

    We propose a new approach for estimating the electrostatic part of the excitation energy transfer (EET) coupling between electronically excited chromophores based on the transition density-derived cumulative atomic multipole moments (TrCAMM). In this approach, the transition potential of a chromophore is expressed in terms of truncated distributed multipolar expansion and analytical formulas for the TrCAMMs are derived. The accuracy and computational feasibility of the proposed approach is tested against the exact Coulombic couplings, and various multipole expansion truncation schemes are analyzed. The results of preliminary calculations show that the TrCAMM approach is capable of reproducing the exact Coulombic EET couplings accurately and efficiently and is superior to other widely used schemes: the transition charges from electrostatic potential (TrESP) and the transition density cube (TDC) method.

  8. Nesting-driven multipolar order in CeB6 from photoemission tomography.

    PubMed

    Koitzsch, A; Heming, N; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Portnichenko, P Y; Dukhnenko, A V; Shitsevalova, N Y; Filipov, V B; Lev, L L; Strocov, V N; Ollivier, J; Inosov, D S

    2016-01-01

    Some heavy fermion materials show so-called hidden-order phases which are invisible to many characterization techniques and whose microscopic origin remained controversial for decades. Among such hidden-order compounds, CeB6 is of model character due to its simple electronic configuration and crystal structure. Apart from more conventional antiferromagnetism, it shows an elusive phase at low temperatures, which is commonly associated with multipolar order. Here we show that this phase roots in a Fermi surface instability. This conclusion is based on a full 3D tomographic sampling of the electronic structure by angle-resolved photoemission and comparison with inelastic neutron scattering data. The hidden order is mediated by itinerant electrons. Our measurements will serve as a paradigm for the investigation of hidden-order phases in f-electron systems, but also generally for situations where the itinerant electrons drive orbital or spin order. PMID:26976632

  9. Output of acoustical sources. [effects of structural elements and background flow on immobile multipolar point radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic radiation from a source, here viewed as an immobile point singularity with periodic strength and a given multipolar nature, is affected by the presence of nearly structural elements (e.g., rigid or impedance surfaces) as well as that of a background flow in the medium. An alternative to the conventional manner of calculating the net source output by integrating the energy flux over a distant control surface is described; this involves a direct evaluation of the secondary wavefunction at the position of the primary source and obviates the need for a (prospectively difficult) flux integration. Various full and half-planar surface configurations with an adjacent source are analyzed in detail, and the explicit results obtained, in particular, for the power factor of a dipole brings out a substantial rise in its output as the source nears the sharp edge of a half-plane.

  10. Nesting-driven multipolar order in CeB6 from photoemission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koitzsch, A.; Heming, N.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Portnichenko, P. Y.; Dukhnenko, A. V; Shitsevalova, N. Y.; Filipov, V. B.; Lev, L. L.; Strocov, V. N.; Ollivier, J.; Inosov, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Some heavy fermion materials show so-called hidden-order phases which are invisible to many characterization techniques and whose microscopic origin remained controversial for decades. Among such hidden-order compounds, CeB6 is of model character due to its simple electronic configuration and crystal structure. Apart from more conventional antiferromagnetism, it shows an elusive phase at low temperatures, which is commonly associated with multipolar order. Here we show that this phase roots in a Fermi surface instability. This conclusion is based on a full 3D tomographic sampling of the electronic structure by angle-resolved photoemission and comparison with inelastic neutron scattering data. The hidden order is mediated by itinerant electrons. Our measurements will serve as a paradigm for the investigation of hidden-order phases in f-electron systems, but also generally for situations where the itinerant electrons drive orbital or spin order. PMID:26976632

  11. Characterizing forest stands with multi-incidence angle and multi-polarized SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, R. M.; Lozano-Garcia, D. F.; Gillespie, D. D.

    1987-01-01

    The potential for using HH-polarized L-band SAR data obtained at different incidence angles from satellite altitudes to identify and map different forest cover types and stand density classes is studied. Reasonably accurate results are obtained if the speckle characteristics of the data are suppressed by low-pass spatial filters and a contextual classification algorithm. Multipolarized L-band SAR data obtained from aircraft altitudes over the same test site are also analyzed to assess the relationships between polarization and forest stand characteristics. It is found that incidence angle controls, to a very large extent, the characteristics of the data and the type of information that can be obtained from L-band, HH-polarized satellite SAR data. Cross-polarization of L-band SAR data enhances and differentiates various forest stand characteristics which cannot be defined using only the like-polarized data, and vice-versa.

  12. FMRP regulates multipolar to bipolar transition affecting neuronal migration and cortical circuitry.

    PubMed

    La Fata, Giorgio; Gärtner, Annette; Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Dresselaers, Tom; Dawitz, Julia; Poorthuis, Rogier B; Averna, Michele; Himmelreich, Uwe; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Achsel, Tilmann; Dotti, Carlos G; Bagni, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Deficiencies in fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) are the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS), with symptoms manifesting during infancy and early childhood. Using a mouse model for FXS, we found that Fmrp regulates the positioning of neurons in the cortical plate during embryonic development, affecting their multipolar-to-bipolar transition (MBT). We identified N-cadherin, which is crucial for MBT, as an Fmrp-regulated target in embryonic brain. Furthermore, spontaneous network activity and high-resolution brain imaging revealed defects in the establishment of neuronal networks at very early developmental stages, further confirmed by an unbalanced excitatory and inhibitory network. Finally, reintroduction of Fmrp or N-cadherin in the embryo normalized early postnatal neuron activity. Our findings highlight the critical role of Fmrp in the developing cerebral cortex and might explain some of the clinical features observed in patients with FXS, such as alterations in synaptic communication and neuronal network connectivity.

  13. Improved resummation of post-Newtonian multipolar waveforms from circularized compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Iyer, Bala R.; Nagar, Alessandro

    2009-03-15

    We improve and generalize a resummation method of post-Newtonian multipolar waveforms from circular (nonspinning) compact binaries introduced in Refs. 1,2. One of the characteristic features of this resummation method is to replace the usual additive decomposition of the standard post-Newtonian approach by a multiplicative decomposition of the complex multipolar waveform h{sub lm} into several (physically motivated) factors: (i) the Newtonian waveform, (ii) a relativistic correction coming from an 'effective source', (iii) leading-order tail effects linked to propagation on a Schwarzschild background, (iv) a residual tail dephasing, and (v) residual relativistic amplitude corrections f{sub lm}. We explore here a new route for resumming f{sub lm} based on replacing it by its l-th root: {rho}{sub lm}=f{sub lm}{sup 1/l}. In the extreme-mass-ratio case, this resummation procedure results in a much better agreement between analytical and numerical waveforms than when using standard post-Newtonian approximants. We then show that our best approximants behave in a robust and continuous manner as we deform them by increasing the symmetric mass ratio {nu}{identical_to}m{sub 1}m{sub 2}/(m{sub 1}+m{sub 2}){sup 2} from 0 (extreme-mass-ratio case) to 1/4 (equal-mass case). The present paper also completes our knowledge of the first post-Newtonian corrections to multipole moments by computing ready-to-use explicit expressions for the first post-Newtonian contributions to the odd-parity (current) multipoles.

  14. The multiple functions of T stellate/multipolar/chopper cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Donata; Wright, Samantha; Cao, Xiao-Jie; Ferragamo, Michael; Bal, Ramazan

    2011-06-01

    Acoustic information is brought to the brain by auditory nerve fibers, all of which terminate in the cochlear nuclei, and is passed up the auditory pathway through the principal cells of the cochlear nuclei. A population of neurons variously known as T stellate, type I multipolar, planar multipolar, or chopper cells forms one of the major ascending auditory pathways through the brainstem. T Stellate cells are sharply tuned; as a population they encode the spectrum of sounds. In these neurons, phasic excitation from the auditory nerve is made more tonic by feedforward excitation, coactivation of inhibitory with excitatory inputs, relatively large excitatory currents through NMDA receptors, and relatively little synaptic depression. The mechanisms that make firing tonic also obscure the fine structure of sounds that is represented in the excitatory inputs from the auditory nerve and account for the characteristic chopping response patterns with which T stellate cells respond to tones. In contrast with other principal cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), T stellate cells lack a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance and are therefore sensitive to small, steady, neuromodulating currents. The presence of cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors allows the excitability of these cells to be modulated by medial olivocochlear efferent neurons and by neuronal circuits associated with arousal. T Stellate cells deliver acoustic information to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB), periolivary regions around the lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), and to the contralateral ventral lemniscal nuclei (VNLL) and inferior colliculus (IC). It is likely that T stellate cells participate in feedback loops through both medial and lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons and they may be a source of ipsilateral excitation of the LSO.

  15. The Multiple Functions of T Stellate/Multipolar/Chopper Cells in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Donata; Wright, Samantha; Cao, Xiao-Jie; Ferragamo, Michael; Bal, Ramazan

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic information is brought to the brain by auditory nerve fibers, all of which terminate in the cochlear nuclei, and is passed up the auditory pathway through the principal cells of the cochlear nuclei. A population of neurons variously known as T stellate, type I multipolar, planar multipolar, or chopper cells forms one of the major ascending auditory pathways through the brain stem. T Stellate cells are sharply tuned; as a population they encode the spectrum of sounds. In these neurons, phasic excitation from the auditory nerve is made more tonic by feed forward excitation, coactivation of inhibitory with excitatory inputs, relatively large excitatory currents through NMDA receptors, and relatively little synaptic depression. The mechanisms that make firing tonic also obscure the fine structure of sounds that is represented in the excitatory inputs from the auditory nerve and account for the characteristic chopping response patterns with which T stellate cells respond to tones. In contrast with other principal cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), T stellate cells lack a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance and are therefore sensitive to small, steady, neuromodulating currents. The presence of cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors allows the excitability of these cells to be modulated by medial olivocochlear efferent neurons and by neuronal circuits associated with arousal. T Stellate cells deliver acoustic information to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB), periolivary regions around the lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), and to the contralateral ventral lemniscal nuclei (VNLL) and inferior colliculus (IC). It is likely that T stellate cells participate in feedback loops through both medial and lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons and they may be a source of ipsilateral excitation of the LSO. PMID:21056098

  16. Reelin, Rap1 and N-cadherin orient the migration of multipolar neurons in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Jossin, Yves; Cooper, Jonathan A

    2011-06-01

    Projection neurons migrate from the ventricular zone to the neocortical plate during the development of the mouse brain. Their overall movement is radial, but they become multipolar and move nonradially in the intermediate zone. Here we show that Reelin, the Rap1 GTPase and N-cadherin (NCad) are important for multipolar neurons to polarize their migration toward the cortical plate. Inhibition and rescue experiments indicated that Reelin regulates migration through Rap1 and Akt, and that the Rap1-regulated GTPases RalA, RalB, Rac1 and Cdc42 are also involved. We found that Rap1 regulated the plasma membrane localization of NCad and NCad rescued radial polarization when Rap1 was inhibited. However, inhibition of Rap1 or NCad had little effect on glia-dependent locomotion. We propose a multistep mechanism in which Reelin activates Rap1, Rap1 upregulates NCad, and NCad is needed to orient cell migration.

  17. ADAM17 is critical for multipolar exit and radial migration of neuronal intermediate progenitor cells in mice cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyu; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Zengmin; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Bin; Pan, Le; Ma, Zhixing; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    The radial migration of neuronal progenitor cells is critical for the development of cerebral cortex layers. They go through a critical step transforming from multipolar to bipolar before outward migration. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) is a transmembrane protease which can process many substrates involved in cell-cell interaction, including Notch, ligands of EGFR, and some cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we used in utero electroporation to knock down or overexpress ADAM17 at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in neuronal progenitor cells to examine the role of ADAM17 in cortical embryonic neurogenesis. Our results showed that the radial migration of ADAM17-knocked down cells were normal till E16.5 and reached the intermediate zone (IZ). Then most transfected cells stopped migration and stayed at the IZ to inner cortical plate (CP) layer at E18.5, and there was higher percentage of multipolar cells at IZ layer in the ADAM17-knocked down group compared to the cells in control group. Marker staining revealed that those ADAM17-knocked down cells differentiated normally from neural stem cells (NSCs) to neuronal intermediate progenitor cells (nIPCs) but did not differentiate into mature neurons. The migration and multipolar exit defects caused by ADAM17 knockdown could be partially rescued by over-expressing an shRNA resistant ADAM17, while overexpressing ADAM17 alone did not affect the radial migration. Taken together, our results showed for the first time that, ADAM17 is critical in regulating the multipolar-stage exit and radial migration of the nIPCs during telencephalon cortex development in mice. PMID:23755270

  18. ADAM17 is critical for multipolar exit and radial migration of neuronal intermediate progenitor cells in mice cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyu; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Zengmin; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Bin; Pan, Le; Ma, Zhixing; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    The radial migration of neuronal progenitor cells is critical for the development of cerebral cortex layers. They go through a critical step transforming from multipolar to bipolar before outward migration. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) is a transmembrane protease which can process many substrates involved in cell-cell interaction, including Notch, ligands of EGFR, and some cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we used in utero electroporation to knock down or overexpress ADAM17 at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in neuronal progenitor cells to examine the role of ADAM17 in cortical embryonic neurogenesis. Our results showed that the radial migration of ADAM17-knocked down cells were normal till E16.5 and reached the intermediate zone (IZ). Then most transfected cells stopped migration and stayed at the IZ to inner cortical plate (CP) layer at E18.5, and there was higher percentage of multipolar cells at IZ layer in the ADAM17-knocked down group compared to the cells in control group. Marker staining revealed that those ADAM17-knocked down cells differentiated normally from neural stem cells (NSCs) to neuronal intermediate progenitor cells (nIPCs) but did not differentiate into mature neurons. The migration and multipolar exit defects caused by ADAM17 knockdown could be partially rescued by over-expressing an shRNA resistant ADAM17, while overexpressing ADAM17 alone did not affect the radial migration. Taken together, our results showed for the first time that, ADAM17 is critical in regulating the multipolar-stage exit and radial migration of the nIPCs during telencephalon cortex development in mice.

  19. Multipolarity of the 2-→1- , ground-state transition in 210Bi via multivariable angular correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Szpak, B.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C.; Urban, W.

    2016-07-01

    The multipolarity of the main transition leading to the ground state in 210Bi was investigated using the angular correlations of γ rays. The analyzed γ -coincidence data were obtained from the 209Bi(n ,γ )210Bi experiment performed at Institut Laue-Langevin Grenoble at the PF1B cold-neutron facility. The EXILL (EXOGAM at the ILL) multidetector array, consisting of 16 high-purity germanium detectors, was used to detect γ transitions. The mixing ratio of the 320-keV γ ray was defined by minimizing a multivariable χΣ2 function constructed from the coefficients of angular correlation functions for seven pairs of strong transitions in 210Bi. As a result, the almost pure M 1 multipolarity of the 320-keV γ ray was obtained, with an E 2 admixture of less than 0.6% only (95% confidence limit). Based on this multipolarity the neutron-capture cross section leading to the ground state in 210Bi, that decays in turn to radiotoxic 210Po, was determined to be within the limits 21.3(9) and 21.5(9) mb. This result is important for nuclear reactor applications.

  20. Tuberculoventral neurons project to the multipolar cell area but not to the octopus cell area of the posteroventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wickesberg, R E; Whitlon, D; Oertel, D

    1991-11-15

    Tuberculoventral neurons in the deep layer of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) provide frequency-specific inhibition to neurons in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) of the mouse (Wickesberg and Oertel, '88, '90). The present experiments examine the projection from the deep DCN to the posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN). Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injections into the PVCN reveal that the multipolar cell area, but not the octopus cell area, is innervated by neurons in the deep layer of the DCN. Injections into the multipolar cell area, in the rostral and ventral PVCN, labeled neurons across the entire rostrocaudal extent of the deep DCN. The labeled tuberculoventral neurons generally lay within the band of labeled auditory nerve terminals in the DCN. Injections of HRP into the octopus cell area, in the dorsal caudal PVCN, labeled almost no cells within the band of auditory nerve fiber terminals that were labeled by the same injection. The inhibition from tuberculoventral neurons onto ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) neurons is likely to be mediated by glycine (Wickesberg and Oertel, '90). Slices of the cochlear nuclear complex were immunolabeled by an antibody against glycine conjugated with glutaraldehyde to bovine serum albumin (Wenthold et al., '87). Glycine-like immunoreactivity was found throughout the DCN, the AVCN and the multipolar cell area, but there was little labeling in the octopus cell area. This finding provides independent evidence that tuberculoventral neurons do not innervate the octopus cell area and indicates that the octopus cell area is anatomically and functionally distinct.

  1. Role of the multipolar electrostatic interaction energy components in strong and weak cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Kadlubanski, Pawel; Calderón-Mojica, Katherine; Rodriguez, Weyshla A; Majumdar, D; Roszak, Szczepan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-08-22

    Density functional and Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) calculations have been carried out on various model cation-π complexes formed through the interactions of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and NH4(+) cations with benzene, p-methylphenol, and 3-methylindole. Partial hydration of the metal cations was also considered in these model studies to monitor the effect of hydration of cations in cation-π interactions. The binding energies of these complexes were computed from the fully optimized structures using coupled cluster calculations including triple excitations (CCSD(T)) and Gaussian-G4-MP2 (G4MP2) techniques. An analysis of the charge sharing between the donor (the π-systems) and the acceptors (the cations) together with the partitioning of total interaction energies revealed that the strong and weak cation-π interactions have similar electrostatic interaction properties. Further decomposition of such electrostatic terms into their multipolar components showed the importance of the charge-dipole, charge-quadrupole, and charge-octopole terms in shaping the electrostatic forces in such interactions. The computed vibrational spectra of the complexes were analyzed for the specific cation-π interaction modes and have been shown to contain the signature of higher order electrostatic interaction energy components (quadrupole and octopole) in such interactions. PMID:23895641

  2. The Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon-Counting Lidar: Development and Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar is an airborne instrument developed to demonstrate laser altimetry measurement methods that will enable more efficient observations of topography and surface properties from space. The instrument was developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryosphere remote sensing. The SIMPL transmitter is an 11 KHz, 1064 nm, plane-polarized micropulse laser transmitter that is frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four push-broom beams. The receiver employs single-photon, polarimetric ranging at 532 and 1064 nm using Single Photon Counting Modules in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and depolarizing scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. Data acquired over ice-covered Lake Erie in February, 2009 are documenting SIMPL s measurement performance and capabilities, demonstrating differentiation of open water and several ice cover types. ICESat-2 will employ several of the technologies advanced by SIMPL, including micropulse, single photon ranging in a multi-beam, push-broom configuration operating at 532 nm.

  3. The Shaping of the Multipolar Pre-planetary Nebula CRL 618 by Multidirectional Bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Sheng; Lee, Chin-Fei; Moraghan, Anthony; Smith, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In order to understand the formation of the multipolar structures of the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618, we perform 3D simulations using a multidirectional bullet model. The optical lobes of CRL 618 and fast molecular outflows at the tips of the lobes have been found to have similar expansion ages of ˜100 yr. Additional fast molecular outflows were found near the source along the outflow axes with ages of ˜45 yr, suggesting a second episode of bullet ejections. Thus, in our simulations, two episodes of bullet ejections are assumed. The shaping process is simulated using the ZEUS-3D hydrodynamics code that includes molecular and atomic cooling. In addition, molecular chemistry is also included to calculate the CO intensity maps. Our results show the following: (1) Multiepoch bullets interacting with the toroidal dense core can produce the collimated multiple lobes as seen in CRL 618. The total mass of the bullets is ˜0.034 M⊙, consistent with the observed high-velocity (HV) CO emission in fast molecular outflows. (2) The simulated CO J = 3-2 intensity maps show that the low-velocity cavity wall and the HV outflows along the lobes are reasonably consistent with the observations. The position-velocity diagram of the outflows along the outflow axes shows a linear increase of velocity with distance, similar to the observations. The ejections of these bullets could be due to magnetorotational explosions or nova-like explosions around a binary companion.

  4. Transverse versus longitudinal tripolar configuration for selective stimulation with multipolar cuff electrodes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Thomas N; Kurstjens, G A Mathijs; Struijk, Johannes J

    2011-04-01

    The ability to stimulate subareas of a nerve selectively is highly desirable, since it has the potential of simplifying surgery to implanting one cuff on a large nerve instead of many cuffs on smaller nerves or muscles, or alternatively can improve function where surgical access to the smaller nerves is limited. In this paper, stimulation was performed with a four-channel multipolar cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve of nine rabbits to compare the extensively researched longitudinal tripolar configuration with the transverse tripolar configuration, which has received less interest. The performance of these configurations was evaluated in terms of selectivity in recruitment of the three branches of the sciatic nerve. The results showed that the transverse configuration was able to selectively activate the sciatic nerve branches to a functionally relevant level in more cases than the longitudinal configuration (20/27 versus 11/27 branches) and overall achieved a higher mean selectivity [0.79 ± 0.13 versus 0.61 ± 0.09 (mean ± standard deviation)]. The transverse configuration was most successful at recruiting the small cutaneous and medium-sized peroneal branches, and less successful at recruiting the large tibial nerve. PMID:21421427

  5. FMRP regulates multipolar to bipolar transition affecting neuronal migration and cortical circuitry.

    PubMed

    La Fata, Giorgio; Gärtner, Annette; Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Dresselaers, Tom; Dawitz, Julia; Poorthuis, Rogier B; Averna, Michele; Himmelreich, Uwe; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Achsel, Tilmann; Dotti, Carlos G; Bagni, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Deficiencies in fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) are the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS), with symptoms manifesting during infancy and early childhood. Using a mouse model for FXS, we found that Fmrp regulates the positioning of neurons in the cortical plate during embryonic development, affecting their multipolar-to-bipolar transition (MBT). We identified N-cadherin, which is crucial for MBT, as an Fmrp-regulated target in embryonic brain. Furthermore, spontaneous network activity and high-resolution brain imaging revealed defects in the establishment of neuronal networks at very early developmental stages, further confirmed by an unbalanced excitatory and inhibitory network. Finally, reintroduction of Fmrp or N-cadherin in the embryo normalized early postnatal neuron activity. Our findings highlight the critical role of Fmrp in the developing cerebral cortex and might explain some of the clinical features observed in patients with FXS, such as alterations in synaptic communication and neuronal network connectivity. PMID:25402856

  6. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E.; Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U.; Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.; Pereira, P. L.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering study of the dynamics of a multipolar plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, M.; Péalat, M.; Taran, J.-P.; Bacal, M.; Berlemont, P.; Skinner, D. A.; Bretagne, J.; Hutcheon, R. J.

    1992-03-01

    A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) study of the hydrogen plasma generated by a discharge with magnetic multipolar confinement has been conducted at pressures in the range 0.5-5 Pa. The steady-state radial distribution of the rovibrational populations has been measured. The vibrational temperature is always uniformly distributed and so is the rotational temperature at the lower pressures, while a strong gradient is seen at 5 Pa for the rotation. Time-resolved measurements with the discharge operated in a square-pulse mode give additional insight into the dynamics of the discharge. Some results are compared with the predictions of two computer models of the plasma kinetics. We observe H{2} vibrational excitation by the Joule-heated filament alone (in the absence of the discharge) and show it to be caused primarily by the confined discharge between the filament and its cold positive copper connector. Another interpretation of the presence of vibrationally excited H{2} by recombinative desorption (Hall R.I. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 60 (1988) 337) is not comforted by our results, within instrumental sensitivity. The densities of the first rotational levels that the ortho and para forms of H{2} have different electron collisional cross-sections. Under pulsed excitation, the vibrational temperature rises on a time scale of 1-2 ms in agreement with numerical predictions. At switch-off, we show by matching the experimental and theoretical decays that vibrational state v=1 survives 16± 5 wall collisions; meanwhile, the rotation cools very rapidly, probably because of superelastic electronic collisions.

  8. Post-fall-back evolution of multipolar magnetic fields and radio pulsar activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshev, A. P.; Elfritz, J. G.; Popov, S. B.

    2016-11-01

    It has long been unclear if the small-scale magnetic structures on the neutron star (NS) surface could survive the fall-back episode. The study of the Hall cascade by Cumming, Arras & Zweibel hinted that energy in small-scales structures should dissipate on short time-scales. Our new 2D magneto-thermal simulations suggest the opposite. For the first ˜10 kyr after the fall-back episode with accreted mass 10-3 M⊙, the observed NS magnetic field appears dipolar, which is insensitive to the initial magnetic topology. In framework of the Ruderman & Sutherland, vacuum gap model during this interval, non-thermal radiation is strongly suppressed. After this time, the initial (i.e. multipolar) structure begins to re-emerge through the NS crust. We distinguish three evolutionary epochs for the re-emergence process: the growth of internal toroidal field, the advection of buried poloidal field, and slow Ohmic diffusion. The efficiency of the first two stages can be enhanced when small-scale magnetic structure is present. The efficient re-emergence of high-order harmonics might significantly affect the curvature of the magnetospheric field lines in the emission zone. So, only after few 104 yr would be the NS starts shining as a pulsar again, which is in correspondence with radio silence of central compact objects. In addition, these results can explain the absence of good candidates for thermally emitting NSs with freshly re-emerged field among radio pulsars (), as NSs have time to cool down, and supernova remnants can already dissipate.

  9. Multipolar Ewald Methods, 2: Applications Using a Quantum Mechanical Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A fully quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) based on a modified “divide-and-conquer” (mDC) framework is applied to a series of molecular simulation applications, using a generalized Particle Mesh Ewald method extended to multipolar charge densities. Simulation results are presented for three example applications: liquid water, p-nitrophenylphosphate reactivity in solution, and crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine. Simulations of liquid water using a parametrized mDC model are compared to TIP3P and TIP4P/Ew water models and experiment. The mDC model is shown to be superior for cluster binding energies and generally comparable for bulk properties. Examination of the dissociative pathway for dephosphorylation of p-nitrophenylphosphate shows that the mDC method evaluated with the DFTB3/3OB and DFTB3/OPhyd semiempirical models bracket the experimental barrier, whereas DFTB2 and AM1/d-PhoT QM/MM simulations exhibit deficiencies in the barriers, the latter for which is related, in part, to the anomalous underestimation of the p-nitrophenylate leaving group pKa. Simulations of crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine are performed and the overall structure and atomic fluctuations are compared with the experiment and the general AMBER force field (GAFF). The QMFF, which was not parametrized for this application, was shown to be in better agreement with crystallographic data than GAFF. Our simulations highlight some of the application areas that may benefit from using new QMFFs, and they demonstrate progress toward the development of accurate QMFFs using the recently developed mDC framework. PMID:25691830

  10. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants in acutely deafened cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. The conductive nature of the fluids and tissues of the cochlea can lead to broad activation of spiral ganglion neurons using contemporary cochlear implant stimulation configurations such as monopolar (MP) stimulation. The relatively poor spatial selectivity is thought to limit implant performance, particularly in noisy environments. Several current focusing techniques have been proposed to reduce the spread of activation with the aim towards achieving improved clinical performance. Approach. The present research evaluated the efficacy of focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation, a relatively new focusing technique in the cochlea, and compared its efficacy to both MP stimulation and tripolar (TP) stimulation. The spread of neural activity across the inferior colliculus (IC), measured by recording the spatial tuning curve, was used as a measure of spatial selectivity. Adult cats (n = 6) were acutely deafened and implanted with an intracochlear electrode array before multi-unit responses were recorded across the cochleotopic gradient of the contralateral IC. Recordings were made in response to acoustic and electrical stimulation using the MP, TP and FMP configurations. Main results. FMP and TP stimulation resulted in greater spatial selectivity than MP stimulation. However, thresholds were significantly higher (p < 0.001) for FMP and TP stimulation compared to MP stimulation. There were no differences found in spatial selectivity and threshold between FMP and TP stimulation. Significance. The greater spatial selectivity of FMP and TP stimulation would be expected to result in improved clinical performance. However, further research will be required to demonstrate the efficacy of these modes of stimulation after longer durations of deafness.

  11. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants in long-term deafened cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Wise, Andrew K.; Fallon, James B.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation has been shown to produce restricted neural activation using intracochlear stimulation in animals with a normal population of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). However, in a clinical setting, the widespread loss of SGNs and peripheral fibres following deafness is expected to influence the effectiveness of FMP. Approach. We compared the efficacy of FMP stimulation to both monopolar (MP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation in long-term deafened cat cochleae (n = 8). Unlike our previous study, these cochleae contained <10% of the normal SGN population adjacent to the electrode array. We also evaluated the effect of electrode position on stimulation modes by using either modiolar facing or lateral wall facing half-band electrodes. The spread of neural activity across the inferior colliculus, a major nucleus within the central auditory pathway, was used as a measure of spatial selectivity. Main results. In cochleae with significant SGN degeneration, we observed that FMP and TP stimulation resulted in greater spatial selectivity than MP stimulation (p < 0.001). However, thresholds were significantly higher for FMP and TP stimulation compared to MP stimulation (p < 0.001). No difference between FMP and TP stimulation was found in any measures. The high threshold levels for FMP stimulation was significantly reduced without compromising spatial selectivity by varying the degree of current focusing (referred as ‘partial-FMP’ stimulation). Spatial selectivity of all stimulation modes was unaffected by the electrode position. Finally, spatial selectivity in long-term deafened cochleae was significantly less than that of cochleae with normal SGN population (George S S et al 2014 J. Neural Eng. 11 065003). Significance. The present results indicate that the greater spatial selectivity of FMP and TP stimulation over MP stimulation is maintained in cochleae with significant neural degeneration and is not adversely affected by electrode

  12. Multipolar Ewald methods, 2: applications using a quantum mechanical force field.

    PubMed

    Giese, Timothy J; Panteva, Maria T; Chen, Haoyuan; York, Darrin M

    2015-02-10

    A fully quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) based on a modified “divide-and-conquer” (mDC) framework is applied to a series of molecular simulation applications, using a generalized Particle Mesh Ewald method extended to multipolar charge densities. Simulation results are presented for three example applications: liquid water, p-nitrophenylphosphate reactivity in solution, and crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine. Simulations of liquid water using a parametrized mDC model are compared to TIP3P and TIP4P/Ew water models and experiment. The mDC model is shown to be superior for cluster binding energies and generally comparable for bulk properties. Examination of the dissociative pathway for dephosphorylation of p-nitrophenylphosphate shows that the mDC method evaluated with the DFTB3/3OB and DFTB3/OPhyd semiempirical models bracket the experimental barrier, whereas DFTB2 and AM1/d-PhoT QM/MM simulations exhibit deficiencies in the barriers, the latter for which is related, in part, to the anomalous underestimation of the p-nitrophenylate leaving group pKa. Simulations of crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine are performed and the overall structure and atomic fluctuations are compared with the experiment and the general AMBER force field (GAFF). The QMFF, which was not parametrized for this application, was shown to be in better agreement with crystallographic data than GAFF. Our simulations highlight some of the application areas that may benefit from using new QMFFs, and they demonstrate progress toward the development of accurate QMFFs using the recently developed mDC framework.

  13. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. II. Flux rope eruptions with current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-11-20

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of a CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. In particular, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. This released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares, and the flux rope would, therefore, go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is inconsistent with the radio afterglow. Fortunately, in the latter case, i.e., the catastrophic escape, the flux rope could escape the magnetar and go to infinity in a dynamical way. This is more consistent with radio afterglow observations of giant flares. We find that the minor radius of the flux rope has important implications for its eruption. Flux ropes with larger minor radii are more prone to erupt. We stress that the CS provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection, which would further enhance the energy release during eruptions.

  14. Control of Multipolar and Orbital Order in Perovskite-like [C(NH2)3]CuxCd1-x(HCOO)3 Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nicole L; Thygesen, Peter M M; Boström, Hanna L B; Reynolds, Emily M; Collings, Ines E; Phillips, Anthony E; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2016-08-01

    We study the compositional dependence of molecular orientation (multipolar) and orbital (quadrupolar) order in the perovskite-like metal-organic frameworks [C(NH2)3]CuxCd1-x(HCOO)3. Upon increasing the fraction x of Jahn-Teller-active Cu(2+), we observe an orbital disorder/order transition and a multipolar reorientation transition, each occurring at distinct critical compositions xo = 0.45(5) and xm = 0.55(5). We attribute these transitions to a combination of size, charge distribution, and percolation effects. Our results establish the accessibility in formate perovskites of novel structural degrees of freedom beyond the familiar dipolar terms responsible for (anti)ferroelectric order. We discuss the implications of cooperative quadrupolar and multipolar states for the design of relaxor-like hybrid perovskites. PMID:27414161

  15. A phosphatidylinositol lipids system, lamellipodin, and Ena/VASP regulate dynamic morphology of multipolar migrating cells in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Sasaki, Shinji; Nuriya, Mutsuo; Ogawa, Yukino; Yasui, Masato; Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2012-08-22

    In the developing mammalian cerebral cortex, excitatory neurons are generated in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone; these neurons migrate toward the pial surface. The neurons generated in the VZ assume a multipolar morphology and remain in a narrow region called the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) for ∼24 h, in which they extend and retract multiple processes dynamically. They eventually extend an axon tangentially and begin radial migration using a migratory mode called locomotion. Despite the potential biological importance of the process movement of multipolar cells, the molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we observed that the processes of mouse multipolar cells were actin rich and morphologically resembled the filopodia and lamellipodia in growth cones; thus, we focused on the actin-remodeling proteins Lamellipodin (Lpd) and Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Lpd binds to phosphatidylinositol (3,4)-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P₂] and recruits Ena/VASP, which promotes the assembly of actin filaments, to the plasma membranes. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that Lpd is expressed in multipolar cells in the MAZ. The functional silencing of either Lpd or Ena/VASP decreased the number of primary processes. Immunostaining and a Förster resonance energy transfer analysis revealed the subcellular localization of PI(3,4)P₂ at the tips of the processes. A knockdown experiment and treatment with an inhibitor for Src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase-2, a 5-phosphatase that produces PI(3,4)P₂ from phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, decreased the number of primary processes. Our observations suggest that PI(3,4)P₂, Lpd, and Ena/VASP are involved in the process movement of multipolar migrating cells.

  16. Multipolar electrostatics based on the Kriging machine learning method: an application to serine.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongna; Mills, Matthew J L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-04-01

    A multipolar, polarizable electrostatic method for future use in a novel force field is described. Quantum Chemical Topology (QCT) is used to partition the electron density of a chemical system into atoms, then the machine learning method Kriging is used to build models that relate the multipole moments of the atoms to the positions of their surrounding nuclei. The pilot system serine is used to study both the influence of the level of theory and the set of data generator methods used. The latter consists of: (i) sampling of protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), or (ii) normal mode distortion along either (a) Cartesian coordinates, or (b) redundant internal coordinates. Wavefunctions for the sampled geometries were obtained at the HF/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/apc-1, and MP2/cc-pVDZ levels of theory, prior to calculation of the atomic multipole moments by volume integration. The average absolute error (over an independent test set of conformations) in the total atom-atom electrostatic interaction energy of serine, using Kriging models built with the three data generator methods is 11.3 kJ mol⁻¹ (PDB), 8.2 kJ mol⁻¹ (Cartesian distortion), and 10.1 kJ mol⁻¹ (redundant internal distortion) at the HF/6-31G(d,p) level. At the B3LYP/apc-1 level, the respective errors are 7.7 kJ mol⁻¹, 6.7 kJ mol⁻¹, and 4.9 kJ mol⁻¹, while at the MP2/cc-pVDZ level they are 6.5 kJ mol⁻¹, 5.3 kJ mol⁻¹, and 4.0 kJ mol⁻¹. The ranges of geometries generated by the redundant internal coordinate distortion and by extraction from the PDB are much wider than the range generated by Cartesian distortion. The atomic multipole moment and electrostatic interaction energy predictions for the B3LYP/apc-1 and MP2/cc-pVDZ levels are similar, and both are better than the corresponding predictions at the HF/6-31G(d,p) level.

  17. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Theresa A.; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    . Conclusions Our analysis indicates that, far from being simple polygonal prisms, endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape. Their unusual geometry may be essential for the endothelium to carry out its role as the principal regulator of corneal extracellular fluid flux, and thus ultimately of tissue clarity. PMID:27081293

  18. Dependence of the probabilities of the electric-multipole electron transitions in W{sup 24+} on multipolarity

    SciTech Connect

    Gaigalas, Gediminas; Rudzikas, Zenonas; Rynkun, Pavel; Alkauskas, Andrius

    2011-03-15

    Usually it is accepted that the probabilities of the electric-multipole electron transitions are rapidly decreasing functions of their multipolarity. Therefore while calculating the probabilities of electronic transitions between the configurations of certain chosen parities, it seems sufficient to take into account the first nonzero term, i.e., to consider the electron transitions of lowest multipolarity permitted by the exact selection rules. This paper aims at verifying this assumption on the example of electric-octupole transitions in W{sup 24+} ion. For this purpose the large-scale multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Fock calculations have been performed for the configurations [Kr]4d{sup 10}4f{sup 4} and [Kr]4d{sup 10}4f{sup 3}5s energy levels of W{sup 24+} ion. The relativistic corrections were taken into account in the quasirelativistic Breit-Pauli and fully relativistic Breit (taking into account QED effects) approximations. The role of correlation, relativistic, and QED corrections is discussed. Line strengths, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities in Coulomb and Babushkin gauges are presented for E1 and E3 transitions among these levels.

  19. Detailed angular correlation analysis with 4{pi} spectrometers: Spin determinations and multipolarity mixing measurements in {sup 128}Ba

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhoever, I.; Vogel, O.; Klein, H.; Dewald, A.; von Brentano, P.; Gableske, J.; Nicolay, N.; Gelberg, A.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Janssens, R.V.; Carpenter, M.P.; Kruecken, R.; Petkov, P.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Bazzacco, D.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Pavan, P.; de Angelis, G.; Lunardi, S.; Napoli, D.R.; Frauendorf, S.; Doenau, F.

    1998-08-01

    We analyze for the first time the full {gamma}{gamma} directional correlations from oriented states (DCO) in an experiment performed with the GASP detector array. Our analysis is based on a transformation of the directional information into expansion coefficients of an orthogonal basis. With this method, which we call SpeeDCO (spectral expansion of DCO), the complete DCO information is concentrated in 12 {gamma}{gamma} coincidence spectra. The analysis is applicable to all detector arrays which uniformly cover the solid angle. We show that the complete DCO information can be used for a reliable and unique determination of spins and multipolarity mixing ratios in weakly populated bands. We were able to establish the spins and the positive parity of the {Delta}I=1 {open_quotes}M1 band{close_quotes} in {sup 128}Ba and multipolarity mixing ratios of nine M1/E2 in-band transitions were derived as well. The measured values are in good agreement with those expected for a high-K rotational band. thinsp thinsp thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. The Optical-Infared Study and Geometric Model of Young Multipolar Planetary nebula -- IRAS 21282+5050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chau, Wayne; Kwok, Sun

    2015-08-01

    We present high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared imaging of the famous compact planetary nebula (PN) IRAS 21282+5050. Optical images of this object reveal several complex morphological structures including three pairs of lobes and an elliptical shell lying close to the plane of the sky. From near-infrared observations, we found a dust torus which is oriented nearly perpendicular to the major axis of elliptical shell. The results suggest that IRAS 21282+5050 (IRAS 21282) is indeed a multipolar PN, and these structures developed in the early stage on its evolutionary track. We also constructed this object by a three-dimensional (3D) model and determined the dimensions of these intrinsic structures. Assuming these lobes are shaped by wind interactions, the presence of these geometric structures has been suggested as the result of multiple phases of fast winds with temporal and directional variations. Based on the visualization of 3D model of this object viewed from different orientations, the appearance of IRAS 21282 shows similar intrinsic structures as other multipolar PNs.

  1. Comparative analysis of transverse intrafascicular multichannel, longitudinal intrafascicular and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of nerve fascicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badia, Jordi; Boretius, Tim; Andreu, David; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Stieglitz, Thomas; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    The selection of a suitable nerve electrode for neuroprosthetic applications implies a trade-off between invasiveness and selectivity, wherein the ultimate goal is achieving the highest selectivity for a high number of nerve fascicles by the least invasiveness and potential damage to the nerve. The transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME) is intended to be transversally inserted into the peripheral nerve and to be useful to selectively activate subsets of axons in different fascicles within the same nerve. We present a comparative study of TIME, LIFE and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of small nerves. The electrodes were implanted on the rat sciatic nerve, and the activation of gastrocnemius, plantar and tibialis anterior muscles was recorded by EMG signals. Thus, the study allowed us to ascertain the selectivity of stimulation at the interfascicular and also at the intrafascicular level. The results of this study indicate that (1) intrafascicular electrodes (LIFE and TIME) provide excitation circumscribed to the implanted fascicle, whereas extraneural electrodes (cuffs) predominantly excite nerve fascicles located superficially; (2) the minimum threshold for muscle activation with TIME and LIFE was significantly lower than with cuff electrodes; (3) TIME allowed us to selectively activate the three tested muscles when stimulating through different active sites of one device, both at inter- and intrafascicular levels, whereas selective activation using multipolar cuff (with a longitudinal tripolar stimulation configuration) was only possible for two muscles, at the interfascicular level, and LIFE did not activate selectively more than one muscle in the implanted nerve fascicle.

  2. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate. PMID:22267309

  3. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons switch from a multipolar migration mode to a novel "climbing" migration mode during development.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Ayako; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Matsunaga, Yuki; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2014-01-22

    The hippocampus plays important roles in brain functions. Despite the importance of hippocampal functions, recent analyses of neuronal migration have mainly been performed on the cerebral neocortex, and the cellular mechanisms responsible for the formation of the hippocampus are not yet completely understood. Moreover, why a prolonged time is required for hippocampal neurons to complete their migration has been unexplainable for several decades. We analyzed the migratory profile of neurons in the developing mouse hippocampal CA1 region and found that the hippocampal pyramidal neurons generated near the ventricle became postmitotic multipolar cells and accumulated in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) in the late stage of development. The hippocampal neurons passed through the pyramidal layer by a unique mode of migration. Their leading processes were highly branched and made contact with many radial fibers. Time-lapse imaging revealed that the migrating cells changed their scaffolds from the original radial fibers to other radial fibers, and as a result they proceed in a zigzag manner, with long intervals. The migrating cells in the hippocampus reminded us of "rock climbers" that instead of using their hands to pull up their bodies were using their leading processes to pull up their cell bodies. Because this mode of migration had never been described, we called it the "climbing" mode. The change from the "climbing" mode in the hippocampus to the "locomotion" mode in the neocortex may have contributed to the brain expansion during evolution.

  4. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate.

  5. Multipolar theory of blackbody radiation shift of atomic energy levels and its implications for optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Porsev, Sergey G.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2006-08-15

    Blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts of the {sup 3}P{sub 0}-{sup 1}S{sub 0} clock transition in the divalent atoms Mg, Ca, Sr, and Yb are evaluated. The dominant electric-dipole contributions are computed using accurate relativistic many-body techniques of atomic structure. At room temperatures, the resulting uncertainties in the E1 BBR shifts are large and substantially affect the projected 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy of the optical-lattice-based clocks. A peculiarity of these clocks is that the characteristic BBR wavelength is comparable to the {sup 3}P fine-structure intervals. To evaluate relevant M1 and E2 contributions, a theory of multipolar BBR shifts is developed. The resulting corrections, although presently masked by the uncertainties in the E1 contribution, are required at the 10{sup -18} accuracy goal.

  6. Forest biomass, canopy structure, and species composition relationships with multipolarization L-band synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of forest biomass, canopy structure, and species composition on L-band synthetic aperature radar data at 44 southern Mississippi bottomland hardwood and pine-hardwood forest sites was investigated. Cross-polarization mean digital values for pine forests were significantly correlated with green weight biomass and stand structure. Multiple linear regression with five forest structure variables provided a better integrated measure of canopy roughness and produced highly significant correlation coefficients for hardwood forests using HV/VV ratio only. Differences in biomass levels and canopy structure, including branching patterns and vertical canopy stratification, were important sources of volume scatter affecting multipolarization radar data. Standardized correction techniques and calibration of aircraft data, in addition to development of canopy models, are recommended for future investigations of forest biomass and structure using synthetic aperture radar.

  7. Laser transmitter design and performance for the slope imaging multi-polarization photon-counting lidar (SIMPL) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.

    2016-03-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) is a polarimetric, two-color, multi-beam push broom laser altimeter developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program. It has flown successfully on multiple airborne platforms beginning in 2008.1 It was developed to demonstrate new altimetry capabilities that combine height measurements and information about surface composition and properties. In this talk we will discuss the laser transmitter design and performance and present recent science data collected over the Greenland ice sheet and arctic sea ice in support of the second NASA Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat-2) mission to be launched in 2017.2

  8. NDUFV2 regulates neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex through modulation of the multipolar-bipolar transition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianda; Wu, Qinwei; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Dai

    2015-11-01

    Abnormalities during brain development are tightly linked several psychiatric disorders. Mutations in NADH dehydrogenase ubiquinone flavoprotein 2 (NDUFV2) are responsible for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Parkinson׳s disease. However, the function of NDUFV2 during brain development remains unclear. Here we reported that ndufv2 is expressed in the developing cerebral cortex. In utero suppression of ndufv2 arrested neuronal migration, leading to accumulation of ectopic neurons in the intermediate zone. ndufv2 inhibition did not affect radial glia scaffold, progenitor cells or neurons survival. However, the loss of ndufv2 impairs neuronal multipolar-bipolar transition in vivo and polarization in vitro. Moreover, ndufv2 affected actin cytoskeleton and tubulin stabilization in cortical neurons. Overall, our findings establish a new NDUFV2 dependent mechanism underlying neuronal migration and psychiatric disorders.

  9. [Modulating effect of dopamine on amplitude of GABA-produced chemocontrolled currents in multipolar spinal cord neurons of ammocaete].

    PubMed

    Bukinich, A A

    2010-01-01

    By using the patch-clamp method in the whole cell configuration, modulating effect of dopamine on GABA-activated currents has been studied on isolated multipolar spinal cord neurons of the ammocaete (larva of the lamprey Lampetra planeri). At application of dopamine (5 microM), there was observed in some cases a decrease of the GABA-activated current, on average, by 33.3 +/- 8.7 (n = 8, p < 0.01), in other cases--an increase of the amplitude, on average, by 37.3 +/- 11.8% (n = 5, p < 0.01). Concentration of GABA amounted to 2 mM. Study of action of agonists of D1- and D2-receptors on amplitude of che-mocontrolled currents has shown that agonist of D1-receptors (+)-SKF-38393 (5 microM) decreases the GABA-activated current amplitude, on average, by 63.1 +/- 11.7% (n = 8, p < 0.01); the agonist of D2-receptors (-)-quinpirole (5 microM) produces in various cells the dopamine-like effects: an increase of the GABA-activated current amplitude, on average, by 61.0 +/- 13.8% (n = 8, p < 0.01) and a decrease of amplitude, on average, by 55.7 +/- 2.0 % (n = 6, p < 0.01). It has been shown that antagonist of D2-receptors sulpiride (5 microM) does not block effects produced by dopamine. The dopamine effects were partially blocked by antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390 (5 microM): a decrease of the GABA-activated amplitude current amounted, on average, to 11.7 +/- 1.8 % (n = 7, p < 0.01), while an increase of amplitude--8.3 +/- 2.0 % (n = 5,p < 0.01). At the same time, effects of agonist of D1-receptors quinpirole (5 microM) were partially blocked by antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390: a decrease of the GABA-activated current amplitude amounted, on average, to 9.2 +/- 3.4 % (n = 6, p < 0.01) and an increase of amplitude--6.3 +/- 1.8 % (n = 10, p < 0.01). The obtained data indicate differences of mechanisms of the receptor-mediated effect of agonists of dopamine receptors on GABA-activated and potential-activated currents of multipolar neurons of the ammocaete spinal

  10. The 5'-flanking region of the RP58 coding sequence shows prominent promoter activity in multipolar cells in the subventricular zone during corticogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, C; Hirai, S; Miwa, A; Takahashi, A; Okado, H

    2012-01-10

    Pyramidal neurons of the neocortex are produced from progenitor cells located in the neocortical ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ) during embryogenesis. RP58 is a transcriptional repressor that is strongly expressed in the developing brain and plays an essential role in corticogenesis. The expression of RP58 is strictly regulated in a time-dependent and spatially restricted manner. It is maximally expressed in E15-16 embryonic cerebral cortex, localized specifically to the cortical plate and SVZ of the neocortex, hippocampus, and parts of amygdala during brain development, and found in glutamatergic but not GABAergic neurons. Identification of the promoter activity underlying specific expression patterns provides important clues to their mechanisms of action. Here, we show that the RP58 gene promoter is activated prominently in multipolar migrating cells, the first in vivo analysis of RP58 promoter activity in the brain. The 5.3 kb 5'-flanking genomic DNA of the RP58 coding region demonstrates promoter activity in neurons both in vitro and in vivo. This promoter is highly responsive to the transcription factor neurogenin2 (Ngn2), which is a direct upstream activator of RP58 expression. Using in utero electroporation, we demonstrate that RP58 gene promoter activity is first detected in a subpopulation of pin-like VZ cells, then prominently activated in migrating multipolar cells in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) located just above the VZ. In dissociated primary cultured cortical neurons, RP58 promoter activity mimics in vivo expression patterns from a molecular standpoint that RP58 is expressed in a fraction of Sox2-positive progenitor cells, Ngn2-positive neuronal committed cells, and Tuj1-positive young neurons, but not in Dlx2-positive GABAergic neurons. Finally, we show that Cre recombinase expression under the control of the RP58 gene promoter is a feasible tool for conditional gene switching in post-mitotic multipolar migrating

  11. WAVE2-Abi2 complex controls growth cone activity and regulates the multipolar-bipolar transition as well as the initiation of glia-guided migration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min-Jue; Yagi, Hideshi; Kuroda, Kazuki; Wang, Chen-Chi; Komada, Munekazu; Zhao, Hong; Sakakibara, Akira; Miyata, Takaki; Nagata, Koh-Ichi; Oka, Yuichiro; Iguchi, Tokuichi; Sato, Makoto

    2013-06-01

    Glia-guided migration (glia-guided locomotion) during radial migration is a characteristic yet unique mode of migration. In this process, the directionality of migration is predetermined by glial processes and not by growth cones. Prior to the initiation of glia-guided migration, migrating neurons transform from multipolar to bipolar, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this multipolar-bipolar transition and the commencement of glia-guided migration are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the multipolar-bipolar transition is not solely a cell autonomous event; instead, the interaction of growth cones with glial processes plays an essential role. Time-lapse imaging with lattice assays reveals the importance of vigorously active growth cones in searching for appropriate glial scaffolds, completing the transition, and initiating glia-guided migration. These growth cone activities are regulated by Abl kinase and Cdk5 via WAVE2-Abi2 through the phosphorylation of tyrosine 150 and serine 137 of WAVE2. Neurons that do not display such growth cone activities are mispositioned in a more superficial location in the neocortex, suggesting the significance of growth cones for the final location of the neurons. This process occurs in spite of the "inside-out" principle in which later-born neurons are situated more superficially. PMID:22617848

  12. WAVE2-Abi2 complex controls growth cone activity and regulates the multipolar-bipolar transition as well as the initiation of glia-guided migration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min-Jue; Yagi, Hideshi; Kuroda, Kazuki; Wang, Chen-Chi; Komada, Munekazu; Zhao, Hong; Sakakibara, Akira; Miyata, Takaki; Nagata, Koh-Ichi; Oka, Yuichiro; Iguchi, Tokuichi; Sato, Makoto

    2013-06-01

    Glia-guided migration (glia-guided locomotion) during radial migration is a characteristic yet unique mode of migration. In this process, the directionality of migration is predetermined by glial processes and not by growth cones. Prior to the initiation of glia-guided migration, migrating neurons transform from multipolar to bipolar, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this multipolar-bipolar transition and the commencement of glia-guided migration are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the multipolar-bipolar transition is not solely a cell autonomous event; instead, the interaction of growth cones with glial processes plays an essential role. Time-lapse imaging with lattice assays reveals the importance of vigorously active growth cones in searching for appropriate glial scaffolds, completing the transition, and initiating glia-guided migration. These growth cone activities are regulated by Abl kinase and Cdk5 via WAVE2-Abi2 through the phosphorylation of tyrosine 150 and serine 137 of WAVE2. Neurons that do not display such growth cone activities are mispositioned in a more superficial location in the neocortex, suggesting the significance of growth cones for the final location of the neurons. This process occurs in spite of the "inside-out" principle in which later-born neurons are situated more superficially.

  13. Numerical simulation and performance improvement of a multi-polar concentric Halbach cylindrical magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yonghua; Guo, Yue; Xiao, Shuifang; Yu, Shen; Ji, Hu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-05-01

    Multi-polar concentric Halbach cylinders of magnets could generate the magnetic field varying considerably in the annular gaps, thus were applied in the rotary magnetic refrigerators. In the current investigation, a six-polar concentric Halbach cylinder is developed based on the ideal concentric one by the numerical simulation with COMSOL Multiphysics. Cylinder radii are optimized and magnet material profiles are adjusted for a better overall performance (Λcool). Moreover, the segmentation on the concentric cylinder is conducted for an easy fabrication, and the edge effect of finite-length device is studied. With the present investigation, it is found that a larger external radius of external cylinder facilitates a larger flux density in the high field region (| B | bar high), while Λcool could be worse. Meanwhile, with the removal of magnet materials enclosed by the equipotential lines of magnetic vector potential, the magnetic flux density in low field region (| B | bar low) drops from 0.271 to 0.0136 T, and Λcool rises from 1.36 to 1.85 T0.7. Moreover, a proper segmentation would not degrade the difference between | B | bar high and | B | bar low, on the contrary, Λcool rises by about 20.2% due to magnet materials lack for efficiency replaced by soft irons. Finally, current 3D simulation indicates the edge effect on Λcool could be trivial.

  14. Automated Wetland Delineation from Multi-Frequency and Multi-Polarized SAR Images in High Temporal and Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, L.; Schmitt, A.; Wendleder, A.

    2016-06-01

    Water scarcity is one of the main challenges posed by the changing climate. Especially in semi-arid regions where water reservoirs are filled during the very short rainy season, but have to store enough water for the extremely long dry season, the intelligent handling of water resources is vital. This study focusses on Lac Bam in Burkina Faso, which is the largest natural lake of the country and of high importance for the local inhabitants for irrigated farming, animal watering, and extraction of water for drinking and sanitation. With respect to the competition for water resources an independent area-wide monitoring system is essential for the acceptance of any decision maker. The following contribution introduces a weather and illumination independent monitoring system for the automated wetland delineation with a high temporal (about two weeks) and a high spatial sampling (about five meters). The similarities of the multispectral and multi-polarized SAR acquisitions by RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X are studied as well as the differences. The results indicate that even basic approaches without pre-classification time series analysis or post-classification filtering are already enough to establish a monitoring system of prime importance for a whole region.

  15. Quantifying the dynamics of water bodies, wetlands and biomass in the Poyang Lake region: A multi-polarization SAR remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Huiyong

    species. Temporal profiles of C-band multi-polarized backscatter coefficients for individual land cover types over the period of December 2004 to November 2005 were studied and described in the context of the ecology and seasonal dynamics of biophysical parameters of individual land cover types. A knowledge-based hierarchical land cover mapping method was developed to quantify the dynamics of paddy rice, natural wetlands and floods using the time series of HH- and HV-backscatters. The specific phenological and ecological characteristics of wetlands including paddy rice are the most important data in mapping their spatial and temporal patterns. The classification accuracy is over 90% for water bodies, rice paddies and Carex spp. wetlands, but it is not high for tall wetlands (68%). A decision tree approach was adopted to evaluate the capacity of L-band SAR in land cover mapping by combining with optical imagery. Classification errors were mainly induced by the mixed spectrum between and covers, and lack of independent training data and validation data also caused uncertainty in the results.

  16. Towards an accurate representation of electrostatics in classical force fields: Efficient implementation of multipolar interactions in biomolecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagui, Celeste; Pedersen, Lee G.; Darden, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The accurate simulation of biologically active macromolecules faces serious limitations that originate in the treatment of electrostatics in the empirical force fields. The current use of "partial charges" is a significant source of errors, since these vary widely with different conformations. By contrast, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) obtained through the use of a distributed multipole moment description, has been shown to converge to the quantum MEP outside the van der Waals surface, when higher order multipoles are used. However, in spite of the considerable improvement to the representation of the electronic cloud, higher order multipoles are not part of current classical biomolecular force fields due to the excessive computational cost. In this paper we present an efficient formalism for the treatment of higher order multipoles in Cartesian tensor formalism. The Ewald "direct sum" is evaluated through a McMurchie-Davidson formalism [L. McMurchie and E. Davidson, J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)]. The "reciprocal sum" has been implemented in three different ways: using an Ewald scheme, a particle mesh Ewald (PME) method, and a multigrid-based approach. We find that even though the use of the McMurchie-Davidson formalism considerably reduces the cost of the calculation with respect to the standard matrix implementation of multipole interactions, the calculation in direct space remains expensive. When most of the calculation is moved to reciprocal space via the PME method, the cost of a calculation where all multipolar interactions (up to hexadecapole-hexadecapole) are included is only about 8.5 times more expensive than a regular AMBER 7 [D. A. Pearlman et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 91, 1 (1995)] implementation with only charge-charge interactions. The multigrid implementation is slower but shows very promising results for parallelization. It provides a natural way to interface with continuous, Gaussian-based electrostatics in the future. It is

  17. Towards an accurate representation of electrostatics in classical force fields: efficient implementation of multipolar interactions in biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Sagui, Celeste; Pedersen, Lee G; Darden, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The accurate simulation of biologically active macromolecules faces serious limitations that originate in the treatment of electrostatics in the empirical force fields. The current use of "partial charges" is a significant source of errors, since these vary widely with different conformations. By contrast, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) obtained through the use of a distributed multipole moment description, has been shown to converge to the quantum MEP outside the van der Waals surface, when higher order multipoles are used. However, in spite of the considerable improvement to the representation of the electronic cloud, higher order multipoles are not part of current classical biomolecular force fields due to the excessive computational cost. In this paper we present an efficient formalism for the treatment of higher order multipoles in Cartesian tensor formalism. The Ewald "direct sum" is evaluated through a McMurchie-Davidson formalism [L. McMurchie and E. Davidson, J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)]. The "reciprocal sum" has been implemented in three different ways: using an Ewald scheme, a particle mesh Ewald (PME) method, and a multigrid-based approach. We find that even though the use of the McMurchie-Davidson formalism considerably reduces the cost of the calculation with respect to the standard matrix implementation of multipole interactions, the calculation in direct space remains expensive. When most of the calculation is moved to reciprocal space via the PME method, the cost of a calculation where all multipolar interactions (up to hexadecapole-hexadecapole) are included is only about 8.5 times more expensive than a regular AMBER 7 [D. A. Pearlman et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 91, 1 (1995)] implementation with only charge-charge interactions. The multigrid implementation is slower but shows very promising results for parallelization. It provides a natural way to interface with continuous, Gaussian-based electrostatics in the future. It is

  18. Multipolarity remanences in lower oceanic crustal gabbros recovered by drilling at Hess Deep (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 345)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Antony; Horst, Andrew; Friedman, Sarah; Nozaka, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    A long-term goal of the scientific ocean drilling community is to understand the processes by which the ocean crust is constructed through magmatism, deformation, metamorphism and hydrothermal cooling. Insights into the magnetic properties of the lower crust have come from drilling at oceanic core complexes and in tectonic windows. At the Hess Deep Rift, propagation of the Cocos-Nazca Ridge into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust exposes a dismembered, but nearly complete lower crustal section. Here, IODP Expedition 345 (Site U1415) recovered primitive plutonic lithologies including gabbro, troctolitic gabbro and olivine gabbronorite. These rocks exhibit cumulate textures similar to those found in layered basic intrusions and some ophiolite complexes. Metamorphism is dominated by background greenschist facies alteration associated with cataclastic deformation that likely results from Cocos-Nazca rifting. Some intervals display complex, multiple remanence components within individual samples. A high temperature component unblocks above 500°-520°C and an intermediate temperature component of nearly antipodal direction unblocks between 425°-450°C and 500°-520°C. In addition, a few samples display a third component that unblocks between 100-350°C that is nearly parallel to the highest temperature component. These multiple, nearly antipodal components suggest that remanence was acquired in different geomagnetic chrons, and represent the first multipolarity remanences seen in Pacific lower oceanic crust. Similar remanence structures, however, have been reported in lower crustal gabbros recovered from slow-spreading rate crust along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and have been interpreted to reflect protracted accretion or protracted cooling. In contrast, at Hess Deep unblocking temperatures appear consistent with temperatures inferred for successive phases of alteration, suggesting an alteration history spanning at least two polarity chrons.

  19. Multipolarity Remanences in Lower Oceanic Crustal Gabbros Recovered By Drilling at Hess Deep (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 345)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A.; Horst, A. J.; Friedman, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A long-term goal of the scientific ocean drilling community is to understand the processes by which the ocean crust is constructed through magmatism, deformation, metamorphism and hydrothermal cooling. Insights into the magnetic properties of the lower crust have come from drilling at oceanic core complexes and in tectonic windows. At the Hess Deep Rift, propagation of the Cocos-Nazca Ridge into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust exposes a dismembered, but nearly complete lower crustal section. Here, IODP Expedition 345 (Site U1415) recovered primitive plutonic lithologies including gabbro, troctolitic gabbro and olivine gabbronorite. These rocks exhibit cumulate textures similar to those found in layered basic intrusions and some ophiolite complexes. Metamorphism is dominated by background greenschist facies alteration associated with cataclastic deformation that likely results from Cocos-Nazca rifting. Some intervals display complex, multiple remanence components within individual samples. A high temperature component unblocks above 500°-520°C and an intermediate temperature component of nearly antipodal direction unblocks between 425°-450°C and 500°-520°C. In addition, a few samples display a third component that unblocks between 100-350°C that is nearly parallel to the highest temperature component. These multiple, nearly antipodal components suggest that remanence was acquired in different geomagnetic chrons, and represent the first multipolarity remanences seen in Pacific lower oceanic crust. Similar remanence structures, however, have been reported in lower crustal gabbros recovered from slow-spreading rate crust along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and have been interpreted to reflect protracted accretion or protracted cooling. In contrast, at Hess Deep unblocking temperatures appear consistent with temperatures inferred for successive phases of alteration, suggesting an alteration history spanning at least two polarity chrons.

  20. Cdk5 is required for multipolar-to-bipolar transition during radial neuronal migration and proper dendrite development of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Toshio; Hirasawa, Motoyuki; Tabata, Hidenori; Mutoh, Tetsuji; Adachi, Tomoko; Suzuki, Hiromi; Saruta, Keiko; Iwasato, Takuji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hashimoto, Mistuhiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ogawa, Masaharu; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2007-06-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex consists of six layers that are generated via coordinated neuronal migration during the embryonic period. Recent studies identified specific phases of radial migration of cortical neurons. After the final division, neurons transform from a multipolar to a bipolar shape within the subventricular zone-intermediate zone (SVZ-IZ) and then migrate along radial glial fibres. Mice lacking Cdk5 exhibit abnormal corticogenesis owing to neuronal migration defects. When we introduced GFP into migrating neurons at E14.5 by in utero electroporation, we observed migrating neurons in wild-type but not in Cdk5(-/-) embryos after 3-4 days. Introduction of the dominant-negative form of Cdk5 into the wild-type migrating neurons confirmed specific impairment of the multipolar-to-bipolar transition within the SVZ-IZ in a cell-autonomous manner. Cortex-specific Cdk5 conditional knockout mice showed inverted layering of the cerebral cortex and the layer V and callosal neurons, but not layer VI neurons, had severely impaired dendritic morphology. The amount of the dendritic protein Map2 was decreased in the cerebral cortex of Cdk5-deficient mice, and the axonal trajectory of cortical neurons within the cortex was also abnormal. These results indicate that Cdk5 is required for proper multipolar-to-bipolar transition, and a deficiency of Cdk5 results in abnormal morphology of pyramidal neurons. In addition, proper radial neuronal migration generates an inside-out pattern of cerebral cortex formation and normal axonal trajectories of cortical pyramidal neurons.

  1. Establishment of M1 multipolarity of a 6.5 (micro)2n resonance in 172Yb at E(gamma) = 3.3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, A; Voinov, A; Algin, E; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garrett, P E; Guttormsen, M; Nelson, R O; Rekstad, J; Siem, S

    2004-02-04

    Two-step-cascade spectra in {sup 172}Yb have been measured after thermal neutron capture. they are compared to calculations based on experimental values of the level density and radiative strength function (RSF) obtained from the {sup 173}Yb(3{sup 3}He,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 172}Yb reaction. The multipolarity of a 6.5(15) {mu}{sub N}{sup 2} resonance at E{sub {gamma}} = 3.3(1) MeV in the RSF is determined to be M1 by this comparison.

  2. Multipolarity analysis for {sup 14}C high-energy resonance populated by ({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, D. Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E.; Bonaccorso, A.; Fortunato, L.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2015-10-15

    The {sup 12}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 14}C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition.

  3. General methodology to optimize damping functions to account for charge penetration effects in electrostatic calculations using multicentered multipolar expansions.

    PubMed

    Werneck, Araken S; Filho, Tarcísio M Rocha; Dardenne, Laurent E

    2008-01-17

    We developed a methodology to optimize exponential damping functions to account for charge penetration effects when computing molecular electrostatic properties using the multicentered multipolar expansion method (MME). This methodology is based in the optimization of a damping parameter set using a two-step fast local fitting procedure and the ab initio (Hartree-Fock/6-31G** and 6-31G**+) electrostatic potential calculated in a set of concentric grid of points as reference. The principal aspect of the methodology is a first local fitting step which generates a focused initial guess to improve the performance of a simplex method avoiding the use of multiple runs and the choice of initial guesses. Three different strategies for the determination of optimized damping parameters were tested in the following studies: (1) investigation of the error in the calculation of the electrostatic interaction energy for five hydrogen-bonded dimers at standard and nonstandard hydrogen-bonded geometries and at nonequilibrium geometries; (2) calculation of the electrostatic molecular properties (potential and electric field) for eight small molecular systems (methanol, ammonia, water, formamide, dichloromethane, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide, and acetonitrile) and for the 20 amino acids. Our results show that the methodology performs well not only for small molecules but also for relatively larger molecular systems. The analysis of the distinct parameter sets associated with different optimization strategies show that (i) a specific parameter set is more suitable and more general for electrostatic interaction energy calculations, with an average absolute error of 0.46 kcal/mol at hydrogen-bond geometries; (ii) a second parameter set is more suitable for electrostatic potential and electric field calculations at and outside the van der Waals (vdW) envelope, with an average error decrease >72% at the vdW surface. A more general amino acid damping parameter set was constructed from the

  4. Interplay of interchain interactions and exchange anisotropy: Stability and fragility of multipolar states in spin-1/2 quasi-one-dimensional frustrated helimagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Satoshi; Drechsler, Stefan-Ludwig; Kuzian, Roman; Richter, Johannes; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2015-12-01

    We quantify the stability of the formation of multipolar states against always present interchain couplings in quasi-one-dimensional spin-1/2 chain systems with a frustrating in-chain J1-J2 exchange, including parameter regimes that are of direct relevance to many edge-shared cuprate spin-chain compounds. Three representative types of antiferromagnetic interchain coupling and the presence of uniaxial exchange anisotropy are considered. The magnetic phase diagrams are determined by density matrix renormalization group calculations and completed by very accurate analytic and numerical results for the nematic and the dipolar phases employing the hard-core-boson approach. We establish that a sizable interchain coupling has a strong influence on the possible instability of multipolar phases at high magnetic fields in the vicinity of the saturation fields in favor of the usual dipolar one-magnon phase. Moreover, skew interchain couplings strongly affect the pitch of spiral states. Our theoretical results bring to the fore candidate materials close to quantum nematic/triatic ordering.

  5. Multipolar, time-dynamical model for the loss compensation and lasing of a spherical plasmonic nanoparticle spaser immersed in an active gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, Alessandro; Chipouline, Arkadi; Aradian, Ashod

    2016-09-01

    The plasmonic response of a metal nanoparticle in the presence of surrounding gain elements is studied, using a space and time-dependent model, which integrates a quantum formalism to describe the gain and a classical treatment for the metal. Our model fully takes into account the influence of the system geometry (nanosphere) and offers for the first time, the possibility to describe the temporal evolution of the fields and the coupling among the multipolar modes of the particle. We calculate the lasing threshold value for all multipoles of the spaser, and demonstrate that the dipolar one is lowest. The onset of the lasing instability, in the linear regime, is then studied both with and without external field forcing. We also study the behaviour of the system below the lasing threshold, with the external field, demonstrating the existence of an amplification regime where the nanoparticle’s plasmon is strongly enhanced as the threshold is approached. Finally, a qualitative discussion is provided on later, non-linear stages of the dynamics and the approach to the steady-state of the spaser; in particular, it is shown that, for the considered geometry, the spasing is necessarily multi-modal and multipolar modes are always activated.

  6. Multipolar, time-dynamical model for the loss compensation and lasing of a spherical plasmonic nanoparticle spaser immersed in an active gain medium.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Alessandro; Chipouline, Arkadi; Aradian, Ashod

    2016-01-01

    The plasmonic response of a metal nanoparticle in the presence of surrounding gain elements is studied, using a space and time-dependent model, which integrates a quantum formalism to describe the gain and a classical treatment for the metal. Our model fully takes into account the influence of the system geometry (nanosphere) and offers for the first time, the possibility to describe the temporal evolution of the fields and the coupling among the multipolar modes of the particle. We calculate the lasing threshold value for all multipoles of the spaser, and demonstrate that the dipolar one is lowest. The onset of the lasing instability, in the linear regime, is then studied both with and without external field forcing. We also study the behaviour of the system below the lasing threshold, with the external field, demonstrating the existence of an amplification regime where the nanoparticle's plasmon is strongly enhanced as the threshold is approached. Finally, a qualitative discussion is provided on later, non-linear stages of the dynamics and the approach to the steady-state of the spaser; in particular, it is shown that, for the considered geometry, the spasing is necessarily multi-modal and multipolar modes are always activated. PMID:27625072

  7. Multipolar, time-dynamical model for the loss compensation and lasing of a spherical plasmonic nanoparticle spaser immersed in an active gain medium

    PubMed Central

    Veltri, Alessandro; Chipouline, Arkadi; Aradian, Ashod

    2016-01-01

    The plasmonic response of a metal nanoparticle in the presence of surrounding gain elements is studied, using a space and time-dependent model, which integrates a quantum formalism to describe the gain and a classical treatment for the metal. Our model fully takes into account the influence of the system geometry (nanosphere) and offers for the first time, the possibility to describe the temporal evolution of the fields and the coupling among the multipolar modes of the particle. We calculate the lasing threshold value for all multipoles of the spaser, and demonstrate that the dipolar one is lowest. The onset of the lasing instability, in the linear regime, is then studied both with and without external field forcing. We also study the behaviour of the system below the lasing threshold, with the external field, demonstrating the existence of an amplification regime where the nanoparticle’s plasmon is strongly enhanced as the threshold is approached. Finally, a qualitative discussion is provided on later, non-linear stages of the dynamics and the approach to the steady-state of the spaser; in particular, it is shown that, for the considered geometry, the spasing is necessarily multi-modal and multipolar modes are always activated. PMID:27625072

  8. C3G/Rapgef1 Is Required in Multipolar Neurons for the Transition to a Bipolar Morphology during Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavin; Lutter, Daniela; Bochenek, Magdalena L; Kato, Katsuhiro; Tsytsyura, Yaroslav; Glyvuk, Natalia; Sakakibara, Akira; Klingauf, Jürgen; Adams, Ralf H; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of a polarized morphology is essential for the development and function of neurons. During the development of the mammalian neocortex, neurons arise in the ventricular zone (VZ) from radial glia cells (RGCs) and leave the VZ to generate the cortical plate (CP). During their migration, newborn neurons first assume a multipolar morphology in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and lower intermediate zone (IZ). Subsequently, they undergo a multi-to-bipolar (MTB) transition to become bipolar in the upper IZ by developing a leading process and a trailing axon. The small GTPases Rap1A and Rap1B act as master regulators of neural cell polarity in the developing mouse neocortex. They are required for maintaining the polarity of RGCs and directing the MTB transition of multipolar neurons. Here we show that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) C3G (encoded by the Rapgef1 gene) is a crucial regulator of the MTB transition in vivo by conditionally inactivating the Rapgef1 gene in the developing mouse cortex at different time points during neuronal development. Inactivation of C3G results in defects in neuronal migration, axon formation and cortical lamination. Live cell imaging shows that C3G is required in cortical neurons for both the specification of an axon and the initiation of radial migration by forming a leading process. PMID:27111087

  9. C3G/Rapgef1 Is Required in Multipolar Neurons for the Transition to a Bipolar Morphology during Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavin; Lutter, Daniela; Bochenek, Magdalena L; Kato, Katsuhiro; Tsytsyura, Yaroslav; Glyvuk, Natalia; Sakakibara, Akira; Klingauf, Jürgen; Adams, Ralf H; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of a polarized morphology is essential for the development and function of neurons. During the development of the mammalian neocortex, neurons arise in the ventricular zone (VZ) from radial glia cells (RGCs) and leave the VZ to generate the cortical plate (CP). During their migration, newborn neurons first assume a multipolar morphology in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and lower intermediate zone (IZ). Subsequently, they undergo a multi-to-bipolar (MTB) transition to become bipolar in the upper IZ by developing a leading process and a trailing axon. The small GTPases Rap1A and Rap1B act as master regulators of neural cell polarity in the developing mouse neocortex. They are required for maintaining the polarity of RGCs and directing the MTB transition of multipolar neurons. Here we show that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) C3G (encoded by the Rapgef1 gene) is a crucial regulator of the MTB transition in vivo by conditionally inactivating the Rapgef1 gene in the developing mouse cortex at different time points during neuronal development. Inactivation of C3G results in defects in neuronal migration, axon formation and cortical lamination. Live cell imaging shows that C3G is required in cortical neurons for both the specification of an axon and the initiation of radial migration by forming a leading process.

  10. C3G/Rapgef1 Is Required in Multipolar Neurons for the Transition to a Bipolar Morphology during Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bhavin; Lutter, Daniela; Bochenek, Magdalena L.; Kato, Katsuhiro; Tsytsyura, Yaroslav; Glyvuk, Natalia; Sakakibara, Akira; Klingauf, Jürgen; Adams, Ralf H.; Püschel, Andreas W.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of a polarized morphology is essential for the development and function of neurons. During the development of the mammalian neocortex, neurons arise in the ventricular zone (VZ) from radial glia cells (RGCs) and leave the VZ to generate the cortical plate (CP). During their migration, newborn neurons first assume a multipolar morphology in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and lower intermediate zone (IZ). Subsequently, they undergo a multi-to-bipolar (MTB) transition to become bipolar in the upper IZ by developing a leading process and a trailing axon. The small GTPases Rap1A and Rap1B act as master regulators of neural cell polarity in the developing mouse neocortex. They are required for maintaining the polarity of RGCs and directing the MTB transition of multipolar neurons. Here we show that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) C3G (encoded by the Rapgef1 gene) is a crucial regulator of the MTB transition in vivo by conditionally inactivating the Rapgef1 gene in the developing mouse cortex at different time points during neuronal development. Inactivation of C3G results in defects in neuronal migration, axon formation and cortical lamination. Live cell imaging shows that C3G is required in cortical neurons for both the specification of an axon and the initiation of radial migration by forming a leading process. PMID:27111087

  11. Genetic changes induced by space flight factors in barley seeds on Soyuz-5 and Soyuz-9 craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuzhdin, N. I.; Dozortseva, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Air-dry seeds of the barley Zimujuschij moscowskyi of the 1969 harvest were taken into space onboard the spaceships Soyuz-5 and Soyuz-9. A cytological study of the mitoses in meristemic cells in rootlet terminals revealed that space flight factors (SFF) in nonirradiated seeds induced about 3% of aberrant cells. After irradiation the effect of SFF increased over two-fold. Although the radio protectors ensured the seeds against from the SFF-induced damage either in irradiated or nonirradiated seed cells which is inconsistent with the previously obtained data.

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption⋆

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.; Shvedova, A.A.; Reynolds, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 μg/cm2 single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). To investigate mitotic spindle aberrations at concentrations anticipated in exposed workers, primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells were exposed to SWCNT for 24–72 h at doses equivalent to 20 weeks of exposure at the Permissible Exposure Limit for particulates not otherwise regulated. We have now demonstrated fragmented centrosomes, disrupted mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number at those doses. The data further demonstrated multipolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of the disrupted mitoses. The increased multipolar mitotic spindles were associated with an increased number of cells in the G2 phase of mitosis, indicating a mitotic checkpoint response. Nanotubes were observed in association with mitotic spindle microtubules, the centrosomes and condensed chromatin in cells exposed to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm2 SWCNT. Three-dimensional reconstructions showed carbon nanotubes within the centrosome structure. The lower doses did not cause cytotoxicity or reduction in colony formation after 24 h; however, after three days, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the SWCNT-exposed cells. Colony formation assays showed an increased proliferation seven days after exposure. Our results show significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by SWCNT at occupationally relevant doses. The increased proliferation that was observed in carbon nanotube-exposed cells indicates a greater potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter

  13. Transferred multipolar atom model for 10β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate obtained from the biotransformation of methyloestrenolone.

    PubMed

    Faroque, Muhammad Umer; Yousuf, Sammer; Zafar, Salman; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Ahmed, Maqsood

    2016-05-01

    Biotransformation is the structural modification of compounds using enzymes as the catalysts and it plays a key role in the synthesis of pharmaceutically important compounds. 10β,17β-Dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate, C19H28O3·2H2O, was obtained from the fungal biotransformation of methyloestrenolone. The structure was refined using the classical independent atom model (IAM) and a transferred multipolar atom model using the ELMAM2 database. The results from the two refinements have been compared. The ELMAM2 refinement has been found to be superior in terms of the refinement statistics. It has been shown that certain electron-density-derived properties can be calculated on the basis of the transferred parameters for crystals which diffract to ordinary resolution.

  14. Transferred multipolar atom model for 10β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate obtained from the biotransformation of methyloestrenolone.

    PubMed

    Faroque, Muhammad Umer; Yousuf, Sammer; Zafar, Salman; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Ahmed, Maqsood

    2016-05-01

    Biotransformation is the structural modification of compounds using enzymes as the catalysts and it plays a key role in the synthesis of pharmaceutically important compounds. 10β,17β-Dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate, C19H28O3·2H2O, was obtained from the fungal biotransformation of methyloestrenolone. The structure was refined using the classical independent atom model (IAM) and a transferred multipolar atom model using the ELMAM2 database. The results from the two refinements have been compared. The ELMAM2 refinement has been found to be superior in terms of the refinement statistics. It has been shown that certain electron-density-derived properties can be calculated on the basis of the transferred parameters for crystals which diffract to ordinary resolution. PMID:27146568

  15. Reduction of Fluoroscopic Exposure Using a New Fluoroscopy Integrating Technology in a 3D-Mapping System During Pulmonary Vein Isolation With a Circular Multipolar Irrigated Catheter.

    PubMed

    Blockhaus, Christian; Schmidt, Jan; Kurt, Muhammed; Clasen, Lukas; Brinkmeyer, Christoph; Katsianos, Efstratios; Müller, Patrick; Gerguri, Shqipe; Kelm, Malte; Shin, Dong-In; Makimoto, Hisaki

    2016-05-25

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a cornerstone therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). With increasing numbers of PVI procedures, demand arises to reduce the cumulative fluoroscopic radiation exposure for both the physician and the patient. New technologies are emerging to address this issue. Here, we report our first experiences with a new fluoroscopy integrating technology in addition to a current 3D-mapping system. The new fluoroscopy integrating system (FIS) with 3D-mapping was used prospectively in 15 patients with AF. Control PVI cases (n = 37) were collected retrospectively as a complete series. Total procedure time (skin to skin), fluoroscopic time, and dose-area-product (DAP) data were analyzed. All PVI procedures were performed by one experienced physician using a commercially available circular multipolar irrigated ablation catheter. All PVI procedures were successfully undertaken without major complications. Baseline characteristics of the two groups showed no significant differences. In the group using the FIS, the fluoroscopic time and DAP were significantly reduced from 571 ± 187 seconds versus 1011 ± 527 seconds (P = 0.0029) and 4342 ± 2073 cGycm(2) versus 6208 ± 3314 cGycm(2) (P = 0.049), respectively. Mean procedure time was not significantly affected and was 114 ± 31 minutes versus 104 ± 24 minutes (P = 0.23) by the FIS.The use of the new FIS with the current 3D-mapping system enables a significant reduction of the total fluoroscopy time and DAP compared to the previous combination of 3D-mapping system plus normal fluoroscopy during PVI utilizing a circular multipolar irrigated ablation catheter. However, the concomitant total procedure time is not affected. Thus, the new system reduces the radiation exposure for both the physicians and patients.

  16. Modifications of mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 15, discusses modifications of mitosis, including endoreduplication, polyteny, endomitosis, C-mitosis, restitution, amitosis and multipolar mitoses. Apart from multipolar mitosis, all other mitotic modifications are characterized by an absent or defective spindle, and in most cases these result in the duplication of the chromosome number. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of an allosteric inhibitor of HSET that targets cancer cells with supernumerary centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Watts, Ciorsdaidh A; Richards, Frances M; Bender, Andreas; Bond, Peter J; Korb, Oliver; Kern, Oliver; Riddick, Michelle; Owen, Paul; Myers, Rebecca M; Raff, Jordan; Gergely, Fanni; Jodrell, Duncan I; Ley, Steven V

    2013-11-21

    Centrosomes associate with spindle poles; thus, the presence of two centrosomes promotes bipolar spindle assembly in normal cells. Cancer cells often contain supernumerary centrosomes, and to avoid multipolar mitosis and cell death, these are clustered into two poles by the microtubule motor protein HSET. We report the discovery of an allosteric inhibitor of HSET, CW069, which we designed using a methodology on an interface of chemistry and biology. Using this approach, we explored millions of compounds in silico and utilized convergent syntheses. Only compound CW069 showed marked activity against HSET in vitro. The inhibitor induced multipolar mitoses only in cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. CW069 therefore constitutes a valuable tool for probing HSET function and, by reducing the growth of cells containing supernumerary centrosomes, paves the way for new cancer therapeutics.

  18. On the use of L-band multipolarization airborne SAR for surveys of crops, vineyards, and orchards in a California irrigated agricultural region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The airborne L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collected multipolarization calibrated image data over an irrigated agricultural test site near Fresno, CA, on March 6, 1984. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the effects of incidence angle on the measured backscattering coefficients could be removed by using a correction factor equal to the secant of the angle raised to the 1.4 power, (2) for this scene and time of year, the various polarization channels were highly correlated such that the use of more than one polarization added little to the ability of the radar to discriminate vegetation type or condition; the exception was barley which separated from vineyards only when a combination of like and cross polarization data were used (polarization was very useful for corn identification in fall crops), (3) an excellent separation between herbaceous vegetation (alfalfa, barley, and oats) or bare fields and trees in orchards existed in brightness was well correlated to alfalfa height or biomass, especially for the HH polarization combination, (5) vineyards exhibited a narrow range of brightnesses with no systematic effects of type or number of stakes nor of number of wires in the trellises nor of the size of the vines, (6) within the orchard classes, areal biomass characterized by basal area differences caused radar image brightness differences for small to medium trees but not for medium to large trees.

  19. Scalable improvement of SPME multipolar electrostatics in anisotropic polarizable molecular mechanics using a general short-range penetration correction up to quadrupoles.

    PubMed

    Narth, Christophe; Lagardère, Louis; Polack, Étienne; Gresh, Nohad; Wang, Qiantao; Bell, David R; Rackers, Joshua A; Ponder, Jay W; Ren, Pengyu Y; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2016-02-15

    We propose a general coupling of the Smooth Particle Mesh Ewald SPME approach for distributed multipoles to a short-range charge penetration correction modifying the charge-charge, charge-dipole and charge-quadrupole energies. Such an approach significantly improves electrostatics when compared to ab initio values and has been calibrated on Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory reference data. Various neutral molecular dimers have been tested and results on the complexes of mono- and divalent cations with a water ligand are also provided. Transferability of the correction is adressed in the context of the implementation of the AMOEBA and SIBFA polarizable force fields in the TINKER-HP software. As the choices of the multipolar distribution are discussed, conclusions are drawn for the future penetration-corrected polarizable force fields highlighting the mandatory need of non-spurious procedures for the obtention of well balanced and physically meaningful distributed moments. Finally, scalability and parallelism of the short-range corrected SPME approach are addressed, demonstrating that the damping function is computationally affordable and accurate for molecular dynamics simulations of complex bio- or bioinorganic systems in periodic boundary conditions. PMID:26814845

  20. Building on the EGIPPS performance assessment: the multipolar framework as a heuristic to tackle the complexity of performance of public service oriented health care organisations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Performance of health care systems is a key concern of policy makers and health service managers all over the world. It is also a major challenge, given its multidimensional nature that easily leads to conceptual and methodological confusion. This is reflected by a scarcity of models that comprehensively analyse health system performance. Discussion In health, one of the most comprehensive performance frameworks was developed by the team of Leggat and Sicotte. Their framework integrates 4 key organisational functions (goal attainment, production, adaptation to the environment, and values and culture) and the tensions between these functions. We modified this framework to better fit the assessment of the performance of health organisations in the public service domain and propose an analytical strategy that takes it into the social complexity of health organisations. The resulting multipolar performance framework (MPF) is a meta-framework that facilitates the analysis of the relations and interactions between the multiple actors that influence the performance of health organisations. Summary Using the MPF in a dynamic reiterative mode not only helps managers to identify the bottlenecks that hamper performance, but also the unintended effects and feedback loops that emerge. Similarly, it helps policymakers and programme managers at central level to better anticipate the potential results and side effects of and required conditions for health policies and programmes and to steer their implementation accordingly. PMID:24742181

  1. Multipolar phases and magnetically hidden order: review of the heavy-fermion compound Ce1‑x La x B6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Alistair S.; Friemel, Gerd; Inosov, Dmytro S.

    2016-06-01

    Cerium hexaboride is a cubic f-electron heavy-fermion compound that displays a rich array of low-temperature magnetic ordering phenomena which have been the subject of investigation for more than 50 years. Its complex behaviour is the result of competing interactions, with both itinerant and local electrons playing important roles. Investigating this material has proven to be a substantial challenge, in particular because of the appearance of a ‘magnetically hidden order’ phase, which remained elusive to neutron-scattering investigations for many years. It was not until the development of modern x-ray scattering techniques that the long suspected multipolar origin of this phase was confirmed. Doping with non-magnetic lanthanum dilutes the magnetic cerium sublattice and reduces the f-electron count, bringing about substantial changes to the ground state with the emergence of new phases and quantum critical phenomena. To this day, Ce1‑x La x B6 and its related compounds remain a subject of intense interest. Despite the substantial progress in understanding their behaviour, they continue to reveal new and unexplained physical phenomena. Here we present a review of the accumulated body of knowledge on this family of materials in order to provide a firm standpoint for future investigations.

  2. Cellular and molecular characterization of multipolar Map5-expressing cells: a subset of newly generated, stage-specific parenchymal cells in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like cells (mMap5 cells) expressing the microtubule associated protein 5 (Map5), which is known to be present in most neurons. We characterized the morphology, phenotype, regional distribution, proliferative dynamics, and stage-specific marker expression of these cells in the rabbit and mouse CNS, also assessing their existence in other mammalian species. mMap5 cells were never found to co-express the Ng2 antigen. They appear to be a population of glial cells sharing features but also differences with Ng2+progenitor cells. We show that mMap5 cells are newly generated, postmitotic parenchymal elements of the oligodendroglial lineage, thus being a stage-specific population of polydendrocytes. Finally, we report that the number of mMap5 cells, although reduced within the brain of adult/old animals, can increase in neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions.

  3. Increased doublecortin (DCX) expression and incidence of DCX-immunoreactive multipolar cells in the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb system of suicides

    PubMed Central

    Maheu, Marissa E.; Devorak, Julia; Freibauer, Alexander; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; Turecki, Gustavo; Mechawar, Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Postmortem studies have confirmed the occurrence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in humans and implicated this process in antidepressant response, yet neurogenesis in other regions remains to be examined in the context of depression. Here we assess the extent of subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB) neurogenesis in adult humans having died by suicide. Protein expression of proliferative and neurogenic markers Sox2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and doublecortin (DCX) were examined in postmortem SVZ and OB samples from depressed suicides and matched sudden-death controls. In the SVZ, DCX-immunoreactive (IR) cells displayed phenotypes typical of progenitors, whereas in the olfactory tract (OT), they were multipolar with variable size and morphologies suggestive of differentiating cells. DCX expression was significantly increased in the OB of suicides, whereas SVZ DCX expression was higher among unmedicated, but not antidepressant-treated, suicides. Although very few DCX-IR cells were present in the control OT, they were considerably more common in suicides and correlated with OB DCX levels. Suicides also displayed higher DCX-IR process volumes. These results support the notion that OB neurogenesis is minimal in adult humans. They further raise the possibility that the differentiation and migration of SVZ-derived neuroblasts may be altered in unmedicated suicides, leading to an accumulation of ectopically differentiating cells in the OT. Normal SVZ DCX expression among suicides receiving antidepressants suggests a potentially novel mode of action of antidepressant medication. Given the modest group sizes and rarity of DCX-IR cells assessed here, a larger-scale characterization will be required before firm conclusions can be made regarding the identity of these cells. PMID:26082689

  4. Harnessing Fluorine–Sulfur Contacts and Multipolar Interactions for the Design of p53 Mutant Y220C Rescue Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many oncogenic mutants of the tumor suppressor p53 are conformationally unstable, including the frequently occurring Y220C mutant. We have previously developed several small-molecule stabilizers of this mutant. One of these molecules, PhiKan083, 1-(9-ethyl-9H-carbazole-3-yl)-N-methylmethanamine, binds to a mutation-induced surface crevice with a KD = 150 μM, thereby increasing the melting temperature of the protein and slowing its rate of aggregation. Incorporation of fluorine atoms into small molecule ligands can substantially improve binding affinity to their protein targets. We have, therefore, harnessed fluorine–protein interactions to improve the affinity of this ligand. Step-wise introduction of fluorines at the carbazole ethyl anchor, which is deeply buried within the binding site in the Y220C–PhiKan083 complex, led to a 5-fold increase in affinity for a 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl anchor (ligand efficiency of 0.3 kcal mol–1 atom–1). High-resolution crystal structures of the Y220C–ligand complexes combined with quantum chemical calculations revealed favorable interactions of the fluorines with protein backbone carbonyl groups (Leu145 and Trp146) and the sulfur of Cys220 at the mutation site. Affinity gains were, however, only achieved upon trifluorination, despite favorable interactions of the mono- and difluorinated anchors with the binding pocket, indicating a trade-off between energetically favorable protein–fluorine interactions and increased desolvation penalties. Taken together, the optimized carbazole scaffold provides a promising starting point for the development of high-affinity ligands to reactivate the tumor suppressor function of the p53 mutant Y220C in cancer cells. PMID:27267810

  5. Polarization effects and multipolarization SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Imaging radar polarimeters are usually implemented using a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) approach to give a high resolution image in two dimensions: range and azimuth. For each pixel in the image a polarimetric SAR gives sufficient information to characterize the polarimetric scattering properties of the imaged area (or target) as seen by the radar. Using a polarimetric SAR system as opposed to a single-polarization SAR system provides significantly more information about the target scattering mechanisms and allows better discrimination between different types of surfaces. In these notes a brief overview of SAR polarimetry is offered. The notes are intended as a text to accompany a lecture on SAR polarimetry as part of an AGARD-NATO course. Covered in the notes are the following: the polarization properties of electromagnetic waves; the concepts of radar scattering and measuring radar backscatter with a SAR; polarization synthesis; scattering matrix, Stokes matrix, and covariance matrix representations of polarimetric SAR data; polarization signature plots; design and calibration of polarimetric SAR systems; polarization filtering for target detection; fitting a simple model to polarimetric SAR measurements of naturally occurring features; and supervised classification of polarimetric SAR data.

  6. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  7. Functions and structure of nuclear deterrence in the post-cold war world. More for less - an arms control strategy for the 1990s. A SIOP for Perestroika. Theater nuclear forces and extended deterrence in a multipolar world. Special series report

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, D.M.; Wooten, R.E.; Sundberg, E.E.; Szafranski, R.; Booker, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This Publication includes: Essay (1). The Function and Structure of Nuclear Deterrence in the Post-Cold War World. Essay (2). More for Less-An Arms Control Strategy for the 1990s. Essay (3). A SIOP for Perestroika. Essay (4). Theater Nuclear Forces and Extended Deterrence in a Multipolar World.

  8. Gadolinium chloride pretreatment ameliorates acute cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Loukas G; Tzirogiannis, Konstantinos N; Demonakou, Maria D; Kourentzi, Kalliopi T; Mykoniatis, Michael G; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I

    2013-08-01

    Cadmium is a known industrial and environmental pollutant. It causes hepatotoxicity upon acute administration. Features of cadmium-induced acute hepatoxicity encompass necrosis, apoptosis, peliosis and inflammatory infiltration. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) may prevent cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity by suppressing Kupffer cells. The effect of GdCl3 pretreatment on a model of acute cadmium-induced liver injury was investigated. Male Wistar rats 4-5 months old were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline followed by cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 6.5 mg/kg) or GdCl3 (10 mg/kg) followed by CdCl2 (6.5 mg/kg; groups I and II, respectively). Rats of both the groups were killed at 9, 12, 16, 24, 48 and 60 h after cadmium intoxication. Liver sections were analyzed for necrosis, apoptosis, peliosis and mitoses. Liver regeneration was also evaluated by tritiated thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were also determined. Hepatic necrosis, hepatocyte and nonparenchymal cell apoptosis and macroscopic and microscopic types of peliosis hepatis were minimized by gadolinium pretreatment. Serum levels of AST and ALT were also greatly diminished in rats of group II. Tritiated thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA was increased in gadolinium pretreatment rats. Kupffer cell activation was minimal in both the groups of rats. Gadolinium pretreatment attenuates acute cadmium-induced liver injury in young Wistar rats, with mechanisms other than Kupffer cell elimination.

  9. On the disentangling modes of ortho- and para-braids in mitosing mammalian spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Matioli, G T

    1994-10-01

    This note complements a previous one (1), regarding in particular, mitotic separation of replica homologs from their templates, in mammalian spermatogonia. Topological differences between Ortho- and Para-braids determine different modes of antipodal segregation of paired homologs prior to onset of meiosis.

  10. [Effects of oil-refining microbes (genus Acinetobacter) on cytogenetical structures of human lymphocytes in cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Il'inskikh, N N; Il'inskikh, E N; Il'inskikh, I N

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess ability of oil-refining bacteria Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and A. valentis to induce karyopathological abnormalities and chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocyte cultures. It was found that the cultures infected with A. calcoaceticus showed significantly high frequencies of cytogenetical effects and chromosomal aberrant cells as compared to the intact cultures and cultures infected with A. valentis. The most of chromosomal aberrations, mainly chromatid aberrations, were located in 1 and 2 chromosomes. Moreover, the aberrations were detected in some specific chromosome areas. Abnormalities of mitotic cell division and nucleus morphology were determined in lymphocyte cultures infected with A. calcoaceticus. There were found significantly high frequencies of cells with micronuclei, nucleus protrusions, anaphase or metaphase chromosome and chromosomal fragments lagging as well as multipolar and C-mitoses. Thus, the oil-refining bacteria A. calcoaceticus in contrast to A. valentis demonstrated strong genotoxic effects in human lymphocyte cultures in vitro.

  11. DNA damage causes TP53-dependent coupling of self-renewal and senescence pathways in embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Thomas R; Salmina, Kristine; Huna, Anda; Inashkina, Inna; Jankevics, Eriks; Riekstina, Una; Kalnina, Zane; Ivanov, Andrey; Townsend, Paul A; Cragg, Mark S; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have highlighted an apparently paradoxical link between self-renewal and senescence triggered by DNA damage in certain cell types. In addition, the finding that TP53 can suppress senescence has caused a re-evaluation of its functional role in regulating these outcomes. To investigate these phenomena and their relationship to pluripotency and senescence, we examined the response of the TP53-competent embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line PA-1 to etoposide-induced DNA damage. Nuclear POU5F1/OCT4A and P21CIP1 were upregulated in the same cells following etoposide-induced G 2M arrest. However, while accumulating in the karyosol, the amount of OCT4A was reduced in the chromatin fraction. Phosphorylated CHK2 and RAD51/γH2AX-positive nuclear foci, overexpression of AURORA B kinase and moderate macroautophagy were evident. Upon release from G 2M arrest, cells with repaired DNA entered mitoses, while the cells with persisting DNA damage remained at this checkpoint or underwent mitotic slippage and gradually senesced. Reduction of TP53 using sh- or si-RNA prevented the upregulation of OCT4A and P21CIP1 and increased DNA damage. Subsequently, mitoses, micronucleation and senescence were all enhanced after TP53 reduction with senescence confirmed by upregulation of CDKN2A/P16INK4A and increased sa-β-galactosidase positivity. Those mitoses enhanced by TP53 silencing were shown to be multicentrosomal and multi-polar, containing fragmented and highly deranged chromosomes, indicating a loss of genome integrity. Together, these data suggest that TP53-dependent coupling of self-renewal and senescence pathways through the DNA damage checkpoint provides a mechanism for how embryonal stem cell-like EC cells safeguard DNA integrity, genome stability and ultimately the fidelity of self-renewal. PMID:23287532

  12. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  13. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface.

  14. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, E. I.; Guillot, B.; Blakeley, M. P.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Mitschler, A.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Fadel, F.; Valsecchi, W. M.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T.; Claudot, J.; Podjarny, A.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  15. Information Content Analysis for the Multi-Viewing, Multi-Channel, Multi-Polarization Imaging (3MI) Instrument : Toward Retrieval of Vertically Resolved Cloud Properties from Passive Only Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedi, J.; Merlin, G.; Labonnote, L.; Cornet, C.; Ferlay, N.; Desmons, M.; Dubuisson, P.; Parol, F.; Davis, A. B.; Marbach, T.

    2014-12-01

    The EUMETSAT Polar System- Second Generation (EPS-SG) is currently under development to take over the current EUMETSAT Polar System at the 2020 horizon. As part of it, the Multi-Viewing Multi-Channel Multi-Polarization Imaging mission (3MI) will be dedicated to the operational monitoring of aerosols but will also provide unique observations for characterization of cloud properties building on the legacy of POLDER and particularly of its 3rd mission (PARASOL) within the A-Train. Through the synergy of POLDER3/PARASOL and MODIS/AQUA several studies have demonstrated the great interest of combining multispectral, multiangle and polarization measurements in the visible, near and shortwave infrared to better constrain retrieval of clouds microphysical and macrophysical properties. Remote-sensing of cloud thermodynamic phase (Riedi et al, 2010), liquid (Bréon and Doutriaux-Boucher, 2005) or ice clouds microphysics (Zhang et al, 2009; Cole et al, 2012), cloud radiative (Zeng et al, 2012) or macrophysical properties (Ferlay et al, 2010; Desmons et al, 2013) can unarguably benefit from the additional information content brought by polarization and multiangle measurements. At the same time, retrieval algorithms are gaining further complexity and skills. Thanks to availability of computational resources, practical implementation of optimal estimation or related optimization techniques (Delanoe & Hogan, 2008; Dubovik et al, 2013) have appeared that allow simultaneous and consistent retrieval of larger sets of parameters from constantly growing observations vectors. Therefore 3MI observations will not only allow to improve accuracy of future cloud products but also opens perspectives for the development of new retrieval algorithms. A major challenge for cloud remote-sensing from passive measurements is to obtain information on clouds properties vertical distribution and structure. Through results of a comprehensive information content analysis we will illustrate our current

  16. Multipolar interference for directed light emission.

    PubMed

    Hancu, Ion M; Curto, Alberto G; Castro-López, Marta; Kuttge, Martin; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-01-01

    By directing light, optical antennas can enhance light-matter interaction and improve the efficiency of nanophotonic devices. Here we exploit the interference among the electric dipole, quadrupole, and magnetic dipole moments of a split-ring resonator to experimentally realize a compact directional optical antenna. This single-element antenna design robustly directs emission even when covered with nanometric emitters at random positions, outperforming previously demonstrated nanoantennas with a bandwidth of 200 nm and a directivity of 10.1 dB from a subwavelength structure. The advantages of this approach bring directional optical antennas closer to practical applications.

  17. Somatic tetraploidy in specific chick retinal ganglion cells induced by nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Sandra M.; Escoll, Pedro; de la Hera, Antonio; Frade, José M.

    2009-01-01

    A subset of neurons in the normal vertebrate nervous system contains double the normal amount of DNA in their nuclei. These neurons are all thought to derive from aberrant mitoses in neuronal precursor cells. Here we show that endogenous NGF induces DNA replication in a subpopulation of differentiating chick retinal ganglion cells that express both the neurotrophin receptor p75 and the E2F1 transcription factor, but that lack the retinoblastoma protein. Many of these neurons avoid G2/M transition and remain alive in the retina as tetraploid cells with large cell somas and extensive dendritic trees, and most of them express β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits, a specific marker of retinal ganglion cells innervating lamina F in the stratum-griseum-et-fibrosum-superficiale of the tectal cortex. Tetraploid neurons were also observed in the adult mouse retina. Thus, a developmental program leading to somatic tetraploidy in specific retinal neurons exists in vertebrates. This program might occur in other vertebrate neurons during normal or pathological situations. PMID:20018664

  18. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J; Mason, Susan M; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N; Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D G; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D

    2015-09-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells. PMID:26299965

  19. Microcystin-LR and Cylindrospermopsin Induced Alterations in Chromatin Organization of Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Csaba; M-Hamvas, Márta; Vasas, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce metabolites with diverse bioactivities, structures and pharmacological properties. The effects of microcystins (MCYs), a family of peptide type protein-phosphatase inhibitors and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), an alkaloid type of protein synthesis blocker will be discussed in this review. We are focusing mainly on cyanotoxin-induced changes of chromatin organization and their possible cellular mechanisms. The particularities of plant cells explain the importance of such studies. Preprophase bands (PPBs) are premitotic cytoskeletal structures important in the determination of plant cell division plane. Phragmoplasts are cytoskeletal structures involved in plant cytokinesis. Both cyanotoxins induce the formation of multipolar spindles and disrupted phragmoplasts, leading to abnormal sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. Thus, MCY and CYN are probably inducing alterations of chromosome number. MCY induces programmed cell death: chromatin condensation, nucleus fragmentation, necrosis, alterations of nuclease and protease enzyme activities and patterns. The above effects may be related to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or disfunctioning of microtubule associated proteins. Specific effects: MCY-LR induces histone H3 hyperphosphorylation leading to incomplete chromatid segregation and the formation of micronuclei. CYN induces the formation of split or double PPB directly related to protein synthesis inhibition. Cyanotoxins are powerful tools in the study of plant cell organization. PMID:24084787

  20. Bicuculline induces synapse formation on primary cultured accessory olfactory bulb neurons.

    PubMed

    Kato-Negishi, Midori; Muramoto, Kazuyo; Kawahara, Masahiro; Hosoda, Ritsuko; Kuroda, Yoichiro; Ichikawa, Masumi

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the roles of the GABAergic inhibitory system of accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) in pheromonal memory formation, we have developed a primary culture system of AOB neurons, which had numerous excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Using this culture system of AOB neurons, we examined the correlation in rats between neuronal excitation and synaptic morphology by bicuculline-induced disinhibition of cultured AOB neurons. The exposure to bicuculline induced long-lasting oscillatory changes in the intracellular calcium level ([Ca2+]in) of cultured non-GABAergic multipolar neurons, which were identified as mitral/tufted cells (MT cells). These MT cells exhibited the appearance of dendritic filopodia structures after a 10-min treatment with bicuculline. By labelling presynaptic terminals with FM4-64, the appearance of new presynaptic terminals was clearly observed on newly formed filopodia after 120 min treatment with bicuculline. These results suggest that bicuculline-induced [Ca2+]in oscillation of MT cells induces the growth of filopodia and subsequently the formation of new presynaptic terminals. Furthermore, tetrodotoxin or the deprivation of extracellular calcium blocked bicuculline-induced synapse formation. The present results indicate that the long-lasting [Ca2+]in oscillation caused by bicuculline-induced disinhibition of cultured MT cells is significantly implicated in the mechanism underlying synapse formation on cultured AOB neurons. Our established culture system of AOB neurons will aid in clarifying the mechanism of synapse formation between AOB neurons and the molecular mechanism of pheromonal memory formation. PMID:14511315

  1. Intraperitoneal mesotheliomas induced in mice by a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J.M.; Anderson, L.M. ); Kovatch, R.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Female mice of 6 strains (C3H/HeN, BALB/c, C57BL/6N, DBA/2, NIH Swiss, and AKR/N) were given the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) intragastrically in olive oil at a dose of 20 mg/kg, weekly for 12 wk. Half were pretreated 24 h before each MC administration with intraperitoneal {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}-NF, 150 mg/kg in olive oil), a noncarinogenic inducer of certain cytochrome P-450 isozymes. Remaining mice were given olive oil prior to MC in the same fashion, or {beta}-NF in olive oil or olive oil alone without subsequent exposure to MC. All mice were killed when moribund or 13 mo after the start of treatment. Most of the mice, irrespective of treatment, exhibited signs of peritoneal injury, including inflammation, necrosis, granuloma formation, and mineralization. Mice of some of the strains also presented peritoneal mesotheliomas, in addition to a variety of other tumors. {beta}-NF pretreatment reduced the frequency of mesotheliomas: there was only one definite mesothelioma in any of the {beta}-NF-MC groups, in a C3H/He mouse. Most of the measotheliomas were mixed fibro-mesothelial type, sometimes with papillary epithelial excrescences. They typically grew in a botryoid pattern within the peritoneal cavity, coating the abdominal organs and sometimes actively invading these organs and the diaphragm. Some lesions exhibited pleomorphism, prominent giant cells, and frequent mitoses. In addition, several lesions consisting of severe mesothelial hyperplasia associated with tissue necrosis and inflammation were considered as possible early stages of mesothelioma development. It was postulated that peritoneal injury imposed by repeated intraperitoneal injection of oil acted as an enhancing factor for mesothelioma induction by MC.

  2. Toxic effects of tetraethyl lead and its derivatives on the chrysophyte Poterioochromonas malhamensis. VI. Effects on lorica formation, mitosis, and cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, G.

    1986-02-01

    Effects of tetraethyl lead (TEL) and derivatives triethyl lead (TriEL), diethyl lead (DiEL), and inorganic lead (Pb) on lorica formation of the unicellular alga Poterioochromonas malhamensis were investigated by light and electron microscopy. Lorica formation is microtubule (MT)--mediated and disturbed by agents interfering with MTs. TEL, largely ineffective as such, inhibited lorica formation of P. malhamensis when the lead compound was illuminated during or before the experiment. TriEL inhibited most; DiEL produced qualitatively effects similar to those of TriEL at about 10 times higher concentrations. Inorganic lead was even less toxic and did not selectively inhibit lorica formation of the algae. Low concentrations of TriEL (5 to 7.5 microM) selectively disturbed lorica formation, causing formation of numerous stalk-less loricae which exhibited gross and ultrastructural alterations like those induced by the antimitotic drug colchicine. The effects of TriEL on mitosis and cytokinesis of P. malhamensis were also investigated. The most sensitive mitotic phase was metaphase, which, however, accumulated only up to 5% after treatment of the cells with toxic concentrations (10 microM) of TriEL for 24 hr (control, 2%). On the other hand, up to 15% telophases (including binucleated cells) and even multinucleated cells with up to eight nuclei per cell were found, indicating that cytokinesis was considerably more effectively disturbed by TriEL than mitosis. In giant multinucleated algae, mitoses normally proceeded synchronously; some asynchronous mitoses were found. Beside normal-looking mitotic spindles in giant algae, multipolar spindles, disoriented spindles, and metaphase-like chromosome arrays completely lacking MTs were observed by electron microscopy. The effects of TriEL on cytokinesis of the algae were largely reversible.

  3. PRR11 regulates late-S to G2/M phase progression and induces premature chromatin condensation (PCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chundong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yi; Zhu, Huifang; Wang, Yitao; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Jiang; Ozaki, Toshinori; Bu, Youquan

    2015-03-13

    Recently, we have demonstrated that proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11) is a novel tumor-related gene product likely implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression as well as lung cancer development. However, its precise role in cell cycle progression remains unclear. In the present study, we have further investigated the expression pattern and functional implication of PRR11 during cell cycle in detail in human lung carcinoma-derived H1299 cells. According to our immunofluorescence study, PRR11 was expressed largely in cytoplasm, the amount of PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase, and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. Consistent with those observations, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRR11 caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase. Intriguingly, the treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. Moreover, knockdown of PRR11 also resulted in a remarkable retardation of G2/M progression, and PRR11-knockdown cells subsequently underwent G2 phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by obvious mitotic defects such as multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. In addition, forced expression of PRR11 promoted the premature Chromatin condensation (PCC), and then proliferation of PRR11-expressing cells was massively attenuated and induced apoptosis. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that PRR11, which is strictly regulated during cell cycle progression, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of accurate cell cycle progression through the late S phase to mitosis. - Highlights: • PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. • PRR11-knockdown caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase and G2 phase. • The treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. • PRR11-knockdown led to multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. • Forced expression of PRR11 promoted the PCC and inhibited

  4. Trivalent dimethylarsenic compound induces histone H3 phosphorylation and abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshihide; Miyazaki, Koichi; Kita, Kayoko; Ochi, Takafumi

    2009-12-15

    Trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] has been shown to induce mitotic abnormalities, such as centrosome abnormality, multipolar spindles, multipolar division, and aneuploidy, in several cell lines. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these mitotic abnormalities, we investigated DMA(III)-mediated changes in histone H3 phosphorylation and localization of Aurora B kinase, which is a key molecule in cell mitosis. DMA(III) caused the phosphorylation of histone H3 (ser10) and was distributed predominantly in mitotic cells, especially in prometaphase cells. By contrast, most of the phospho-histone H3 was found to be localized in interphase cells after treatment with inorganic arsenite [iAs(III)], suggesting the involvement of a different pathway in phosphorylation. DMA(III) activated Aurora B kinase and slightly activated ERK MAP kinase. Phosphorylation of histone H3 by DMA(III) was effectively reduced by ZM447439 (Aurora kinase inhibitor) and slightly reduced by U0126 (MEK inhibitor). By contrast, iAs(III)-dependent histone H3 phosphorylation was markedly reduced by U0126. Aurora B kinase is generally localized in the midbody during telophase and plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, in some cells treated with DMA(III), Aurora B was not localized in the midbody of telophase cells. These findings suggested that DMA(III) induced a spindle abnormality, thereby activating the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) through the Aurora B kinase pathway. In addition, cytokinesis was not completed because of the abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase by DMA(III), thereby resulting in the generation of multinucleated cells. These results provide insight into the mechanism of arsenic tumorigenesis.

  5. Induced Abortion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Induced Abortion Patient Education FAQs Induced Abortion Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Induced Abortion FAQ043, May 2015 PDF Format Induced ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  6. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin—a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects. PMID:27379342

  7. Induction of Excess Centrosomes in Neural Progenitor Cells during the Development of Radiation-Induced Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Mikio; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kato, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    The embryonic brain is one of the tissues most vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In this study, we showed that ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in the neural progenitors of the mouse cerebral cortex, and that the surviving progenitor cells subsequently develop a considerable amount of supernumerary centrosomes. When mouse embryos at Day 13.5 were exposed to γ-rays, brains sizes were reduced markedly in a dose-dependent manner, and these size reductions persisted until birth. Immunostaining with caspase-3 antibodies showed that apoptosis occurred in 35% and 40% of neural progenitor cells at 4 h after exposure to 1 and 2 Gy, respectively, and this was accompanied by a disruption of the apical layer in which mitotic spindles were positioned in unirradiated mice. At 24 h after 1 Gy irradiation, the apoptotic cells were completely eliminated and proliferation was restored to a level similar to that of unirradiated cells, but numerous spindles were localized outside the apical layer. Similarly, abnormal cytokinesis, which included multipolar division and centrosome clustering, was observed in 19% and 24% of the surviving neural progenitor cells at 48 h after irradiation with 1 and 2 Gy, respectively. Because these cytokinesis aberrations derived from excess centrosomes result in growth delay and mitotic catastrophe-mediated cell elimination, our findings suggest that, in addition to apoptosis at an early stage of radiation exposure, radiation-induced centrosome overduplication could contribute to the depletion of neural progenitors and thereby lead to microcephaly. PMID:27367050

  8. Induction of Excess Centrosomes in Neural Progenitor Cells during the Development of Radiation-Induced Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Mikio; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kato, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    The embryonic brain is one of the tissues most vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In this study, we showed that ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in the neural progenitors of the mouse cerebral cortex, and that the surviving progenitor cells subsequently develop a considerable amount of supernumerary centrosomes. When mouse embryos at Day 13.5 were exposed to γ-rays, brains sizes were reduced markedly in a dose-dependent manner, and these size reductions persisted until birth. Immunostaining with caspase-3 antibodies showed that apoptosis occurred in 35% and 40% of neural progenitor cells at 4 h after exposure to 1 and 2 Gy, respectively, and this was accompanied by a disruption of the apical layer in which mitotic spindles were positioned in unirradiated mice. At 24 h after 1 Gy irradiation, the apoptotic cells were completely eliminated and proliferation was restored to a level similar to that of unirradiated cells, but numerous spindles were localized outside the apical layer. Similarly, abnormal cytokinesis, which included multipolar division and centrosome clustering, was observed in 19% and 24% of the surviving neural progenitor cells at 48 h after irradiation with 1 and 2 Gy, respectively. Because these cytokinesis aberrations derived from excess centrosomes result in growth delay and mitotic catastrophe-mediated cell elimination, our findings suggest that, in addition to apoptosis at an early stage of radiation exposure, radiation-induced centrosome overduplication could contribute to the depletion of neural progenitors and thereby lead to microcephaly. PMID:27367050

  9. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paula A; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M

    2015-12-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  10. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Paula A.; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N.; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H.; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J.; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M.

    2015-01-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  11. Analysis of morphological markers of chromosomal instability in ascitic fluid.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Ruchita; Dey, Pranab; Uppal, Radha; Rajwanshi, Arvind

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal instability (CI) plays a major role in the carcinogenesis. Micronuclei, nuclear budding, chromatin bridges,and multipolar mitoses are the morphological markers of CI and have never been studied in routine cytological specimens. Aims of the study is to analyze the significance of morphological markers of CI in malignant and benign ascitic fluid smears. A total of sixty benign and 40 malignant ascitic fluid samples were selected for this study. All the cases with malignant ascitic fluid showed histopathological evidence of malignancy in ovary and omentum. Chromatin bridges, multipolar mitosis (MPM), micronuclei and nuclear budding were counted in 1000 cells in representative May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) stained smears. The CI markers were correlated with the cytological diagnosis of effusion. The mean number of micronuclei, nuclear budding, chromatin bridge and multipolar mitoses found in malignant effusions were 13.2611.79, 10.1067.07, 2.5362.67, 1.964.5, respectively. The mean number of micronuclei, nuclear budding, anaphase bridges, and MPM found in benign effusion cases were 0.566761.07934, 0.516761.33, 0.66760.25, and 0, respectively. The student t test showed significant differences between malignant and benign ascitic fluid samples for each marker of CI. This is the first comprehensive study of morphological markers of CI in ascitic fluid smears. This study has shown strong correlation between markers of CI and cytological diagnosis of malignancy. In future, the knowledge of these markers can be applied to diagnose malignancy in suspected cases of effusion in difficult situations.

  12. Chromosomal and Nuclear Alterations in Root Tip Cells of Allium Cepa L. Induced by Alprazolam

    PubMed Central

    Nefic, Hilada; Musanovic, Jasmin; Metovic, Azra; Kurteshi, Kemajl

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine used in panic disorders and other anxiety states. Target organ of Alprazolam is CNS, causing depression of respiration and consciousness. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the genotoxic potential of Alprazolam using Allium cepa test. Methods: Allium cepa is one of the most suitable plants for detecting different types of xenobiotics. The test enables the assessment of different genetic endpoints making possible damage to the DNA of humans to be predicted. Results: Alprazolam induced chromosomal (anaphase bridges, breaks, lagging and stickiness, abnormal spiralisation, multipolarity and polyploidy) and cytological aberrations, especially nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, fragmented nucleus and apoptotic bodies, cells without nucleus, binucleated and micronucleated cells), morphological alterations in shape and size of cells, spindle disturbance and polar deviation in root tip meristem cells of Allium cepa at all tested concentrations. Alprazolam also caused significant inhibition of mitotic index in these cells. Conclusion: These changes in cells are indicators of genotoxic potential of Alprazolam suggesting a need for further in vitro studies on animal and human lymphocytes as well as in vivo studies. PMID:25568504

  13. Arsenite-induced mitotic death involves stress response and is independent of tubulin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B. Frazier; McNeely, Samuel C.; Miller, Heather L.; States, J. Christopher

    2008-07-15

    Arsenite, a known mitotic disruptor, causes cell cycle arrest and cell death at anaphase. The mechanism causing mitotic arrest is highly disputed. We compared arsenite to the spindle poisons nocodazole and paclitaxel. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in interphase cells demonstrated that, while nocodazole and paclitaxel disrupt microtubule polymerization through destabilization and hyperpolymerization, respectively, microtubules in arsenite-treated cells remain comparable to untreated cells even at supra-therapeutic concentrations. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in mitotic cells showed spindle formation in arsenite- and paclitaxel-treated cells but not in nocodazole-treated cells. Spindle formation in arsenite-treated cells appeared irregular and multi-polar. {gamma}-tubulin staining showed that cells treated with nocodazole and therapeutic concentrations of paclitaxel contained two centrosomes. In contrast, most arsenite-treated mitotic cells contained more than two centrosomes, similar to centrosome abnormalities induced by heat shock. Of the three drugs tested, only arsenite treatment increased expression of the inducible isoform of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i). HSP70 and HSP90 proteins are intimately involved in centrosome regulation and mitotic spindle formation. HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG sensitized cells to arsenite treatment and increased arsenite-induced centrosome abnormalities. Combined treatment of 17-DMAG and arsenite resulted in a supra-additive effect on viability, mitotic arrest, and centrosome abnormalities. Thus, arsenite-induced abnormal centrosome amplification and subsequent mitotic arrest is independent of effects on tubulin polymerization and may be due to specific stresses that are protected against by HSP90 and HSP70.

  14. Spectral Moments of Collision-Induced Absorption of CO2 Pairs: The Role of the Intermolecular Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruszka, Marcin; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of the anisotropy of the intermolecular potential in the rototranslational collision-induced absorption of the CO2 pairs. Using newly developed formulas that include the effects of anisotropy of the potential to all orders, we calculate the two lowest spectral moments gamma(prime), and alpha(prime), for four different classes of C02 pair potentials and compare the results with the experimental values. We assumed only multipolar induction in the process of forming the induced dipole, with the second-order contributions included. Using a site-site LJ and a site-site semi-ab initio intermolecular potentials we were able to reproduce the experimental values of gamma(prime), and alpha(prime) moments over entire temperature range from 230 to 330 K. Also, the role of an electrostatic interaction between two C02 molecules and its impact on the spectral moments is thoroughly investigated. An isotropic core with a point quadrupole centered at each molecule is shown to be an inadequate representation of the C02-CO2 potential. Additionally, we show the results obtained with the first- and second-order perturbation theory to be more than twice too small.

  15. Multipolarization radar images for geologic mapping and vegetation discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.; Farr, T. G.; Ford, J. P.; Thompson, T. W.; Werner, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    NASA has developed an airborne SAR that simultaneously yields image data in four linear polarizations in L-band with 10-m resolution over a swath of about 10 km. Signal data are recorded both optically and digitally and annotated in each of the channels to facilitate completely automated digital correlation. Comparison of the relative intensities of the different polarizations furnishes discriminatory mapping information. Local intensity variations in like-polarization images result from topographic effects, while strong cross polarization responses denote the effects of vegetation cover and, in some cases, possible scattering from the subsurface. In each of the areas studied, multiple polarization data led to the discrimination and mapping of unique surface unit features.

  16. A continuum solvent model of the multipolar dispersion solvation energy.

    PubMed

    Duignan, Timothy T; Parsons, Drew F; Ninham, Barry W

    2013-08-15

    The dispersion energy is an important contribution to the total solvation energies of ions and neutral molecules. Here, we present a new continuum model calculation of these energies, based on macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The model uses the frequency dependent multipole polarizabilities of molecules in order to accurately calculate the dispersion interaction of a solute particle with surrounding water molecules. It includes the dipole, quadrupole, and octupole moment contributions. The water is modeled via a bulk dielectric susceptibility with a spherical cavity occupied by the solute. The model invokes damping functions to account for solute-solvent wave function overlap. The assumptions made are very similar to those used in the Born model. This provides consistency and additivity of electrostatic and dispersion (quantum mechanical) interactions. The energy increases in magnitude with cation size, but decreases slightly with size for the highly polarizable anions. The higher order multipole moments are essential, making up more than 50% of the dispersion solvation energy of the fluoride ion. This method provides an accurate and simple way of calculating the notoriously problematic dispersion contribution to the solvation energy. The result establishes the importance of using accurate calculations of the dispersion energy for the modeling of solvation. PMID:23837890

  17. Final remnant of binary black hole mergers: Multipolar analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Robert

    2009-10-15

    Methods are presented to define and compute source multipoles of dynamical horizons in numerical relativity codes, extending previous work in the isolated and dynamical horizon formalisms to allow for horizons that are not axisymmetric. These methods are then applied to a binary black hole merger simulation, providing evidence that the final remnant is a Kerr black hole, both through the (spatially) gauge-invariant recovery of the geometry of the apparent horizon, and through a detailed extraction of quasinormal ringing modes directly from the strong-field region.

  18. Induced Probabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, John H.

    Induced probabilities have been largely ignored by educational researchers. Simply stated, if a new or random variable is defined in terms of a first random variable, then induced probability is the probability or density of the new random variable that can be found by summation or integration over the appropriate domains of the original random…

  19. 2-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-one (HKL-1) induces G2/M arrest and mitotic catastrophe in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Mei-Hua; Liu, Chin-Yu; Lin, Chiao-Min; Chen, Yen-Jung; Chen, Chun-Jen; Lin, Yu-Fu; Huang, Li-Jiau; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    2012-03-01

    2-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-one (HKL-1), a 2-phenyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4-one (2-PN) derivative, was synthesized and evaluated as an effective antimitotic agent in our laboratory. However, the molecular mechanisms are uncertain. In this study, HKL-1 was demonstrated to induce multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human leukemia HL-60 cells. Western blotting showed that HKL-1 induces mitotic catastrophe in HL-60 cells through regulating mitotic phase-specific kinases (down-regulating CDK1, cyclin B1, CENP-E, and aurora B) and regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins (down-regulating Bcl-2 and up-regulating Bax and Bak), followed by caspase-9/-3 cleavage. These findings suggest that HKL-1 appears to exert its cytotoxicity toward HL-60 cells in culture by inducing mitotic catastrophe. Highlights: ► HKL-1 is a potential antimitotic agent against HL-60 cells. ► HKL-1 induces spindle disruption and sustained resulted in mitotic catastrophe. ► CENP-E and aurora B protein expressions significantly reduced. ► Bcl-2 family protein expressions altered and caspase-9/-3 activation. ► HKL-1 is an attractive candidate for possible use as a novel antimitotic agent.

  20. Chlamydia Induces Anchorage Independence in 3T3 Cells and Detrimental Cytological Defects in an Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Andrea E.; Fowler, Larry J.; Patel, Rahul K.; Wallet, Shannon M.; Grieshaber, Scott S.

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia are Gram negative, obligate intracellular bacterial organisms with different species causing a multitude of infections in both humans and animals. Chlamydia trachomatis is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection (STI) Chlamydia, the most commonly acquired bacterial STI in the United States. Chlamydial infections have also been epidemiologically linked to cervical cancer in women co-infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV). We have previously shown chlamydial infection results in centrosome amplification and multipolar spindle formation leading to chromosomal instability. Many studies indicate that centrosome abnormalities, spindle defects, and chromosome segregation errors can lead to cell transformation. We hypothesize that the presence of these defects within infected dividing cells identifies a possible mechanism for Chlamydia as a cofactor in cervical cancer formation. Here we demonstrate that infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is able to transform 3T3 cells in soft agar resulting in anchorage independence and increased colony formation. Additionally, we show for the first time Chlamydia infects actively replicating cells in vivo. Infection of mice with Chlamydia results in significantly increased cell proliferation within the cervix, and in evidence of cervical dysplasia. Confocal examination of these infected tissues also revealed elements of chlamydial induced chromosome instability. These results contribute to a growing body of data implicating a role for Chlamydia in cervical cancer development and suggest a possible molecular mechanism for this effect. PMID:23308295

  1. Direct observation of one-dimensional plasmon coupling in metallic nanofibers prepared by evaporation-induced self-assembly with DNA.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Hidenobu; Tokonami, Shiho; Hamada, Taichi; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Tsutomu; Iwata, Futoshi; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2012-11-01

    Here we report a simple method for the preparation of highly aligned metallic nanofibers with anisotropic aggregates of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as well as a direct observation of localized plasmon field and its coupling in the prepared metallic nanofibers. Metallic nanofibers of several tens of nanometers wide and millimeters long were prepared. The preparation method, which is based on the process of evaporation-induced self-assembly with DNA and drying front movement, eliminates the need for lithography and an external field, and it is fast, cheap and easy. Dark-field scattering spectroscopy was used to study the strong plasmon coupling of AgNPs in the metallic nanofibers. We observed strong near-field coupling between neighboring nanoparticles, which results in red-shifted multipolar plasmon modes that are highly polarized along the fiber axis. The polarization dependence of plasmon coupling in the metallic nanofibers observed in this study was satisfactorily explained by the morphology of the metallic nanofibers, which was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, Raman spectra imaging of the metallic nanofibers revealed the existence of intense hot spots localized along their axes, which played a significant role in the intensity of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals from DNA bases in the metallic nanofiber. Our results demonstrate the use of evaporation-induced self-assembly with DNA as a straightforward method to produce one-dimensional coupling of localized plasmons with a longer scale. PMID:23011186

  2. Direct observation of one-dimensional plasmon coupling in metallic nanofibers prepared by evaporation-induced self-assembly with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Hidenobu; Tokonami, Shiho; Hamada, Taichi; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Tsutomu; Iwata, Futoshi; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2012-10-01

    Here we report a simple method for the preparation of highly aligned metallic nanofibers with anisotropic aggregates of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as well as a direct observation of localized plasmon field and its coupling in the prepared metallic nanofibers. Metallic nanofibers of several tens of nanometers wide and millimeters long were prepared. The preparation method, which is based on the process of evaporation-induced self-assembly with DNA and drying front movement, eliminates the need for lithography and an external field, and it is fast, cheap and easy. Dark-field scattering spectroscopy was used to study the strong plasmon coupling of AgNPs in the metallic nanofibers. We observed strong near-field coupling between neighboring nanoparticles, which results in red-shifted multipolar plasmon modes that are highly polarized along the fiber axis. The polarization dependence of plasmon coupling in the metallic nanofibers observed in this study was satisfactorily explained by the morphology of the metallic nanofibers, which was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, Raman spectra imaging of the metallic nanofibers revealed the existence of intense hot spots localized along their axes, which played a significant role in the intensity of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals from DNA bases in the metallic nanofiber. Our results demonstrate the use of evaporation-induced self-assembly with DNA as a straightforward method to produce one-dimensional coupling of localized plasmons with a longer scale.

  3. Inducing Metaassociations and Induced Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgués, Xavier; Franch, Xavier; Ribó, Josep M.

    In the last years, UML has been tailored to be used as a domain-specific modelling notation in several contexts. Extending UML with this purpose entails several advantages: the integration of the domain in a standard framework; its potential usage by the software engineering community; and the existence of supporting tools. In previous work, we explored one particular issue of heavyweight extensions, namely, the definition of inducing meta-associations in metamodels as a way to induce the presence of specific relation-ships in their instances. Those relationships were intended by the metamodel specifier but not forced by the metamodel itself. However, our work was restricted to the case of induced associations. This paper proposes an extension to the general case in which inducing metaassociations may force the existence of arbitrary relationships at M1. To attain this goal, we provide a general defini-tion of inducing metaassociation that covers all the possible cases. After revisi-ting induced associations, we show the inducement of the other relationship types defined in UML: association classes, generalization and dependencies.

  4. Microcystin-LR induces mitotic spindle assembly disorders in Vicia faba by protein phosphatase inhibition and not reactive oxygen species induction.

    PubMed

    Garda, Tamás; Kónya, Zoltán; Tándor, Ildikó; Beyer, Dániel; Vasas, Gábor; Erdődi, Ferenc; Vereb, György; Papp, Georgina; Riba, Milán; M-Hamvas, Márta; Máthé, Csaba

    2016-07-20

    We aimed to reveal the mechanisms of mitotic spindle anomalies induced by microcystin-LR (MCY-LR), a cyanobacterial toxin in Vicia faba, a well-known model in plant cell and molecular biology. MCY-LR inhibits type 1 and 2A phosphoserine/threonine specific protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A) and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. The cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of the cyanotoxin during cytopathogenesis. Histochemical-immunohistochemical and biochemical methods were used. A significant number of MCY-LR induced spindle alterations are described for the first time. Disrupted, multipolar spindles and missing kinetochore fibers were detected both in metaphase and anaphase cells. Additional polar microtubule (MT) bundles, hyperbundling of spindle MTs, monopolar spindles, C-S- shaped, additional and asymmetric spindles were detected in metaphase, while midplane kinetochore fibers were detected in anaphase cells only. Several spindle anomalies induced mitotic disorders, i.e. they occurred concomitantly with altered sister chromatid separation. Alterations were dependent on the MCY-LR dose and exposure time. Under long-term (2 and mainly 6 days') exposure they were detected in the concentration range of 0.1-20μgmL(-1) MCY-LR that inhibited PP1 and PP2A significantly without significant ROS induction. Elevated peroxidase/catalase activities indicated that MCY-LR treated V. faba plants showed efficient defense against oxidative stress. Thus, although the elevation of ROS is known to induce cytoskeletal aberrations in general, this study shows that long-term protein phosphatase inhibition is the primary cause of MCY-LR induced spindle disorders. PMID:27186862

  5. The E1B19K-deleted oncolytic adenovirus mutant AdΔ19K sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to drug-induced DNA-damage by down-regulating Claspin and Mre11

    PubMed Central

    Pantelidou, Constantia; Cherubini, Gioia; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated sensitization of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs depends on simultaneous interactions of early viral genes with cell death and survival pathways. It is unclear what cellular factors mediate these interactions in the presence of DNA-damaging drugs. We found that adenovirus prevents Chk1-mediated checkpoint activation through inactivation of Mre11 and downregulation of the pChk1 adaptor-protein, Claspin, in cells with high levels of DNA-damage induced by the cytotoxic drugs gemcitabine and irinotecan. The mechanisms for Claspin downregulation involve decreased transcription and increased degradation, further attenuating pChk1-mediated signalling. Live cell imaging demonstrated that low doses of gemcitabine caused multiple mitotic aberrations including multipolar spindles, micro- and multi-nucleation and cytokinesis failure. A mutant virus with the anti-apoptotic E1B19K-gene deleted (AdΔ19K) further enhanced cell killing, Claspin downregulation, and potentiated drug-induced DNA damage and mitotic aberrations. Decreased Claspin expression and inactivation of Mre11 contributed to the enhanced cell killing in combination with DNA-damaging drugs. These results reveal novel mechanisms that are utilised by adenovirus to ensure completion of its life cycle in the presence of cellular DNA damage. Taken together, our findings reveal novel cellular targets that may be exploited when developing improved anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:26872382

  6. Genotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes at occupationally relevant doses.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Katelyn J; Reynolds, Steven H; Kashon, Michael L; Lowry, David T; Dong, Chenbo; Hubbs, Ann F; Young, Shih-Houng; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Porter, Dale W; Benkovic, Stanley A; McCawley, Michael; Keane, Michael J; Mastovich, John T; Bunker, Kristin L; Cena, Lorenzo G; Sparrow, Mark C; Sturgeon, Jacqueline L; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Sargent, Linda M

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are commercially-important products of nanotechnology; however, their low density and small size makes carbon nanotube respiratory exposures likely during their production or processing. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). In this study, we examined whether multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) cause mitotic spindle damage in cultured cells at doses equivalent to 34 years of exposure at the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL). MWCNT induced a dose responsive increase in disrupted centrosomes, abnormal mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number 24 hours after exposure to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm² MWCNT. Monopolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of disrupted mitoses. Three-dimensional reconstructions of 0.1 μm optical sections showed carbon nanotubes integrated with microtubules, DNA and within the centrosome structure. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated a greater number of cells in S-phase and fewer cells in the G2 phase in MWCNT-treated compared to diluent control, indicating a G1/S block in the cell cycle. The monopolar phenotype of the disrupted mitotic spindles and the G1/S block in the cell cycle is in sharp contrast to the multi-polar spindle and G2 block in the cell cycle previously observed following exposure to SWCNT. One month following exposure to MWCNT there was a dramatic increase in both size and number of colonies compared to diluent control cultures, indicating a potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter cells. Our results demonstrate significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by MWCNT at occupationally relevant exposure levels.

  7. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  8. Inducing puberty.

    PubMed

    Delemarre, Eveline M; Felius, Bram; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A

    2008-12-01

    Puberty is the result of increasing pulsatile secretion of the hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), which stimulates the release of gonadotropins and in turn gonadal activity. In general in females, development of secondary sex characteristics due to the activity of the gonadal axis, i.e., the growth of breasts, is the result of exposure to estrogens, while in boys testicular growth is dependent on gonadotropins and virilization on androgens. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is a rare disease. More common is the clinical picture of delayed puberty, often associated with a delay of growth and more often familial occurring. Especially, boys are referred because of the delay of growth and puberty. A short course (3-6 months) of androgens may help these boys to overcome the psychosocial repercussions, and during this period an increase in the velocity of height growth and some virilization will occur. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism may present in a congenital form caused by developmental disorders, some of which are related to a genetic disorder, or secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction due to, among others, a cerebral tumor. In hypogonadotropic hypogonadism puberty can be initiated by the use of pulsatile GnRH, gonadotropins, and sex steroids. Sex steroids will induce development of the secondary sex characteristics alone, while combined administration of gonadotropins and GnRH may induce gonadal development including fertility.

  9. [Induced "acarophobia"].

    PubMed

    Mester, H

    1975-01-01

    Although only ablut 240 cases of 'acarophobia' are on record in zoological and medical literature, it can be seen that this delusional syndrome without doubt leads to psychoses of association more frequently than any other mental disturbance. The literature contains many references, and the author can give two examples from personal esperience. At least every sixth patient suffering from delusions of parasitosis 'infects' relations. This really remarkable tendency to spread by psychological contagion on one or more dependent persons has been ignored by many writers. The supposition that such occurrences are very rare proves to be false. Sometimes the associated who acquired the symptons in an absolutely identical fashion seem to be more worried by the vermin they hallucinate than the initiators are. The number of patients constituting an affected group is following a Neyman distribution. Emphasis is laid on the finding that the proportion of consanguineous persons within the sample of patients who showed an induced delusion of parasitosis is by far less high than in other psychopathological forms of communicated insanity.

  10. Proteomic profiling revealed the functional networks associated with mitotic catastrophe of HepG2 hepatoma cells induced by 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Huang Bo; Guan Hua; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi; He Xingpeng; Liu Xiaodan; Wang Yu; Shang Zengfu; Zhou Pingkun

    2011-05-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death resulting from abnormal mitosis, is a cytotoxic death pathway as well as an appealing mechanistic strategy for the development of anti-cancer drugs. In this study, 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde was demonstrated to induce DNA double-strand break, multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We used proteomic profiling to identify the differentially expressed proteins underlying mitotic catastrophe. A total of 137 differentially expressed proteins (76 upregulated and 61 downregulated proteins) were identified. Some of the changed proteins have previously been associated with mitotic catastrophe, such as DNA-PKcs, FoxM1, RCC1, cyclin E, PLK1-pT210, 14-3-3{sigma} and HSP70. Multiple isoforms of 14-3-3, heat-shock proteins and tubulin were upregulated. Analysis of functional significance revealed that the 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the differentially expressed proteins. The modulated proteins were found to be involved in macromolecule complex assembly, cell death, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin and cytoskeletal organization. These findings revealed the overall molecular events and functional signaling networks associated with spindle disruption and mitotic catastrophe. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > 6-bromoisovanillin induced spindle disruption and sustained mitotic arrest, consequently resulted in mitotic catastrophe. > Proteomic profiling identified 137 differentially expressed proteins associated mitotic catastrophe. > The 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the altered proteins. > The macromolecule complex assembly, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin organization were also shown involved in mitotic catastrophe.

  11. [Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-09-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a serious and underestimated adverse drug effect. We briefly discuss the main features of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, particularly analyzing the most recent advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome.

  12. Morphology of microvascular changes and endothelial regeneration in experimental ozone-induced parathyroiditis. III. Some pathologic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Atwal, O.S.; Pemsingh, R.S.

    1981-03-01

    Proliferation of the vascular endothelium of the parathyroid glands of dogs exposed to ozone inhalation was studied. Direct observation of mitoses in the endothelial cells were made. Focal hemorrhages in the form of the presence of erythrocytes, clotting, and fibrin deposition in the extravascular spaces were seen. Ultrastructural analysis of transverse section of blood vessels showed intravascular platelet aggregation. Lymphoid cells were observed in the lumen of the blood vessels as well as in the perivascular areas as infiltrates. The possibility is discussed that present vascular reactions signify the morphologic equivalent of an immunologic response.

  13. Spin-isovector giant resonances induced by (n,p) reactions on heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, S. A.; Spicer, B. M.; Raywood, K. J.; Abegg, R.; Alford, W. P.; Celler, A.; Frekers, D.; Green, P. E.; Häusser, O.; Helmer, R. L.; Henderson, R. S.; Hicks, K. H.; Jackson, K. P.; Jeppesen, R. G.; King, N. S.; Miller, C. A.; Moinester, M. A.; Officer, V. C.; Shute, G. G.; Trudel, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Yavin, A. I.; Yen, S.

    1998-06-01

    Double differential cross sections from the 120Sn(n,p)120In and 181Ta(n,p)181Hf reactions at 298 MeV and the 238U(n,p)238Pa reaction at 318 MeV have been measured for excitation energies up to 50 MeV in the residual nucleus. These data, together with the previously published data from the 90Zr(n,p)90Y and 208Pb(n,p)208Tl reactions at 198 MeV, have been analyzed for spin-isovector resonances of multipolarities less than 7, using the multipole decomposition method. The strengths due to spin-isovector excitations of multipolarity less than 4 have been extracted. The anomalous behavior of the extracted spin-isovector quadrupole strength with target mass number is discussed with reference to the calculations of Leonardi et al. The cross section due to quasifree processes was calculated and subtracted from the data. The data after this subtraction were reanalyzed for spin-isovector resonances and the strengths due to multipolarities up to 3 were extracted. The strengths due to spin-isovector dipole and octupole excitations were compared to values calculated, for 1ħω transitions only, using the sum rules of Macfarlane. The behavior with target mass number is well represented by these sum rules.

  14. [Drug-induced dementia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taro; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Many drugs have been reported to induce not only delirium but also cognitive impairment. Some types of drugs are reported to induce dementia, and prolonged hypotension or hypoglycemia induced by overuse of antihypertensive drugs or oral antidiabetic drugs could result in dementia. Recently, taking multiple drugs with anticholinergic activity are reported to cause cognitive decline and anticholinergic burden should be avoided especially in patients with dementia. Drug-induced dementia can be prevented by avoiding polypharmacy and adhering to the saying 'start low and go slow' . Early diagnosis of drug-induced dementia and withdrawal of the offending drug is essential to improve cognitive function. PMID:27025096

  15. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  16. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  17. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  18. Merlin/ERM proteins establish cortical asymmetry and centrosome position

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alan M.; DuBoff, Brian; Casaletto, Jessica B.; Gladden, Andrew B.; McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate asymmetry at the cell cortex underlies cell polarization and asymmetric cell division. Here we demonstrate a novel role for the tumor suppressor Merlin and closely related ERM proteins (Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin) in generating cortical asymmetry in the absence of external cues. Our data reveal that Merlin functions to restrict the cortical distribution of the actin regulator Ezrin, which in turn positions the interphase centrosome in single epithelial cells and three-dimensional organotypic cultures. In the absence of Merlin, ectopic cortical Ezrin yields mispositioned centrosomes, misoriented spindles, and aberrant epithelial architecture. Furthermore, in tumor cells with centrosome amplification, the failure to restrict cortical Ezrin abolishes centrosome clustering, yielding multipolar mitoses. These data uncover fundamental roles for Merlin/ERM proteins in spatiotemporally organizing the cell cortex and suggest that Merlin's role in restricting cortical Ezrin may contribute to tumorigenesis by disrupting cell polarity, spindle orientation, and, potentially, genome stability. PMID:23249734

  19. Bio-monitoring the genotoxicity of populations of Scots pine in the vicinity of a radioactive waste storage facility.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, Stanislav A; Kim, Jin Kyu; Oudalova, Alla A; Vasiliyev, Denis V; Dikareva, Nina S; Zimin, Vladimir L; Dikarev, Vladimir G

    2005-05-01

    Results of a long-term (1997-2002) study of the Scots pine populations growing in the vicinity of the radioactive waste storage facility ('Radon' LWPE) are presented. Cytogenetic disturbances in reproductive (seeds) and vegetative (needles) tissues sampled from Scots pine populations were studied to examine whether Scots pine trees have experienced environmental stress in areas with relatively low levels of pollution. The data clearly indicate the presence of mutagenic contaminants in the environment of the pine trees. An increased number of mitotic abnormalities, especially multipolar mitoses was found in the pine tree populations submitted to man-made exposure, which suggests that the cytogenetic damage is mainly caused by chemical contamination. A higher radioresistance of the Scots pine seeds from the impacted populations was shown by use of acute gamma-irradiation. During the observation period 1997-2002, pine trees exposed to anthropogenic pollution showed a steady increase of cytogenetic alterations in the root meristem cells. PMID:15866466

  20. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  1. [Isoniazid-induced myopathy].

    PubMed

    Chaouch, N; Mejid, M; Zarrouk, M; Racil, H; Rouhou, S Cheikh; El Euch, G; Chabbou, A

    2011-12-01

    Drug-induced muscle disorders are now well known and vary from a simple isolated increase in muscle enzymes to severe drug-induced myopathy. The list of drugs inducing myopathy is very long and continues to grow. The onset of muscle disorders under isoniazid often falls within a drug-induced neuropathy or a drug-induced lupus. However, the occurrence of isolated isoniazid-induced drug myopathy without neuropathy is an extremely rare condition especially with non-toxic doses. The authors report the case of a 28-year-old man, without a previous medical history, hospitalized for pulmonary tuberculosis. After initiating tuberculosis treatment for five days, he presented muscle pain, fasciculation and weakness initially involving the lower left limb that quickly propagated to all four limbs. The physical examination noted a left ankle flush, a swollen left calf and fasciculation of both calves while the neurological examination was normal. The CPK was normal. Electromyography confirmed the myopathy without neuropathic findings. Isoniazid withdrawal was marked by the rapid disappearance of the symptoms. The reintroduction of a half-dose of isoniazid only induced a few transitional muscular fasciculations. The onset of the symptoms under tuberculosis treatment, the absence of later muscle disorders, the absence of any other cause of myopathy and the total disappearance of the symptoms after isoniazid withdrawal confirmed the diagnosis of isoniazid-induced myopathy.

  2. Microcystin-LR, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, induces alterations in mitotic chromatin and microtubule organization leading to the formation of micronuclei in Vicia faba

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Dániel; Tándor, Ildikó; Kónya, Zoltán; Bátori, Róbert; Roszik, Janos; Vereb, György; Erdődi, Ferenc; Vasas, Gábor; M-Hamvas, Márta; Jambrovics, Károly; Máthé, Csaba

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Microcystin-LR (MCY-LR) is a cyanobacterial toxin, a specific inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A) with significant impact on aquatic ecosystems. It has the potential to alter regulation of the plant cell cycle. The aim of this study was improved understanding of the mitotic alterations induced by cyanotoxin in Vicia faba, a model organism for plant cell biology studies. Methods Vicia faba seedlings were treated over the long and short term with MCY-LR purified in our laboratory. Short-term treatments were performed on root meristems synchronized with hydroxylurea. Sections of lateral root tips were labelled for chromatin, phosphorylated histone H3 and β-tubulin via histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Mitotic activity and the occurrence of mitotic alterations were detected and analysed by fluorescence microscopy. The phosphorylation state of histone H3 was studied by Western blotting. Key Results Long-term MCY-LR exposure of lateral root tip meristems increased the percentage of either early or late mitosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We observed hypercondensed chromosomes and altered sister chromatid segregation (lagging chromosomes) leading to the formation of micronuclei, accompanied by the formation of disrupted, multipolar and monopolar spindles, disrupted phragmoplasts and the hyperphosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10. Short-term MCY-LR treatment of synchronized cells showed that PP1 and PP2A inhibition delayed the onset of anaphase at 1 µg mL−1 MCY-LR, accelerated cell cycle at 10 µg mL−1 MCY-LR and induced the formation of lagging chromosomes. In this case mitotic microtubule alterations were not detected, but histone H3 was hyperphosphorylated. Conclusions MCY-LR delayed metaphase–anaphase transition. Consequently, it induced aberrant chromatid segregation and micronucleus formation that could be associated with both H3 hyperphosphorylation and altered microtubule organization

  3. Techniques in processing multi-frequency multi-polarization spaceborne SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, John C.; Chang, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the algorithm design of the SIR-C ground data processor, with emphasis on the unique elements involved in the production of registered multifrequency polarimetric data products. A quick-look processing algorithm used for generation of low-resolution browse image products and estimation of echo signal parameters is also presented. Specifically the discussion covers: (1) azimuth reference function generation to produce registered polarimetric imagery; (2) geometric rectification to accommondate cross-track and along-track Doppler drifts; (3) multilook filtering designed to generate output imagery with a uniform resolution; and (4) efficient coding to compress the polarimetric image data for distribution.

  4. Anti-Stokes coherent Raman diffusion study of a multipolar hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, M.; Pealat, M.

    1986-05-01

    A low pressure H2 plasma created under magnetic confinement is studied to determine the space-time distribution of the rotation/vibration state populations. The plasma generator and the optical instruments are described. The measurements show the importance of collisions with the wall to damp vibration, while the rotation relaxation is mainly dependent on molecule to molecule collisions.

  5. Generation of trisomies in cancer cells by multipolar mitosis and incomplete cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Gisselsson, David; Jin, Yuesheng; Lindgren, David; Persson, Johan; Gisselsson, Lennart; Hanks, Sandra; Sehic, Daniel; Mengelbier, Linda Holmquist; Øra, Ingrid; Rahman, Nazneen; Mertens, Fredrik; Mitelman, Felix; Mandahl, Nils

    2010-01-01

    One extra chromosome copy (i.e., trisomy) is the most common type of chromosome aberration in cancer cells. The mechanisms behind the generation of trisomies in tumor cells are largely unknown, although it has been suggested that dysfunction of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) leads to an accumulation of trisomies through failure to correctly segregate sister chromatids in successive cell divisions. By using Wilms tumor as a model for cancers with trisomies, we now show that trisomic cells can form even in the presence of a functional SAC through tripolar cell divisions in which sister chromatid separation proceeds in a regular fashion, but cytokinesis failure nevertheless leads to an asymmetrical segregation of chromosomes into two daughter cells. A model for the generation of trisomies by such asymmetrical cell division accurately predicted several features of clones having extra chromosomes in vivo, including the ratio between trisomies and tetrasomies and the observation that different trisomies found in the same tumor occupy identical proportions of cells and colocalize in tumor tissue. Our findings provide an experimentally validated model explaining how multiple trisomies can occur in tumor cells that still maintain accurate sister chromatid separation at metaphase–anaphase transition and thereby physiologically satisfy the SAC. PMID:21059955

  6. Realistic sampling of amino acid geometries for a multipolar polarizable force field

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy J.; Cardamone, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The Quantum Chemical Topological Force Field (QCTFF) uses the machine learning method kriging to map atomic multipole moments to the coordinates of all atoms in the molecular system. It is important that kriging operates on relevant and realistic training sets of molecular geometries. Therefore, we sampled single amino acid geometries directly from protein crystal structures stored in the Protein Databank (PDB). This sampling enhances the conformational realism (in terms of dihedral angles) of the training geometries. However, these geometries can be fraught with inaccurate bond lengths and valence angles due to artefacts of the refinement process of the X‐ray diffraction patterns, combined with experimentally invisible hydrogen atoms. This is why we developed a hybrid PDB/nonstationary normal modes (NM) sampling approach called PDB/NM. This method is superior over standard NM sampling, which captures only geometries optimized from the stationary points of single amino acids in the gas phase. Indeed, PDB/NM combines the sampling of relevant dihedral angles with chemically correct local geometries. Geometries sampled using PDB/NM were used to build kriging models for alanine and lysine, and their prediction accuracy was compared to models built from geometries sampled from three other sampling approaches. Bond length variation, as opposed to variation in dihedral angles, puts pressure on prediction accuracy, potentially lowering it. Hence, the larger coverage of dihedral angles of the PDB/NM method does not deteriorate the predictive accuracy of kriging models, compared to the NM sampling around local energetic minima used so far in the development of QCTFF. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26235784

  7. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  8. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-15

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  9. Realistic sampling of amino acid geometries for a multipolar polarizable force field.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy J; Cardamone, Salvatore; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-09-15

    The Quantum Chemical Topological Force Field (QCTFF) uses the machine learning method kriging to map atomic multipole moments to the coordinates of all atoms in the molecular system. It is important that kriging operates on relevant and realistic training sets of molecular geometries. Therefore, we sampled single amino acid geometries directly from protein crystal structures stored in the Protein Databank (PDB). This sampling enhances the conformational realism (in terms of dihedral angles) of the training geometries. However, these geometries can be fraught with inaccurate bond lengths and valence angles due to artefacts of the refinement process of the X-ray diffraction patterns, combined with experimentally invisible hydrogen atoms. This is why we developed a hybrid PDB/nonstationary normal modes (NM) sampling approach called PDB/NM. This method is superior over standard NM sampling, which captures only geometries optimized from the stationary points of single amino acids in the gas phase. Indeed, PDB/NM combines the sampling of relevant dihedral angles with chemically correct local geometries. Geometries sampled using PDB/NM were used to build kriging models for alanine and lysine, and their prediction accuracy was compared to models built from geometries sampled from three other sampling approaches. Bond length variation, as opposed to variation in dihedral angles, puts pressure on prediction accuracy, potentially lowering it. Hence, the larger coverage of dihedral angles of the PDB/NM method does not deteriorate the predictive accuracy of kriging models, compared to the NM sampling around local energetic minima used so far in the development of QCTFF.

  10. A DETAILED SPATIOKINEMATIC MODEL OF THE CONICAL OUTFLOW OF THE MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7026

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. M.; Lopez, J. A.; Steffen, W.; Richer, M. G.

    2013-03-15

    We present extensive, long-slit, high-resolution coverage of the complex planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7026. We acquired 10 spectra using the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer at San Pedro Martir Observatory in Baja California, Mexico, and each shows exquisite detail, revealing the intricate structure of this object. Incorporating these spectra into the three-dimensional visualization and kinematic program SHAPE and using Hubble Space Telescope images of NGC 7026, we have produced a detailed structural and kinematic model of this PN. NGC 7026 exhibits remarkable symmetry consisting of three lobe pairs and four sets of knots, all symmetrical about the nucleus and displaying a conical outflow. Comparing the three-dimensional structure of this nebula to recent XMM-Newton X-ray observations, we investigate the extended X-ray emission in relation to the nebular structure. We find that the X-ray emission, while confined to the closed, northern lobes of this PN, shows an abrupt termination in the middle of the southeast lobe, which our long slit data show to be open. This is where the shocked fast wind seems to be escaping the interior of the nebula and the X-ray emission rapidly cools in this region.

  11. The star fish twins: Two young planetary nebulae with extreme multipolar morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, R.

    2000-01-01

    We present alpha images of two objects, He 2-47 and M1-37, obtained during a Hubble Space Telescope imaging survey of young planetary nebulae (PNs) selected on the basis of their low-excitation characteristics.

  12. Interpreting shadows: Arms control and defense planning in a rapidly changing multi-polar world

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.R.

    1999-06-01

    The focus of arms control is changing. It now deals with issues affecting all nations and not just the super powers. A new framework for approaching non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and arms control could focus on a two-fold policy initiative. The first policy would be a new strategic `triad` built around conventional capability including rapidly deployable forces, regional ballistic missile defense, and long-range precision-strike capability. The second policy would employ an information strategy using the current diplomatic initiatives that appear to be the most productive, or unilateral and multilateral export controls, military assistance in the form of infrastructure, and confidence building measures. Continued success in arms control requires abandoning Cold War policies. Emerging policies will need to appreciate different world views. Good intelligence will be a key factor in the success of any policy orientation and its implementation. The focus needs to change from arms control involving the superpowers to arms control involving everyone.

  13. Multi-polarization C-band SAR for soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.; Brisco, B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery have shown qualitative relationships between radar backscatter and soil moisture. However, to be able to use these data in operational programs it will be necessary to establish quantitatively how the radar return is related to soil moisture and the effects of surface roughness, soil type, and vegetation cover and growth stage, as a function of frequency and polarization. To this end, a multi-year experiment began in 1990 as a cooperative venture amongst the Canada Center (Agriculture Canada), and the Universities of Guelph, Sherbrooke, Laval, and Waterloo. During 1990, SAR imagery was acquired during two periods (May and Jun.) to correspond to times of minimal and substantial vegetation cover. SAR data were acquired on three days in May and on four days in Jul. to cover different soil moisture conditions. This unique comprehensive data set is used to investigate the relationships between soil moisture and radar backscatter. The experiment and data collected are described, and a preliminary qualitative interpretation of the relationship between soil moisture and image tone is provided.

  14. Dynamic polarizability and electric multipolar transitions in two electron atoms under exponential cosine screened coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Supriya K.; Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed investigations on the frequency dependent polarizabilities, transition energies, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities of two electron systems He, B e2 +, C4 + , and O6 + under electric dipolar (E1) and quadrupolar (E2) excitations have been performed using exponential cosine screened coulomb potential with a view to understand the structural behaviour of such systems due to external confinement produced by plasma environment. Time dependent coupled Hartree-Fock theory within a variational framework has been adopted for studying the first three low lying excited states 1 s2:1Se→1 s n p :1Po (n = 2, 3, 4) and 1 s n d :1De (n = 3, 4, 5) under such excitations. Quantitatively, the effect of confinement produced by the external plasma has been taken care of by considering the change in atomic potential through plasma screening, directly related to the coupling strength of the plasma with the atomic charge cloud. With increased plasma screening, a gradual destabilisation of the energy levels with subsequent reduction of the ionization potential and number of excited states has been observed. Behavioral pattern of the frequency dependent polarizabilities, excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities under systematic increase of the screening has been investigated. Results have been compared thoroughly with those available for free systems and under confinement by exponential cosine screened and screened Coulomb potential.

  15. Multi-polarization quantum control of rotational motion through dipole coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turinici, Gabriel; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-03-01

    In this work we analyze the quantum controllability of rotational motion under the influence of an external laser field coupled through a permanent dipole moment. The analysis takes into consideration up to three polarization fields, but we also discuss the consequences for working with fewer polarized fields.

  16. Multipolar electrostatics for proteins: atom-atom electrostatic energies in crambin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongna; Mills, Matthew J L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-02-15

    Accurate electrostatics necessitates the use of multipole moments centered on nuclei or extra point charges centered away from the nuclei. Here, we follow the former alternative and investigate the convergence behavior of atom-atom electrostatic interactions in the pilot protein crambin. Amino acids are cut out from a Protein Data Bank structure of crambin, as single amino acids, di, or tripeptides, and are then capped with a peptide bond at each side. The atoms in the amino acids are defined through Quantum Chemical Topology (QCT) as finite volume electron density fragments. Atom-atom electrostatic energies are computed by means of a multipole expansion with regular spherical harmonics, up to a total interaction rank of L = ℓA+ ℓB + 1 = 10. The minimum internuclear distance in the convergent region of all the 15 possible types of atom-atom interactions in crambin that were calculated based on single amino acids are close to the values calculated from di and tripeptides. Values obtained at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ levels are only slightly larger than those calculated at HF/6-31G(d,p) level. This convergence behavior is transferable to the well-known amyloid beta polypeptide Aβ1-42. Moreover, for a selected central atom, the influence of its neighbors on its multipole moments is investigated, and how far away this influence can be ignored is also determined. Finally, the convergence behavior of AMBER becomes closer to that of QCT with increasing internuclear distance.

  17. MAGNETAR GIANT FLARES-FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS IN MULTIPOLAR MAGNETOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Cong

    2012-09-20

    We address a primary question regarding the physical mechanism that triggers the energy release and initiates the onset of eruptions in the magnetar magnetosphere. Self-consistent stationary, axisymmetric models of the magnetosphere are constructed based on force-free magnetic field configurations that contain a helically twisted force-free flux rope. Depending on the surface magnetic field polarity, there exist two kinds of magnetic field configurations, inverse and normal. For these two kinds of configurations, variations of the flux rope equilibrium height in response to gradual surface physical processes, such as flux injections and crust motions, are carefully examined. We find that equilibrium curves contain two branches: one represents a stable equilibrium branch, and the other an unstable equilibrium branch. As a result, the evolution of the system shows a catastrophic behavior: when the magnetar surface magnetic field evolves slowly, the height of the flux rope would gradually reach a critical value beyond which stable equilibriums can no longer be maintained. Subsequently, the flux rope would lose equilibrium and the gradual quasi-static evolution of the magnetosphere will be replaced by a fast dynamical evolution. In addition to flux injections, the relative motion of active regions would give rise to the catastrophic behavior and lead to magnetic eruptions as well. We propose that a gradual process could lead to a sudden release of magnetosphere energy on a very short dynamical timescale, without being initiated by a sudden fracture in the crust of the magnetar. Some implications of our model are also discussed.

  18. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  19. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is noise-induced hearing ... additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound in our environment, ...

  20. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains ...

  1. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  2. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  3. Opioid-induced endocrinopathy.

    PubMed

    Colameco, Stephen; Coren, Joshua S

    2009-01-01

    Debilitating chronic nonmalignant pain is often managed using opioid medications. However, with increased use of this drug class comes concern about adverse effects on patients' endocrine function. In the present review, the authors discuss opioid-induced interference with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, effects on adrenal androgen production, and endocrine deficiency. In addition, the authors describe symptomology for opioid-induced endocrinopathy as well as diagnostic testing options. Treatment modalities for those afflicted with this condition are also described.

  4. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  5. [Exercise-induced asthma].

    PubMed

    Dinh Xuan, A T; Marsac, J; Lockhart, A

    1988-12-10

    Exercise-induced asthma only differs from common asthma in its causative factor. It is a typical asthmatic attack which follows a strenuous and continuous physical exercise lasting 5 to 10 minutes, most often in cold and dry weather. The prevalence of exercise-induced asthma has not yet been firmly established; its pathophysiological mechanisms are still debated, and the respective roles of heat and water losses by the airways are not clearly defined. However, the influence of the type of exercise as a precipitating factor of exercise-induced asthma is now well-known. All things being equal, swimming generates less asthma than running and cycling. This enables the subjects to be directed towards the most suitable sports and encouraged to improve their physical fitness. Drug treatment of exercise-induced asthma must preferentially be preventive; it relies on cromoglycate and beta-2 adrenergic agonists, the latter being also capable of treating acute exercise-induced bronchial obstruction. Education of the patients and their family is also important.

  6. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  7. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Joseph; Wellington, Daniel; Miller, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 34 year-old man who developed exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis after unaccustomed high-intensity exercise. Subclinical rhabdomyolysis is common after heavy exercise, yet it is uncommon for patients to seek medical advice. The presentation is variable and despite potentially life-threatening complications the diagnosis may be easily missed by patients and healthcare professionals. A high-index of suspicion is critical to avoid missing the diagnosis. We summarise the current knowledge, clinical course, complications and management of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27657164

  8. Food-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Muraro, Antonella

    2012-02-01

    Food-induced anaphylaxis (FIA) is a serious allergic reaction that may cause death rapidly in otherwise healthy individuals. There is no universal agreement on its definition or criteria for diagnosis. Hospital admissions for FIA have more than doubled in the last decade. Food is one of the most common causes of anaphylaxis, with most surveys indicating that food-induced reactions account for 30% to 50% of cases. The most commonly implicated foods are peanut, tree nuts, milk, eggs, sesame seeds, fish, and shellfish. The only life-saving treatment for anaphylaxis is allergen avoidance, and epinephrine injection if an anaphylactic event occurs.

  9. Benzocaine-induced methemoglobinemia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P M; Lala, D S; Arsura, E L

    2000-01-01

    Methemoglobinemia is an uncommon but important complication associated with the use of topical anesthetics. We describe four cases of methemoglobinemia induced by topical benzocaine use. We review pathophysiology, early diagnosis, and therapy for this reversible yet potentially fatal condition. Physicians who use procedures involving the application of topical anesthetics need to be aware of this side effect to prevent significant morbidity and mortality.

  10. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  11. Cocaine induced hippocampi infarction

    PubMed Central

    Morales Vidal, Sarkis Gibran; Hornik, Alejandro; Morgan, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    A middle age man presented with disorientation and memory impairment due to bilateral hippocampal strokes secondary to cocaine use. This is the second report of cocaine induced hippocampi ischaemic strokes. In contrast to the previous report, this middle age man did not have cardiac arrest. PMID:22761214

  12. Statin-induced Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Redmond, Elizabeth; Harbor, Cathryn

    2012-05-01

    Heart disease (HD) is the number one killer in the United States.(1) In 2006, the direct and indirect costs associated with cardiovascular disease in the United States were estimated at 400 billion dollars.(2) Statin therapy for cholesterol reduction is a mainstay intervention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as reflected in atorvastatin's status as the number one prescribed medication in the United States.(3) Statin therapy, however, is also associated with side effects that signal mitochondrial distress. A commonly reported statin-induced symptom is myalgia, which is defined as muscle pain without an associated elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK). In clinical trials, the reports of myalgia vary from less than 1% to 25% of patients.(4) Myopathy is a general term defined as an abnormal condition or disease of muscle tissue. Myopathy includes myalgia, myositis (inflammation of muscle tissue associated with elevated CK) and the very serious condition rhabdomyolysis (extreme myositis). Histological findings in statin-induced myopathy demonstrate electron chain dysfunction making "mitochondrial myopathy" the more precise term.(5) Mitochondrial myopathy has been associated with statin-induced CoQ10 depletion.(5) Given the density of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes, and CoQ10's role in mitochondrial energy production, depletion has long been associated with increased risk for heart disease.(6-7) In the case below, mitochondrial-specific organic acids, serum CoQ10, vitamin D and clinical history all suggest statin-induced mitochondrial myopathy, despite normal serum CK.

  13. Does formaldehyde induce aneuploidy?

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kühner, Stefanie; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Schütz, Petra

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) was tested for a potential aneugenic activity in mammalian cells. We employed tests to discriminate between aneugenic and clastogenic effects in accordance with international guidelines for genotoxicity testing. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus test (CBMNT) in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with a pan-centromeric probe was performed with cultured human lymphocytes and the human A549 lung cell line. FA induced micronuclei (MN) in binuclear cells of both cell types under standard in vitro test conditions following the OECD guideline 487. FISH analysis revealed that the vast majority of induced MN were centromere negative, thus indicating a clastogenic effect. A similar result was obtained for MN induced by γ-irradiation, whereas the typical aneugens colcemid (COL) and vincristine (VCR) predominantly induced centromere-positive MN. Furthermore, COL and VCR clearly enhanced the MN frequency in mononuclear lymphocytes in the CBMNT, whereas such an effect was not observed for γ-irradiation and FA. In experiments with the Chinese hamster V79 cell line, the aneugens COL and VCR clearly increased the frequency of tetraploid second division metaphases, whereas FA did not cause such an effect. Altogether, our results confirm the clastogenicity of FA in cultured mammalian cells but exclude a significant aneugenic activity. PMID:21804075

  14. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  15. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  16. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    2013-05-01

    Patients can develop thrombocytopenia during heparin therapy.The most frequent form, type I heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, does not require cessation of therapy. Type II heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is immune-mediated. It can cause venous or arterial thrombosis, which may be fatal or require amputation. Type II thrombocytopenia typically develops 5 to 10 days after initiation of treatment, sometimes earlier in patients previously exposed to heparins. The recommendations on platelet-count monitoring during heparin therapy are not based on high-level evidence. The main risk factors for type II thrombocytopenia must be taken into account: unfractionated heparin, previous heparin exposure, surgery, female patient. For patients considered at high risk for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, platelet-count monitoring is usually recommended at least twice a week for at least 2 weeks. The treatment of immune-mediated heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is based on stopping heparin and replacing it with danaparoid or argatroban. In practice, the decision to initiate treatment with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin is not a trivial one. In addition to the bleeding risk, the risk of type II thrombocytopenia in the short- term, or during subsequent heparin therapy, should be taken into account when assessing the harm-benefit balance. PMID:23819174

  17. Injection-induced earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  18. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in a pump including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means 32,36 which cooperate with a first vortex cell 38 and a series of secondary vortex cells 40 to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow.

  19. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed Central

    Carratala, C.; Gea, J. G.; Aguar, M. C.; Grau, S.; Espadaler-Medina, J. M.; Broquetas, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  20. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed

    Carratala, C; Gea, J G; Aguar, M C; Grau, S; Espadaler-Medina, J M; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  1. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  2. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is…

  3. Asthma induced by enkephalin.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, R D; Bellamy, D; Pyke, D A

    1980-01-01

    A total of 291 diabetics were studied to see whether an asthmatic reaction was associated with facial flushing induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol. Of these patients, 191 reported facial flushing, of whom 12 reported breathlessness as well. Of these 12, five also described wheezing, and respiratory function tests showed them to have asthma. Three of these five patients underwent further tests, which showed that the asthmatic reaction could be prevented by giving disodium cromoglycate and the specific opiate antagonist naloxone. One patient developed wheezing when given an enkephalin analogue with opiate-like activity. Asthma induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol was concluded to be mediated by endogenous peptides with opiate-like activity such as enkephalin. PMID:7357255

  4. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  5. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  6. Sunitinib Induced Immune Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Shekarriz, Ramin; Koulaeinejad, Neda; Nosrati, Anahita; Salehifa, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Sunitinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor which prevents tumor growth and metastatic progression. It was approved for treatment of advanced renal cell cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumor and advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. It has several adverse reactions on multi organ systems including hematologic system. Although the neutropenia and thrombocytopenia commonly happens as Grade 3 or 4 abnormalities following bone marrow suppression, in the rare cases, the immune mediated abnormality may drive the sunitinib-induced hematologic disorder. In this report, we present a case of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia induced by sunitinib. One month after first treatment cycle with sunitinib, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia were occurred. The patient had a normal bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, the thrombocytopenia was resistant to platelet transfusion which successfully was treated with prednisolone. PMID:26664400

  7. Sunitinib Induced Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Shekarriz, Ramin; Koulaeinejad, Neda; Nosrati, Anahita; Salehifa, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Sunitinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor which prevents tumor growth and metastatic progression. It was approved for treatment of advanced renal cell cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumor and advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. It has several adverse reactions on multi organ systems including hematologic system. Although the neutropenia and thrombocytopenia commonly happens as Grade 3 or 4 abnormalities following bone marrow suppression, in the rare cases, the immune mediated abnormality may drive the sunitinib-induced hematologic disorder. In this report, we present a case of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia induced by sunitinib. One month after first treatment cycle with sunitinib, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia were occurred. The patient had a normal bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, the thrombocytopenia was resistant to platelet transfusion which successfully was treated with prednisolone. PMID:26664400

  8. Polarization induced doped transistor

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  9. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  10. Levetiracetam-induced pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Talal; Kay, Dana; Alqahtani, Saeed A; Makke, Yamane; Lesky, Linda; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2015-01-01

    Pancytopenia is a rare side effect of levetiracetam (LEV) that is associated with severe morbidity that requires hospitalization. Here, we report a patient with a right temporoparietal tumor who underwent a temporal craniotomy with resection of the mass and was started on LEV for seizure prophylaxis per the neurosurgery local protocol. The patient developed LEV-induced pancytopenia, which was successfully managed by discontinuation of this medication. Our report aims to increase awareness of this rare cause of pancytopenia among clinicians. PMID:26744695

  11. [Induced autotetraploid grape mutants].

    PubMed

    Kuliev, V M

    2011-01-01

    The methods of experimental mitotic and meiotic polyploidy in grapes are represented in the article. Results of cytological, histo-anatomical, biomorphological researches of induced autotetraploids are shown. Genetic characteristics, parameters of generative organs, quantitative and structural genome changes were studied. Comparative quantitative changes in the content of chloroplast and mitochondrion DNAs and RNAs in diploids and autotetraploids were defined. Also are shown. The biology-economic evaluation of autotetraploids on comparison with the initial grape variety is represented. PMID:21774401

  12. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Powers, A.R.; Gancsos, M.G.; Finn, E.S.; Morgan, P.T.; Corlett, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At sub-anesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation, and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Methods Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of three participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Results Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. Discussion We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced AVHs in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the magnetic resonance scanner, and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis: the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs and it does so more in situations of reduced perceptual input. The reduced perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine; such circumstances induce aberrant percepts including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of AVHs and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. PMID:26361209

  13. Fluoroscopy-induced radionecrosis.

    PubMed

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Kamangar, Faranak; Ho, Baran; Chang, Shurong; Dahle, Sara E; Schulman, Joshua M; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2016-01-01

    Complications from radiation exposure during fluoroscopic guidance of cardiac catheterization may occur. With repeated procedures, the risk for cutaneous injuries increases. Herein, we describe a 59-year-old man with extensive coronary artery disease, who had undergone multiple revascularization procedures and developed a non-healing ulcer on his left inferior scapula. The patient's medical history, physical exam findings, and histopathology gave clues to a case of radiation-induced dermatitis and necrosis. PMID:27617939

  14. Cefoperazone Induced Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Katukuri, Goutham Reddy; Maddala, Raja Naga Mahesh; Ramamoorthi, Kusugodlu; Hande, Manjunatha

    2016-08-01

    Cefoperazone is a beta-lactam antibiotic which is frequently used in treating a variety of gram positive and gram negative infections. The chemical structure of cefoperazone contains a side chain of N-methylthiotetrazole which can inhibit vitamin K metabolism resulting in hypoprothombinemia. We report a case of cefoperazone induced coagulopathy manifesting as gastrointestinal bleeding. A Naranjo assessment score of 5 was obtained, indicating a probable relationship between the patient's coagulation function disorder and her use of the suspect drug. PMID:27656491

  15. Desloratadine Induced Pill Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Alkim, Huseyin; Iscan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Pill induced esophagitis is a rare complication mostly seen in patients using tetracycline and its derivatives or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Here we present a 37 years old female patient experiencing pill esophagitis after taking desloratadine without liquid immediately before going to bed. This was the first pill esophagitis case related with desloratadine reported in the literature. Pill esophagitis is a preventable complication that consists of giving simple advice of how and when to take medication.

  16. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  17. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  18. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Sepsis-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Leigh Ann; Supinski, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and despite advances in management, mortality remains high. In survivors, sepsis increases the risk for the development of persistent acquired weakness syndromes affecting both the respiratory muscles and the limb muscles. This acquired weakness results in prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, difficulty weaning, functional impairment, exercise limitation, and poor health-related quality of life. Abundant evidence indicates that sepsis induces a myopathy characterized by reductions in muscle force-generating capacity, atrophy (loss of muscle mass), and altered bioenergetics. Sepsis elicits derangements at multiple subcellular sites involved in excitation contraction coupling, such as decreasing membrane excitability, injuring sarcolemmal membranes, altering calcium homeostasis due to effects on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and disrupting contractile protein interactions. Muscle wasting occurs later and results from increased proteolytic degradation as well as decreased protein synthesis. In addition, sepsis produces marked abnormalities in muscle mitochondrial functional capacity and when severe, these alterations correlate with increased death. The mechanisms leading to sepsis-induced changes in skeletal muscle are linked to excessive localized elaboration of proinflammatory cytokines, marked increases in free-radical generation, and activation of proteolytic pathways that are upstream of the proteasome including caspase and calpain. Emerging data suggest that targeted inhibition of these pathways may alter the evolution and progression of sepsis-induced myopathy and potentially reduce the occurrence of sepsis-mediated acquired weakness syndromes. PMID:20046121

  20. Baby universes with induced gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yihong; Gao, Hongbo

    1989-12-01

    Some quantum effects of baby universes with induced gravity are discussed. The authors prove that the interactions between the baby-parent universes are non-local, and argue that the induced low-energy cosmological constant is zero. This argument does not depend on the detail of the induced potential.

  1. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  2. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  3. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  4. Cannabis induced asystole.

    PubMed

    Brancheau, Daniel; Blanco, Jessica; Gholkar, Gunjan; Patel, Brijesh; Machado, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis or marijuana is the most used recreational, and until recently illegal, drug in the United States. Although cannabis has medicinal use, its consumption has been linked to motor vehicle accidents in dose dependent fashion. Marijuana and other cannabinoids produce a multitude of effects on the human body that may result in these motor vehicle accidents. Some of the effects that marijuana has been known to cause include altered sensorium, diminished reflexes, and increased vagal tone. We present a case of cannabis induced asystole from hypervagotonia. PMID:26520167

  5. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes.

  6. Fission induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments was investigated, as well as the probability of utilizing the energy of these particles to create population inversion leading to laser action. Eventually, it is hoped that the same medium could be used for both fissioning and lasing, thus avoiding inefficiences in converting one form of energy to the other. A central problem in understanding a fission induced plasma is to obtain an accurate model of the electron behavior; some calculations are presented to this end. The calculations are simple, providing a compendium of processes for reference.

  7. Cannabis induced asystole.

    PubMed

    Brancheau, Daniel; Blanco, Jessica; Gholkar, Gunjan; Patel, Brijesh; Machado, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis or marijuana is the most used recreational, and until recently illegal, drug in the United States. Although cannabis has medicinal use, its consumption has been linked to motor vehicle accidents in dose dependent fashion. Marijuana and other cannabinoids produce a multitude of effects on the human body that may result in these motor vehicle accidents. Some of the effects that marijuana has been known to cause include altered sensorium, diminished reflexes, and increased vagal tone. We present a case of cannabis induced asystole from hypervagotonia.

  8. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes. PMID:7652089

  9. Bupropion-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Khazaal, Yasser; Krenz, Sonia; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2003-09-01

    Whereas there are some case reports of bupropion-induced vivid dreaming and nightmares, until now it has not been associated with somnambulism. A case is reported of a patient treated with bupropion as a smoking cessation medication, who developed somnambulism during nicotine withdrawal. Furthermore, the sleepwalking episodes were associated with eating behaviour. Amnesia was reported for all episodes. As, on one hand,bupropion is a noradrenergic and dopaminergic drug and nicotine withdrawal, on the other hand, is associated with alterations in monoaminergic functions, an interaction at the level of these neurotransmitters is suggested as the underlying mechanism. PMID:13129839

  10. [Minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation].

    PubMed

    Karrer, S; Szeimies, R M; Pfau, A; Schröder, J; Stolz, W; Landthaler, M

    1998-03-01

    A common adverse effect of minocycline therapy is cutaneous pigmentation. We describe two patients who presented with hyperpigmentation caused by minocycline. One patient, aged 54 years, had taken minocycline due to lung silicosis for 3 years before black pigmentation of the face occurred. The other 49 year-old patient developed grey-black hyperpigmentation on both lower legs after a 6-month therapy with minocycline for folliculitis. This patient was treated with the Q-switched ruby laser and the pigmentation resolved in the treated area. The different clinical and histological forms of minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation are discussed.

  11. Ifosfamide induced Fanconi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Buttemer, Samantha; Pai, Mohan; Lau, Keith K

    2011-01-01

    Ifosfamide (IFA) is a powerful chemotherapeutic drug that is active against a variety of paediatric malignancies. However, renal toxicities such as haemorrhagic cystitis and Fanconi syndrome are major hazards that hinder its use in clinical practice. The authors present a case of a patient treated for Wilms’ tumour with IFA who developed rickets with Fanconi syndrome. Patients undergoing IFA treatment must be carefully monitored for the development of iatrogenic complications. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the underlying pathomechanism of IFA induced Fanconi syndrome, and selective renal protection against during chemotherapy with IFA may be possible soon. PMID:22669992

  12. Emotionally induced hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Altman, Rachel S; Schwartz, Robert A

    2002-05-01

    Hyperhidrosis, a disorder that usually begins in childhood or adolescence, is defined as sweating in excess of what is required for normal thermoregulation. This condition may adversely affect one's quality of life by causing emotional disturbance and social embarrassment. Three forms of hyperhidrosis exist: emotionally induced, localized, and generalized. Hyperhidrosis may be either idiopathic or secondary to other diseases, metabolic disorders, febrile illnesses, or drugs. Diagnosis usually is made based on the patient's history and visible signs of excessive sweating. Various effective treatment options are available. PMID:12041810

  13. Demonstrating induced recharge

    SciTech Connect

    Caswell, B. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes an attempt by a New England community to explore for an aquifer that would yield 1 million gallons of ground water per day. After the discovery of a glacial sand and gravel aquifer, a demonstration of a hydraulic coupling between the aquifer and an adjacent stream was undertaken. This connection was needed to maintain recharge capacity of the well. The paper goes on to describe the techniques needed and used to determine the induced recharge caused by drawdown in these test wells.

  14. [Cannabinoid-induced hyperemesis].

    PubMed

    Lieb, Martin; Palm, Ulrich; Nicolaus, Mathias; Reibke, Roland; Baghai, Thomas C

    2011-04-01

    In this case report, we describe a 29 year-old male patient with a history of chronic cannabis abuse presenting with recurrent vomiting, intense nausea and abdominal pain. Abstinence from cannabis resolved both vomiting and abdominal pain. We conclude that in case of chronic cannabis abuse, patients presenting with severe and chronic nausea, vomiting, accompanied by abdominal pain and compulsive behaviour (hot bathing), in the absence of other obvious causes, the diagnosis of cannabinoid-induced hyperemesis syndrome should be considered. PMID:21462097

  15. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Cleva; Kross, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals. PMID:22408440

  16. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  17. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  18. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  19. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taro; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old man presented with acute flushing, pruritus and warmth followed by collapse after vigorous exercise in a gymnasium. After resting for 30 min and receiving a rapid infusion of 0.9% sodium chloride, he was finally stable. He admitted that he had a similar experience 5 years earlier during exercise. Based on the patient's history, his symptoms were attributed to exercise-induced anaphylaxis. None of his episodes was associated with any suspicious co-triggers of anaphylaxis. He was successfully discharged from hospital without any complications after receiving guidance on how to prevent this condition. PMID:22669856

  20. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taro; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old man presented with acute flushing, pruritus and warmth followed by collapse after vigorous exercise in a gymnasium. After resting for 30 min and receiving a rapid infusion of 0.9% sodium chloride, he was finally stable. He admitted that he had a similar experience 5 years earlier during exercise. Based on the patient's history, his symptoms were attributed to exercise-induced anaphylaxis. None of his episodes was associated with any suspicious co-triggers of anaphylaxis. He was successfully discharged from hospital without any complications after receiving guidance on how to prevent this condition.

  1. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  2. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-08-28

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing.

  3. INTERFERON INDUCED THYROIDITIS

    PubMed Central

    Tomer, Yaron

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases that develop as a result of interactions between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the genetic and environmental triggers contributing to AITD. The major environmental triggers of AITD include iodine, smoking, medications, pregnancy, and possibly stress. In this review we will focus on two well-documented environmental triggers of AITD, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and interferon alpha (IFNa) therapy. Chronic HCV infection has been shown to be associated with increased incidence of clinical and subclinical autoimmune thyroiditis (i.e. the presence of thyroid antibodies in euthyroid subjects). Moreover, IFNa therapy of chronic HCV infection is associated with subclinical or clinical thyroiditis in up to 40% of cases which can be autoimmune, or non-autoimmune thyroiditis. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) in chronic HCV patients may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of HCV and interferon induced thyroiditis have been well characterized, the mechanisms causing these conditions are still poorly understood. PMID:20022216

  4. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, António J; Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-18

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  5. [Drug-induced laryngospasm].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, T; Munakata, K

    1997-02-01

    We report a case of drug-induced laryngospasm due to Chlorpromazine. A drug-induced laryngospasm has not been previously reported in the literature. A 70-year-old male with the proximal end fracture of the femur was scheduled for the operative fixation. He had a past history of alcoholism and had underwent a long-term chlorpromazine therapy for 45 years until admission to our hospital. There have been a few reports on unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long-term treatment with chlorpromazine. Caution was therefore needed in general anesthesia, which was thought to be safer than epidural or spinal anesthesia in this case. Accordingly for the preparation of an emergency operation, the central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein was performed under subcutaneous injection of lidocaine. Severe dyspnea and cyanosis occurred a few minutes after the administration of lidocaine. The specific diagnosis of laryngospasm was made by inspection of the vocal cords. Immediate oral intubation was performed and no complications ensued during and after the operation. This episode strongly suggests that one reason of the unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long term treatment with chlorpromazine could be laryngospasm. In conclusion, anesthesiologists should be aware of the possibility of laryngospasm under similar conditions.

  6. Video game induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, C D; De Marco, P; Grünewald, R A; Giannakodimos, S; Panayiotopoulos, C P

    1994-08-01

    Fifteen patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing video games are described together with a review of 20 cases in the English literature. Nine of the 15 cases and all but two of the reported cases experienced their first seizure while playing video games. Two thirds of patients had idiopathic generalised epilepsy and mainly reported generalised tonic clonic seizures, but some had typical absence seizures and myoclonic jerks while playing video games. In this series, 30% with idiopathic generalised epilepsy had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Overall, 70% of patients with idiopathic generalised epilepsy were photosensitive to intermittent photic stimulation and the mechanism of seizure provocation was probably similar to that of television induced seizures, although sensitivity to specific patterns was sometimes important. Two children had self induced video game seizures. Non-photic factors such as excitement, fatigue, sleep deprivation, cognitive processing, and diurnal variation in susceptibility seemed to be important seizure precipitants, particularly in non-photo-sensitive patients. Twenty nine per cent of patients had partial (mainly occipital) video game associated seizures. Occipital spikes were common in the EEG of these patients. Photosensitivity to intermittent photic stimulation may have been important in two patients but in the others, who all played arcade video games, other mechanisms need to be considered. Video game associated seizures are a feature of several epileptic syndromes and differ in precipitants and appropriate management.

  7. [Drug-induced laryngospasm].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, T; Munakata, K

    1997-02-01

    We report a case of drug-induced laryngospasm due to Chlorpromazine. A drug-induced laryngospasm has not been previously reported in the literature. A 70-year-old male with the proximal end fracture of the femur was scheduled for the operative fixation. He had a past history of alcoholism and had underwent a long-term chlorpromazine therapy for 45 years until admission to our hospital. There have been a few reports on unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long-term treatment with chlorpromazine. Caution was therefore needed in general anesthesia, which was thought to be safer than epidural or spinal anesthesia in this case. Accordingly for the preparation of an emergency operation, the central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein was performed under subcutaneous injection of lidocaine. Severe dyspnea and cyanosis occurred a few minutes after the administration of lidocaine. The specific diagnosis of laryngospasm was made by inspection of the vocal cords. Immediate oral intubation was performed and no complications ensued during and after the operation. This episode strongly suggests that one reason of the unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long term treatment with chlorpromazine could be laryngospasm. In conclusion, anesthesiologists should be aware of the possibility of laryngospasm under similar conditions. PMID:9071116

  8. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  9. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  10. Peripherally induced oromandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, C.; Lai, E.; Jankovic, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a focal dystonia manifested by involuntary muscle contractions producing repetitive, patterned mouth, jaw, and tongue movements. Dystonia is usually idiopathic (primary), but in some cases it follows peripheral injury. Peripherally induced cervical and limb dystonia is well recognised, and the aim of this study was to characterise peripherally induced OMD.
METHODS—The following inclusion criteria were used for peripherally induced OMD: (1) the onset of the dystonia was within a few days or months (up to 1 year) after the injury; (2) the trauma was well documented by the patient's history or a review of their medical and dental records; and (3) the onset of dystonia was anatomically related to the site of injury (facial and oral).
RESULTS—Twenty seven patients were identified in the database with OMD, temporally and anatomically related to prior injury or surgery. No additional precipitant other than trauma could be detected. None of the patients had any litigation pending. The mean age at onset was 50.11 (SD 14.15) (range 23-74) years and there was a 2:1 female preponderance. Mean latency between the initial trauma and the onset of OMD was 65 days (range 1 day-1 year). Ten (37%) patients had some evidence of predisposing factors such as family history of movement disorders, prior exposure to neuroleptic drugs, and associated dystonia affecting other regions or essential tremor. When compared with 21 patients with primary OMD, there was no difference for age at onset, female preponderance, and phenomenology. The frequency of dystonic writer's cramp, spasmodic dysphonia, bruxism, essential tremor, and family history of movement disorder, however, was lower in the post-traumatic group (p<0.05). In both groups the response to botulinum toxin treatment was superior to medical therapy (p<0.005). Surgical intervention for temporomandibular disorders was more frequent in the post-traumatic group and was associated with

  11. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  12. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  13. Induced seismicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1997-09-18

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

  14. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  15. Disorder induces explosive synchronization.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2014-06-01

    We study explosive synchronization, a phenomenon characterized by first-order phase transitions between incoherent and synchronized states in networks of coupled oscillators. While explosive synchronization has been the subject of many recent studies, in each case strong conditions on the heterogeneity of the network, its link weights, or its initial construction are imposed to engineer a first-order phase transition. This raises the question of how robust explosive synchronization is in view of more realistic structural and dynamical properties. Here we show that explosive synchronization can be induced in mildly heterogeneous networks by the addition of quenched disorder to the oscillators' frequencies, demonstrating that it is not only robust to, but moreover promoted by, this natural mechanism. We support these findings with numerical and analytical results, presenting simulations of a real neural network as well as a self-consistency theory used to study synthetic networks.

  16. Herbivore induced plant volatiles

    PubMed Central

    War, Abdul Rashid; Sharma, Hari Chand; Paulraj, Michael Gabriel; War, Mohd Yousf; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2011-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivory through different defensive mechanisms. The induction of volatile emission is one of the important and immediate response of plants to herbivory. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are involved in plant communication with natural enemies of the insect herbivores, neighboring plants, and different parts of the damaged plant. Release of a wide variety of HIPVs in response to herbivore damage and their role in plant-plant, plant-carnivore and intraplant communications represents a new facet of the complex interactions among different trophic levels. HIPVs are released from leaves, flowers, and fruits into the atmosphere or into the soil from roots in response to herbivore attack. Moreover, HIPVs act as feeding and/or oviposition deterrents to insect pests. HIPVs also mediate the interactions between the plants and the microorganisms. This review presents an overview of HIPVs emitted by plants, their role in plant defense against herbivores and their implications for pest management. PMID:22105032

  17. Multiphoton electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Lingling; Kang, Hoonsoo; Zhu, Yifu; Wu, Ying

    2003-05-01

    We show that in multi-level atomic systems coupled by multiple laser fields, all linear and nonlinear absorptions may be completely suppressed, leading to the multiphoton electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Under suitable conditions, multiphoton EIT may be used to realize selective steady-state population inversion in coherently pumped atomic systems and achieve efficient nonlinear light generation at low light intensities. As examples, we will present studies of multiphoton EIT in five-level and six-level atomic systems, which demonstrate steady-state population inversion from selective nonlinear excitation. We will also present studies of resonant hyper-Raman and four-wave mixing processes that are enhanced via suppression of the lower-order linear and nonlinear absorptions, and are capable of generating short-wavelength, coherent light at low pump intensities.

  18. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  19. Heparin induced thrombocytopenia: review.

    PubMed

    Dasararaju, Radhika; Singh, Nirupama; Mehta, Amitkumar

    2013-08-01

    Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a serious, potentially life and limb threatening immune adverse reaction to heparin. IgG antibodies against platelet factor 4 and heparin multimer complexes activate platelets to create a prothrombotic state. ELISA based immunoassay to detect these antibodies is sensitive while serotonin release assay is highly specific but is not widely available. 4T score is a simple score to calculate pre-test probability of HIT. Score < 3 is highly specific to exclude the diagnosis. Alternate anticoagulants like lepirudin, argatroban or danaparoid are recommended in therapeutic dose to treat or prevent thrombotic events in HIT. Increased awareness of this condition among clinicians is important to ensure its early recognition and treatment to avoid serious complications. PMID:23991928

  20. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF.

  1. Discreteness induced extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira; da Silva, Linaena Méricy

    2015-11-01

    Two simple models based on ecological problems are discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown how discrepant may be the results of the models that include spatial distribution with discrete interactions when compared with the continuous analogous models. In the continuous case we have, under certain circumstances, the population explosion. When we take into account the finiteness of the population, we get the opposite result, extinction. We will analyze how these results depend on the dimension d of the space and describe the phenomenon of the "Discreteness Inducing Extinction" (DIE). The results are interpreted in the context of the "paradox of sex", an old problem of evolutionary biology.

  2. Vincristine induced cranial polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bay, Ali; Yilmaz, Cahide; Yilmaz, Nebi; Oner, Ahmet Faik

    2006-06-01

    We describe a 5-year-old girl showed recovery of vincristine induced cranial polyneuropathy with pyridoxine and pyridostigmine treatment. A 5-year-old girl was diagnosed preB cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). She received chemotherapy according to the previously described modified St. Jude total therapy studies XIII. Five days after the fourth dose of vincristine, she presented with bilateral ptosis. Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis, and complete external opthalmoplegia with normal pupillary and corneal reflexes. She received 3.8 mg cumulative dose of vincristin before development of ptosis. A neuroprotective and neuroregenerative treatment attempt with pyridoxine and pyridostigmine was initiated. The bilateral ptosis markedly improved after 7 days of pyridoxine and pyridostigmine treatment and completely resolved after two weeks. The both agents were given for 3 weeks and were well tolerated without any side effects. During the follow up period we did not observe residue or recurrence of the ptosis.

  3. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  4. Uncertainty-induced quantum nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shao-xiong; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-shui; Song, He-shan

    2014-01-01

    Based on the skew information, we present a quantity, uncertainty-induced quantum nonlocality (UIN) to measure the quantum correlation. It can be considered as the updated version of the original measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) preserving the good computability but eliminating the non-contractivity problem. For 2×d-dimensional state, it is shown that UIN can be given by a closed form. In addition, we also investigate the maximal uncertainty-induced nonlocality.

  5. Laser Induced Thermal Keratoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Householder, John; Horwitz, Larry S.; Lowe, Kenneth W.; Murrillo, Adolfo

    1989-09-01

    A technique of corneal surgery that is thermally induced and relatively nonenvasive has been studied by the authors, and the preliminary results of the thermal keratoplasty performed on live rabbits are reported here. A carbon dioxide laser was used with simple optical and pointing systems to thermally induce several arbitrary patterns of corneal reformation. Endothelial photographs were taken before the procedure and then again ten days after. They indicated no damage in the Descemet's membrane nor was there damage observed to the endothelium. As much, as 14 "diopters" of change occurred in the corneal keratometry with both positive and negative directions signs. The magnitude and direction of the change were recorded as functions of the pattern of the therapy produced and the laser energy deposited in the stroma. Any corneal reformation was tracked as a function of time subsequent to the procedure. A-minor decay was observed within the first three days of the procedure and the majority of the reformations have maintained at the time of this writing. Since radiation at this wavelength is highly attenuated and absorbed in cornea, no change was observed beyond mid-stroma and the lens and retina appeared uneffective. The authors believe that this technology will be a significant contributor to corneal refractive procedures in the near future. Unlike any refractive surgery currently practiced, this technology may lead to a procedure that: 1) is reversible, 2) is re.eatable, 3) stren thens rather then weakens the cornea, 4) is a..arentl more stable, 5) is more flexible in the types of corneal curvature changes it can produce, 6) results in very clean mires, 7) is painless, and 8) results in total corneal clarity.

  6. Baboon syndrome induced by hydroxyzine.

    PubMed

    Akkari, Hayet; Belhadjali, Hichem; Youssef, Monia; Mokni, Sana; Zili, Jamelediine

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions are very rare. We report here a typical case of drug-related Baboon syndrome or symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE) which was induced by hydroxyzine in a 60-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive patch and oral accidental provocation tests with hydroxyzine. Patch tests and oral provocation tests with cetirizine and levocetirizine were negative. A review of the literature identified only 17 reported cases of hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first case of hydroxyzine-induced SDRIFE. PMID:23723506

  7. Iodine-Induced hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Markou, K; Georgopoulos, N; Kyriazopoulou, V; Vagenakis, A G

    2001-05-01

    Iodine is an essential element for thyroid hormone synthesis. The thyroid gland has the capacity and holds the machinery to handle the iodine efficiently when the availability of iodine becomes scarce, as well as when iodine is available in excessive quantities. The latter situation is handled by the thyroid by acutely inhibiting the organification of iodine, the so-called acute Wolff-Chaikoff effect, by a mechanism not well understood 52 years after the original description. It is proposed that iodopeptide(s) are formed that temporarily inhibit thyroid peroxidase (TPO) mRNA and protein synthesis and, therefore, thyroglobulin iodinations. The Wolff-Chaikoff effect is an effective means of rejecting the large quantities of iodide and therefore preventing the thyroid from synthesizing large quantities of thyroid hormones. The acute Wolff-Chaikoff effect lasts for few a days and then, through the so-called "escape" phenomenon, the organification of intrathyroidal iodide resumes and the normal synthesis of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) returns. This is achieved by decreasing the intrathyroidal inorganic iodine concentration by down regulation of the sodium iodine symporter (NIS) and therefore permits the TPO-H202 system to resume normal activity. However, in a few apparently normal individuals, in newborns and fetuses, in some patients with chronic systemic diseases, euthyroid patients with autoimmune thyroiditis, and Graves' disease patients previously treated with radioimmunoassay (RAI), surgery or antithyroid drugs, the escape from the inhibitory effect of large doses of iodides is not achieved and clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism ensues. Iodide-induced hypothyroidism has also been observed in patients with a history of postpartum thyroiditis, in euthyroid patients after a previous episode of subacute thyroiditis, and in patients treated with recombinant interferon-alpha who developed transient thyroid dysfunction during interferon-a treatment. The

  8. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  9. Laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Merante, Alfonso; Gareri, Pietro; Marigliano, Norma Maria; De Fazio, Salvatore; Bonacci, Elvira; Torchia, Carlo; Russo, Gaetano; Lacroce, Pasquale; Lacava, Roberto; Castagna, Alberto; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ruotolo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes a case of laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis in an elderly patient. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for the onset of confusion, tremors, an inability to walk, and a fever that she had been experiencing for 36 hours. She often took high dosages of lactulose and sorbitol syrup as a laxative (about 70 g/day). During her physical examination, the patient was confused, drowsy, and she presented hyposthenia in her upper and lower limbs, symmetric and diffuse moderate hyporeflexia, and her temperature was 37.8°C. Laboratory tests revealed severe hyponatremia with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis. Moreover, rhabdomyolysis markers were found. The correction of hydroelectrolytic imbalances with saline, potassium and sodium chlorure, calcium gluconate was the first treatment. During her hospitalization the patient presented acute delirium, treated with haloperidol and prometazine chloridrate intramuscularly. She was discharged 12 days later, after resolution of symptoms, and normalized laboratory tests. Over-the-counter drugs such as laxatives are usually not considered dangerous; on the other hand, they may cause serum electrolytic imbalance and rhabdomyolysis. A careful monitoring of all the drugs taken by the elderly is one of the most important duties of a physician since drug interactions and their secondary effects may be fatal. PMID:20396636

  10. Fission-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments, and to utilize the energy of the particles to create population inversion that would lead to laser action is investigated. An investigation was made of various laser materials which could be used for nuclear-pumped lasing. The most likely candidate for a fissioning material in the gaseous form is uranium hexafluoride - UF6, and experiments were performed to investigate materials that would be compatible with it. One of the central problems in understanding a fission-induced plasma is to obtain a model of the electron behavior, and some preliminary calculations are presented. In particular, the rates of various processes are discussed. A simple intuitive model of the electron energy distribution function is also shown. The results were useful for considering a mathematical model of a nuclear-pumped laser. Next a theoretical model of a (3)He-Ar nuclear-pumped laser is presented. The theory showed good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Seizure-induced neglect.

    PubMed Central

    Heilman, K M; Howell, G J

    1980-01-01

    A man with intermittent right parieto-occipital seizures was monitored by electroencephalography while he received 60 trials of being touched on the right, left, or both hands. Half of the trials were given during a focal seizure, and half were given interictally. While the patient was having seizures, he appropriately responded to all 10 stimuli delivered to the right hand, but four of 10 responses were incorrect (allaesthetic) when he was stimulated on the left. With bilateral simultaneous stimulation he neglected the left hand in all 10 trials. His interictal performance was flawless. When given a line-bisection task on two occasions during a seizure, the patient attempted to make a mark to the left of the entire sheet of paper. Immediately postictally he made a mark at the right end of the line. The case illustrates that focal seizures may induce elements of the neglect syndrome and that attention (to contralateral stimuli) and intention to perform (in the contralateral hemispatial field) may be dissociable phenomena. PMID:6777464

  12. [Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Thiele, T; Althaus, K; Greinacher, A

    2010-09-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an adverse drug reaction that carries an increased risk of thromboembolic complications. HIT is caused by platelet-activating antibodies directed against a complex of platelet factor 4 (PF4) and heparin. HIT typically manifests in the second week after initiation of heparin therapy with a platelet count reduction of more than 50% of the highest level after the start of heparin administration as well as thromboembolic events. The clinical probability can be calculated by the 4 T's score. The laboratory diagnosis of HIT is based on confirmation of PF4/heparin antibodies or on functional tests that provide evidence of heparin-dependent platelet-activating antibodies. A low 4 T's score and negative HIT test virtually rule out the presence of HIT. Patients with acute HIT require anticoagulation with a compatible anticoagulant in a therapeutic dose. The drugs currently available for this include the direct thrombin inhibitors argatroban, lepirudin, bivalirudin, and desirudin and the indirect factor Xa inhibitors danaparoid and fondaparinux. PMID:20694716

  13. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Chong, William H; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Chen, Clara C; Collins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and fascinating paraneoplastic syndrome in which patients present with bone pain, fractures, and muscle weakness. The cause is high blood levels of the recently identified phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In TIO, FGF23 is secreted by mesenchymal tumors that are usually benign, but are typically very small and difficult to locate. FGF23 acts primarily at the renal tubule and impairs phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leading to hypophosphatemia and low levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A step-wise approach utilizing functional imaging (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and octreotide scintigraphy) followed by anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and, if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23 is usually successful in locating the tumors. For tumors that cannot be located, medical treatment with phosphate supplements and active vitamin D (calcitriol or alphacalcidiol) is usually successful; however, the medical regimen can be cumbersome and associated with complications. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and provides guidance in evaluating and treating these patients. Novel imaging modalities and medical treatments, which hold promise for the future, are also reviewed. PMID:21490240

  14. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, A L; Austen, K F

    1980-08-01

    Sixteen patients were seen because of possibly life-threatening exercise-associated symptoms similar to anaphylactic reactions. Asthma attacks, cholinergic urticaria and angioedema, and cardiac arrythmias are recognized as exertion-related phenomena in predisposed patients but are distinct from the syndrome described here. A syndrome characterized by the exertion-related onset of cutaneous pruritus and warmth, the development of generalized urticaria, and the appearance of such additional manifestations as collapse in 12 patients, gastrointestinal tract symptoms in five patients, and upper respiratory distress in 10 patients has been designated exercise-induced anaphylaxis, because of the striking similarity of this symptom complex to the anaphylactic syndrome elicited by ingestion or injection of a foreign antigenic substance. There is a family history of atopic desease for 11 patients and cold urticaria for two others and a personal history of atopy in six. The size of the wheals, the failure to develop an attack with a warm bath or shower or a fever, and the prominence of syncope rule against the diagnosis of conventional cholinergic urticaria. There is no history or evidence of an encounter with an environmental source of antigen during the exercise period. PMID:7400473

  15. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  16. Loperamide-induced hypopituitarism

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Catherine; Gan, Earn H; Pearce, Simon H S

    2016-01-01

    Loperamide is the most commonly used antidiarrhoeal medication in the UK. We report a serious and hitherto undocumented adverse effect of chronic use in a 45-year-old man with inflammatory bowel disease. He presented to the endocrine clinic with fatigue and low libido; biochemical assessment revealed hypogonadism and adrenal insufficiency without any elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone. When symptoms allowed, loperamide was reduced and a short synacthen test (SST) showed a ‘clear pass’ with a normal peak cortisol of 833 nmol/L. Later, worsening diarrhoea necessitated an escalation in loperamide use again. While taking a daily dose of 15–20 mg (recommended daily maximum 16 mg) reassessment revealed a fall in peak cortisol on SST to 483 nmol/L, a subnormal response. Clinicians should exercise caution when relying on loperamide to manage their patients’ chronic diarrhoea and remain mindful of the possibility of drug-induced life-threatening adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27681351

  17. Clofibrate-Induced Antidiuresis

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Arnold M.; Howanitz, Joan; Gemert, Marcia Van; Miller, Myron

    1973-01-01

    Normal subjects and patients with antidiuretic hormone (ADH) deficiency were studied to determine the mechanism of the antidiuretic action of clofibrate. Before clofibrate treatment, the patients' ability to concentrate urine with a standardized dehydration procedure correlated with the amount of ADH which was excreted. During clofibrate administration all six patients with ADH deficiency developed an antidiuresis which was like that of ADH, since there was no change in sodium, potassium, total solute, or creatinine excretion. There was a correlation between the patients' ability to concentrate urine during dehydration and the subsequent response to clofibrate, and the excretion of ADH during dehydration correlated with the excretion of ADH on clofibrate therapy. Clofibrate-induced antidiuresis in these patients was partially overcome by ethanol and by water loading. Clofibrate interfered with the ability of patients and subjects to excrete a water load and prevented the water load from inhibiting ADH excretion in the normal subjects. These studies suggested that clofibrate was acting through endogenous ADH and this thesis was supported by the failure of clofibrate to produce an antidiuresis when injected into rats with total ADH deficiency (Brattleboro strain) although an antidiuresis was produced in water-loaded normal rats. When the drug was injected into Brattleboro rats with exogenous ADH, clofibrate either did not alter or it inhibited the action of the ADH. The data demonstrate that clofibrate has a significant ADH-like action. This action appears to be mediated through the release of endogenous ADH. Images PMID:4685079

  18. Dialysis induced hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Habte, B; Carter, R; Shamebo, M; Veicht, J; Boulton Jones, J M

    1982-09-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which hypoxemia is produced in patients on dialysis by studying changes in neutrophil count, blood gases and pulmonary function in a patient with only trace amounts of circulating C3 associated with Type II mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis and a control group of 6 patients with normal C3 levels during a 4 hour hemodialysis. Fifteen minutes after the start of dialysis the neutrophil count fell to 13% of pre-dialysis values in the control group while it only fell to 71% in the study patient. A further fall to 47% occurred in the patient at 30 minutes. A drop in PaO2 by 15% of initial values occurred at 15 and 30 minutes in the controls and the patient respectively matching the trend of fall in the neutrophil count. PaCO2 fell sharply across the dialysis membrane with reciprocol changes in the dialysis bath. Alveolar oxygen tension showed a significant reduction starting at 15 minutes correlating with the reduction in PaO2. The A-a O2 gradient was not altered significantly. These data strongly suggest that the principal mechanism leading to hypoxemia during dialysis is hypoventilation resulting from CO2 loss into the dialysis bath. Complement mediated pulmonary leucostasis may play a secondary role in inducing a quicker fall in PaO2 in the early part of dialysis. PMID:7140022

  19. Glutaraldehyde-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Barry L.; Lamoureux, Esther; Miller, Mark; Vasilevsky, Carol-Ann; Julien, Lynne; Gordon, Philip H.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To describe the etiology and clinical course of acute colitis occurring after flexible endoscopy. Design Chart review. Setting A university teaching hospital. Patients Eight patients who sought assessment of potential colonic disease. Intervention Colonoscopy in 5 patients and flexible sigmoidoscopy in 3 patients. The indication for endoscopy was screening in 5 patients, cancer surveillance in 2 patients and preoperative evaluation of colon carcinoma in 1 patient. Outcome measures The relation of presenting symptoms to glutaraldehyde exposure, the response to therapy and the need for further therapy. Results All patients had abdominal pain, mucus diarrhea and rectal bleeding within 48 hours after endoscopy. Most patients reported that the symptoms started within 12 hours of the procedure. All patients were confirmed by sigmoidoscopy to have colitis within 72 hours of the first endoscopic procedure. One patient required hospitalization. In the first 7 patients several stool cultures were negative for Clostridium difficile using the cytotoxin assay by the cell culture method. Four patients had negative cultures for Yersinia, Salmonella and Shigella spp. Three patients were treated with metronidazole initially. Two patients underwent endoscopic biopsy and examination of the biopsy specimen showed fibrinoleukocytic exudate and ischemic type injury. One patient underwent the scheduled sigmoid resection within 48 hours of endoscopy for a Dukes’ stage B adenocarcinoma. Concomitant acute ischemic colitis limited to the mucosa and submucosa was noted in the resected specimen. Symptoms resolved in all patients and follow-up endoscopy revealed normal mucosa. Conclusion The entity of glutaraldehyde-induced colitis should be recognized and special attention should be given during instrument cleansing to minimize the risk of its development. PMID:11308232

  20. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics. PMID:26918138

  1. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis.

    PubMed

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs' characteristics. PMID:26918138

  2. Drug-induced cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, H J; Lewis, J H

    1987-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis, defined as arrested bile flow, mimics extrahepatic obstruction in its biochemical, clinical and morphological features. It may be due to hepatocyte lesions of which there are three types, termed canalicular, hepatocanalicular and hepatocellular, respectively; or it may be due to ductal lesions at the level of the cholangiole or portal or septal ducts. Defective bile flow due to hepatic lesions reflects abnormal modification of the ductular bile. Defective formation of canalicular bile may involve bile acid-dependent or independent flow. It appears to result most importantly from defective secretion of bile acid-dependent flow secondary to defective uptake from sinusoidal blood, defective transcellular transport and defective secretion; or from regurgitation of secreted bile via leaky tight junctions. An independent defect in bile acid-independent flow is less clear. Defective flow of bile along the canaliculus may reflect increased viscosity and impaired canalicular contractility secondary to injury of the pericanalicular microfibrillar network. Impaired flow beyond the canaliculus may result from ductal injury. Sites of lesions that contribute to cholestasis include the sinusoidal and canalicular plasma membrane, the pericanalicular network and the tight junction and, less certainly, microtubules and microfilaments and Golgi apparatus. A number of drugs that lead to cholestasis have been found to lead to injury at one or more of these sites. Other agents (alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate, methylenedianiline, contaminated rapeseed oil, paraquat) lead to ductal injury resulting in cholestasis. Reports of inspissated casts in ductules (benoxaprofen jaundice) and injury to the major excretory tree (5-fluorouridine after hepatic artery infusion) have led to other forms of ductal cholestasis. Most instances of drug-induced cholestasis present as acute, transient illness, although important chronic forms also occur. The clinical features include the

  3. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  4. Drug-Induced Urinary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Matlaga, Brian R; Shah, Ojas D; Assimos, Dean G

    2003-01-01

    Urinary calculi may be induced by a number of medications used to treat a variety of conditions. These medications may lead to metabolic abnormalities that facilitate the formation of stones. Drugs that induce metabolic calculi include loop diuretics; carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; and laxatives, when abused. Correcting the metabolic abnormality may eliminate or dramatically attenuate stone activity. Urinary calculi can also be induced by medications when the drugs crystallize and become the primary component of the stones. In this case, urinary supersaturation of the agent may promote formation of the calculi. Drugs that induce calculi via this process include magnesium trisilicate; ciprofloxacin; sulfa medications; triamterene; indinavir; and ephedrine, alone or in combination with guaifenesin. When this situation occurs, discontinuation of the medication is usually necessary. PMID:16985842

  5. Irradiation Induced Creep of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Murty, Prof K.L.; Eapen, Dr. Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The current status of graphite irradiation induced creep strain prediction is reviewed and the major creep models are described. The ability of the models to quantitatively predict the irradiation induced creep strain of graphite is reported. Potential mechanisms of in-crystal creep are reviewed as are mechanisms of pore generation under stress. The case for further experimental work is made and the need for improved creep models across multi-scales is highlighted.

  6. [Induced abortion: pro and con].

    PubMed

    Balić, Adem; Balić, Devleta; Habibović, A; Adzajlić, A

    2003-01-01

    Induced abortion like a method of birth control is the most unpopular method but it is a choice of great deal women especially in our environment. In connection with very loud demands for sharpened the low of pregnancy interrupting, many authors analyse methods, complications and risk groups of women, its acceptability like a method of family planning. At the end they give conclusion with some concrete suggestions and the aim to reduce the number of induced abortions. PMID:14528715

  7. Induced resistance responses in maize.

    PubMed

    Morris, S W; Vernooij, B; Titatarn, S; Starrett, M; Thomas, S; Wiltse, C C; Frederiksen, R A; Bhandhufalck, A; Hulbert, S; Uknes, S

    1998-07-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a widely distributed plant defense system that confers broad-spectrum disease resistance and is accompanied by coordinate expression of the so-called SAR genes. This type of resistance and SAR gene expression can be mimicked with chemical inducers of resistance. Here, we report that chemical inducers of resistance are active in maize. Chemical induction increases resistance to downy mildew and activates expression of the maize PR-1 and PR-5 genes. These genes are also coordinately activated by pathogen infection and function as indicators of the defense reaction. Specifically, after pathogen infection, the PR-1 and PR-5 genes are induced more rapidly and more strongly in an incompatible than in a compatible interaction. In addition, we show that monocot lesion mimic plants also express these defense-related genes and that they have increased levels of salicylic acid after lesions develop, similar to pathogeninfected maize plants. The existence of chemically inducible disease resistance and PR-1 and PR-5 gene expression in maize indicates that maize is similar to dicots in many aspects of induced resistance. This reinforces the notion of an ancient plant-inducible defense pathway against pathogen attack that is shared between monocots and dicots.

  8. Victim-induced criminality.

    PubMed

    Fooner, M

    1966-09-01

    about the probable effects on the administration of criminal justice. These are pragmatic problems; there is a third problem which may at this time seem speculative, but is, nevertheless, quite important. 3) To what extent will a particular proposal for victim compensation contribute to a temptation-opportunity pattern in victim behavior? In previous studies it has been pointed out that large numbers of our fellow Americans have tended to acquire casual money-handling habits-generically designated "carelessness"-which contribute to the national growth of criminality. How the victim helps the criminal was sketched in reports of those studies (10). It was made abundantly clear that human beings in our affluent society cannot be assumed to be prudent or self-protective against the hazards of crime. Even when the "victim" is not overtly acting to commit a crime-as in the case of the property owner who hires an arsonist-he often tempts the offender. Among the victims of burglary-statistically the most prevalent crime in the United States-are a substantial number of Americans who keep cash, jewelry, and other valuables carelessly at home or in hotel rooms to which the burglar has easy access through door or window. Victims of automobile theft-one of the fastest growing classes of crime-include drivers who leave the vehicle or its contents invitingly accessible to thieves. And so on with other classes of crime. As pointed out in previous studies, when victim behavior follows a temptation-opportunity pattern, it (i) contributes to a "climate of criminal inducements," (ii) adds to the economic resources available to criminal societies, and (iii) detracts from the ability of lawenforcement agencies to suppress the growth of crime.

  9. Drug-Induced Itch Management.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Drugs may cause itching as a concomitant symptom of drug-induced skin reactions or in the form of pruritus without skin lesions. Drug-induced itch is defined as generalized itching without skin lesions, caused by a drug. Itching associated with drug-induced cholestasis is among the common dermatologic adverse events (dAEs) that induce itching. Some drugs such as opioids, antimalarials, and hydroxyethyl starch are known to induce itching without skin lesions. The clinical features and underlying proposed mechanisms of itching caused by these drugs have been specifically investigated. The recent application of targeted anticancer drugs has increased the survival rate of cancer patients. These new agents cause significant dAEs such as acneiform rashes, dry skin, hand-foot syndrome, paronychia, and itching. Itching is a common side effect of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. Though not life-threatening, these dAEs have a negative impact on a patient's quality of life, leading to dose reduction and possibly less effective cancer therapy. It is important to provide an effective supportive antipruritic treatment without interruption of the administration of these drugs. This chapter concludes by describing basic measures to be taken for diagnosis and treatment of drug-induced itch. The principle of treatment is discontinuation of suspected causative drugs in general except for anticancer medications. In case itching lasts long after drug withdrawal or the causative drug cannot be stopped, vigorous symptomatic antipruritic treatment and specific therapies for different types of drug-induced itch should be undertaken. PMID:27578085

  10. Bulgy tadpoles: inducible defense morph.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kinya

    2004-08-01

    Predator induced morphological defenses are marked morphological shifts induced directly by cues associated with a predator. Generally, remote cues, i.e., chemical substances emitted from predators or injured conspecifics, are considered to be ideal signals to induce morphological change in aquatic environments rather than close cues, i.e., close chemical or tactile cues, since chemical substances that can propagate over relatively long distances and persist for a long period may allow organisms to keep safe and to deliberately change their morph. In fact, most organisms adopting an inducible morphological defense utilize remote chemical cues to detect predation risk and to produce morphological defenses. In this paper, we report a unique and functionally well designed inducible morphological defense strategy where the induction process requires close cues from a predator. The tadpoles of Rana pirica exhibited a bulgy bodied morphology when threatened with predation by larval salamanders, Hynobius retardatus, in close proximity. Predation trials and a function experiment showed that the induced bulgy morph is an adaptive defense phenotype against the gape-limited predator larval H. retardatus. Furthermore, R. pirica tadpoles use two adaptive strategies in terms of cost saving, i.e., adjustment of the extent of bulginess according to predation risk and reversibility by actual shrink of bulgy body after removing the predation threat. In general, R. pirica hatch earlier than H. retardatus. In natural ponds, during the early developmental stage R. pirica tadpoles live in close proximity to young H. retardatus larvae. As they grow, the salamanders gradually become serious predators and the predator-prey interaction becomes intimate. After a while, predation, cannibalism and metamorphosis decrease the number of salamanders in the ponds, and the predator-prey interaction weakens. Such a phenology in the predator-prey interaction allows the evolution of a close

  11. Bulgy tadpoles: inducible defense morph.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kinya

    2004-08-01

    Predator induced morphological defenses are marked morphological shifts induced directly by cues associated with a predator. Generally, remote cues, i.e., chemical substances emitted from predators or injured conspecifics, are considered to be ideal signals to induce morphological change in aquatic environments rather than close cues, i.e., close chemical or tactile cues, since chemical substances that can propagate over relatively long distances and persist for a long period may allow organisms to keep safe and to deliberately change their morph. In fact, most organisms adopting an inducible morphological defense utilize remote chemical cues to detect predation risk and to produce morphological defenses. In this paper, we report a unique and functionally well designed inducible morphological defense strategy where the induction process requires close cues from a predator. The tadpoles of Rana pirica exhibited a bulgy bodied morphology when threatened with predation by larval salamanders, Hynobius retardatus, in close proximity. Predation trials and a function experiment showed that the induced bulgy morph is an adaptive defense phenotype against the gape-limited predator larval H. retardatus. Furthermore, R. pirica tadpoles use two adaptive strategies in terms of cost saving, i.e., adjustment of the extent of bulginess according to predation risk and reversibility by actual shrink of bulgy body after removing the predation threat. In general, R. pirica hatch earlier than H. retardatus. In natural ponds, during the early developmental stage R. pirica tadpoles live in close proximity to young H. retardatus larvae. As they grow, the salamanders gradually become serious predators and the predator-prey interaction becomes intimate. After a while, predation, cannibalism and metamorphosis decrease the number of salamanders in the ponds, and the predator-prey interaction weakens. Such a phenology in the predator-prey interaction allows the evolution of a close

  12. Algorithmic complexity. A new approach of non-linear algorithms for the analysis of atrial signals from multipolar basket catheter.

    PubMed

    Pitschner, H F; Berkowitsch, A

    2001-01-01

    Symbolic dynamics as a non linear method and computation of the normalized algorithmic complexity (C alpha) was applied to basket-catheter mapping of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the right human atrium. The resulting different degrees of organisation of AF have been compared to conventional classification of Wells. Short time temporal and spatial distribution of the C alpha during AF and effects of propafenone on this distribution have been investigated in 30 patients. C alpha was calculated for a moving window. Generated C alpha was analyzed within 10 minutes before and after administration of propafenone. The inter-regional C alpha distribution was statistically analyzed. Inter-regional C alpha differences were found in all patients (p < 0.001). The right atrium could be divided in high- and low complexity areas according to individual patterns. A significant C alpha increase in cranio-caudal direction was confirmed inter-individually (p < 0.01). The administration of propafenone enlarged the areas of low complexity.

  13. Assessment of tropical forest stand characteristics with multipolarization SAR data acquired over a mountainous region in Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shih-Tseng

    1990-01-01

    A digital terrain elevation data set was coregistered with radar data for assessing tropical forest stand characteristics. Both raw and topographically corrected L-band polarimetric radar data acquired over the tropical forests of Costa Rica were analyzed and correlated with field-collected tree parameter data to study the stand characteristics. The results of analyses using 18 out of 81 plots for sites A and B indicated that per-plot bole volume and tree volume are related to SAR data, particularly at site A. The topographically corrected SAR data appear to produce the same findings as those of uncorrected data.

  14. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria: multipolarity, multiallelism and hierarchical transmission of mitochondrial DNA in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yohsuke; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Direct evidence of digestion of paternal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been found in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum. This is the first report on the selective digestion of mtDNA inside the zygote, and is striking evidence for the mechanism of maternal inheritance of mitochondria. Moreover, two mitochondrial nuclease activities were detected in this organism as-candidates for the nucleases responsible for selective digestion of mtDNA. In the true slime mold, there is an additional-feature of the uniparental inheritance of mitochondria.Although mitochondria are believed to be inherited from the maternal lineage in nearly all eukaryotes, the mating types of the true slime mold P. polycephalum is not restricted to two: there are three mating loci--matA, matB,and matC--and these loci have 16, 15, and 3 alleles,-respectively. Interestingly, the transmission patterns of mtDNA are determined by the matA locus, in a hierarchical-fashion (matA hierarchy) as follows: matA7[matA2[matA11[matA12[matA15/matA16[matA1[matA6.The strain possessing the higher status of matA would be the mtDNA donor in crosses. Furthermore, we have found that some crosses showed biparental inheritance of mitochondria.This review describes the phenomenon of hierarchical transmission of mtDNA in true slime molds, and discusses the presumed molecular mechanism of maternal and biparental inheritance.

  15. Lattice-Induced Frequency Shifts in Sr Optical Lattice Clocks at the 10{sup -17} Level

    SciTech Connect

    Westergaard, P. G.; Lodewyck, J.; Lecallier, A.; Millo, J.; Lemonde, P.; Lorini, L.; Burt, E. A.; Zawada, M.

    2011-05-27

    We present a comprehensive study of the frequency shifts associated with the lattice potential in a Sr lattice clock by comparing two such clocks with a frequency stability reaching 5x10{sup -17} after a 1 h integration time. We put the first experimental upper bound on the multipolar M1 and E2 interactions, significantly smaller than the recently predicted theoretical upper limit, and give a 30-fold improved upper limit on the effect of hyperpolarizability. Finally, we report on the first observation of the vector and tensor shifts in a Sr lattice clock. Combining these measurements, we show that all known lattice related perturbations will not affect the clock accuracy down to the 10{sup -17} level, even for lattices as deep as 150 recoil energies.

  16. Drug-induced cutaneous vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Antiga, E; Verdelli, A; Bonciani, D; Bonciolini, V; Quintarelli, L; Volpi, W; Fabbri, P; Caproni, M

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous vasculitides (CV) can be idiopathic or secondary to several triggers, including drugs, which account for up to 30% of all the cases of CV. Several drugs can induce CV, including some medications commonly used in dermatology, including minocycline, and several new drugs, such as anti-TNF agents. Different pathomecanisms are involved in the development of drug-induced CV, including the formation and deposition of immune complexes, the induction of neutrophil apoptosis, the formation of neoantigens between the drugs and proteins from the host, the shift of the immune response, and others. Although the diagnosis is difficult, because the clinical picture of drug-induced CV is in general indistinguishable from that of other forms of CV, it is important to recognize such entities in order to correctly manage the patient. Anamnesis, diagnostic algorithms to assess the likelihood of the association between a drug and a cutaneous reaction, skin biopsy and laboratory testing (including the search for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) are useful tools to make a diagnosis of drug-induced CV. About the therapy, while in idiopathic vasculitides the treatment is usually more aggressive and long-lasting, very often requiring a maintenance therapy with immunosuppressive drugs, in drug-induced CV the discontinuation of the suspected drug alone is usually enough to achieve complete remission, making the prognosis usually very good.

  17. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy.

  18. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy. PMID:27625926

  19. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  20. Validating induced seismicity forecast models—Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király-Proag, Eszter; Zechar, J. Douglas; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Doetsch, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. In this study, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models; this test bench can be used for model development, model selection, and ensemble model building. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models: Shapiro and Smoothed Seismicity (SaSS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). These models incorporate a different mix of physics-based elements and stochastic representation of the induced sequences. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. Generally, HySei forecasts the seismicity rate better after shut-in but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distribution. On the other hand, SaSS forecasts the spatial distribution better and gives better seismicity rate estimates before shut-in. The shut-in phase is a difficult moment for both models in both reservoirs: the models tend to underpredict the seismicity rate around, and shortly after, shut-in.

  1. Drug-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Hair loss can have major psychological consequences. It can be due to a wide variety of causes, including hormonal disorders, dietary factors, infections, inflammation, trauma, emotional factors, and cancer. Drugs can also induce hair loss, by interacting with the hair growth cycle. Drug-induced hair loss may be immediate or delayed, sudden or gradual, and diffuse or localised. It is usually reversible after drug discontinuation. The drugs most often implicated in hair loss are anticancer agents, interferon, azole antifungals, lithium, immunosuppressants, and many other drugs belonging to a variety of pharmacological classes. PMID:27280198

  2. Drug-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Hair loss can have major psychological consequences. It can be due to a wide variety of causes, including hormonal disorders, dietary factors, infections, inflammation, trauma, emotional factors, and cancer. Drugs can also induce hair loss, by interacting with the hair growth cycle. Drug-induced hair loss may be immediate or delayed, sudden or gradual, and diffuse or localised. It is usually reversible after drug discontinuation. The drugs most often implicated in hair loss are anticancer agents, interferon, azole antifungals, lithium, immunosuppressants, and many other drugs belonging to a variety of pharmacological classes.

  3. Cefixime-induced oculogyric crisis.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Erhan; Bayram, Meral Torun; Hiz, Semra; Turkmen, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Oculogyric crisis is a neurologic adverse event characterized by bilateral dystonic, usually upward, conjugate eye deviations. Cefixime is a third-generation cephalosporin and is widely used in clinical practice in childhood. Confusion, encephalopathy, coma, myoclonus, nonconvulsive status epilepticus, and seizures have been described with the use of cephalosporins. We presented a cefixime-induced oculogyric crisis in a 7-year-old boy during the treatment of urinary tract infection, and this is the first case of cefixime-induced oculogyric crisis whose ocular symptoms gradually disappeared within 48 hours after the drug was discontinued.

  4. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Method for induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-04-14

    A method is described for generating a log of the formation phase shift, resistivity and spontaneous potential of an earth formation from data obtained from the earth formation with a multi-electrode induced polarization logging tool. The method comprises obtaining data samples from the formation at measurement points equally spaced in time of the magnitude and phase of the induced voltage and the magnitude and phase of the current supplied by a circuit through a reference resistance R/sub 0/ to a survey current electrode associated with the tool.

  6. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  7. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  8. Induced activation in accelerator components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bungau, Cristian; Bungau, Adriana; Cywinski, Robert; Barlow, Roger; Edgecock, Thomas Robert; Carlsson, Patrick; Danared, Hâkan; Mezei, Ferenc; Holm, Anne Ivalu Sander; Møller, Søren Pape; Thomsen, Heine Dølrath

    2014-08-01

    The residual activity induced in particle accelerators is a serious issue from the point of view of radiation safety as the long-lived radionuclides produced by fast or moderated neutrons and impact protons cause problems of radiation exposure for staff involved in the maintenance work and when decommissioning the facility. This paper presents activation studies of the magnets and collimators in the High Energy Beam Transport line of the European Spallation Source due to the backscattered neutrons from the target and also due to the direct proton interactions and their secondaries. An estimate of the radionuclide inventory and induced activation are predicted using the GEANT4 code.

  9. Anaphylaxis induced by lentil inhalation.

    PubMed

    Ayşenur, Kaya; Akan, Ayşegül; Mustafa, Erkoçoğlu; Müge, Toyran; Kocabaş, Can Naci

    2012-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is a rapid onset serious allergic reaction which may be fatal. Foods are the most common allergens leading to anaphylaxis especially for childhood. Most of the food-induced anaphylactic reactions take place after ingestion of the allergic food and only a few cases exist with anaphylactic reactions induced by inhalation of foods such as peanut, soybean and lupine. The case we present is unusual in that an 8 1/2-year-old boy developed anaphylaxis with the inhalation of steam from boiling lentils.

  10. Propylthiouracil-induced alveolar hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Bünyamin; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Kacemer, Hasret; Demirkan, Halil; Altuntaş, Atilla; Dirican, Nigar; Köroğlu, Banu Kale; Şahin, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Thionamide induced vasculitis is a multisystem disease. The patients may present with different clinical signs and findings due to organ involvement. These patients are almost always perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (pANCA) or antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) positive. Clinical findings are not seen in all of the patients who are ANCA positive while using thionamide. Although symptoms usually resolve with drug discontinuation, some patients, however, require high-dose steroids, immunosuppressants, or plasmapheresis. We present here a case of alveolar hemorrhage induced by propilthiouracil (PTU) during treatment with PTU for Graves’ disease; patients completely recovered with corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis.

  11. Mold-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2004-01-01

    Mold-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis results from macrophage- and lymphocyte-driven inflammation, which may be attributable to contaminated humidifiers or heating-ventilation systems or sources in homes, schools, or workplaces. A case may be suspected when there is water intrusion or inadequate drainage. Some fungal causes include species of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cryptostroma, Penicillium, Pullularia, Rhodotorula, and Trichosporon. The differential diagnosis includes mold-induced asthma, sick building syndrome, mass psychogenic illness (epidemic hysteria), unjustified fears of "toxic" molds, and conditions causing recurrent pneumonitis. PMID:15510579

  12. Variations in the Electrostatic Landscape of Class II Human Leukocyte Antigen Molecule Induced by Modifications in the Myelin Basic Protein Peptide: A Theoretical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo, William A.; Galindo, Johan F.; Ortiz, Marysol; Villaveces, José L.; Daza, Edgar E.; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2009-01-01

    The receptor-ligand interactions involved in the formation of the complex between Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules and antigenic peptides, which are essential for establishing an adaptive immunological response, were analyzed in the Class II Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) peptide complex (HLA-DRβ1*1501-MBP) using a multipolar molecular electrostatic potential approach. The Human Leukocyte Antigen - peptide complex system was divided into four pockets together with their respective peptide fragment and the corresponding occupying amino acid was replaced by each of the remaining 19 amino acids. Partial atomic charges were calculated by a quantum chemistry approach at the Hatree Fock/3-21*G level, to study the behavior of monopole, dipole and quadrupole electrostatic multipolar moments. Two types of electrostatic behavior were distinguished in the pockets' amino acids: “anchoring” located in Pocket 1 and 4, and “recognition” located in Pocket 4 and 7. According to variations in the electrostatic landscape, pockets were ordered as: Pocket 1>Pocket 9≫Pocket 4≈Pocket 7 which is in agreement with the binding ability reported for Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex pockets. In the same way, amino acids occupying the polymorphic positions β13R, β26F, β28D, β9W, β74A, β47F and β57D were shown to be key for this Receptor-Ligand interaction. The results show that the multipolar molecular electrostatic potential approach is appropriate for characterizing receptor-ligand interactions in the MHC–antigenic peptide complex, which could have potential implications for synthetic vaccine design. PMID:19132105

  13. 'Popper'-induced vision loss.

    PubMed

    Krilis, Matthew; Thompson, Julia; Atik, Alp; Lusthaus, Jed; Jankelowitz, Stacey

    2013-05-01

    Amyl nitrite 'poppers' are recreational drugs, which are a potent source of nitric oxide. The use of 'poppers' can cause psychoactive stimulation, reduced blood pressure, tachycardia and involuntary muscle relaxation. Their use is becoming increasingly common around the world, including approximately 60% of Australia's male homosexual community. We report the first case of 'popper'-induced vision loss in Australasia.

  14. Eosinophilic pneumonia induced by daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Don; Anstead, Michael I; Kuhn, Robert J

    2007-04-01

    We present a case of drug-induced eosinophilic pneumonia resulting from intravenous daptomycin being used as therapy for recurrent methicillin-sensitive Staphlococcus aureus endocarditis. The patient developed hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Daptomycin therapy was discontinued immediately, and the patient improved significantly after the administration of intravenous corticosteroids allowing for extubation 3 days later.

  15. Induced geometry from disformal transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang-Fang; Huang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    In this note, we use the disformal transformation to induce a geometry from the manifold which is originally Riemannian. The new geometry obtained here can be considered as a generalization of Weyl integrable geometry. Based on these results, we further propose a geometry which is naturally a generalization of Weyl geometry.

  16. Toxic encephalopathy induced by capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Niemann, B; Rochlitz, C; Herrmann, R; Pless, M

    2004-01-01

    Toxic encephalopathy is a rarely described side effect of 5-fluorouracil which usually presents with cerebellar, neuropsychiatric, and focal neurological symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging findings are described as patchy white matter alterations. We report the 1st case of capecitabine-induced toxic encephalopathy with epilepsy-like symptoms and diffuse white matter alterations on magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Multiple Induced Abortions: Danish Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Mogens; David, Henry P.; Morgall, Janine M.

    1997-01-01

    Women having an induced abortion in an urban clinic were studied. First, second, and third time aborters (N=150) were interviewed. Variables including reasons for choosing abortion, life situations, contraceptive risk-taking, and ease of becoming pregnant were examined. Related studies and suggestions for postabortion counseling are discussed.…

  18. Adrafinil-induced orofacial dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Thobois, Stéphane; Xie, Jing; Mollion, Helena; Benatru, Isabelle; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2004-08-01

    We describe the first case of orofacial abnormal movements induced by adrafinil, a vigilance promoting agent of the same pharmacological class as modafinil. The dyskinesias did not spontaneously recover despite adrafinil withdrawal for a 4-month period. They were secondly dramatically improved by tetrabenazine, a presynaptic dopaminergic depleting drug which was introduced after the 4-month adrafinil-free period. PMID:15300665

  19. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  20. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply non-linear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatio-temporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the geometrical description of the spatio-temporal patterns of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non-Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope and provides an alternative physical approach to poroelasticity for the modelling of induced seismicity. The applicability of the proposed geometrical approach is illustrated for the case of the 2006, Basel enhanced geothermal system stimulation experiment. Applicability to more problematic cases where the stress field may be spatially heterogeneous is also discussed.

  1. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  2. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  3. [Readers' position against induced abortion].

    PubMed

    1981-08-25

    Replies to the request by the Journal of Nursing on readers' positions against induced abortion indicate there is a definite personal position against induced abortion and the assistance in this procedure. Some writers expressed an emotional "no" against induced abortion. Many quoted arguments from the literature, such as a medical dictionary definition as "a premeditated criminally induced abortion." The largest group of writers quoted from the Bible, the tenor always being: "God made man, he made us with his hands; we have no right to make the decision." People with other philosophies also objected. Theosophical viewpoint considers reincarnation and the law of cause and effect (karma). This philosophy holds that induced abortion impedes the appearance of a reincarnated being. The fundamental question in the abortion problem is, "can the fetus be considered a human life?" The German anatomist Professor E. Bleckschmidt points out that from conception there is human life, hence the fertilized cell can only develop into a human being and is not merely a piece of tissue. Professional nursing interpretation is that nursing action directed towards killing of a human being (unborn child) is against the nature and the essence of the nursing profession. A different opinion states that a nurse cares for patients who have decided for the operation. The nurse doesn't judge but respects the individual's decision. Some proabortion viewpoints considered the endangering of the mother's life by the unborn child, and the case of rape. With the arguments against abortion the question arises how to help the woman with unwanted pregnancy. Psychological counseling is emphasized as well as responsible and careful assistance. Referral to the Society for Protection of the Unborn Child (VBOK) is considered as well as other agencies. Further reader comments on this subject are solicited. PMID:6913282

  4. An inducible offense: carnivore morph tadpoles induced by tadpole carnivory

    PubMed Central

    Levis, Nicholas A; de la Serna Buzón, Sofia; Pfennig, David W

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is commonplace, and plasticity theory predicts that organisms should often evolve mechanisms to detect and respond to environmental cues that accurately predict future environmental conditions. Here, we test this prediction in tadpoles of spadefoot toads, Spea multiplicata. These tadpoles develop into either an omnivore ecomorph, which is a dietary generalist, or a carnivore ecomorph, which specializes on anostracan shrimp and other tadpoles. We investigated a novel proximate cue – ingestion of Scaphiopus tadpoles – and its propensity to produce carnivores by rearing tadpoles on different diets. We found that diets containing tadpoles from the genus Scaphiopus produced more carnivores than diets without Scaphiopus tadpoles. We discuss why Scaphiopus tadpoles are an excellent food source and why it is therefore advantageous for S. multiplicata tadpoles to produce an inducible offense that allows them to better utilize this resource. In general, such inducible offenses provide an excellent setting for investigating the proximate and evolutionary basis of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25897380

  5. Distinguishing warming-induced drought from drought-induced warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, M. L.; Yin, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is usually observed that temperatures, especially maximum temperatures are higher during drought. A very widely held public perception is that the increase in temperature is a cause of drought. This represents the warming-induced drought scenario. However, the agricultural and hydrologic scientific communities have a very different interpretation with drought being the cause of increasing temperature. In essence, those communities assume the warming is a surface feedback and their interpretation is for drought-induced warming. This is a classic cause-effect problem that has resisted definitive explanation due to the lack of radiative observations at suitable spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation we first summarise the observations and then use theory to untangle the cause-effect relationships that underlie the competing interpretations. We then show how satellite data (CERES, NASA) can be used to disentangle the cause-effect relations.

  6. Does a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia induce vestigial cytoplasmic incompatibility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaijeveld, Ken; Reumer, Barbara M.; Mouton, Laurence; Kremer, Natacha; Vavre, Fabrice; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Wolbachia is a maternally inherited bacterium that manipulates the reproduction of its host. Recent studies have shown that male-killing strains can induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) when introgressed into a resistant host. Phylogenetic studies suggest that transitions between CI and other Wolbachia phenotypes have also occurred frequently, raising the possibility that latent CI may be widespread among Wolbachia. Here, we investigate whether a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain can also induce CI. Parthenogenetic females of the parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica regularly produce a small number of males that may be either infected or not. Uninfected males were further obtained through removal of the Wolbachia using antibiotics and from a naturally uninfected strain. Uninfected females that had mated with infected males produced a slightly, but significantly more male-biased sex ratio than uninfected females that had mated with uninfected males. This effect was strongest in females that mated with males that had a relatively high Wolbachia titer. Quantitative PCR indicated that infected males did not show higher ratios of nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA content. Wolbachia therefore does not cause diploidization of cells in infected males. While these results are consistent with CI, other alternatives such as production of abnormal sperm by infected males cannot be completely ruled out. Overall, the effect was very small (9%), suggesting that if CI is involved it may have degenerated through the accumulation of mutations.

  7. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  8. Coherent-state-induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogyan, A.; Malakyan, Yu.

    2016-04-01

    We examine electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in an ensemble of cold Λ -type atoms induced by a quantum control field in multimode coherent states and compare it with the transparency created by the classical light of the same intensity. We show that the perfect coincidence is achieved only in the case of a single-mode coherent state, whereas the transparency sharply decreases, when the number of the modes exceeds the mean number of control photons in the medium. The origin of the effect is the modification of photon statistics in the control field with increasing the number of the modes that weakens its interaction with atoms resulting in a strong probe absorption. For the same reason, the probe pulse transforms from EIT-based slow light into superluminal propagation caused by the absorption.

  9. Paramagnetically induced gapful topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, Akito; Yanase, Youichi

    2016-08-01

    We propose a generic scenario for realizing gapful topological superconductors (TSCs) from gapless spin-singlet superconductors (SCs). Noncentrosymmetric nodal SCs in two dimensions are shown to be gapful under a Zeeman field, as a result of the cooperation of inversion-symmetry breaking and time-reversal-symmetry breaking. In particular, non-s -wave SCs acquire a large excitation gap. Such paramagnetically induced gapful SCs may be classified into TSCs in the symmetry class D specified by the Chern number. We show nontrivial Chern numbers over a wide parameter range for spin-singlet SCs. A variety of the paramagnetically induced gapful TSCs are demonstrated, including D +p -wave TSC, extended S +p -wave TSC, p +D +f -wave TSC, and s +P -wave TSC. Natural extension toward three-dimensional Weyl SCs is also discussed.

  10. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Saifan, Chadi; Barakat, Iskandar; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiometry exams, he displayed persistent moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss bilaterally. Discussion. This case is notable because unlike all but one previously reported case, the patient—who was restated on methadone—did not make a complete recovery. Conclusion. Methadone overuse in rare cases causes SSHL. PMID:23983704

  11. Dipole-Induced Electromagnetic Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthumpally-Joseph, Raiju; Sukharev, Maxim; Atabek, Osman; Charron, Eric

    2014-10-01

    We determine the optical response of a thin and dense layer of interacting quantum emitters. We show that, in such a dense system, the Lorentz redshift and the associated interaction broadening can be used to control the transmission and reflection spectra. In the presence of overlapping resonances, a dipole-induced electromagnetic transparency (DIET) regime, similar to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), may be achieved. DIET relies on destructive interference between the electromagnetic waves emitted by quantum emitters. Carefully tuning material parameters allows us to achieve narrow transmission windows in, otherwise, completely opaque media. We analyze in detail this coherent and collective effect using a generalized Lorentz model and show how it can be controlled. Several potential applications of the phenomenon, such as slow light, are proposed.

  12. Drug-induced hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Amacher, David E; Chalasani, Naga

    2014-05-01

    Several drugs have been associated with the potential for drug-induced hepatic steatosis (DIHS) and/or phospholipidosis (DIPL), a lysosomal storage disorder. Drug-induced hepatic steatosis is generally a chronic but reversible affliction and may involve drug accumulation in the liver. Fat accumulation may be either macrovesicular or microvesicular in nature. Commonly used medications associated with DIHS include amiodarone, valproate, tamoxifen, methotrexate, and some chemotherapeutic and antiretroviral agents. Two recently approved medications for the treatment of hereditary homozygous hypercholesterolemia have also been noted to cause hepatic steatosis. For some compounds such as methotrexate and tamoxifen, the underlying metabolic risk factors such as obesity and metabolic syndrome may exacerbate their potential to cause DIHS and its progression. In this article, the authors discuss the preclinical screening and mechanisms of DIHS and DIPL, and review specific examples of drugs commonly used in clinical practice that are known to cause DIHS. PMID:24879984

  13. Chlorine-induced cardiopulmonary injury.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Matthew; Lam, Adam; Svendsen, Erik R; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Matalon, Sadis

    2016-06-01

    Chlorine (Cl2 ) is utilized worldwide for a diverse range of industrial applications, including pulp bleaching, sanitation, and pharmaceutical development. Though Cl2 has widespread use, little is known regarding the mechanisms of toxicity associated with Cl2 exposure, which occurs during industrial accidents or acts of terrorism. Previous instances of Cl2 exposure have led to reported episodes of respiratory distress that result in high morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, studies suggest that acute Cl2 exposure also results in systemic vascular injury and subsequent myocardial contractile dysfunction. Here, we review both lung and cardiac pathology associated with acute Cl2 inhalation and discuss recently published data that suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction underlies the pathogenesis of Cl2 -induced toxicity. Last, we discuss our findings that suggest that upregulation of autophagy protects against Cl2 -induced lung inflammation and can be a potential therapeutic target for ameliorating the toxic effects of Cl2 exposure. PMID:27303906

  14. Flow-induced vibrations-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles--Part 1. Physical nature of the phenomenon; Theoretical and experimental studies on heat exchanger U-bend tube bundle vibration characteristics; Experimental model analysis of metallic pipeline conveying fluid; Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint; and A study on the vibrations of pipelines caused by internal pulsating flows.

  15. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  16. Cadmium-induced testicular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn{sup 2+} and/or Ca{sup 2+} mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men.

  17. Cadmium-induced testicular injury.

    PubMed

    Siu, Erica R; Mruk, Dolores D; Porto, Catarina S; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn(2+) and/or Ca(2+) mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men. PMID:19236889

  18. Amisulpride for clozapine induced sialorrhea.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ashish; Sharma, Dinesh Dutt

    2009-01-01

    Clozapine is an atypical and novel antipsychotic medication useful for patients with schizophrenia who are refractory to treatment. Its use is often associated with troublesome side effects like sialorrhea, sedation, weight gain, enuresis, dizziness, besides life threatening side effects like agranulocytosis. Drug treatments used for Clozapine induced sialorrhea (CIS) like anticholinergic drugs and alpha 2 receptor antagonists have their own added side effects. A case of CIS responding to low dose of Amisulpride is reported.

  19. Cadmium-induced Testicular Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, and the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor, oxidative stress inducer and how it may disrupt the Zn+2 and/or Ca+2 mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity is emerged, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men. PMID:19236889

  20. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  1. Rosiglitazone-induced immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Huang, Tao; Sahud, Mervyn A

    2006-05-01

    Rosiglitazone is one of the members in the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of anti-diabetic agents that have proven efficacy in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. We studied serum from a patient who developed acute, severe thrombocytopenia after exposure to rosiglitazone maleate (Avandia) and proposed the mechanisms for rosiglitazone-induced thrombocytopenia. Tested by flow cytometry, the patient's serum was positive for rosiglitazone-induced antibody with the binding ratio of 5.93 (mean fluorescence intensity, MFI) in the presence of the patient's serum and rosiglitazone in a final concentration of 0.53 mmol/l. The antibody was found to bind both glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa complex and GP Ib/IX complex by MAIPA assay using five different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against GP complexes Ib/IX, GPIIb/IIIa or GPIa/IIa. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that both GPIIb/IIIa and GP Ib/IX complex were precipitated by antibody in the presence, but not in the absence of rosiglitazone. These findings provide evidence that immune thrombocytopenia can be caused by sensitivity to the antidiabetic agent rosiglitazone maleate. This report documents the first case of rosiglitazone-induced immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:16702039

  2. Efficient treatment of induced dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; Shao, Yihan; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Most existing treatments of induced dipoles in polarizable molecular mechanics force field calculations use either the self-consistent variational method, which is solved iteratively, or the “direct” approximation that is non-iterative as a result of neglecting coupling between induced dipoles. The variational method is usually implemented using assumptions that are only strictly valid under tight convergence of the induced dipoles, which can be computationally demanding to enforce. In this work, we discuss the nature of the errors that result from insufficient convergence and suggest a strategy that avoids such problems. Using perturbation theory to reintroduce the mutual coupling into the direct algorithm, we present a computationally efficient method that combines the precision of the direct approach with the accuracy of the variational approach. By analyzing the convergence of this perturbation series, we derive a simple extrapolation formula that delivers a very accurate approximation to the infinite order solution at the cost of only a few iterations. We refer to the new method as extrapolated perturbation theory. Finally, we draw connections to our previously published permanent multipole algorithm to develop an efficient implementation of the electric field and Thole terms and also derive some necessary, but not sufficient, criteria that force field parameters must obey. PMID:26298123

  3. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The systematics of induced radioactivity on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied in a wide range of materials using low level background facilities for detection of gamma rays. Approx. 400 samples of materials processed from structural parts of the spacecraft, as well as materials from onboard experiments, were analyzed at national facilities. These measurements show the variety of radioisotopes that are produced with half-lives greater than 2 wks, most of which are characteristic of proton induced reactions above 20 MeV. For the higher activity, long lived isotopes, it was possible to map the depth and directional dependences of the activity. Due to the stabilized configuration of the LDEF, the induced radioactivity data clearly show contributions from the anisotropic trapped proton flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly. This effect is discussed, along with evidence for activation by galactic protons and thermal neutrons. The discovery of Be-7 was made on leading side parts of the spacecraft, although this was though not to be related to the in situ production of radioisotopes from external particle fluxes.

  4. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy.

  5. Field induced gap infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A tunable infrared detector which employs a vanishing band gap semimetal material provided with an induced band gap by a magnetic field to allow intrinsic semiconductor type infrared detection capabilities is disclosed. The semimetal material may thus operate as a semiconductor type detector with a wavelength sensitivity corresponding to the induced band gap in a preferred embodiment of a diode structure. Preferred semimetal materials include Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, x is less than 0.15, HgCdSe, BiSb, alpha-Sn, HgMgTe, HgMnTe, HgZnTe, HgMnSe, HgMgSe, and HgZnSe. The magnetic field induces a band gap in the semimetal material proportional to the strength of the magnetic field allowing tunable detection cutoff wavelengths. For an applied magnetic field from 5 to 10 tesla, the wavelength detection cutoff will be in the range of 20 to 50 micrometers for Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys with x about 0.15. A similar approach may also be employed to generate infrared energy in a desired band gap and then operating the structure in a light emitting diode or semiconductor laser type of configuration.

  6. UV-induced cutaneous photobiology.

    PubMed

    Beissert, S; Granstein, R D

    1996-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) present in sunlight is a major environmental factor capable of affecting human health and well being. The organ primarily affected by UVR is the skin, which is composed of a variety of different cell types. Here, UVR is needed for production of active vitamin D as well as producing undesirable effects such as sunburn, premature cutaneous photoaging, and promoting skin cancer development. Depending on the radiation dose, UVR influences virtually every cutaneous cell type investigated differently. Since the end of the nineteenth century, sun exposure has been known to induce skin cancer, which is now the human malignancy with the most rapidly increasing incidence. In several experimental models, mid-range UVR has been demonstrated to be the major cause of UV-induced cutaneous tumors. The stratospheric ozone layer protecting the terrestrial surface from higher quantum energy solar radiation is being damaged by industrial activities resulting in the possibility of increased UVR exposure in the future. Investigations in the field of experimental dermatology have shown that within the skin an immunosurveillance system exists that may be able to detect incipient neoplasms and to elicit a host responses against it. This article reviews the literature on studies designed to investigate the effects of UVR on cutaneous cellular components, with special focus on the immune system within the skin and the development of UV-induced cancer.

  7. Diesel exhaust exposure induces angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohua; Kherada, Nisharahmed; Hong, Xinru; Quan, Chunli; Zheng, Ling; Wang, Aixia; Wold, Loren; Lippmann, Morton; Chen, Lung Chi; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Sun, Qinghua

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that exposure to whole diesel exhaust (WDE) would enhance angiogenesis/vasculogenesis. Male apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, with either scaffold implantation subcutaneously or hindlimb ischemia, were exposed to either WDE (containing diesel exhaust particle [DEP] at a concentration of about 1 mg/m3) or filtered air 6 hours/day, 5 days/week in a whole body exposure chamber for 2, 5, or 8 weeks, respectively. WDE exposure significantly increased total cell counts in the scaffolds, aortic, and perivascular fat tissues. Macrophage infiltration was enhanced and CD31 expression increased in the scaffolds, which was coupled by increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression. WDE exposure led to increased CD31 expression, while decreasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the aortic wall. The vessel volume measured by micro-CT was increased in ischemic and non-ischemic hindlimbs in response to WDE exposure. DEP exposure induced capillary-like tube formation in endothelial cells in vitro, and caused capillary sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo. In addition, WDE exposure significantly increased mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, while decreasing prolylhydroxylase (PHD) 2 expression. WDE exposure increases inflammatory cell infiltration, enhances the vessel volume/flow, and increases capillary tube formation and sprouting, thereby inducing angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The angiogenic effects may occur through increasing HIF-1α and VEGF while decreasing PHD2 expression. PMID:19683567

  8. Observations on instabilities of cavitating inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braisted, D.; Brennen, C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental observations of instability of cavitating inducers were made for two different inducers operating at different flow coefficients. In general, instability occurred just before head breakdown. Auto-oscillation and rotating cavitation were observed. Analysis of small-amplitude behavior of the inducer and hydraulic system is carried out, and analytical predictions of stability limits were compared with experiment.

  9. Calculating Leakage Around Turbopump Inducer Shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Sen Yih; Sindir, Munir M.

    1987-01-01

    New mathematical model for leakage flow around shrouded turbopump inducers yields more realistic analyses from which designers determine best geometry for leakage-flow-reinjection ports. Also, designers use calculated velocity profile at inducer leading edge to determine blade-angle distribution of inducer leading edge.

  10. Reversible Fluindione-Induced Chronic Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Crepin, Thomas; Bamoulid, Jamal; Courivaud, Cécile; Dahmani, Omar; Felix, Sophie; Ducloux, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Fluindione is well known to induce acute drug-induced interstitial nephritis (IN). Most cases occurred soon after the onset of treatment. We report a unique case of severe subacute fluindione-induced IN diagnosed 2 years after the treatment was begun. Renal function dramatically improved after fluindione withdrawal and steroid therapy. PMID:27127666

  11. Statistical Seismology and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Kazemian, J.

    2014-12-01

    While seismicity triggered or induced by natural resources production such as mining or water impoundment in large dams has long been recognized, the recent increase in the unconventional production of oil and gas has been linked to rapid rise in seismicity in many places, including central North America (Ellsworth et al., 2012; Ellsworth, 2013). Worldwide, induced events of M~5 have occurred and, although rare, have resulted in both damage and public concern (Horton, 2012; Keranen et al., 2013). In addition, over the past twenty years, the increase in both number and coverage of seismic stations has resulted in an unprecedented ability to precisely record the magnitude and location of large numbers of small magnitude events. The increase in the number and type of seismic sequences available for detailed study has revealed differences in their statistics that previously difficult to quantify. For example, seismic swarms that produce significant numbers of foreshocks as well as aftershocks have been observed in different tectonic settings, including California, Iceland, and the East Pacific Rise (McGuire et al., 2005; Shearer, 2012; Kazemian et al., 2014). Similarly, smaller events have been observed prior to larger induced events in several occurrences from energy production. The field of statistical seismology has long focused on the question of triggering and the mechanisms responsible (Stein et al., 1992; Hill et al., 1993; Steacy et al., 2005; Parsons, 2005; Main et al., 2006). For example, in most cases the associated stress perturbations are much smaller than the earthquake stress drop, suggesting an inherent sensitivity to relatively small stress changes (Nalbant et al., 2005). Induced seismicity provides the opportunity to investigate triggering and, in particular, the differences between long- and short-range triggering. Here we investigate the statistics of induced seismicity sequences from around the world, including central North America and Spain, and

  12. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  13. Temperature-Induced and Photo-Induced Phase Transition in a BistableMetal-Cyanide Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    Studies that are related to thermal-induced phase transition and photo-induced phase transition are important issues in the field of solid state science. Rubidium manganese hexacyanoferrate RbMn[Fe(CN)6], one of the Prussian blue analogs, is a suitable system for observing thermal-induced and photo-induced phase transitions since this compound is a mixed-valence compound that has a strong cooperativity due to the CN ligand bridges. Here, we describe the crystal structure, magnetic properties, thermal-induced phase transition, and photo-induced phase collapse and photomagnetic effect based on photo-induced phase transition of RbMn[Fe(CN)6].

  14. Inducible gene expression systems for plants.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Several systems for induction of transgene expression in plants have been described recently. Inducible systems were used mainly in tobacco, rice, Arabidopsis, tomato, and maize. Inducible systems offer researchers the possibility to deregulate gene expression levels at particular stages of plant development and in particular tissues of interest. The more precise temporal and spatial control, obtained by providing the transgenic plant with the appropriate chemical compound or treatment, permits to analyze also the function of those genes required for plant viability. In addition, inducible systems allow promoting local changes in gene expression levels without causing gross alterations to the whole plant development. Here, protocols will be presented to work with five different inducible systems: AlcR/AlcA (ethanol inducible); GR fusions, GVG, and pOp/LhGR (dexamethasone inducible); XVE/OlexA (beta-estradiol inducible); and heat shock induction. PMID:20734254

  15. Performance of LE-7 LOX pump inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamijo, Kenjiro; Yamada, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Ryohei; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu

    A liquid oxygen turbopump has been developed for the main engine (LE-7) of the H-II rocket. The LE-7 LOX pump requires an inducer with quite high suction performance and high head, because a low-speed pump is not used ahead of the main pump in the LE-7 engine. The inducer was designed using the customary method and its hydraulic and mechanical performances were investigated in tests of LE-7 LOX turbopumps. The original combination of an inducer and an inducer housing satisfied the required hydraulic performance criteria. However, this combination was found to result in supersynchronous shaft vibrations due to rotating cavitation which occurred in the inducer. This problem was almost completely solved by a simple modification of the inducer upstream housing. Furthermore, the rotating cavitation of the present inducer was investigated using a new theory of such cavitation developed by Tsujimoto, et al.

  16. Sad music induces pleasant emotion.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion.

  17. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  18. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion.

    PubMed

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J

    2015-04-28

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI-LC-MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte.

  19. Sad music induces pleasant emotion

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion. PMID:23785342

  20. Drug-induced nail disorders.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Nail disorders are defined according to their appearance and the part of the nail affected: the nail plate, the tissues that support or hold the nail plate in place, or the lunula. The consequences of most nail disorders are purely cosmetic. Other disorders, such as ingrown nails, inflammation, erythema, abscesses or tumours, cause functional impairment or pain. The appearance of the lesions is rarely indicative of their cause. Possible causes include physiological changes, local disorders or trauma, systemic conditions, toxic substances and drugs. Most drug-induced nail disorders resolve after discontinuation of the drug, although complete resolution sometimes takes several years. Drugs appear to induce nail disorders through a variety of mechanisms. Some drugs affect the nail matrix epithelium, the nail bed or the nail folds. Some alter nail colour. Other drugs induce photosensitivity. Yet others affect the blood supply to the nail unit. Nail abnormalities are common during treatment with certain cytotoxic drugs: taxanes, anthracyclines, fluorouracil, EGFR, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, etc. Some drugs are associated with a risk of serious and painful lesions, such as abscesses. When these disorders affect quality of life, the benefits of withdrawing the drug must be weighed against the severity of the condition being treated and the drug's efficacy, taking into account the harm-benefit balance of other options. Various anti-infective drugs, including tetracyclines, quinolones, clofazimine and zidovudine, cause the nail plate to detach from the nail bed after exposure to light, or cause nail discoloration. Psoralens and retinoids can also have the same effects. PMID:25162091

  1. Psychological sequelae of induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Romans-Clarkson, S E

    1989-12-01

    This article reviews the scientific literature on the psychological sequelae of induced abortion. The methodology and results of studies carried out over the last twenty-two years are examined critically. The unanimous consensus is that abortion does not cause deleterious psychological effects. Women most likely to show subsequent problems are those who were pressured into the operation against their own wishes, either by relatives or because their pregnancy had medical or foetal contraindications. Legislation which restricts abortion causes problems for women with unwanted pregnancies and their doctors. It is also unjust, as it adversely most affects lower socio-economic class women.

  2. Magnetically induced pulser laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.S.; Leopold, K.E.

    1985-02-15

    A novel excitation scheme has been developed for excimer discharge lasers. The technique uses pulse transformer technology to induce a fast, high voltage pulse directly onto a ground potential laser electrode resulting in the breakdown of the laser gas mix. Saturation of the pulse transformer core inductance then permits efficient energy transfer from the main energy storage circuit into the discharge. When this excitation technique was used in a XeCl laser an output energy density of 2.5 J/l and an overall electrical to optical efficiency of 2% were obtained. The technique appears promising for the development of high energy, high average power excimer lasers.

  3. Opioid induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Howard S; Laufer, Andras

    2014-01-01

    Opioids are broad spectrum analgesics that are an integral part of the therapeutic armamentarium to combat pain in the palliative care population. Unfortunately, among the adverse effects of opioids that may be experienced along with analgesia is nausea, vomiting, and/or retching. Although it is conceivable that in the future, using combination agents (opioids combined with agents which may nullify emetic effects), currently nausea/vomiting remains a significant issue for certain patients. However, there exists potential current strategies that may be useful in efforts to diminish the frequency and/or intensity of opioid-induced nausea/vomiting (OINV).

  4. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  5. Nilotinib-Induced Keratosis Pilaris.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wai Mun Sean; Aw, Chen Wee Derrick

    2016-01-01

    Nilotinib is a second-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is approved for the treatment of imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukaemia expressing the Bcr-Abl mutation. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions occur more frequently in patients using this medication. We present a case of nilotinib-induced keratosis pilaris that did not have accompanying symptoms of alopecia or pruritus. Greater recognition of this association is needed so that appropriate treatment can be instituted to ensure a good oncologic outcome. PMID:27194977

  6. Laser Induced Blue Luminescence Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haiyong; Duan, Yanmin; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Yaoju; Yang, Fugui

    2011-09-01

    Laser induced strange blue luminescence in several Raman crystals has been investigated. The blue luminescence at about 473 nm has the characteristic of no orientation and only produced in the crystal where the fundament laser oscillated. The experimental results show that the blue luminescence must result from the fundamental laser around 1.0 µm rather than Stokes-shifting. The spectrum detected is similar for different crystals. This blue luminescence is obviously strange and inconsistent with traditional luminescence theories, which maybe a brand-new luminescence theory.

  7. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  8. Drug-Induced Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced tendon disorders are an often underestimated risk factor. The range from detrimental effects on the tendon include tendinopathy as well as potentially tendon rupture. As for today, four main drug classes have been reported to be associated with potentially deteriorated tendon properties: 1. Corticosteroids, 2. Chinolon antibiotics, 3. Aromatase inhbitors, 4. Statins as HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors. Most often, the Achilles tendon is affected in terms of tendinopathy and/or subsequent tendon rupture. However, nearly every tendon of the entire body might be affected in a detrimental way by one or a combination of the aformentioned agents. PMID:27535265

  9. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  10. Magnetically induced QCD Kondo effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Sho; Itakura, Kazunori; Kuramoto, Yoshio

    2016-10-01

    The "QCD Kondo effect" stems from the color exchange interaction in QCD with non-Abelian property, and can be realized in a high-density quark matter containing heavy-quark impurities. We propose a novel type of the QCD Kondo effect induced by a strong magnetic field. In addition to the fact that the magnetic field does not affect the color degrees of freedom, two properties caused by the Landau quantization in a strong magnetic field are essential for the "magnetically induced QCD Kondo effect"; (1) dimensional reduction to 1 +1 -dimensions, and (2) finiteness of the density of states for lowest energy quarks. We demonstrate that, in a strong magnetic field B , the scattering amplitude of a massless quark off a heavy quark impurity indeed shows a characteristic behavior of the Kondo effect. The resulting Kondo scale is estimated as ΛK≃√{eqB }αs1 /3exp {-4 π /Ncαslog (4 π /αs)} where αs and Nc are the fine structure constant of strong interaction and the number of colors in QCD, and eq is the electric charge of light quarks.

  11. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70(S6K), as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP-LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy.

  12. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  13. Diet-induced metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Adeva, María M; Souto, Gema

    2011-08-01

    The modern Western-type diet is deficient in fruits and vegetables and contains excessive animal products, generating the accumulation of non-metabolizable anions and a lifespan state of overlooked metabolic acidosis, whose magnitude increases progressively with aging due to the physiological decline in kidney function. In response to this state of diet-derived metabolic acidosis, the kidney implements compensating mechanisms aimed to restore the acid-base balance, such as the removal of the non-metabolizable anions, the conservation of citrate, and the enhancement of kidney ammoniagenesis and urinary excretion of ammonium ions. These adaptive processes lower the urine pH and induce an extensive change in urine composition, including hypocitraturia, hypercalciuria, and nitrogen and phosphate wasting. Low urine pH predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria are risk factors for calcium stone disease. Even a very mild degree of metabolic acidosis induces skeletal muscle resistance to the insulin action and dietary acid load may be an important variable in predicting the metabolic abnormalities and the cardiovascular risk of the general population, the overweight and obese persons, and other patient populations including diabetes and chronic kidney failure. High dietary acid load is more likely to result in diabetes and systemic hypertension and may increase the cardiovascular risk. Results of recent observational studies confirm an association between insulin resistance and metabolic acidosis markers, including low serum bicarbonate, high serum anion gap, hypocitraturia, and low urine pH.

  14. Hydroxycut-induced Liver Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kaswala, DH; Shah, S; Patel, N; Raisoni, S; Swaminathan, S

    2014-01-01

    In the recent era, use of various nutritional supplements is highly encouraged amongst the people of United States. Weight loss supplements are major part of the nutritional supplements and their usage is unregulated in the US. Obesity is a major health concern in the US and Americans spend around $30 billion a year for weight loss supplements. At times, these supplements can be responsible for documented or undocumented adverse drug effects. The health consequences related to these supplements are often overlooked by the general public, even though FDA issues advisories regarding them. One common supplement used for weight loss was Hydroxycut (Iovate Health Sciences Research, Oakville, Ontario, Canada). Hydroxycut was recalled from the market after a FDA warning in May 2009 because of 23 reports of serious health problems ranging from jaundice and elevated liver enzymes to liver damage. 1 This case report adds evidence for Hydroxycut - induced hepatotoxicity. A 27 year old man with right upper quadrant pain and jaundice was found to have elevated liver enzymes and was taking Hydroxycut along with other supplements. Liver biopsy showed drug induced hepatotoxicity. Discontinuation of Hydroxycut dramatically improved liver functions and related symptoms. PMID:24669349

  15. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  16. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  17. Non-drug-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bacchetta, Justine; Dubourg, Laurence; Juillard, Laurent; Cochat, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Several drugs and other compounds can induce acute and/or chronic nephrotoxicity. The goal of this study was to review clinical features of nephrotoxicity induced by 'atypical' or 'unconventional' agents, such as environmental agents (metals, minerals, animals), food agents (mushrooms, aristolochic acid, medicinal traditional herbals, dietary supplements, melamine), drugs, and other products (ethylene glycol). Nephrotoxicity varies according to local background, dependent on different food and cultural customs, as well as to differences in local fauna and flora. The incidence of such a phenomenon is not well known. Many different pathophysiological pathways are involved, and the spectrum of renal lesions is rather wide. 'Epidemic nephrotoxicity' may occur, as recently illustrated by the melamine epidemics in Chinese infants receiving powdered milk formulas; a rapid reaction to unusual increased frequency of acute kidney injury and nephrolithiasis in young children has led to a rapid analysis from international experts, with subsequent recommendations for diagnosis and care. Nephrotoxicity should be considered when there is any unexplained renal impairment, especially in children. PMID:19399523

  18. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einhorn, Martin B.; Jones, D. R. Timothy

    2016-05-01

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass)2 from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  19. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70S6K, as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP–LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy. PMID:24769862

  20. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  1. Stress proteins induced by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Del Razo, L M; Quintanilla-Vega, B; Brambila-Colombres, E; Calderón-Aranda, E S; Manno, M; Albores, A

    2001-12-01

    The elevated expression of stress proteins is considered to be a universal response to adverse conditions, representing a potential mechanism of cellular defense against disease and a potential target for novel therapeutics. Exposure to arsenicals either in vitro or in vivo in a variety of model systems has been shown to cause the induction of a number of the major stress protein families such as heat shock proteins (Hsp). Among them are members with low molecular weight, such as metallotionein and ubiquitin, as well as ones with masses of 27, 32, 60, 70, 90, and 110 kDa. In most of the cases, the induction of stress proteins depends on the capacity of the arsenical to reach the target, its valence, and the type of exposure, arsenite being the biggest inducer of most Hsp in several organs and systems. Hsp induction is a rapid dose-dependent response (1-8 h) to the acute exposure to arsenite. Thus, the stress response appears to be useful to monitor the sublethal toxicity resulting from a single exposure to arsenite. The present paper offers a critical review of the capacity of arsenicals to modulate the expression and/or accumulation of stress proteins. The physiological consequences of the arsenic-induced stress and its usefulness in monitoring effects resulting from arsenic exposure in humans and other organisms are discussed.

  2. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70(S6K), as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP-LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy. PMID:24769862

  3. Condensation induced water hammer safety

    SciTech Connect

    Gintner, M.A.

    1997-03-10

    Condensation induced water hammer events in piping systems can cause catastrophic steam system failures which can result in equipment damage, personal injury, and even death. As an industry, we have learned to become accustomed to the ''banging'' that we often hear in our steam piping systems, and complacent in our actions to prevent it. It is unfortunate that lives are lost needlessly, as this type of water hammer event is preventable if one only applies some basic principles when operating and maintaining their steam systems. At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site where I work, there was one such accident that occurred in 1993 which took the life of a former co-worker and friend of mine. Hanford was established as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. it is a 560 square mile complex located along the banks of the Columbia River in Southeastern Washington State. For almost 45 years, hanford's mission was to produce weapons grade plutonium for our nations defense programs. Today, Hanford no longer produces plutonium, but is focused on site clean-up and economic diversification. Hanford still uses steam for heating and processing activities, utilizing over 20 miles of piping distribution systems similar to those found in industry. Although these aging systems are still sound, they cannot stand up to the extreme pressure pulses developed by a condensation induced water hammer.

  4. Zafirlukast-induced acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Su, Chien-Wei; Wu, Jaw-Ching; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Huang, Yi-Shin; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2002-11-01

    Zafirlukast, a competitive cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, is a new class of asthma medications. It has shown an adverse event profile similar to that of placebo. Herein, we present a 69-year-old female patient who suffered from general malaise, poor appetite, nausea and jaundice after 3 months of zafirlukast therapy for asthma. She had no past history of liver disease, nor history of alcoholism, herb medication, blood transfusion, acupuncture, tattoo or recent traveling history. Liver biochemistries revealed elevated serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartase aminotransferase levels up to 481 U/L and 212 U/L, respectively. Moreover, peak serum total bilirubin level was elevated to 34.8 mg/dL during admission. Serum viral hepatitis marker, antinuclear antibody, anti-mitochondrial antibody and anti-smooth muscle antibody were all negative. Her general condition and liver biochemistries improved gradually after zafirlukast was discontinued. Roussel Uclaf causality assessment for adverse drug reaction confirmed the diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury. This case reminds us that zafirlukast is a potentially hepato-toxic drug. If clinical manifestations of hepatitis develop, patients should be managed cautiously and closely monitored for liver biochemistries. If drug-induced hepatitis is suspected, medication should be discontinued immediately to prevent further liver injury. PMID:12583521

  5. Amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Syed; Ayoub, Walaa; Hassan, Mona; Wisgerhof, Max

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was found to have bradycardia, hypothermia and respiratory failure 3 weeks after initiation of amiodarone therapy for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone was found to be 168 μIU/mL (nl. 0.3-5 μIU/mL) and free thyroxine (FT4) was <0.2 ng/dL (nl. 0.8-1.8 ng/dL). He received intravenous fluids, vasopressor therapy and stress dose steroids; he was intubated and admitted to the intensive care unit. He received 500 μg of intravenous levothyroxine in the first 18 h of therapy, and 150 µg intravenous daily thereafter. Haemodynamic improvement, along with complete recovery of mental status, occurred after 48 h. Twelve hours after the initiation of therapy, FT4 was 0.96 ng/dL. The patient was maintained on levothyroxine 175 (g POorally daily. A thyroid ultrasound showed diffuse heterogeneity. The 24 hour excretion of iodine was 3657 (mcg (25-756 ( mcg). The only two cases of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma in the literature report patient death despite supportive therapy and thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents the most thoroughly investigated case of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma with a history significant for subclinical thyroid disease. PMID:24729111

  6. Neutrino-Induced Meson Productions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi X.

    We develop a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model for neutrino-nucleon reactions in the resonance region, by extending the DCC model that we have previously developed through an analysis of π N,γ N to π N,η N,KΛ ,KΣ reaction data for W ≤ 2.1 GeV. We analyze electron-induced reaction data for both proton and neutron targets to determine the vector current form factors up to Q2 ≤ 3.0 (GeV/c)2. Axial-current matrix elements are derived in accordance with the Partially Conserved Axial Current (PCAC) relation to the πN interactions of the DCC model. As a result, we can uniquely determine the interference pattern between resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. Our calculated cross sections for neutrino-induced single-pion productions are compared with available data, and are found to be in reasonable agreement with the data. We also calculate the double-pion production cross sections in the resonance region, for the first time, with relevant resonance contributions and channel couplings. The result is compared with the double-pion production data. For a future development of a neutrino-nucleus reaction model and/or a neutrino event generator for analyses of neutrino experiments, the DCC model presented here can give a useful input.

  7. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. PMID:23972547

  8. Amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Syed; Ayoub, Walaa; Hassan, Mona; Wisgerhof, Max

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was found to have bradycardia, hypothermia and respiratory failure 3 weeks after initiation of amiodarone therapy for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone was found to be 168 μIU/mL (nl. 0.3–5 μIU/mL) and free thyroxine (FT4) was <0.2 ng/dL (nl. 0.8–1.8 ng/dL). He received intravenous fluids, vasopressor therapy and stress dose steroids; he was intubated and admitted to the intensive care unit. He received 500 μg of intravenous levothyroxine in the first 18 h of therapy, and 150 µg intravenous daily thereafter. Haemodynamic improvement, along with complete recovery of mental status, occurred after 48 h. Twelve hours after the initiation of therapy, FT4 was 0.96 ng/dL. The patient was maintained on levothyroxine 175 (g POorally daily. A thyroid ultrasound showed diffuse heterogeneity. The 24 hour excretion of iodine was 3657 (mcg (25–756 ( mcg). The only two cases of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma in the literature report patient death despite supportive therapy and thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents the most thoroughly investigated case of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma with a history significant for subclinical thyroid disease. PMID:24729111

  9. Optically induced parametric magnetic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Ricardo; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2011-05-01

    Optically pumped vector magnetometers based on zero-field resonances have reached very high sensitivities by operating at high atomic densities where dephasing due to spin-exchange collisions can be suppressed. Simplified setups, with just one laser beam have measured magnetic fields from the human brain and heart. A key feature in these magnetometers is the introduction of an rf magnetic field along the measurement axis to generate a parametric resonance. Lock-in detection of the transmitted light, at an odd harmonic of the modulation frequency, allows the reduction of the low frequency noise and generates a resonance with dispersive shape. Here we study a zero-field vector magnetometer where the parametric resonances are induced by the vector AC stark-shift of light. This approach does not produce any external magnetic field that could disturb the reading of other magnetometers in the vicinity and could provide an alternative in applications where an applied AC-field cannot be used. We have characterized the vector AC stark-shift effect of light on Rb atoms contained in a micromachined vapor cell with buffer gas. We have obtained parametric resonances induced by modulation of the light-shift. We also analyze the detunings and intensities of the light-shift beam that maintain the magnetometer within the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime.

  10. Plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Shi, Xu; Zhong, Yuqing; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We have successfully developed a plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis system that uses a gold nanoparticle-loaded oxide semiconductor electrode to produce useful chemical energy as hydrogen and ammonia. The most important feature of this system is that both sides of a strontium titanate single-crystal substrate are used without an electrochemical apparatus. Plasmon-induced water splitting occurred even with a minimum chemical bias of 0.23 V owing to the plasmonic effects based on the efficient oxidation of water and the use of platinum as a co-catalyst for reduction. Photocurrent measurements were performed to determine the electron transfer between the gold nanoparticles and the oxide semiconductor. The efficiency of water oxidation was determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments aimed at elucidating the electron density in the gold nanoparticles. A set-up similar to the water-splitting system was used to synthesize ammonia via nitrogen fixation using ruthenium instead of platinum as a co-catalyst. PMID:26052419

  11. [Autoimmune hepatitis induced by isotretionine].

    PubMed

    Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos Lopez, Roxana; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Scavino, Yolanda; Morales, Alejandro; Tagle, Martín

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a teenage patient with the diagnosis of drug induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient is a 16 years old female, with the past medical history of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism controlled with levothyroxine, who started treatment with Isotretionin (®Accutane) 20 mg q/12 hours for a total of 3 months for the treatment of severe acne. The physical examination was within normal limits and the results of the laboratory exams are: Baseline values of ALT 28 U/L, AST 28 U/L. Three months later: AST 756 U/L, ALT 1199U/L, alkaline phosphatase 114 U/L, with normal bilirrubin levels throughout the process. The serology studies were negative for all viral hepatitis; ANA titers were positive (1/160) and igG levels were also elevated. A liver biopsy was performed, and was compatible with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Corticosteroid therapy was started with Prednisone 40 mg per day one week after stopping the treatment with isotretionin, observing an improvement in the laboratory values. We describe this case and review the world literature since there are no reported cases of Isotretinoin-induced autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27131947

  12. Shear-Induced Reactive Gelation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bastian; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-11-24

    In this work, we describe a method for the production of porous polymer materials in the form of particles characterized by narrow pore size distribution using the principle of shear-induced reactive gelation. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) primary particles with diameter ranging from 80 to 200 nm are used as building blocks, which are assembled into fractal-like clusters when exposed to high shear rates generated in a microchannel. It was found that independent of the primary particle size, it is possible to modulate the internal structure of formed fractal-like aggregates having fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 by varying the residence time in the microchannel. Thermally induced postpolymerization was used to increase the mechanical resilience of such formed clusters. Primary particle interpenetration was observed by SEM and confirmed by light scattering resulting in an increase of fractal dimension. Nitrogen sorption measurements and mercury porosimetry confirmed formation of a porous material with surface area ranging from 20 to 40 m(2)/g characterized by porosity of 70% and narrow pore size distribution with an average diameter around 700 nm without the presence of any micropores. The strong perfusive character of the synthesized material was confirmed by the existence of a plateau of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate measured at high reduced velocities using a chromatographic column packed with the synthesized microclusters. PMID:26488233

  13. Shear induced phase transitions induced in edible fats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    The food industry crystallizes fats under different conditions of temperature and shear to obtain products with desired crystalline phases. Milk fat, palm oil, cocoa butter and chocolate were crystallized from the melt in a temperature controlled Couette cell. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies were conducted to examine the role of shear on the phase transitions seen in edible fats. The shear forces on the crystals induced acceleration of the alpha to beta-prime phase transition with increasing shear rate in milk fat and palm oil. The increase was slow at low shear rates and became very strong above 360 s-1. In cocoa butter the acceleration between beta-prime-III and beta-V phase transition increased until a maximum of at 360 s-1, and then decreased, showing competition between enhanced heat transfer and viscous heat generation.

  14. Kif2a depletion generates chromosome segregation and pole coalescence defects in animal caps and inhibits gastrulation of the Xenopus embryo

    PubMed Central

    Eagleson, Gerald; Pfister, Katherine; Knowlton, Anne L.; Skoglund, Paul; Keller, Ray; Stukenberg, P. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Kif2a is a member of the kinesin-13 microtubule depolymerases, which tightly regulate microtubule dynamics for many cellular processes. We characterized Kif2a depletion in Xenopus animal caps and embryos. Kif2a depletion generates defects in blastopore closure. These defects are rescued by removing the animal cap, suggesting that Kif2a-depleted animal caps are not compliant enough to allow gastrulation movements. Gastrulation defects are not rescued by a Kif2a mutated in an Aurora kinase phosphorylation site, suggesting that the phenotypes are caused by problems in mitosis. During animal cap mitoses, Kif2a localizes to the spindle poles and centromeres. Depletion of Kif2a generated multipolar spindles in stage 12 embryos. Kif2a-depleted animal caps have anaphase lagging chromosomes in stage 9 and 10 embryos and subsequent cytokinesis failure. Later divisions have greater than two centrosomes, generating extra spindle poles. Kif2a-depleted embryos are also defective at coalescing extra spindle poles into a bipolar spindle. The gastrulation and mitotic phenotypes can be rescued by either human Kif2a or Kif2b, which suggests that the two homologues redundantly regulate mitosis in mammals. These studies demonstrate that defects in mitosis can inhibit large-scale developmental movements in vertebrate tissues. PMID:25568341

  15. [Drug-induced Cognitive Impairment].

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Moeko; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-04-01

    Elderly people are more likely than young people to develop cognitive impairments associated with medication use. One of the reasons for this is that renal and liver functions are often impaired in elderly people. Dementia and delirium (an acute confused state) are known to be associated with drug toxicity. Anticholinergic medications are common causes of both acute and chronic cognitive impairment. Psychoactive drugs, antidepressants and anticonvulsants can cause dementia and delirium. In addition, non-psychoactive drugs such as histamine H2 receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent), and cardiac medications, may cause acute or chronic cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the offending agent are essential for the prevention of drug-induced dementia and delirium. PMID:27056860

  16. Fatal food-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Yunginger, J W; Sweeney, K G; Sturner, W Q; Giannandrea, L A; Teigland, J D; Bray, M; Benson, P A; York, J A; Biedrzycki, L; Squillace, D L

    1988-09-01

    Fatal food-induced anaphylaxis is rarely reported. In 16 months, we identified seven such cases involving five males and two females, aged 11 to 43 years. All victims were atopic with multiple prior anaphylactic episodes after ingestion of the incriminated food (peanut, four; pecan, one; crab, one; fish, one). In six cases the allergenic food was ingested away from home. Factors contributing to the severity of individual reactions included denial of symptoms, concomitant intake of alcohol, reliance on oral antihistamines alone to treat symptoms, and adrenal suppression by chronic glucocorticoid therapy for coexisting asthma. In no case was epinephrine administered immediately after onset of symptoms. Premortem or postmortem serum samples were available from six victims; in each case elevated levels of IgE antibodies to the incriminated food were demonstrated. Food-sensitive individuals must self-administer epinephrine promptly at the first sign of systemic reaction. Emergency care providers should be aware of cricothyrotomy as a life-saving procedure.

  17. Peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions.

    PubMed

    Burks, W; Bannon, G A; Sicherer, S; Sampson, H A

    1999-07-01

    Food allergies, particularly to peanuts, are a common cause of anaphylaxis. Approximately 125 people die each year in the USA secondary to food-induced anaphylaxis. Clinical anaphylaxis is a syndrome of diverse etiology and dramatic presentation of symptoms associated with the classic features of type I, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity [1]. Typically the term anaphylaxis connotes an immunologically-mediated event that occurs after exposure to certain foreign substances. This reaction results from the generation and release of a variety of potent biologically active mediators and their concerted effects on various target organs. Anaphylaxis is recognized by cutaneous, respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal signs and symptoms occurring singly or in combination. This article focuses on allergic reactions to peanuts that manifest as signs and symptoms involving multiple target organs or the cardiovascular system alone.

  18. Drug-Induced (Thalidomide) Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ing, George M.; Olman, C. L.; Oyd, John R.

    1962-01-01

    Phocomelia (flipper-like limbs) has long been recognized as a rare malformation. Numerous cases of phocomelia and other congenital malformations have recently been reported in the United Kingdom, Australia, Europe and Canada in which the common factor appears to have been the administration of the hypnotic compound thalidomide during early pregnancy. Two additional cases of infants born with phocomelia, amelia and alimentary abnormalities are presented. In both of these cases the administration of thalidomide was initiated early during pregnancy (five to eight weeks after the last normal menstrual period) and maintained for several weeks. Thalidomide (alpha-phthalimido glutarimide) is related chemically to other glutarimides currently in clinical use. The possibility that these compounds and/or their metabolites may induce teratogenic effects warrants consideration. Emphasis is added to the view that caution should be exercised when prescribing new drugs. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:20327332

  19. [Iodine excess induced thyroid dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Egloff, Michael; Philippe, Jacques

    2016-04-20

    The principle sources of iodine overload, amiodarone and radiologic contrast media, are frequently used in modern medicine. The thyroid gland exerts a protective effect against iodine excess by suppressing iodine internalization into the thyrocyte and iodine organification, the Wolff-Chaikoff effect. Insufficiency of this effect or lack of escape from it leads to hypo- or hyperthyroidism respectively. Amiodarone induced thyrotoxicosis is a complex condition marked by two different pathophysiological mechanisms with different treatments. Thyroid metabolism changes after exposure to radiologic contrast media are frequent, but they rarely need to be treated. High risk individuals need to be identifed in order to delay the exam or to monitor thyroid function or apply prophylactic measures in selected cases. PMID:27276725

  20. Light-induced click reactions.

    PubMed

    Tasdelen, Mehmet Atilla; Yagci, Yusuf

    2013-06-01

    Spatial and temporal control over chemical and biological processes, both in terms of "tuning" products and providing site-specific control, is one of the most exciting and rapidly developing areas of modern science. For synthetic chemists, the challenge is to discover and develop selective and efficient reactions capable of generating useful molecules in a variety of matrices. In recent studies, light has been recognized as a valuable method for determining where, when, and to what extent a process is started or stopped. Accordingly, this Minireview will present the fundamental aspects of light-induced click reactions, highlight the applications of these reactions to diverse fields of study, and discuss the potential for this methodology to be applied to the study of biomolecular systems.

  1. Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Babu, Suma; Li, Yuebing

    2015-04-15

    Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is a recently characterized entity belonging to the spectrum of statin myotoxicity. It is a more severe form, and is usually associated with significant proximal muscle weakness, strikingly elevated creatine kinase levels and persistent symptoms despite statin discontinuation. The characteristic pathological finding is a marked muscle fiber necrosis with minimal or no inflammation on muscle biopsy. SINAM is an autoimmune disorder associated with an antibody against 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and the antibody titer is a useful marker for assessing treatment response. However, anti-HMGCR positive myopathies are also caused by unknown etiologies other than statin exposure, especially in the younger population. SINAM should be promptly recognized as immunosuppressive therapy can improve its clinical outcome significantly. Further research is needed to elucidate its pathogenesis and provide evidence based guidelines for management.

  2. Canagliflozin-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica; Begum, Tahmina; Smalligan, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are relatively new antihyperglycemic agents that lower renal glucose reabsorption. They are used as adjunctive therapy to standard diabetes treatment. Case Report: We present the case of a 62-year-old woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and sudden-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Use of canagliflozin, a SGLT-2 inhibitor, was determined to be the cause of the DKA. The patient ultimately recovered after 5 days in the intensive care unit. She was changed to long- and short-acting insulins and instructed to avoid canagliflozin. Conclusion: Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are effective at lowering a patient’s hemoglobin A1C, physicians must be aware of the rare but dangerous potential adverse effect of inducing DKA. This article reports an illustrative case and presents a review of the literature.

  3. Muon-induced visual sensations.

    PubMed

    McNulty, P J; Pease, V P; Bond, V P

    1976-01-01

    The visual phenomena induced by the passage of a pulse of extremely relativistic muons through the vitreous humor have been studied at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The visual phenomena include flashes that range from small crescents of light in the peripheral field of view to large clouds of light that fill the entire field of view as well as bright flashes with dark centers. Three subjects have been exposed to date. Arguments are given to show that the physical mechanism behind these flashes is Cerenkov radiation. Standard psychophysical techniques are used to determine the threshold for muoninduced visual sensations for one subject. Comparison is made with his pion treshold measured under the same condition.

  4. Induced Pluripotency for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Menghua; Chen, Guilai; Hu, Baoyang

    2013-01-01

    The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has revolutionized the concept of cellular reprogramming and potentially will solve the immunological compatibility issues that have so far hindered the application of human pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine. Recent findings showed that pluripotency is defined by a state of balanced lineage potency, which can be artificially instated through various procedures, including the conventional Yamanaka strategy. As a type of pluripotent stem cell, iPSCs are subject to the usual concerns over purity of differentiated derivatives and risks of tumor formation when used for cell-based therapy, though they provide certain advantages in translational research, especially in the areas of personalized medicine, disease modeling and drug screening. iPSC-based technology, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and direct lineage conversion each will play distinct roles in specific aspects of translational medicine, and continue yielding surprises for scientists and the public. PMID:24056061

  5. Drug Induced Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwaiblmair, Martin; Behr, Werner; Haeckel, Thomas; Märkl, Bruno; Foerg, Wolfgang; Berghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of therapeutic drugs, the list of drugs that is responsible for severe pulmonary disease also grows. Many drugs have been associated with pulmonary complications of various types, including interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusions. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) can be caused by chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, antiarrhythmic drugs, and immunosuppressive agents. There are no distinct physiologic, radiographic or pathologic patterns of DILD, and the diagnosis is usually made when a patient with interstitial lung disease (ILD) is exposed to a medication known to result in lung disease. Other causes of ILD must be excluded. Treatment is avoidance of further exposure and systemic corticosteroids in patients with progressive or disabling disease. PMID:22896776

  6. [Iodine excess induced thyroid dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Egloff, Michael; Philippe, Jacques

    2016-04-20

    The principle sources of iodine overload, amiodarone and radiologic contrast media, are frequently used in modern medicine. The thyroid gland exerts a protective effect against iodine excess by suppressing iodine internalization into the thyrocyte and iodine organification, the Wolff-Chaikoff effect. Insufficiency of this effect or lack of escape from it leads to hypo- or hyperthyroidism respectively. Amiodarone induced thyrotoxicosis is a complex condition marked by two different pathophysiological mechanisms with different treatments. Thyroid metabolism changes after exposure to radiologic contrast media are frequent, but they rarely need to be treated. High risk individuals need to be identifed in order to delay the exam or to monitor thyroid function or apply prophylactic measures in selected cases.

  7. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species. PMID:26100345

  8. Comparative Markedness and Induced Opacity.

    PubMed

    Dinnsen, Daniel A; Gierut, Judith A; Farris-Trimble, Ashley W

    2010-01-01

    Results are reported from a descriptive and experimental study that was intended to evaluate comparative markedness (McCarthy 2002, 2003) as an amendment to optimality theory. Two children (aged 4;3 and 4;11) with strikingly similar, delayed phonologies presented with two independent, interacting error patterns of special interest, i.e., Deaffrication ([tɪn] 'chin') and Consonant Harmony ([ɡɔɡ] 'dog') in a feeding interaction ([kik] 'cheek'). Both children were enrolled in a counterbalanced treatment study employing a multiple base-line single-subject experimental design, which was intended to induce a grandfather effect in one case ([dɔɡ] 'dog' and [kik] 'cheek') and a counterfeeding interaction in the other ([ɡɔɡ] 'dog' and [tik] 'cheek'). The results were largely supportive of comparative markedness, although some anomalies were observed. The clinical implications of these results are also explored.

  9. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Paiaulla, Santosh; Venkategowda, Pradeep Marur; Rao, S Manimala; Balaraju, Banda

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day) since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality. PMID:26321810

  10. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  11. Electromagnetically induced transparency in rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Abraham J.; Mayer, Shannon K.

    2009-02-01

    We investigate ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in rubidium gas. The theoretical absorption profile of a weak probe laser beam at 780.2nm (5S1/2→5P3/2) is modeled in the presence of a strong coupling laser beam at 776.0nm (5P3/2→5D5/2) and the absorption transparency window is characterized. We use two grating-feedback diode lasers and observe EIT experimentally in rubidium and compare the results to the theory. This experiment brings quantum optics into the advanced undergraduate laboratory and utilizes equipment and expertise commonly available in laboratories equipped to perform diode-laser-based absorption spectroscopy of rubidium.

  12. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  13. Apixaban-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sherri-Anne; Alsaad, Ali A; Mack, Anwar; Phillips, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with well-controlled hypertension presented to the emergency department with new-onset atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response. Treatment for atrial fibrillation was initiated, including rate control and anticoagulation with 5 mg of apixaban two times per day for primary stroke prophylaxis. Three days after initiation of apixaban, the patient noted new-onset abdominal pain, worsening shortness of breath and weakness. Laboratory results showed elevated liver enzymes. Workup for elevated transaminase did not reveal any underlying infectious or autoimmune process. Apixaban, a probable cause for the hepatocellular injury, was discontinued and replaced with intravenous unfractionated heparin to bridge anticoagulation with warfarin. The patient's symptoms resolved as her transaminases improved by discontinuation of apixaban. We illustrate this case of drug-induced hepatotoxicity secondary to treatment with apixaban. It is important for physicians to be aware of this rare adverse effect caused by a widely used novel oral anticoagulant. PMID:27651407

  14. Radiocontrast-induced renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Misson, R.T.; Cutler, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretical advantages over the presently used agents. 58 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  15. Monoarthritis Induced by Bupropion Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Weiqing; Williams, Barry N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Bupropion hydrochloride is an inhibitor of dopamine and norepinephrine, which is commonly prescribed for major depression, smoking cessation, and bipolar depression. Here we report a highly unusual case of bupropion induced knee monoarthritis in a bipolar depression patient. With bupropion XL 150 mg for 2 weeks, her left knee began to swell; at the third week, this condition was worsening. The aggravation of the left knee effusion stopped after the discontinuation of bupropion XL. The effusion and swelling disappeared after 15 ml of synovial fluid was drawn out and the effusion has never returned. Analysis of the synovial fluid showed noninflammatory effusion. Her left knee swelling was most likely due to angioedema caused by bupropion XL.

  16. Canagliflozin-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica; Begum, Tahmina; Smalligan, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are relatively new antihyperglycemic agents that lower renal glucose reabsorption. They are used as adjunctive therapy to standard diabetes treatment. Case Report: We present the case of a 62-year-old woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and sudden-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Use of canagliflozin, a SGLT-2 inhibitor, was determined to be the cause of the DKA. The patient ultimately recovered after 5 days in the intensive care unit. She was changed to long- and short-acting insulins and instructed to avoid canagliflozin. Conclusion: Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are effective at lowering a patient’s hemoglobin A1C, physicians must be aware of the rare but dangerous potential adverse effect of inducing DKA. This article reports an illustrative case and presents a review of the literature. PMID:27635409

  17. Desorption induced by electronic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, V. N.

    1994-10-01

    A survey is presented of the techniques and instruments used in studies of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) that can be stimulated by irradiating a solid surface by electrons (ESD) or photons (PSD). The most general characteristics and aspects of this phenomenon are systematized. An analysis is made of relations between DIET and crystallographic and band structure of the substrate, the nature of adsorption bonding and specific features of desorbing particles. The main DIET models involving various electronic excitations of adsorption bonding and their relaxation as particles escape from the surface are discussed, and their predictions are compared with the available experimental data. Particular attention is focussed on the DIET models involving many-electron excitations. The various applications of DIET techniques to studies of adsorbed layers and of surface processes are considered. The radiation stability of solid surfaces and of film coatings with respect to excitation of their electronic subsystem is discussed.

  18. Phenytoin-induced Lyell's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lobão, Bárbara; Martins, Claúdio; Sousa, Manuel; Marques, Susana; Pedroso, Ermelinda

    2012-01-01

    Lyell's syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare dermatological disease that causes serious morbidity and mortality. It is most commonly drug induced. The authors report the case of a 57-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital with severe rash all over the body. She had been previously submitted to brain surgery for total resection of a large meningioma and medicated with phenytoin for seizures prophylaxis. During this treatment, erythematous lesions and blisters were observed first on her face and trunk and then spreading to the entire body. Detachment of the skin, as well as mucous involvement especially of mouth and conjunctiva, was also observed. TEN was diagnosed, and phenytoin was discontinued. Intravenous fluids, systemic steroids and tightened infection control measures were implemented. After 10 days, skin recovery and re-epithelialisation were established, temperature decreased and mucosal complications stabilised. The patient was discharged after 1 month of hospitalisation. PMID:23230258

  19. Anion-induced urea deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Boiocchi, Massimo; Del Boca, Laura; Esteban-Gómez, David; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Monzani, Enrico

    2005-05-01

    The urea-based receptor 1 (1-(7-nitrobenzo[1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)urea, L--H), interacts with X- ions in MeCN, according to two consecutive steps: 1) formation of a hydrogen-bond complex [L--H...X]-; 2) deprotonation of L--H to give L- and [HX2]-, as shown by spectrophotometric and 1H NMR titration experiments. Step 2) takes place with more basic anions (fluoride, carboxylates, dihydrogenphosphate), while less basic anions (Cl-, NO2-, NO3-) do not induce proton transfer. On crystallisation from a solution containing L--H and excess Bu4NF, the tetrabutylammonium salt of the deprotonated urea derivative (Bu4N[L]) was isolated and its crystal and molecular structure determined. PMID:15770711

  20. The induced magnetosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.

    1982-03-01

    No evidence was found for an intrinsic magnetic field, nor for the development of a bow shock wave, as the corotating Saturnian magnetoplasma convected past Titan during the Voyager 1 close encounter of November 12, 1980. The observation of a well-developed, induced bipolar magnetic tail is evidence, however, of a strong electrodynamic interaction. Three thin, current-carrying regions were crossed which correspond to the inbound and outbound tail magnetopause and an imbedded tail neutral sheet. The interaction is unique among those observed to date in the solar system, in that it is intermediate with respect to sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers by comparison with Titan in the solar wind and Io in the Jovian magnetosphere. The draping of the Saturnian magnetic field around the ionosphere of Titan is suggested by results of the analysis of magnetic field data.

  1. Drug-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Cock, Hannah R

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced status epilepticus (SE) is a relatively uncommon phenomenon, probably accounting for less than 5% of all SE cases, although limitations in case ascertainment and establishing causation substantially weaken epidemiological estimates. Some antiepileptic drugs, particularly those with sodium channel or GABA(γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic properties, frequently exacerbate seizures and may lead to SE if used inadvertently in generalized epilepsies or less frequently in other epilepsies. Tiagabine seems to have a particular propensity for triggering nonconvulsive SE sometimes in patients with no prior history of seizures. In therapeutic practice, SE is most commonly seen in association with antibiotics (cephalosporins, quinolones, and some others) and immunotherapies/chemotherapies, the latter often in the context of a reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Status epilepticus following accidental or intentional overdoses, particularly of antidepressants or other psychotropic medications, has also featured prominently in the literature: whilst there are sometimes fatal consequences, this is more commonly because of cardiorespiratory or metabolic complications than as a result of seizure activity. A high index of suspicion is required in identifying those at risk and in recognizing potential clues from the presentation, but even with a careful analysis of patient and drug factors, establishing causation can be difficult. In addition to eliminating the potential trigger, management should be as for SE in any other circumstances, with the exception that phenobarbitone is recommended as a second-line treatment for suspected toxicity-related SE where the risk of cardiovascular complications is higher anyways and may be exacerbated by phenytoin. There are also specific recommendations/antidotes in some situations. The outcome of drug-induced status epilepticus is mostly good when promptly identified and treated, though less so in the context of overdoses. This article is

  2. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Marzano, A V; Tavecchio, S; Menicanti, C; Crosti, C

    2014-06-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DI-LE) is defined as an entity characterized by clinical manifestations and immunopathological serum findings similar to those of idiopathic lupus but which is temporally related to drug exposure and resolves after withdrawal of the implicated drug. Similarly to idiopathic lupus, DI-LE can be divided into systemic LE, subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE), chronic cutaneous LE (CCLE) and cutaneous LE tumidus. DI-SCLE is the most frequent variant of drug-induced cutaneous LE and presents mainly with annular-polycyclic lesions; the clinical picture is often widespread, with involvement of the lower legs that are usually spared in idiopathic SCLE. ANA and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are typically present, whereas antihistone antibodies are uncommonly found. We have recently addressed the question whether DI-SCLE differs significantly from its idiopathic counterpart by virtue of clinical features and, based on our findings, we have suggested that the frequent occurrence of malar rash and bullous, erythema multiforme-like and vasculitic manifestations can be regarded as the hallmark of DI-SCLE. In contrast, the histology is not a useful diagnostic criterion for DI-SCLE, considering that the typical pattern of lichenoid interface dermatitis is seen only in the early stage of disease and tissue eosinophilia does not represent a differentiating histopathological feature. DI-CCLE and DI-LE tumidus, albeit possibly misdiagnosed, are rarely observed and are characterized by classic discoid lesions and erythematous-oedematous plaques on sun exposed areas, respectively. Management of DI-LE is based on the discontinuation of the offending drug; topical and/or systemic corticosteroids and other immunomodulating/immunosuppressive agents should be reserved for resistant cases.

  3. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    PubMed

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  4. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible. PMID:27012985

  5. Dietary Induced Atherogenesis in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Gerrity, Ross G.; Naito, Herbert K.; Richardson, Mary; Schwartz, Colin J.

    1979-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia was induced in pigs by feeding a chow diet supplemented with 1.5% cholesterol and 19.5% lard for periods up to 12 weeks. The aortic intima from areas of spontaneously differing permeability to proteins, as demarcated by their uptake of Evans blue dye, was examined using light microscopy and both scanning and transmission electron microscopy to describe the earliest detectable changes in intimal morphology induced by the diet. After 2, 4, and 6 weeks of feeding, cholesterol/lardfed pigs demonstrated monocyte adherence to the endothelium in areas of enhanced permeability (blue areas) in 86% of samples examined, as compared to 52% in areas of lesser permeability (white areas) and 17% in control animals. Similarly, the number of monocytes in the intima was higher in blue areas than in adjacent white areas or blue areas from control animals. After 12 weeks of feeding, all blue areas showed intimal monocytes, with fewer seen in white areas. Aortic endothelial cells in hypercholesterolemic pigs were normal in ultrastructural appearance, except they contained more lysosomes and cytoplasmic filaments than those from control animals. No lesions were observed at 2, 4, and 6 weeks, although plasma cholesterol levels were substantially elevated (200-400 mg/dl) at these times. A marked hyper-β-lipoproteinemia was evident from 4 weeks onward, but no elevation of serum triglycerides was evident at any stage. Plasma phospholipid concentrations increased but not in direct proportion to cholesterol levels. At 12 weeks, foam cell lesions were observed in areas of enhanced permeability but not in adjacent areas of normal permeability. Lesion foam cells appeared to be derived from the monocytes which adhered to and penetrated the endothelium at earlier stages, since no intimal involvement, or lipid engorgement, by medial smooth muscle cells was observed. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 1Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure

  6. [Induced abortion in China: problems and interventions].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shang-chun; Qiu, Hong-yan

    2010-10-01

    Pooled literatures showed that the induced abortion in China faces many problems:the number of induced abortion remains large; most cases are young and nulliparity women; the frequency of abortion is high; and the interval between one and another abortion is short. Health promotion strategies should be applied to address these problems. It is important to increase the population's awareness of contraception,especially among nulliparity and migrant populations. Routine and effective contraceptive methods should be recommended and emphasized during induced abortion and delivery to lower the rate of induced abortion.

  7. An evaluation of a hubless inducer and a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindley, B. K.; Martinson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the performance of several configurations of hubless inducers with a hydrodynamically similar conventional inducer and to demonstrate the performance of a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump using these inducers. A boost pump of this type consists of an inducer connected to a hydraulic turbine with a high speed rotor located in between. All the flow passes through the inducer, rotor, and hydraulic turbine, then into the main pump. The rotor, which is attached to the main pump shaft, provides the input power to drive the hydraulic turbine which, in turn, drives the inducer. The inducer, rotating at a lower speed, develops the necessary head to prevent rotor cavitation. The rotor speed is consistent with present main engine liquid hydrogen pump designs and the overall boost pump head rise is sufficient to provide adequate main pump suction head. This system would have the potential for operating at lower liquid hydrogen tank pressures.

  8. Subduction initiation: spontaneous and induced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Robert J.

    2004-10-01

    The sinking of lithosphere at subduction zones couples Earth's exterior with its interior, spawns continental crust and powers a tectonic regime that is unique to our planet. In spite of its importance, it is unclear how subduction is initiated. Two general mechanisms are recognized: induced and spontaneous nucleation of subduction zones. Induced nucleation (INSZ) responds to continuing plate convergence following jamming of a subduction zone by buoyant crust. This results in regional compression, uplift and underthrusting that may yield a new subduction zone. Two subclasses of INSZ, transference and polarity reversal, are distinguished. Transference INSZ moves the new subduction zone outboard of the failed one. The Mussau Trench and the continuing development of a plate boundary SW of India in response to Indo-Asian collision are the best Cenozoic examples of transference INSZ processes. Polarity reversal INSZ also follows collision, but continued convergence in this case results in a new subduction zone forming behind the magmatic arc; the response of the Solomon convergent margin following collision with the Ontong Java Plateau is the best example of this mode. Spontaneous nucleation (SNSZ) results from gravitational instability of oceanic lithosphere and is required to begin the modern regime of plate tectonics. Lithospheric collapse initiates SNSZ, either at a passive margin or at a transform/fracture zone, in a fashion similar to lithospheric delamination. The theory of hypothesis predicts that seafloor spreading will occur in the location that becomes the forearc, as asthenosphere wells up to replace sunken lithosphere, and that seafloor spreading predates plate convergence. This is the origin of most boninites and ophiolites. Passive margin collapse is a corollary of the Wilson cycle but no Cenozoic examples are known; furthermore, the expected strength of the lithosphere makes this mode unlikely. Transform collapse SNSZ appears to have engendered new

  9. Subduction initiation: spontaneous and induced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-10-01

    The sinking of lithosphere at subduction zones couples Earth's exterior with its interior, spawns continental crust and powers a tectonic regime that is unique to our planet. In spite of its importance, it is unclear how subduction is initiated. Two general mechanisms are recognized: induced and spontaneous nucleation of subduction zones. Induced nucleation (INSZ) responds to continuing plate convergence following jamming of a subduction zone by buoyant crust. This results in regional compression, uplift and underthrusting that may yield a new subduction zone. Two subclasses of INSZ, transference and polarity reversal, are distinguished. Transference INSZ moves the new subduction zone outboard of the failed one. The Mussau Trench and the continuing development of a plate boundary SW of India in response to Indo Asian collision are the best Cenozoic examples of transference INSZ processes. Polarity reversal INSZ also follows collision, but continued convergence in this case results in a new subduction zone forming behind the magmatic arc; the response of the Solomon convergent margin following collision with the Ontong Java Plateau is the best example of this mode. Spontaneous nucleation (SNSZ) results from gravitational instability of oceanic lithosphere and is required to begin the modern regime of plate tectonics. Lithospheric collapse initiates SNSZ, either at a passive margin or at a transform/fracture zone, in a fashion similar to lithospheric delamination. The theory of hypothesis predicts that seafloor spreading will occur in the location that becomes the forearc, as asthenosphere wells up to replace sunken lithosphere, and that seafloor spreading predates plate convergence. This is the origin of most boninites and ophiolites. Passive margin collapse is a corollary of the Wilson cycle but no Cenozoic examples are known; furthermore, the expected strength of the lithosphere makes this mode unlikely. Transform collapse SNSZ appears to have engendered new

  10. Hydralazine-induced cholestatic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ahad; Hammad, Raza; Cucco, Robert; Niranjan, Selva

    2009-01-01

    Hydralazine has been widely used for treating hypertension, particularly in patients with renal failure. We report a case on a patient in whom we believe the drug was implicated in an otherwise unexplained disturbance of liver function. A 63-year-old African-American female with medical history of hypertension and end-stage renal disease (on hemodialysis) was admitted to the hospital with epigastric pain and jaundice. The symptoms started about 1 week ago. Initial laboratory tests showed abnormal liver enzymes with elevated conjugated bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase suggestive of cholestatic jaundice. Amylase and lipase were normal. Abdominal ultrasound showed normal caliber common bile duct without evidence of obstruction. Abdominal CT scan does not show any evidence of intra- or extrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation, and no mass lesions were seen in the pancreas. Further blood chemistry showed worsening of liver enzymes and increased bilirubin over the next 2-3 days. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography failed to show any evidence of intra- or extrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation. No other laboratory evidence of cholestatic jaundice was found. Before proceeding for invasive diagnostic procedure, that is, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, the patient's drug history was reviewed. She was on hydralazine 75 mg 3 times per day, started 5 months ago. At that time, her liver function tests were normal. As we could not find any other cause of cholestatic jaundice, we attributed this as a side effect of hydralazine. A trial was given by stopping the hydralazine. It was seen that there was significant improvement in the liver function enzymes over the next week. Complete clinical and biochemical recovery occurred over the next 4 weeks. Liver injury after long-term therapy with hydralazine and after short-term therapy with hydralazine (2-10 days) has been described. Hydralazine-induced hepatotoxicity may manifest as hypersensitivity-type injury

  11. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  12. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure.

  13. Inflammation-inducing Factors of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which causes mycoplasmal pneumonia in human, mainly causes pneumonia in children, although it occasionally causes disease in infants and geriatrics. Some pathogenic factors produced by M. pneumoniae, such as hydrogen peroxide and Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin have been well studied. However, these factors alone cannot explain this predilection. The low incidence rate of mycoplasmal pneumonia in infants and geriatrics implies that the strong inflammatory responses induced by M. pneumoniae coordinate with the pathogenic factors to induce pneumonia. However, M. pneumoniae lacks a cell wall and does not possess an inflammation-inducing endotoxin, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In M. pneumoniae, lipoproteins were identified as an inflammation-inducing factor. Lipoproteins induce inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2. Because Mycoplasma species lack a cell wall and lipoproteins anchored in the membrane are exposed, lipoproteins and TLR2 have been thought to be important for the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae. However, recent reports suggest that M. pneumoniae also induces inflammatory responses also in a TLR2-independent manner. TLR4 and autophagy are involved in this TLR2-independent inflammation. In addition, the CARDS toxin or M. pneumoniae cytadherence induces inflammatory responses through an intracellular receptor protein complex called the inflammasome. In this review, the inflammation-inducing factors of M. pneumoniae are summarized. PMID:27065977

  14. Innovation Inducement Prizes: Connecting Research to Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besharov, Douglas J.; Williams, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Innovation inducement prizes have been used for centuries. In the United States, a recent federal policy change--the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010--clarified and simplified a path by which all federal agencies can offer innovation inducement prizes, thus intensifying interest in how government agencies can most effectively design…

  15. Religion as Schedule-Induced Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I argue that a class of religious behaviors exists that is induced, for prepared organisms, by specific stimuli that are experienced according to a response-independent schedule. Like other schedule-induced behaviors, the members of this class serve as minimal units out of which functional behavior may arise. In this way, there…

  16. Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss The importance of hearing Hearing allows you to ... surround the soft tissue of the inner ear. Hearing loss occurs when the inner ear is damaged. What ...

  17. Morphactin-induced parthenocarpy in the cucumber.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R W; Cantliffe, D J; Shannon, S

    1971-03-26

    Parthenocarpy was induced in cucumber Cucumis sativus L. by foliar application of morphactin. Morphactin (chlorfluorenol) was most effective in inducing parthenocarpy when applied in the flowering stage, and the response was enhanced by prior treatment with Ethrel (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid). Morphactin stimulated pistillate flower development in a monoecious cultivar but did not modify sex expression of a gynoecious line. PMID:17742578

  18. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidman, Michael D.

    1999-01-01

    This article provides an overview of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), the leading cause of occupationally induced hearing loss in industrialized countries. It discusses causes of NIHL and compelling evidence that reactive oxygen metabolites and cochlear hypoprefusion are responsible for the destruction of cochlear hair cells. Prevention is also…

  19. SEU induced errors observed in microprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Asenek, V.; Underwood, C.; Oldfield, M.; Velazco, R.; Rezgui, S.; Cheynet, P.; Ecoffet, R.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, the authors present software tools for predicting the rate and nature of observable SEU induced errors in microprocessor systems. These tools are built around a commercial microprocessor simulator and are used to analyze real satellite application systems. Results obtained from simulating the nature of SEU induced errors are shown to correlate with ground-based radiation test data.

  20. Mechanisms of chemical-induced porphyrinopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Silbergeld, E.K. Fowler, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 45 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic Regulation of the Heme Pathway; Porphyrins in Urine as an Indication of Exposure to Chlorinated Hydrocarbons; Mechanisms of PCB-induced Porphyria and Yusho Disease; and Lead-Induced Abnormalities of Porphyrin Metabolism: The Relationship with Iron Deficiency.