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Sample records for induces multipolar mitoses

  1. Chromosome nondisjunction during bipolar mitoses of binucleated intermediates promote aneuploidy formation along with multipolar mitoses rather than chromosome loss in micronuclei induced by asbestos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianwei; Lv, Lei; Huang, Yun; Ren, Xiaohui; Shi, Qinghua

    2017-02-14

    Asbestos is a well-known occupational carcinogen that can cause aneuploidy during the early stages of neoplastic development. To explore the origins of asbestos-induced aneuploidy, we performed long-term live-cell imaging followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization of chromosomes 8 and 12 in human bronchial epithelial (HBEC) and mesothelial (MeT5A) cells. We demonstrate that asbestos induces aneuploidy via binucleated intermediates resulting from cytokinesis failure. On the one hand, asbestos increases chromosome nondisjunction during bipolar divisions of binucleated intermediates and produces near-tetraploidy. On the other hand, asbestos increases multipolar divisions of binucleated intermediates to produce aneuploidy. Surprisingly, chromosomes in asbestos-induced micronucleated cells are not truly lost by the cells, and do not contribute to aneuploid cell formation in either cell type. These results clarify the cellular source of asbestos-induced aneuploidy. In particular, they show the asbestos-induced disruption of bipolar chromosomal segregation in tetraploid cells, thereby demonstrating the causality between binucleated intermediates and aneuploidy evolution, rather than chromosome loss in micronuclei.

  2. The resveratrol analogue trimethoxystilbene inhibits cancer cell growth by inducing multipolar cell mitosis.

    PubMed

    Traversi, Gianandrea; Fiore, Mario; Percario, Zulema; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2017-03-01

    Natural compounds are extensively studied for their potential use in traditional and non-traditional medicine. Several natural and synthetic Resveratrol analogues have shown interesting biological activities in the field of cancer chemoprevention. In the present study, we have focused on the ability of Resveratrol and two methoxylated derivatives (Trimethoxystilbene and Pterostilbene) to inhibit human cancer cell growth particularly analyzing their ability to interfere with tubulin dynamics at mitosis. We show that Trimethoxystilbene, differently from Resveratrol and Pterostilbene, alters microtubule polymerization dynamics in HeLa cells specifically inducing multipolar spindles and mitotic arrest coupled to a reduction of cell growth and an increase in apoptotic death by mitotic catastrophe. This work demonstrates that the structural modification of Rsv causes substantial changes in the mechanism of action of the derivatives. The presence of three extra methyl groups renders Trimethoxy very efficient in impairing cell proliferation by inducing mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Fate of Chrysotile-Induced Multipolar Mitosis and Aneuploid Population in Cultured Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Cortez, Beatriz; Quassollo, Gonzalo; Caceres, Alfredo; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Chrysotile is one of the six types of asbestos, and it is the only one that can still be commercialized in many countries. Exposure to other types of asbestos has been associated with serious diseases, such as lung carcinomas and pleural mesotheliomas. The association of chrysotile exposure with disease is controversial. However, in vitro studies show the mutagenic potential of chrysotile, which can induce DNA and cell damage. The present work aimed to analyze alterations in lung small cell carcinoma cultures after 48 h of chrysotile exposure, followed by 2, 4 and 8 days of recovery in fiber-free culture medium. Some alterations, such as aneuploid cell formation, increased number of cells in G2/M phase and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed even after 8 days of recovery. The presence of chrysotile fibers in the cell cultures was detected and cell morphology was observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. After 4 and 8 days of recovery, only a few chrysotile fragments were present in some cells, and the cellular morphology was similar to that of control cells. Cells transfected with the GFP-tagged α-tubulin plasmid were treated with chrysotile for 24 or 48 h and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed by time-lapse microscopy. Fates of these cells were established: retention in metaphase, cell death, progression through M phase generating more than two daughter cells or cell fusion during telophase or cytokinesis. Some of them were related to the formation of aneuploid cells and cells with abnormal number of centrosomes. PMID:21483691

  4. Multipolar mitosis of tetraploid cells: inhibition by p53 and dependency on Mos.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Ilio; Senovilla, Laura; Jemaà, Mohamed; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Nanty, Lisa; Criollo, Alfredo; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Manic, Gwenola; Métivier, Didier; Vivet, Sonia; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Joza, Nicholas; Valent, Alexander; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-04-07

    Tetraploidy can constitute a metastable intermediate between normal diploidy and oncogenic aneuploidy. Here, we show that the absence of p53 is not only permissive for the survival but also for multipolar asymmetric divisions of tetraploid cells, which lead to the generation of aneuploid cells with a near-to-diploid chromosome content. Multipolar mitoses (which reduce the tetraploid genome to a sub-tetraploid state) are more frequent when p53 is downregulated and the product of the Mos oncogene is upregulated. Mos inhibits the coalescence of supernumerary centrosomes that allow for normal bipolar mitoses of tetraploid cells. In the absence of p53, Mos knockdown prevents multipolar mitoses and exerts genome-stabilizing effects. These results elucidate the mechanisms through which asymmetric cell division drives chromosomal instability in tetraploid cells.

  5. Multipolar mitosis of tetraploid cells: inhibition by p53 and dependency on Mos

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Ilio; Senovilla, Laura; Jemaà, Mohamed; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Nanty, Lisa; Criollo, Alfredo; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Manic, Gwenola; Métivier, Didier; Vivet, Sonia; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Joza, Nicholas; Valent, Alexander; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Tetraploidy can constitute a metastable intermediate between normal diploidy and oncogenic aneuploidy. Here, we show that the absence of p53 is not only permissive for the survival but also for multipolar asymmetric divisions of tetraploid cells, which lead to the generation of aneuploid cells with a near-to-diploid chromosome content. Multipolar mitoses (which reduce the tetraploid genome to a sub-tetraploid state) are more frequent when p53 is downregulated and the product of the Mos oncogene is upregulated. Mos inhibits the coalescence of supernumerary centrosomes that allow for normal bipolar mitoses of tetraploid cells. In the absence of p53, Mos knockdown prevents multipolar mitoses and exerts genome-stabilizing effects. These results elucidate the mechanisms through which asymmetric cell division drives chromosomal instability in tetraploid cells. PMID:20186124

  6. Multipolar electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Salvatore; Hughes, Timothy J; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-06-14

    Atomistic simulation of chemical systems is currently limited by the elementary description of electrostatics that atomic point-charges offer. Unfortunately, a model of one point-charge for each atom fails to capture the anisotropic nature of electronic features such as lone pairs or π-systems. Higher order electrostatic terms, such as those offered by a multipole moment expansion, naturally recover these important electronic features. The question remains as to why such a description has not yet been widely adopted by popular molecular mechanics force fields. There are two widely-held misconceptions about the more rigorous formalism of multipolar electrostatics: (1) Accuracy: the implementation of multipole moments, compared to point-charges, offers little to no advantage in terms of an accurate representation of a system's energetics, structure and dynamics. (2) Efficiency: atomistic simulation using multipole moments is computationally prohibitive compared to simulation using point-charges. Whilst the second of these may have found some basis when computational power was a limiting factor, the first has no theoretical grounding. In the current work, we disprove the two statements above and systematically demonstrate that multipole moments are not discredited by either. We hope that this perspective will help in catalysing the transition to more realistic electrostatic modelling, to be adopted by popular molecular simulation software.

  7. v-Src-induced nuclear localization of YAP is involved in multipolar spindle formation in tetraploid cells.

    PubMed

    Kakae, Keiko; Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Kuga, Takahisa; Saito, Youhei; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Nakayama, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine kinase, c-Src, is involved in a variety of signaling events, including cell division. We have reported that v-Src, which is a mutant variant of the cellular proto-oncogene, c-Src, causes delocalization of Aurora B kinase, resulting in a furrow regression in cytokinesis and the generation of multinucleated cells. However, the effect of v-Src on mitotic spindle formation is unknown. Here we show that v-Src-expressing HCT116 and NIH3T3 cells undergo abnormal cell division, in which cells separate into more than two cells. Upon v-Src expression, the proportion of multinucleated cells is increased in a time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that v-Src increases the number of cells having a ≥4N DNA content. Microscopic analysis showed that v-Src induces the formation of multipolar spindles with excess centrosomes. These results suggest that v-Src induces multipolar spindle formation by generating multinucleated cells. Tetraploidy activates the tetraploidy checkpoint, leading to a cell cycle arrest of tetraploid cells at the G1 phase, in which the nuclear exclusion of the transcription co-activator YAP plays a critical role. In multinucleated cells that are induced by cytochalasin B and the Plk1 inhibitor, YAP is excluded from the nucleus. However, v-Src prevents this nuclear exclusion of YAP through a decrease in the phosphorylation of YAP at Ser127 in multinucleated cells. Furthermore, v-Src decreases the expression level of p53, which also plays a critical role in the cell cycle arrest of tetraploid cells. These results suggest that v-Src promotes abnormal spindle formation in at least two ways: generation of multinucleated cells and a weakening of the tetraploidy checkpoint.

  8. Multipolar optically induced electric and magnetic resonances in the ellipsoidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reena; Devi, Inder; Kalra, Yogita; Sinha, R. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, electric and magnetic resonances induced in the ellipsoidal dielectric nanoparticles in the optical range have been analyzed. Circular displacement currents excited inside the elliptical nano-particles by the incident light result in magnetic dipolar resonance in the dielectric nanoparticles. Kerker's type scattering is observed due to the mutual interference of electric and magnetic resonances. The effect on the resonance conditions with the variation in the relative permittivity from Er= 5 to Er= 20 of the ellipsoidal nanoparticle has been observed. It has been analyzed that peaks of electric and magnetic resonances come closer by decreasing the electric permittivity of the nanoparticle, which leads to the increase in the directionality in the forward direction, as verified using Generalized Kerker's condition. Further, far field scattering patterns have been obtained using the finite element method. Here, the electric and magnetic resonances have been optically induced up to quadrupolar modes. There is enhancement of the directionality in the forward direction when electric and magnetic resonances are in phase. Further, the effect of size of the linear array of ellipsoidal nanoparticles on the directionality has been analyzed. It has been observed that there is increase in the directivity by increasing the chain of the nanoparticles. Thus, the ellipsoidal nanoparticles can lead to the design of low loss and highly directional optical nanoantennas.

  9. Ultraweak emission imagery of mitosing soybeans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. Q.; Usa, M.; Inaba, H.

    1989-02-01

    In the single-photon counting mode, we have obtained images of germinating soybeans and other plant tissues using only the ultraweak light emitted by the specimen. The emission described here is to be distinguished from bioluminescence and is not induced by previous exposure to light, chemical agents or other means, but is a naturally occurring emission associated with normal biochemical processes. The images of germinating soybeans show that emission is strongest in areas of active mitosis, demonstrating that the technique of singlephoton counting imaging can provide useful morphological information.

  10. Expression of the novel maternal centrosome assembly factor Wdr8 is required for vertebrate embryonic mitoses

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daigo; Stemmer, Manuel; Thumberger, Thomas; Ruppert, Thomas; Bärenz, Felix; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Gruss, Oliver J.

    2017-01-01

    The assembly of the first centrosome occurs upon fertilisation when male centrioles recruit pericentriolar material (PCM) from the egg cytoplasm. The mechanisms underlying the proper assembly of centrosomes during early embryogenesis remain obscure. We identify Wdr8 as a novel maternally essential protein that is required for centrosome assembly during embryonic mitoses of medaka (Oryzias latipes). By CRISPR–Cas9-mediated knockout, maternal/zygotic Wdr8-null (m/zWdr8−/−) blastomeres exhibit severe defects in centrosome structure that lead to asymmetric division, multipolar mitotic spindles and chromosome alignment errors. Via its WD40 domains, Wdr8 interacts with the centriolar satellite protein SSX2IP. Combining targeted gene knockout and in vivo reconstitution of the maternally essential Wdr8–SSX2IP complex reveals an essential link between maternal centrosome proteins and the stability of the zygotic genome for accurate vertebrate embryogenesis. Our approach provides a way of distinguishing maternal from paternal effects in early embryos and should contribute to understanding molecular defects in human infertility. PMID:28098238

  11. Multipolar ECR plasma characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ciubotariu, C.I.; Golovanivsky, K.S.; Bacal, M.

    1995-12-31

    There has been considerable interest in the development of intense negative ion sources for use in high-energy neutral beam heating and diagnostics systems for nuclear fusion plasmas. As it was shown by one of the authors overdense ECR plasmas seem to be an appropriate medium to produce H-ions at high rate. Overdense plasmas are a result of the microwave({mu}wave) power absorption in ECR plasma heating and magnetic field confinement. Our aim is to characterize the hydrogen plasma produced in a 2.45 GHz multipolar negative ion ECR source (ECRIN).

  12. Zygotic expression of the pebble locus is required for cytokinesis during the postblastoderm mitoses of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hime, G; Saint, R

    1992-01-01

    Mutations at the pebble locus of Drosophila melanogaster result in embryonic lethality. Examination of homozygous mutant embryos at the end of embryogenesis revealed the presence of fewer and larger cells which contained enlarged nuclei. Characterization of the embryonic cell cycles using DAPI, propidium iodide, anti-tubulin and anti-spectrin staining showed that the first thirteen rapid syncytial nuclear divisions proceeded normally in pebble mutant embryos. Following cellularization, the postblastoderm nuclear divisions occurred (mitoses 14, 15 and 16), but cytokinesis was never observed. Multinucleate cells and duplicate mitotic figures were seen within single cells at the time of the cycle 15 mitoses. We conclude that zygotic expression of the pebble gene is required for cytokinesis following cellularization during Drosophila embryogenesis. We postulate that developmental regulation of zygotic transcription of the pebble gene is a consequence of the transition from syncytial to cellular mitoses during cycle 14 of embryogenesis.

  13. Multipolar interference effects in nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2017-03-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an arbitrary nanoscale object can be characterized by a multipole decomposition of the electromagnetic field that allows one to describe the scattering intensity and radiation pattern through interferences of dominating multipole modes excited. In modern nanophotonics, both generation and interference of multipole modes start to play an indispensable role, and they enable nanoscale manipulation of light with many related applications. Here, we review the multipolar interference effects in metallic, metal-dielectric and dielectric nanostructures, and suggest a comprehensive view on many phenomena involving the interferences of electric, magnetic and toroidal multipoles, which drive a number of recently discussed effects in nanophotonics such as unidirectional scattering, effective optical antiferromagnetism, generalized Kerker scattering with controlled angular patterns, generalized Brewster angle, and non-radiating optical anapoles. We further discuss other types of possible multipolar interference effects not yet exploited in the literature and envisage the prospect of achieving more flexible and advanced nanoscale control of light relying on the concepts of multipolar interference through full phase and amplitude engineering. This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  14. Multipolar interference effects in nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2017-03-28

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an arbitrary nanoscale object can be characterized by a multipole decomposition of the electromagnetic field that allows one to describe the scattering intensity and radiation pattern through interferences of dominating multipole modes excited. In modern nanophotonics, both generation and interference of multipole modes start to play an indispensable role, and they enable nanoscale manipulation of light with many related applications. Here, we review the multipolar interference effects in metallic, metal-dielectric and dielectric nanostructures, and suggest a comprehensive view on many phenomena involving the interferences of electric, magnetic and toroidal multipoles, which drive a number of recently discussed effects in nanophotonics such as unidirectional scattering, effective optical antiferromagnetism, generalized Kerker scattering with controlled angular patterns, generalized Brewster angle, and non-radiating optical anapoles. We further discuss other types of possible multipolar interference effects not yet exploited in the literature and envisage the prospect of achieving more flexible and advanced nanoscale control of light relying on the concepts of multipolar interference through full phase and amplitude engineering.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  15. Libration-driven multipolar instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cébron, D.; Vantieghem, S.; Herreman, W.

    2014-01-01

    We consider rotating flows in non-axisymmetric enclosures that are driven by libration, i.e. by a small periodic modulation of the rotation rate. Thanks to its simplicity, this model is relevant to various contexts, from industrial containers (with small oscillations of the rotation rate) to fluid layers of terrestial planets (with length-of-day variations). Assuming a multipolar $n$-fold boundary deformation, we first obtain the two-dimensional basic flow. We then perform a short-wavelength local stability analysis of the basic flow, showing that an instability may occur in three dimensions. We christen it the Libration Driven Multipolar Instability (LDMI). The growth rates of the LDMI are computed by a Floquet analysis in a systematic way, and compared to analytical expressions obtained by perturbation methods. We then focus on the simplest geometry allowing the LDMI, a librating deformed cylinder. To take into account viscous and confinement effects, we perform a global stability analysis, which shows that the LDMI results from a parametric resonance of inertial modes. Performing numerical simulations of this librating cylinder, we confirm that the basic flow is indeed established and report the first numerical evidence of the LDMI. Numerical results, in excellent agreement with the stability results, are used to explore the non-linear regime of the instability (amplitude and viscous dissipation of the driven flow). We finally provide an example of LDMI in a deformed spherical container to show that the instability mechanism is generic. Our results show that the previously studied libration driven elliptical instability simply corresponds to the particular case $n=2$ of a wider class of instabilities. Summarizing, this work shows that any oscillating non-axisymmetric container in rotation may excite intermittent, space-filling LDMI flows, and this instability should thus be easy to observe experimentally.

  16. Nonrandom frequency distribution of mitoses in rat lobuloaveolar mammary gland epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, D. M.; Stowers, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative microscopic technique was employed to examine the distribution of mitotic activity in the rat mammary gland. The frequency distribution of mitoses per unit volume of lobuloalveolar mammary gland epithelium in virgin Lewis/Mai rats at each phase of the estrous cycle were determined and compared to the expected Poisson frequency distributions, assuming random mitotic activity. Both pooled data and data from individual rats were compared to expected Poisson distributions. At each phase of the estrous cycle, the pooled observed distributions deviated significantly from Poisson distributions. Sixty-seven percent (72/108) of the observed frequency distributions obtained from individual rats also deviated significantly from expected Poisson distributions. These data indicate a nonrandom distribution of mitoses in rat lobuloalveolar mammary gland epithelium. This observation suggests that local cell products and/or a variation in the extent of replicative synchrony of lobuloalveolar cell populations may determine in part the pattern of mitotic activity in this tissue. A nonrandom distribution of mitoses in mammary epithelium may have significance in relation to the genesis of hyperplastic and neoplastic lesions of the mammary gland. PMID:560125

  17. Expression of mitoses per thousand cells and cell density in breast carcinomas: a proposal.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J F; Dutt, P L; Page, D L

    1992-06-01

    A method of standardizing mitotic counts is described. This provisional approach, which expresses mitoses as a percentage of breast cancer cells present, holds the promise of facilitating interlaboratory agreement as well as providing a measure of tumor cellularity, probably an independent prognostic indicator in its own right. We suggest that this approach or one similar to it will maximize the evaluation and quantitation of proliferative activity from routinely available histologic material. Furthermore, the method is accomplished with little added effort beyond the customary histologic evaluation.

  18. Designing Multipolar Resonances in Dielectric Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Butakov, Nikita A; Schuller, Jon A

    2016-12-08

    Dielectric resonators form the building blocks of nano-scale optical antennas and metamaterials. Due to their multipolar resonant response and low intrinsic losses they offer design flexibility and high-efficiency performance. These resonators are typically described in terms of a spherical harmonic decomposition with Mie theory. In experimental realizations however, a departure from spherical symmetry and the use of high-index substrates leads to new features appearing in the multipolar response. To clarify this behavior, we present a systematic experimental and numerical characterization of Silicon disk resonators. We demonstrate that for disk resonators on low-index quartz substrates, the electric and magnetic dipole modes are easily identifiable across a wide range of aspect-ratios, but that higher order peaks cannot be unambiguously associated with any specific multipolar mode. On high-index Silicon substrates, even the fundamental dipole modes do not have a clear association. When arranged into arrays, resonances are shifted and pronounced preferential forward and backward scattering conditions appear, which are not as apparent in individual resonators and may be associated with interference between multipolar modes. These findings present new opportunities for engineering the multipolar scattering response of dielectric optical antennas and metamaterials, and provide a strategy for designing nano-optical components with unique functionalities.

  19. Designing Multipolar Resonances in Dielectric Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Butakov, Nikita A.; Schuller, Jon A.

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric resonators form the building blocks of nano-scale optical antennas and metamaterials. Due to their multipolar resonant response and low intrinsic losses they offer design flexibility and high-efficiency performance. These resonators are typically described in terms of a spherical harmonic decomposition with Mie theory. In experimental realizations however, a departure from spherical symmetry and the use of high-index substrates leads to new features appearing in the multipolar response. To clarify this behavior, we present a systematic experimental and numerical characterization of Silicon disk resonators. We demonstrate that for disk resonators on low-index quartz substrates, the electric and magnetic dipole modes are easily identifiable across a wide range of aspect-ratios, but that higher order peaks cannot be unambiguously associated with any specific multipolar mode. On high-index Silicon substrates, even the fundamental dipole modes do not have a clear association. When arranged into arrays, resonances are shifted and pronounced preferential forward and backward scattering conditions appear, which are not as apparent in individual resonators and may be associated with interference between multipolar modes. These findings present new opportunities for engineering the multipolar scattering response of dielectric optical antennas and metamaterials, and provide a strategy for designing nano-optical components with unique functionalities. PMID:27929038

  20. Designing Multipolar Resonances in Dielectric Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butakov, Nikita A.; Schuller, Jon A.

    2016-12-01

    Dielectric resonators form the building blocks of nano-scale optical antennas and metamaterials. Due to their multipolar resonant response and low intrinsic losses they offer design flexibility and high-efficiency performance. These resonators are typically described in terms of a spherical harmonic decomposition with Mie theory. In experimental realizations however, a departure from spherical symmetry and the use of high-index substrates leads to new features appearing in the multipolar response. To clarify this behavior, we present a systematic experimental and numerical characterization of Silicon disk resonators. We demonstrate that for disk resonators on low-index quartz substrates, the electric and magnetic dipole modes are easily identifiable across a wide range of aspect-ratios, but that higher order peaks cannot be unambiguously associated with any specific multipolar mode. On high-index Silicon substrates, even the fundamental dipole modes do not have a clear association. When arranged into arrays, resonances are shifted and pronounced preferential forward and backward scattering conditions appear, which are not as apparent in individual resonators and may be associated with interference between multipolar modes. These findings present new opportunities for engineering the multipolar scattering response of dielectric optical antennas and metamaterials, and provide a strategy for designing nano-optical components with unique functionalities.

  1. Cytological characteristics and classification of spindle inhibitors according to their effects on segmentation mitoses.

    PubMed

    Sentein, P; Ates, Y

    1978-01-01

    The effects of spindle inhibitors and of protein synthesis inhibitors on segmentation mitoses allow us to classify them into six groups : 1. Colchicine type : destruction of the whole achromatic apparatus and centrospheres without storing of dense bodies; 2. Quinoline type : same effect on the achromatic apparatus, but blocked centrospheres with accumulation of dense bodies; 3. Chloralhydrate type : Incomplete destruction of achromatic apparatus, spindle residue which maintains the chromosomes in a star shape, inactive centrospheres sequestered by the reticulum, but without accumulation of dense bodies; 4. Phenylurethane type : Incomplete and reversible action, which leads to easy production of pluripolar mitoses; 5. Carboxylic acid type : dissociation of the spindle, sometimes with blocking of the centrosphere, together with profound chromosome changes without primitive breaks; the intensity and quality of their action is related to the number of carbon atoms in the acid considered; 6. Protein synthesis inhibitor type : (cycloheximide, pederin) characterized by a stop of the nuclear cycle at telo-prophase when the action is sufficient, chromosome abnormalities, sometimes, reduced to strings of beads, and freeing of asters; at weaker concentrations mitosis is possible, but the congression of chromosomes at the equator is abnormal because of functional disturbance of the kinetochores. The nature and grading of these effects, their association (or non - association) to chromosome damage, the soundness of the spindle when only the chromosomes are affected (nitrogen mustard) make this one of the tests which gives the most specific data about the action of antimitotic substances.

  2. Outcome after conization for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III: relation with surgical margins, extension to the crypts and mitoses.

    PubMed

    Maluf, Paulo José; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2004-01-01

    Factors linked to residual neoplasia and recurrence following conization of the uterine cervix for treating cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III (CIN III), such as the surgical margins, extension of CIN into the crypts and the number of mitoses, have been studied with contradictory results. We evaluated patients submitted to conization for CIN III and analyzed the aforementioned factors, relating them to recurrence and residual neoplasia in hysterectomy specimens. The surgical specimen of cold-knife conization for CIN III performed in 63 patients (average age, 37.3 +/- 9.3 years) was fixed in 4% formaldehyde. The ectocervical and endocervical margins were removed and the cone was cut into fragments perpendicular to the surface of the endocervical mucosa (1 mm thick). One histological section (5 microm thick) was cut from each block and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. We studied the total number of fragments from each cone and affected by CIN, endocervical and ectocervical margins, extension to the crypts, number of mitoses and tripolar mitoses in 100 microscope fields using a 100x objective. The endocervical margin was involved in 34.9% vs 9.5% (P = 0.001) of ectocervical margins. Recurrence affected 53.8% of cases presenting involved margins versus 12.9% in the cases without involved margins (P = 0.0078). The average interval to recurrence was 3.2 years. CIN was present in 2.5 to 100% (median, 28%) of the cone fragments (median no., 28; range, 7-95). A median of 44.4% and 25% of cone fragments presented CIN with and without recurrence, respectively. Correlation of the number of mitoses with tripolar mitoses and the percentage of fragments involved by CIN with the number of mitoses and tripolar mitoses showed, respectively, P = 0.02, 0.05 and 0.005. A median of 142 mitosis and 4 tripolar mitosis were observed per case with disease recurrence versus 104 and 3 (P = 0.02, 0.6), respectively, when recurrence did not occur. Of 14 patients who underwent

  3. Both Cyclin B levels and DNA-replication checkpoint control the early embryonic mitoses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jun-Yuan; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Schubiger, Gerold

    2013-01-01

    Summary The earliest embryonic mitoses in Drosophila, as in other animals except mammals, are viewed as synchronous and of equal duration. However, we observed that total cell-cycle length steadily increases after cycle 7, solely owing to the extension of interphase. Between cycle 7 and cycle 10, this extension is DNA-replication checkpoint independent, but correlates with the onset of Cyclin B oscillation. In addition, nuclei in the middle of embryos have longer metaphase and shorter anaphase than nuclei at the two polar regions. Interestingly, sister chromatids move faster in anaphase in the middle than the posterior region. These regional differences correlate with local differences in Cyclin B concentration. After cycle 10, interphase and total cycle duration of nuclei in the middle of the embryo are longer than at the poles. Because interphase also extends in checkpoint mutant (grapes) embryo after cycle 10, although less dramatic than wild-type embryos, interphase extension after cycle 10 is probably controlled by both Cyclin B limitation and the DNA-replication checkpoint. PMID:14681192

  4. p53 Dependent Centrosome Clustering Prevents Multipolar Mitosis in Tetraploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Qiyi; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Huang, Yun; Ma, Tieliang; Zhang, Yingyin; Hou, Heli; Cooke, Howard J.; Yang, Da-Qing; Wu, Mian; Shi, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Background p53 abnormality and aneuploidy often coexist in human tumors, and tetraploidy is considered as an intermediate between normal diploidy and aneuploidy. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether and how p53 influences the transformation from tetraploidy to aneuploidy. Principal Findings Live cell imaging was performed to determine the fates and mitotic behaviors of several human and mouse tetraploid cells with different p53 status, and centrosome and spindle immunostaining was used to investigate centrosome behaviors. We found that p53 dominant-negative mutation, point mutation, or knockout led to a 2∼ 33-fold increase of multipolar mitosis in N/TERT1, 3T3 and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), while mitotic entry and cell death were not significantly affected. In p53-/- tetraploid MEFs, the ability of centrosome clustering was compromised, while centrosome inactivation was not affected. Suppression of RhoA/ROCK activity by specific inhibitors in p53-/- tetraploid MEFs enhanced centrosome clustering, decreased multipolar mitosis from 38% to 20% and 16% for RhoA and ROCK, respectively, while expression of constitutively active RhoA in p53+/+ tetraploid 3T3 cells increased the frequency of multipolar mitosis from 15% to 35%. Conclusions p53 could not prevent tetraploid cells entering mitosis or induce tetraploid cell death. However, p53 abnormality impaired centrosome clustering and lead to multipolar mitosis in tetraploid cells by modulating the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. PMID:22076149

  5. Induction of Aneuploidy, Centrosome Abnormality, Multipolar Spindle, and Multipolar Division in Cultured Mammalian Cells Exposed to an Arsenic Metabolite, Dimethylarsinate.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Toxicological studies of arsenic compounds were conducted in cultured mammalian cells to investigate the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. Dimethylarsinate DMA(V) was not cytotoxic in cells depleted of GSH, but was found to be cytotoxic when GSH was present outside the cells. The results suggested that a reactive form of DMA(V) was generated through interaction with GSH. Dimethylarsine iodide DMI(III) was used as a model compound of DMA(III), and the biological effects were investigated. DMI(III) was about 10000 times more toxic to the cells than DMA(V). Chromosome structural aberrations and numerical changes, such as aneuploidy, were induced by DMI(III). DMA(V) induced multiple foci of the centrosome protein, γ-tubulin, which were colocalized with multipolar spindles in mitotic cells. The multiple foci coalesced into a single dot on disruption of the microtubules (MT). However, reorganization of the MT caused multiple foci of γ-tubulin, suggesting that the induction of centrosome abnormalities by DMA(V) required intact MT. Inhibition of the MT-dependent motor, kinesin, prevented formation of multiple foci of γ-tubulin, which pointed to the involvement of the MT-dependent mitotic motor, kinesin, in the maintenance of centrosome abnormalities. DMI(III) caused abnormal cytokinesis (multipolar division). In addition, DMI(III) caused morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Consideration of the overall process following the centrosome abnormalities caused by DMA(V) suggested a mode of cytotoxicity in which the mitotic centrosome is a critical target.

  6. Perturbation theory for multipolar discrete fluids.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Ana L; Gámez, Francisco

    2011-10-07

    An analytical expression for the Helmholtz free energy of discrete multipolar potentials as a function of density, temperature, and intermolecular parameters is obtained as an extension of the multipolar square-well perturbation theory [A. L. Benavides, Y. Guevara, and F. del Río, Physica A 202, 420 (1994)]. The presented procedure is suitable for the description of a more general intermolecular potential model taking into account the overlap and dispersion forces through a discrete potential represented by a sequence of square-shoulders and wells, as well as electrostatic interactions. The main advantage of this approach is that since the Helmholtz free energy is given as an explicit expression in terms of the intermolecular parameters characterizing the interaction, the properties of interest can be easily obtained through usual thermodynamic relations. Besides, since a great variety of discretized potentials can be used with this equation of state, its applicability is very vast. By varying the intermolecular parameters, some illustrative cases are considered, and their phase diagrams are tested against available simulation data. It is found that this theoretical approach is able to reproduce qualitatively and quantitatively well the vapor-liquid equilibrium of the chosen potentials with different multipole moment of varied strengths, except in the critical region. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. Perturbation theory for multipolar discrete fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Ana L.; Gámez, Francisco

    2011-10-01

    An analytical expression for the Helmholtz free energy of discrete multipolar potentials as a function of density, temperature, and intermolecular parameters is obtained as an extension of the multipolar square-well perturbation theory [A. L. Benavides, Y. Guevara, and F. del Río, Physica A 202, 420 (1994), 10.1016/0378-4371(94)90469-3]. The presented procedure is suitable for the description of a more general intermolecular potential model taking into account the overlap and dispersion forces through a discrete potential represented by a sequence of square-shoulders and wells, as well as electrostatic interactions. The main advantage of this approach is that since the Helmholtz free energy is given as an explicit expression in terms of the intermolecular parameters characterizing the interaction, the properties of interest can be easily obtained through usual thermodynamic relations. Besides, since a great variety of discretized potentials can be used with this equation of state, its applicability is very vast. By varying the intermolecular parameters, some illustrative cases are considered, and their phase diagrams are tested against available simulation data. It is found that this theoretical approach is able to reproduce qualitatively and quantitatively well the vapor-liquid equilibrium of the chosen potentials with different multipole moment of varied strengths, except in the critical region.

  8. Arbitrary order permanent Cartesian multipolar electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boateng, H. A.; Todorov, I. T.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a concerted effort to implement advanced classical potential energy surfaces by adding higher order multipoles to fixed point charge electrostatics in a bid to increase the accuracy of simulations of condensed phase systems. One major hurdle is the unwieldy nature of the expressions which in part has limited developers mostly to including only dipoles and quadrupoles. In this paper, we present a generalization of the Cartesian formulation of electrostatic multipolar interactions that enables the specification of an arbitrary order of multipoles. Specifically, we derive formulas for arbitrary order implementation of the particle mesh Ewald method and give a closed form formula for the stress tensor in the reciprocal space. In addition, we provide recurrence relations for common electrostatic potentials employed in molecular simulations, which allows for the generalization to arbitrary order and guarantees a computational cost that scales as O(p3) for Cartesian multipole interactions of order p.

  9. Forest discrimination with multipolarization imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Wickland, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The relations between polarization signatures and biophysical characteristics through a range of different forest environments were investigated using airborne synthetic-aperture (SAR) images acquired at L-band on March 1, 1984 in South Carolina. SAR data acquired in four linear polarization states with 10-m spatial resolution were encoded as color composite images and compared to US Forest Service forest stand data. The most useful correlative forest data were stand basal area, forest age, site condition index, and forest management type. It is found that the multipolarization images discriminate variation in tree density or difference in the amount of understory, but no evidence has been found for discrimination between evergreen and deciduous forest types.

  10. Forest discrimination with multipolarization imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Wickland, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of radar polarization diversity for discriminating forest canopy variables on airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images is evaluated. SAR images were acquired at L-Band (24.6 cm) simultaneously in four linear polarization states (HH, HV, VH, and VV) in South Carolina on March 1, 1984. In order to relate the polarization signatures to biophysical properties, false-color composite images were compared to maps of forest stands in the timber compartment. In decreasing order, the most useful correlative forest data are stand basal area, forest age, site condition index, and forest management type. It is found that multipolarization images discriminate variation in tree density and difference in the amount of understory, but do not discriminate between evergreen and deciduous forest types.

  11. A novel network of multipolar bursting interneurons generates theta frequency oscillations in neocortex.

    PubMed

    Blatow, Maria; Rozov, Andrei; Katona, Istvan; Hormuzdi, Sheriar G; Meyer, Axel H; Whittington, Miles A; Caputi, Antonio; Monyer, Hannah

    2003-06-05

    GABAergic interneurons can phase the output of principal cells, giving rise to oscillatory activity in different frequency bands. Here we describe a new subtype of GABAergic interneuron, the multipolar bursting (MB) cell in the mouse neocortex. MB cells are parvalbumin positive but differ from fast-spiking multipolar (FS) cells in their morphological, neurochemical, and physiological properties. MB cells are reciprocally connected with layer 2/3 pyramidal cells and are coupled with each other by chemical and electrical synapses. MB cells innervate FS cells but not vice versa. MB to MB cell as well as MB to pyramidal cell synapses exhibit paired-pulse facilitation. Carbachol selectively induced synchronized theta frequency oscillations in MB cells. Synchrony required both gap junction coupling and GABAergic chemical transmission, but not excitatory glutamatergic input. Hence, MB cells form a distinct inhibitory network, which upon cholinergic drive can generate rhythmic and synchronous theta frequency activity, providing temporal coordination of pyramidal cell output.

  12. MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULAE: NOT AS GEOMETRICALLY DIVERSIFIED AS THOUGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.-N.; Imai, H.; Chibueze, J.; Kwok, Sun; Tafoya, D. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2012-12-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) have diverse morphological shapes, including point-symmetric and multipolar structures. Many PNe also have complicated internal structures such as tori, lobes, knots, and ansae. A complete accounting of all the morphological structures through physical models is difficult. A first step toward such an understanding is to derive the true three-dimensional structure of the nebulae. In this paper, we show that a multipolar nebula with three pairs of lobes can explain many such features, if orientation and sensitivity effects are taken into account. Using only six parameters-the inclination and position angles of each pair-we are able to simulate the observed images of 20 PNe with complex structures. We suggest that multipolar structure is an intrinsic structure of PNe and the statistics of multipolar PNe have been severely underestimated in the past.

  13. Targeting TAO kinases using a new inhibitor compound delays mitosis and induces mitotic cell death in centrosome amplified breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Koo, Chuay-Yeng; Giacomini, Caterina; Reyes-Corral, Marta; Olmos, Yolanda; Tavares, Ignatius A; Marson, Charles M; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Tutt, Andrew N; Morris, Jonathan D H

    2017-08-22

    Thousand-and-one amino acid kinases (TAOKs) 1 and 2 are activated catalytically during mitosis and can contribute to mitotic cell rounding and spindle positioning. Here, we characterize a compound that inhibits TAOK1 and TAOK2 activity with IC50 values of 11-15 nM, is ATP-competitive and targets these kinases selectively. TAOK inhibition or depletion in centrosome amplified SKBR3 or BT549 breast cancer cell models increases the mitotic population, the percentages of mitotic cells displaying amplified centrosomes and multipolar spindles, induces cell death and inhibits cell growth. In contrast, non-tumorigenic and dividing bipolar MCF-10A breast cells appear less dependent on TAOK activity and can complete mitosis and proliferate in the presence of the TAOK inhibitor. We demonstrate that TAOK1 and TAOK2 localize to the cytoplasm and centrosomes respectively during mitosis. Live cell imaging shows that the TAOK inhibitor prolongs the duration of mitosis in SKBR3 cells, increases mitotic cell death and reduces the percentages of cells exiting mitosis, whereas MCF-10A cells continue to divide and proliferate. Over 80% of breast cancer tissues display supernumerary centrosomes and tumor cells frequently cluster extra centrosomes to avoid multipolar mitoses and associated cell death. Consequently, drugs that stimulate centrosome declustering and induce multipolarity are likely to target dividing centrosome amplified cancer cells preferentially, whilst sparing normal bipolar cells. Our results demonstrate that TAOK inhibition can enhance centrosome declustering and mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells and these proteins may therefore offer novel therapeutic targets suitable for drug inhibition and the potential treatment of breast cancers, where supernumerary centrosomes occur. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Geological applications of multipolarization SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.

    1986-01-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by SEASAT and the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A/B) operating at L-band with HH polarization were found to be useful in conjunction with other sensors for lithologic discrimination in arid environments with limited vegetation cover. In order to assess the utility of more advanced sensors for geologic research and define the unique contributions each sensor makes, remote sensing data were collected over the Deadman Butte area of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. The Wind River Basin is an asymmetric sedimentary basin in central Wyoming created during the early Eocene Laramide orogeny. The stratigraphic section of the Deadman Butte study area, which was measured by Woodward is made up of Paleozoic and Mesozoic marine shales, siltstones, limestones, and sandstones. Sensor systems included LANDSAT 4 Thematic Mapper (TM), Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) and the Multipolarization, L-band airborne SAR, a prototype for the next Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-C). Sensor parameters are given.

  15. The multipolar stage and disruptions in neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    LoTurco, Joseph J; Bai, Jilin

    2006-07-01

    The genetic basis is now known for several disorders of neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex. Identification of the cellular processes mediated by the implicated genes is revealing crucial stages of neuronal migration and has the potential to reveal common cellular causes of neuronal migration disorders. We hypothesize that a newly recognized morphological stage of neuronal migration, the multipolar stage, is vulnerable and is disrupted in several disorders of neocortical development. The multipolar stage occurs as bipolar progenitor cells become radially migrating neurons. Several studies using in utero electroporation and RNAi have revealed that transition out of the multipolar stage depends on the function of filamin A, LIS1 and DCX. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins in humans cause distinct neuronal migration disorders, including periventricular nodular heterotopia, subcortical band heterotopia and lissencephaly. The multipolar stage therefore seems to be a critical point of migration control and a vulnerable target for disruption of neocortical development. This review is part of the INMED/TINS special issue "Nature and nurture in brain development and neurological disorders", based on presentations at the annual INMED/TINS symposium (http://inmednet.com/).

  16. Excitation of dark multipolar plasmonic resonances at terahertz frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Wei, YuMing; Zang, XiaoFei; Zhu, YiMing; Zhuang, SongLin

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally observe the excitation of dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances in a hybrid structure consisting of a corrugated metallic disk coupled with a C-shaped dipole resonator. The uncoupled corrugated metallic disk only supports a dipolar resonance in the transmission spectrum due to perfect symmetry of the structure. However, the dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances emerge when coupled with a bright C-shaped resonator which is placed in the vicinity of the corrugated metallic disk. These excited multipolar resonances show minimum influence on the coupling distance between the C-shaped resonator and corrugated metallic disk. The resonance frequencies of the radiative modes are controlled by varying the angle of the C-shaped resonator and the inner disk radius, both of which play dominant roles in the excitation of the spoof localized surface plasmons. Observation of such a transition from the dark to radiative nature of multipolar spoof localized plasmon resonances would find potential applications in terahertz based resonant plasmonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:26903382

  17. Strategies for Business Schools in a Multi-Polar World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dameron, Stephanie; Durand, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the contours of the emerging business education and institutions in a multi-polar world and to identify the causes of the strategic convergence of management education, to explore the limitations of the dominant models of management education and to propose a range of strategic alternatives for…

  18. Strategies for Business Schools in a Multi-Polar World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dameron, Stephanie; Durand, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the contours of the emerging business education and institutions in a multi-polar world and to identify the causes of the strategic convergence of management education, to explore the limitations of the dominant models of management education and to propose a range of strategic alternatives for…

  19. Excitation of dark multipolar plasmonic resonances at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Wei, Yuming; Zang, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yiming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally observe the excitation of dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances in a hybrid structure consisting of a corrugated metallic disk coupled with a C-shaped dipole resonator. The uncoupled corrugated metallic disk only supports a dipolar resonance in the transmission spectrum due to perfect symmetry of the structure. However, the dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances emerge when coupled with a bright C-shaped resonator which is placed in the vicinity of the corrugated metallic disk. These excited multipolar resonances show minimum influence on the coupling distance between the C-shaped resonator and corrugated metallic disk. The resonance frequencies of the radiative modes are controlled by varying the angle of the C-shaped resonator and the inner disk radius, both of which play dominant roles in the excitation of the spoof localized surface plasmons. Observation of such a transition from the dark to radiative nature of multipolar spoof localized plasmon resonances would find potential applications in terahertz based resonant plasmonic and metamaterial devices.

  20. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: Mono or multipolar?

    PubMed

    Cartier, Victoire; Boursier, Jérôme; Lebigot, Jérôme; Oberti, Frédéric; Fouchard-Hubert, Isabelle; Aubé, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Thermo-ablation by radiofrequency is recognized as a curative treatment for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma. However, local recurrence may occur because of incomplete peripheral tumor destruction. Multipolar radiofrequency has been developed to increase the size of the maximal ablation zone. We aimed to compare the efficacy of monopolar and multipolar radiofrequency for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and determine factors predicting failure. A total of 171 consecutive patients with 214 hepatocellular carcinomas were retrospectively included. One hundred fifty-eight tumors were treated with an expandable monopolar electrode and 56 with a multipolar technique using several linear bipolar electrodes. Imaging studies at 6 weeks after treatment, then every 3 months, assessed local effectiveness. Radiofrequency failure was defined as persistent residual tumor after two sessions (primary radiofrequency failure) or local tumor recurrence during follow-up. This study received institutional review board approval (number 2014/77). Imaging showed complete tumor ablation in 207 of 214 lesions after the first session of radiofrequency. After a second session, only two cases of residual viable tumor were observed. During follow-up, there were 46 local tumor recurrences. Thus, radiofrequency failure occurred in 48/214 (22.4%) cases. By multivariate analysis, technique (P < 0.001) and tumor size (P = 0.023) were independent predictors of radiofrequency failure. Failure rate was lower with the multipolar technique for tumors < 25 mm (P = 0.023) and for tumors between 25 and 45 mm (P = 0.082). There was no difference for tumors ≥ 45 mm (P = 0.552). Compared to monopolar radiofrequency, multipolar radiofrequency improves tumor ablation with a subsequent lower rate of local tumor recurrence. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Multipolar electromagnetic fields around neutron stars: exact vacuum solutions and related properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2015-06-01

    The magnetic field topology in the surrounding of neutron stars is one of the key questions in pulsar magnetospheric physics. A very extensive literature exists about the assumption of a dipolar magnetic field but very little progress has been made in attempts to include multipolar components in a self-consistent way. In this paper, we study the effect of multipolar electromagnetic fields anchored in the star. We give exact analytical solutions in closed form for any order l and apply them to the retarded point quadrupole (l = 2), hexapole (l = 3) and octopole (l = 4), a generalization of the retarded point dipole (l = 1). We also compare the Poynting flux from each multipole and show that the spin-down luminosity depends on the ratio R/rL, R being the neutron star radius and rL the light-cylinder radius. Therefore the braking index also depends on R/rL. As such multipole fields possess very different topology, most importantly smaller length scales compared to the dipolar field, especially close to the neutron star, we investigate the deformation of the polar caps induced by these multipolar fields. Such fields could have a strong impact on the interpretation of the pulsed radio emission suspected to emanate from these polar caps as well as on the inferred geometry deduced from the high-energy light-curve fitting and on the magnetic field strength. Discrepancies between the two-pole caustic model and our new multipole caustic model are emphasized with the quadrupole field. To this respect, we demonstrate that working with only a dipole field can be very misleading.

  2. Mouse molar morphogenesis revisited by three-dimensional reconstruction. III. Spatial distribution of mitoses and apoptoses up to bell-staged first lower molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Viriot, L; Peterková, R; Vonesch, J L; Peterka, M; Ruch, J V; Lesot, H

    1997-10-01

    Computer-assisted 3D reconstructions were used to follow the development of the embryonic mouse first lower molar (M1). At ED 12.5, the thickening of the oral epithelium, which was thought to correspond to the molar dental lamina, regressed in its anterior part as a result of apoptosis. Only the posterior part later gave rise to molars. The transition to the cap stage entailed medial and lateral extensions of the dental epithelium. The growth and histo-morphogenesis of the enamel organ as well as cervical loop formation proceeded more rapidly in the anterior part of the M1 during the cap and early bell stages producing significant morphological differences along the antero-posterior axis. Apoptosis was temporarily intensive in the anterior part of the bud- and cap-shaped epithelium and thus pointed domains which do not participate in the formation of the final M1 enamel organ. In the well-formed cap, apoptoses displayed maximum concentration in the enamel knot (EK). No increase in the number of metaphases could be detected in the vicinity of the EK. Mitoses were distributed throughout the epithelial compartment until cap stage and then mainly concentrated in the inner dental epithelium at the early bell stage. At this later stage, either lateral views or thick virtual sections performed in the reconstruction demonstrated a clear cut distribution of mitoses and apoptoses in the enamel organ. At the early bell stage, mitoses in the mesenchyme demonstrated an increasing postero-anterior gradient.

  3. The emerging multi-polar world and China's grand game

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rajan

    2011-01-19

    This talk outlines a scenario describing an emerging multipolar world that is aligned with geographical regions. The stability and security of this multipolar world is examined with respect to demographics, trade (economics), resource constraints, and development. In particular I focus on Asia which has two large countries, China and India, competing for resources and markets and examine the emerging regional relations, opportunities and threats. These relationships must overcome many hurdles - the Subcontinent is in a weak position politically and strategically and faces many threats, and China's growing power could help stabilize it or create new threats. Since the fate of 1.5 billion (2.4 billion by 2050) people depends on how the Subcontinent evolves, this talk is meant to initiates a discussion of what China and India can do to help the region develop and stabilize.

  4. Multipolar radiation of quantum emitters with nanowire optical antennas

    PubMed Central

    Curto, Alberto G.; Taminiau, Tim H.; Volpe, Giorgio; Kreuzer, Mark P.; Quidant, Romain; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2013-01-01

    Multipolar transitions other than electric dipoles are generally too weak to be observed at optical frequencies in single quantum emitters. For example, fluorescent molecules and quantum dots have dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of light and therefore emit predominantly as electric dipoles. Here we demonstrate controlled emission of a quantum dot into multipolar radiation through selective coupling to a linear nanowire antenna. The antenna resonance tailors the interaction of the quantum dot with light, effectively creating a hybrid nanoscale source beyond the simple Hertz dipole. Our findings establish a basis for the controlled driving of fundamental modes in nanoantennas and metamaterials, for the understanding of the coupling of quantum emitters to nanophotonic devices such as waveguides and nanolasers, and for the development of innovative quantum nano-optics components with properties not found in nature. PMID:23612291

  5. From dipolar to multipolar interactions between ultracold Feshbach molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéméner, Goulven; Lepers, Maxence; Luc-Koenig, Eliane; Dulieu, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Using the multipolar expansion of electrostatic and magnetostatic potential energies, we characterize the long-range interactions between two weakly-bound diatomic molecules, taking as an example the paramagnetic Er2 Feshbach molecules which were produced recently. The interaction between atomic magnetic dipoles gives rise to the usual R-3 leading term of the multipolar expansion, where R is the intermolecular distance. We show that additional terms scaling as R-5, R-7 and so on also appear, which are strongly anisotropic with respect to the orientation of the molecules. These terms can be seen as effective molecular multipole moments reflecting the spatial extension of the molecules which is non-negligible compared to R. We acknowledge the financial support of the COPOMOL project (ANR-13-IS04-0004) from Agence Nationale de la Recherche.

  6. Mapping diverse forest cover with multipolarization airborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Wickland, D. E.; Sharitz, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging radar backscatter in continuously forested areas contains information about the forest canopy; it also contains data about topography, landforms, and terrain texture. For purposes of radar image interpretation and geologic mapping researchers were interested in identifying and separating forest canopy effects from geologic or geomorphic effects on radar images. The objectives of this investigation was to evaluate forest canopy variables in multipolarization radar images under conditions where geologic and topographic variables are at a minimum. A subsidiary objective was to compare the discriminatory capabilities of the radar images with corresponding optical images of similar spatial resolution. It appears that the multipolarization images discriminate variation in tree density, but no evidence was found for discrimination between evergreen and deciduous forest types.

  7. Dynamic FoxG1 expression coordinates the integration of multipolar pyramidal neuron precursors into the cortical plate.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Goichi; Fishell, Gord

    2012-06-21

    Pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex are born in the ventricular zone and migrate through the intermediate zone to enter into the cortical plate. In the intermediate zone, these migrating precursors move tangentially and initiate the extension of their axons by transiently adopting a characteristic multipolar morphology. We observe that expression of the forkhead transcription factor FoxG1 is dynamically regulated during this transitional period. By utilizing conditional genetic strategies, we show that the downregulation of FoxG1 at the beginning of the multipolar cell phase induces Unc5D expression, the timing of which ultimately determines the laminar identity of pyramidal neurons. In addition, we demonstrate that the re-expression of FoxG1 is required for cells to transit out of the multipolar cell phase and to enter into the cortical plate. Thus, the dynamic expression of FoxG1 during migration within the intermediate zone is essential for the proper assembly of the cerebral cortex.

  8. Structural and functional classes of multipolar cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Doucet, John R; Ryugo, David K

    2006-04-01

    Multipolar cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) are a structurally and functionally diverse group of projection neurons. Understanding their role in the ascending pathway involves partitioning multipolar cells into distinct populations and determining where in the brain each sends its coded messages. In this study, we used retrograde labeling techniques in rats to identify multipolar neurons that project their axons to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), the contralateral CN, or both structures. Three rats received injections of biotinylated dextran amine in the ipsilateral DCN and diamidino yellow in the contralateral CN. Several radiate multipolar neurons (defined by their axonal projections to the ipsilateral DCN and their dendrites that traverse VCN isofrequency sheets) were double-labeled but over 70% were not. This result suggests two distinct populations: (1) radiate-commissural (RC) multipolar cells that project to the ipsilateral DCN and the contralateral CN, and (2) radiate multipolar cells that project exclusively (in this context) to the ipsilateral DCN. In a different group of animals, we retrogradely labeled multipolar neurons that project their axons to the contralateral CN and measured the size of their cell bodies. The mean size of this population (266 +/- 156 microm2) was significantly smaller than those of RC-multipolar cells (418 +/- 140 microm2). We conclude that the CN commissural pathway is composed of at least two components: (1) RC multipolar cells and (2) commissural multipolar cells that are small- and medium-sized neurons that project exclusively (in this context) to the contralateral CN. These results identify separate structural groups of multipolar cells that may correspond to physiological unit types described in the literature. They also provide protocols for isolating and studying different populations of multipolar cells to determine the neural mechanisms that govern their responses to sound.

  9. Multipolar modes in dielectric disk resonator for wireless power transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mingzhao; Belov, Pavel; Kapitanova, Polina

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a magnetic resonant WPT system based on dielectric disk resonators and investigated the WPT efficiency as a function of separation. It has been demonstrated that the power transfer can be achieved at different multipolar modes. The numerical study shows that the highest WPT efficiency of 99% can be obtained for the MQ mode in an ideal case. However, the efficiency of MQ mode decays much faster than the MD mode which suggests that a trade-off has to be made in the practical WPT system design.

  10. Lithologic mapping in a sedimentary environment using multipolarization SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.; Schenck, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    Multipolarization Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from the NASA/JPL aircraft SAR were used in conjunction with LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM), Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data as part of a three-year research program to evaluate the utility of remote sensing measurements for analysis of sedimentary basins. The purpose of this research effort is to construct stratigraphic columns, map variations in the lithology, geometry, and structure of sedimentary rocks in the Wind River/Bighorn Basin area, Wyoming, and to integrate remote sensing data with conventional rain models of basin formation and evolution.

  11. The Role of Angular Momentum in the Construction of Electromagnetic Multipolar Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tischler, Nora; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Multipolar solutions of Maxwell's equations are used in many practical applications and are essential for the understanding of light-matter interactions at the fundamental level. Unlike the set of plane wave solutions of electromagnetic fields, the multipolar solutions do not share a standard derivation or notation. As a result, expressions…

  12. Molecules and mechanisms that regulate multipolar migration in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Most neurons migrate with an elongated, "bipolar" morphology, extending a long leading process that explores the environment. However, when immature projection neurons enter the intermediate zone (IZ) of the neocortex they become "multipolar". Multipolar cells extend and retract cytoplasmic processes in different directions and move erratically-sideways, up and down. Multipolar cells extend axons while they are in the lower half of the IZ. Remarkably, the cells then resume radial migration: they reorient their centrosome and Golgi apparatus towards the pia, transform back to bipolar morphology, and commence locomotion along radial glia (RG) fibers. This reorientation implies the existence of directional signals in the IZ that are ignored during the multipolar stage but sensed after axonogenesis. In vivo genetic manipulation has implicated a variety of candidate directional signals, cell surface receptors, and signaling pathways, that may be involved in polarizing multipolar cells and stabilizing a pia-directed leading process for radial migration. Other signals are implicated in starting multipolar migration and triggering axon outgrowth. Here we review the molecules and mechanisms that regulate multipolar migration, and also discuss how multipolar migration affects the orderly arrangement of neurons in layers and columns in the developing neocortex.

  13. The Role of Angular Momentum in the Construction of Electromagnetic Multipolar Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tischler, Nora; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Multipolar solutions of Maxwell's equations are used in many practical applications and are essential for the understanding of light-matter interactions at the fundamental level. Unlike the set of plane wave solutions of electromagnetic fields, the multipolar solutions do not share a standard derivation or notation. As a result, expressions…

  14. The body-centered cubic structure of methyllithium tetramer crystal: staggered methyl conformation by electrostatic stabilization via intratetramer multipolarization.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yusuke; Demura, Akimitsu; Okamoto, Takuya; Hitomi, Haruko; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2006-06-29

    The methyllithium tetramer (CH3Li)4 structure in the bcc crystal has been theoretically optimized with the use of density functional theory calculations under the periodic boundary condition. The X-ray structure shows that the methyl-group conformation in tetramer in crystal takes the staggered form rather than the eclipsed form that is taken in the isolated tetramer, i.e., the crystal packing effect, and this has been reproduced for the first time. It is concluded that the staggered form is advantageous in crystal, as a whole, due to the larger electrostatic stabilization via the induced intratetramer multipolarization, although it should cause, simultaneously, smaller destabilization in intratetramer electronic energy.

  15. Age-dating volcanic and alluvial surfaces with multipolarization data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    A false-color multipolarization version of one of the images of Owens Valley area acquired by the JPL Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is given. A geologic map of the alluvial fans there (Gillespie, 1982) is also given for comparison. In general, brightness in the multipolarization images can be seen to be inversely proportional to the age of the surfaces. A more detailed investigation of the relationship between backscatter and age of the surfaces was undertaken with calibrated aircraft SAR data. The quantitative relationship between backscatter coefficient and age for the three polarizations is shown. The straight lines connecting the measured data points imply a steady-state process, although the process or processes leading to this relationship may have operated at rates that varied with climate fluctuations, such as the glacial ages. It is expected that the relationship between radar brightness and age is a consistent one, and that with the wider availability of calibrated radar backscatter data, these relationships can be less well-known areas. The effect of variable such as past climate fluctuations, tectonic disturbance, and rock type must be understood before extension beyond the Mojave Desert region can be attempted.

  16. Anatomy of the Binary Black Hole Recoil: A Multipolar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Buonanno, Alessandra; vanMeter, James R.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the recoil velocity computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including 1 = 4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (= 98%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (2 95%). We describe how the relative amplitude, and more importantly, the relative phase, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ring-down phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced, to a high level of accuracy, by an effective Newtonian formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing in the Newtonian formula the radial separation with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes. Analytic formulae, obtained by expressing the multipole moments in terms of the fundamental QNMs of a Kerr BH, are able to explain the onset and amount of '.anti-kick" for each of the simulations. Lastly, we apply this multipolar analysis to understand the remarkable difference between the amplitudes of planar and non-planar kicks for equal-mass spinning black holes.

  17. Transverse multipolar light-matter couplings in evanescent waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2016-11-01

    We present an approach to study the interaction between matter and evanescent fields. The approach is based on the decomposition of evanescent plane waves into multipoles of well-defined angular-momentum transverse to both decay and propagation directions. We use the approach to identify the origin of the recently observed directional coupling of emitters into guided modes, and of the opposite Zeeman state excitation of atoms near a fiber. We explain how to rigorously quantify both effects and show that the directionality and the difference in excitation rates grow exponentially with the multipolar order of the light-matter interaction. We also use the approach to study and maximize the transverse torque exerted by an evanescent plane wave onto a given spherical absorbing particle. All the obtained physical insights can be traced back to the two main features of the decomposition of evanescent plane waves into transverse multipolar modes: A polarization independent exponential dominance of modes with large transverse angular momentum, and a polarization-controlled parity selection rule.

  18. Requirement of mitoses for the reversal of X-inactivation in cell hybrids between murine embryonal carcinoma cells and normal female thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, N. )

    1988-04-01

    By means of a 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and acridine orange fluorescence staining method the authors studied reactivation of the inactivated X chromosome (X{sub i}) in newly formed cell hybrids between the near-diploid HPRT-deficient OTF9-63 murine embryonal carcinoma cell (ECC) with an XO sex chromosome constitution and the normal female mouse thymocyte. Synchronization of the late replicating S chromosome in such hybrid cells, indicative of reactivation, was found for the first time on Day 3, and the frequency of reactivation was attained 90% on Day 5. Inhibition of cell cycle progression either by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of polyamine metabolism, or by isoleucine-deficient medium after cell fusion delayed reactivation of the X{sub i}, which implied that the number of cell division cycles traversed by individual cells rather than the length of time after cell fusion is critical for the reactivation. Double-labeling experiments using ({sup 3}H)thymidine and BrdU indicated that hybrid cells had undergone three or four mitoses before reactivation of the X{sub i}. Most probably reactivation of the X{sub i} is consequent to reversion of the thymocyte genome to an undifferentiated state under the influence of OTF9 genome. DNA demethylation or dilution of X{sub i}-specific factors by mitoses may be involved in this process.

  19. Okadaic acid mediates p53 hyperphosphorylation and growth arrest in cells with wild-type p53 but increases aberrant mitoses in cells with non-functional p53.

    PubMed

    Milczarek, G J; Chen, W; Gupta, A; Martinez, J D; Bowden, G T

    1999-06-01

    The protein phosphatase inhibitor and tumor promoting agent okadaic acid (OA), has been shown previously to induce hyperphosphorylation of p53 protein, which in turn correlated with increased transactivation or apoptotic function. However, how the tumor promotion effects of OA relate to p53 tumor supressor function (or dysfunction) remain unclear. Rat embryonic fibroblasts harboring a temperature-sensitive mouse p53 transgene were treated with 50 nM doses of OA. At the wild-type permissive temperature this treatment resulted in: (i) the hyperphosphorylation of sites within tryptic peptides of the transactivation domain of p53; (ii) an increase in p53 affinity for a p21(waf1) promotor oligonucleotide; (iii) an increase in cellular steady state levels of p21(waf1) message; (iv) a G2/M cell cycle blockage in addition to the G1/S arrest previously associated with p53; and (v) no increased incidence of apoptosis. On the other hand, OA treatment at the mutated p53 permissive temperature resulted in a relatively high incidence of aberrant mitosis with no upregulation of p21(waf1) message. These results suggest that while wild-type p53 blocks the proliferative effects of OA through p21(waf1)-mediated growth arrest, cells with non-functional p53 cannot arrest and suffer relatively high levels of OA-mediated aberrant mitoses.

  20. Molecules and mechanisms that regulate multipolar migration in the intermediate zone

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Most neurons migrate with an elongated, “bipolar” morphology, extending a long leading process that explores the environment. However, when immature projection neurons enter the intermediate zone (IZ) of the neocortex they become “multipolar”. Multipolar cells extend and retract cytoplasmic processes in different directions and move erratically—sideways, up and down. Multipolar cells extend axons while they are in the lower half of the IZ. Remarkably, the cells then resume radial migration: they reorient their centrosome and Golgi apparatus towards the pia, transform back to bipolar morphology, and commence locomotion along radial glia (RG) fibers. This reorientation implies the existence of directional signals in the IZ that are ignored during the multipolar stage but sensed after axonogenesis. In vivo genetic manipulation has implicated a variety of candidate directional signals, cell surface receptors, and signaling pathways, that may be involved in polarizing multipolar cells and stabilizing a pia-directed leading process for radial migration. Other signals are implicated in starting multipolar migration and triggering axon outgrowth. Here we review the molecules and mechanisms that regulate multipolar migration, and also discuss how multipolar migration affects the orderly arrangement of neurons in layers and columns in the developing neocortex. PMID:25452716

  1. Multipolar Coupling in Hybrid Metal–Dielectric Metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Rui; Rusak, Evgenia; Staude, Isabelle; Dominguez, Jason; Decker, Manuel; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Brener, Igal; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-03-02

    In this paper, we study functional hybrid metasurfaces consisting of metal–dielectric nanoantennas that direct light from an incident plane wave or from localized light sources into a preferential direction. The directionality is obtained by carefully balancing the multipolar contributions to the scattering response from the constituents of the metasurface. The hybrid nanoantennas are composed of a plasmonic gold nanorod acting as a feed element and a silicon nanodisk acting as a director element. In order to experimentally realize this design, we have developed a two-step electron-beam lithography process in combination with a precision alignment step. Finally, the optical response of the fabricated sample is measured and reveals distinct signatures of coupling between the plasmonic and the dielectric nanoantenna elements that ultimately leads to unidirectional radiation of light.

  2. Multipolar blackbody radiation shifts for single-ion clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Bindiya; Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2012-01-01

    Appraising the projected 10-18 fractional uncertainty in the optical frequency standards using singly ionized ions, we estimate the blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts due to the magnetic dipole (M1) and electric quadrupole (E2) multipoles of the applied external electromagnetic field. Multipolar scalar polarizabilities are determined for the singly ionized calcium (Ca+) and strontium (Sr+) ions using the relativistic coupled-cluster method, though the theory can be exercised for any single-ion clocks. The expected energy shifts for the respective clock transitions are estimated to be 4.38(3)×10-4 Hz for Ca+ and 9.50(7)×10-5 Hz for Sr+. These shifts are large enough and may be a prerequisite for the frequency standards to achieve the foreseen 10-18 precision goal.

  3. Multipolar Coupling in Hybrid Metal–Dielectric Metasurfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Rui; Rusak, Evgenia; Staude, Isabelle; ...

    2016-03-02

    In this paper, we study functional hybrid metasurfaces consisting of metal–dielectric nanoantennas that direct light from an incident plane wave or from localized light sources into a preferential direction. The directionality is obtained by carefully balancing the multipolar contributions to the scattering response from the constituents of the metasurface. The hybrid nanoantennas are composed of a plasmonic gold nanorod acting as a feed element and a silicon nanodisk acting as a director element. In order to experimentally realize this design, we have developed a two-step electron-beam lithography process in combination with a precision alignment step. Finally, the optical response ofmore » the fabricated sample is measured and reveals distinct signatures of coupling between the plasmonic and the dielectric nanoantenna elements that ultimately leads to unidirectional radiation of light.« less

  4. Multipolar interference for non-reciprocal nonlinear generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutrina, Ekaterina; Urbas, Augustine

    2016-04-01

    We show that nonlinear multipolar interference allows achieving not only unidirectional, but also non-reciprocal nonlinear generation from a nanoelement, with the direction of the produced light decoupled from the direction of at least one of the excitation beams. Alternatively, it may allow inhibiting the specified nonlinear response in a nanoelement or in its periodic arrangement by reversing the direction of one of the pumps. These general phenomena exploit the fact that, contrary to the linear response case, nonlinear magneto-electric interference stems from a combination of additive and multiplicative processes and includes an interference between various terms within the electric and magnetic partial waves themselves. We demonstrate the introduced concept numerically using an example of a plasmonic dimer geometry with realistic material parameters.

  5. Multipolar interference for non-reciprocal nonlinear generation

    PubMed Central

    Poutrina, Ekaterina; Urbas, Augustine

    2016-01-01

    We show that nonlinear multipolar interference allows achieving not only unidirectional, but also non-reciprocal nonlinear generation from a nanoelement, with the direction of the produced light decoupled from the direction of at least one of the excitation beams. Alternatively, it may allow inhibiting the specified nonlinear response in a nanoelement or in its periodic arrangement by reversing the direction of one of the pumps. These general phenomena exploit the fact that, contrary to the linear response case, nonlinear magneto-electric interference stems from a combination of additive and multiplicative processes and includes an interference between various terms within the electric and magnetic partial waves themselves. We demonstrate the introduced concept numerically using an example of a plasmonic dimer geometry with realistic material parameters. PMID:27126209

  6. Does Size Matter? The Multipolar International Landscape of Nanoscience

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Pablo; Kreimer, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    How do different countries tackle nanoscience research? Are all countries similar except for a trivial size effect, as science is often assumed to be universal? Or does size dictate large differences, as large countries are able to develop activities in all directions of research, while small countries have to specialize in some specific niches? Alternatively, is size irrelevant, as all countries have followed different historical paths, leading to different patterns of specialisation? Here, we develop an original method that uses a bottom-up definition of scientific subfields to map the international structure of any scientific field. Our analysis shows that nanoscience research does not show a universal pattern of specialisation, homothetic of that of a single global leader (e.g., the United States). Instead, we find a multipolar world, with four main ways of doing nanosciences. PMID:27992439

  7. Nanoscale interference patterns of gap-mode multipolar plasmonic fields.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshito; Sanada, Akio; Sasaki, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Arbitrary spatial distributions of the electric field of light are formed through the interference of individual wavenumber mode fields with appropriate amplitudes and phases, while the maximum wavenumber in the far field is limited by the wavelength of light. In contrast, localized surface plasmons (LSPs) possess the ability to confine photons strongly into nanometer-scale areas, exceeding the diffraction limit. In particular, gap-mode LSPs produce single-nanometer-sized, highly intense localized fields, known as hot spots. Here, we show the nanoscale spatial profiles of the LSP fields within hot spots, which exhibit complicated fine structures, rather than single peaks. The nanopatterns are created by constructive and destructive interferences of dipolar, quadrupolar, and higher-order multipolar plasmonic modes, which can be drastically altered by controlling parameters of the excitation optical system. The analysis in this study would be useful for proposing new concepts for manipulation and control of light-matter interactions in nanospaces.

  8. Does Size Matter? The Multipolar International Landscape of Nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Levin, Luciano; Jensen, Pablo; Kreimer, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    How do different countries tackle nanoscience research? Are all countries similar except for a trivial size effect, as science is often assumed to be universal? Or does size dictate large differences, as large countries are able to develop activities in all directions of research, while small countries have to specialize in some specific niches? Alternatively, is size irrelevant, as all countries have followed different historical paths, leading to different patterns of specialisation? Here, we develop an original method that uses a bottom-up definition of scientific subfields to map the international structure of any scientific field. Our analysis shows that nanoscience research does not show a universal pattern of specialisation, homothetic of that of a single global leader (e.g., the United States). Instead, we find a multipolar world, with four main ways of doing nanosciences.

  9. A global optimization approach to multi-polarity sentiment analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinmiao; Li, Jing; Wu, Yukeng

    2015-01-01

    Following the rapid development of social media, sentiment analysis has become an important social media mining technique. The performance of automatic sentiment analysis primarily depends on feature selection and sentiment classification. While information gain (IG) and support vector machines (SVM) are two important techniques, few studies have optimized both approaches in sentiment analysis. The effectiveness of applying a global optimization approach to sentiment analysis remains unclear. We propose a global optimization-based sentiment analysis (PSOGO-Senti) approach to improve sentiment analysis with IG for feature selection and SVM as the learning engine. The PSOGO-Senti approach utilizes a particle swarm optimization algorithm to obtain a global optimal combination of feature dimensions and parameters in the SVM. We evaluate the PSOGO-Senti model on two datasets from different fields. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti model can improve binary and multi-polarity Chinese sentiment analysis. We compared the optimal feature subset selected by PSOGO-Senti with the features in the sentiment dictionary. The results of this comparison indicated that PSOGO-Senti can effectively remove redundant and noisy features and can select a domain-specific feature subset with a higher-explanatory power for a particular sentiment analysis task. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti approach is effective and robust for sentiment analysis tasks in different domains. By comparing the improvements of two-polarity, three-polarity and five-polarity sentiment analysis results, we found that the five-polarity sentiment analysis delivered the largest improvement. The improvement of the two-polarity sentiment analysis was the smallest. We conclude that the PSOGO-Senti achieves higher improvement for a more complicated sentiment analysis task. We also compared the results of PSOGO-Senti with those of the genetic algorithm (GA) and grid search method. From

  10. Incommensurate short-range multipolar order parameter of phase II in Ce3Pd20Si6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnichenko, P. Y.; Paschen, S.; Prokofiev, A.; Vojta, M.; Cameron, A. S.; Mignot, J.-M.; Ivanov, A.; Inosov, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    The clathrate compound Ce3Pd20Si6 is a heavy-fermion metal that exhibits magnetically hidden order at low temperatures. Reputedly, this exotic type of magnetic ground state, known as "phase II", could be associated with the ordering of Ce 4 f quadrupolar moments. In contrast to conventional (dipolar) order, it has vanishing Bragg intensity in zero magnetic field and, as a result, has escaped direct observation by neutron scattering until now. Here we report the observation of diffuse magnetic neutron scattering induced by an application of magnetic field along either the [1 1 ¯0 ] or the [001 ] direction within phase II. The broad elastic magnetic signal that surrounds the (111) structural Bragg peak can be attributed to a short-range G -type antiferromagnetic arrangement of field-induced dipoles modulated by the underlying multipolar order on the simple-cubic sublattice of Ce ions occupying the 8 c Wyckoff site. In addition, for magnetic fields applied along the [001 ] direction, the diffuse magnetic peaks in Ce3Pd20Si6 become incommensurate, suggesting a more complex modulated structure of the underlying multipolar order that can be continuously tuned by a magnetic field.

  11. Multipolar mitosis and aneuploidy after chrysotile treatment: a consequence of abscission failure and cytokinesis regression.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Beatriz Araujo; Rezende-Teixeira, Paula; Redick, Sambra; Doxsey, Stephen; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2016-02-23

    Chrysotile, like other types of asbestos, has been associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis. However, the cellular abnormalities induced by these fibers involved in cancer development have not been elucidated yet. Previous works show that chrysotile fibers induce features of cancer cells, such as aneuploidy, multinucleation and multipolar mitosis. In the present study, normal and cancer derived human cell lines were treated with chrysotile and the cellular and molecular mechanisms related to generation of aneuploid cells was elucidated. The first alteration observed was cytokinesis regression, the main cause of multinucleated cells formation and centrosome amplification. The multinucleated cells formed after cytokinesis regression were able to progress through cell cycle and generated aneuploid cells after abnormal mitosis. To understand the process of cytokinesis regression, localization of cytokinetic proteins was investigated. It was observed mislocalization of Anillin, Aurora B, Septin 9 and Alix in the intercellular bridge, and no determination of secondary constriction and abscission sites. Fiber treatment also led to overexpression of genes related to cancer, cytokinesis and cell cycle. The results show that chrysotile fibers induce cellular and molecular alterations in normal and tumor cells that have been related to cancer initiation and progression, and that tetraploidization and aneuploid cell formation are striking events after fiber internalization, which could generate a favorable context to cancer development.

  12. Multipolar mitosis and aneuploidy after chrysotile treatment: a consequence of abscission failure and cytokinesis regression

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Beatriz Araujo; Teixeira, Paula Rezende; Redick, Sambra; Doxsey, Stephen; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Chrysotile, like other types of asbestos, has been associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis. However, the cellular abnormalities induced by these fibers involved in cancer development have not been elucidated yet. Previous works show that chrysotile fibers induce features of cancer cells, such as aneuploidy, multinucleation and multipolar mitosis. In the present study, normal and cancer derived human cell lines were treated with chrysotile and the cellular and molecular mechanisms related to generation of aneuploid cells was elucidated. The first alteration observed was cytokinesis regression, the main cause of multinucleated cells formation and centrosome amplification. The multinucleated cells formed after cytokinesis regression were able to progress through cell cycle and generated aneuploid cells after abnormal mitosis. To understand the process of cytokinesis regression, localization of cytokinetic proteins was investigated. It was observed mislocalization of Anillin, Aurora B, Septin 9 and Alix in the intercellular bridge, and no determination of secondary constriction and abscission sites. Fiber treatment also led to overexpression of genes related to cancer, cytokinesis and cell cycle. The results show that chrysotile fibers induce cellular and molecular alterations in normal and tumor cells that have been related to cancer initiation and progression, and that tetraploidization and aneuploid cell formation are striking events after fiber internalization, which could generate a favorable context to cancer development. PMID:26788989

  13. Prdm8 regulates the morphological transition at multipolar phase during neocortical development.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mayuko; Kuroda, Takao; Honda, Aya; Komabayashi-Suzuki, Mariko; Komai, Tae; Shinkai, Yoichi; Mizutani, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that the PR domain protein Prdm8 serves as a key regulator of the length of the multipolar phase by controlling the timing of morphological transition. We used a mouse line with expression of Prdm8-mVenus reporter and found that Prdm8 is predominantly expressed in the middle and upper intermediate zone during both the late and terminal multipolar phases. Prdm8 expression was almost coincident with Unc5D expression, a marker for the late multipolar phase, although the expression of Unc5D was found to be gradually down-regulated to the point at which mVenus expression was gradually up-regulated. This expression pattern suggests the possible involvement of Prdm8 in the control of the late and terminal multipolar phases, which controls the timing for morphological transition. To test this hypothesis, we performed gain- and loss-of-function analysis of neocortical development by using in utero electroporation. We found that the knockdown of Prdm8 results in premature change from multipolar to bipolar morphology, whereas the overexpression of Prdm8 maintained the multipolar morphology. Additionally, the postnatal analysis showed that the Prdm8 knockdown stimulated the number of early born neurons, and differentiated neurons located more deeply in the neocortex, however, majority of those cells could not acquire molecular features consistent with laminar location. Furthermore, we found the candidate genes that were predominantly utilized in both the late and terminal multipolar phases, and these candidate genes included those encoding for guidance molecules. In addition, we also found that the expression level of these guidance molecules was inhibited by the introduction of the Prdm8 expression vector. These results indicate that the Prdm8-mediated regulation of morphological changes that normally occur during the late and terminal multipolar phases plays an important role in neocortical development.

  14. Multipolar migration: the third mode of radial neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2003-11-05

    Two distinct modes of radial neuronal migration, locomotion and somal translocation, have been reported in the developing cerebral cortex. Although these two modes of migration have been well documented, the cortical intermediate zone contains abundant multipolar cells, and they do not resemble the cells migrating by locomotion or somal translocation. Here, we report that these multipolar cells express neuronal markers and extend multiple thin processes in various directions independently of the radial glial fibers. Time-lapse analysis of living slices revealed that the multipolar cells do not have any fixed cell polarity, and that they very dynamically extend and retract multiple processes as their cell bodies slowly move. They do not usually move straight toward the pial surface during their radial migration, but instead frequently change migration direction and rate; sometimes they even remain in almost the same position, especially when they are in the subventricular zone. Occasionally, the multipolar cells jump tangentially during their radial migration. Because the migration modality of these cells clearly differs from locomotion or somal translocation, we refer to their novel type of migration as "multipolar migration." In view of the high proportion of cells exhibiting multipolar migration, this third mode of radial migration must be an important type of migration in the developing cortex.

  15. A Global Optimization Approach to Multi-Polarity Sentiment Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinmiao; Li, Jing; Wu, Yukeng

    2015-01-01

    Following the rapid development of social media, sentiment analysis has become an important social media mining technique. The performance of automatic sentiment analysis primarily depends on feature selection and sentiment classification. While information gain (IG) and support vector machines (SVM) are two important techniques, few studies have optimized both approaches in sentiment analysis. The effectiveness of applying a global optimization approach to sentiment analysis remains unclear. We propose a global optimization-based sentiment analysis (PSOGO-Senti) approach to improve sentiment analysis with IG for feature selection and SVM as the learning engine. The PSOGO-Senti approach utilizes a particle swarm optimization algorithm to obtain a global optimal combination of feature dimensions and parameters in the SVM. We evaluate the PSOGO-Senti model on two datasets from different fields. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti model can improve binary and multi-polarity Chinese sentiment analysis. We compared the optimal feature subset selected by PSOGO-Senti with the features in the sentiment dictionary. The results of this comparison indicated that PSOGO-Senti can effectively remove redundant and noisy features and can select a domain-specific feature subset with a higher-explanatory power for a particular sentiment analysis task. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti approach is effective and robust for sentiment analysis tasks in different domains. By comparing the improvements of two-polarity, three-polarity and five-polarity sentiment analysis results, we found that the five-polarity sentiment analysis delivered the largest improvement. The improvement of the two-polarity sentiment analysis was the smallest. We conclude that the PSOGO-Senti achieves higher improvement for a more complicated sentiment analysis task. We also compared the results of PSOGO-Senti with those of the genetic algorithm (GA) and grid search method. From

  16. Induction of robust de novo centrosome amplification, high-grade spindle multipolarity and metaphase catastrophe: a novel chemotherapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Pannu, V; Rida, P C G; Ogden, A; Clewley, R; Cheng, A; Karna, P; Lopus, M; Mishra, R C; Zhou, J; Aneja, R

    2012-01-01

    Centrosome amplification (CA) and resultant chromosomal instability have long been associated with tumorigenesis. However, exacerbation of CA and relentless centrosome declustering engender robust spindle multipolarity (SM) during mitosis and may induce cell death. Recently, we demonstrated that a noscapinoid member, reduced bromonoscapine, (S)-3-(R)-9-bromo-5-(4,5-dimethoxy-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-1-yl)-4-methoxy-6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-[1,3]dioxolo-[4,5-g]isoquinoline (Red-Br-nos), induces reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated autophagy and caspase-independent death in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Herein, we show that Red-Br-nos induces ROS-dependent DNA damage that resulted in high-grade CA and SM in PC-3 cells. Unlike doxorubicin, which causes double-stranded DNA breaks and chronic G2 arrest accompanied by ‘templated' CA, Red-Br-nos-mediated DNA damage elicits de novo CA during a transient S/G2 stall, followed by checkpoint abrogation and mitotic entry to form aberrant mitotic figures with supernumerary spindle poles. Attenuation of multipolar phenotype in the presence of tiron, a ROS inhibitor, indicated that ROS-mediated DNA damage was partly responsible for driving CA and SM. Although a few cells (∼5%) yielded to aberrant cytokinesis following an ‘anaphase catastrophe', most mitotically arrested cells (∼70%) succumbed to ‘metaphase catastrophe,' which was caspase-independent. This report is the first documentation of rapid de novo centrosome formation in the presence of parent centrosome by a noscapinoid family member, which triggers death-inducing SM via a unique mechanism that distinguishes it from other ROS-inducers, conventional DNA-damaging agents, as well as other microtubule-binding drugs. PMID:22785532

  17. Induction of robust de novo centrosome amplification, high-grade spindle multipolarity and metaphase catastrophe: a novel chemotherapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Pannu, V; Rida, P C G; Ogden, A; Clewley, R; Cheng, A; Karna, P; Lopus, M; Mishra, R C; Zhou, J; Aneja, R

    2012-07-12

    Centrosome amplification (CA) and resultant chromosomal instability have long been associated with tumorigenesis. However, exacerbation of CA and relentless centrosome declustering engender robust spindle multipolarity (SM) during mitosis and may induce cell death. Recently, we demonstrated that a noscapinoid member, reduced bromonoscapine, (S)-3-(R)-9-bromo-5-(4,5-dimethoxy-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-1-yl)-4-methoxy-6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-[1,3]dioxolo-[4,5-g]isoquinoline (Red-Br-nos), induces reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated autophagy and caspase-independent death in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Herein, we show that Red-Br-nos induces ROS-dependent DNA damage that resulted in high-grade CA and SM in PC-3 cells. Unlike doxorubicin, which causes double-stranded DNA breaks and chronic G2 arrest accompanied by 'templated' CA, Red-Br-nos-mediated DNA damage elicits de novo CA during a transient S/G2 stall, followed by checkpoint abrogation and mitotic entry to form aberrant mitotic figures with supernumerary spindle poles. Attenuation of multipolar phenotype in the presence of tiron, a ROS inhibitor, indicated that ROS-mediated DNA damage was partly responsible for driving CA and SM. Although a few cells (∼5%) yielded to aberrant cytokinesis following an 'anaphase catastrophe', most mitotically arrested cells (∼70%) succumbed to 'metaphase catastrophe,' which was caspase-independent. This report is the first documentation of rapid de novo centrosome formation in the presence of parent centrosome by a noscapinoid family member, which triggers death-inducing SM via a unique mechanism that distinguishes it from other ROS-inducers, conventional DNA-damaging agents, as well as other microtubule-binding drugs.

  18. Multipolar correlations between reactants in crystalline and semiamorphous zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Mandeville, J.B.; Golub, J.; Kozak, J.J.

    1988-03-24

    The authors study the role of multipolar correlations in influencing the efficiency of reaction between a fixed target molecule and a diffusing coreactant in zeolites that exhibit both crystalline and semiamorphous structures. They focus on zeolite A and construct a geometrical model whose framework structure and attendant channel patterns have the same topology as the 26-hedral cavities of type I of this aluminosilicate. They consider reaction partners interacting via (attractiverepulsive) ion-ion, angle-averaged ion-dipole, and angle-averaged dipole-dipole potentials V(r), and by coupling the theory of finite Markov processes with a lattice version of the Debye-Smoluchowski theory of encounter-controlled reactions, they quantify the differences in the diffusion-controlled rate constant k/sub D/ for reactions taking place in crystalline regions of finite extent (rafts) versus those occurring in crystalline regions surrounded by an amorphous aluminosilicate structure. Calculations based on the model introduced in this paper suggest that much of the marked cation-exchange activity and catalytic activity of fully crystalline zeolites is already captured by semiamorphous zeolites containing raft structures having the spatial extent of those found in recent experimental work by Thomas and Bursill

  19. Potential applications of multipolarization SAR for pine plantation biomass estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1985-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of the research tasks under the Radar Land Cover Analysis Program. The Radar Land Cover Analysis objective is, through utilization of multisensor data, to gain a basic understanding of the measurements and data characteristics in the visible-IR-microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum associated with specific surface features and cover types. Since the results of analysis of data acquired by Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) and LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) over the study area were reported (NSTL/ERL Report No. 228, December 1984), this study focused on the analysis and evaluation of the L-band multipolarization airborne SAR data acquired over a southeastern pine forest scene. The data acquisition mission was flown on September 8 and 9, 1983. The HH, HV polarizations and the VV, VH polarizations were used on the first and the second day, respectively. Due to instrumentation difficulties, the digital recorder recorded only the second day's data. Because of this, only the VV and VH polarization data were used in this analysis. However, the HH and HV polarization images were available for visual comparison. It appears that SAR digital numbers correlate with the index of green biomass.

  20. Configuration analysis and optimization on multipolar Galatea trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, W. M.; Tao, B. Q.; Jin, X. J.; Li, Z. W.

    2016-10-01

    Multipolar Galatea magnetic trap simulation model was established with the finite element simulation software COMSOL Multiphysics. Analyses about the magnetic section configuration show that better magnetic configuration should make more plasma stay in the weak magnetic field rather than the annular magnetic shell field. Then an optimization model was established with axial electromagnetic force, weak magnetic field area and average magnetic mirror ratio as the optimization goals and with the currents of myxines as design variables. Select appropriate weight coefficients and get optimization results by applying genetic algorithm. Results show that the superiority of the target value of typical application parameters, including the average magnetic mirror can reduce more than 5%, the weak magnetic field area can increase at least 65%, at the same time, axial electromagnetic force acting on the outer myxines can be reduced to less than 50 N. Finally, the results were proved by COMSOL Multiphysics and the results proved the optimized magnetic trap configuration with more plasma in the weak magnetic field can reduce the plasma diffusion velocity and is more conducive for the constraint of plasma.

  1. Configuration analysis and optimization on multipolar Galatea trap

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W. M. Tao, B. Q.; Jin, X. J.; Li, Z. W.

    2016-10-15

    Multipolar Galatea magnetic trap simulation model was established with the finite element simulation software COMSOL Multiphysics. Analyses about the magnetic section configuration show that better magnetic configuration should make more plasma stay in the weak magnetic field rather than the annular magnetic shell field. Then an optimization model was established with axial electromagnetic force, weak magnetic field area and average magnetic mirror ratio as the optimization goals and with the currents of myxines as design variables. Select appropriate weight coefficients and get optimization results by applying genetic algorithm. Results show that the superiority of the target value of typical application parameters, including the average magnetic mirror can reduce more than 5%, the weak magnetic field area can increase at least 65%, at the same time, axial electromagnetic force acting on the outer myxines can be reduced to less than 50 N. Finally, the results were proved by COMSOL Multiphysics and the results proved the optimized magnetic trap configuration with more plasma in the weak magnetic field can reduce the plasma diffusion velocity and is more conducive for the constraint of plasma.

  2. A multipolar approach to the interatomic covalent interaction energy.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Evelio; Menéndez Crespo, Daniel; Costales, Aurora; Martín Pendás, Ángel

    2017-04-30

    Interatomic exchange-correlation energies correspond to the covalent energetic contributions to an interatomic interaction in real space theories of the chemical bond, but their widespread use is severely limited due to their computationally intensive character. In the same way as the multipolar (mp) expansion is customary used in biomolecular modeling to approximate the classical Coulomb interaction between two charge densities ρA(r) and ρB(r), we examine in this work the mp approach to approximate the interatomic exchange-correlation (xc) energies of the Interacting Quantum Atoms method. We show that the full xc mp series is quickly divergent for directly bonded atoms (1-2 pairs) albeit it works reasonably well most times for 1- n (n > 2) interactions. As with conventional perturbation theory, we show numerically that the xc series is asymptotically convergent and that, a truncated xc mp approximation retaining terms up to l1+l2=2 usually gives relatively accurate results, sometimes even for directly bonded atoms. Our findings are supported by extensive numerical analyses on a variety of systems that range from several standard hydrogen bonded dimers to typically covalent or aromatic molecules. The exact algebraic relationship between the monopole-monopole xc mp term and the inter-atomic bond order, as measured by the delocalization index of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules, is also established. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Ordering in linear multipolar colloids driven by an external field.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Waess, O

    2006-08-14

    An approach to describe a linear multipolar colloid driven by an external field is developed by considering a colloid which in absence of the field is low structured and its coupling potential is axially symmetric. The equilibrium correlation of one component of the orientation tensor, self and collective, is computed up to linear order in density, which can be measured in an appropriate light scattering experiment. The self-correlation is written in terms of the second and fourth order parameters. All the equilibrium quantities are computed up to two-body level. This is done by assuming that the two-body equilibrium density function is given by the Boltzmann distribution, whereas the one-body density function is computed as solution of the equilibrium N-body Smoluchowski equation in the absence of hydrodynamic interactions. These observables, self and collective, as well as the second and fourth order parameters are able to describe when the colloid would evolve to an orientationally ordered phase. Explicit results for the dipole and quadrupole moments are reported. These results predict a different alignment with the external field for each moment. A relationship is provided between second and fourth order parameters, predicting the critical value of the external field in which the colloid goes into an axially symmetric phase.

  4. Relationships between multipolarized radar backscatter and slash pine stand parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussin, Yousif Ali; Hoffer, Roger M.

    1989-01-01

    Multipolarized L-band (24.5 cm) aircraft radar data was obtained for a primarily forested area in northern Florida. Based on the results of previous studies by Hoffer and Hussin (1989), a swath of medium incidence angle (35-25 deg) data was defined. Three groups of slash pine stands were located in the data: 4- to 17-year-old plantations, 18- to 48-year-old plantations, and 16- to 53-year-old natural stands. Stand data obtained from the forest-products companies operating in the area include age, tree height, diameter-at-breast height, basal area, volume (cords/acre), and density (trees/acre). Each of these stand parameters were compared to each of the four polarizations (HH, VV, VH, and HV) of the radar data for each group of stands. Statistically significant relationships were found between the radar backscatter and the forest stand parameters only for the 4- to 17-year-old slash pine plantation stands. In general, the cross-polarized radar backscatter was more highly correlated with the various stand parameters than the like-polarized backscatter, and the VV-polarized data were more highly correlated than the HH-polarized data.

  5. Two-site fluctuations and multipolar intersite exchange interactions in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourovskii, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    An approach is proposed for evaluating dipolar and multipolar intersite interactions in strongly correlated materials. This approach is based on the single-site dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) in conjunction with the atomic approximation for the local self-energy. Starting from the local-moment paramagnetic state described by DMFT, we derive intersite interactions by considering the response of the DMFT grand potential to small fluctuations of atomic configurations on two neighboring sites. The present method is validated by applying it to one-band and two-band eg Hubbard models on the simple-cubic 3 d lattice. It is also applied to study the spin-orbital order in the parent cubic structure of ternary chromium fluoride KCrF3. We obtain the onset of a G-type antiferro-orbital order at a significantly lower temperature compared to that in real distorted KCrF3. In contrast, its layered A-type antiferromagnetic order and Néel temperature are rather well reproduced. The calculated full Kugel-Khomskii Hamiltonian contains spin-orbital coupling terms inducing a misalignment in the antiferro-orbital order upon the onset of antiferromagnetism.

  6. Multi-Polarization Reconfigurable Antenna for Wireless Biomedical System.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hang; Lin, Wei; Huitema, Laure; Arnaud, Eric

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a multi-polarization reconfigurable antenna with four dipole radiators for biomedical applications in body-centric wireless communication system (BWCS). The proposed multi-dipole antenna with switchable 0°, +45°, 90° and -45° linear polarizations is able to overcome the polarization mismatching and multi-path distortion in complex wireless channels as in BWCS. To realize this reconfigurable feature for the first time among all the reported antenna designs, we assembled four dipoles together with 45° rotated sequential arrangements. These dipoles are excited by the same feeding source provided by a ground tapered Balun. A metallic reflector is placed below the dipoles to generate a broadside radiation. By introducing eight PIN diodes as RF switches between the excitation source and the four dipoles, we can control a specific dipole to operate. As the results, 0°, +45°, 90° and -45° linear polarizations can be switched correspondingly to different operating dipoles. Experimental results agree with the simulation and show that the proposed antenna well works in all polarization modes with desirable electrical characteristics. The antenna has a wide impedance bandwidth of 34% from 2.2 to 3.1 GHz (for the reflection coefficient ≤ -10 dB) and exhibits a stable cardioid-shaped radiation pattern across the operating bandwidth with a peak gain of 5.2 dBi. To validate the effectiveness of the multi-dipole antenna for biomedical applications, we also designed a meandered PIFA as the implantable antenna. Finally, the communication link measurement shows that our proposed antenna is able to minimize the polarization mismatching and maintains the optimal communication link thanks to its polarization reconfigurability.

  7. Electrophysiological channel interactions using focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Speech intelligibility with existing multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) is thought to be limited by poor spatial selectivity and interactions between CI channels caused by overlapping activation with monopolar (MP) stimulation. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation in the inferior colliculus (IC), compared to MP stimulation. Approach. This study explored interactions in the IC produced by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels. We recorded multi-unit neural activity in the IC of anaesthetized cats with normal and severely degenerated spiral ganglion neuron populations in response to FMP, TP and MP stimulation from a 14 channel CI. Stimuli were applied to a ‘fixed’ CI channel, chosen toward the middle of the cochlear electrode array, and the effects of simultaneously stimulating a more apical ‘test’ CI channel were measured as a function of spatial separation between the two stimulation channels and stimulus level of the fixed channel. Channel interactions were quantified by changes in neural responses and IC threshold (i.e., threshold shift) elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels, compared to stimulation of the test channel alone. Main results. Channel interactions were significantly lower for FMP and TP than for MP stimulation (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed between FMP and TP stimulation. With MP stimulation, threshold shifts increased with decreased inter-electrode spacing and increased stimulus levels of the fixed channel. For FMP and TP stimulation, channel interactions were found to be similar for different inter-electrode spacing and stimulus levels of the fixed channel. Significance. The present study demonstrates how the degree of channel interactions in a CI can be controlled using stimulation configurations such as FMP and TP; such knowledge is essential in enhancing CI function in complex

  8. Exposure of Allium cepa root cells to zidovudine or nevirapine induces cytogenotoxic changes.

    PubMed

    Onwuamah, Chika K; Ekama, Sabdat O; Audu, Rosemary A; Ezechi, Oliver C; Poirier, Miriam C; Odeigah, Peter G C

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs have proved useful in the clinical management of HIV-infected persons, though there are concerns about the effects of exposure to these DNA-reactive drugs. We investigated the potential of the plant model Allium cepa root tip assay to demonstrate the cytogenotoxicity of zidovudine and nevirapine and as a replace-reduce-refine programme amenable to resource-poor research settings. Cells mitotic index were determined in squashed root cells from Allium cepa bulbs exposed to zidovudine or nevirapine for 48 hr. The concentration of zidovudine and nevirapine inhibiting 50% root growth after 96 hr exposure was 65.0 µM and 92.5 µM respectively. Root length of all antiretroviral-exposed roots after 96 hr exposure was significantly shorter than the unexposed roots while additional root growth during a subsequent 48 hr recovery period in the absence of drug was not significantly different. By ANOVA, there was a significant association between percentage of cells in mitosis and zidovudine dose (p=0.004), but not nevirapine dose (p=0.68). Chromosomal aberrations such as sticky chromosomes, chromatin bridges, multipolar mitoses and binucleated cells were observed in root cells exposed to zidovudine and nevirapine for 48 hr. The most notable chromosomal aberration was drug-related increases in sticky chromosomes. Overall, the study showed inhibition in root length growth, changes in the mitotic index, and the induction of chromosomal aberrations in Allium bulbs treated for 96 hr or 48 hr with zidovudine and nevirapine. The study reveals generalized cytogenotoxic damage induced by exposure to zidovudine and nevirapine, and further show that the two compounds differ in their effects on mitosis and the types of chromosomal aberrations induced.

  9. Exposure of Allium cepa Root Cells to Zidovudine or Nevirapine Induces Cytogenotoxic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Onwuamah, Chika K.; Ekama, Sabdat O.; Audu, Rosemary A.; Ezechi, Oliver C.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Odeigah, Peter G C.

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs have proved useful in the clinical management of HIV-infected persons, though there are concerns about the effects of exposure to these DNA-reactive drugs. We investigated the potential of the plant model Allium cepa root tip assay to demonstrate the cytogenotoxicity of zidovudine and nevirapine and as a replace-reduce-refine programme amenable to resource–poor research settings. Cells mitotic index were determined in squashed root cells from Allium cepa bulbs exposed to zidovudine or nevirapine for 48 hr. The concentration of zidovudine and nevirapine inhibiting 50% root growth after 96 hr exposure was 65.0 µM and 92.5 µM respectively. Root length of all antiretroviral-exposed roots after 96 hr exposure was significantly shorter than the unexposed roots while additional root growth during a subsequent 48 hr recovery period in the absence of drug was not significantly different. By ANOVA, there was a significant association between percentage of cells in mitosis and zidovudine dose (p = 0.004), but not nevirapine dose (p = 0.68). Chromosomal aberrations such as sticky chromosomes, chromatin bridges, multipolar mitoses and binucleated cells were observed in root cells exposed to zidovudine and nevirapine for 48 hr. The most notable chromosomal aberration was drug-related increases in sticky chromosomes. Overall, the study showed inhibition in root length growth, changes in the mitotic index, and the induction of chromosomal aberrations in Allium bulbs treated for 96 hr or 48 hr with zidovudine and nevirapine. The study reveals generalized cytogenotoxic damage induced by exposure to zidovudine and nevirapine, and further show that the two compounds differ in their effects on mitosis and the types of chromosomal aberrations induced. PMID:24599327

  10. Potential application of multipolarization SAR for pine-plantation biomass estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shih-Tseng

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the technique and the potential utility of multipolarization Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for pine-plantation biomass estimation. Three channels of SAR data, one from the Shuttle Imaging Radar SIR-A and the other two from the aircraft SAR, were acquired over the Baldwin County, Alabama, study area. The SIR-A data were acquired with HH polarization and the aircraft SAR data with VV and VH polarizations. Linear regression techniques are used to estimate the pine-plantation biomass, tree height, and age using 21 test plots. The results indicate that the multipolarization data are highly related to the plantation biomass. The results suggest a potential application of multipolarization SAR for pine-plantation biomass estimation.

  11. Planar multipolar cells in the cochlear nucleus project to medial olivocochlear neurons in mouse.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Keith N; Benson, Thane E; Brown, M Christian

    2012-05-01

    Medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons originate in the superior olivary complex and project to the cochlea, where they act to reduce the effects of noise masking and protect the cochlea from damage. MOC neurons respond to sound via a reflex pathway; however, in this pathway the cochlear nucleus cell type that provides input to MOC neurons is not known. We investigated whether multipolar cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus have projections to MOC neurons by labeling them with injections into the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The projections of one type of labeled multipolar cell, planar neurons, were traced into the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, where they were observed terminating on MOC neurons (labeled in some cases by a second cochlear injection of FluoroGold). These terminations formed what appear to be excitatory synapses, i.e., containing small, round vesicles and prominent postsynaptic densities. These data suggest that cochlear nucleus planar multipolar neurons drive the MOC neuron's response to sound.

  12. Numerical simulation of multipolar configuration and prepulse technique to obtain spatially reverse recruitment order.

    PubMed

    Dali, Melissa; Rossel, Olivier; Guiraud, David

    2016-08-01

    In the context of functional electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves, the control of a specific motor or sensory functions may need selective stimulation to target the desired effect without others. In implanted stimulation, spatial selectivity is obtained using multipolar CUFF electrodes with specific spread of the current over each contact. Furthermore, electrical stimulation recruits large fibers before small ones, whereas the targeted function could be elicited by a specific fiber type i.e. fiber diameter. In our work, numerical simulations were used to investigate the combination of multipolar configuration and prepulses, in order to obtain spatially reverse recruitment order. Multipolar stimulation provides efficient spatial selectivity, whereas sub-threshold prepulses were used to reverse recruitment order with a reasonable increase of the injected charges. We compared several selective configurations combined with prepulses to show that some are able to guarantee both the spatial selectivity while one fiber's diameter can be preferentially activated.

  13. Potential application of multipolarization SAR for pine-plantation biomass estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    This paper presents the techniques and the potential utility of multipolarization Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for pine-plantation biomass estimation. Three channels of SAR data, one from the Shuttle Imaging Radar SIR-A and the other two from the aircraft SAR, were acquired over the Baldwin County, Alabama, study area. The SIR-A data were acquired with HH polarization and the aircraft SAR data with VV and VH polarizations. Linear regression techniques are used to estimate the pine-plantation biomass, tree height, and age using 21 test plots. The results indicate that the multipolarization data are highly related to the plantation biomass. The results suggest a potential application of multipolarization SAR for pine-plantation biomass estimation.

  14. Short-Term Results of Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Ablation Using a Multipolar System for Localized Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Naoki; Isoda, Norio; Takaoka, Yoshinari; Hirosawa, Takuya; Watanabe, Shunji; Otake, Toshiya; Murayama, Kozue; Fujieda, Takeshi; Tsukui, Mamiko; Miyata, Natsumi; Ono, Kohei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim Multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is feasible for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for which a large ablative area is planned, and it imposes a light physical burden on patients. Multipolar RFA via the percutaneous approach is performed in the majority of cases, but the efficacy of multipolar RFA with a laparoscopic approach has rarely been studied. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of multipolar laparoscopic RFA (LRA) for localized HCC over the short term. Methods From January 2014 to January 2016, 77 consecutive patients with 130 HCCs treated by multipolar LRA were assessed. One to three bipolar needle applicators were inserted under laparoscopic ultrasonography guidance, regardless of tumor location. We intended to achieve parallel insertions and no-touch ablation as much as possible. Results The median size of the main tumor was 22 mm (range, 10-42 mm). The median follow-up time was 13.6 months (range, 3.1-24.8 months). In all cases, a sufficient ablative area was obtained as planned, without thermal injury of adjacent organs. During the follow-up period, all patients were alive with no local tumor progression, while intrahepatic recurrence distant from the primary site occurred in 7 patients. The 2-year local tumor progression-free survival rate and overall cancer-free survival rate were 100 and 81.6%, respectively. There were no procedural major complications caused prolonging the hospitalization, and all patients were discharged without subjective symptoms 4-7 days after LRA. Conclusions Multipolar LRA was efficacious in the treatment of localized HCCs by safely achieving a good ablative area. PMID:28275580

  15. Are we counting mitoses correctly?

    PubMed

    Yigit, Nuri; Gunal, Armagan; Kucukodaci, Zafer; Karslioglu, Yildirim; Onguru, Onder; Ozcan, Ayhan

    2013-12-01

    The number of mitotic figures in a predefined area is essential in pathologic evaluation for most tumors. This information sometimes provides clues in differentiating neoplastic lesions from nonneoplastic ones and sometimes in defining and grading of the tumors as well as prognosticating expected lifetime of the patient. As a generally accepted concept, scanning a certain number of consecutive nonoverlapping areas that are rich in viable tumor cells is required. Invasion fronts or the periphery of the tumors is preferred for counting mitosis. The target area to be counted for mitotic activity for various tumors is standardized as the number of mitosis in an established number of high-power fields. However, suggested mitotic counts, which constitute the basis of these studies, were obtained via the old microscopes, which usually had narrower visual fields than the state-of-the-art microscopes. Because the visual fields of the present microscopes provide larger areas compared with the older ones, corrections in mitosis counting are needed to make them compatible with the criteria, which had been put forward in the original reference studies.

  16. Evidence of multipolar response of Bacteriorhodopsin by noncollinear second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Bovino, F A; Larciprete, M C; Sibilia, C; Váró, G; Gergely, C

    2012-06-18

    Noncollinear second harmonic generation from a Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) oriented multilayer film was systematically investigated by varying the polarization state of both fundamental beams. Both experimental results and theoretical simulations, show that the resulting polarization mapping is an useful tool to put in evidence the optical chirality of the investigated film as well as the corresponding multipolar contributions to the nonlinear.

  17. Connexin 43 controls the multipolar phase of neuronal migration to the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuxin; Sun, Lin; Torii, Masaaki; Rakic, Pasko

    2012-05-22

    The prospective pyramidal neurons, migrating from the proliferative ventricular zone to the overlaying cortical plate, assume multipolar morphology while passing through the transient subventricular zone. Here, we show that this morphogenetic transformation, from the bipolar to the mutipolar and then back to bipolar again, is associated with expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) and, that knockdown of Cx43 retards, whereas its overexpression enhances, this morphogenetic process. In addition, we have observed that knockdown of Cx43 reduces expression of p27, whereas overexpression of p27 rescues the effect of Cx43 knockdown in the multipolar neurons. Furthermore, functional gap junction/hemichannel domain, and the C-terminal domain of Cx43, independently enhance the expression of p27 and promote the morphological transformation and migration of the multipolar neurons in the SVZ/IZ. Collectively, these results indicate that Cx43 regulates the passage of migrating neurons through their multipolar stage via p27 signaling and that interference with this process, by either genetic and/or environmental factors, may cause cortical malformations.

  18. Connexin 43 controls the multipolar phase of neuronal migration to the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiuxin; Sun, Lin; Torii, Masaaki; Rakic, Pasko

    2012-01-01

    The prospective pyramidal neurons, migrating from the proliferative ventricular zone to the overlaying cortical plate, assume multipolar morphology while passing through the transient subventricular zone. Here, we show that this morphogenetic transformation, from the bipolar to the mutipolar and then back to bipolar again, is associated with expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) and, that knockdown of Cx43 retards, whereas its overexpression enhances, this morphogenetic process. In addition, we have observed that knockdown of Cx43 reduces expression of p27, whereas overexpression of p27 rescues the effect of Cx43 knockdown in the multipolar neurons. Furthermore, functional gap junction/hemichannel domain, and the C-terminal domain of Cx43, independently enhance the expression of p27 and promote the morphological transformation and migration of the multipolar neurons in the SVZ/IZ. Collectively, these results indicate that Cx43 regulates the passage of migrating neurons through their multipolar stage via p27 signaling and that interference with this process, by either genetic and/or environmental factors, may cause cortical malformations. PMID:22566616

  19. Spherical tensor multipolar electrostatics and smooth particle mesh Ewald summation: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, François; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-07-01

    The point-charge approximation, typically used by classical molecular mechanics force-fields, can be overcome by a multipolar expansion. For decades multipole moments were only used in the context of the rigid body approximation but recently it has become possible to combine multipolar electrostatics with molecular flexibility. The program DL_MULTI, which is derived from DL_POLY_2, includes efficient multipolar Ewald functionality up to the hexadecapole moment but the code is restricted to rigid bodies. The incorporation of flexibility into DL_MULTI would cause too large an impact on its architecture whereas the package DL_POLY_4 offers a more attractive and sustainable route to handle multipolar electrostatics. This package inherently handles molecular flexibility, which warrants sufficiently transferable atoms or atoms that are "knowledgeable" about their chemical environment (as made possible by quantum chemical topology and machine learning). DL_MULTI uses the spherical multipole formalism, which is mathematically more involved than the Cartesian one but which is more compact. DL_POLY_4 uses the computationally efficient method of smooth particle mesh Ewald (SPME) summation, which has also been parallellized by others. Therefore, combining the strengths of DL_POLY_4 and DL_MULTI poses the challenge of merging SPME with multipolar electrostatics by spherical multipole. In an effort to recast as clearly as possible the principles behind DL_MULTI, its key equations have been reformulated by the more streamlined route involving the algebra of complex numbers, and some of these equations' peculiarities clarified. This article explores theoretically the repercussions of the merging of SPME with spherical multipole electrostatics (as implemented in DL_MULTI). Difficulties in design and implementation of possible future code are discussed.

  20. Multipolar radiofrequency ablation using internally cooled electrodes in ex vivo bovine liver: correlation between volume of coagulation and amount of applied energy.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Stephan; Rempp, Hansjörg; Schmidt, Diethard; Schraml, Christina; Hoffmann, Rüdiger; Claussen, Claus D; Pereira, Philippe L

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between applied energy and volume of coagulation induced by multipolar radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Multipolar RF ablations (n=80) were performed in ex vivo bovine liver. Three bipolar applicators with two electrodes located on each applicator shaft were placed in a triangular array. The power-output (75-225 W) and the distance between the different applicators (2, 3, 4, 5 cm) were systematically varied. The volume of confluent white coagulation and the amount of applied energy were assessed. Based on our experimental data the relationship between the volume of coagulation and applied energy was assessed by nonlinear regression analysis. The variability explained by the model was determined by the parameter r(2). The volume of coagulation increases with higher amounts of applied energy. The maximum amount of energy was applied at a power-output of 75 W and an applicator distance of 5 cm. The corresponding maximum volume of coagulation was 324 cm(3) and required an application of 453 kJ. The relationship between amount of applied energy (E) and volume (V) of coagulation can be described by the function, V=4.39E(0.7) (r(2)=0.88). By approximation the volume of coagulation can be calculated by the linear function V=0.61E+40.7 (r(2)=0.87). Ex vivo the relationship between volume of coagulation and amount of applied energy can be described by mathematical modeling. The amount of applied energy correlates to the volume of coagulation and may be a useful parameter to monitor multipolar RF ablation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Do DNA double-strand breaks induced by Alu I lead to development of novel aberrations in the second and third post-treatment mitoses?

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, A.; Bonk, K.; Mueller, M.U.; Streffer, C.; Obe, G.

    1996-02-01

    Several authors have reported that ionizing radiation can give rise to novel aberrations several mitotic divisions after the exposure. At our institute this phenomenon has been observed in mouse preimplantation embryos. This cell system is uniquely well suited for such investigations because the first three cell divisions show a high degree of synchrony. Thus the expression of chromosomal aberrations at the first, second and third mitosis after irradiation can be scored unambiguously. To investigate whether DNA double-strand breaks may be the lesions responsible for the delayed expression of chromosomal aberrations, we have studied the frequencies of aberrations in the first, second and third mitosis after treatment of one-cell mouse embryos with the restriction enzyme Alu I. Embryos were permeabilized with Streptolysin-O. The results indicate that the induction of double-strand breaks does not lead to novel aberrations in the third post-treatment mitosis. Several embryos scored at the second mitosis showed very high numbers of aberrations, indicating that Alu I may remain active in the cells for a period of one cell cycle. After treatment with Streptolysin-O alone, enhanced aberration frequencies were observed in the third post-treatment mitosis, suggesting that membrane damage has a delayed effect on the cellular integrity. 44 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Wnt signaling regulates multipolar-to-bipolar transition of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Boitard, Michael; Bocchi, Riccardo; Egervari, Kristof; Petrenko, Volodymyr; Viale, Beatrice; Gremaud, Stéphane; Zgraggen, Eloisa; Salmon, Patrick; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2015-03-03

    The precise timing of pyramidal cell migration from the ventricular germinal zone to the cortical plate is essential for establishing cortical layers, and migration errors can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders underlying psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here, we report that Wnt canonical as well as non-canonical signaling is active in pyramidal precursors during radial migration. We demonstrate using constitutive and conditional genetic strategies that transient downregulation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during the multipolar stage plays a critical role in polarizing and orienting cells for radial migration. In addition, we show that reduced canonical Wnt signaling is triggered cell autonomously by time-dependent expression of Wnt5A and activation of non-canonical signaling. We identify ephrin-B1 as a canonical Wnt-signaling-regulated target in control of the multipolar-to-bipolar switch. These findings highlight the critical role of Wnt signaling activity in neuronal positioning during cortical development.

  3. Hubble space telescope observations and geometric models of compact multipolar planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chau, Wayne; Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun E-mail: wwlljj1314@gmail.com E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2014-05-20

    We report high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations of 10 compact planetary nebulae (PNs). Many interesting internal structures, including multipolar lobes, arcs, two-dimensional rings, tori, and halos, are revealed for the first time. These results suggest that multipolar structures are common among PNs, and these structures develop early in their evolution. From three-dimensional geometric models, we have determined the intrinsic dimensions of the lobes. Assuming the lobes are the result of interactions between later-developed fast winds and previously ejected asymptotic giant branch winds, the geometric structures of these PNs suggest that there are multiple phases of fast winds separated by temporal variations and/or directional changes. A scenario of evolution from lobe-dominated to cavity-dominated stages is presented. The results reported here will provide serious constraints on any dynamical models of PNs.

  4. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. I. Fully and partially open eruptions of flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-04-01

    We propose a catastrophic eruption model for the enormous energy release of magnetars during giant flares, in which a toroidal and helically twisted flux rope is embedded within a force-free magnetosphere. The flux rope stays in stable equilibrium states initially and evolves quasi-statically. Upon the loss of equilibrium, the flux rope cannot sustain the stable equilibrium states and erupts catastrophically. During the process, the magnetic energy stored in the magnetosphere is rapidly released as the result of destabilization of global magnetic topology. The magnetospheric energy that could be accumulated is of vital importance for the outbursts of magnetars. We carefully establish the fully open fields and partially open fields for various boundary conditions at the magnetar surface and study the relevant energy thresholds. By investigating the magnetic energy accumulated at the critical catastrophic point, we find that it is possible to drive fully open eruptions for dipole-dominated background fields. Nevertheless, it is hard to generate fully open magnetic eruptions for multipolar background fields. Given the observational importance of the multipolar magnetic fields in the vicinity of the magnetar surface, it would be worthwhile to explore the possibility of the alternative eruption approach in multipolar background fields. Fortunately, we find that flux ropes may give rise to partially open eruptions in the multipolar fields, which involve only partial opening of background fields. The energy release fractions are greater for cases with central-arcaded multipoles than those with central-caved multipoles that emerged in background fields. Eruptions would fail only when the centrally caved multipoles become extremely strong.

  5. Multipolar polarizabilities and two-body dispersion coefficients for Na by a variationally stable procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiu-Feng; Huang, Shi-Zhong

    2011-11-01

    Based on the weakest bound electron potential model theory, the ground-state wave function of Na is investigated. The variationally stable procedure of Gao and Starace is then employed to evaluate the static multipolar polarizabilities of Na, and the two-body dispersion coefficients for the Na-Na system. Calculated values show that our results are in general agreement with those previously reported in the literature.

  6. Force-balance model of suppression of multipolar division in cancer cells with extra centrosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie

    2013-03-01

    Cancer cells often possess extra centrosomes which have the potential to cause cell death due to catastrophic multipolar division. Many cancer cells, however, are able to escape multipolar mitosis by clustering the extra centrosomes to form bipolar spindles. The mechanism of centrosome clustering is therefore of great interest to the development of anti-cancer drugs because the de-clustering of extra centrosomes provides an appealing way to eliminate cancer cells while keeping healthy cells intact. We present a physical model assuming 1) dynamic centrosomal microtubules interact with chromosomes by both pushing on chromosome arms and pulling along kinetochores; 2) these microtubules interact with force generators associated with actin/adhesion structures at the cell boundary; and 3) motors act on anti-parallel microtubules from different centrosomes. We find via computer simulations that chromosomes tend to aggregate near the cell center while centrosomes can be either clustered to form bipolar spindles or scattered to form multipolar spindles, depending on the strengths of relative forces, cell shape and adhesion geometry. The model predictions agree with data from cells plated on adhesive micropatterns and from biochemically or genetically perturbed cells. Furthermore, our model is able to explain various microtubule distributions in interphase cells on patterned substrates. This work was supported by NSF

  7. RP58 regulates the multipolar-bipolar transition of newborn neurons in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Hirai, Shinobu; Miwa, Akiko; Heng, Julian Ik-Tsen; Shitara, Hiroshi; Ishii, Rie; Taya, Choji; Kawano, Hitoshi; Kasai, Masataka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Okado, Haruo

    2013-02-21

    Accumulating evidence suggests that many brain diseases are associated with defects in neuronal migration, suggesting that this step of neurogenesis is critical for brain organization. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal migration remain largely unknown. Here, we identified the zinc-finger transcriptional repressor RP58 as a key regulator of neuronal migration via multipolar-to-bipolar transition. RP58(-/-) neurons exhibited severe defects in the formation of leading processes and never shifted to the locomotion mode. Cre-mediated deletion of RP58 using in utero electroporation in RP58(flox/flox) mice revealed that RP58 functions in cell-autonomous multipolar-to-bipolar transition, independent of cell-cycle exit. Finally, we found that RP58 represses Ngn2 transcription to regulate the Ngn2-Rnd2 pathway; Ngn2 knockdown rescued migration defects of the RP58(-/-) neurons. Our findings highlight the critical role of RP58 in multipolar-to-bipolar transition via suppression of the Ngn2-Rnd2 pathway in the developing cerebral cortex.

  8. Phosphorylation of SCG10/stathmin-2 determines multipolar stage exit and neuronal migration rate.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Nina; Zdrojewska, Justyna; Padzik, Artur; Komulainen, Emilia; Björkblom, Benny; Rannikko, Emmy; Tararuk, Tanya; Garcia-Frigola, Cristina; Sandholm, Jouko; Nguyen, Laurent; Kallunki, Tuula; Courtney, Michael J; Coffey, Eleanor T

    2011-03-01

    Cell migration is the consequence of the sum of positive and negative regulatory mechanisms. Although appropriate migration of neurons is a principal feature of brain development, the negative regulatory mechanisms remain obscure. We found that JNK1 was highly active in developing cortex and that selective inhibition of JNK in the cytoplasm markedly increased both the frequency of exit from the multipolar stage and radial migration rate and ultimately led to an ill-defined cellular organization. Moreover, regulation of multipolar-stage exit and radial migration in Jnk1(-/-) (also known as Mapk8) mice, resulted from consequential changes in phosphorylation of the microtubule regulator SCG10 (also called stathmin-2). Expression of an SCG10 mutant that mimics the JNK1-phosphorylated form restored normal migration in the brains of Jnk1(-/-) mouse embryos. These findings indicate that the phosphorylation of SCG10 by JNK1 is a fundamental mechanism that governs the transition from the multipolar stage and the rate of neuronal cell movement during cortical development.

  9. Multipolar Effects in the Optical Active Second Harmonic Generation from Sawtooth Chiral Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huimin; Guo, Yuxiang; Gao, Wensheng; Ma, Jie; Zhong, Yongchun; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C. T.; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-01-01

    Based on the facts that chiral molecules response differently to left- and right-handed circular polarized light, chiroptical effects are widely employed for determining structure chirality, detecting enantiomeric excess, or controlling chemical reactions of molecules. Compared to those in natural materials, chiroptical behaviors can be significantly amplified in chiral plasmonic metamaterials due to the concentrated local fields in the structure. The on-going research towards giant chiroptical effects in metamaterial generally focus on optimizing the field-enhancement effects. However, the observed chiroptical effects in metamaterials rely on more complicated factors and various possibilities towards giant chiroptical effects remains unexplored. Here we study the optical-active second harmonic generation (SHG) behaviors in a pair of planar sawtooth gratings with mirror-imaged patterns. Significant multipolar effects were observed in the polarization-dependent SHG curves. We show that the chirality of the nanostructure not only give rise to nonzero chiral susceptibility tensor components within the electric-dipole approximation, but also lead to different levels of multipolar interactions for the two orthogonal circular polarizations that further enhance the nonlinear optical activity of the material. Our results thus indicate novel ways to optimize nonlinear plasmonic structures and achieve giant chiroptical response via multipolar interactions. PMID:26911449

  10. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in breast cancer is due to chromosome missegregation on multipolar spindles

    PubMed Central

    Zasadil, Lauren M.; Andersen, Kristen A.; Yeum, Dabin; Rocque, Gabrielle B.; Wilke, Lee G.; Tevaarwerk, Amye J.; Raines, Ronald T.; Burkard, Mark E.; Weaver, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    The blockbuster chemotherapy drug paclitaxel is widely presumed to cause cell death in tumors as a consequence of mitotic arrest, as it does at concentrations routinely used in cell culture. However, we determine here that paclitaxel levels in primary breast tumors are well below those required to elicit sustained mitotic arrest. Instead, cells in these lower concentrations of drug proceed through mitosis without substantial delay and divide their chromosomes on multipolar spindles, resulting in chromosome missegregation and cell death. Consistent with these cell culture data, the majority of mitotic cells in primary human breast cancers contain multipolar spindles after paclitaxel treatment. Contrary to the previous hypothesis, we find that mitotic arrest is dispensable for tumor regression in patients. These results demonstrate that mitotic arrest is not responsible for the efficacy of paclitaxel, which occurs due to chromosome missegregation on highly abnormal, multipolar spindles. This mechanistic insight may be used to improve selection of future anti-mitotic drugs and to identify a biomarker with which to select patients likely to benefit from paclitaxel. PMID:24670687

  11. Efficacy of multipolar radiofrequency with pulsed magnetic field therapy for the treatment of abdominal cellulite.

    PubMed

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Sathaworawong, Angkana; Manuskiatti, Woraphong; Sadick, Neil S

    2017-08-01

    Cellulite is a metabolic condition, predominately seen in females, that affects the subcutaneous tissue of the posterolateral thighs, buttocks, pelvic region, and abdomen. It is characterized by skin dimpling and lumpiness resembling an orange peel. Despite the wide range of treatment options for patients with cellulite, there is a paucity of empirical data supporting their efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new-generation multipolar radiofrequency (RF) device for the treatment of cellulite. A multipolar RF device with pulsed magnetic fields was used to treat abdominal cellulite. Twenty-five healthy adult females with stage II or stage III abdominal cellulite underwent 8 weekly treatments. Assessments were performed at baseline and at weeks 1, 4, and 12 following the final treatment. Reduction in subcutaneous thickness in the axial and sagittal plane of the abdomen was observed at 1 week following treatment initiation. Results from self-reported questionnaires revealed a significantly high level of patient satisfaction (60%). Assessments by a blinded investigator at one, four, and twelve weeks after the final treatment demonstrated a significant improvement in cellulite appearance. No adverse effects were reported and the treatment was well tolerated. This study demonstrates the safety, efficacy, and subject satisfaction of multipolar RF with pulsed magnetic field therapy in the treatment of abdominal cellulite.

  12. Rational Design of Orthogonal Multipolar Interactions with Fluorine in Protein–Ligand Complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Pollock, Jonathan; Borkin, Dmitry; Lund, George; ...

    2015-08-19

    Multipolar interactions involving fluorine and the protein backbone have been frequently observed in protein–ligand complexes. Such fluorine–backbone interactions may substantially contribute to the high affinity of small molecule inhibitors. Here we found that introduction of trifluoromethyl groups into two different sites in the thienopyrimidine class of menin–MLL inhibitors considerably improved their inhibitory activity. In both cases, trifluoromethyl groups are engaged in short interactions with the backbone of menin. In order to understand the effect of fluorine, we synthesized a series of analogues by systematically changing the number of fluorine atoms, and we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the complexes withmore » menin. Here, we found that introduction of fluorine at favorable geometry for interactions with backbone carbonyls may improve the activity of menin–MLL inhibitors as much as 5- to 10-fold. In order to facilitate the design of multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions in protein–ligand complexes, we developed a computational algorithm named FMAP, which calculates fluorophilic sites in proximity to the protein backbone. We demonstrated that FMAP could be used to rationalize improvement in the activity of known protein inhibitors upon introduction of fluorine. Furthermore, FMAP may also represent a valuable tool for designing new fluorine substitutions and support ligand optimization in drug discovery projects. Analysis of the menin–MLL inhibitor complexes revealed that the backbone in secondary structures is particularly accessible to the interactions with fluorine. Lastly, considering that secondary structure elements are frequently exposed at protein interfaces, we postulate that multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions may represent a particularly attractive approach to improve inhibitors of protein–protein interactions.« less

  13. Rational Design of Orthogonal Multipolar Interactions with Fluorine in Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Jonathan; Borkin, Dmitry; Lund, George; Purohit, Trupta; Dyguda-Kazimierowicz, Edyta; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-09-24

    Multipolar interactions involving fluorine and the protein backbone have been frequently observed in protein-ligand complexes. Such fluorine-backbone interactions may substantially contribute to the high affinity of small molecule inhibitors. Here we found that introduction of trifluoromethyl groups into two different sites in the thienopyrimidine class of menin-MLL inhibitors considerably improved their inhibitory activity. In both cases, trifluoromethyl groups are engaged in short interactions with the backbone of menin. In order to understand the effect of fluorine, we synthesized a series of analogues by systematically changing the number of fluorine atoms, and we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the complexes with menin. We found that introduction of fluorine at favorable geometry for interactions with backbone carbonyls may improve the activity of menin-MLL inhibitors as much as 5- to 10-fold. In order to facilitate the design of multipolar fluorine-backbone interactions in protein-ligand complexes, we developed a computational algorithm named FMAP, which calculates fluorophilic sites in proximity to the protein backbone. We demonstrated that FMAP could be used to rationalize improvement in the activity of known protein inhibitors upon introduction of fluorine. Furthermore, FMAP may also represent a valuable tool for designing new fluorine substitutions and support ligand optimization in drug discovery projects. Analysis of the menin-MLL inhibitor complexes revealed that the backbone in secondary structures is particularly accessible to the interactions with fluorine. Considering that secondary structure elements are frequently exposed at protein interfaces, we postulate that multipolar fluorine-backbone interactions may represent a particularly attractive approach to improve inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  14. Post-Newtonian factorized multipolar waveforms for spinning, nonprecessing black-hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yi; Buonanno, Alessandra; Racine, Etienne; Fujita, Ryuichi; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2011-03-15

    We generalize the factorized resummation of multipolar waveforms introduced by Damour, Iyer, and Nagar to spinning black holes. For a nonspinning test particle spiraling a Kerr black hole in the equatorial plane, we find that factorized multipolar amplitudes which replace the residual relativistic amplitude f{sub lm} with its lth root, {rho}{sub lm}=f{sub lm}{sup 1/l}, agree quite well with the numerical amplitudes up to the Kerr-spin value q{<=}0.95 for orbital velocities v{<=}0.4. The numerical amplitudes are computed solving the Teukolsky equation with a spectral code. The agreement for prograde orbits and large spin values of the Kerr black-hole can be further improved at high velocities by properly factoring out the lower-order post-Newtonian contributions in {rho}{sub lm}. The resummation procedure results in a better and systematic agreement between numerical and analytical amplitudes (and energy fluxes) than standard Taylor-expanded post-Newtonian approximants. This is particularly true for higher-order modes, such as (2,1), (3,3), (3,2), and (4,4), for which less spin post-Newtonian terms are known. We also extend the factorized resummation of multipolar amplitudes to generic mass-ratio, nonprecessing, spinning black holes. Lastly, in our study we employ new, recently computed, higher-order post-Newtonian terms in several subdominant modes and compute explicit expressions for the half and one-and-half post-Newtonian contributions to the odd-parity (current) and even-parity (odd) multipoles, respectively. Those results can be used to build more accurate templates for ground-based and space-based gravitational-wave detectors.

  15. Rational Design of Orthogonal Multipolar Interactions with Fluorine in Protein–Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multipolar interactions involving fluorine and the protein backbone have been frequently observed in protein–ligand complexes. Such fluorine–backbone interactions may substantially contribute to the high affinity of small molecule inhibitors. Here we found that introduction of trifluoromethyl groups into two different sites in the thienopyrimidine class of menin–MLL inhibitors considerably improved their inhibitory activity. In both cases, trifluoromethyl groups are engaged in short interactions with the backbone of menin. In order to understand the effect of fluorine, we synthesized a series of analogues by systematically changing the number of fluorine atoms, and we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the complexes with menin. We found that introduction of fluorine at favorable geometry for interactions with backbone carbonyls may improve the activity of menin–MLL inhibitors as much as 5- to 10-fold. In order to facilitate the design of multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions in protein–ligand complexes, we developed a computational algorithm named FMAP, which calculates fluorophilic sites in proximity to the protein backbone. We demonstrated that FMAP could be used to rationalize improvement in the activity of known protein inhibitors upon introduction of fluorine. Furthermore, FMAP may also represent a valuable tool for designing new fluorine substitutions and support ligand optimization in drug discovery projects. Analysis of the menin–MLL inhibitor complexes revealed that the backbone in secondary structures is particularly accessible to the interactions with fluorine. Considering that secondary structure elements are frequently exposed at protein interfaces, we postulate that multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions may represent a particularly attractive approach to improve inhibitors of protein–protein interactions. PMID:26288158

  16. Multipolar moments of weak lensing signal around clusters. Weighing filaments in harmonic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouin, C.; Gavazzi, R.; Codis, S.; Pichon, C.; Peirani, S.; Dubois, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Upcoming weak lensing surveys such as Euclid will provide an unprecedented opportunity to quantify the geometry and topology of the cosmic web, in particular in the vicinity of lensing clusters. Aims: Understanding the connectivity of the cosmic web with unbiased mass tracers, such as weak lensing, is of prime importance to probe the underlying cosmology, seek dynamical signatures of dark matter, and quantify environmental effects on galaxy formation. Methods: Mock catalogues of galaxy clusters are extracted from the N-body PLUS simulation. For each cluster, the aperture multipolar moments of the convergence are calculated in two annuli (inside and outside the virial radius). By stacking their modulus, a statistical estimator is built to characterise the angular mass distribution around clusters. The moments are compared to predictions from perturbation theory and spherical collapse. Results: The main weakly chromatic excess of multipolar power on large scales is understood as arising from the contraction of the primordial cosmic web driven by the growing potential well of the cluster. Besides this boost, the quadrupole prevails in the cluster (ellipsoidal) core, while at the outskirts, harmonic distortions are spread on small angular modes, and trace the non-linear sharpening of the filamentary structures. Predictions for the signal amplitude as a function of the cluster-centric distance, mass, and redshift are presented. The prospects of measuring this signal are estimated for current and future lensing data sets. Conclusions: The Euclid mission should provide all the necessary information for studying the cosmic evolution of the connectivity of the cosmic web around lensing clusters using multipolar moments and probing unique signatures of, for example, baryons and warm dark matter.

  17. Rational Design of Orthogonal Multipolar Interactions with Fluorine in Protein–Ligand Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Jonathan; Borkin, Dmitry; Lund, George; Purohit, Trupta; Dyguda-Kazimierowicz, Edyta; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-08-19

    Multipolar interactions involving fluorine and the protein backbone have been frequently observed in protein–ligand complexes. Such fluorine–backbone interactions may substantially contribute to the high affinity of small molecule inhibitors. Here we found that introduction of trifluoromethyl groups into two different sites in the thienopyrimidine class of menin–MLL inhibitors considerably improved their inhibitory activity. In both cases, trifluoromethyl groups are engaged in short interactions with the backbone of menin. In order to understand the effect of fluorine, we synthesized a series of analogues by systematically changing the number of fluorine atoms, and we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the complexes with menin. Here, we found that introduction of fluorine at favorable geometry for interactions with backbone carbonyls may improve the activity of menin–MLL inhibitors as much as 5- to 10-fold. In order to facilitate the design of multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions in protein–ligand complexes, we developed a computational algorithm named FMAP, which calculates fluorophilic sites in proximity to the protein backbone. We demonstrated that FMAP could be used to rationalize improvement in the activity of known protein inhibitors upon introduction of fluorine. Furthermore, FMAP may also represent a valuable tool for designing new fluorine substitutions and support ligand optimization in drug discovery projects. Analysis of the menin–MLL inhibitor complexes revealed that the backbone in secondary structures is particularly accessible to the interactions with fluorine. Lastly, considering that secondary structure elements are frequently exposed at protein interfaces, we postulate that multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions may represent a particularly attractive approach to improve inhibitors of protein–protein interactions.

  18. Effects of multipolar electrode radiofrequency energy delivery on ventricular endocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Oeff, M.; Langberg, J.J.; Franklin, J.O.; Chin, M.C.; Sharkey, H.; Finkbeiner, W.; Herre, J.M.; Scheinman, M.M. )

    1990-03-01

    This study examined the effects of radiofrequency energy applied in a bipolar fashion with single as compared with multiple sequential applications at the canine endocardium. In this closed-chest model, radiofrequency energy (750 kHz) was delivered between two adjacent poles of an electrode catheter. Single applications were performed at distinct sites in the left (n = 30) and right ventricles (n = 29) of 13 normal dogs. A multiple sequential technique, which enlarges the ablated endocardial surface, was applied in the left (n = 13) and right ventricles (n = 4) of seven normal dogs and six dogs with remote myocardial infarction. Single applications (199 +/- 200 joules) resulted in lesions with a volume of 0.12 +/- 0.06 cm3 (range 0.03 to 0.31 cm3) and an endocardial surface area of 0.29 +/- 0.15 cm2 (range 0.06 to 0.63 cm2). Changes at the catheter/tissue interface led to a rise in impedance, restricting further enlargement of the necrosis. Sequential delivery of radiofrequency energy between poles 1 and 2, 2 and 3, and 3 and 4 of a quadripolar electrode catheter repeated 9 to 11 times in slightly different positions allowed a cumulative energy of 6571 +/- 3857 joules to be applied to the endocardium, resulting in a lesion volume of 0.84 +/- 0.38 cm3, with an endocardial lesion surface area of 3.7 +/- 1.2 cm2 (range 2.9 to 5.1 cm2). Histologically, all radiofrequency lesions were restricted to the endocardium/subendocardium with a small border zone of injury. Aggressive stimulation techniques did not induce ventricular tachycardia in any of the dogs before and 19 +/- 11.4 days after multiple sequential ablations.

  19. Optical Photometry of BY Cam Modeled Using a Multipolar Magnetic Field Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, John; Mason, P. A.; Zhilkin, A.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Robinson, E. L.

    2014-01-01

    We present new high-speed broad-band optical photometry of the asynchronous polar (magnetic cataclysmic variable) BY Cam. Observations were obtained at the 2.1-m Otto Struve Telescope of McDonald observatory with 3s integration times. In an attempt to understand the complex changes in accretion flow geometry, we performed full 3D MHD simulations assuming a variety of white dwarf magnetic field structures including both aligned and non-aligned dipole plus quadrupole field components. We compare model predictions with photometry and various phases of the beat cycle and find that synthetic light curves derived from a multipolar field structure are consistent with the optical photometry.

  20. Effective medium multipolar tensor analysis of second-harmonic generation from metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanowicz, Mariusz; Kujala, Sami; Husu, Hannu; Kauranen, Martti

    2011-02-01

    We present a detailed multipolar tensor analysis of second-harmonic (SH) generation from arrays of L-shaped gold nanoparticles. We define three effective nonlinear tensors, which include electric dipoles only (Aeee) and lowest-order magnetic (and quadrupole) effects at the fundamental (Aeem) and the SH (Amee) frequency. The components of the various tensors are distinguished through their different transformations as the experimental geometry is varied. The response is dominated by electric-dipole effects. However, the higher multipoles also play a significant role and are more important at the fundamental frequency than at the SH frequency. The results correlate well with the particles' plasmonic resonances and symmetry rules.

  1. The Development of the Multipolar Magnesium Cell: A Case History of International Cooperation in a Competitive World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivilotti, Olivo G.

    The author conceived the first multipolar magnesium electrolytic cell in the late 1970s, in order to offset the impact of an 80kA monopolar cell developed in cooperation with Osaka Titanium Company (OTC) being licensed by Alcan to a major competitor of OTC. During the 1980s the commercial value of the multipolar magnesium cell technology was established. The 1990s saw significant further progress by OTC, while attempts by Alcan to commercialize it in magnesium production plants met with technical difficulties and failure, due primarily to the lack of magnesium chloride feed of adequate quality. Now the author plans to commercialize a new multipolar cell design with a target productivity of 8-10 tons/day and a unit power consumption of 8.5-10 KWHR/kg of magnesium.

  2. MEG (Magnetoencephalography) multipolar modeling of distributed sources using RAP-MUSIC (Recursively Applied and Projected Multiple Signal Characterization)

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J. C.; Baillet, S.; Jerbi, K.; Leahy, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the use of truncated multipolar expansions for producing dynamic images of cortical neural activation from measurements of the magnetoencephalogram. We use a signal-subspace method to find the locations of a set of multipolar sources, each of which represents a region of activity in the cerebral cortex. Our method builds up an estimate of the sources in a recursive manner, i.e. we first search for point current dipoles, then magnetic dipoles, and finally first order multipoles. The dynamic behavior of these sources is then computed using a linear fit to the spatiotemporal data. The final step in the procedure is to map each of the multipolar sources into an equivalent distributed source on the cortical surface. The method is illustrated through an application to epileptic interictal MEG data.

  3. Thermal protection performance of magnetohydrodynamic heat shield system based on multipolar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Li; Jun, Liu; Weiqiang, Liu

    2017-07-01

    In order to cover the shortage of dipole magnetic field in the magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) heat shield system, physical model of a multipolar magnetic field with central and peripheral solenoids is constructed. By employing the governing equations of three dimensional thermochemical nonequilibrium flow with electromagnetic source terms based on the low magneto-Reynolds assumption, the flow control performance of the dipole and multipolar magnetic fields are numerically simulated. To make the results comparable, two groups of cases are designed by first assuming equal stagnation magnetic induction strength and secondly assuming equal ampere-turns. Results show that, the five-magnet system, whose central polar orientation is the same with the peripheral ones, have stronger work capability and better shock control and thermal protection performance. Moreover, the five-solenoid systems are the best when the ampere-turns of the central solenoid are twice and fourth of the peripheral ones under those two circumstances respectively. Compared with the dipole magnetic field, the stagnation non-catalytic heat fluxes are decreased by a factor of 47.5% and 34.0% respectively.

  4. Properties of liquid water from a systematic refinement of a high-rank multipolar electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Majeed S; Liem, Steven Y; Popelier, Paul L A

    2010-05-07

    We build on previous work [S. Y. Liem and P. L. A. Popelier, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 4, 353 (2008)], where for the first time, a high-rank multipolar electrostatic potential was used in molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water at a wide range of pressures and temperatures, and using a multipolar Ewald summation. Water is represented as a rigid body, with atomic multipole moments defined by quantum chemical topology partitioning its gas phase electron density. The effect of the level of theory on the local structure of liquid water is systematically addressed. Values for Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters are optimized, for both oxygen and hydrogen atoms, against bulk properties. The best LJ parameters were then used in a set of simulations at 30 different temperatures (1 atm) and another set at 11 different pressures (at 298 K). Inclusion of the hydrogen LJ parameters significantly increases the self-diffusion coefficient. The behavior of bulk properties was studied and the local water structure analyzed by both radial and spatial distribution functions. Comparisons with familiar point-charge potentials, such as TIP3P, TIP4P, TIP5P, and simple point charge, show the benefits of multipole moments.

  5. Effects of Multipolar Radiofrequency and Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Treatment for Face and Neck Rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Thais Cristina Ferraz; Rocha, Sheyla de Fatima Soares; Ramos, Daniel Gontijo; Ramos, Camila Gontijo; Carvalho, Michelle Vanessa dos Anjos

    2017-01-01

    Skin aging is a gradual process that leads to wrinkle formation, laxity, and overall changes in skin appearance. In recent years, the demands to noninvasive treatments for facial rejuvenation increased, along with a variety of technologies and devices, such as radiofrequency. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical effects of a multipolar radiofrequency and pulsed electromagnetic field treatment for face and neck rejuvenation. Eleven patients with mild to moderate grades of photoaging underwent eight radiofrequency and pulsed electromagnetic field treatment sessions, once a week. Clinical photographs were taken before and a week after the end of the treatment, and improvement of facial skin parameters was evaluated by two different investigators. Significant improvement in skin laxity was observed in all eleven patients (100%). Improvement in facial contour was noted in 73% and 100% of patients when analyzed by investigators A and B, respectively. The score for overall improvement in skin condition was 3 ± 0.78 for investigator A and 3.6 ± 0.67 for investigator B. All patients were satisfied with the procedure and noted significant improvement in the skin. The combined multipolar radiofrequency and pulsed electromagnetic field device is effective and safe for treatment of aged skin in Brazilian patients. PMID:28373880

  6. An axosomatic and axodendritic multipolar neuron in the lizard cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu, A; Martinez-Guijarro, F J; de la Iglesia, J A; Lopez-Garcia, C

    1994-01-01

    The morphology and synaptic organisation of a type of multipolar neuron of the lizard cerebral cortex were studied by Golgi impregnation, intracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase, electron microscopy, and immunocytochemistry. It is a GABA-immunoreactive interneuron and most likely parvalbumin-immunoreactive. Its conspicuous axonal arbor is characterised by an initial segment arising from the soma or from a juxtasomatic dendritic segment. The initial axon segment ramifies and gives rise to thick myelinated segments that terminate in short unmyelinated branches studded with thick boutons 'en passant' that (1) make axosomatic synapses on bipyramidal neuronal somata and (2) synapse on initial apical dendritic segments of bipyramidal neurons forming climbing-like cartridges. The dendrites extend throughout the thickness of the cortex, receiving synaptic input from a variety of sources of which the most prominent is that of zinc-positive boutons coming from granule cells of the medial cortex. According to its synaptology, this interneuron may play a role in regulating the activity of bipyramidal neurons by both feed-forward and feed-back inhibition mechanisms. From a comparative standpoint, it may be related to the sparsely spiny or nonspiny multipolar neurons of the stratum oriens of the mammalian hippocampus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:7928645

  7. Nesting-driven multipolar order in CeB6 from photoemission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koitzsch, A.; Heming, N.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Portnichenko, P. Y.; Dukhnenko, A. V.; Shitsevalova, N. Y.; Filipov, V. B.; Lev, L. L.; Strocov, V. N.; Ollivier, J.; Inosov, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Some heavy fermion materials show so-called hidden-order phases which are invisible to many characterization techniques and whose microscopic origin remained controversial for decades. Among such hidden-order compounds, CeB6 is of model character due to its simple electronic configuration and crystal structure. Apart from more conventional antiferromagnetism, it shows an elusive phase at low temperatures, which is commonly associated with multipolar order. Here we show that this phase roots in a Fermi surface instability. This conclusion is based on a full 3D tomographic sampling of the electronic structure by angle-resolved photoemission and comparison with inelastic neutron scattering data. The hidden order is mediated by itinerant electrons. Our measurements will serve as a paradigm for the investigation of hidden-order phases in f-electron systems, but also generally for situations where the itinerant electrons drive orbital or spin order.

  8. Nesting-driven multipolar order in CeB6 from photoemission tomography.

    PubMed

    Koitzsch, A; Heming, N; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Portnichenko, P Y; Dukhnenko, A V; Shitsevalova, N Y; Filipov, V B; Lev, L L; Strocov, V N; Ollivier, J; Inosov, D S

    2016-03-15

    Some heavy fermion materials show so-called hidden-order phases which are invisible to many characterization techniques and whose microscopic origin remained controversial for decades. Among such hidden-order compounds, CeB6 is of model character due to its simple electronic configuration and crystal structure. Apart from more conventional antiferromagnetism, it shows an elusive phase at low temperatures, which is commonly associated with multipolar order. Here we show that this phase roots in a Fermi surface instability. This conclusion is based on a full 3D tomographic sampling of the electronic structure by angle-resolved photoemission and comparison with inelastic neutron scattering data. The hidden order is mediated by itinerant electrons. Our measurements will serve as a paradigm for the investigation of hidden-order phases in f-electron systems, but also generally for situations where the itinerant electrons drive orbital or spin order.

  9. Nesting-driven multipolar order in CeB6 from photoemission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koitzsch, A.; Heming, N.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Portnichenko, P. Y.; Dukhnenko, A. V; Shitsevalova, N. Y.; Filipov, V. B.; Lev, L. L.; Strocov, V. N.; Ollivier, J.; Inosov, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Some heavy fermion materials show so-called hidden-order phases which are invisible to many characterization techniques and whose microscopic origin remained controversial for decades. Among such hidden-order compounds, CeB6 is of model character due to its simple electronic configuration and crystal structure. Apart from more conventional antiferromagnetism, it shows an elusive phase at low temperatures, which is commonly associated with multipolar order. Here we show that this phase roots in a Fermi surface instability. This conclusion is based on a full 3D tomographic sampling of the electronic structure by angle-resolved photoemission and comparison with inelastic neutron scattering data. The hidden order is mediated by itinerant electrons. Our measurements will serve as a paradigm for the investigation of hidden-order phases in f-electron systems, but also generally for situations where the itinerant electrons drive orbital or spin order. PMID:26976632

  10. Output of acoustical sources. [effects of structural elements and background flow on immobile multipolar point radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic radiation from a source, here viewed as an immobile point singularity with periodic strength and a given multipolar nature, is affected by the presence of nearly structural elements (e.g., rigid or impedance surfaces) as well as that of a background flow in the medium. An alternative to the conventional manner of calculating the net source output by integrating the energy flux over a distant control surface is described; this involves a direct evaluation of the secondary wavefunction at the position of the primary source and obviates the need for a (prospectively difficult) flux integration. Various full and half-planar surface configurations with an adjacent source are analyzed in detail, and the explicit results obtained, in particular, for the power factor of a dipole brings out a substantial rise in its output as the source nears the sharp edge of a half-plane.

  11. Output of acoustical sources. [effects of structural elements and background flow on immobile multipolar point radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic radiation from a source, here viewed as an immobile point singularity with periodic strength and a given multipolar nature, is affected by the presence of nearly structural elements (e.g., rigid or impedance surfaces) as well as that of a background flow in the medium. An alternative to the conventional manner of calculating the net source output by integrating the energy flux over a distant control surface is described; this involves a direct evaluation of the secondary wavefunction at the position of the primary source and obviates the need for a (prospectively difficult) flux integration. Various full and half-planar surface configurations with an adjacent source are analyzed in detail, and the explicit results obtained, in particular, for the power factor of a dipole brings out a substantial rise in its output as the source nears the sharp edge of a half-plane.

  12. Characterizing forest stands with multi-incidence angle and multi-polarized SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, R. M.; Lozano-Garcia, D. F.; Gillespie, D. D.

    1987-01-01

    The potential for using HH-polarized L-band SAR data obtained at different incidence angles from satellite altitudes to identify and map different forest cover types and stand density classes is studied. Reasonably accurate results are obtained if the speckle characteristics of the data are suppressed by low-pass spatial filters and a contextual classification algorithm. Multipolarized L-band SAR data obtained from aircraft altitudes over the same test site are also analyzed to assess the relationships between polarization and forest stand characteristics. It is found that incidence angle controls, to a very large extent, the characteristics of the data and the type of information that can be obtained from L-band, HH-polarized satellite SAR data. Cross-polarization of L-band SAR data enhances and differentiates various forest stand characteristics which cannot be defined using only the like-polarized data, and vice-versa.

  13. FMRP regulates multipolar to bipolar transition affecting neuronal migration and cortical circuitry.

    PubMed

    La Fata, Giorgio; Gärtner, Annette; Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Dresselaers, Tom; Dawitz, Julia; Poorthuis, Rogier B; Averna, Michele; Himmelreich, Uwe; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Achsel, Tilmann; Dotti, Carlos G; Bagni, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Deficiencies in fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) are the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS), with symptoms manifesting during infancy and early childhood. Using a mouse model for FXS, we found that Fmrp regulates the positioning of neurons in the cortical plate during embryonic development, affecting their multipolar-to-bipolar transition (MBT). We identified N-cadherin, which is crucial for MBT, as an Fmrp-regulated target in embryonic brain. Furthermore, spontaneous network activity and high-resolution brain imaging revealed defects in the establishment of neuronal networks at very early developmental stages, further confirmed by an unbalanced excitatory and inhibitory network. Finally, reintroduction of Fmrp or N-cadherin in the embryo normalized early postnatal neuron activity. Our findings highlight the critical role of Fmrp in the developing cerebral cortex and might explain some of the clinical features observed in patients with FXS, such as alterations in synaptic communication and neuronal network connectivity.

  14. An improved experimental databank of transferable multipolar atom models--ELMAM2. Construction details and applications.

    PubMed

    Domagała, Sławomir; Fournier, Bertrand; Liebschner, Dorothee; Guillot, Benoît; Jelsch, Christian

    2012-05-01

    ELMAM2 is a generalized and improved library of experimentally derived multipolar atom types. The previously published ELMAM database is restricted mostly to protein atoms. The current database is extended to common functional groups encountered in organic molecules and is based on optimized local axes systems taking into account the local pseudosymmetry of the molecular fragment. In this approach, the symmetry-restricted multipoles have zero populations, while others take generally significant values. The various applications of the database are described. The deformation electron densities, electrostatic potentials and interaction energies calculated for several tripeptides and aromatic molecules are calculated using ELMAM2 electron-density parameters and compared with the former ELMAM database and density functional theory calculations.

  15. Multifrequency, Multipolarization External Calibration of the SIR-C/X-SAR Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony; Sarabandi, K.

    1996-01-01

    Progress and the future plans for the following objectives are discussed: (1) Assess the accuracy at which the SIR-C/X-SAR standard data products can be calibrated through the use of ground calibrators to estimate the end-to-end system polarization calibration constants (or distortion parameters) and incorporate the constants into the data processing; (2) Study the cross-calibration between three multipolarization systems: SIR-C, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA/JPL) DC-8 SAR, and the University of Michigan ground-based polarimetric scatterometer; (3) Evaluate the calibration "stability" of SIR-C/X-SAR (measured by variations in the calibration constants) over the range swath width and over a specified distance in azimuth. Variations over a 12-hour period (between ascending and descending passes) will also be studied; and (4) Develop a cost-effective calibration plan including development of inexpensive polarimetric active calibrators.

  16. Estimation of Soil Moisture with L-band Multi-polarization Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, J.; Chen, K. S.; Kim, Chung-Li Y.; Van Zyl, J. J.; Njoku, E.; Sun, G.; O'Neill, P.; Jackson, T.; Entekhabi, D.

    2004-01-01

    Through analyses of the model simulated data-base, we developed a technique to estimate surface soil moisture under HYDROS radar sensor (L-band multi-polarizations and 40deg incidence) configuration. This technique includes two steps. First, it decomposes the total backscattering signals into two components - the surface scattering components (the bare surface backscattering signals attenuated by the overlaying vegetation layer) and the sum of the direct volume scattering components and surface-volume interaction components at different polarizations. From the model simulated data-base, our decomposition technique works quit well in estimation of the surface scattering components with RMSEs of 0.12,0.25, and 0.55 dB for VV, HH, and VH polarizations, respectively. Then, we use the decomposed surface backscattering signals to estimate the soil moisture and the combined surface roughness and vegetation attenuation correction factors with all three polarizations.

  17. Comparisons of wind speed retrieval methods on C-band multi-polarization SAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Juan; Wang, Difeng

    2014-10-01

    This paper compares the wind speed retrieval methods on C-band multi-polarization SAR measurements to find out the most appropriate one for each polarization data. The RADARSAT-2 SAR quad-polarization (VV+HH+VH+HV) data and NDBC buoy wind data were collocated. For VVpolarization, the retrieved wind speed are compared among four geophysical model function (GMF). For HH polarization, the retrieved wind speed are compared among four polarization ratio model (PR) based on CMOD5 GMF. For VH polarization, the retrieved wind speed are compared between two linear models. Comparisons show all of three polarimetric SAR data have the ability of retrieving wind speed. Based on the error analysis, the commendatory methods are proposed for each polarization.

  18. Phonon Dynamics and Multipolar Isomorphic Transition in β-Pyrochlore KOs2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kazumasa

    2011-02-01

    We investigate with a microscopic model anharmonic K-cation oscillation observed by neutron experiments in β-pyrochlore superconductor KOs2O6, which also shows a mysterious first-order structural transition at Tp = 7.5 K. We have identified a set of microscopic model parameters that successfully reproduce the observed tem perature dependence and the superconducting transition temperature. Considering changes in the parameters at Tp, we can explain puzzling experimental results about electron--phonon coupling and neutron data. Our analysis demonstrates that the first-order transition is multipolar transition driven by the octupolar component of K-cation oscillations. The octupole moment does not change the symmetry and is characteristic to noncentrosymmetric K-cation potential.

  19. The multiple functions of T stellate/multipolar/chopper cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Donata; Wright, Samantha; Cao, Xiao-Jie; Ferragamo, Michael; Bal, Ramazan

    2011-06-01

    Acoustic information is brought to the brain by auditory nerve fibers, all of which terminate in the cochlear nuclei, and is passed up the auditory pathway through the principal cells of the cochlear nuclei. A population of neurons variously known as T stellate, type I multipolar, planar multipolar, or chopper cells forms one of the major ascending auditory pathways through the brainstem. T Stellate cells are sharply tuned; as a population they encode the spectrum of sounds. In these neurons, phasic excitation from the auditory nerve is made more tonic by feedforward excitation, coactivation of inhibitory with excitatory inputs, relatively large excitatory currents through NMDA receptors, and relatively little synaptic depression. The mechanisms that make firing tonic also obscure the fine structure of sounds that is represented in the excitatory inputs from the auditory nerve and account for the characteristic chopping response patterns with which T stellate cells respond to tones. In contrast with other principal cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), T stellate cells lack a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance and are therefore sensitive to small, steady, neuromodulating currents. The presence of cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors allows the excitability of these cells to be modulated by medial olivocochlear efferent neurons and by neuronal circuits associated with arousal. T Stellate cells deliver acoustic information to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB), periolivary regions around the lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), and to the contralateral ventral lemniscal nuclei (VNLL) and inferior colliculus (IC). It is likely that T stellate cells participate in feedback loops through both medial and lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons and they may be a source of ipsilateral excitation of the LSO.

  20. Spatial Restriction of Neural Activation Using Focused Multipolar Stimulation With a Retinal Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Thomas C; Fallon, James B; Thien, Patrick C; Shivdasani, Mohit N

    2016-06-01

    The resolution provided by present state-of-the-art retinal prostheses is severely limiting for recipients, partly due to the broad spread of activation in the retina in response to monopolar (MP) electrical stimulation. Focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation has been shown to restrict neural activation in the cochlea compared to MP stimulation. We extended the FMP stimulation technique to a two-dimensional electrode array and compared its efficacy to MP and hexapolar (HP) stimulation in the retina. Normally-sighted cats (n = 6) were implanted with a suprachoroidal electrode array containing 42 electrodes. Multichannel multiunit spiking activity was recorded from the visual cortex in response to MP, HP, and FMP retinal stimulation. When inferring retinal spread using voltage recordings off the stimulating array, FMP stimulation showed significantly reduced voltages in regions surrounding the primary stimulating electrode. When measuring the retinal and cortical selectivity of neural responses, FMP and HP stimulation showed significantly higher selectivity compared to MP stimulation (separate 2-way ANOVAs, P < 0.05). However, the lowest cortical thresholds for each stimulating electrode were higher for FMP and HP compared to MP stimulation (1-way ANOVA, P < 0.001). No significant differences were observed between FMP and HP stimulation in any measures. Focused multipolar and HP stimulation using a two-dimensional array are promising techniques to reduce the spread of activation for a retinal prosthesis. Clinical application would be expected to result in smaller phosphenes; thus, reducing phosphene overlap between electrodes and increasing the resolution at the expense of higher thresholds for activation.

  1. Ultrastructure and immunocytochemical characteristics of cells in the octopus cell area of the rat cochlear nucleus: comparison with multipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2003-01-01

    Cells in the octopus cell area of the rat ventral cochlear nucleus have been connected to the monaural interpretation of spectral patterns of sound such as those derived from speech. This is possible by their fast onset of firing after each octopus cell and its dendrites have been contacted by many auditory fibres carrying different frequencies. The cytological characteristics that make these large cells able to perform such a function have been studied with ultrastructural immunocytochemistry for glycine, GABA and glutamate, and compared to that of other multipolar neurons of other regions of the ventral cochlear nucleus. Cells in the octopus cell area have an ultrastructure similar to large-giant D-multipolar neurons present in other areas of the cochlear nucleus, from which they differ by the presence of a larger excitatory axo-somatic synaptic input and larger mitochondria. Octopus cells are glycine and GABA negative, and glutamate positive with different degree. Large octopus cells receive more axo-somatic boutons than smaller octopus cells. Fusiform octopus cells are found sparsely within the intermediate acoustic striae. These cells are large to giant excitatory neurons (23-35 microm) with 62-85% of their irregular perimeter covered with large axo-somatic synaptic boutons. Most boutons contain round vesicles and are glycine and GABA negative but glutamate positive. The latter excitatory boutons represent about 70% of the input to octopus cells. Glycine positive boutons with flat and pleomorphic vesicles account for 9-10% of the input while GABA-ergic boutons with pleomorphic vesicles represent about 20% of the synaptic input. Other few, multipolar cells within the rat octopus cell area are surrounded by more inhibitory than excitatory terminals which contain flat and pleomorphic vesicles, a feature distinctive from that of true octopus cells. The latter resemble multipolar cells seen outside the octopus cell area that project to the contralateral inferior

  2. Point-by-point pulmonary vein antrum isolation guided by intracardiac echocardiography and 3D mapping and duty-cycled multipolar AF ablation: effect of multipolar ablation on procedure duration and fluoroscopy time.

    PubMed

    Khaykin, Yaariv; Zarnett, Lauren; Friedlander, Daniel; Wulffhart, Zaev A; Whaley, Bonnie; Giewercer, David; Tsang, Bernice; Verma, Atul

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary vein antrum isolation (PVAI) guided by intracardiac echocardiography and a roaming circular mapping catheter is an effective treatment modality for atrial fibrillation. Unfortunately, the complexity of this technique leads to long procedure times and high fluoroscopy exposure. Single-catheter multipolar ablation holds the promise to reduce these parameters. This study examined the effect of the conventional point-by-point PVAI with that of single-catheter multipolar ablation on the procedural characteristics and clinical outcomes of atrial fibrillation ablation. Referred patients underwent PVAI guided by a magnetic-based 3D mapping (CARTO 3(®) System; group 1) or duty-cycled multipolar AF ablation using the pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC, group 2) between June 2010 and May 2011. Data were analyzed from 19 patients in group 1 and 31 patients in group 2. There was no significant difference in the length of the procedure between the two groups (135 ± 26 vs 125 ± 25 min, P = 0.20). Patients who underwent ablation using PVAC spent significantly less time in the procedure room pre- and post-procedure than those who underwent conventional PVAI (205 ± 38 vs 179 ± 30 min, P = 0.02) and had a significantly shorter fluoroscopy exposure (50 ± 16 vs 36 ± 14 min, P = 0.003) and radiofrequency energy delivery time (54 ± 26 vs 32 ± 33 min, P = 0.02). No differences in safety and efficacy were seen between the groups. Single-catheter multipolar AF ablation was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy duration, radiofrequency energy delivery time, and the time the patient spent in the procedure room before and after ablation, although measured short-term clinical outcomes were similar.

  3. Reelin, Rap1 and N-cadherin orient the migration of multipolar neurons in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Jossin, Yves; Cooper, Jonathan A

    2011-06-01

    Projection neurons migrate from the ventricular zone to the neocortical plate during the development of the mouse brain. Their overall movement is radial, but they become multipolar and move nonradially in the intermediate zone. Here we show that Reelin, the Rap1 GTPase and N-cadherin (NCad) are important for multipolar neurons to polarize their migration toward the cortical plate. Inhibition and rescue experiments indicated that Reelin regulates migration through Rap1 and Akt, and that the Rap1-regulated GTPases RalA, RalB, Rac1 and Cdc42 are also involved. We found that Rap1 regulated the plasma membrane localization of NCad and NCad rescued radial polarization when Rap1 was inhibited. However, inhibition of Rap1 or NCad had little effect on glia-dependent locomotion. We propose a multistep mechanism in which Reelin activates Rap1, Rap1 upregulates NCad, and NCad is needed to orient cell migration.

  4. ADAM17 is critical for multipolar exit and radial migration of neuronal intermediate progenitor cells in mice cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyu; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Zengmin; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Bin; Pan, Le; Ma, Zhixing; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    The radial migration of neuronal progenitor cells is critical for the development of cerebral cortex layers. They go through a critical step transforming from multipolar to bipolar before outward migration. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) is a transmembrane protease which can process many substrates involved in cell-cell interaction, including Notch, ligands of EGFR, and some cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we used in utero electroporation to knock down or overexpress ADAM17 at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in neuronal progenitor cells to examine the role of ADAM17 in cortical embryonic neurogenesis. Our results showed that the radial migration of ADAM17-knocked down cells were normal till E16.5 and reached the intermediate zone (IZ). Then most transfected cells stopped migration and stayed at the IZ to inner cortical plate (CP) layer at E18.5, and there was higher percentage of multipolar cells at IZ layer in the ADAM17-knocked down group compared to the cells in control group. Marker staining revealed that those ADAM17-knocked down cells differentiated normally from neural stem cells (NSCs) to neuronal intermediate progenitor cells (nIPCs) but did not differentiate into mature neurons. The migration and multipolar exit defects caused by ADAM17 knockdown could be partially rescued by over-expressing an shRNA resistant ADAM17, while overexpressing ADAM17 alone did not affect the radial migration. Taken together, our results showed for the first time that, ADAM17 is critical in regulating the multipolar-stage exit and radial migration of the nIPCs during telencephalon cortex development in mice.

  5. Huntingtin-Mediated Multipolar-Bipolar Transition of Newborn Cortical Neurons Is Critical for Their Postnatal Neuronal Morphology.

    PubMed

    Barnat, Monia; Le Friec, Julien; Benstaali, Caroline; Humbert, Sandrine

    2017-01-04

    In the developing cortex, projection neurons undergo multipolar-bipolar transition, radial-directed migration, and maturation. The contribution of these developmental steps to the structure of the adult cortex is not completely understood. Here, we report that huntingtin (HTT), the protein mutated in Huntington's disease, is enriched in polarizing projection neurons. The depletion of HTT in postmitotic projection neurons leads to the mislocalization of layer-specific neuronal populations in the mouse neocortex. HTT is required for the multipolar-bipolar transition of projection neurons and for the maintenance of their bipolar shape during their radial migration. HTT mediates these effects in vivo through the regulation of RAB11-dependent N-Cadherin trafficking. Importantly, HD pathological HTT alters RAB11-dependent neuronal migration. Finally, we show that the cortical defects resulting from the postmitotic loss of HTT specifically during embryonic development affect neuronal morphology at adulthood. Our data reveal a new HTT-RAB11-N-Cadherin pathway regulating multipolar-bipolar transition with direct implications for mature brain. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  6. Multipolarity of the 2-→1- , ground-state transition in 210Bi via multivariable angular correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Szpak, B.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C.; Urban, W.

    2016-07-01

    The multipolarity of the main transition leading to the ground state in 210Bi was investigated using the angular correlations of γ rays. The analyzed γ -coincidence data were obtained from the 209Bi(n ,γ )210Bi experiment performed at Institut Laue-Langevin Grenoble at the PF1B cold-neutron facility. The EXILL (EXOGAM at the ILL) multidetector array, consisting of 16 high-purity germanium detectors, was used to detect γ transitions. The mixing ratio of the 320-keV γ ray was defined by minimizing a multivariable χΣ2 function constructed from the coefficients of angular correlation functions for seven pairs of strong transitions in 210Bi. As a result, the almost pure M 1 multipolarity of the 320-keV γ ray was obtained, with an E 2 admixture of less than 0.6% only (95% confidence limit). Based on this multipolarity the neutron-capture cross section leading to the ground state in 210Bi, that decays in turn to radiotoxic 210Po, was determined to be within the limits 21.3(9) and 21.5(9) mb. This result is important for nuclear reactor applications.

  7. Tuberculoventral neurons project to the multipolar cell area but not to the octopus cell area of the posteroventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wickesberg, R E; Whitlon, D; Oertel, D

    1991-11-15

    Tuberculoventral neurons in the deep layer of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) provide frequency-specific inhibition to neurons in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) of the mouse (Wickesberg and Oertel, '88, '90). The present experiments examine the projection from the deep DCN to the posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN). Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injections into the PVCN reveal that the multipolar cell area, but not the octopus cell area, is innervated by neurons in the deep layer of the DCN. Injections into the multipolar cell area, in the rostral and ventral PVCN, labeled neurons across the entire rostrocaudal extent of the deep DCN. The labeled tuberculoventral neurons generally lay within the band of labeled auditory nerve terminals in the DCN. Injections of HRP into the octopus cell area, in the dorsal caudal PVCN, labeled almost no cells within the band of auditory nerve fiber terminals that were labeled by the same injection. The inhibition from tuberculoventral neurons onto ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) neurons is likely to be mediated by glycine (Wickesberg and Oertel, '90). Slices of the cochlear nuclear complex were immunolabeled by an antibody against glycine conjugated with glutaraldehyde to bovine serum albumin (Wenthold et al., '87). Glycine-like immunoreactivity was found throughout the DCN, the AVCN and the multipolar cell area, but there was little labeling in the octopus cell area. This finding provides independent evidence that tuberculoventral neurons do not innervate the octopus cell area and indicates that the octopus cell area is anatomically and functionally distinct.

  8. Multipolar Electrostatic Energy Prediction for all 20 Natural Amino Acids Using Kriging Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Timothy L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2016-06-14

    A machine learning method called kriging is applied to the set of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Kriging models are built that predict electrostatic multipole moments for all topological atoms in any amino acid based on molecular geometry only. These models then predict molecular electrostatic interaction energies. On the basis of 200 unseen test geometries for each amino acid, no amino acid shows a mean prediction error above 5.3 kJ mol(-1), while the lowest error observed is 2.8 kJ mol(-1). The mean error across the entire set is only 4.2 kJ mol(-1) (or 1 kcal mol(-1)). Charged systems are created by protonating or deprotonating selected amino acids, and these show no significant deviation in prediction error over their neutral counterparts. Similarly, the proposed methodology can also handle amino acids with aromatic side chains, without the need for modification. Thus, we present a generic method capable of accurately capturing multipolar polarizable electrostatics in amino acids.

  9. Cholesterol oxidase: ultrahigh-resolution crystal structure and multipolar atom model-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarychta, Bartosz; Lyubimov, Artem; Ahmed, Maqsood; Munshi, Parthapratim; Guillot, Benoît; Vrielink, Alice; Jelsch, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Examination of protein structure at the subatomic level is required to improve the understanding of enzymatic function. For this purpose, X-ray diffraction data have been collected at 100 K from cholesterol oxidase crystals using synchrotron radiation to an optical resolution of 0.94 Å. After refinement using the spherical atom model, nonmodelled bonding peaks were detected in the Fourier residual electron density on some of the individual bonds. Well defined bond density was observed in the peptide plane after averaging maps on the residues with the lowest thermal motion. The multipolar electron density of the protein-cofactor complex was modelled by transfer of the ELMAM2 charge-density database, and the topology of the intermolecular interactions between the protein and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor was subsequently investigated. Taking advantage of the high resolution of the structure, the stereochemistry of main-chain bond lengths and of C=O···H-N hydrogen bonds was analyzed with respect to the different secondary-structure elements.

  10. The Shaping of the Multipolar Pre-planetary Nebula CRL 618 by Multidirectional Bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Sheng; Lee, Chin-Fei; Moraghan, Anthony; Smith, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In order to understand the formation of the multipolar structures of the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618, we perform 3D simulations using a multidirectional bullet model. The optical lobes of CRL 618 and fast molecular outflows at the tips of the lobes have been found to have similar expansion ages of ˜100 yr. Additional fast molecular outflows were found near the source along the outflow axes with ages of ˜45 yr, suggesting a second episode of bullet ejections. Thus, in our simulations, two episodes of bullet ejections are assumed. The shaping process is simulated using the ZEUS-3D hydrodynamics code that includes molecular and atomic cooling. In addition, molecular chemistry is also included to calculate the CO intensity maps. Our results show the following: (1) Multiepoch bullets interacting with the toroidal dense core can produce the collimated multiple lobes as seen in CRL 618. The total mass of the bullets is ˜0.034 M⊙, consistent with the observed high-velocity (HV) CO emission in fast molecular outflows. (2) The simulated CO J = 3-2 intensity maps show that the low-velocity cavity wall and the HV outflows along the lobes are reasonably consistent with the observations. The position-velocity diagram of the outflows along the outflow axes shows a linear increase of velocity with distance, similar to the observations. The ejections of these bullets could be due to magnetorotational explosions or nova-like explosions around a binary companion.

  11. The Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon-Counting Lidar: Development and Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar is an airborne instrument developed to demonstrate laser altimetry measurement methods that will enable more efficient observations of topography and surface properties from space. The instrument was developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryosphere remote sensing. The SIMPL transmitter is an 11 KHz, 1064 nm, plane-polarized micropulse laser transmitter that is frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four push-broom beams. The receiver employs single-photon, polarimetric ranging at 532 and 1064 nm using Single Photon Counting Modules in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and depolarizing scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. Data acquired over ice-covered Lake Erie in February, 2009 are documenting SIMPL s measurement performance and capabilities, demonstrating differentiation of open water and several ice cover types. ICESat-2 will employ several of the technologies advanced by SIMPL, including micropulse, single photon ranging in a multi-beam, push-broom configuration operating at 532 nm.

  12. Multipolar phase in frustrated spin-1/2 and spin-1 chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvej, Aslam; Kumar, Manoranjan

    2017-08-01

    The J1-J2 spin-chain model with nearest-neighbor J1 and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic J2 interaction is one of the most popular frustrated magnetic models. This model system has been extensively studied theoretically and applied to explain the magnetic properties of the real low-dimensional materials. However, the existence of different phases for the J1-J2 model in an axial magnetic field h is either not understood or has been controversial. In this paper, we show the existence of higher order p >4 multipolar phase near the critical point (J2/J1)c=-0.25 . The criterion to detect the quadrupolar or spin nematic (SN)/spin density wave of type two (SDW2) phase using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiment data is also discussed, and INS data of LiCuVO4 compound is modeled. We discuss the dimerized and degenerate ground state in the quadrupolar phase. The major contribution of binding energy in the spin-1/2 system comes from the longitudinal component of the nearest-neighbor bonds. We also study spin nematic /SDW2 phase in spin-1 system in large J2/J1 limit.

  13. The Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon-Counting Lidar: Development and Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar is an airborne instrument developed to demonstrate laser altimetry measurement methods that will enable more efficient observations of topography and surface properties from space. The instrument was developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryosphere remote sensing. The SIMPL transmitter is an 11 KHz, 1064 nm, plane-polarized micropulse laser transmitter that is frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four push-broom beams. The receiver employs single-photon, polarimetric ranging at 532 and 1064 nm using Single Photon Counting Modules in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and depolarizing scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. Data acquired over ice-covered Lake Erie in February, 2009 are documenting SIMPL s measurement performance and capabilities, demonstrating differentiation of open water and several ice cover types. ICESat-2 will employ several of the technologies advanced by SIMPL, including micropulse, single photon ranging in a multi-beam, push-broom configuration operating at 532 nm.

  14. Role of the multipolar electrostatic interaction energy components in strong and weak cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Kadlubanski, Pawel; Calderón-Mojica, Katherine; Rodriguez, Weyshla A; Majumdar, D; Roszak, Szczepan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-08-22

    Density functional and Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) calculations have been carried out on various model cation-π complexes formed through the interactions of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and NH4(+) cations with benzene, p-methylphenol, and 3-methylindole. Partial hydration of the metal cations was also considered in these model studies to monitor the effect of hydration of cations in cation-π interactions. The binding energies of these complexes were computed from the fully optimized structures using coupled cluster calculations including triple excitations (CCSD(T)) and Gaussian-G4-MP2 (G4MP2) techniques. An analysis of the charge sharing between the donor (the π-systems) and the acceptors (the cations) together with the partitioning of total interaction energies revealed that the strong and weak cation-π interactions have similar electrostatic interaction properties. Further decomposition of such electrostatic terms into their multipolar components showed the importance of the charge-dipole, charge-quadrupole, and charge-octopole terms in shaping the electrostatic forces in such interactions. The computed vibrational spectra of the complexes were analyzed for the specific cation-π interaction modes and have been shown to contain the signature of higher order electrostatic interaction energy components (quadrupole and octopole) in such interactions.

  15. Spatially resolved simulations of membrane reactions and dynamics: Multipolar reaction DPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füchslin, R. M.; Maeke, T.; McCaskill, J. S.

    2009-08-01

    Biophysical chemistry of mesoscale systems and quantitative modeling in systems biology now require a simulation methodology unifying chemical reaction kinetics with essential collective physics. This will enable the study of the collective dynamics of complex chemical and structural systems in a spatially resolved manner with a combinatorially complex variety of different system constituents. In order to allow a direct link-up with experimental data (e.g. high-throughput fluorescence images) the simulations must be constructed locally, i.e. mesoscale phenomena have to emerge from local composition and interactions that can be extracted from experimental data. Under suitable conditions, the simulation of such local interactions must lead to processes such as vesicle budding, transport of membrane-bounded compartments and protein sorting, all of which result from a sophisticated interplay between chemical and mechanical processes and require the link-up of different length scales. In this work, we show that introducing multipolar interactions between particles in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) leads to extended membrane structures emerging in a self-organized manner and exhibiting the necessary mechanical stability for transport, correct scaling behavior, and membrane fluidity so as to provide a two-dimensional self-organizing dynamic reaction environment for kinetic studies in the context of cell biology. Supplementary material in the form of video files available from the Journal web page at 10.1140/epje/i2009-10482-x and are accessible for authorised users. in here

  16. THE SHAPING OF THE MULTIPOLAR PRE-PLANETARY NEBULA CRL 618 BY MULTIDIRECTIONAL BULLETS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Po-Sheng; Lee, Chin-Fei; Moraghan, Anthony; Smith, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In order to understand the formation of the multipolar structures of the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618, we perform 3D simulations using a multidirectional bullet model. The optical lobes of CRL 618 and fast molecular outflows at the tips of the lobes have been found to have similar expansion ages of ∼100 yr. Additional fast molecular outflows were found near the source along the outflow axes with ages of ∼45 yr, suggesting a second episode of bullet ejections. Thus, in our simulations, two episodes of bullet ejections are assumed. The shaping process is simulated using the ZEUS-3D hydrodynamics code that includes molecular and atomic cooling. In addition, molecular chemistry is also included to calculate the CO intensity maps. Our results show the following: (1) Multiepoch bullets interacting with the toroidal dense core can produce the collimated multiple lobes as seen in CRL 618. The total mass of the bullets is ∼0.034 M{sub ⊙}, consistent with the observed high-velocity (HV) CO emission in fast molecular outflows. (2) The simulated CO J = 3–2 intensity maps show that the low-velocity cavity wall and the HV outflows along the lobes are reasonably consistent with the observations. The position–velocity diagram of the outflows along the outflow axes shows a linear increase of velocity with distance, similar to the observations. The ejections of these bullets could be due to magnetorotational explosions or nova-like explosions around a binary companion.

  17. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E.; Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U.; Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.; Pereira, P. L.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  18. Multipolar Ewald Methods, 2: Applications Using a Quantum Mechanical Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A fully quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) based on a modified “divide-and-conquer” (mDC) framework is applied to a series of molecular simulation applications, using a generalized Particle Mesh Ewald method extended to multipolar charge densities. Simulation results are presented for three example applications: liquid water, p-nitrophenylphosphate reactivity in solution, and crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine. Simulations of liquid water using a parametrized mDC model are compared to TIP3P and TIP4P/Ew water models and experiment. The mDC model is shown to be superior for cluster binding energies and generally comparable for bulk properties. Examination of the dissociative pathway for dephosphorylation of p-nitrophenylphosphate shows that the mDC method evaluated with the DFTB3/3OB and DFTB3/OPhyd semiempirical models bracket the experimental barrier, whereas DFTB2 and AM1/d-PhoT QM/MM simulations exhibit deficiencies in the barriers, the latter for which is related, in part, to the anomalous underestimation of the p-nitrophenylate leaving group pKa. Simulations of crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine are performed and the overall structure and atomic fluctuations are compared with the experiment and the general AMBER force field (GAFF). The QMFF, which was not parametrized for this application, was shown to be in better agreement with crystallographic data than GAFF. Our simulations highlight some of the application areas that may benefit from using new QMFFs, and they demonstrate progress toward the development of accurate QMFFs using the recently developed mDC framework. PMID:25691830

  19. Multipolar Ewald methods, 2: applications using a quantum mechanical force field.

    PubMed

    Giese, Timothy J; Panteva, Maria T; Chen, Haoyuan; York, Darrin M

    2015-02-10

    A fully quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) based on a modified “divide-and-conquer” (mDC) framework is applied to a series of molecular simulation applications, using a generalized Particle Mesh Ewald method extended to multipolar charge densities. Simulation results are presented for three example applications: liquid water, p-nitrophenylphosphate reactivity in solution, and crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine. Simulations of liquid water using a parametrized mDC model are compared to TIP3P and TIP4P/Ew water models and experiment. The mDC model is shown to be superior for cluster binding energies and generally comparable for bulk properties. Examination of the dissociative pathway for dephosphorylation of p-nitrophenylphosphate shows that the mDC method evaluated with the DFTB3/3OB and DFTB3/OPhyd semiempirical models bracket the experimental barrier, whereas DFTB2 and AM1/d-PhoT QM/MM simulations exhibit deficiencies in the barriers, the latter for which is related, in part, to the anomalous underestimation of the p-nitrophenylate leaving group pKa. Simulations of crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine are performed and the overall structure and atomic fluctuations are compared with the experiment and the general AMBER force field (GAFF). The QMFF, which was not parametrized for this application, was shown to be in better agreement with crystallographic data than GAFF. Our simulations highlight some of the application areas that may benefit from using new QMFFs, and they demonstrate progress toward the development of accurate QMFFs using the recently developed mDC framework.

  20. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. II. Flux rope eruptions with current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-11-20

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of a CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. In particular, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. This released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares, and the flux rope would, therefore, go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is inconsistent with the radio afterglow. Fortunately, in the latter case, i.e., the catastrophic escape, the flux rope could escape the magnetar and go to infinity in a dynamical way. This is more consistent with radio afterglow observations of giant flares. We find that the minor radius of the flux rope has important implications for its eruption. Flux ropes with larger minor radii are more prone to erupt. We stress that the CS provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection, which would further enhance the energy release during eruptions.

  1. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants in long-term deafened cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Wise, Andrew K.; Fallon, James B.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation has been shown to produce restricted neural activation using intracochlear stimulation in animals with a normal population of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). However, in a clinical setting, the widespread loss of SGNs and peripheral fibres following deafness is expected to influence the effectiveness of FMP. Approach. We compared the efficacy of FMP stimulation to both monopolar (MP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation in long-term deafened cat cochleae (n = 8). Unlike our previous study, these cochleae contained <10% of the normal SGN population adjacent to the electrode array. We also evaluated the effect of electrode position on stimulation modes by using either modiolar facing or lateral wall facing half-band electrodes. The spread of neural activity across the inferior colliculus, a major nucleus within the central auditory pathway, was used as a measure of spatial selectivity. Main results. In cochleae with significant SGN degeneration, we observed that FMP and TP stimulation resulted in greater spatial selectivity than MP stimulation (p < 0.001). However, thresholds were significantly higher for FMP and TP stimulation compared to MP stimulation (p < 0.001). No difference between FMP and TP stimulation was found in any measures. The high threshold levels for FMP stimulation was significantly reduced without compromising spatial selectivity by varying the degree of current focusing (referred as ‘partial-FMP’ stimulation). Spatial selectivity of all stimulation modes was unaffected by the electrode position. Finally, spatial selectivity in long-term deafened cochleae was significantly less than that of cochleae with normal SGN population (George S S et al 2014 J. Neural Eng. 11 065003). Significance. The present results indicate that the greater spatial selectivity of FMP and TP stimulation over MP stimulation is maintained in cochleae with significant neural degeneration and is not adversely affected by electrode

  2. Post-fall-back evolution of multipolar magnetic fields and radio pulsar activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshev, A. P.; Elfritz, J. G.; Popov, S. B.

    2016-11-01

    It has long been unclear if the small-scale magnetic structures on the neutron star (NS) surface could survive the fall-back episode. The study of the Hall cascade by Cumming, Arras & Zweibel hinted that energy in small-scales structures should dissipate on short time-scales. Our new 2D magneto-thermal simulations suggest the opposite. For the first ˜10 kyr after the fall-back episode with accreted mass 10-3 M⊙, the observed NS magnetic field appears dipolar, which is insensitive to the initial magnetic topology. In framework of the Ruderman & Sutherland, vacuum gap model during this interval, non-thermal radiation is strongly suppressed. After this time, the initial (i.e. multipolar) structure begins to re-emerge through the NS crust. We distinguish three evolutionary epochs for the re-emergence process: the growth of internal toroidal field, the advection of buried poloidal field, and slow Ohmic diffusion. The efficiency of the first two stages can be enhanced when small-scale magnetic structure is present. The efficient re-emergence of high-order harmonics might significantly affect the curvature of the magnetospheric field lines in the emission zone. So, only after few 104 yr would be the NS starts shining as a pulsar again, which is in correspondence with radio silence of central compact objects. In addition, these results can explain the absence of good candidates for thermally emitting NSs with freshly re-emerged field among radio pulsars (), as NSs have time to cool down, and supernova remnants can already dissipate.

  3. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants in acutely deafened cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. The conductive nature of the fluids and tissues of the cochlea can lead to broad activation of spiral ganglion neurons using contemporary cochlear implant stimulation configurations such as monopolar (MP) stimulation. The relatively poor spatial selectivity is thought to limit implant performance, particularly in noisy environments. Several current focusing techniques have been proposed to reduce the spread of activation with the aim towards achieving improved clinical performance. Approach. The present research evaluated the efficacy of focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation, a relatively new focusing technique in the cochlea, and compared its efficacy to both MP stimulation and tripolar (TP) stimulation. The spread of neural activity across the inferior colliculus (IC), measured by recording the spatial tuning curve, was used as a measure of spatial selectivity. Adult cats (n = 6) were acutely deafened and implanted with an intracochlear electrode array before multi-unit responses were recorded across the cochleotopic gradient of the contralateral IC. Recordings were made in response to acoustic and electrical stimulation using the MP, TP and FMP configurations. Main results. FMP and TP stimulation resulted in greater spatial selectivity than MP stimulation. However, thresholds were significantly higher (p < 0.001) for FMP and TP stimulation compared to MP stimulation. There were no differences found in spatial selectivity and threshold between FMP and TP stimulation. Significance. The greater spatial selectivity of FMP and TP stimulation would be expected to result in improved clinical performance. However, further research will be required to demonstrate the efficacy of these modes of stimulation after longer durations of deafness.

  4. On the possibility to detect multipolar order in URu2Si2 by the electric quadrupolar transition of resonant elastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. L.; Fabbris, G.; Meyers, D.; Sung, N. H.; Baumbach, R. E.; Bauer, E. D.; Ryan, P. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Kotliar, G.; Dai, X.

    2017-08-01

    Resonant elastic x-ray scattering is a powerful technique for measuring multipolar order parameters. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally study the possibility of using this technique to detect the proposed multipolar order parameters in URu2Si2 at the U-L3 edge with the electric quadrupolar transition. Based on an atomic model, we calculate the azimuthal dependence of the quadrupolar transition at the U-L3 edge. The results illustrate the potential of this technique for distinguishing different multipolar order parameters. We then perform experiments on ultraclean single crystals of URu2Si2 at the U-L3 edge to search for the predicted signal, but do not detect any indications of multipolar moments within the experimental uncertainty. We theoretically estimate the orders of magnitude of the cross section and the expected count rate of the quadrupolar transition and compare them to the dipolar transitions at the U-M4 and U-L3 edges, clarifying the difficulty in detecting higher order multipolar order parameters in URu2Si2 in the current experimental setup.

  5. [Morphometry of giant multipolar neurons of the brain stem reticular formation in rats on board the Kosmos-1667 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Belichenko, P V; Leontovich, T A

    1989-05-01

    Giant multipolar neurons of nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis of rats which had been kept on board the biosatellite "Kosmos-1667" were morphometrically studied. There was a trend towards the increase in the cellular surface, the maximum diameter of dendritic field, the volume of the whole dendritic territory in the test group ad in the control experimental group kept on the earth. A reliable decrease in dendritic mass oriented to nucleus vestibularis and an increase in dendritic mass oriented to the midline were also found in test group, as compared to 3 control groups. Our data were discussed in the light of nervous tissue plasticity in adult mammals.

  6. 4-Benzoyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzoxazine-2-carbonitrile: refinement using a multipolar atom model.

    PubMed

    Ejsmont, Krzysztof; Joly, Jean Pierre; Wenger, Emmanuel; Guillot, Benoit; Jelsch, Christian

    2009-07-01

    The structural model for the title compound, C(16)H(12)N(2)O(2), was refined using a multipolar atom model transferred from an experimental electron-density database. The refinement showed some improvements of crystallographic statistical indices when compared with a conventional spherical neutral-atom refinement. The title compound adopts a half-chair conformation. The amide N atom lies almost in the plane defined by the three neighbouring C atoms. In the crystal structure, molecules are linked by weak intermolecular C-H...O and C-H...pi hydrogen bonds.

  7. Analysis of Multi-Polarization Switching in Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers Using Multi-peak gain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chuan; Chen, Yu-Fong; Chin, Pei-Hou; Quadir, Shaham; Li, Yueh-Chen; Wu, Yu-Heng; Yen, Tsu-Chiang

    2013-03-01

    This research investigated the mulit-polarization switching (MPS) in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) at constant temperature by simple multi-peak gain model.In experimental results, the phenomenon of the polarization switching (PS) in the VCSEL were arduous to definite quantitative analysis. A simple multi-peak gain model which included the temperature effect and current effect was established to match the MPS in the VCSEL. Simulation results match the experimental results well and shoe that the variation of temperature is a affecting factor of MPS. Therefore, the simple multi-peak gain model contributed a good understanding of multi-polarization switching in VCSELs.

  8. Clinical and Molecular Consequences of NF1 Microdeletion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    in cells, and an important type is centrosome abnormality, which leads to abnormal mitoses and consequent losses and gains of chromosomes. We...whether other neurofibromas (from NF1 deletion and/or intragenic mutation patients) also show abnormal and multipolar mitoses and in particular...multipolar mitoses . This suggests a possible role for centrosome dysregulation in neurofibromagenesis. This discovery also poses the new and exicting

  9. A phosphatidylinositol lipids system, lamellipodin, and Ena/VASP regulate dynamic morphology of multipolar migrating cells in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Sasaki, Shinji; Nuriya, Mutsuo; Ogawa, Yukino; Yasui, Masato; Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2012-08-22

    In the developing mammalian cerebral cortex, excitatory neurons are generated in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone; these neurons migrate toward the pial surface. The neurons generated in the VZ assume a multipolar morphology and remain in a narrow region called the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) for ∼24 h, in which they extend and retract multiple processes dynamically. They eventually extend an axon tangentially and begin radial migration using a migratory mode called locomotion. Despite the potential biological importance of the process movement of multipolar cells, the molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we observed that the processes of mouse multipolar cells were actin rich and morphologically resembled the filopodia and lamellipodia in growth cones; thus, we focused on the actin-remodeling proteins Lamellipodin (Lpd) and Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Lpd binds to phosphatidylinositol (3,4)-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P₂] and recruits Ena/VASP, which promotes the assembly of actin filaments, to the plasma membranes. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that Lpd is expressed in multipolar cells in the MAZ. The functional silencing of either Lpd or Ena/VASP decreased the number of primary processes. Immunostaining and a Förster resonance energy transfer analysis revealed the subcellular localization of PI(3,4)P₂ at the tips of the processes. A knockdown experiment and treatment with an inhibitor for Src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase-2, a 5-phosphatase that produces PI(3,4)P₂ from phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, decreased the number of primary processes. Our observations suggest that PI(3,4)P₂, Lpd, and Ena/VASP are involved in the process movement of multipolar migrating cells.

  10. Multipolar electrostatics based on the Kriging machine learning method: an application to serine.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongna; Mills, Matthew J L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-04-01

    A multipolar, polarizable electrostatic method for future use in a novel force field is described. Quantum Chemical Topology (QCT) is used to partition the electron density of a chemical system into atoms, then the machine learning method Kriging is used to build models that relate the multipole moments of the atoms to the positions of their surrounding nuclei. The pilot system serine is used to study both the influence of the level of theory and the set of data generator methods used. The latter consists of: (i) sampling of protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), or (ii) normal mode distortion along either (a) Cartesian coordinates, or (b) redundant internal coordinates. Wavefunctions for the sampled geometries were obtained at the HF/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/apc-1, and MP2/cc-pVDZ levels of theory, prior to calculation of the atomic multipole moments by volume integration. The average absolute error (over an independent test set of conformations) in the total atom-atom electrostatic interaction energy of serine, using Kriging models built with the three data generator methods is 11.3 kJ mol⁻¹ (PDB), 8.2 kJ mol⁻¹ (Cartesian distortion), and 10.1 kJ mol⁻¹ (redundant internal distortion) at the HF/6-31G(d,p) level. At the B3LYP/apc-1 level, the respective errors are 7.7 kJ mol⁻¹, 6.7 kJ mol⁻¹, and 4.9 kJ mol⁻¹, while at the MP2/cc-pVDZ level they are 6.5 kJ mol⁻¹, 5.3 kJ mol⁻¹, and 4.0 kJ mol⁻¹. The ranges of geometries generated by the redundant internal coordinate distortion and by extraction from the PDB are much wider than the range generated by Cartesian distortion. The atomic multipole moment and electrostatic interaction energy predictions for the B3LYP/apc-1 and MP2/cc-pVDZ levels are similar, and both are better than the corresponding predictions at the HF/6-31G(d,p) level.

  11. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Theresa A.; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    . Conclusions Our analysis indicates that, far from being simple polygonal prisms, endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape. Their unusual geometry may be essential for the endothelium to carry out its role as the principal regulator of corneal extracellular fluid flux, and thus ultimately of tissue clarity. PMID:27081293

  12. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants: a preclinical safety study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Robert K.; Wise, Andrew K.; Enke, Ya Lang; Carter, Paul M.; Fallon, James B.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Cochlear implants (CIs) have a limited number of independent stimulation channels due to the highly conductive nature of the fluid-filled cochlea. Attempts to develop highly focused stimulation to improve speech perception in CI users includes the use of simultaneous stimulation via multiple current sources. Focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation is an example of this approach and has been shown to reduce interaction between stimulating channels. However, compared with conventional biphasic current pulses generated from a single current source, FMP is a complex stimulus that includes extended periods of stimulation before charge recovery is achieved, raising questions on whether chronic stimulation with this strategy is safe. The present study evaluated the long-term safety of intracochlear stimulation using FMP in a preclinical animal model of profound deafness. Approach. Six cats were bilaterally implanted with scala tympani electrode arrays two months after deafening, and received continuous unilateral FMP stimulation at levels that evoked a behavioural response for periods of up to 182 d. Electrode impedance, electrically-evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) and auditory brainstem responses (EABRs) were monitored periodically over the course of the stimulation program from both the stimulated and contralateral control cochleae. On completion of the stimulation program cochleae were examined histologically and the electrode arrays were evaluated for evidence of platinum (Pt) corrosion. Main results. There was no significant difference in electrode impedance between control and chronically stimulated electrodes following long-term FMP stimulation. Moreover, there was no significant difference between ECAP and EABR thresholds evoked from control or stimulated cochleae at either the onset of stimulation or at completion of the stimulation program. Chronic FMP stimulation had no effect on spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) survival when compared with

  13. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Theresa A; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Defoe, Dennis M

    2016-01-01

    from being simple polygonal prisms, endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape. Their unusual geometry may be essential for the endothelium to carry out its role as the principal regulator of corneal extracellular fluid flux, and thus ultimately of tissue clarity.

  14. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons switch from a multipolar migration mode to a novel "climbing" migration mode during development.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Ayako; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Matsunaga, Yuki; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2014-01-22

    The hippocampus plays important roles in brain functions. Despite the importance of hippocampal functions, recent analyses of neuronal migration have mainly been performed on the cerebral neocortex, and the cellular mechanisms responsible for the formation of the hippocampus are not yet completely understood. Moreover, why a prolonged time is required for hippocampal neurons to complete their migration has been unexplainable for several decades. We analyzed the migratory profile of neurons in the developing mouse hippocampal CA1 region and found that the hippocampal pyramidal neurons generated near the ventricle became postmitotic multipolar cells and accumulated in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) in the late stage of development. The hippocampal neurons passed through the pyramidal layer by a unique mode of migration. Their leading processes were highly branched and made contact with many radial fibers. Time-lapse imaging revealed that the migrating cells changed their scaffolds from the original radial fibers to other radial fibers, and as a result they proceed in a zigzag manner, with long intervals. The migrating cells in the hippocampus reminded us of "rock climbers" that instead of using their hands to pull up their bodies were using their leading processes to pull up their cell bodies. Because this mode of migration had never been described, we called it the "climbing" mode. The change from the "climbing" mode in the hippocampus to the "locomotion" mode in the neocortex may have contributed to the brain expansion during evolution.

  15. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate.

  16. The Optical-Infared Study and Geometric Model of Young Multipolar Planetary nebula -- IRAS 21282+5050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chau, Wayne; Kwok, Sun

    2015-08-01

    We present high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared imaging of the famous compact planetary nebula (PN) IRAS 21282+5050. Optical images of this object reveal several complex morphological structures including three pairs of lobes and an elliptical shell lying close to the plane of the sky. From near-infrared observations, we found a dust torus which is oriented nearly perpendicular to the major axis of elliptical shell. The results suggest that IRAS 21282+5050 (IRAS 21282) is indeed a multipolar PN, and these structures developed in the early stage on its evolutionary track. We also constructed this object by a three-dimensional (3D) model and determined the dimensions of these intrinsic structures. Assuming these lobes are shaped by wind interactions, the presence of these geometric structures has been suggested as the result of multiple phases of fast winds with temporal and directional variations. Based on the visualization of 3D model of this object viewed from different orientations, the appearance of IRAS 21282 shows similar intrinsic structures as other multipolar PNs.

  17. Application of multipolar charge models and molecular dynamics simulations to study stark shifts in inhomogeneous electric fields.

    PubMed

    Devereux, Michael; Plattner, Nuria; Meuwly, Markus

    2009-11-26

    Atomic multipole moments are used to investigate vibrational frequency shifts of CO and H(2) in uniform and inhomogeneous electric fields using ab initio calculations and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The importance of using atomic multipole moments that can accurately represent both molecular electrostatics and the vibrational response of the molecule to changes in the local electric field is highlighted. The vibrational response of CO to applied uniform and inhomogeneous electric fields is examined using Density Functional Theory calculations for a range of test fields, and the results are used to assess the performance of different atomic multipole models. In uniform fields, the calculated Stark tuning rates of Deltamu = 0.52 cm(-1)/(MV/cm) (DFT), Deltamu = 0.55 cm(-1)/(MV/cm) (fluctuating three-point charge model), and Deltamu = 0.64 cm(-1)/(MV/cm) (Multipole model up to octupole), compare favorably with the experimentally measured value of 0.67 cm(-1)/(MV/cm). For H(2), which has no permanent dipole moment, CCSD(T) calculations demonstrate the importance of bond-weakening effects in force fields in response to the applied inhomogeneous electric field. Finally, CO in hexagonal ice is considered as a test system to highlight the performance of selected multipolar models in MD simulations. The approach discussed here can be applied to calibrate a range of multipolar charge models for diatomic probes, with applications to interpret Stark spectroscopy measurements in protein active sites.

  18. Dependence of the probabilities of the electric-multipole electron transitions in W{sup 24+} on multipolarity

    SciTech Connect

    Gaigalas, Gediminas; Rudzikas, Zenonas; Rynkun, Pavel; Alkauskas, Andrius

    2011-03-15

    Usually it is accepted that the probabilities of the electric-multipole electron transitions are rapidly decreasing functions of their multipolarity. Therefore while calculating the probabilities of electronic transitions between the configurations of certain chosen parities, it seems sufficient to take into account the first nonzero term, i.e., to consider the electron transitions of lowest multipolarity permitted by the exact selection rules. This paper aims at verifying this assumption on the example of electric-octupole transitions in W{sup 24+} ion. For this purpose the large-scale multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Fock calculations have been performed for the configurations [Kr]4d{sup 10}4f{sup 4} and [Kr]4d{sup 10}4f{sup 3}5s energy levels of W{sup 24+} ion. The relativistic corrections were taken into account in the quasirelativistic Breit-Pauli and fully relativistic Breit (taking into account QED effects) approximations. The role of correlation, relativistic, and QED corrections is discussed. Line strengths, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities in Coulomb and Babushkin gauges are presented for E1 and E3 transitions among these levels.

  19. Comparative analysis of transverse intrafascicular multichannel, longitudinal intrafascicular and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of nerve fascicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badia, Jordi; Boretius, Tim; Andreu, David; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Stieglitz, Thomas; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    The selection of a suitable nerve electrode for neuroprosthetic applications implies a trade-off between invasiveness and selectivity, wherein the ultimate goal is achieving the highest selectivity for a high number of nerve fascicles by the least invasiveness and potential damage to the nerve. The transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME) is intended to be transversally inserted into the peripheral nerve and to be useful to selectively activate subsets of axons in different fascicles within the same nerve. We present a comparative study of TIME, LIFE and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of small nerves. The electrodes were implanted on the rat sciatic nerve, and the activation of gastrocnemius, plantar and tibialis anterior muscles was recorded by EMG signals. Thus, the study allowed us to ascertain the selectivity of stimulation at the interfascicular and also at the intrafascicular level. The results of this study indicate that (1) intrafascicular electrodes (LIFE and TIME) provide excitation circumscribed to the implanted fascicle, whereas extraneural electrodes (cuffs) predominantly excite nerve fascicles located superficially; (2) the minimum threshold for muscle activation with TIME and LIFE was significantly lower than with cuff electrodes; (3) TIME allowed us to selectively activate the three tested muscles when stimulating through different active sites of one device, both at inter- and intrafascicular levels, whereas selective activation using multipolar cuff (with a longitudinal tripolar stimulation configuration) was only possible for two muscles, at the interfascicular level, and LIFE did not activate selectively more than one muscle in the implanted nerve fascicle.

  20. Laser transmitter design and performance for the slope imaging multi-polarization photon-counting lidar (SIMPL) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.

    2016-03-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) is a polarimetric, two-color, multi-beam push broom laser altimeter developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program. It has flown successfully on multiple airborne platforms beginning in 2008.1 It was developed to demonstrate new altimetry capabilities that combine height measurements and information about surface composition and properties. In this talk we will discuss the laser transmitter design and performance and present recent science data collected over the Greenland ice sheet and arctic sea ice in support of the second NASA Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat-2) mission to be launched in 2017.2

  1. NDUFV2 regulates neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex through modulation of the multipolar-bipolar transition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianda; Wu, Qinwei; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Dai

    2015-11-02

    Abnormalities during brain development are tightly linked several psychiatric disorders. Mutations in NADH dehydrogenase ubiquinone flavoprotein 2 (NDUFV2) are responsible for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Parkinson׳s disease. However, the function of NDUFV2 during brain development remains unclear. Here we reported that ndufv2 is expressed in the developing cerebral cortex. In utero suppression of ndufv2 arrested neuronal migration, leading to accumulation of ectopic neurons in the intermediate zone. ndufv2 inhibition did not affect radial glia scaffold, progenitor cells or neurons survival. However, the loss of ndufv2 impairs neuronal multipolar-bipolar transition in vivo and polarization in vitro. Moreover, ndufv2 affected actin cytoskeleton and tubulin stabilization in cortical neurons. Overall, our findings establish a new NDUFV2 dependent mechanism underlying neuronal migration and psychiatric disorders.

  2. Multipolar theory of blackbody radiation shift of atomic energy levels and its implications for optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Porsev, Sergey G.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2006-08-15

    Blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts of the {sup 3}P{sub 0}-{sup 1}S{sub 0} clock transition in the divalent atoms Mg, Ca, Sr, and Yb are evaluated. The dominant electric-dipole contributions are computed using accurate relativistic many-body techniques of atomic structure. At room temperatures, the resulting uncertainties in the E1 BBR shifts are large and substantially affect the projected 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy of the optical-lattice-based clocks. A peculiarity of these clocks is that the characteristic BBR wavelength is comparable to the {sup 3}P fine-structure intervals. To evaluate relevant M1 and E2 contributions, a theory of multipolar BBR shifts is developed. The resulting corrections, although presently masked by the uncertainties in the E1 contribution, are required at the 10{sup -18} accuracy goal.

  3. Increase of intracellular Ca2+ by P2Y but not P2X receptors in cultured cortical multipolar neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Wolfgang; Nörenberg, Wolfgang; Franke, Heike; Schaefer, Michael; Illes, Peter

    2009-10-10

    The expression and functionality of P2X/P2Y receptor subtypes in multipolar nonpyramidal neurons of mixed cortical cell cultures were investigated by means of immunocytochemistry and fura-2 microfluorimetry. The morphological studies revealed that most of the neurons are immunoreactive for GABA and express a range of P2X/P2Y receptors, predominantly of the P2X(2,4,6) and P2Y(1,2) subtypes. P2X(1) and P2X(7) receptor immunoreactivity (IR) was found on thin axon-like processes and presynaptic structures, respectively. Application of ATP caused a small concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in most investigated neurons, whereas only about the half of these cells responded to 2',3'-O-(benzoyl-4-benzoyl)-ATP (BzATP), ADPbetaS, 2MeSADP, or 2MeSATP and even fewer cells to UTP. In contrast, alpha,beta-meATP, UDP, and UDP-glucose failed to produce any [Ca2+]i signaling. The response to ATP itself was inhibited by pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS), Reactive Blue 2, 2'-deoxy-N(6)-methyl adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate (MRS2179), and suramin (300 microM) as well as by a cyclopiazonic acid-induced depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. A Ca2+-free external medium tended to decrease the ATP-induced [Ca2+]i transients, although this action did not reach statistical significance. Various blockers of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels and the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone did not interfere with the effect of ATP, whereas a combination of the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) decreased it. Cross-desensitization experiments between ADPbetaS or UTP and ATP suggested that ATP acts on the one hand via P2Y(1,2) receptors and on the other hand by additional signaling mechanisms. These mechanisms may involve the release of glutamate (which in consequence activates ionotropic glutamate receptors) and the entry of Ca2

  4. 3MI: The Multi-Viewing Multi-Channel Multi-Polarization Imaging Mission of the EUMETSAT Polar System - Second Generation (EPS-SG) dedicated to aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Thierry; Phillips, Pepe; Schlüssel, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The EPS-SG Multi-Viewing Multi-Channel Multi-Polarization Imaging Mission (3MI) is a radiometer dedicated to aerosol characterization for climate monitoring, air quality forecasts and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). The purpose of the 3MI concept, likewise that of the heritage missions POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) and Polarization & Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar (PARASOL), is to reconstruct a multi-spectral (from 410 to 2130 nm), multi-polarization (-60°, 0°, and +60°), and multi-angular (14 views) image of the Earth outgoing radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in order to resolve the directional anisotropy and the microphysical properties of aerosol.

  5. The 5'-flanking region of the RP58 coding sequence shows prominent promoter activity in multipolar cells in the subventricular zone during corticogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, C; Hirai, S; Miwa, A; Takahashi, A; Okado, H

    2012-01-10

    Pyramidal neurons of the neocortex are produced from progenitor cells located in the neocortical ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ) during embryogenesis. RP58 is a transcriptional repressor that is strongly expressed in the developing brain and plays an essential role in corticogenesis. The expression of RP58 is strictly regulated in a time-dependent and spatially restricted manner. It is maximally expressed in E15-16 embryonic cerebral cortex, localized specifically to the cortical plate and SVZ of the neocortex, hippocampus, and parts of amygdala during brain development, and found in glutamatergic but not GABAergic neurons. Identification of the promoter activity underlying specific expression patterns provides important clues to their mechanisms of action. Here, we show that the RP58 gene promoter is activated prominently in multipolar migrating cells, the first in vivo analysis of RP58 promoter activity in the brain. The 5.3 kb 5'-flanking genomic DNA of the RP58 coding region demonstrates promoter activity in neurons both in vitro and in vivo. This promoter is highly responsive to the transcription factor neurogenin2 (Ngn2), which is a direct upstream activator of RP58 expression. Using in utero electroporation, we demonstrate that RP58 gene promoter activity is first detected in a subpopulation of pin-like VZ cells, then prominently activated in migrating multipolar cells in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) located just above the VZ. In dissociated primary cultured cortical neurons, RP58 promoter activity mimics in vivo expression patterns from a molecular standpoint that RP58 is expressed in a fraction of Sox2-positive progenitor cells, Ngn2-positive neuronal committed cells, and Tuj1-positive young neurons, but not in Dlx2-positive GABAergic neurons. Finally, we show that Cre recombinase expression under the control of the RP58 gene promoter is a feasible tool for conditional gene switching in post-mitotic multipolar migrating

  6. [Modulating effect of dopamine on amplitude of GABA-produced chemocontrolled currents in multipolar spinal cord neurons of ammocaete].

    PubMed

    Bukinich, A A

    2010-01-01

    By using the patch-clamp method in the whole cell configuration, modulating effect of dopamine on GABA-activated currents has been studied on isolated multipolar spinal cord neurons of the ammocaete (larva of the lamprey Lampetra planeri). At application of dopamine (5 microM), there was observed in some cases a decrease of the GABA-activated current, on average, by 33.3 +/- 8.7 (n = 8, p < 0.01), in other cases--an increase of the amplitude, on average, by 37.3 +/- 11.8% (n = 5, p < 0.01). Concentration of GABA amounted to 2 mM. Study of action of agonists of D1- and D2-receptors on amplitude of che-mocontrolled currents has shown that agonist of D1-receptors (+)-SKF-38393 (5 microM) decreases the GABA-activated current amplitude, on average, by 63.1 +/- 11.7% (n = 8, p < 0.01); the agonist of D2-receptors (-)-quinpirole (5 microM) produces in various cells the dopamine-like effects: an increase of the GABA-activated current amplitude, on average, by 61.0 +/- 13.8% (n = 8, p < 0.01) and a decrease of amplitude, on average, by 55.7 +/- 2.0 % (n = 6, p < 0.01). It has been shown that antagonist of D2-receptors sulpiride (5 microM) does not block effects produced by dopamine. The dopamine effects were partially blocked by antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390 (5 microM): a decrease of the GABA-activated amplitude current amounted, on average, to 11.7 +/- 1.8 % (n = 7, p < 0.01), while an increase of amplitude--8.3 +/- 2.0 % (n = 5,p < 0.01). At the same time, effects of agonist of D1-receptors quinpirole (5 microM) were partially blocked by antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390: a decrease of the GABA-activated current amplitude amounted, on average, to 9.2 +/- 3.4 % (n = 6, p < 0.01) and an increase of amplitude--6.3 +/- 1.8 % (n = 10, p < 0.01). The obtained data indicate differences of mechanisms of the receptor-mediated effect of agonists of dopamine receptors on GABA-activated and potential-activated currents of multipolar neurons of the ammocaete spinal

  7. The development and migration of large multipolar neurons into the cochlear nucleus of the North American opossum.

    PubMed

    Willard, F H; Martin, G F

    1986-06-01

    We have studied the maturation of the inferior colliculus and cochlear nuclei of the North American opossum with particular emphasis on the large multipolar neurons of the cochlear nucleus. These neurons include the principal and giant cells of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and the large neurons of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), all of which can be labelled by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injections into the contralateral inferior colliculus (IC). The size of these neurons, their characteristic Nissl patterns, and their labelling density after injections into the IC render them distinguishable from other neurons in this nuclei, even in young animals. In Nissl-stained sections of newborn opossums, a band of horizontally oriented neurons can be identified dorsomedial to the vestibular nerve root. This band extends from an apparent cytogenetic zone close to the sulcus limitans, to, but not within, the presumptive cochlear nucleus. Between birth and estimated postnatal day 22 (EPND 22) the band shifts laterally, eventually becoming incorporated into the cochlear nucleus. Many neurons in this band have perinuclear caps of Nissl substance similar to those present in the principal cells of the adult DCN. Injections of HRP into the IC as early as EPND 5 (17 days after conception) labelled neurons in the band referred to above but not in the presumptive cochlear nucleus. By EPND 15, labelled cells were clustered mainly within the nucleus proper. Most of these cells were located in the DCN, but a few were scattered in the dorsocentral VCN. Consistent labelling of small neurons in VCN was not obtained until sometime later. From EPND 15 to EPND 20 most of the labelled cells in DCN reoriented in the vertical plane, aligned in layer II, and differentiated into principal neurons. Some, however, remained deep to layer II and differentiated into giant neurons. The heavily labelled cells in VCN differentiated into large neurons. Our results suggest that the large multipolar

  8. WAVE2-Abi2 complex controls growth cone activity and regulates the multipolar-bipolar transition as well as the initiation of glia-guided migration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min-Jue; Yagi, Hideshi; Kuroda, Kazuki; Wang, Chen-Chi; Komada, Munekazu; Zhao, Hong; Sakakibara, Akira; Miyata, Takaki; Nagata, Koh-Ichi; Oka, Yuichiro; Iguchi, Tokuichi; Sato, Makoto

    2013-06-01

    Glia-guided migration (glia-guided locomotion) during radial migration is a characteristic yet unique mode of migration. In this process, the directionality of migration is predetermined by glial processes and not by growth cones. Prior to the initiation of glia-guided migration, migrating neurons transform from multipolar to bipolar, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this multipolar-bipolar transition and the commencement of glia-guided migration are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the multipolar-bipolar transition is not solely a cell autonomous event; instead, the interaction of growth cones with glial processes plays an essential role. Time-lapse imaging with lattice assays reveals the importance of vigorously active growth cones in searching for appropriate glial scaffolds, completing the transition, and initiating glia-guided migration. These growth cone activities are regulated by Abl kinase and Cdk5 via WAVE2-Abi2 through the phosphorylation of tyrosine 150 and serine 137 of WAVE2. Neurons that do not display such growth cone activities are mispositioned in a more superficial location in the neocortex, suggesting the significance of growth cones for the final location of the neurons. This process occurs in spite of the "inside-out" principle in which later-born neurons are situated more superficially.

  9. The vapor-liquid interface potential of (multi)polar fluids and its influence on ion solvation.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Lorand; Beu, Titus; Manghi, Manoel; Palmeri, John

    2013-04-21

    The interface between the vapor and liquid phase of quadrupolar-dipolar fluids is the seat of an electric interfacial potential whose influence on ion solvation and distribution is not yet fully understood. To obtain further microscopic insight into water specificity we first present extensive classical molecular dynamics simulations of a series of model liquids with variable molecular quadrupole moments that interpolates between SPC/E water and a purely dipolar liquid. We then pinpoint the essential role played by the competing multipolar contributions to the vapor-liquid and the solute-liquid interface potentials in determining an important ion-specific direct electrostatic contribution to the ionic solvation free energy for SPC/E water-dominated by the quadrupolar and dipolar parts-beyond the dominant polarization one. Our results show that the influence of the vapor-liquid interfacial potential on ion solvation is strongly reduced due to the strong partial cancellation brought about by the competing solute-liquid interface potential.

  10. Automated Wetland Delineation from Multi-Frequency and Multi-Polarized SAR Images in High Temporal and Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, L.; Schmitt, A.; Wendleder, A.

    2016-06-01

    Water scarcity is one of the main challenges posed by the changing climate. Especially in semi-arid regions where water reservoirs are filled during the very short rainy season, but have to store enough water for the extremely long dry season, the intelligent handling of water resources is vital. This study focusses on Lac Bam in Burkina Faso, which is the largest natural lake of the country and of high importance for the local inhabitants for irrigated farming, animal watering, and extraction of water for drinking and sanitation. With respect to the competition for water resources an independent area-wide monitoring system is essential for the acceptance of any decision maker. The following contribution introduces a weather and illumination independent monitoring system for the automated wetland delineation with a high temporal (about two weeks) and a high spatial sampling (about five meters). The similarities of the multispectral and multi-polarized SAR acquisitions by RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X are studied as well as the differences. The results indicate that even basic approaches without pre-classification time series analysis or post-classification filtering are already enough to establish a monitoring system of prime importance for a whole region.

  11. Numerical simulation and performance improvement of a multi-polar concentric Halbach cylindrical magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yonghua; Guo, Yue; Xiao, Shuifang; Yu, Shen; Ji, Hu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-05-01

    Multi-polar concentric Halbach cylinders of magnets could generate the magnetic field varying considerably in the annular gaps, thus were applied in the rotary magnetic refrigerators. In the current investigation, a six-polar concentric Halbach cylinder is developed based on the ideal concentric one by the numerical simulation with COMSOL Multiphysics. Cylinder radii are optimized and magnet material profiles are adjusted for a better overall performance (Λcool). Moreover, the segmentation on the concentric cylinder is conducted for an easy fabrication, and the edge effect of finite-length device is studied. With the present investigation, it is found that a larger external radius of external cylinder facilitates a larger flux density in the high field region (| B | bar high), while Λcool could be worse. Meanwhile, with the removal of magnet materials enclosed by the equipotential lines of magnetic vector potential, the magnetic flux density in low field region (| B | bar low) drops from 0.271 to 0.0136 T, and Λcool rises from 1.36 to 1.85 T0.7. Moreover, a proper segmentation would not degrade the difference between | B | bar high and | B | bar low, on the contrary, Λcool rises by about 20.2% due to magnet materials lack for efficiency replaced by soft irons. Finally, current 3D simulation indicates the edge effect on Λcool could be trivial.

  12. Accuracy and tractability of a kriging model of intramolecular polarizable multipolar electrostatics and its application to histidine.

    PubMed

    Kandathil, Shaun M; Fletcher, Timothy L; Yuan, Yongna; Knowles, Joshua; Popelier, Paul L A

    2013-08-05

    We propose a generic method to model polarization in the context of high-rank multipolar electrostatics. This method involves the machine learning technique kriging, here used to capture the response of an atomic multipole moment of a given atom to a change in the positions of the atoms surrounding this atom. The atoms are malleable boxes with sharp boundaries, they do not overlap and exhaust space. The method is applied to histidine where it is able to predict atomic multipole moments (up to hexadecapole) for unseen configurations, after training on 600 geometries distorted using normal modes of each of its 24 local energy minima at B3LYP/apc-1 level. The quality of the predictions is assessed by calculating the Coulomb energy between an atom for which the moments have been predicted and the surrounding atoms (having exact moments). Only interactions between atoms separated by three or more bonds ("1, 4 and higher" interactions) are included in this energy error. This energy is compared with that of a central atom with exact multipole moments interacting with the same environment. The resulting energy discrepancies are summed for 328 atom-atom interactions, for each of the 29 atoms of histidine being a central atom in turn. For 80% of the 539 test configurations (outside the training set), this summed energy deviates by less than 1 kcal mol(-1). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Change vector analysis method for inundation change detection using multi-temporal multi-polarized SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guozhuang; Guo, Huadong; Liao, Jingjuan

    2007-11-01

    With the all-weather and day-night imaging capability, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) plays an important role in inundation extent change detection. Inundation extent change detection using SAR will be easy as a result of the dark image tones yielded by specular reflection. Change vector analysis (CVA) method, an effective change detection method, is also a valuable inundation extent change detection method. In CVA method, change magnitude and change direction can be generated separately, which can be used to determine change areas and change types. CVA method also has the ability to process any number of spectral bands and to produce detailed change information. In this paper, CVA method was applied to inundation extent change detection using multi-temporal multi-polarization ENVISAT ASAR alternative polarization images acquired on 2004-08-29, 2004-12-12 and 2005-03-27. The test site is located in Poyang Lake wetland, where land surface had different inundation extent when images were acquired. Firstly these 3 phases of images were registered together. Then the change vectors were calculated using these images. After that change magnitude and direction cosine images were produced. At last the change areas and the corresponding change type were extracted separately using decision tree method. The result indicates that CVA method has potential utility in inundation extent change detection.

  14. Multipolar phases and magnetically hidden order: review of the heavy-fermion compound Ce1-x La x B6.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Alistair S; Friemel, Gerd; Inosov, Dmytro S

    2016-06-01

    Cerium hexaboride is a cubic f-electron heavy-fermion compound that displays a rich array of low-temperature magnetic ordering phenomena which have been the subject of investigation for more than 50 years. Its complex behaviour is the result of competing interactions, with both itinerant and local electrons playing important roles. Investigating this material has proven to be a substantial challenge, in particular because of the appearance of a 'magnetically hidden order' phase, which remained elusive to neutron-scattering investigations for many years. It was not until the development of modern x-ray scattering techniques that the long suspected multipolar origin of this phase was confirmed. Doping with non-magnetic lanthanum dilutes the magnetic cerium sublattice and reduces the f-electron count, bringing about substantial changes to the ground state with the emergence of new phases and quantum critical phenomena. To this day, Ce1-x La x B6 and its related compounds remain a subject of intense interest. Despite the substantial progress in understanding their behaviour, they continue to reveal new and unexplained physical phenomena. Here we present a review of the accumulated body of knowledge on this family of materials in order to provide a firm standpoint for future investigations.

  15. Multipolarity remanences in lower oceanic crustal gabbros recovered by drilling at Hess Deep (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 345)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Antony; Horst, Andrew; Friedman, Sarah; Nozaka, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    A long-term goal of the scientific ocean drilling community is to understand the processes by which the ocean crust is constructed through magmatism, deformation, metamorphism and hydrothermal cooling. Insights into the magnetic properties of the lower crust have come from drilling at oceanic core complexes and in tectonic windows. At the Hess Deep Rift, propagation of the Cocos-Nazca Ridge into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust exposes a dismembered, but nearly complete lower crustal section. Here, IODP Expedition 345 (Site U1415) recovered primitive plutonic lithologies including gabbro, troctolitic gabbro and olivine gabbronorite. These rocks exhibit cumulate textures similar to those found in layered basic intrusions and some ophiolite complexes. Metamorphism is dominated by background greenschist facies alteration associated with cataclastic deformation that likely results from Cocos-Nazca rifting. Some intervals display complex, multiple remanence components within individual samples. A high temperature component unblocks above 500°-520°C and an intermediate temperature component of nearly antipodal direction unblocks between 425°-450°C and 500°-520°C. In addition, a few samples display a third component that unblocks between 100-350°C that is nearly parallel to the highest temperature component. These multiple, nearly antipodal components suggest that remanence was acquired in different geomagnetic chrons, and represent the first multipolarity remanences seen in Pacific lower oceanic crust. Similar remanence structures, however, have been reported in lower crustal gabbros recovered from slow-spreading rate crust along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and have been interpreted to reflect protracted accretion or protracted cooling. In contrast, at Hess Deep unblocking temperatures appear consistent with temperatures inferred for successive phases of alteration, suggesting an alteration history spanning at least two polarity chrons.

  16. Multipolarity Remanences in Lower Oceanic Crustal Gabbros Recovered By Drilling at Hess Deep (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 345)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A.; Horst, A. J.; Friedman, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A long-term goal of the scientific ocean drilling community is to understand the processes by which the ocean crust is constructed through magmatism, deformation, metamorphism and hydrothermal cooling. Insights into the magnetic properties of the lower crust have come from drilling at oceanic core complexes and in tectonic windows. At the Hess Deep Rift, propagation of the Cocos-Nazca Ridge into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust exposes a dismembered, but nearly complete lower crustal section. Here, IODP Expedition 345 (Site U1415) recovered primitive plutonic lithologies including gabbro, troctolitic gabbro and olivine gabbronorite. These rocks exhibit cumulate textures similar to those found in layered basic intrusions and some ophiolite complexes. Metamorphism is dominated by background greenschist facies alteration associated with cataclastic deformation that likely results from Cocos-Nazca rifting. Some intervals display complex, multiple remanence components within individual samples. A high temperature component unblocks above 500°-520°C and an intermediate temperature component of nearly antipodal direction unblocks between 425°-450°C and 500°-520°C. In addition, a few samples display a third component that unblocks between 100-350°C that is nearly parallel to the highest temperature component. These multiple, nearly antipodal components suggest that remanence was acquired in different geomagnetic chrons, and represent the first multipolarity remanences seen in Pacific lower oceanic crust. Similar remanence structures, however, have been reported in lower crustal gabbros recovered from slow-spreading rate crust along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and have been interpreted to reflect protracted accretion or protracted cooling. In contrast, at Hess Deep unblocking temperatures appear consistent with temperatures inferred for successive phases of alteration, suggesting an alteration history spanning at least two polarity chrons.

  17. Tetraploid cells from cytokinesis failure induce aneuploidy and spontaneous transformation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lei; Zhang, Tianwei; Yi, Qiyi; Huang, Yun; Wang, Zheng; Hou, Heli; Zhang, Huan; Zheng, Wei; Hao, Qiaomei; Guo, Zongyou; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2012-08-01

    Most ovarian cancers originate from the ovarian surface epithelium and are characterized by aneuploid karyotypes. Aneuploidy, a consequence of chromosome instability, is an early event during the development of ovarian cancers. However, how aneuploid cells are evolved from normal diploid cells in ovarian cancers remains unknown. In the present study, cytogenetic analyses of a mouse syngeneic ovarian cancer model revealed that diploid mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells (MOSECs) experienced an intermediate tetraploid cell stage, before evolving to aneuploid (mainly near-tetraploid) cells. Using long-term live-cell imaging followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we demonstrated that tetraploid cells originally arose from cytokinesis failure of bipolar mitosis in diploid cells, and gave rise to aneuploid cells through chromosome mis-segregation during both bipolar and multipolar mitoses. Injection of the late passage aneuploid MOSECs resulted in tumor formation in C57BL/6 mice. Therefore, we reveal a pathway for the evolution of diploid to aneuploid MOSECs and elucidate a mechanism for the development of near-tetraploid ovarian cancer cells.

  18. Cdk5 is required for multipolar-to-bipolar transition during radial neuronal migration and proper dendrite development of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Toshio; Hirasawa, Motoyuki; Tabata, Hidenori; Mutoh, Tetsuji; Adachi, Tomoko; Suzuki, Hiromi; Saruta, Keiko; Iwasato, Takuji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hashimoto, Mistuhiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ogawa, Masaharu; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2007-06-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex consists of six layers that are generated via coordinated neuronal migration during the embryonic period. Recent studies identified specific phases of radial migration of cortical neurons. After the final division, neurons transform from a multipolar to a bipolar shape within the subventricular zone-intermediate zone (SVZ-IZ) and then migrate along radial glial fibres. Mice lacking Cdk5 exhibit abnormal corticogenesis owing to neuronal migration defects. When we introduced GFP into migrating neurons at E14.5 by in utero electroporation, we observed migrating neurons in wild-type but not in Cdk5(-/-) embryos after 3-4 days. Introduction of the dominant-negative form of Cdk5 into the wild-type migrating neurons confirmed specific impairment of the multipolar-to-bipolar transition within the SVZ-IZ in a cell-autonomous manner. Cortex-specific Cdk5 conditional knockout mice showed inverted layering of the cerebral cortex and the layer V and callosal neurons, but not layer VI neurons, had severely impaired dendritic morphology. The amount of the dendritic protein Map2 was decreased in the cerebral cortex of Cdk5-deficient mice, and the axonal trajectory of cortical neurons within the cortex was also abnormal. These results indicate that Cdk5 is required for proper multipolar-to-bipolar transition, and a deficiency of Cdk5 results in abnormal morphology of pyramidal neurons. In addition, proper radial neuronal migration generates an inside-out pattern of cerebral cortex formation and normal axonal trajectories of cortical pyramidal neurons.

  19. Establishment of M1 multipolarity of a 6.5 (micro)2n resonance in 172Yb at E(gamma) = 3.3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, A; Voinov, A; Algin, E; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garrett, P E; Guttormsen, M; Nelson, R O; Rekstad, J; Siem, S

    2004-02-04

    Two-step-cascade spectra in {sup 172}Yb have been measured after thermal neutron capture. they are compared to calculations based on experimental values of the level density and radiative strength function (RSF) obtained from the {sup 173}Yb(3{sup 3}He,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 172}Yb reaction. The multipolarity of a 6.5(15) {mu}{sub N}{sup 2} resonance at E{sub {gamma}} = 3.3(1) MeV in the RSF is determined to be M1 by this comparison.

  20. 5-(3,4-Dimethoxybenzyl)-7-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazepane-2,6-dione acetonitrile solvate refined using a multipolar atom model.

    PubMed

    Ejsmont, Krzysztof; Boeglin, Joel; Didierjean, Claude; Guichard, Gilles; Jelsch, Christian

    2010-06-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, C(16)H(23)N(3)O(4).CH(3)CN, was refined using a multipolar atom model transferred from an experimental electron-density database. The refinement showed some improvement in crystallographic statistical indices compared with the independent atom model. The triazepane ring adopts a twist-boat conformation. In the crystal structure, the molecule forms intermolecular contacts with 14 different neighbours. There are two N-H...O and one C-H...O intermolecular hydrogen bond.

  1. Multipolarity analysis for {sup 14}C high-energy resonance populated by ({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, D. Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E.; Bonaccorso, A.; Fortunato, L.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2015-10-15

    The {sup 12}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 14}C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition.

  2. General methodology to optimize damping functions to account for charge penetration effects in electrostatic calculations using multicentered multipolar expansions.

    PubMed

    Werneck, Araken S; Filho, Tarcísio M Rocha; Dardenne, Laurent E

    2008-01-17

    We developed a methodology to optimize exponential damping functions to account for charge penetration effects when computing molecular electrostatic properties using the multicentered multipolar expansion method (MME). This methodology is based in the optimization of a damping parameter set using a two-step fast local fitting procedure and the ab initio (Hartree-Fock/6-31G** and 6-31G**+) electrostatic potential calculated in a set of concentric grid of points as reference. The principal aspect of the methodology is a first local fitting step which generates a focused initial guess to improve the performance of a simplex method avoiding the use of multiple runs and the choice of initial guesses. Three different strategies for the determination of optimized damping parameters were tested in the following studies: (1) investigation of the error in the calculation of the electrostatic interaction energy for five hydrogen-bonded dimers at standard and nonstandard hydrogen-bonded geometries and at nonequilibrium geometries; (2) calculation of the electrostatic molecular properties (potential and electric field) for eight small molecular systems (methanol, ammonia, water, formamide, dichloromethane, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide, and acetonitrile) and for the 20 amino acids. Our results show that the methodology performs well not only for small molecules but also for relatively larger molecular systems. The analysis of the distinct parameter sets associated with different optimization strategies show that (i) a specific parameter set is more suitable and more general for electrostatic interaction energy calculations, with an average absolute error of 0.46 kcal/mol at hydrogen-bond geometries; (ii) a second parameter set is more suitable for electrostatic potential and electric field calculations at and outside the van der Waals (vdW) envelope, with an average error decrease >72% at the vdW surface. A more general amino acid damping parameter set was constructed from the

  3. [Peculiarities of dopamine receptors on the membrane of spinal cord multipolar neurons of the brook lamprey Lampetra planeri].

    PubMed

    Bukinich, A a; Tsvetkov, E A; Veselkin, N P

    2007-01-01

    On isolated multiporal neurons of spinal cord of amniocoete larva of the brook lamprey Lampetra planeri, by the patch-clamp method in configuration "the whole cell", a modulating effect of dopamine on potential-activated Na+ currents was studied. Application of dopamine (10 microM) was shown to produce a complex action on the sodium current amplitude. In some cases a decrease of the amplitude, on average, by 13.5 +/- 2.2% was found, while in others--an increase, on average, by 8.6 +/- 6.1%. The modulation dopamine effect was not accompanied by any changes either of the threshold of the current appearance or of resistance of neuronal cell membranes. Pharmacological analysis with use of dopamine agonist has shown that the agonist of D1-receptors (-)-SKF-38393 (10 microM) decreases the Na+ current amplitude, whereas the agonist of D2-receptors (-)-quinpirole (10 microM) can produce in different cells both an increase, by 30.7 +/- 17.0 %, and a decrease, by 13.2 +/- 3.1%, of the Na+ current amplitude. The obtained data indicate the existence of D1- and D2-receptors on the membrane of multipolar spinal neurons of the amniocoete larva of the brook lamprey. Study of action of antagonists has shown that the antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390 (10 microM) does not affect action of the agonist of D1-receptors (-)-SKF-38393 (10 microM); the antagonist of D2-receptors (-)-sulpiride (10 microM) blocks completely effects both of the agonist of D1-receptors (-)-SKF-38393 (10 microM) and of the agonist of D2-receptors (-)-quinpirole (10 microM). The antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390 (10 microM) produced no effect on action of the agonist of D1-receptors (-)-SKF-38393 (10 microM). The obtained data indicate peculiarities of dopamine receptors of Cyclostomata as compared with those in mammals.

  4. Multipolar, time-dynamical model for the loss compensation and lasing of a spherical plasmonic nanoparticle spaser immersed in an active gain medium

    PubMed Central

    Veltri, Alessandro; Chipouline, Arkadi; Aradian, Ashod

    2016-01-01

    The plasmonic response of a metal nanoparticle in the presence of surrounding gain elements is studied, using a space and time-dependent model, which integrates a quantum formalism to describe the gain and a classical treatment for the metal. Our model fully takes into account the influence of the system geometry (nanosphere) and offers for the first time, the possibility to describe the temporal evolution of the fields and the coupling among the multipolar modes of the particle. We calculate the lasing threshold value for all multipoles of the spaser, and demonstrate that the dipolar one is lowest. The onset of the lasing instability, in the linear regime, is then studied both with and without external field forcing. We also study the behaviour of the system below the lasing threshold, with the external field, demonstrating the existence of an amplification regime where the nanoparticle’s plasmon is strongly enhanced as the threshold is approached. Finally, a qualitative discussion is provided on later, non-linear stages of the dynamics and the approach to the steady-state of the spaser; in particular, it is shown that, for the considered geometry, the spasing is necessarily multi-modal and multipolar modes are always activated. PMID:27625072

  5. C3G/Rapgef1 Is Required in Multipolar Neurons for the Transition to a Bipolar Morphology during Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavin; Lutter, Daniela; Bochenek, Magdalena L; Kato, Katsuhiro; Tsytsyura, Yaroslav; Glyvuk, Natalia; Sakakibara, Akira; Klingauf, Jürgen; Adams, Ralf H; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of a polarized morphology is essential for the development and function of neurons. During the development of the mammalian neocortex, neurons arise in the ventricular zone (VZ) from radial glia cells (RGCs) and leave the VZ to generate the cortical plate (CP). During their migration, newborn neurons first assume a multipolar morphology in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and lower intermediate zone (IZ). Subsequently, they undergo a multi-to-bipolar (MTB) transition to become bipolar in the upper IZ by developing a leading process and a trailing axon. The small GTPases Rap1A and Rap1B act as master regulators of neural cell polarity in the developing mouse neocortex. They are required for maintaining the polarity of RGCs and directing the MTB transition of multipolar neurons. Here we show that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) C3G (encoded by the Rapgef1 gene) is a crucial regulator of the MTB transition in vivo by conditionally inactivating the Rapgef1 gene in the developing mouse cortex at different time points during neuronal development. Inactivation of C3G results in defects in neuronal migration, axon formation and cortical lamination. Live cell imaging shows that C3G is required in cortical neurons for both the specification of an axon and the initiation of radial migration by forming a leading process.

  6. Multipolar, time-dynamical model for the loss compensation and lasing of a spherical plasmonic nanoparticle spaser immersed in an active gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, Alessandro; Chipouline, Arkadi; Aradian, Ashod

    2016-09-01

    The plasmonic response of a metal nanoparticle in the presence of surrounding gain elements is studied, using a space and time-dependent model, which integrates a quantum formalism to describe the gain and a classical treatment for the metal. Our model fully takes into account the influence of the system geometry (nanosphere) and offers for the first time, the possibility to describe the temporal evolution of the fields and the coupling among the multipolar modes of the particle. We calculate the lasing threshold value for all multipoles of the spaser, and demonstrate that the dipolar one is lowest. The onset of the lasing instability, in the linear regime, is then studied both with and without external field forcing. We also study the behaviour of the system below the lasing threshold, with the external field, demonstrating the existence of an amplification regime where the nanoparticle’s plasmon is strongly enhanced as the threshold is approached. Finally, a qualitative discussion is provided on later, non-linear stages of the dynamics and the approach to the steady-state of the spaser; in particular, it is shown that, for the considered geometry, the spasing is necessarily multi-modal and multipolar modes are always activated.

  7. Genetic changes induced by space flight factors in barley seeds on Soyuz-5 and Soyuz-9 craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuzhdin, N. I.; Dozortseva, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Air-dry seeds of the barley Zimujuschij moscowskyi of the 1969 harvest were taken into space onboard the spaceships Soyuz-5 and Soyuz-9. A cytological study of the mitoses in meristemic cells in rootlet terminals revealed that space flight factors (SFF) in nonirradiated seeds induced about 3% of aberrant cells. After irradiation the effect of SFF increased over two-fold. Although the radio protectors ensured the seeds against from the SFF-induced damage either in irradiated or nonirradiated seed cells which is inconsistent with the previously obtained data.

  8. One-year clinical outcome after ablation with a novel multipolar irrigated ablation catheter for treatment of atrial fibrillation: potential implications for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Wakili, Reza; Siebermair, Johannes; Fichtner, Stephanie; Sinner, Moritz F; Klocker, Eva; Olesch, Lucia; Hilberath, Jan N; Sarai, Samira; Clauss, Sebastian; Sattler, Stefan; Kääb, Stefan; Estner, Heidi L

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is an established therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF). However, PVI remains a time-consuming procedure. A novel multipolar irrigated radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheter (nMARQ™) is aiming to improve PVI. We investigated the influence on procedural parameters and assessed clinical outcomes after PVI using this novel catheter. Fifty-eight consecutive patients with paroxysmal AF were equally allocated (n = 29/group) to PVI treatment with (i) the novel multipolar ablation catheter (nMARQ™) and (ii) a standard single-tip ablation catheter (SAC). Study endpoints included procedure time, fluoroscopy time, radiation dose, RF time, number of energy applications, and clinical outcome defined as freedom from AF after a single procedure. Successful PVI was confirmed by a separate circular, multipolar mapping catheter in all patients treated with the nMARQ™. Pulmonary vein isolation was achieved in 100% in the SAC group. In the nMARQ™ group, PVI was suggested in all patients. However, confirmatory mapping revealed persistent pulmonary vein (PV) conduction in 19 out of 29 nMARQ™ patients. These patients underwent further ablation, which still failed to achieve PVI in 5 of the 29 nMARQ™ patients, mainly due to significant temperature rise in the oesophagus and device-related limitations reaching the right inferior PV. Mean fluoroscopy time (31 ± 12 vs. 23 ± 10 min, P < 0.05) and (132 ± 37 vs. 109 ± 30 min, P < 0.05) were longer in nMARQ™ vs. SAC patients. Radiofrequency time was shorter in nMARQ™ vs. SAC group (21 ± 9 vs. 35 ± 12 min, P < 0.001). Radiation dose and the number of energy applications did not differ between both groups. Clinical outcome analysis revealed no significant differences (nMARQ™: 72 vs. SAC: 72%) after a mean follow-up of 373 ± 278 days. The use of the nMARQ™ catheter is associated with important device-related limitations to achieve successful PVI. However, clinical outcomes were equivalent in n

  9. Transferred multipolar atom model for 10β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate obtained from the biotransformation of methyloestrenolone.

    PubMed

    Faroque, Muhammad Umer; Yousuf, Sammer; Zafar, Salman; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Ahmed, Maqsood

    2016-05-01

    Biotransformation is the structural modification of compounds using enzymes as the catalysts and it plays a key role in the synthesis of pharmaceutically important compounds. 10β,17β-Dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate, C19H28O3·2H2O, was obtained from the fungal biotransformation of methyloestrenolone. The structure was refined using the classical independent atom model (IAM) and a transferred multipolar atom model using the ELMAM2 database. The results from the two refinements have been compared. The ELMAM2 refinement has been found to be superior in terms of the refinement statistics. It has been shown that certain electron-density-derived properties can be calculated on the basis of the transferred parameters for crystals which diffract to ordinary resolution.

  10. Multi-Frequency and Multi-Polarization Study on SAR-Based Coastal AReas Characterization: The Case of the Yellow River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buono, Andrea; Nunziata, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Maurizio; Li, Xiaofeng; Shen, Dongliang; Ding, Xianwen

    2016-08-01

    The Yellow River is the most sediment-filled river and the sixth-longest one in the world. It is of paramount importance for safe navigation, local economy and environment due to the presence of floods, farms, aquacultures and pollution. Further, the Yellow River delta is characterized by several physical phenomena due to both natural and anthropogenic processes: sedimentation, erosion, floods, pollution, etc.In this study, actual partially-overlapped L-/C-band fully- polarimetric (FP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are used to investigate the scattering properties of the Yellow River delta, whose very complex area is characterized by different environments as recorded by ground truth data acquired during a ship-based in-situ campaign. Preliminary results witness that multi-polarization and multi-frequency SAR measurements allow inferring more physical information in such a complex environment that can be used as starting point for developing ad hoc classification algorithms.

  11. A theoretical analysis of HLA-DRbeta1*0301-CLIP complex using the first three multipolar moments of the electrostatic field.

    PubMed

    Balbín, Alejandro; Cárdenas, Constanza; Villaveces, José Luis; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2006-09-01

    Interactions between the HLA-DRbeta1*0301 molecule and several occupying peptides obtained from computational substitutions made to the CLIP peptide are studied. The exploration was carried out using a vector composed of the first three terms of the multipolar expansion of the electrostatic field, namely, charge (q), dipole (d) and quadrupole (C). Comparisons between pocket-peptide interactions established that the binding pockets for this HLA molecule are ordered in terms of their importance for binding peptides, as follows: P1 > P4 > P6 > P7 > P9. A set of electrostatically distinct amino acids that determine interaction stability and specificity were identified for each pocket. The beta74R residue was especially identified as being the key amino acid mediating the occupying peptide binding for pocket 4; this residue has been recently associated with Graves' disease.

  12. Per-point and per-field contextual classification of multipolarization and multiple incidence angle aircraft L-band radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, Roger M.; Hussin, Yousif Ali

    1989-01-01

    Multipolarized aircraft L-band radar data are classified using two different image classification algorithms: (1) a per-point classifier, and (2) a contextual, or per-field, classifier. Due to the distinct variations in radar backscatter as a function of incidence angle, the data are stratified into three incidence-angle groupings, and training and test data are defined for each stratum. A low-pass digital mean filter with varied window size (i.e., 3x3, 5x5, and 7x7 pixels) is applied to the data prior to the classification. A predominately forested area in northern Florida was the study site. The results obtained by using these image classifiers are then presented and discussed.

  13. Was the Devonian geomagnetic field dipolar or multipolar? Palaeointensity studies of Devonian igneous rocks from the Minusa Basin (Siberia) and the Kola Peninsula dykes, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, V. V.; Biggin, A. J.; Veselovskiy, R. V.; Shatsillo, A. V.; Hawkins, L. M. A.; Shcherbakov, V. P.; Zhidkov, G. V.

    2017-05-01

    Defining variations in the behaviour of the geomagnetic field through geological time is critical to understanding the dynamics of Earth's core and its response to mantle convection and planetary evolution. Furthermore, the question of whether the axial dipole dominance of the recent palaeomagnetic field persists through the whole of Earth's history is fundamental to determining the reliability of palaeogeographic reconstructions and the efficacy of the magnetosphere in shielding Earth from solar wind radiation. Previous palaeomagnetic directional studies have suggested that the palaeofield had a complex configuration in the Devonian period (419-359 Ma). Here we present new high-quality palaeointensity determinations from rocks aged between 408 and 375 Ma from the Minusa Basin (southern Siberia), and the Kola Peninsula that enable the first reliable investigation of the strength of the field during this enigmatic period. Palaeointensity experiments were performed using the thermal Thellier, microwave Thellier and Wilson methods on 165 specimens from 25 sites. Six out of eight successful sites from the Minusa Basin and all four successful sites from the Kola Peninsula produced extremely low palaeointensities (<10 μT). These findings challenge the uniformitarian view of the palaeomagnetic field: field intensities of nearly an order of magnitude lower than Neogene values (except during relatively rare geomagnetic excursions and reversals) together with the widespread appearance of strange directions found in the Devonian suggest that the Earth's field during this time may have had a dominantly multipolar geometry. A persistent, low intensity multipolar magnetic field and associated diminished magnetosphere would increase the impact of solar particles on the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere with potential major implications for Earth's climate and biosphere.

  14. Reduction of Fluoroscopic Exposure Using a New Fluoroscopy Integrating Technology in a 3D-Mapping System During Pulmonary Vein Isolation With a Circular Multipolar Irrigated Catheter.

    PubMed

    Blockhaus, Christian; Schmidt, Jan; Kurt, Muhammed; Clasen, Lukas; Brinkmeyer, Christoph; Katsianos, Efstratios; Müller, Patrick; Gerguri, Shqipe; Kelm, Malte; Shin, Dong-In; Makimoto, Hisaki

    2016-05-25

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a cornerstone therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). With increasing numbers of PVI procedures, demand arises to reduce the cumulative fluoroscopic radiation exposure for both the physician and the patient. New technologies are emerging to address this issue. Here, we report our first experiences with a new fluoroscopy integrating technology in addition to a current 3D-mapping system. The new fluoroscopy integrating system (FIS) with 3D-mapping was used prospectively in 15 patients with AF. Control PVI cases (n = 37) were collected retrospectively as a complete series. Total procedure time (skin to skin), fluoroscopic time, and dose-area-product (DAP) data were analyzed. All PVI procedures were performed by one experienced physician using a commercially available circular multipolar irrigated ablation catheter. All PVI procedures were successfully undertaken without major complications. Baseline characteristics of the two groups showed no significant differences. In the group using the FIS, the fluoroscopic time and DAP were significantly reduced from 571 ± 187 seconds versus 1011 ± 527 seconds (P = 0.0029) and 4342 ± 2073 cGycm(2) versus 6208 ± 3314 cGycm(2) (P = 0.049), respectively. Mean procedure time was not significantly affected and was 114 ± 31 minutes versus 104 ± 24 minutes (P = 0.23) by the FIS.The use of the new FIS with the current 3D-mapping system enables a significant reduction of the total fluoroscopy time and DAP compared to the previous combination of 3D-mapping system plus normal fluoroscopy during PVI utilizing a circular multipolar irrigated ablation catheter. However, the concomitant total procedure time is not affected. Thus, the new system reduces the radiation exposure for both the physicians and patients.

  15. Was the Devonian geomagnetic field dipolar or multipolar? Palaeointensity studies of Devonian igneous rocks from the Minusa Basin (Siberia) and the Kola Peninsula dykes, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, V. V.; Biggin, A. J.; Veselovskiy, R. V.; Shatsillo, A. V.; Hawkins, L.; Shcherbakov, V. P.; Zhidkov, G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Defining variations in the behaviour of the geomagnetic field through geological time is critical to understanding the dynamics of Earth's core and its response to mantle convection and planetary evolution. Furthermore, the question of whether the axial dipole dominance of the recent palaeomagnetic field persists through the whole of Earth's history is fundamental to determining the reliability of palaeogeographic reconstructions and the efficacy of the magnetosphere in shielding Earth from solar wind radiation. Previous palaeomagnetic directional studies have suggested that the palaeofield had a complex configuration in the Devonian period (419-359 Ma). Here we present new palaeointensity determinations from rocks aged between 408 and 375 Ma from the Minusa Basin (southern Siberia), and the Kola Peninsula to investigate the strength of the field during this enigmatic period. Palaeointensity experiments were performed using the thermal Thellier, microwave Thellier, and Wilson methods on 165 specimens from 25 sites. Six out of eight successful sites from the Minusa Basin and all four successful sites from the Kola Peninsula produced extremely low palaeointensities (< 10 μT). These findings challenge the uniformitarian view of the palaeomagnetic field: field intensities of nearly an order of magnitude lower than Neogene values (except during relatively rare geomagnetic excursions and reversals) together with the widespread appearance of strange directions found in the Devonian suggest that the Earth's field during this time may have had a dominantly multipolar geometry. A persistent, low intensity multipolar magnetic field and associated diminished magnetosphere would increase the impact of solar particles on the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere with potential major implications for Earth's climate and biosphere.

  16. [transversion of cell polarity from Bi- to multipolarity is the mechanism determining multiple spore formation in Anaerobacter polyendosporus PS-1T].

    PubMed

    Duda, V I; Suzina, N E; Polivtseva, V N; Gafarov, A B; Shorokhova, A P; Machulin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The number of spores formed in a single cell ofAnaerobacterpolyendosporus PS-1T is significantly influenced by the composition of nutrient media. Depending on carbohydrate concentration in synthetic medium, the number of spores may vary from one-two to five-seven. Investigation of spore formation by fluorescence and electron microscopy revealed that on media with 0.5-1.0% glucose or galactose most of the vegetative cells remained rod-shaped after cessation of cell division in the culture. Their nucleoids were localized at cell poles close to the polar site of the cytoplasmic membrane. Forespores were formed at one or both of these poles. A satellite nucleoid (operator) was detected close to each forespore. In the variant with bipolar organization of mother cells only one or two spores per cell were formed. In the second variant of cultivation, when the cells grew at low galactose concentrations (0.1-0.3%), most of the vegetative cells increased in volume and became oval or spherical after cessation of cell division in the culture. Epifluorescence microscopy with nucleic acids-specific fluorochromes (DAPI and acridine orange) revealed the presence of multiple (six to nine) nucleoids in these cells. The nucleoids were located at the cell periphery in close contact with the cytoplasmic membrane. These nucleoids became the centers (poles) for forespore formation. Thus, in the early stationary phase transversion from bipolar to multipolar cells occurred during the early stationary phase. Cessation of cell division combined with continuing replication of the nucleoids resulted in formation on multinuclear cells. The multiplicity of nucleoides and multipolarity of these cells were prerequisites determining endogenous polysporogenesis, occurring as synchronous formation of three to seven twin spores in a number of the oval and spherical cells.

  17. Modifications of mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 15, discusses modifications of mitosis, including endoreduplication, polyteny, endomitosis, C-mitosis, restitution, amitosis and multipolar mitoses. Apart from multipolar mitosis, all other mitotic modifications are characterized by an absent or defective spindle, and in most cases these result in the duplication of the chromosome number. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  18. On the use of L-band multipolarization airborne SAR for surveys of crops, vineyards, and orchards in a California irrigated agricultural region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The airborne L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collected multipolarization calibrated image data over an irrigated agricultural test site near Fresno, CA, on March 6, 1984. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the effects of incidence angle on the measured backscattering coefficients could be removed by using a correction factor equal to the secant of the angle raised to the 1.4 power, (2) for this scene and time of year, the various polarization channels were highly correlated such that the use of more than one polarization added little to the ability of the radar to discriminate vegetation type or condition; the exception was barley which separated from vineyards only when a combination of like and cross polarization data were used (polarization was very useful for corn identification in fall crops), (3) an excellent separation between herbaceous vegetation (alfalfa, barley, and oats) or bare fields and trees in orchards existed in brightness was well correlated to alfalfa height or biomass, especially for the HH polarization combination, (5) vineyards exhibited a narrow range of brightnesses with no systematic effects of type or number of stakes nor of number of wires in the trellises nor of the size of the vines, (6) within the orchard classes, areal biomass characterized by basal area differences caused radar image brightness differences for small to medium trees but not for medium to large trees.

  19. Cellular and molecular characterization of multipolar Map5-expressing cells: a subset of newly generated, stage-specific parenchymal cells in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like cells (mMap5 cells) expressing the microtubule associated protein 5 (Map5), which is known to be present in most neurons. We characterized the morphology, phenotype, regional distribution, proliferative dynamics, and stage-specific marker expression of these cells in the rabbit and mouse CNS, also assessing their existence in other mammalian species. mMap5 cells were never found to co-express the Ng2 antigen. They appear to be a population of glial cells sharing features but also differences with Ng2+progenitor cells. We show that mMap5 cells are newly generated, postmitotic parenchymal elements of the oligodendroglial lineage, thus being a stage-specific population of polydendrocytes. Finally, we report that the number of mMap5 cells, although reduced within the brain of adult/old animals, can increase in neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions.

  20. Charge-density analysis using multipolar atom and spherical charge models: 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione, a compound displaying a resonance-assisted hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Nassour, Ayoub; Kubicki, Maciej; Wright, Jonathan; Borowiak, Teresa; Dutkiewicz, Grzegorz; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The experimental charge-density distribution in 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione in the crystal state was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collection at 0.33 Å resolution. The molecule in the crystal is in the enol form. The experimental electron density was refined using the Hansen-Coppens multipolar model and an alternative modeling, based on spherical atoms and additional charges on the covalent bonds and electron lone-pair sites. The crystallographic refinements, charge-density distributions, molecular electrostatic potentials, dipole moments and intermolecular interaction energies obtained from the different charge-density models were compared. The experimental results are also compared with the theoretical charge densities using theoretical structure factors obtained from periodic quantum calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. A strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bond connects molecules along the [001] direction. The deformation density maps show the resonance within the O=C-C=C-OH fragment and merged lone pair lobes on the hydroxyl O atom. This resonance is further confirmed by the analysis of charges and topology of the electron density.

  1. Cellular and Molecular Characterization of Multipolar Map5-Expressing Cells: A Subset of Newly Generated, Stage-Specific Parenchymal Cells in the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like cells (mMap5 cells) expressing the microtubule associated protein 5 (Map5), which is known to be present in most neurons. We characterized the morphology, phenotype, regional distribution, proliferative dynamics, and stage-specific marker expression of these cells in the rabbit and mouse CNS, also assessing their existence in other mammalian species. mMap5 cells were never found to co-express the Ng2 antigen. They appear to be a population of glial cells sharing features but also differences with Ng2+progenitor cells. We show that mMap5 cells are newly generated, postmitotic parenchymal elements of the oligodendroglial lineage, thus being a stage-specific population of polydendrocytes. Finally, we report that the number of mMap5 cells, although reduced within the brain of adult/old animals, can increase in neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions. PMID:23667595

  2. Scalable improvement of SPME multipolar electrostatics in anisotropic polarizable molecular mechanics using a general short-range penetration correction up to quadrupoles

    PubMed Central

    Narth, Christophe; Lagardère, Louis; Polack, Étienne; Gresh, Nohad; Wang, Qiantao; Bell, David R.; Rackers, Joshua A.; Ponder, Jay W.; Ren, Pengyu Y.; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2015-01-01

    We propose a general coupling of the Smooth Particle Mesh Ewald (spme) approach for distributed multipoles to a short-range charge penetration correction modifying the charge-charge, charge-dipole and charge-quadrupole energies. Such an approach significantly improves electrostatics when compared to ab initio values and has been calibrated on Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory (sapt) reference data. Various neutral molecular dimers have been tested as results on charged systems (metal cation complexes) are provided. Transferability of the correction is adressed in the context of the implementation of the amoeba and sibfa polarizable force fields in the Tinker-hp software. As the choices of the multipolar distribution are discussed, conclusions are drawn for the future penetration-corrected polarizable force fields highlighting the mandatory need of non-spurious procedures for the obtention of well balanced and physically meaningful distributed moments. Finally scalability and parallelism of the short-range corrected spme approach are addressed, demonstrating that the damping function is computationally affordable and accurate for molecular dynamics simulations of complexe bio- or bioinorganic systems in periodic boundary conditions. PMID:26814845

  3. Scalable improvement of SPME multipolar electrostatics in anisotropic polarizable molecular mechanics using a general short-range penetration correction up to quadrupoles.

    PubMed

    Narth, Christophe; Lagardère, Louis; Polack, Étienne; Gresh, Nohad; Wang, Qiantao; Bell, David R; Rackers, Joshua A; Ponder, Jay W; Ren, Pengyu Y; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2016-02-15

    We propose a general coupling of the Smooth Particle Mesh Ewald SPME approach for distributed multipoles to a short-range charge penetration correction modifying the charge-charge, charge-dipole and charge-quadrupole energies. Such an approach significantly improves electrostatics when compared to ab initio values and has been calibrated on Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory reference data. Various neutral molecular dimers have been tested and results on the complexes of mono- and divalent cations with a water ligand are also provided. Transferability of the correction is adressed in the context of the implementation of the AMOEBA and SIBFA polarizable force fields in the TINKER-HP software. As the choices of the multipolar distribution are discussed, conclusions are drawn for the future penetration-corrected polarizable force fields highlighting the mandatory need of non-spurious procedures for the obtention of well balanced and physically meaningful distributed moments. Finally, scalability and parallelism of the short-range corrected SPME approach are addressed, demonstrating that the damping function is computationally affordable and accurate for molecular dynamics simulations of complex bio- or bioinorganic systems in periodic boundary conditions. Copyright © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. On the use of L-band multipolarization airborne SAR for surveys of crops, vineyards, and orchards in a California irrigated agricultural region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The airborne L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collected multipolarization calibrated image data over an irrigated agricultural test site near Fresno, CA, on March 6, 1984. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the effects of incidence angle on the measured backscattering coefficients could be removed by using a correction factor equal to the secant of the angle raised to the 1.4 power, (2) for this scene and time of year, the various polarization channels were highly correlated such that the use of more than one polarization added little to the ability of the radar to discriminate vegetation type or condition; the exception was barley which separated from vineyards only when a combination of like and cross polarization data were used (polarization was very useful for corn identification in fall crops), (3) an excellent separation between herbaceous vegetation (alfalfa, barley, and oats) or bare fields and trees in orchards existed in brightness was well correlated to alfalfa height or biomass, especially for the HH polarization combination, (5) vineyards exhibited a narrow range of brightnesses with no systematic effects of type or number of stakes nor of number of wires in the trellises nor of the size of the vines, (6) within the orchard classes, areal biomass characterized by basal area differences caused radar image brightness differences for small to medium trees but not for medium to large trees.

  5. Building on the EGIPPS performance assessment: the multipolar framework as a heuristic to tackle the complexity of performance of public service oriented health care organisations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Performance of health care systems is a key concern of policy makers and health service managers all over the world. It is also a major challenge, given its multidimensional nature that easily leads to conceptual and methodological confusion. This is reflected by a scarcity of models that comprehensively analyse health system performance. Discussion In health, one of the most comprehensive performance frameworks was developed by the team of Leggat and Sicotte. Their framework integrates 4 key organisational functions (goal attainment, production, adaptation to the environment, and values and culture) and the tensions between these functions. We modified this framework to better fit the assessment of the performance of health organisations in the public service domain and propose an analytical strategy that takes it into the social complexity of health organisations. The resulting multipolar performance framework (MPF) is a meta-framework that facilitates the analysis of the relations and interactions between the multiple actors that influence the performance of health organisations. Summary Using the MPF in a dynamic reiterative mode not only helps managers to identify the bottlenecks that hamper performance, but also the unintended effects and feedback loops that emerge. Similarly, it helps policymakers and programme managers at central level to better anticipate the potential results and side effects of and required conditions for health policies and programmes and to steer their implementation accordingly. PMID:24742181

  6. Asymmetry-Induced Transport with Azimuthal Perturbations at the Trapping Separatrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabantsev, A. A.; Tsidulko, Yu. A.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2008-11-01

    Our experiments show that weak multipolar perturbations added to a trapping separatrix have large effects on asymmetry-induced transport and plasma wave damping, as suggested by recent theoretical models. Here, the pure electron plasma columns have a controlled trapping separatrix created by an applied θ-symmetric wall ``squeeze'' voltage, and a controlled overall asymmetry such as magnetic tilt. Breaking the θ-symmetry of the separatrix by adding multipolar potential perturbations φm causes large and easily characterized effects for a variety of asymmetry-induced dissipative processes. For example, the measured bulk expansion rate νP is a function of the angle δθ between the magnetic tilt and the multipolar separatrix perturbation. This function is the sum of phase-constant (c) and phase-variable ( θ) parts, i.e., νP= νc+ νθ(2 δθ). For dipole or quadrupole (m , 2 ) perturbations νc νθ, so νP 2 νθ2̂( δθ); and for higher (m ,4... ) perturbations one finds νθ≡0, so the νP enhancement is phase-independent. Moreover, the two parts scale differently with magnetic field B, possibly explaining the puzzling B-1.4 scalings observed experimentally. D.H.E. Dubin and Yu.A. Tsidulko, adjacent poster

  7. Defective neuronal migration and inhibition of bipolar to multipolar transition of migrating neural cells by Mesoderm-Specific Transcript, Mest, in the developing mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Ji, Liting; Bishayee, Kausik; Sadra, Ali; Choi, Seunghyuk; Choi, Wooyul; Moon, Sungho; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2017-07-04

    Brain developmental disorders such as lissencephaly can result from faulty neuronal migration and differentiation during the formation of the mammalian neocortex. The cerebral cortex is a modular structure, where developmentally, newborn neurons are generated as a neuro-epithelial sheet and subsequently differentiate, migrate and organize into their final positions in the cerebral cortical plate via a process involving both tangential and radial migration. The specific role of Mest, an imprinted gene, in neuronal migration has not been previously studied. In this work, we reduced expression of Mest with in utero electroporation of neuronal progenitors in the developing embryonic mouse neocortex. Reduction of Mest levels by shRNA significantly reduced the number of neurons migrating to the cortical plate. Also, Mest-knockdown disrupted the transition of bipolar neurons into multipolar neurons migrating out of the sub-ventricular zone region. The migrating neurons also adopted a more tangential migration pattern upon knockdown of the Mest message, losing their potential to attach to radial glia cells, required for radial migration. The differentiation and migration properties of neurons via Wnt-Akt signaling were affected by Mest changes. In addition, miR-335, encoded in a Mest gene intron, was identified as being responsible for blocking the default tangential migration of the neurons. Our results suggest that Mest and its intron product, miR-335, play important roles in neuronal migration with Mest regulating the morphological transition of primary neurons required in the formation of the mammalian neocortex. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The terminal basal mitosis of chicken retinal Lim1 horizontal cells is not sensitive to cisplatin-induced cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Shirazi Fard, Shahrzad; Thyselius, Malin; All-Ericsson, Charlotta; Hallböök, Finn

    2014-01-01

    For proper development, cells need to coordinate proliferation and cell cycle-exit. This is mediated by a cascade of proteins making sure that each phase of the cell cycle is controlled before the initiation of the next. Retinal progenitor cells divide during the process of interkinetic nuclear migration, where they undergo S-phase on the basal side, followed by mitoses on the apical side of the neuroepithelium. The final cell cycle of chicken retinal horizontal cells (HCs) is an exception to this general cell cycle behavior. Lim1 expressing (+) horizontal progenitor cells (HPCs) have a heterogenic final cell cycle, with some cells undergoing a terminal mitosis on the basal side of the retina. The results in this study show that this terminal basal mitosis of Lim1+ HPCs is not dependent on Chk1/2 for its regulation compared to retinal cells undergoing interkinetic nuclear migration. Neither activating nor blocking Chk1 had an effect on the basal mitosis of Lim1+ HPCs. Furthermore, the Lim1+ HPCs were not sensitive to cisplatin-induced DNA damage and were able to continue into mitosis in the presence of γ-H2AX without activation of caspase-3. However, Nutlin3a-induced expression of p21 did reduce the mitoses, suggesting the presence of a functional p53/p21 response in HPCs. In contrast, the apical mitoses were blocked upon activation of either Chk1/2 or p21, indicating the importance of these proteins during the process of interkinetic nuclear migration. Inhibiting Cdk1 blocked M-phase transition both for apical and basal mitoses. This confirmed that the cyclin B1-Cdk1 complex was active and functional during the basal mitosis of Lim1+ HPCs. The regulation of the final cell cycle of Lim1+ HPCs is of particular interest since it has been shown that the HCs are able to sustain persistent DNA damage, remain in the cell cycle for an extended period of time and, consequently, survive for months.

  9. Harnessing Fluorine-Sulfur Contacts and Multipolar Interactions for the Design of p53 Mutant Y220C Rescue Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias R; Jones, Rhiannon N; Baud, Matthias G J; Wilcken, Rainer; Boeckler, Frank M; Fersht, Alan R; Joerger, Andreas C; Spencer, John

    2016-08-19

    Many oncogenic mutants of the tumor suppressor p53 are conformationally unstable, including the frequently occurring Y220C mutant. We have previously developed several small-molecule stabilizers of this mutant. One of these molecules, PhiKan083, 1-(9-ethyl-9H-carbazole-3-yl)-N-methylmethanamine, binds to a mutation-induced surface crevice with a KD = 150 μM, thereby increasing the melting temperature of the protein and slowing its rate of aggregation. Incorporation of fluorine atoms into small molecule ligands can substantially improve binding affinity to their protein targets. We have, therefore, harnessed fluorine-protein interactions to improve the affinity of this ligand. Step-wise introduction of fluorines at the carbazole ethyl anchor, which is deeply buried within the binding site in the Y220C-PhiKan083 complex, led to a 5-fold increase in affinity for a 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl anchor (ligand efficiency of 0.3 kcal mol(-1) atom(-1)). High-resolution crystal structures of the Y220C-ligand complexes combined with quantum chemical calculations revealed favorable interactions of the fluorines with protein backbone carbonyl groups (Leu145 and Trp146) and the sulfur of Cys220 at the mutation site. Affinity gains were, however, only achieved upon trifluorination, despite favorable interactions of the mono- and difluorinated anchors with the binding pocket, indicating a trade-off between energetically favorable protein-fluorine interactions and increased desolvation penalties. Taken together, the optimized carbazole scaffold provides a promising starting point for the development of high-affinity ligands to reactivate the tumor suppressor function of the p53 mutant Y220C in cancer cells.

  10. Harnessing Fluorine–Sulfur Contacts and Multipolar Interactions for the Design of p53 Mutant Y220C Rescue Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many oncogenic mutants of the tumor suppressor p53 are conformationally unstable, including the frequently occurring Y220C mutant. We have previously developed several small-molecule stabilizers of this mutant. One of these molecules, PhiKan083, 1-(9-ethyl-9H-carbazole-3-yl)-N-methylmethanamine, binds to a mutation-induced surface crevice with a KD = 150 μM, thereby increasing the melting temperature of the protein and slowing its rate of aggregation. Incorporation of fluorine atoms into small molecule ligands can substantially improve binding affinity to their protein targets. We have, therefore, harnessed fluorine–protein interactions to improve the affinity of this ligand. Step-wise introduction of fluorines at the carbazole ethyl anchor, which is deeply buried within the binding site in the Y220C–PhiKan083 complex, led to a 5-fold increase in affinity for a 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl anchor (ligand efficiency of 0.3 kcal mol–1 atom–1). High-resolution crystal structures of the Y220C–ligand complexes combined with quantum chemical calculations revealed favorable interactions of the fluorines with protein backbone carbonyl groups (Leu145 and Trp146) and the sulfur of Cys220 at the mutation site. Affinity gains were, however, only achieved upon trifluorination, despite favorable interactions of the mono- and difluorinated anchors with the binding pocket, indicating a trade-off between energetically favorable protein–fluorine interactions and increased desolvation penalties. Taken together, the optimized carbazole scaffold provides a promising starting point for the development of high-affinity ligands to reactivate the tumor suppressor function of the p53 mutant Y220C in cancer cells. PMID:27267810

  11. Properties of native P2X receptors in large multipolar neurons dissociated from rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wakamori, Minoru; Sorimachi, Masaru

    2004-04-16

    ATP, the ligand of P2X receptors, is a candidate of neurotransmitter or co-transmitter in the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Anatomical studies have revealed the wide distribution of P2X receptors in the brain. So far, P2X-mediated small synaptic responses have been recorded in some brain regions. To determine the physiological significance of postsynaptic ATP receptors in the brain, we have investigated the P2X responses in rat dissociated hypothalamic arcuate neurons by using the patch-clamp technique. ATP evoked inward currents in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=42 microM) at a holding potential of -70 mV. The current-voltage relationship showed a marked inward rectification starting around -10 mV. Although neither 300 microM alphabeta-methylene-ATP nor 300 microM betagamma-methylene-ATP induced any currents, 100 microM ATPgammaS and 100 microM 2-methylthio-ATP evoked inward currents of which amplitude was about 60% of the control currents evoked by 100 microM ATP. PPADS, one of P2 receptor antagonists, inhibited the ATP-evoked currents in a time- and a concentration-dependent manners (IC(50)=19 microM at 2 min). Permeant Ca(2+) inhibited the ATP-evoked currents in the range of millimolars (IC(50)=7 mM); however, Cd(2+) (1-300 microM), a broad cation channel blocker, facilitated the currents with slow off-response. Zn(2+) in the range of 1-100 microM facilitated the currents whereas Zn(2+) at the concentrations over 100 microM inhibited the currents. These observations suggest that functional P2X receptors are expressed in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. The most likely subunit combinations of the P2X receptors are P2X(2)-homomultimer and P2X(2)/P2X(6)-heteromultimer.

  12. Stokes and anti-Stokes luminescence in Tm(3+)/Yb(3+)-doped Lu3Ga5O12 nano-garnets: a study of multipolar interactions and energy transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rathaiah, Mamilla; Haritha, Pamuluri; Lozano-Gorrín, Antonio Diego; Babu, Palamandala; Jayasankar, Chalicheemalapalli Kulala; Rodríguez-Mendoza, Ulises Ruyman; Lavín, Victor; Venkatramu, Vemula

    2016-06-07

    Nanocrystalline Lu3Ga5O12 garnets doped with Tm(3+)/Yb(3+) ions have been synthesized by a low cost and environmentally benign sol-gel technique and characterized for their structural, Stokes and anti-Stokes luminescence properties. The diffuse reflectance spectra of doped Lu3Ga5O12 nano-garnets have been measured to derive the partial energy level structure of Tm(3+) and Yb(3+) ions and possible energy transfer channels between them. Upon laser excitation at 473 nm, weak red and intense near-infrared Stokes emissions have been observed in the nano-garnets. The decay curves of (3)H4 and (1)G4 levels of Tm(3+) ions and the (2)F5/2 level of Yb(3+) ions have been measured upon resonant laser excitation and are found to be non-exponential in nature due to multipolar interactions. In order to know the kind of multipolar interaction among optically active ions, the decay curves are analyzed through the generalized Yokota-Tanimoto model. Moreover, under 970 nm laser excitation, intense blue anti-Stokes emission is observed by the naked eye in Tm(3+)-Yb(3+) co-doped Lu3Ga5O12 nano-garnets. The results show that as-synthesized nano-garnets may be useful in the field of phosphors and photonics.

  13. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  14. A Unipolar or Multipolar World?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-11

    doom for the American economy. Economist Paul Krugman in The Age of Diminished Expectations believes that sour economic performance today is broadly... Paul Krugman , The Aqe of Diminished ExDectations (Washington, DC: The Washington Post Co., 1990), 5. 44Huntington, 84. 4 5Nye, ’Still in the Game, 45

  15. Prediction of vapor-liquid equilibrium and PVTx properties of geological fluid system with SAFT-LJ EOS including multi-polar contribution. Part I: Application to H 2O-CO 2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rui; Dubessy, Jean

    2010-04-01

    Molecular based equations of state (EOS) are attractive because they can take into account the energetic contribution of the main types of molecular interactions. This study models vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) and PVTx properties of the H 2O-CO 2 binary system using a Lennard-Jones (LJ) referenced SAFT (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory) EOS. The improved SAFT-LJ EOS is defined in terms of the residual molar Helmholtz energy, which is a sum of four terms representing the contributions from LJ segment-segment interactions, chain-forming among the LJ segments, short-range associations and long-range multi-polar interactions. CO 2 is modeled as a linear chain molecule with a constant quadrupole moment, and H 2O is modeled as a spherical molecule with four association sites and a dipole moment. The multi-polar contribution to Helmholtz energy, including the dipole-dipole, dipole-quadrupole, and quadrupole-quadrupole contribution for H 2O-CO 2 system, is calculated using the theory of Gubbins and Twu (1978). Six parameters for pure H 2O and four parameters for pure CO 2 are needed in our model. The Van der Waals one-fluid mixing rule is used to calculate the Lennard-Jones energy parameter and volume parameter for the mixture. Two or three binary parameters are needed for CO 2-H 2O mixtures, which are evaluated from phase equilibrium data of the binary system. Comparison with the experimental data shows that our model represents the PVT properties of CO 2 better than other SAFT EOS without a quadrupole contribution. For the CO 2-H 2O system, our model agrees well with the vapor-liquid equilibrium data from 323-623 K. The average relative deviation for CO 2 solubility (expressed in mole fraction) in water is within 6%. Our model can also predict the PVTx properties of CO 2-H 2O mixtures up to 1073 K and 3000 bar. The good performance of this model indicates that: (1) taking account of the multi-polar contribution explicitly improves the agreement of calculated

  16. Calculation of vapor-liquid equilibrium and PVTx properties of geological fluid system with SAFT-LJ EOS including multi-polar contribution. Part III. Extension to water-light hydrocarbons systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rui; Lai, Shaocong; Dubessy, Jean

    2014-01-01

    The SAFT-LJ EOS improved by Sun and Dubessy (2010, 2012) is extended to water-light hydrocarbon systems. Light hydrocarbons (including CH4, C2H6, C3H8 and nC4H10) are modeled as chain molecules without multi-polar moments. The contributions of the shape of molecules and main intermolecular interactions existing in water-light hydrocarbon systems (including repulsive and attractive forces between Lennard-Jones segments, the hydrogen-bonding force and the multi-polar interaction between water molecules) to the residual Helmholtz energy were accounted for by this EOS. The adjustable parameters for the interactions of H2O-CH4, H2O-C2H6, H2O-C3H8, and H2O-nC4H10 pairs were evaluated from mutual solubility data of binary water-hydrocarbon systems at vapor-liquid equilibria. Comparison with the experimental data shows this SAFT-LJ EOS can represent well vapor-liquid (and liquid-liquid) equilibria of binary water-light hydrocarbon systems over a wide P-T range. The accuracy of this EOS for mutual solubilities of methane, ethane, propane and water is within the experimental uncertainty generally. Moreover, the model is able to accurately predict the vapor-liquid equilibria and PVTx properties of multi-component systems composed of water, light hydrocarbon as well as CO2. As we know, this EOS is the first one allowing quantitative calculation of the mutual solubilities of water and light hydrocarbons over a wide P-T range among SAFT-type EOSs. This work indicates that the molecular-based EOS combined with conventional mixing rule can well describe the thermodynamic behavior of highly non-ideal systems such as water-light hydrocarbons mixtures except in the critical region for which long range density fluctuations cannot be taken into account by this analytical model.

  17. Gadolinium chloride pretreatment ameliorates acute cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Loukas G; Tzirogiannis, Konstantinos N; Demonakou, Maria D; Kourentzi, Kalliopi T; Mykoniatis, Michael G; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I

    2013-08-01

    Cadmium is a known industrial and environmental pollutant. It causes hepatotoxicity upon acute administration. Features of cadmium-induced acute hepatoxicity encompass necrosis, apoptosis, peliosis and inflammatory infiltration. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) may prevent cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity by suppressing Kupffer cells. The effect of GdCl3 pretreatment on a model of acute cadmium-induced liver injury was investigated. Male Wistar rats 4-5 months old were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline followed by cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 6.5 mg/kg) or GdCl3 (10 mg/kg) followed by CdCl2 (6.5 mg/kg; groups I and II, respectively). Rats of both the groups were killed at 9, 12, 16, 24, 48 and 60 h after cadmium intoxication. Liver sections were analyzed for necrosis, apoptosis, peliosis and mitoses. Liver regeneration was also evaluated by tritiated thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were also determined. Hepatic necrosis, hepatocyte and nonparenchymal cell apoptosis and macroscopic and microscopic types of peliosis hepatis were minimized by gadolinium pretreatment. Serum levels of AST and ALT were also greatly diminished in rats of group II. Tritiated thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA was increased in gadolinium pretreatment rats. Kupffer cell activation was minimal in both the groups of rats. Gadolinium pretreatment attenuates acute cadmium-induced liver injury in young Wistar rats, with mechanisms other than Kupffer cell elimination.

  18. Effects of inhibitors of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis on frequencies and types of premature chromosome condensation from X-ray induced micronuclei.

    PubMed

    Madle, S; Nowak, J; Obe, G

    1976-10-28

    Cells containing X-ray induced micronuclei were treated for a few hours before fixation with inhibitors of DNA synthesis (cytosine arabinoside; azathioprine; thymidine; trenimon), of RNA synthesis (actinomycin D; ethidium bromide), and of protein synthesis (puromycin). Only the inhibitors of DNA synthesis lead to a significant suppression of the frequencies of mitoses with micronucleus derived premature chromosome condensation (PCC). We tend to interprete the result as follows: Micronuclei that are in the G1 phase of their cell cycles are accumulated at the G1/S border or in the early S phase of their cell cycles under the influence of the inhibitors of the DNA synthesis. Micronuclei blocked in this way cannot be induced to undergo PCC and seem to disappear from the cells.

  19. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface.

  20. Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, induces sister chromatid exchanges in a Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cell line.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, A; Furuta, A; Ozaki, M; Fukuhara, K; Miyata, N

    2001-07-25

    We tested the genotoxicity of 3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol), a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes, in a bacterial reverse mutation assay, in vitro chromosome aberration (CA) test, in vitro micronucleus (MN) test, and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test. Resveratrol was negative in the strains we used in the bacterial reverse mutation assay (S. typhimurium TA98 and TA100 and E. coli WP2uvrA) in the absence and presence of a microsomal metabolizing system. It induced structural CAs at 2.5-20 microg/ml and showed weak aneuploidy induction in a Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cell line. It induced MN cells and polynuclear and karyorrhectic cells after 48h treatments in the in vitro MN test. In the SCE test, resveratrol caused a clear cell-cycle delay; at 10 microg/ml, the cell cycle took twice as long as it did in the control. Resveratrol induced SCEs dose-dependently at up to 10 microg/ml, at which it increased SCE six-fold, and the number was almost as large as mitomycin C, a strong SCE inducer. No second mitoses were observed at 20 microg/ml even after 54h. Cell cycle analysis by FACScan indicated that resveratrol caused S phase arrest, and 48h treatment induced apoptosis. Our results suggest that resveratrol may preferentially induce SCE but not CA, that is, it may cause S phase arrest only when SCEs are induced.

  1. Physiology, anaerobes, and the origin of mitosing cells 50 years on.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F

    2017-01-11

    Endosymbiotic theory posits that some organelles or structures of eukaryotic cells stem from free-living prokaryotes that became endosymbionts within a host cell. Endosymbiosis has a long and turbulent history of controversy and debate going back over 100 years. The 1967 paper by Lynn Sagan (later Lynn Margulis) forced a reluctant field to take endosymbiotic theory seriously and to incorporate it into the fabric of evolutionary thinking. Margulis envisaged three cellular partners associating in series at eukaryotic origin: the host (an engulfing bacterium), the mitochondrion (a respiring bacterium), and the flagellum (a spirochaete), with lineages descended from that flagellated eukaryote subsequently acquiring plastids from cyanobacteria, but on multiple different occasions in her 1967 account. Today, the endosymbiotic origin of mitochondria and plastids (each single events, the data now say) is uncontested textbook knowledge. The host has been more elusive, recent findings identifying it as a member of the archaea, not as a sister group of the archaea. Margulis's proposal for a spirochaete origin of flagellae was abandoned by everyone except her, because no data ever came around to support the idea. Her 1967 proposal that mitochondria and plastids arose from different endosymbionts was novel. The paper presented an appealing narrative that linked the origin of mitochondria with oxygen in Earth history: cyanobacteria make oxygen, oxygen starts accumulating in the atmosphere about 2.4 billion years ago, oxygen begets oxygen-respiring bacteria that become mitochondria via symbiosis, followed by later (numerous) multiple, independent symbioses involving cyanobacteria that brought photosynthesis to eukaryotes. With the focus on oxygen, Margulis's account of eukaryote origin was however unprepared to accommodate the discovery of mitochondria in eukaryotic anaerobes. Today's oxygen narrative has it that the oceans were anoxic up until about 580 million years ago, while the atmosphere attained modern oxygen levels only about 400 million years ago. Since eukaryotes are roughly 1.6 billion years old, much of eukaryotic evolution took place in low oxygen environments, readily explaining the persistence across eukaryotic supergroups of eukaryotic anaerobes and anaerobic mitochondria at the focus of endosymbiotic theories that came after the 1967 paper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Observation of the first mitose cycle of human lymphocytes after ten days in culture (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Doloy, M T; Le Go, R; Ducatez, G; Lepetit, J; Bourguignon, M

    1980-01-01

    A technique is described which allows the observation of the first in vitro division of human lymphocytes following a long lag period with no mitotic activity. This technique is useful when studying the effect of chronic aggressions on the chromosomes.

  3. Harmonic filters for 3D multichannel data: rotation invariant detection of mitoses in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlachter, Matthias; Reisert, Marco; Herz, Corinna; Schlürmann, Fabienne; Lassmann, Silke; Werner, Martin; Burkhardt, Hans; Ronneberger, Olaf

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for a trainable rotation invariant detection of complex structures in 3D microscopic multichannel data using a nonlinear filter approach. The basic idea of our approach is to compute local features in a window around each 3D position and map these features by means of a nonlinear mapping onto new local harmonic descriptors of the local window. These local harmonic descriptors are then combined in a linear way to form the output of the filter. The optimal combination of the computed local harmonic descriptors is determined in previous training step, and allows the filter to be adapted to an arbitrary structure depending on the problem at hand. Our approach is not limited to scalar-valued images and can also be used for vector-valued (multichannel) images such as gradient vector flow fields. We present realizations of a scalar-valued and a vector-valued multichannel filter. Our proposed algorithm was quantitatively evaluated on colorectal cancer cell lines (cells grown under controlled conditions), on which we successfully detected complex 3D mitotic structures. For a qualitative evaluation we tested our algorithms on human 3D tissue samples of colorectal cancer. We compare our results with a steerable filter approach as well as a morphology-based approach.

  4. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, E. I.; Guillot, B.; Blakeley, M. P.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Mitschler, A.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Fadel, F.; Valsecchi, W. M.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T.; Claudot, J.; Podjarny, A.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  5. Information Content Analysis for the Multi-Viewing, Multi-Channel, Multi-Polarization Imaging (3MI) Instrument : Toward Retrieval of Vertically Resolved Cloud Properties from Passive Only Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedi, J.; Merlin, G.; Labonnote, L.; Cornet, C.; Ferlay, N.; Desmons, M.; Dubuisson, P.; Parol, F.; Davis, A. B.; Marbach, T.

    2014-12-01

    The EUMETSAT Polar System- Second Generation (EPS-SG) is currently under development to take over the current EUMETSAT Polar System at the 2020 horizon. As part of it, the Multi-Viewing Multi-Channel Multi-Polarization Imaging mission (3MI) will be dedicated to the operational monitoring of aerosols but will also provide unique observations for characterization of cloud properties building on the legacy of POLDER and particularly of its 3rd mission (PARASOL) within the A-Train. Through the synergy of POLDER3/PARASOL and MODIS/AQUA several studies have demonstrated the great interest of combining multispectral, multiangle and polarization measurements in the visible, near and shortwave infrared to better constrain retrieval of clouds microphysical and macrophysical properties. Remote-sensing of cloud thermodynamic phase (Riedi et al, 2010), liquid (Bréon and Doutriaux-Boucher, 2005) or ice clouds microphysics (Zhang et al, 2009; Cole et al, 2012), cloud radiative (Zeng et al, 2012) or macrophysical properties (Ferlay et al, 2010; Desmons et al, 2013) can unarguably benefit from the additional information content brought by polarization and multiangle measurements. At the same time, retrieval algorithms are gaining further complexity and skills. Thanks to availability of computational resources, practical implementation of optimal estimation or related optimization techniques (Delanoe & Hogan, 2008; Dubovik et al, 2013) have appeared that allow simultaneous and consistent retrieval of larger sets of parameters from constantly growing observations vectors. Therefore 3MI observations will not only allow to improve accuracy of future cloud products but also opens perspectives for the development of new retrieval algorithms. A major challenge for cloud remote-sensing from passive measurements is to obtain information on clouds properties vertical distribution and structure. Through results of a comprehensive information content analysis we will illustrate our current

  6. Multipolar interference for directed light emission.

    PubMed

    Hancu, Ion M; Curto, Alberto G; Castro-López, Marta; Kuttge, Martin; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-01-08

    By directing light, optical antennas can enhance light-matter interaction and improve the efficiency of nanophotonic devices. Here we exploit the interference among the electric dipole, quadrupole, and magnetic dipole moments of a split-ring resonator to experimentally realize a compact directional optical antenna. This single-element antenna design robustly directs emission even when covered with nanometric emitters at random positions, outperforming previously demonstrated nanoantennas with a bandwidth of 200 nm and a directivity of 10.1 dB from a subwavelength structure. The advantages of this approach bring directional optical antennas closer to practical applications.

  7. Assembly of Reconfigurable Colloidal Structures by Multidirectional Field-Induced Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Velev, Orlin D

    2015-07-28

    Field-directed colloidal assembly has shown remarkable recent progress in increasing the complexity, degree of control, and multiscale organization of the structures. This has largely been achieved by using particles of complex shapes and polarizabilites (Janus, patchy, shaped, and faceted). We review the fundamentals of the interactions leading to the directed assembly of such structures, the ways to simulate the dynamics of the process, and the effect of particle size, shape, and properties on the type of structure obtained. We discuss how directional polarization interactions induced by external electric and magnetic fields can be used to assemble complex particles or particle mixtures into lattices of tailored structure. Examples of such systems include isotropic and anisotropic shaped particles with surface patches, which form networks and crystals of unusual symmetry by dipolar, quadrupolar, and multipolar interactions in external fields. The emerging trends in making reconfigurable and dynamic structures are discussed.

  8. Somatic tetraploidy in specific chick retinal ganglion cells induced by nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Sandra M.; Escoll, Pedro; de la Hera, Antonio; Frade, José M.

    2009-01-01

    A subset of neurons in the normal vertebrate nervous system contains double the normal amount of DNA in their nuclei. These neurons are all thought to derive from aberrant mitoses in neuronal precursor cells. Here we show that endogenous NGF induces DNA replication in a subpopulation of differentiating chick retinal ganglion cells that express both the neurotrophin receptor p75 and the E2F1 transcription factor, but that lack the retinoblastoma protein. Many of these neurons avoid G2/M transition and remain alive in the retina as tetraploid cells with large cell somas and extensive dendritic trees, and most of them express β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits, a specific marker of retinal ganglion cells innervating lamina F in the stratum-griseum-et-fibrosum-superficiale of the tectal cortex. Tetraploid neurons were also observed in the adult mouse retina. Thus, a developmental program leading to somatic tetraploidy in specific retinal neurons exists in vertebrates. This program might occur in other vertebrate neurons during normal or pathological situations. PMID:20018664

  9. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J.; Mason, Susan M.; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A.; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N.; Sammons, Morgan A.; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D.G.; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W.; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P.; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L.; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells. PMID:26299965

  10. Abnormal mitosis in hypertetraploid cells causes aberrant nuclear morphology in association with H2O2-induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu

    2008-09-01

    Aberrant nuclear morphology, such as nuclei with irregular shapes or fragmented nuclei, is often observed in senescent cells, but its biological significance is not fully understood. My previous study showed that aberrant nuclear morphology in senescent human fibroblasts is attributable to abnormal mitosis in later passages. In this study, the production of abnormal nuclei in association with premature senescence was investigated. Premature senescence was induced by brief exposure of human fibroblasts to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and mitosis was observed by time-lapse microscopy. In addition, cell cycle and nuclear morphology after exposure to H(2)O(2) were also analyzed using a laser scanning cytometer. Time-lapse analysis revealed that the induction of premature senescence caused abnormal mitoses, such as mitotic slippage or incomplete mitosis, especially in later days after H(2)O(2) exposure and often resulted in abnormal nuclear morphology. Analysis by laser scanning cytometer showed significantly higher frequency of abnormal cells with deformed nuclei and abnormal mitotic cells with misaligned chromosomes in a hypertetraploid subpopulation. These results suggest that unstable hypertetraploid cells, formed in association with H(2)O(2)-induced premature senescence, cause abnormal mitosis that leads to aberrant nuclear morphology.

  11. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J; Mason, Susan M; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N; Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D G; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D

    2015-09-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells.

  12. Ruta Graveolens Extract Induces DNA Damage Pathways and Blocks Akt Activation to Inhibit Cancer Cell Proliferation and Survival

    PubMed Central

    FADLALLA, KHALDA; WATSON, ANGELA; YEHUALAESHET, TESHOME; TURNER, TIMOTHY; SAMUEL, TEMESGEN

    2011-01-01

    Background Ruta graveolens is a medicinal herb that has been used for centuries against various ailments. This study examined the anticancer properties of the herb using cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods Methanolic extract of R. graveolens was tested on colon, breast and prostate cancer cells. Viability, cell cycle profiles, clonogenicity and capase activation were measured. Induction and subcellular localizations of p53, 53BP1 and γ-H2AX proteins were examined. Results the extract dose-dependently decreased the viability and the clonogenicity of treated cells and induced G2/M arrest, aberrant mitoses, and caspase-3 activation. It also induced the p53 pathway and focal concentration of the DNA damage response proteins 53BP1 and γ-H2AX. Moreover, the levels of phospho-Akt and cyclin B1 were reduced by treatment, whereas only cyclin B1 was reduced in normal dermal fibroblasts. Conclusion R. graveolens extract contains bioactive compounds which, independently of known photoactivatable mechanisms, potently inhibit cancer cell proliferation and survival through multiple targets. PMID:21273604

  13. Microcystin-LR and Cylindrospermopsin Induced Alterations in Chromatin Organization of Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Csaba; M-Hamvas, Márta; Vasas, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce metabolites with diverse bioactivities, structures and pharmacological properties. The effects of microcystins (MCYs), a family of peptide type protein-phosphatase inhibitors and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), an alkaloid type of protein synthesis blocker will be discussed in this review. We are focusing mainly on cyanotoxin-induced changes of chromatin organization and their possible cellular mechanisms. The particularities of plant cells explain the importance of such studies. Preprophase bands (PPBs) are premitotic cytoskeletal structures important in the determination of plant cell division plane. Phragmoplasts are cytoskeletal structures involved in plant cytokinesis. Both cyanotoxins induce the formation of multipolar spindles and disrupted phragmoplasts, leading to abnormal sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. Thus, MCY and CYN are probably inducing alterations of chromosome number. MCY induces programmed cell death: chromatin condensation, nucleus fragmentation, necrosis, alterations of nuclease and protease enzyme activities and patterns. The above effects may be related to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or disfunctioning of microtubule associated proteins. Specific effects: MCY-LR induces histone H3 hyperphosphorylation leading to incomplete chromatid segregation and the formation of micronuclei. CYN induces the formation of split or double PPB directly related to protein synthesis inhibition. Cyanotoxins are powerful tools in the study of plant cell organization. PMID:24084787

  14. Intraperitoneal mesotheliomas induced in mice by a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J.M.; Anderson, L.M. ); Kovatch, R.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Female mice of 6 strains (C3H/HeN, BALB/c, C57BL/6N, DBA/2, NIH Swiss, and AKR/N) were given the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) intragastrically in olive oil at a dose of 20 mg/kg, weekly for 12 wk. Half were pretreated 24 h before each MC administration with intraperitoneal {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}-NF, 150 mg/kg in olive oil), a noncarinogenic inducer of certain cytochrome P-450 isozymes. Remaining mice were given olive oil prior to MC in the same fashion, or {beta}-NF in olive oil or olive oil alone without subsequent exposure to MC. All mice were killed when moribund or 13 mo after the start of treatment. Most of the mice, irrespective of treatment, exhibited signs of peritoneal injury, including inflammation, necrosis, granuloma formation, and mineralization. Mice of some of the strains also presented peritoneal mesotheliomas, in addition to a variety of other tumors. {beta}-NF pretreatment reduced the frequency of mesotheliomas: there was only one definite mesothelioma in any of the {beta}-NF-MC groups, in a C3H/He mouse. Most of the measotheliomas were mixed fibro-mesothelial type, sometimes with papillary epithelial excrescences. They typically grew in a botryoid pattern within the peritoneal cavity, coating the abdominal organs and sometimes actively invading these organs and the diaphragm. Some lesions exhibited pleomorphism, prominent giant cells, and frequent mitoses. In addition, several lesions consisting of severe mesothelial hyperplasia associated with tissue necrosis and inflammation were considered as possible early stages of mesothelioma development. It was postulated that peritoneal injury imposed by repeated intraperitoneal injection of oil acted as an enhancing factor for mesothelioma induction by MC.

  15. PRR11 regulates late-S to G2/M phase progression and induces premature chromatin condensation (PCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chundong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yi; Zhu, Huifang; Wang, Yitao; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Jiang; Ozaki, Toshinori; Bu, Youquan

    2015-03-13

    Recently, we have demonstrated that proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11) is a novel tumor-related gene product likely implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression as well as lung cancer development. However, its precise role in cell cycle progression remains unclear. In the present study, we have further investigated the expression pattern and functional implication of PRR11 during cell cycle in detail in human lung carcinoma-derived H1299 cells. According to our immunofluorescence study, PRR11 was expressed largely in cytoplasm, the amount of PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase, and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. Consistent with those observations, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRR11 caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase. Intriguingly, the treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. Moreover, knockdown of PRR11 also resulted in a remarkable retardation of G2/M progression, and PRR11-knockdown cells subsequently underwent G2 phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by obvious mitotic defects such as multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. In addition, forced expression of PRR11 promoted the premature Chromatin condensation (PCC), and then proliferation of PRR11-expressing cells was massively attenuated and induced apoptosis. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that PRR11, which is strictly regulated during cell cycle progression, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of accurate cell cycle progression through the late S phase to mitosis. - Highlights: • PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. • PRR11-knockdown caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase and G2 phase. • The treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. • PRR11-knockdown led to multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. • Forced expression of PRR11 promoted the PCC and inhibited

  16. Trivalent dimethylarsenic compound induces histone H3 phosphorylation and abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshihide; Miyazaki, Koichi; Kita, Kayoko; Ochi, Takafumi

    2009-12-15

    Trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] has been shown to induce mitotic abnormalities, such as centrosome abnormality, multipolar spindles, multipolar division, and aneuploidy, in several cell lines. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these mitotic abnormalities, we investigated DMA(III)-mediated changes in histone H3 phosphorylation and localization of Aurora B kinase, which is a key molecule in cell mitosis. DMA(III) caused the phosphorylation of histone H3 (ser10) and was distributed predominantly in mitotic cells, especially in prometaphase cells. By contrast, most of the phospho-histone H3 was found to be localized in interphase cells after treatment with inorganic arsenite [iAs(III)], suggesting the involvement of a different pathway in phosphorylation. DMA(III) activated Aurora B kinase and slightly activated ERK MAP kinase. Phosphorylation of histone H3 by DMA(III) was effectively reduced by ZM447439 (Aurora kinase inhibitor) and slightly reduced by U0126 (MEK inhibitor). By contrast, iAs(III)-dependent histone H3 phosphorylation was markedly reduced by U0126. Aurora B kinase is generally localized in the midbody during telophase and plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, in some cells treated with DMA(III), Aurora B was not localized in the midbody of telophase cells. These findings suggested that DMA(III) induced a spindle abnormality, thereby activating the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) through the Aurora B kinase pathway. In addition, cytokinesis was not completed because of the abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase by DMA(III), thereby resulting in the generation of multinucleated cells. These results provide insight into the mechanism of arsenic tumorigenesis.

  17. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin—a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects. PMID:27379342

  18. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin-a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects.

  19. Induction of Excess Centrosomes in Neural Progenitor Cells during the Development of Radiation-Induced Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Mikio; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kato, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    The embryonic brain is one of the tissues most vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In this study, we showed that ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in the neural progenitors of the mouse cerebral cortex, and that the surviving progenitor cells subsequently develop a considerable amount of supernumerary centrosomes. When mouse embryos at Day 13.5 were exposed to γ-rays, brains sizes were reduced markedly in a dose-dependent manner, and these size reductions persisted until birth. Immunostaining with caspase-3 antibodies showed that apoptosis occurred in 35% and 40% of neural progenitor cells at 4 h after exposure to 1 and 2 Gy, respectively, and this was accompanied by a disruption of the apical layer in which mitotic spindles were positioned in unirradiated mice. At 24 h after 1 Gy irradiation, the apoptotic cells were completely eliminated and proliferation was restored to a level similar to that of unirradiated cells, but numerous spindles were localized outside the apical layer. Similarly, abnormal cytokinesis, which included multipolar division and centrosome clustering, was observed in 19% and 24% of the surviving neural progenitor cells at 48 h after irradiation with 1 and 2 Gy, respectively. Because these cytokinesis aberrations derived from excess centrosomes result in growth delay and mitotic catastrophe-mediated cell elimination, our findings suggest that, in addition to apoptosis at an early stage of radiation exposure, radiation-induced centrosome overduplication could contribute to the depletion of neural progenitors and thereby lead to microcephaly. PMID:27367050

  20. NGF induces neonatal rat sensory neurons to extend dendrites in culture after removal of satellite cells.

    PubMed

    De Koninck, P; Carbonetto, S; Cooper, E

    1993-02-01

    Vertebrate sensory neurons have a pseudo-unipolar morphology; their somata are covered by satellite cells and lack dendrites or synaptic contacts. However, when neonatal rat sensory neurons from the nodose ganglia develop in culture in absence of satellite cells and with NGF, they form synapses among themselves. In this study, we investigated whether neonatal rat nodose neurons express dendrites under the same culture conditions. We show by Lucifer yellow injection that nodose neurons remain typically unipolar when cocultured with their ganglionic satellite cells. However, when these neurons are cultured without satellite cells, virtually all neurons acquire a multipolar morphology. Moreover, when NGF is added to satellite cell-free cultures, several neurons extend dendrites; these processes stain positively for microtubule-associated protein-2. NGF induces a 17-fold increase in dendritic outgrowth after 3 weeks but has little effect on axon number. In addition, we find that the ability of nodose neurons to extend dendrites is developmentally regulated. Furthermore, in a combined morphological and electrophysiological study, using whole-cell voltage-clamp technique with Lucifer yellow in the recording solution, we demonstrate a positive correlation between the extent of dendritic outgrowth and the density of ACh currents, suggesting that these dendrites have ACh receptors. Our results indicate that neonatal rat nodose neurons are capable of extending dendrites and that extrinsic factors can induce or suppress their extension. In addition, the results suggest that these dendrites may act as principal post-synaptic structures for synapse formation that occurs in these cultures.

  1. Zika virus infection induces mitosis abnormalities and apoptotic cell death of human neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Bruno S. F.; Sampaio, Gabriela L. A.; Pereira, Ciro S.; Campos, Gubio S.; Sardi, Silvia I.; Freitas, Luiz A. R.; Figueira, Claudio P.; Paredes, Bruno D.; Nonaka, Carolina K. V.; Azevedo, Carine M.; Rocha, Vinicius P. C.; Bandeira, Antonio C.; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena B. P.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been associated with severe complications both in the developing and adult nervous system. To investigate the deleterious effects of ZIKV infection, we used human neural progenitor cells (NPC), derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). We found that NPC are highly susceptible to ZIKV and the infection results in cell death. ZIKV infection led to a marked reduction in cell proliferation, ultrastructural alterations and induction of autophagy. Induction of apoptosis of Sox2+ cells was demonstrated by activation of caspases 3/7, 8 and 9, and by ultrastructural and flow cytometry analyses. ZIKV-induced death of Sox2+ cells was prevented by incubation with the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. By confocal microscopy analysis we found an increased number of cells with supernumerary centrosomes. Live imaging showed a significant increase in mitosis abnormalities, including multipolar spindle, chromosome laggards, micronuclei and death of progeny after cell division. FISH analysis for chromosomes 12 and 17 showed increased frequency of aneuploidy, such as monosomy, trisomy and polyploidy. Our study reinforces the link between ZIKV and abnormalities in the developing human brain, including microcephaly. PMID:28008958

  2. Bacterial signals N-acyl homoserine lactones induce the changes of morphology and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ge; Ma, Anzhou; Liu, Weifeng; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2016-12-01

    The bacterial quorum sensing signals N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are able to regulate a diverse array of physiological activities, such as symbiosis, virulence and biofilm formation, depending on population density. Recently, it has been discovered that the bacterial quorum sensing (QS) signal molecules can induce extensive response of higher eukaryotes including plants and mammalian cells. However, little is known about the response of fungi reacting to these bacterial signals. Here we showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as an ancient eukaryote and widely used for alcoholic beverage and bioethanol production, exposed to short-chain 3-OC6-HSL and long-chain C12-HSL appeared obvious changes in morphology and ethanol tolerance. AHLs could increase the frequency of cells with bipolar and multipolar buds, and these changes did not present distinct differences when induced by different types (3-OC6-HSL and C12-HSL) and varied concentrations (200 nM and 2 μM) of AHLs. Further investigation by flow cytometer displayed that the cells untreated by AHLs reduced cell size (decreased FSC) and enhanced intracellular density (increased in SSC), compared with the AHLs-induced cells after incubation 6 h. In addition, the long-chain C12-HSL could slightly increase the ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae while the short-chain HSL obviously decreased it. Our study would be valuable to further research on the interaction between prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes, and be reference for industrial production of bioethanol.

  3. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Paula A.; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N.; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H.; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J.; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M.

    2015-01-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  4. Involvement of basic fibroblast growth factor in suramin-induced inhibition of V79/AP4 fibroblast cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, N.; Giannessi, F.; Bianchi, F.; Dolfi, A.; Lupetti, M.; Citti, L.; Danesi, R.; Del Tacca, M.

    1993-01-01

    The V79/AP4 Chinese hamster fibroblasts were densely stained with the anti-basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) antibody demonstrating an endogenous production of the peptide. The in vitro proliferation of these cells was stimulated by exogenous bFGF and the maximum growth (259% increase in 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA) was reached with bFGF 10 ng ml-1. Inhibition of bFGF-mediated mitogenic pathway was obtained with a 15-mer antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeted against bFGF mRNA and with suramin, a drug which blocks the biological activity of heparin-binding growth factors. bFGF antisense oligomer reduced the synthesis of DNA by 79.5 and 89.5% at 20 and 60 microM, respectively; this effect was reversed by the addition of exogenous bFGF to the culture medium. A short-term exposure to suramin 300 micrograms ml-1 produced a modest reduction in 3H-thymidine incorporation but suppressed the mitogenic effect of bFGF on V79/AP4 cells. In cells treated with suramin 300 micrograms ml-1 the drug concentration increased linearly over 3 days, reaching 13.15 micrograms mg-1 of protein; cell proliferation was inhibited in a dose-related manner as evaluated by the colony formation assay (IC50: 344.22 micrograms ml-1) and by the number of mitoses observed in culture. Furthermore, the drug induced ultrastructural alterations, consisting of perinuclear cisternae swelling, chromatin condensation, nucleolar segregation and cytoplasmic vacuolations. These findings demonstrated that the endogenous production of bFGF plays an important role in V79/AP4 fibroblasts proliferation, and the inhibition of bFGF-mediated mitogenic signalling with bFGF antisense oligomer or suramin is an effective mean of reducing cell growth. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7685616

  5. Centrosomal amplification and aneuploidy induced by the antiretroviral drug AZT in hamster and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Borojerdi, Jennifer P.; Ming, Jessica; Cooch, Catherine; Ward, Yvona; Semino-Mora, Cristina; Yu, Mia; Braun, Hannan M.; Taylor, Barbara J.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Olivero, Ofelia A.

    2009-01-01

    The centrosome directs chromosomal migration by a complex process of tubulin-chromatin binding. In this contribution centrosomal abnormalities, including centrosomal amplification, were explored in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) and Normal Human Mammary Epithelial (NHMEC) cells exposed to the antiretroviral drug zidovudine (3’-azido-3’-deoxythymidine, AZT). Centrosomal amplification/fragmentation was observed in both cell types and kinetochore positive micronuclei were found in AZT-exposed CHO cells in correlation with dose. Normal human mammary epithelial cell (NMHEC), strain M99005, previously identified as a strain that incorporates high levels of AZT into DNA (High incorporator, HI), showed greater centrosomal amplification when compared with a second strain, NHMEC M98040, which did not incorporate AZT into DNA (Low incorporator, LI). Additionally, an abnormal tubulin distribution was observed in AZT-exposed HI cells bearing multiple centrosomes. Immunofluorescent staining of human cells with Aurora A, a kinase involved in the maturation of the centrosome, confirmed the induction of centrosomal amplification and revealed multipolar mitotic figures. Flow cytometric studies revealed that cells bearing abnormal numbers of centrosomes and abnormal tubulin distribution had similar S-phase percentages suggesting that cells bearing unbalanced chromosomal segregation could divide. Therefore, AZT induces genomic instability and clastogenicity as well as alterations in proteins involved in centrosomal activation, all of which may contribute to the carcinogenic properties of this compound. PMID:19427513

  6. Hyperthermia induces cytoskeletal alterations and mitotic catastrophe in p53-deficient H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Andrzej; Nowak, Jakub Marcin; Grzanka, Dariusz; Gackowska, Lidia; Michalkiewicz, Jacek; Grzanka, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Hyperthermia is used in cancer therapy, however much remains to be discovered regarding its mechanisms of action at the cellular level. In this study, the effects of hyperthermia on cell death, survival, morphology and the cytoskeleton were investigated in a non-small cell lung cancer cell line, H1299. Despite the fact that this cell line is widely used in research, it has not yet been tested for heat shock sensitivity. Cells were given a 30-min heat shock at 43.5°C and 45°C and left to recover at 37°C for 24 and 48 h. 24 h after heat shock treatment, we monitored changes in the organization of the cytoskeleton using immunofluorescence microscopy. The number of actin stress fibers was significantly reduced, microtubules formed a looser meshwork, a portion of the cells possessed multipolar mitotic spindles, whereas vimentin filaments collapsed into perinuclear complexes. 48 h following heat stress, most of the cells showed recovery of the cytoskeleton, however we observed a considerable number of giant cells that were multinucleated or contained one enlarged nucleus. The data obtained by MTT assay showed a dose-dependent decrease of cell viability, while flow cytometric analysis revealed an increase in the number of cells with externalized phosphatidylserine. The results suggest that one of the modes of heat-induced cell death in H1299 cells is mitotic catastrophe, which probably ends in apoptosis.

  7. Chromosomal and Nuclear Alterations in Root Tip Cells of Allium Cepa L. Induced by Alprazolam

    PubMed Central

    Nefic, Hilada; Musanovic, Jasmin; Metovic, Azra; Kurteshi, Kemajl

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine used in panic disorders and other anxiety states. Target organ of Alprazolam is CNS, causing depression of respiration and consciousness. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the genotoxic potential of Alprazolam using Allium cepa test. Methods: Allium cepa is one of the most suitable plants for detecting different types of xenobiotics. The test enables the assessment of different genetic endpoints making possible damage to the DNA of humans to be predicted. Results: Alprazolam induced chromosomal (anaphase bridges, breaks, lagging and stickiness, abnormal spiralisation, multipolarity and polyploidy) and cytological aberrations, especially nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, fragmented nucleus and apoptotic bodies, cells without nucleus, binucleated and micronucleated cells), morphological alterations in shape and size of cells, spindle disturbance and polar deviation in root tip meristem cells of Allium cepa at all tested concentrations. Alprazolam also caused significant inhibition of mitotic index in these cells. Conclusion: These changes in cells are indicators of genotoxic potential of Alprazolam suggesting a need for further in vitro studies on animal and human lymphocytes as well as in vivo studies. PMID:25568504

  8. Spectral Moments of Collision-Induced Absorption of CO2 Pairs: The Role of the Intermolecular Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruszka, Marcin; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of the anisotropy of the intermolecular potential in the rototranslational collision-induced absorption of the CO2 pairs. Using newly developed formulas that include the effects of anisotropy of the potential to all orders, we calculate the two lowest spectral moments gamma(prime), and alpha(prime), for four different classes of C02 pair potentials and compare the results with the experimental values. We assumed only multipolar induction in the process of forming the induced dipole, with the second-order contributions included. Using a site-site LJ and a site-site semi-ab initio intermolecular potentials we were able to reproduce the experimental values of gamma(prime), and alpha(prime) moments over entire temperature range from 230 to 330 K. Also, the role of an electrostatic interaction between two C02 molecules and its impact on the spectral moments is thoroughly investigated. An isotropic core with a point quadrupole centered at each molecule is shown to be an inadequate representation of the C02-CO2 potential. Additionally, we show the results obtained with the first- and second-order perturbation theory to be more than twice too small.

  9. Shape-Induced Deformation, Capillary Bridging, and Self-Assembly of Cuboids at the Fluid-Fluid Interface.

    PubMed

    Anjali, Thriveni G; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2017-01-24

    The controlled assembly of anisotropic particles through shape-induced interface deformations is shown to be a potential route for the fabrication of novel functional materials. In this article, the shape-induced interface deformation, capillary bridging, and directed self-assembly of cuboidal-shaped hematite particles at fluid-fluid interfaces are reported. The multipolar nature of the interface distortions is directly visualized using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and 3D optical surface profiling. The nature of the interface deformations around cuboidal particles vary from monopolar to octupolar types depending on their orientation and position with respect to the interface. The deformations are of either hexapolar or octupolar type in the face-up orientation, quadrupolar or monopolar type in the edge-up orientation, and monopolar type in the vertex-up orientation. The particles adsorbed at the interface interact through the interface deformations, forming capillary bridges that lead to isolated assemblies of two or more particles. The arrangement of particles in any assembly is such that the condition for capillary attraction is satisfied, that is, in accordance with predictions based on the nature of interface deformations. At sufficient particle concentrations, these isolated structures interact to form a percolating network of cuboids. Furthermore, the difference in the nature of the assembly structures formed at the air-water interface and in the bulk water phase indicates that the interfacial assembly of these particles is controlled by the capillary interactions.

  10. Arsenite-induced mitotic death involves stress response and is independent of tubulin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, B. Frazier; McNeely, Samuel C.; Miller, Heather L.; States, J. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Arsenite, a known mitotic disruptor, causes cell cycle arrest and cell death at anaphase. The mechanism causing mitotic arrest is highly disputed. We compared arsenite to the spindle poisons nocodazole and paclitaxel. Immunofluorescence analysis of α-tubulin in interphase cells demonstrated that, while nocodazole and paclitaxel disrupt microtubule polymerization through destabilization and hyperpolymerization, respectively, microtubules in arsenite-treated cells remain comparable to untreated cells even at supra-therapeutic concentrations. Immunofluorescence analysis of α-tubulin in mitotic cells showed spindle formation in arsenite- and paclitaxel-treated cells but not in nocodazole-treated cells. Spindle formation in arsenite-treated cells appeared irregular and multi-polar. γ-tubulin staining showed that cells treated with nocodazole and therapeutic concentrations of paclitaxel contained two centrosomes. In contrast, most arsenite-treated mitotic cells contained more than two centrosomes, similar to centrosome abnormalities induced by heat shock. Of the three drugs tested, only arsenite treatment increased expression of the inducible isoform of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i). HSP70 and HSP90 proteins are intimately involved in centrosome regulation and mitotic spindle formation. HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG sensitized cells to arsenite treatment and increased arsenite-induced centrosome abnormalities. Combined treatment of 17-DMAG and arsenite resulted in a supra-additive effect on viability, mitotic arrest, and centrosome abnormalities. Thus, arsenite-induced abnormal centrosome amplification and subsequent mitotic arrest is independent of effects on tubulin polymerization and may be due to specific stresses that are protected against by HSP90 and HSP70. PMID:18485433

  11. Arsenite-induced mitotic death involves stress response and is independent of tubulin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B. Frazier; McNeely, Samuel C.; Miller, Heather L.; States, J. Christopher

    2008-07-15

    Arsenite, a known mitotic disruptor, causes cell cycle arrest and cell death at anaphase. The mechanism causing mitotic arrest is highly disputed. We compared arsenite to the spindle poisons nocodazole and paclitaxel. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in interphase cells demonstrated that, while nocodazole and paclitaxel disrupt microtubule polymerization through destabilization and hyperpolymerization, respectively, microtubules in arsenite-treated cells remain comparable to untreated cells even at supra-therapeutic concentrations. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in mitotic cells showed spindle formation in arsenite- and paclitaxel-treated cells but not in nocodazole-treated cells. Spindle formation in arsenite-treated cells appeared irregular and multi-polar. {gamma}-tubulin staining showed that cells treated with nocodazole and therapeutic concentrations of paclitaxel contained two centrosomes. In contrast, most arsenite-treated mitotic cells contained more than two centrosomes, similar to centrosome abnormalities induced by heat shock. Of the three drugs tested, only arsenite treatment increased expression of the inducible isoform of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i). HSP70 and HSP90 proteins are intimately involved in centrosome regulation and mitotic spindle formation. HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG sensitized cells to arsenite treatment and increased arsenite-induced centrosome abnormalities. Combined treatment of 17-DMAG and arsenite resulted in a supra-additive effect on viability, mitotic arrest, and centrosome abnormalities. Thus, arsenite-induced abnormal centrosome amplification and subsequent mitotic arrest is independent of effects on tubulin polymerization and may be due to specific stresses that are protected against by HSP90 and HSP70.

  12. Challenges in the Multipolar Space-Power Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    SheetS Captain, USAF Fairchild Paper Air University Press Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama 36112-5962 July 2007 00frontmatter.indd 1 9/ 6 /07 12:15:29...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6 . AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...site http:// aupress.maxwell.af.mil and the Air University Research Web site http://research.maxwell.af.mil. 00frontmatter.indd 2 9/ 6 /07 12:15:29

  13. Multipolarization radar images for geologic mapping and vegetation discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.; Farr, T. G.; Ford, J. P.; Thompson, T. W.; Werner, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    NASA has developed an airborne SAR that simultaneously yields image data in four linear polarizations in L-band with 10-m resolution over a swath of about 10 km. Signal data are recorded both optically and digitally and annotated in each of the channels to facilitate completely automated digital correlation. Comparison of the relative intensities of the different polarizations furnishes discriminatory mapping information. Local intensity variations in like-polarization images result from topographic effects, while strong cross polarization responses denote the effects of vegetation cover and, in some cases, possible scattering from the subsurface. In each of the areas studied, multiple polarization data led to the discrimination and mapping of unique surface unit features.

  14. Multipolarization radar images for geologic mapping and vegetation discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.; Farr, T. G.; Ford, J. P.; Thompson, T. W.; Werner, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    NASA has developed an airborne SAR that simultaneously yields image data in four linear polarizations in L-band with 10-m resolution over a swath of about 10 km. Signal data are recorded both optically and digitally and annotated in each of the channels to facilitate completely automated digital correlation. Comparison of the relative intensities of the different polarizations furnishes discriminatory mapping information. Local intensity variations in like-polarization images result from topographic effects, while strong cross polarization responses denote the effects of vegetation cover and, in some cases, possible scattering from the subsurface. In each of the areas studied, multiple polarization data led to the discrimination and mapping of unique surface unit features.

  15. Investigation of vegetation with multifrequency and multipolarization SAR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Rudolf; Roth, Achim; Bayer, Thomas

    1990-05-01

    Investigations of vegetation is conducted by synergism of different types of digital image data and models. As a standard application, satellite images are digitally coregistered with existant topographical data and stored in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The usefulness of multiparametric SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data for vegetation mapping is discussed. The multifrequency aspects requires precise geocoding. Different application fields with recent results are discussed: forest investigations with SIR (Spaceborne Imaging Radar)-B data in the southern Rhine valley ; extraction of landuse categories in landscape units using two geocoded Seasat-SAR scenes in the area of Bonn; relief effects on image gray values in geocoded Seasat-SAR images; the concept of a remote sensing data base for ecological applications.

  16. Crop identification with multifrequency, multipolarization, and multiangle radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    In a corn and soybeans test site in Webster County, Iowa, airborne radar scatterometers were used on August 19 and September 10, 1980, to investigate the backscattering properties of these crops at wavelengths of 2.3, 6.3, and 19 cm (Ku-, C-, and L-band, respectively). Both horizontal transmit-horizontal receiver (HH) polarization and horizontal transmit-vertical receive (HV) polarization combinations were used at L- and C-band. Only the VV polarization combination was available at Ku-band. Measurements were obtained at 10 angles of observation from 5 to 50 deg in steps of 5 deg (referenced to the nadir). Excellent separation between corn and soybeans was achieved when either C-band HV at 50 deg or when a defined depolarization factor was used at C-band. Good separation existed at L-band also using either L-band HH at 50 deg or an L-band polarization factor. Significant row direction effects were observed for all HH data near 10 deg. Significant effects of surface soil moisture were observed for all configurations at L-band and C-band.

  17. 2-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-one (HKL-1) induces G2/M arrest and mitotic catastrophe in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Mei-Hua; Liu, Chin-Yu; Lin, Chiao-Min; Chen, Yen-Jung; Chen, Chun-Jen; Lin, Yu-Fu; Huang, Li-Jiau; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    2012-03-01

    2-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-one (HKL-1), a 2-phenyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4-one (2-PN) derivative, was synthesized and evaluated as an effective antimitotic agent in our laboratory. However, the molecular mechanisms are uncertain. In this study, HKL-1 was demonstrated to induce multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human leukemia HL-60 cells. Western blotting showed that HKL-1 induces mitotic catastrophe in HL-60 cells through regulating mitotic phase-specific kinases (down-regulating CDK1, cyclin B1, CENP-E, and aurora B) and regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins (down-regulating Bcl-2 and up-regulating Bax and Bak), followed by caspase-9/-3 cleavage. These findings suggest that HKL-1 appears to exert its cytotoxicity toward HL-60 cells in culture by inducing mitotic catastrophe. Highlights: ► HKL-1 is a potential antimitotic agent against HL-60 cells. ► HKL-1 induces spindle disruption and sustained resulted in mitotic catastrophe. ► CENP-E and aurora B protein expressions significantly reduced. ► Bcl-2 family protein expressions altered and caspase-9/-3 activation. ► HKL-1 is an attractive candidate for possible use as a novel antimitotic agent.

  18. Inducements revisited.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Martin; Moore, Andrew

    1999-04-01

    The paper defends the permissibility of paying inducements to research subjects against objections not covered in an earlier paper in Bioethics. The objections are that inducements would cause inequity, crowd out research, and undesirably commercialize the researcher-subject relationship. The paper shows how these objections presuppose implausible factual and/or normative claims. The final position reached is a qualified defence of freedom of contract which not only supports the permissibility of inducements but also offers guidance to ethics committees in dealing with practical problems that might arise if inducements are offered.

  19. Structure and calculation of field-induced free-free transition matrix elements in many-electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2012-08-01

    In earlier work [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.65.043412 65, 043412 (2002)] we examined the description of atom-radiation coupling in terms of the multipolar Hamiltonian rather than the minimal coupling one, and reached the conclusion that the simple operator DSF(r)={r,rinduced by strong fields and involve off-resonance coupling between extended wave functions representing high-n Rydberg states of the discrete spectrum or asymptotically unbound states of the continuum. For completeness, the singularities of the EDA are also derived and discussed within the present approach.

  20. [Induced acne].

    PubMed

    Humbert, Philippe

    2002-04-15

    Induced acne belongs to the clinical forms of acne. Some dermatoses present with acne-like patterns. They can be induced or perpetuated by non physiological factors. Among these factors, medicines must always be considered, taken either topically (dermocorticoids, sulfur, anti-acneic topics) or generally (androgens, oral corticoids, ACTH, anti-epileptics, anti-depressive drugs, anti-tuberculosis medications). Halogens (iodine, bromine) found in inhaled or orally taken pharmaceutical products, or associated with occupational contact, can also induce acne. Acne of exogenous origin has been described in some specific occupations, and are induced by exposure to chlorine, industrial oils, tar. Sun exposure, PUVA therapy and ionizing radiation are potentially acneigenous. Finally acne caused by cosmetics includes acne cosmetica, brilliantine and oily creams acne and detergent acne.

  1. Revisiting the theoretical basis of the endosymbiotic origin of plastids in the original context of Lynn Margulis on the origin of mitosing, eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki

    2017-09-07

    Fifty years ago, Lynn Margulis proposed a comprehensive hypothesis on the origin of eukaryotic cells with an emphasis on the origin of mitosis. This hypothesis postulated that the eukaryotic cell is a composite of different parts as a result of the symbiosis of various different bacteria. In this hypothesis, she integrated previously proposed ideas that mitochondria and chloroplasts were descendants of endosymbionts that originated from aerobic bacteria and blue-green algae (now cyanobacteria), respectively. However, the major part of her hypothesis, which she believed to be original, was the origin of mitosis. The core of her postulate involved a chromosome partition mechanism dependent on DNA-microtubule binding, which originated from a hypothetical centriole-DNA complex, with an ability to replicate. Surprisingly, her complete lack of real experimental works in the cytoskeleton, cell motility, or paleontology did not prevent this 29-year-old junior scientist from assembling archival knowledge and constructing a narrative on the evolution of all organisms. Whether the centriole-DNA complex originated from a spirochete or not was a minor anecdote in this initial postulate. Unfortunately, this hypothesis on the origin of mitosis, which she believed to be a holistic unity, testable by experiments, was entirely refuted. Despite falsification of her original narrative as a whole, her success as a founder of endosymbiotic theory on the origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts is undoubted. We will discuss the reasons for her success in terms of the historical situation in the latter half of the 20th century. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes at occupationally relevant doses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are commercially-important products of nanotechnology; however, their low density and small size makes carbon nanotube respiratory exposures likely during their production or processing. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). In this study, we examined whether multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) cause mitotic spindle damage in cultured cells at doses equivalent to 34 years of exposure at the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL). MWCNT induced a dose responsive increase in disrupted centrosomes, abnormal mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number 24 hours after exposure to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm2 MWCNT. Monopolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of disrupted mitoses. Three-dimensional reconstructions of 0.1 μm optical sections showed carbon nanotubes integrated with microtubules, DNA and within the centrosome structure. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated a greater number of cells in S-phase and fewer cells in the G2 phase in MWCNT-treated compared to diluent control, indicating a G1/S block in the cell cycle. The monopolar phenotype of the disrupted mitotic spindles and the G1/S block in the cell cycle is in sharp contrast to the multi-polar spindle and G2 block in the cell cycle previously observed following exposure to SWCNT. One month following exposure to MWCNT there was a dramatic increase in both size and number of colonies compared to diluent control cultures, indicating a potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter cells. Our results demonstrate significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by MWCNT at occupationally relevant exposure levels. PMID:24479647

  3. Genotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes at occupationally relevant doses.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Katelyn J; Reynolds, Steven H; Kashon, Michael L; Lowry, David T; Dong, Chenbo; Hubbs, Ann F; Young, Shih-Houng; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Porter, Dale W; Benkovic, Stanley A; McCawley, Michael; Keane, Michael J; Mastovich, John T; Bunker, Kristin L; Cena, Lorenzo G; Sparrow, Mark C; Sturgeon, Jacqueline L; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Sargent, Linda M

    2014-01-30

    Carbon nanotubes are commercially-important products of nanotechnology; however, their low density and small size makes carbon nanotube respiratory exposures likely during their production or processing. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). In this study, we examined whether multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) cause mitotic spindle damage in cultured cells at doses equivalent to 34 years of exposure at the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL). MWCNT induced a dose responsive increase in disrupted centrosomes, abnormal mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number 24 hours after exposure to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm² MWCNT. Monopolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of disrupted mitoses. Three-dimensional reconstructions of 0.1 μm optical sections showed carbon nanotubes integrated with microtubules, DNA and within the centrosome structure. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated a greater number of cells in S-phase and fewer cells in the G2 phase in MWCNT-treated compared to diluent control, indicating a G1/S block in the cell cycle. The monopolar phenotype of the disrupted mitotic spindles and the G1/S block in the cell cycle is in sharp contrast to the multi-polar spindle and G2 block in the cell cycle previously observed following exposure to SWCNT. One month following exposure to MWCNT there was a dramatic increase in both size and number of colonies compared to diluent control cultures, indicating a potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter cells. Our results demonstrate significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by MWCNT at occupationally relevant exposure levels.

  4. Yielding behavior and temperature-induced on-field oscillatory rheological studies in a novel MR suspension containing polymer-capped Fe3Ni alloy microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arief, Injamamul; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Bimetallic alloy nanoparticles of 3d elements are known for their tunable shape, size and magnetic anisotropy and find extensive applications ranging from magneto-mechanical to biomedical devices. This paper reports the polyol-mediated synthesis of Fe-rich polyacrylic acid (PAA)-Fe3Ni alloyed microspheres and its morphological and structural characterizations with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Magnetorheological fluid was prepared by dispersing the 10 vol% microparticles in silicone oil. The room temperature viscoelastic characterization of the fluid was performed under different magnetic fields. The field-dependent yield stresses were scaled using Klingenberg model and found that static yield stress was more accurately described by an M3 dependence, where M is particle magnetization. We proposed a multipolar contribution and ascertained the fact that simple dipolar description was insufficient to describe the trend in a complex rheological fluid. Temperature-dependent oscillatory rheological studies under various fields were also investigated. This demonstrated a strong temperature-induced thinning effect. The temperature-thinning in complex moduli and viscosity were more pronounced for the samples at higher magnetic field owing to quasi-solid behavior.

  5. High-rate pacing-induced atrial fibrillation effectively reveals properties of spontaneously occurring paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, David; Atienza, Felipe; Jalife, José; Martínez-Alzamora, Nieves; Bravo, Loreto; Almendral, Jesús; González-Torrecilla, Esteban; Arenal, Ángel; Bermejo, Javier; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Berenfeld, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Aims Research on paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) assumes that fibrillation induced by rapid pacing adequately reproduces spontaneously occurring paroxysmal AF in humans. We aimed to compare the spectral properties of spontaneous vs. induced AF episodes in paroxysmal AF patients. Methods and results Eighty-five paroxysmal AF patients arriving in sinus rhythm to the electrophysiology laboratory were evaluated prior to ablation. Atrial fibrillation was induced by rapid pacing from the pulmonary vein-left atrial junctions (PV-LAJ), the coronary sinus (CS), or the high right atrium (HRA). Simultaneous recordings were obtained using multipolar catheters. Off-line power spectral analysis of 5 s bipolar electrograms was used to determine dominant frequency (DF) at recording sites with regularity index >0.2. Sixty-eight episodes were analysed for DF. Comparisons were made between spontaneous (n= 23) and induced (n= 45) AF episodes at each recording site. No significant differences were observed between spontaneous and induced AF episodes in HRA (5.18 ± 0.69 vs. 5.06 ± 0.91 Hz; P= 0.64), CS (5.27 ± 0.69 vs. 5.36 ± 0.76 Hz; P= 0.69), or LA (5.72 ± 0.88 vs. 5.64 ± 0.75 Hz; P= 0.7) regardless of pacing site. Consistent with these results, paired analysis in seven patients with both spontaneous and induced AF episodes, showed no regional DFs differences. Moreover, a left-to-right DF gradient was also present in both spontaneous (PV-LAJ 5.71 ± 0.81 vs. HRA 5.18 ± 0.69 Hz; P= 0.005) and induced (PV-LAJ 5.62 ± 0.72 vs. HRA 5.07 ± 0.91 Hz; P= 0.002) AF episodes, with no differences between them (P= not specific). Conclusion In patients with paroxysmal AF, high-rate pacing-induced AF adequately mimics spontaneously initiated AF, regardless of induction site. PMID:22696516

  6. Inducing labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... inducing labor is to "break the bag of waters" or rupture the membranes. Your health care provider will do a pelvic exam and will guide a small plastic probe with a hook on the end through your cervix to create a hole in the membrane. This does not hurt you ...

  7. The E1B19K-deleted oncolytic adenovirus mutant AdΔ19K sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to drug-induced DNA-damage by down-regulating Claspin and Mre11

    PubMed Central

    Pantelidou, Constantia; Cherubini, Gioia; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated sensitization of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs depends on simultaneous interactions of early viral genes with cell death and survival pathways. It is unclear what cellular factors mediate these interactions in the presence of DNA-damaging drugs. We found that adenovirus prevents Chk1-mediated checkpoint activation through inactivation of Mre11 and downregulation of the pChk1 adaptor-protein, Claspin, in cells with high levels of DNA-damage induced by the cytotoxic drugs gemcitabine and irinotecan. The mechanisms for Claspin downregulation involve decreased transcription and increased degradation, further attenuating pChk1-mediated signalling. Live cell imaging demonstrated that low doses of gemcitabine caused multiple mitotic aberrations including multipolar spindles, micro- and multi-nucleation and cytokinesis failure. A mutant virus with the anti-apoptotic E1B19K-gene deleted (AdΔ19K) further enhanced cell killing, Claspin downregulation, and potentiated drug-induced DNA damage and mitotic aberrations. Decreased Claspin expression and inactivation of Mre11 contributed to the enhanced cell killing in combination with DNA-damaging drugs. These results reveal novel mechanisms that are utilised by adenovirus to ensure completion of its life cycle in the presence of cellular DNA damage. Taken together, our findings reveal novel cellular targets that may be exploited when developing improved anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:26872382

  8. Cucurbitacin-I inhibits Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B and survivin, induces defects in cell cycle progression and promotes ABT-737-induced cell death in a caspase-independent manner in malignant human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Daniel R; Jane, Esther P; Pollack, Ian F

    2015-01-01

    Because STAT signaling is commonly activated in malignant gliomas as a result of constitutive EGFR activation, strategies for inhibiting the EGFR/JAK/STAT cascade are of significant interest. We, therefore, treated a panel of established glioma cell lines, including EGFR overexpressors, and primary cultures derived from patients diagnosed with glioblastoma with the JAK/STAT inhibitor cucurbitacin-I. Treatment with cucurbitacin-I depleted p-STAT3, p-STAT5, p-JAK1 and p-JAK2 levels, inhibited cell proliferation, and induced G2/M accumulation, DNA endoreduplication, and multipolar mitotic spindles. Longer exposure to cucurbitacin-I significantly reduced the number of viable cells and this decrease in viability was associated with cell death, as confirmed by an increase in the subG1 fraction. Our data also demonstrated that cucurbitacin-I strikingly downregulated Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B and survivin. We then searched for agents that exhibited a synergistic effect on cell death in combination with cucurbitacin-I. We found that cotreatment with cucurbitacin-I significantly increased Bcl(-)2/Bcl(-)xL family member antagonist ABT-737-induced cell death regardless of EGFR/PTEN/p53 status of malignant human glioma cell lines. Although >50% of the cucurbitacin-I plus ABT-737 treated cells were annexin V and propidium iodide positive, PARP cleavage or caspase activation was not observed. Pretreatment of z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor did not inhibit cell death, suggesting a caspase-independent mechanism of cell death. Genetic inhibition of Aurora kinase A or Aurora kinase B or survivin by RNA interference also sensitized glioma cells to ABT-737, suggesting a link between STAT activation and Aurora kinases in malignant gliomas.

  9. Inducing autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Lea M; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal-mediated catabolic process, which through degradation of different cytoplasmic components aids in maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival during exposure to extra- or intracellular stresses. Ammonia is a potential toxic and stress-inducing byproduct of glutamine catabolism, which has recently been found to induce autophagy in an MTOR independent way and support cancer cell survival. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to investigate the initial signaling events linking ammonia to the induction of autophagy. The MTOR inhibitor rapamycin was used as a reference treatment to emphasize the differences between an MTOR-dependent and -independent autophagy-induction. By this means 5901 phosphosites were identified of which 626 were treatment-specific regulated and 175 were coregulated. Investigation of the ammonia-specific regulated sites supported that MTOR activity was not affected, but indicated increased MAPK3 activity, regulation of proteins involved in Rho signal transduction, and a novel phosphorylation motif, serine-proline-threonine (SPT), which could be linked to cytoskeleton-associated proteins. MAPK3 could not be identified as the primary driver of ammonia-induced autophagy but instead the data suggested an upregulation of AMPK and the unfolded protein response (UPR), which might link ammonia to autophagy induction. Support of UPR induction was further obtained from the finding of increased protein levels of the ER stress markers DDIT3/CHOP and HSPA5 during ammonia treatment. The large-scale data set presented here comprises extensive high-quality quantitative information on phosphoprotein regulation in response to 2 very different autophagy inducers and should therefore be considered a general resource for the community. PMID:24300666

  10. Curcumin affects components of the chromosomal passenger complex and induces mitotic catastrophe in apoptosis-resistant Bcr-Abl-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Wolanin, Kamila; Magalska, Adriana; Mosieniak, Grazyna; Klinger, Rut; McKenna, Sharon; Vejda, Susanne; Sikora, Ewa; Piwocka, Katarzyna

    2006-07-01

    The Bcr-Abl oncoprotein plays a major role in the development and progression of chronic myeloid leukemia and is a determinant of chemotherapy resistance occurring during the blast crisis phase of the disease. The aim of this article was to investigate the possibility of combating the resistance to apoptosis caused by Bcr-Abl by inducing an alternative cell death process. As a model of chronic myeloid leukemia, we employed Bcr-Abl-transfected mouse progenitor 32D cells with low and high Bcr-Abl expression levels corresponding to drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cells, respectively. The drug curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a known potent inducer of cell death in many cancer cells, was investigated for efficacy with Bcr-Abl-expressing cells. Curcumin strongly inhibited cell proliferation and affected cell viability by inducing apoptotic symptoms in all tested cells; however, apoptosis was a relatively late event. G(2)-M cell cycle arrest, together with increased mitotic index and cellular and nuclear morphology resembling those described for mitotic catastrophe, was observed and preceded caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation. Mitosis-arrested cells displayed abnormal chromatin organization, multipolar chromosome segregation, aberrant cytokinesis, and multinucleated cells-morphologic changes typical of mitotic catastrophe. We found that the mitotic cell death symptoms correlated with attenuated expression of survivin, a member of the chromosomal passenger complex, and mislocalization of Aurora B, the partner of survivin in the chromosomal passenger complex. Inhibition of survivin expression with small interfering RNA exhibited similar mitotic disturbances, thus implicating survivin as a major, albeit not the only, target for curcumin action. This study shows that curcumin can overcome the broad resistance to cell death caused by expression of Bcr-Abl and suggests that curcumin may be a promising agent for new combination regimens for drug-resistant chronic myeloid

  11. Alcohol concentration determines the type of atrial arrhythmia induced in a porcine model of acute alcoholic intoxication.

    PubMed

    Anadon, M J; Almendral, J; González, P; Zaballos, M; Delcan, J L; De Guevara, J L

    1996-11-01

    Alcohol abuse has long been suspected clinically to cause paroxysmal atrial tachyarrhythmias. However, such a relationship has never been conclusively proven, partly due to the lack of experimental evidence. Although atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common atrial arrhythmia attributed to acute alcoholic ingestion, atrial flutter has occasionally been noted. We analyzed the possible role of alcohol in initiation and/or maintenance of a variety of atrial tachyarrhythmias in a closed-chest porcine model. Nine pigs underwent nine endocardial right atrial stimulation protocols (RASP) at baseline and 17 RASPs after increasing doses of ethanol (first infusion 1,230 mg/kg, second infusion 870 mg/kg) by means of one multipolar catheter advanced under heavy sedation from the femoral vein. Each RASP included 1, 2, and 3 extrastimuli, and rapid pacing at 5 times diastolic threshold. Venous ethanol concentrations were measured (HPGC method) every 10 minutes and at the time of arrhythmia induction. Atrial tachyarrhythmias were induced in 4 of 9 baseline RASPs, and lasted for a mean of 21 seconds, and in 16 of 17 RASPs after alcohol lasting for a mean of 357 seconds. Only fibrillation was observed at the baseline RASP. The atrial tachyarrhythmias induced after alcohol were AF in 11 RASPs and atrial flutter in 5 RASPs (in 5 animals). The mean venous ethanol concentration at the time of the longest arrhythmia induced for each RASP were 200 +/- 89 mg/dL for RASP inducing fibrillation and 292 +/- 40 mg/dL for RASP inducing flutter (P < 0.05). Flutter tended to be sustained (> 1 minute in duration) more often than fibrillation (4 of 5 flutter vs 2 of 11 fibrillation P < 0.05). In three experiments, atrial flutter persisted for > 10 minutes and was terminated by overdrive atrial pacing. We concluded: (1) in this closed-chest porcine model, an ethanol infusion facilitates a variety of atrial arrhythmias related to the ethanol concentration; (2) flutter tended to be sustained, and

  12. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  13. Proteomic profiling revealed the functional networks associated with mitotic catastrophe of HepG2 hepatoma cells induced by 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Huang Bo; Guan Hua; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi; He Xingpeng; Liu Xiaodan; Wang Yu; Shang Zengfu; Zhou Pingkun

    2011-05-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death resulting from abnormal mitosis, is a cytotoxic death pathway as well as an appealing mechanistic strategy for the development of anti-cancer drugs. In this study, 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde was demonstrated to induce DNA double-strand break, multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We used proteomic profiling to identify the differentially expressed proteins underlying mitotic catastrophe. A total of 137 differentially expressed proteins (76 upregulated and 61 downregulated proteins) were identified. Some of the changed proteins have previously been associated with mitotic catastrophe, such as DNA-PKcs, FoxM1, RCC1, cyclin E, PLK1-pT210, 14-3-3{sigma} and HSP70. Multiple isoforms of 14-3-3, heat-shock proteins and tubulin were upregulated. Analysis of functional significance revealed that the 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the differentially expressed proteins. The modulated proteins were found to be involved in macromolecule complex assembly, cell death, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin and cytoskeletal organization. These findings revealed the overall molecular events and functional signaling networks associated with spindle disruption and mitotic catastrophe. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > 6-bromoisovanillin induced spindle disruption and sustained mitotic arrest, consequently resulted in mitotic catastrophe. > Proteomic profiling identified 137 differentially expressed proteins associated mitotic catastrophe. > The 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the altered proteins. > The macromolecule complex assembly, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin organization were also shown involved in mitotic catastrophe.

  14. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma Print A ... previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ...

  15. Morphology of microvascular changes and endothelial regeneration in experimental ozone-induced parathyroiditis. III. Some pathologic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Atwal, O.S.; Pemsingh, R.S.

    1981-03-01

    Proliferation of the vascular endothelium of the parathyroid glands of dogs exposed to ozone inhalation was studied. Direct observation of mitoses in the endothelial cells were made. Focal hemorrhages in the form of the presence of erythrocytes, clotting, and fibrin deposition in the extravascular spaces were seen. Ultrastructural analysis of transverse section of blood vessels showed intravascular platelet aggregation. Lymphoid cells were observed in the lumen of the blood vessels as well as in the perivascular areas as infiltrates. The possibility is discussed that present vascular reactions signify the morphologic equivalent of an immunologic response.

  16. Association of Rate-Dependent Conduction Block Between Eccentric Coronary Sinus to Left Atrial Connections With Inducible Atrial Fibrillation and Flutter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong; Marine, Joseph E; Li, Jing-Bo; Zghaib, Tarek; Ipek, Esra Gucuk; Sinha, Sunil; Spragg, David D; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Berger, Ronald D; Calkins, Hugh; Nazarian, Saman

    2017-01-01

    We sought to describe the prevalence and variability of coronary sinus (CS) and left atrial (LA) myocardium connections, their susceptibility to rate-dependent conduction block, and association with atrial fibrillation (AF) and flutter induction. The study cohort included 30 consecutive AF patients (age 63.3±10.5 years, 63% male). Multipolar catheters were positioned in the CS, high right atrium (HRA), and LA parallel to and near the CS. Trains of 10 pacing stimuli were delivered during sinus rhythm from each of the following sites: CS proximal (CSp), CS distal (CSd), LA septum (LAs), lateral LA (LAl), and HRA, at the following cycle lengths: 1000, 500, 400, 300, and 250 ms, while recording from the other catheters. With the CS 9 to 10 bipole just inside the CS ostium, CS-LA connections were observed in 100% at CS 9 to 10, 30% at CS 7 to 8, 23% at CS 5 to 6, 23% at CS 3 to 4, and 97% at CS 1 to 2. Eighteen patients (60%) had AF/atrial flutter induced. Rate-dependent conduction block of a CS-LA connection at cycle length of ≥250 ms was present in 17 (94%) of those with versus none of those without AF/atrial flutter induction (P<0.001). Rate-dependent eccentric CS-LA conduction block is associated with AF/atrial flutter induction in patients with drug-refractory AF undergoing ablation. The presence of dual muscular CS-LA connections, coupled with unidirectional block in one limb, seems to serve as a substrate for single or multiple reentry beats, and arrhythmia induction. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. T Cells' Immunological Synapses Induce Polarization of Brain Astrocytes In Vivo and In Vitro: A Novel Astrocyte Response Mechanism to Cellular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Barcia, Carlos; Sanderson, Nicholas S. R.; Barrett, Robert J.; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Puntel, Mariana; Liu, Chunyan; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Astrocytes usually respond to trauma, stroke, or neurodegeneration by undergoing cellular hypertrophy, yet, their response to a specific immune attack by T cells is poorly understood. Effector T cells establish specific contacts with target cells, known as immunological synapses, during clearance of virally infected cells from the brain. Immunological synapses mediate intercellular communication between T cells and target cells, both in vitro and in vivo. How target virally infected astrocytes respond to the formation of immunological synapses established by effector T cells is unknown. Findings Herein we demonstrate that, as a consequence of T cell attack, infected astrocytes undergo dramatic morphological changes. From normally multipolar cells, they become unipolar, extending a major protrusion towards the immunological synapse formed by the effector T cells, and withdrawing most of their finer processes. Thus, target astrocytes become polarized towards the contacting T cells. The MTOC, the organizer of cell polarity, is localized to the base of the protrusion, and Golgi stacks are distributed throughout the protrusion, reaching distally towards the immunological synapse. Thus, rather than causing astrocyte hypertrophy, antiviral T cells cause a major structural reorganization of target virally infected astrocytes. Conclusions Astrocyte polarization, as opposed to hypertrophy, in response to T cell attack may be due to T cells providing a very focused attack, and thus, astrocytes responding in a polarized manner. A similar polarization of Golgi stacks towards contacting T cells was also detected using an in vitro allogeneic model. Thus, different T cells are able to induce polarization of target astrocytes. Polarization of target astrocytes in response to immunological synapses may play an important role in regulating the outcome of the response of astrocytes to attacking effector T cells, whether during antiviral (e.g. infected during HIV, HTLV-1

  18. [Action of a herbicide (paraquat) on hepatocytes in histiotypic culture].

    PubMed

    Verne, J; Fournier, E; Hebert, S; Richshoffer, N

    1975-01-01

    The toxicant action on hepatocytes of "paraquat" introduced at very low concentrations in an in vitro culture of such cells is here established. Mitoses are slowed down and moreover, the lysosomial system is impaired, thus inducing a decrease in its enzymic reactions and the proliferation of very large vesicles.

  19. Merlin/ERM proteins establish cortical asymmetry and centrosome position

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alan M.; DuBoff, Brian; Casaletto, Jessica B.; Gladden, Andrew B.; McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate asymmetry at the cell cortex underlies cell polarization and asymmetric cell division. Here we demonstrate a novel role for the tumor suppressor Merlin and closely related ERM proteins (Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin) in generating cortical asymmetry in the absence of external cues. Our data reveal that Merlin functions to restrict the cortical distribution of the actin regulator Ezrin, which in turn positions the interphase centrosome in single epithelial cells and three-dimensional organotypic cultures. In the absence of Merlin, ectopic cortical Ezrin yields mispositioned centrosomes, misoriented spindles, and aberrant epithelial architecture. Furthermore, in tumor cells with centrosome amplification, the failure to restrict cortical Ezrin abolishes centrosome clustering, yielding multipolar mitoses. These data uncover fundamental roles for Merlin/ERM proteins in spatiotemporally organizing the cell cortex and suggest that Merlin's role in restricting cortical Ezrin may contribute to tumorigenesis by disrupting cell polarity, spindle orientation, and, potentially, genome stability. PMID:23249734

  20. Bio-monitoring the genotoxicity of populations of Scots pine in the vicinity of a radioactive waste storage facility.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, Stanislav A; Kim, Jin Kyu; Oudalova, Alla A; Vasiliyev, Denis V; Dikareva, Nina S; Zimin, Vladimir L; Dikarev, Vladimir G

    2005-05-02

    Results of a long-term (1997-2002) study of the Scots pine populations growing in the vicinity of the radioactive waste storage facility ('Radon' LWPE) are presented. Cytogenetic disturbances in reproductive (seeds) and vegetative (needles) tissues sampled from Scots pine populations were studied to examine whether Scots pine trees have experienced environmental stress in areas with relatively low levels of pollution. The data clearly indicate the presence of mutagenic contaminants in the environment of the pine trees. An increased number of mitotic abnormalities, especially multipolar mitoses was found in the pine tree populations submitted to man-made exposure, which suggests that the cytogenetic damage is mainly caused by chemical contamination. A higher radioresistance of the Scots pine seeds from the impacted populations was shown by use of acute gamma-irradiation. During the observation period 1997-2002, pine trees exposed to anthropogenic pollution showed a steady increase of cytogenetic alterations in the root meristem cells.

  1. The good, the bad and the ugly: the practical consequences of centrosome amplification.

    PubMed

    Sluder, Greenfield; Nordberg, Joshua J

    2004-02-01

    Centrosome amplification (the presence of more than two centrosomes at mitosis) is characteristic of many human cancers. Extra centrosomes can cause the assembly of multipolar spindles, which unequally distribute chromosomes to daughter cells; the resulting genetic imbalances may contribute to cellular transformation. However, this raises the question of how a population of cells with centrosome amplification can survive such chaotic mitoses without soon becoming non-viable as a result of chromosome loss. Recent observations indicate that a variety of mechanisms partially mute the practical consequences of centrosome amplification. Consequently, populations of cells propagate with good efficiency, despite centrosome amplification, yet have an elevated mitotic error rate that can fuel the evolution of the transformed state.

  2. Chemical-Induced Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Harris, John E

    2017-04-01

    Chemical-induced depigmentation of the skin has been recognized for more than 75 years, first as an occupational hazard but then extending to those using household commercial products as common as hair dyes. Since their discovery, these chemicals have been used therapeutically in patients with severe vitiligo to depigment their remaining skin and improve their appearance. Because chemical-induced depigmentation is clinically and histologically indistinguishable from nonchemically induced vitiligo, and because these chemicals appear to induce melanocyte autoimmunity, this phenomenon should be known as "chemical-induced vitiligo," rather than less accurate terms that have been previously used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  4. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  5. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  6. Microcystin-LR, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, induces alterations in mitotic chromatin and microtubule organization leading to the formation of micronuclei in Vicia faba

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Dániel; Tándor, Ildikó; Kónya, Zoltán; Bátori, Róbert; Roszik, Janos; Vereb, György; Erdődi, Ferenc; Vasas, Gábor; M-Hamvas, Márta; Jambrovics, Károly; Máthé, Csaba

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Microcystin-LR (MCY-LR) is a cyanobacterial toxin, a specific inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A) with significant impact on aquatic ecosystems. It has the potential to alter regulation of the plant cell cycle. The aim of this study was improved understanding of the mitotic alterations induced by cyanotoxin in Vicia faba, a model organism for plant cell biology studies. Methods Vicia faba seedlings were treated over the long and short term with MCY-LR purified in our laboratory. Short-term treatments were performed on root meristems synchronized with hydroxylurea. Sections of lateral root tips were labelled for chromatin, phosphorylated histone H3 and β-tubulin via histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Mitotic activity and the occurrence of mitotic alterations were detected and analysed by fluorescence microscopy. The phosphorylation state of histone H3 was studied by Western blotting. Key Results Long-term MCY-LR exposure of lateral root tip meristems increased the percentage of either early or late mitosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We observed hypercondensed chromosomes and altered sister chromatid segregation (lagging chromosomes) leading to the formation of micronuclei, accompanied by the formation of disrupted, multipolar and monopolar spindles, disrupted phragmoplasts and the hyperphosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10. Short-term MCY-LR treatment of synchronized cells showed that PP1 and PP2A inhibition delayed the onset of anaphase at 1 µg mL−1 MCY-LR, accelerated cell cycle at 10 µg mL−1 MCY-LR and induced the formation of lagging chromosomes. In this case mitotic microtubule alterations were not detected, but histone H3 was hyperphosphorylated. Conclusions MCY-LR delayed metaphase–anaphase transition. Consequently, it induced aberrant chromatid segregation and micronucleus formation that could be associated with both H3 hyperphosphorylation and altered microtubule organization

  7. Microcystin-LR, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, induces alterations in mitotic chromatin and microtubule organization leading to the formation of micronuclei in Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Dániel; Tándor, Ildikó; Kónya, Zoltán; Bátori, Róbert; Roszik, Janos; Vereb, György; Erdodi, Ferenc; Vasas, Gábor; M-Hamvas, Márta; Jambrovics, Károly; Máthé, Csaba

    2012-09-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCY-LR) is a cyanobacterial toxin, a specific inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A) with significant impact on aquatic ecosystems. It has the potential to alter regulation of the plant cell cycle. The aim of this study was improved understanding of the mitotic alterations induced by cyanotoxin in Vicia faba, a model organism for plant cell biology studies. Vicia faba seedlings were treated over the long and short term with MCY-LR purified in our laboratory. Short-term treatments were performed on root meristems synchronized with hydroxylurea. Sections of lateral root tips were labelled for chromatin, phosphorylated histone H3 and β-tubulin via histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Mitotic activity and the occurrence of mitotic alterations were detected and analysed by fluorescence microscopy. The phosphorylation state of histone H3 was studied by Western blotting. Long-term MCY-LR exposure of lateral root tip meristems increased the percentage of either early or late mitosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We observed hypercondensed chromosomes and altered sister chromatid segregation (lagging chromosomes) leading to the formation of micronuclei, accompanied by the formation of disrupted, multipolar and monopolar spindles, disrupted phragmoplasts and the hyperphosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10. Short-term MCY-LR treatment of synchronized cells showed that PP1 and PP2A inhibition delayed the onset of anaphase at 1 µg mL(-1) MCY-LR, accelerated cell cycle at 10 µg mL(-1) MCY-LR and induced the formation of lagging chromosomes. In this case mitotic microtubule alterations were not detected, but histone H3 was hyperphosphorylated. MCY-LR delayed metaphase-anaphase transition. Consequently, it induced aberrant chromatid segregation and micronucleus formation that could be associated with both H3 hyperphosphorylation and altered microtubule organization. However, these two phenomena seemed to be independent

  8. Single factors alone can induce mesenchymal-like morphology, but not promote full EMT in breast cancer cell lines with different hormone statuses.

    PubMed

    Tveitarås, Maria K; Reigstad, Inga; Leiss, Lina; Reed, Rolf K; Stuhr, Linda

    2017-10-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is considered to be important for cancer invasion and metastasis. Tumour hypoxia, in addition to Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) and Notch, amongst others, have been suggested to be involved in EMT. We therefore investigated if hypoxia, TGF-β1 and the Notch ligand Jagged-1 alone induced morphological changes with corresponding EMT signatures in different epithelial breast cancer cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, we also studied whether or not TGF-β1, or Jagged-1 in combination with hypoxia added any effect on EMT. The cells were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia alone or in combination with TGF-β1 or Jagged-1. Morphological responses to treatment were investigated by light microscopy, and changes in markers for EMT and hypoxia were evaluated by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence studies. One of the four cell lines (MCF7) became elongated and highly multipolar, indicative of EMT, following hypoxia, TGF-β1 and Jagged-1 treatment per se with the most distinct morphological shift seen with Jagged-1 treatment in combination with hypoxia. Also, when regarding hypoxia, MCF7 cells showed the greatest change in EMT-markers of the four cell lines tested, but these changes were not consistent with a typical EMT pattern. The morphology of BT474 cells was not altered following Jagged-1 treatment, however, Jagged-1 increased E-cadherin levels. Morphology was changed following TGF-β1 treatment of BT474 cells, but it did not affect E-cadherin levels. Neither Jagged-1 nor TGF-β1 altered the levels of Vimentin in the BT474 cell line. The E-cadherin responses to hypoxia varied with end-point in both MCF7 and BT474 cells, and in most cases were not consistent with EMT. Our results using four different breast cancer cell lines in vitro do not provide evidence that EMT is induced by hypoxia alone or in combination with TGF-β1 or the Notch ligand Jagged-1. The inconsistency in morphological appearance and EMT-markers, as

  9. Flumazenil-induced ballism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Ko, Seok-Bum; Choi, Yeong-Bin; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2003-04-01

    Flumazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine, is the first benzodiazepine antagonist and is being used to reverse the adverse pharmacological effects of benzodiazepine. There have been a few reports on the central nevous system side effects with its use. We report a patient with generalized ballism following administration of flumazenil. The mechanism through which flumazenil induced this symptom is unknown. It is conceivable that flumazenil may antagonize the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and induce dopamine hypersensitivity, thus induce dyskinesic symptoms.

  10. Flumazenil-induced ballism.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Ko, Seok-Bum; Choi, Yeong-Bin; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2003-01-01

    Flumazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine, is the first benzodiazepine antagonist and is being used to reverse the adverse pharmacological effects of benzodiazepine. There have been a few reports on the central nevous system side effects with its use. We report a patient with generalized ballism following administration of flumazenil. The mechanism through which flumazenil induced this symptom is unknown. It is conceivable that flumazenil may antagonize the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and induce dopamine hypersensitivity, thus induce dyskinesic symptoms. PMID:12692435

  11. Drug-induced nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2017-01-01

    Drugs are associated frequently with the development of various types of acute and chronic kidney diseases. Nephrotoxicity is associated most commonly with injury in the tubulointerstitial compartment manifested as either acute tubular injury or acute interstitial nephritis. A growing number of reports has also highlighted the potential for drug-induced glomerular disease, including direct cellular injury and immune-mediated injury. Recognition of drug-induced nephropathies and rapid discontinuation of the offending agents are critical to maximizing the likelihood of renal function recovery. This review will focus on the pathology and pathogenesis of drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis and drug-induced glomerular diseases.

  12. Three-dimensional instability of a multipolar vortex in a rotating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Dizès, Stéphane

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, the elliptic instability is generalized to account for Coriolis effects and higher order symmetries. We consider, in a frame rotating at the angular frequency Ω, a stationary vortex which is described near its center r=0 by the stream function written in polar coordinates Ψ=-(r2/2)+p(rn/n)cos(nθ), where the integer n is the order of the azimuthal symmetry, and p is a small positive parameter which measures the strength of the nonaxisymmetric field. Based on the Lifschitz and Hameiri [Phys. Fluids A 3, 2644-2651 (1991)] theory, the local stability analysis of the streamline Ψ=-1/2 is performed in the limit of small p. As for the elliptic instability [Bayly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2160-2163 (1986)], the instability is shown to be due to a parametric resonance of inertial waves when the inclination angle ξ of their wave vector with respect to the rotation axis takes a particular value given by cos ξ=±4/(n(1+Ω)). An explicit formula for the maximum growth rate of the inertial wave is obtained for arbitrary ξ, Ω, and n. As an immediate consequence, it is shown that a vortex core of relative vorticity Wr (assumed positive) is locally unstable if Ω<-(1+n/4)Wr/2 or Ω>(-1+n/4-p(n-1)/2)Wr/2. The predictive power of the local theory is demonstrated on several vortex examples by comparing the local stability predictions with global stability results. For both the Kirchhoff vortex and Moore and Saffman vortex, it is shown how global stability results can be derived from the local stability analysis using the dispersion relation of normal (Kelvin) modes. These results are compared to those obtained by global methods and a surprisingly good agreement is demonstrated. The local results are also applied to rotating Stuart vortices and compared to available numerical data.

  13. The Importance of Why: An Intelligence Approach for a Multi-Polar World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-04

    December 27, 2015). 12. 2 Jupiter Scientific, “Definitions of Important Terms in Chaos Theory,” Jupiter Scientific website, http...www.jupiterscientific.org/sciinfo/chaos.html (accessed February 15, 2016). Jupiter Scientific defines a system as a general concept. Systems are a "set of objects that...24 McChrystal, Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World, 70, and Jupiter Scientific, “Definitions of

  14. The star fish twins: Two young planetary nebulae with extreme multipolar morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, R.

    2000-01-01

    We present alpha images of two objects, He 2-47 and M1-37, obtained during a Hubble Space Telescope imaging survey of young planetary nebulae (PNs) selected on the basis of their low-excitation characteristics.

  15. Multi-frequency, multi-polarization SAR and radiometer sea ice classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Crawford, John P.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Microwave remotely sensed data were acquired simultaneously in March 1988 over Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering Sea ice using the JPL multifrequency, polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR), and multifrequency dual-polarization GSFC radiometer. The experiment was conducted as a series of coordinated underflights of the DMSP SSM/I satellite radiometer to validate ice products derived from its radiance values. Concurrent flights by an NRL P-3 aircraft enabled overlapping high-resolution, single-frequency images to be acquired over the same surfaces using a Ka-band scanning microwave radiometer. Precise coregistration to an accuracy of 100 m, +/- 25 m enables comparison of temporally and spatially coincident active and passive microwave datasets. Three-channel polarimetric SAR data are compared with dual-polarized radiometer data at several SSM/I frequencies, showing backscatter signatures to be highly correlated with radiometric temperatures. Further comparisons are used to evaluate ice concentration retrievals and to show how multiparameter datasets can be used to resolve ambiguities present in identifying certain sea ice forms with a single microwave instrument.

  16. United States-Gulf Cooperation Council Security Cooperation in a Multipolar World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    including plu- tonium separation experiments, uranium enrichment and conversion experiments, and importing various uranium compounds.28 Subsequent...against political protest, a status shared with the two other remaining Arab monarchies, Morocco and Jordan . Geopolitically, the GCC as a region has...commitments, the UAE will not enrich uranium itself, relying instead on imported, enriched fuel. “Abu Dhabi Moves Ahead With Nuclear Program,” Middle

  17. Investigation of The Multipolarity of Electromagnetic Transitions in 88,90Kr Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkan, Nurettin; Olgun, Davut; Uluer, Ihsan; Inan, Sait

    2006-03-01

    We have determined the most appropriate Hamiltonian that is needed for present calculations of nuclei about the A \\cong 80 region by the view of Interacting Boson Model-2 (IBM-2). After obtaining the best Hamiltonian parameters, level energies and B(E2) probabilities of some transitions in 88,90Kr nuclei were estimated. Results are compared with previous experimental and theoretical data and it is observed that they are in good agreement. Finally, R1 = frac{B(E2;41 to 21)}{B(E2;21 to 01)}, R2 = frac{B(E2;22 to 21)}{B(E2;21 to 01)}, \\ R3 = frac{B(E2;02 to 21)}{B(E2;21 to 01)}, R4 = frac{{B(E2;22 to 01)}{B(E2;22 to 21)}, R5 = frac{B(E2;31 to 21)}{B(E2;31 to 41)}, R6 = frac{B(E2;42 to 41)}{B(E2;42 to 22)} and R7 = frac{B(E2;41 to 21)}{B(E2;22 to 21)} ratios are compared with the values of dynamic symmetry limits. (SO(6), SU(5), SU(3)).

  18. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  19. The Importance of Why: An Intelligence Approach for a Multi-Polar World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-04

    ADDRESS(ES) Joint Forces Staff College Joint Advanced Warfighting School 7800 Hampton Blvd Norfolk, VA 23511-1702 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...characteristics, the Joint Force must educate intelligence practitioners in complexity theory, advance inductive and abductive cognitive methods...This page intentionally left blank. NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIVERSITY JOINT FORCES STAFF COLLEGE

  20. Multi-Frequency and Multi-Polarization Scattering Analysis for Model-Based Coastal Areas Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buono, A.; Nunziata, F.; Migliaccio, M.; Li, X.; Wei, Y.; Shen, D.

    2016-08-01

    The Yellow River (in Chinese, Huang He) is the most sediment-filled river and the sixth-longest one in the world. The Yellow River is of paramount importance for safe navigation, local economy and environment due to the presence of floods, farms, aquacultures and pollution. Nonetheless, its delta area it is characterized by of several physical phenomena due to both natural and anthropogenic processes: sedimentation, erosion, floods, pollution, etc.In this study, actual partially overlapped L-/C-band FP SAR data collected from Radarsat-2 and ALOS PalSAR-2, respectively, are used to investigate the scattering properties of the Yellow River delta, whose very challenging area is characterized by different scenarios as recorded by ground truth data acquired during an in-situ campaign. 10 different classes have been codified: sea, river, forest, pond, swamp, tide-land, sand, saline soil, rural and industrial urban areas. However, no ground truth data is available in some codified areas.

  1. Generation of trisomies in cancer cells by multipolar mitosis and incomplete cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Gisselsson, David; Jin, Yuesheng; Lindgren, David; Persson, Johan; Gisselsson, Lennart; Hanks, Sandra; Sehic, Daniel; Mengelbier, Linda Holmquist; Øra, Ingrid; Rahman, Nazneen; Mertens, Fredrik; Mitelman, Felix; Mandahl, Nils

    2010-01-01

    One extra chromosome copy (i.e., trisomy) is the most common type of chromosome aberration in cancer cells. The mechanisms behind the generation of trisomies in tumor cells are largely unknown, although it has been suggested that dysfunction of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) leads to an accumulation of trisomies through failure to correctly segregate sister chromatids in successive cell divisions. By using Wilms tumor as a model for cancers with trisomies, we now show that trisomic cells can form even in the presence of a functional SAC through tripolar cell divisions in which sister chromatid separation proceeds in a regular fashion, but cytokinesis failure nevertheless leads to an asymmetrical segregation of chromosomes into two daughter cells. A model for the generation of trisomies by such asymmetrical cell division accurately predicted several features of clones having extra chromosomes in vivo, including the ratio between trisomies and tetrasomies and the observation that different trisomies found in the same tumor occupy identical proportions of cells and colocalize in tumor tissue. Our findings provide an experimentally validated model explaining how multiple trisomies can occur in tumor cells that still maintain accurate sister chromatid separation at metaphase–anaphase transition and thereby physiologically satisfy the SAC. PMID:21059955

  2. Multifrequency and multipolarization radar scatterometry of sand dunes and comparison with spaceborne and airborne radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, Ronald; Elachi, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Airborne radar scatterometer data on sand dunes, acquired at multiple frequencies and polarizations, are reported. Radar backscatter from sand dunes is very sensitive to the imaging geometry. At small incidence angles the radar return is mainly due to quasi-specular reflection from dune slopes favorably oriented toward the radar. A peak return usually occurs at the incidence angle equal to the angle of repose for the dunes. The peak angle is the same at all frequencies as computed from specular reflection theory. At larger angles the return is significantly weaker. The scatterometer measurements verified observations made with airborne and spaceborne radar images acquired over a number of dune fields in the U.S., central Africa, and the Arabian peninsula. The imaging geometry constraints indicate that possible dunes on other planets, such as Venus, will probably not be detected in radar images unless the incidence angle is less than the angles of repose of such dunes and the radar look direction is approximately orthogonal to the dune trends.

  3. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  4. Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Alpha Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    Antihydrogen production in a neutral atom trap formed by an octupole-based magnetic field minimum is demonstrated using field-ionization of weakly bound anti-atoms. Using our unique annihilation imaging detector, we correlate antihydrogen detection by imaging and by field-ionization for the first time. We further establish how field-ionization causes radial redistribution of the antiprotons during antihydrogen formation and use this effect for the first simultaneous measurements of strongly and weakly bound antihydrogen atoms. Distinguishing between these provides critical information needed in the process of optimizing for trappable antihydrogen. These observations are of crucial importance to the ultimate goal of performing CPT tests involving antihydrogen, which likely depends upon trapping the anti-atom.

  5. Searching for Surficial Deposits on Venus Using Multi-Polarization Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Lynn M.; Campbell, Donald B.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2003-01-01

    Introduction. The Magellan spacecraft returned hundreds of images of craters, radardark halos, and wind features on Venus. It is clear that surficial layers are associated with some of these features; for example, 59 of the craters have parabolic shaped deposits that are thought to be a few centimeters to a meter in thickness. Magellan also revealed about 400 radar dark "splotches" that may be places where a smooth rubble layer was formed when the shock wave from an impactor hit the surface and crushed the rock. Two dune fields and several areas of microdunes were identified in Magellan data, as well a few thousand windstreaks, so it is clear that dust is transported and redeposited by wind. Thin surficial layers that are not clearly visible in the Magellan imagery may be present in other regions as well. In fact, many surfaces on Venus that were imaged by Magellan SAR may look much different when viewed at optical wavelengths, since radar waves penetrate surface layers and show details of the underlying terrain. A good example is the L-Band (24 cm wavelength) shuttle imaging radar (SIRA) observations by McKauley et al. who detected buried river valleys in the Arbain Desert in southern Egypt.

  6. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-15

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  7. Radio phase characteristics of terrain from multipolarized synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Held, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in digital data acquisition and signal processing technology permit simultaneous measurement of the complex (amplitude and phase) radar backscatter from several polarization-diverse antennas. While absolute phase mesurements remain to be analyzed in detail. The differential phase of signals polarized parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence provide information on the scattering mechanisms that dominate the interaction of the radio waves with the terrain. Analysis of phase backscatter maps from a typical urban area yields a bimodal distribution with the two peaks separated by approximately 180 degrees, highly indicative of a dominant simple geometric one bounce-two bounce mechanism. Some maps of agricultural areas exhibit a similar distribution, however, other agricultural areas yield a distribution that, while still bimodal, consists of two peaks separated by about 110 deg. Still other agricultural areas exhibit a more complex distribution. All of the observed phase shifts appear to be independent of incidence angle from at least 20 deg to 55 deg, therefore the 110 degree shifts are inconsistent with both the geometric model used for the urban area and with common dielectric slab models.

  8. Surface Ship Classification Using Multipolarization, Multifrequency Sky-Wave Resonance Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    November 1974. [14] H.L. Van Trees, Detection, Estimation, and Modulation Thoery , Part I, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1968. [15] A. Papoulis, Signal... STRING (22) E*UIVALBCE(LINEI(1j,BUFF(1)),(LINE2(l),BUFF(51i), DIMENSIONM ARA(3OJCMJ E6M) )WO CFT=9.83SE+0a NP=-N C KRPTr in a counter which stops the...and of string IF[LINEIB)(I:I).NE. 𔃻) THEN I Find Length of string "-3 340 ,*? ’!t~., *~A-. *~ SOTO 53 END IF END D0 53 ENCODE(15,103 9, TLINE) NS I

  9. The star fish twins: Two young planetary nebulae with extreme multipolar morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, R.

    2000-01-01

    We present alpha images of two objects, He 2-47 and M1-37, obtained during a Hubble Space Telescope imaging survey of young planetary nebulae (PNs) selected on the basis of their low-excitation characteristics.

  10. Reducing Insertion Sites of Penetrating Multipolar Shaft Electrodes by Double Side Electrode Arrangement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    for Implantable Biomedical Microdevices ,“ Proc. MICRO.tec 2000, Hannover, Germany, 2000, pp. 277-281. [5] T. Stieglitz, “Flexible Biomedical ... Microdevices with Dou- ble-Sided Electrode Arrangements for Neural Applications“, Sens & Act. A-Physical, (in press 2001).

  11. Multi-polarization C-band SAR for soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.; Brisco, B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery have shown qualitative relationships between radar backscatter and soil moisture. However, to be able to use these data in operational programs it will be necessary to establish quantitatively how the radar return is related to soil moisture and the effects of surface roughness, soil type, and vegetation cover and growth stage, as a function of frequency and polarization. To this end, a multi-year experiment began in 1990 as a cooperative venture amongst the Canada Center (Agriculture Canada), and the Universities of Guelph, Sherbrooke, Laval, and Waterloo. During 1990, SAR imagery was acquired during two periods (May and Jun.) to correspond to times of minimal and substantial vegetation cover. SAR data were acquired on three days in May and on four days in Jul. to cover different soil moisture conditions. This unique comprehensive data set is used to investigate the relationships between soil moisture and radar backscatter. The experiment and data collected are described, and a preliminary qualitative interpretation of the relationship between soil moisture and image tone is provided.

  12. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  13. Multipolar universal relations between f -mode frequency and tidal deformability of compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. K.; Sham, Y.-H.; Leung, P. T.; Lin, L.-M.

    2014-12-01

    Though individual stellar parameters of compact stars usually demonstrate obvious dependence on the equation of state (EOS), EOS-insensitive universal formulas relating these parameters remarkably exist. In the present paper, we explore the interrelationship between two such formulas, namely the f -I relation connecting the f -mode quadrupole oscillation frequency ω2 and the moment of inertia I , and the I -Love-Q relations relating I , the quadrupole tidal deformability λ2, and the quadrupole moment Q , which have been proposed by Lau, Leung, and Lin [Astrophys. J. 714, 1234 (2010)] and Yagi and Yunes [Science 341, 365 (2013)], respectively. A relativistic universal relation between ωl and λl with the same angular momentum l =2 ,3 ,… , the so-called "diagonal f -Love relation" that holds for realistic compact stars and stiff polytropic stars, is unveiled here. An in-depth investigation in the Newtonian limit is further carried out to pinpoint its underlying physical mechanism and hence leads to a unified f -I -Love relation. We reach the conclusion that these EOS-insensitive formulas stem from a common physical origin—compact stars can be considered as quasiincompressible when they react to slow time variations introduced by f -mode oscillations, tidal forces and rotations.

  14. Minimal distributed charges: Multipolar quality at the cost of point charge electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unke, Oliver T.; Devereux, Mike; Meuwly, Markus

    2017-10-01

    Most empirical force fields use atom-centered point charges (PCs) to represent the electrostatic potential (ESP) around molecules. While such PC models are computationally efficient, they are unable to capture anisotropic electronic features, such as σ holes or lone pairs. These features are better described using atomic multipole (MTP) moments, which significantly improve the quality of the resulting ESP. However, the improvement comes at the expense of a considerably increased computational complexity and cost for calculating the interaction energies and forces. In the present work, a novel minimal distributed charge model (MDCM) based on off-centered point charges is presented and the quality of the resulting ESP is compared to the performance of MTPs and atom-centered PC models for several test molecules. All three models are fitted using the same algorithm based on differential evolution, which is available as a Fortran90 program from the authors upon request. We show that the MDCM is capable of approximating the reference ab initio ESP with an accuracy as good as, or better than, MTPs without the need for computationally expensive higher order multipoles. Further it is demonstrated that the MDCM is numerically stable in molecular dynamics simulations and is able to reproduce electrostatic interaction energies and thermodynamic quantities with the same accuracy as MTPs at reduced computational cost.

  15. Multipolar electrostatics for proteins: atom-atom electrostatic energies in crambin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongna; Mills, Matthew J L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-02-15

    Accurate electrostatics necessitates the use of multipole moments centered on nuclei or extra point charges centered away from the nuclei. Here, we follow the former alternative and investigate the convergence behavior of atom-atom electrostatic interactions in the pilot protein crambin. Amino acids are cut out from a Protein Data Bank structure of crambin, as single amino acids, di, or tripeptides, and are then capped with a peptide bond at each side. The atoms in the amino acids are defined through Quantum Chemical Topology (QCT) as finite volume electron density fragments. Atom-atom electrostatic energies are computed by means of a multipole expansion with regular spherical harmonics, up to a total interaction rank of L = ℓA+ ℓB + 1 = 10. The minimum internuclear distance in the convergent region of all the 15 possible types of atom-atom interactions in crambin that were calculated based on single amino acids are close to the values calculated from di and tripeptides. Values obtained at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ levels are only slightly larger than those calculated at HF/6-31G(d,p) level. This convergence behavior is transferable to the well-known amyloid beta polypeptide Aβ1-42. Moreover, for a selected central atom, the influence of its neighbors on its multipole moments is investigated, and how far away this influence can be ignored is also determined. Finally, the convergence behavior of AMBER becomes closer to that of QCT with increasing internuclear distance.

  16. A DETAILED SPATIOKINEMATIC MODEL OF THE CONICAL OUTFLOW OF THE MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7026

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. M.; Lopez, J. A.; Steffen, W.; Richer, M. G.

    2013-03-15

    We present extensive, long-slit, high-resolution coverage of the complex planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7026. We acquired 10 spectra using the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer at San Pedro Martir Observatory in Baja California, Mexico, and each shows exquisite detail, revealing the intricate structure of this object. Incorporating these spectra into the three-dimensional visualization and kinematic program SHAPE and using Hubble Space Telescope images of NGC 7026, we have produced a detailed structural and kinematic model of this PN. NGC 7026 exhibits remarkable symmetry consisting of three lobe pairs and four sets of knots, all symmetrical about the nucleus and displaying a conical outflow. Comparing the three-dimensional structure of this nebula to recent XMM-Newton X-ray observations, we investigate the extended X-ray emission in relation to the nebular structure. We find that the X-ray emission, while confined to the closed, northern lobes of this PN, shows an abrupt termination in the middle of the southeast lobe, which our long slit data show to be open. This is where the shocked fast wind seems to be escaping the interior of the nebula and the X-ray emission rapidly cools in this region.

  17. Realistic sampling of amino acid geometries for a multipolar polarizable force field

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy J.; Cardamone, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The Quantum Chemical Topological Force Field (QCTFF) uses the machine learning method kriging to map atomic multipole moments to the coordinates of all atoms in the molecular system. It is important that kriging operates on relevant and realistic training sets of molecular geometries. Therefore, we sampled single amino acid geometries directly from protein crystal structures stored in the Protein Databank (PDB). This sampling enhances the conformational realism (in terms of dihedral angles) of the training geometries. However, these geometries can be fraught with inaccurate bond lengths and valence angles due to artefacts of the refinement process of the X‐ray diffraction patterns, combined with experimentally invisible hydrogen atoms. This is why we developed a hybrid PDB/nonstationary normal modes (NM) sampling approach called PDB/NM. This method is superior over standard NM sampling, which captures only geometries optimized from the stationary points of single amino acids in the gas phase. Indeed, PDB/NM combines the sampling of relevant dihedral angles with chemically correct local geometries. Geometries sampled using PDB/NM were used to build kriging models for alanine and lysine, and their prediction accuracy was compared to models built from geometries sampled from three other sampling approaches. Bond length variation, as opposed to variation in dihedral angles, puts pressure on prediction accuracy, potentially lowering it. Hence, the larger coverage of dihedral angles of the PDB/NM method does not deteriorate the predictive accuracy of kriging models, compared to the NM sampling around local energetic minima used so far in the development of QCTFF. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26235784

  18. Controlling multipolar surface plasmon excitation through the azimuthal phase structure of electron vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, Daniel; Ducati, Caterina

    2016-05-01

    We have theoretically studied how the azimuthal phase structure of an electron vortex beam excites surface plasmons on metal particles of different geometries as observed in electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We have developed a semiclassical approximation combining a ring-shaped beam and the dielectric formalism. Our results indicate that for the case of total orbital angular momentum transfer, we can manipulate surface plasmon multipole excitation and even attain an enhancement factor of several orders of magnitude. Since electron vortex beams interact with particles mostly through effects due to azimuthal symmetry, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the electron beam, anisotropy information (longitudinal and transversal) of the sample may be derived in EELS studies by comparing nonvortex and vortex beam measurements.

  19. On the Effects of Imaging Geometry on Multipolarization SAR Features for Oil Spill Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrunes, Stine; Jones, Cathleen E.; Brekke, Camilla; Holt, Benjamin; Espeseth, Martine M.

    2016-08-01

    Polarimetric SAR is increasingly used for oil spill observation. In order to develop reliable methods for oil spill detection and characterization, the sensitivity of these measurements to the imaging geometry, including incidence angle and look direction relative to the wind, must be investigated. In this paper, we study the effects of these parameters on L-band SAR data collected with the UAVSAR instrument over experimental oil spills. The relative look direction is found to have a larger effect on the slick detectability than the incidence angle, and the detectability is better in the downwind direction compared to upwind. The features showing the best slick detectability in the conditions investigated here are the VV intensity, HV intensity, the geometric intensity and the polarization difference. The latter feature shows low dependency on imaging geometry.

  20. Sensitivity analysis on the relationship between vegetation growth and multi-polarized radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capodici, F.; La Loggia, G.; D'Urso, G.; Maltese, A.; Ciraolo, G.

    2009-09-01

    Spatially distributed soil moisture is required for watershed applications such as drought and flood prediction, crop irrigation scheduling, etc. In particular, an accurate assessment of the spatial and temporal variation of soil moisture is necessary to improve the predictive capability of runoff models, and for improving and validating hydrological processes forecasting. In recent years, several models have been developed in order to retrieve soil moisture using RADAR data. However, these models need precise prior knowledge about surface roughness. Within this framework, the present research aims to investigate the capabilities of multi polarimetric RADAR images to overcome the use of in situ data for surface roughness assessment. The research is carried out on a 24 km² test-site of DEMMIN (Görmin farm), Mecklenburg Vorpommern, in the North-East of Germany approximately 150 km north from Berlin. Data were acquired within ESA-funded project AgriSAR 2006 between April and July 2006. Images used include L-band in HH, VV and HV polarizations acquired from the airborne sensor E-SAR system operated by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt - DLR). Two models have been coupled in order to obtain a rms Surface Roughness Index (rSRI) that is related to terrain physical characteristics as well as vegetation surface properties. These are the PSEM (Polarimetric Semi-Empirical Model) published by Oh et al. in 2002 and a semi empirical model developed by Dubois in 1995. A finite difference iterative solution allowed rSRI retrieval without the use of in situ data. Results have been compared both with in situ rms roughness over bare soil and with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) obtained from Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner (AHS) optical images collected over the whole phenological cycle. They show a good agreement with bare soil in situ data, describing its whole range of variability well, and moreover the NDVI vs. rSRI relationship seems similar to that occurring between NDVI and Leaf Area Index (LAI) for most crop types meaning that rSRI can be considered as LAI look like.

  1. Crystal design using multipolar electrostatic interactions: A concept study for organic electronics

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Qiong; Untenecker, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Summary Using a simple synthetic protocol, heterohexacene analogues with a quadrupolar distribution of partial charges are readily available. In contrast to most other acenes, these compounds crystallize with a slipped-stack, brickwork-like packing which is mainly controlled by electrostatic interactions. This type of packing offers an advantage for organic semiconductors, because it allows more isotropic charge transport compared to the “herring bone” stacking observed for other acenes. PMID:24367401

  2. Multi-polarization C-band SAR for soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.; Brisco, B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery have shown qualitative relationships between radar backscatter and soil moisture. However, to be able to use these data in operational programs it will be necessary to establish quantitatively how the radar return is related to soil moisture and the effects of surface roughness, soil type, and vegetation cover and growth stage, as a function of frequency and polarization. To this end, a multi-year experiment began in 1990 as a cooperative venture amongst the Canada Center (Agriculture Canada), and the Universities of Guelph, Sherbrooke, Laval, and Waterloo. During 1990, SAR imagery was acquired during two periods (May and Jun.) to correspond to times of minimal and substantial vegetation cover. SAR data were acquired on three days in May and on four days in Jul. to cover different soil moisture conditions. This unique comprehensive data set is used to investigate the relationships between soil moisture and radar backscatter. The experiment and data collected are described, and a preliminary qualitative interpretation of the relationship between soil moisture and image tone is provided.

  3. Unified approach to multipolar polarisation and charge transfer for ions: microhydrated Na+.

    PubMed

    Mills, Matthew J L; Hawe, Glenn I; Handley, Christopher M; Popelier, Paul L A

    2013-11-07

    Electrostatic effects play a large part in determining the properties of chemical systems. In addition, a treatment of the polarisation of the electron distribution is important for many systems, including solutions of monatomic ions. Typically employed methods for describing polarisable electrostatics use a number of approximations, including atom-centred point charges and polarisation methods that require iterative calculation on the fly. We present a method that treats charge transfer and polarisation on an equal footing. Atom-centred multipole moments describe the charge distribution of a chemical system. The variation of these multipole moments with the geometry of the surrounding atoms is captured by the machine learning method kriging. The interatomic electrostatic interaction can be computed using the resulting predicted multipole moments. This allows the treatment of both intra- and interatomic polarisation with the same method. The proposed method does not return explicit polarisabilities but instead, predicts the result of the polarisation process. An application of this new method to the sodium cation in a water environment is described. The performance of the method is assessed by comparison of its predictions of atomic multipole moments and atom-atom electrostatic interaction energies to exact results. The kriging models are able to predict the electrostatic interaction energy between the ion and all water atoms within 4 kJ mol(-1) for any of the external test set Na(+)(H2O)6 configurations.

  4. Realistic sampling of amino acid geometries for a multipolar polarizable force field.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy J; Cardamone, Salvatore; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-09-15

    The Quantum Chemical Topological Force Field (QCTFF) uses the machine learning method kriging to map atomic multipole moments to the coordinates of all atoms in the molecular system. It is important that kriging operates on relevant and realistic training sets of molecular geometries. Therefore, we sampled single amino acid geometries directly from protein crystal structures stored in the Protein Databank (PDB). This sampling enhances the conformational realism (in terms of dihedral angles) of the training geometries. However, these geometries can be fraught with inaccurate bond lengths and valence angles due to artefacts of the refinement process of the X-ray diffraction patterns, combined with experimentally invisible hydrogen atoms. This is why we developed a hybrid PDB/nonstationary normal modes (NM) sampling approach called PDB/NM. This method is superior over standard NM sampling, which captures only geometries optimized from the stationary points of single amino acids in the gas phase. Indeed, PDB/NM combines the sampling of relevant dihedral angles with chemically correct local geometries. Geometries sampled using PDB/NM were used to build kriging models for alanine and lysine, and their prediction accuracy was compared to models built from geometries sampled from three other sampling approaches. Bond length variation, as opposed to variation in dihedral angles, puts pressure on prediction accuracy, potentially lowering it. Hence, the larger coverage of dihedral angles of the PDB/NM method does not deteriorate the predictive accuracy of kriging models, compared to the NM sampling around local energetic minima used so far in the development of QCTFF.

  5. Energetics of charge transfer reactions in solvents of dipolar and higher order multipolar character. II. Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perng, Baw-Ching; Newton, Marshall D.; Raineri, Fernando O.; Friedman, Harold L.

    1996-05-01

    We apply the theories developed in the preceding paper (paper I) to calculate various energy quantities of charge transfer (CT) reactions in nine solvents that cover a wide range of polarity, and for which interaction site models (ISM's) may be found in the literature. Besides the two surrogate Hamiltonian theories developed in paper I, the renormalized site-density theory (RST) and the renormalized dielectric theory (RDT), we also investigate a simple harmonic approximation (HXA) for the diabatic free energy profiles, whose characteristic parameters are calculated taking specific advantage of the expression given by the extended reference interaction site method (XRISM) for the free energy of solvation. For each CT process we analyze (a) the solvent reorganization energy λ, (b) the shift of the absorption transition energy due to the solvatochromic effect, and (c) the solvent contribution to the free energy change ΔA. In addition, for a few selected examples, we also report the detailed diabatic free energy profiles. The calculations reported rely on solute-solvent and solvent-solvent pair correlation functions obtained with the XRISM integral equation method applied to nonpolarizable (with fixed mean partial charges) ISM representations of the solute and solvent molecules. To rectify the omission of the solvent electronic degrees of freedom, we correct the dielectric part of the solvent reorganization energy with an additive term designed to compensate for the use of fixed charge ISM models. Contact with theories in which the solvent is represented as a dielectric continuum medium (with or without spatial dispersion) and the solute as a set of charges inside spherical cavities carved out of the dielectric is made straightforwardly within the RDT theory by considering a particularly simple form of the solute-solvent RISM site-site direct correlation functions. Using simple ISM models for several solute species, including Reichardt's betaine-30 dye and a porphyrin-quinone (PQ) ``dyad'' recently studied by Mataga and co-workers, we examine the ability of the molecular theories to explain the dependence of charge-transfer energetics on dipolar and nondipolar solvents. We find that the solvatochromic effect on the absorption energy of betaine-30, which forms the basis of the ET(30) empirical solvent polarity scale, is reproduced reasonably well by the RST, RDT, and HXA theories for solvents ranging from carbon tetrachloride to water. In the case of the PQ dyad, we find that the calculated values of λ in dipolar and nondipolar solvents are in good agreement with experimental estimates. Our results indicate that the molecular theories of solvation discussed in this paper can explain the observation that a solvent with vanishing molecular dipole moment, like benzene, can show unmistakable ``polarity,'' as reflected by its influence on the energetics of CT reactions. We also present calculations that corroborate the suggestion (Sec. VII of paper I) that, compared with the behavior in dipolar solvents, in nondipolar solvents the dependence of λ with the donor-acceptor separation distance is practically negligible.

  6. MAGNETAR GIANT FLARES-FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS IN MULTIPOLAR MAGNETOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Cong

    2012-09-20

    We address a primary question regarding the physical mechanism that triggers the energy release and initiates the onset of eruptions in the magnetar magnetosphere. Self-consistent stationary, axisymmetric models of the magnetosphere are constructed based on force-free magnetic field configurations that contain a helically twisted force-free flux rope. Depending on the surface magnetic field polarity, there exist two kinds of magnetic field configurations, inverse and normal. For these two kinds of configurations, variations of the flux rope equilibrium height in response to gradual surface physical processes, such as flux injections and crust motions, are carefully examined. We find that equilibrium curves contain two branches: one represents a stable equilibrium branch, and the other an unstable equilibrium branch. As a result, the evolution of the system shows a catastrophic behavior: when the magnetar surface magnetic field evolves slowly, the height of the flux rope would gradually reach a critical value beyond which stable equilibriums can no longer be maintained. Subsequently, the flux rope would lose equilibrium and the gradual quasi-static evolution of the magnetosphere will be replaced by a fast dynamical evolution. In addition to flux injections, the relative motion of active regions would give rise to the catastrophic behavior and lead to magnetic eruptions as well. We propose that a gradual process could lead to a sudden release of magnetosphere energy on a very short dynamical timescale, without being initiated by a sudden fracture in the crust of the magnetar. Some implications of our model are also discussed.

  7. Joint tracking and equalization scheme for multi-polarization effects in coherent optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yiqiao; Li, Linqian; Lin, Jiachuan; Xu, Hengying; Zhang, Wenbo; Tang, Xianfeng; Xi, Lixia; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2016-10-31

    We propose a joint multi-polarization-effect tracking and equalization method based on two extended Kalman filters, which can cope with state of polarization (SOP) tracing, polarization demultiplexing, equalization for polarization dependent loss (PDL) and polarization mode dispersion (PMD) in PDM-M-QAM coherent optical communication system. The mathematical model of the proposed method is given and analyzed in detail. Through simulation, the proposed method is proved to be very effective in a 28 Gbaud/s PDM-16QAM system. With the proposed method, SOP tracing speed is up to 110 Mrad/s for azimuth angle and 1200 krad/s for phase angle, respectively, and PDL and PMD can be equalized simultaneously in the values of 10 dB and more than half of the symbol period.

  8. Multipolar response of nonspherical silicon nanoparticles in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Pavel D.; Baryshnikova, Kseniia V.; Artemyev, Yuriy A.; Karabchevsky, Alina; Shalin, Alexander S.; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.

    2017-07-01

    Spectral multipole resonances of parallelepiped-, pyramid-, and cone-like shaped silicon nanoparticles excited by linearly polarized light waves are theoretically investigated. The numerical finite element method is applied for the calculations of the scattering cross sections as a function of the nanoparticles geometrical parameters. The roles of multipole moments (up to the third order) in the scattering process are analyzed using the semianalytical multipole decomposition approach. The possibility of scattering pattern configuration due to the tuning of the multipole contributions to the total scattered waves is discussed and demonstrated. It is shown that cubic nanoparticles can provide a strong isotropic side scattering with minimization of the scattering in forward and backward directions. In the case of the pyramidal and conical nanoparticles the total suppression of the side scattering can be obtained. It was found that due to the shape factor of the pyramidal and conical nanoparticles their electric toroidal dipole resonance can be excited in the spectral region of the first electric and magnetic dipole resonances. The influence of the incident light directions on the optical response of the pyramidal and conical nanoparticles is discussed. The obtained results provide important information that can be used for the development of nanoantennas with improved functionality due to the directional scattering effects.

  9. Stress-induced flowering

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Kaede C

    2010-01-01

    Many plant species can be induced to flower by responding to stress factors. The short-day plants Pharbitis nil and Perilla frutescens var. crispa flower under long days in response to the stress of poor nutrition or low-intensity light. Grafting experiments using two varieties of P. nil revealed that a transmissible flowering stimulus is involved in stress-induced flowering. The P. nil and P. frutescens plants that were induced to flower by stress reached anthesis, fruited and produced seeds. These seeds germinated, and the progeny of the stressed plants developed normally. Phenylalanine ammonialyase inhibitors inhibited this stress-induced flowering, and the inhibition was overcome by salicylic acid (SA), suggesting that there is an involvement of SA in stress-induced flowering. PnFT2, a P. nil ortholog of the flowering gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) of Arabidopsis thaliana, was expressed when the P. nil plants were induced to flower under poor-nutrition stress conditions, but expression of PnFT1, another ortholog of FT, was not induced, suggesting that PnFT2 is involved in stress-induced flowering. PMID:20505356

  10. Teacher-Induced Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Kent C.

    Students of English as a second language (ESL) often come to the classroom with little or no experience in writing in any language and with inaccurate assumptions about writing. Rather than correct these assumptions, teachers often seem to unwittingly reinforce them, actually inducing errors into their students' work. Teacher-induced errors occur…

  11. Docetaxel-induced mitotic arrest in epithelium of gallbladder: a hitherto unreported occurrence.

    PubMed

    Melgoza, Frank; Narula, Navneet; Wu, Mark Li-cheng

    2008-04-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents that bind tubulin cause mitotic arrest, which may be seen histologically. Such mitotic arrest has been reported to occur in the skin, alimentary canal, lungs, liver, bone marrow, endometrium, breasts, or in ascites following treatment with paclitaxel, vincristine, colchicine, podophyllotoxin, or maytansine. Mitotic arrest as a result of docetaxel, a taxane that binds tubulin, has yet to be reported. Mitotic arrest in the gallbladder has also yet to be reported. We recently encountered a case of dramatic mitotic arrest as a result of docetaxel, involving the gallbladder of a 66-year-old man with metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma. Strikingly abundant bizarre mitoses initially prompted a diagnosis of primary carcinoma. Carcinoma was eventually excluded based on the absence of dysplasia in all cells at interphase and the history of recent administration of docetaxel. This is the first case of mitotic arrest involving docetaxel or the gallbladder. Awareness of this phenomenon is necessary to avoid misdiagnosing carcinoma.

  12. Mania Induced by Opipramol

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, TM

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  13. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Feldweg, Anna M

    2015-05-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis is an uncommon disorder in which anaphylaxis occurs in response to physical exertion. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis is a disorder with similar symptoms, although symptoms develop only if exercise takes place within a few hours of eating and, in most cases, only if a specific food is eaten. Management includes education about safe conditions for exercise, the importance of ceasing exercise immediately if symptoms develop, appropriate use of epinephrine, and, for patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, avoidance of the culprit food for at least 4 hours before exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  15. Cytogenetic analyses of Azadirachtin reveal absence of genotoxicity but marked antiproliferative effects in human lymphocytes and CHO cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mosesso, Pasquale; Bohm, Lothar; Pepe, Gaetano; Fiore, Mario; Carpinelli, Alice; Gäde, Gerd; Nagini, Siddavaram; Ottavianelli, Alessandro; Degrassi, Francesca

    2012-09-18

    In this work we have examined the genotoxic potential of the bioinsecticide Azadirachtin A (AZA) and its influence on cell proliferation on human lymphocytes and Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cells. AZA genotoxicity was assessed by the analysis of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in the absence and presence of rat liver S9 metabolism. Primary DNA damage was also investigated by means of the comet assay. The results obtained clearly indicate that AZA is not genotoxic in mammalian cells. On the other hand, AZA proved to interfere with cell cycle progression as shown by modulation of frequencies of first (M1) and second division (M2) metaphases detected by 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling. Accumulation of M1 metaphases were more pronounced in human lymphocytes. In the transformed CHO cell line, however, significant increases of multinucleated interphases and polyploid cells were observed at long treatment time. At higher dose-levels, the incidence of polyploidy was close to 100%. Identification of spindle structure and number of centrosomes by fluorescent immunostaining with α- and γ-tubulin antibodies revealed aberrant mitoses exhibiting multipolar spindles with several centrosomal signals. These findings suggest that AZA can act either through a stabilizing activity of microtubules or by inhibition of Aurora A, since both mechanisms are able to generate genetically unstable polyploid cells with multipolar spindles and multinucleated interphases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  17. Trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D; Gonzalez, Luis S

    2014-08-01

    Coagulopathy is the inability of blood to coagulate normally; in trauma patients, it is a multifactorial and complex process. Seriously injured trauma patients experience coagulopathies during the acute injury phase. Risk factors for trauma-induced coagulopathy include hypothermia, metabolic acidosis, hypoperfusion, hemodilution, and fluid replacement. In addition to the coagulopathy induced by trauma, many patients may also be taking medications that interfere with hemostasis. Therefore, medication-induced coagulopathy also is a concern. Traditional laboratory-based methods of assessing coagulation are being supported or even replaced by point-of-care tests. The evidence-based management of trauma-induced coagulopathy should address hypothermia, fluid resuscitation, blood components administration, and, if needed, medications to reverse identified coagulation disorders. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat and depigmented, but maintains the ...

  19. Drug-induced catatonia.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Harpreet S; Singh, Ira

    2005-09-01

    Catatonia is a heterogeneous syndrome that varies in etiology, presentation, course and sequelae. Initially conceptualized as a subtype of schizophrenia, catatonia is now recognized to occur not only with other psychiatric conditions but also with medical conditions and drug-induced and toxic states. While drug-induced catatonia is now a recognized entity, most studies club it with catatonia due to general medical conditions or organic catatonia, thus precluding any meaningful interpretation of such cases. The literature on drug-induced catatonia mostly draws from scattered case reports. This article attempts to review the available literature in this realm and integrate the information in an attempt to explore the epidemiology, etiology, mechanism and treatment of drug-induced catatonia.

  20. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    Awareness of the need for prevention of glucocorticoid-induced fractures is growing, but glucocorticoid administration is often overlooked as the most common cause of nontraumatic osteonecrosis. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis develops in 9-40% of patients receiving long-term therapy although it may also occur with short-term exposure to high doses, after intra-articular injection, and without glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. The name, osteonecrosis, is misleading because the primary histopathological lesion is osteocyte apoptosis. Apoptotic osteocytes persist because they are anatomically unavailable for phagocytosis and, with glucocorticoid excess, decreased bone remodeling retards their replacement. Glucocorticoid-induced osteocyte apoptosis, a cumulative and unrepairable defect, uniquely disrupts the mechanosensory function of the osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system and thus starts the inexorable sequence of events leading to collapse of the femoral head. Current evidence indicates that bisphosphonates may rapidly reduce pain, increase ambulation, and delay joint collapse in patients with osteonecrosis.

  1. Statin induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2012-06-01

    Statins are an effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, myotoxicity induced by statins is a common adverse event and a major barrier to maximising cardiovascular risk reduction. The clinical spectrum of statin induced myotoxicity includes asymptomatic rise in creatine kinase concentration, myalgia, myositis and rhabdomyolysis. In certain cases, the cessation of statin therapy does not result in the resolution of muscular symptoms or the normalization of creatine kinase, raising the possibility of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. There is increasing understanding and recognition of the pathophysiology and risk factors of statin induced myotoxicity. Careful history and physical examination in conjunction with selected investigations such as creatine kinase measurement, electromyography and muscle biopsy in appropriate clinical scenario help diagnose the condition. The management of statin induced myotoxicity involves statin cessation, the use of alternative lipid lowering agents or treatment regimes, and in the case of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, immunosuppression.

  2. Electromagnetically induced phase grating.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Luís E E

    2010-04-01

    I propose an electromagnetically induced phase grating based on the giant Kerr nonlinearity of an atomic medium under electromagnetically induced transparency. The atomic phase grating behaves similarly to an ideal sinusoidal phase grating, and it is capable of producing a pi phase excursion across a weak probe beam along with high transmissivity. The grating is created with arbitrarily weak fields, and diffraction efficiencies as high as 30% are predicted.

  3. Ethionamide-induced Pellagra.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashashree; Shah, Ira

    2015-08-01

    Pellagra is a disorder characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death, resulting from a deficiency of niacin or its precursor tryptophan. Ethionamide (a second-line antituberculosis agent)-induced pellagra is rarely encountered in clinical practice. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with nicotinamide can prevent life-threatening complications. To date, only three cases have been reported. We report a 13-year-old girl presenting with ethionamide-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of niacin.

  4. Levodopa-induced myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Klawans, H L; Goetz, C; Bergen, D

    1975-05-01

    Twelve parkinsonian patients on long-term levodopa therapy developed intermittent, myoclonic body jerks. The movements consisted of single unilateral or bilateral abrupt jerks of the extremities and occurred most frequently during sleep. Although directly related to daily dosage of levodopa, the myoclonus was specifically blocked by the serotonin antagonist, methysergide. Levodopa-induced myoclonus may be related to intermittent increases of activity of serotonin in the brain and results from levodopa-induced dysregulation of serotonin activity.

  5. Lorazepam-induced diplopia.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Jisha M; Ramesh, Madhan; Parthasarathi, Gurumurthy; Ram, Dushad

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia - seeing double - is a symptom with many potential causes, both neurological and ophthalmological. Benzodiazepine induced ocular side-effects are rarely reported. Lorazepam is one of the commonly used benzodiazepine in psychiatric practice. Visual problems associated with administration of lorazepam are rarely reported and the frequency of occurrence is not established. We report a rare case of lorazepam-induced diplopia in a newly diagnosed case of obsessive compulsive disorder.

  6. Paroxetine-induced galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Prannay; Chavan, B S; Das, Subhash

    2014-10-01

    Drug-induced galactorrhea has been reported with agents such as antidopaminergic antiemetics, antipsychotics, etc., with few case reports of galactorrhea with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including paroxetine, being reported in last few decades. Prolactin levels have been found to be either raised or normal in these cases. We here report a case of paroxetine induced galactorrhea in a 48-year-old female patient of obsessive compulsive disorder, having hyperprolactinemic and euprolactinemic galactorrhea at different time with a pituitary incidentaloma.

  7. Paroxetine-induced galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Prannay; Chavan, B. S.; Das, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced galactorrhea has been reported with agents such as antidopaminergic antiemetics, antipsychotics, etc., with few case reports of galactorrhea with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including paroxetine, being reported in last few decades. Prolactin levels have been found to be either raised or normal in these cases. We here report a case of paroxetine induced galactorrhea in a 48-year-old female patient of obsessive compulsive disorder, having hyperprolactinemic and euprolactinemic galactorrhea at different time with a pituitary incidentaloma. PMID:25568484

  8. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  9. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelaers, Win; Lahorte, Philippe

    This chapter is part one of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced bioradicals is discussed. Bioradicals play a pivotal role in the complex chain of processes starting with the absorption of radiation in biological materials and ending with the radiation-induced biological after-effects. The general aspects of the four consecutive stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) are discussed from an interdisciplinary point of view. The close relationship between radiation dose and track structure, induced DNA damage and cell survival or killing is treated in detail. The repair mechanisms that cells employ, to insure DNA stability following irradiation, are described. Because of their great biomedical importance tumour suppressor genes involved in radiation-induced DNA repair and in checkpoint activation will be treated briefly, together with the molecular genetics of radiosensitivity. Part two of this review will deal with modern theoretical methods and experimental instrumentation for quantitative studies in this research field. Also an extensive overview of the applications of radiation-induced bioradicals will be given. A comprehensive list of references allows further exploration of this research field, characterised in the last decade by a substantial advance, both in fundamental knowledge and in range of applications.

  10. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2010-12-01

    Few dermatologic conditions carry as much emotional distress as chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Forty-seven percent of female patients consider hair loss the most traumatic aspect of chemotherapy, and 8% would decline chemotherapy because of fear of hair loss. A number of agents have been evaluated on the basis of the current understanding of the underlying pathobiology. Among the agents that have been evaluated, topical minoxidil was able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration but could not prevent hair loss. The major approach to minimize chemotherapy-induced hair loss is by scalp cooling, although most published data on scalp cooling are of poor quality. Because chemotherapy-induced toxicity has been associated with nutritional status, nutritional assessment and support might confer beneficial effects. Several experimental approaches to the development of pharmacological agents are under evaluation including: anti-oxidants, cytokines and growth factors, cell cycle and proliferation modifiers, and inhibitors of apoptosis. At present, no approved pharmacologic treatment of chemotherapy-induced hair loss exists. The incidence and severity of the condition are variable and related to the particular chemotherapeutic protocol. Fortunately, chemotherapy-induced hair loss is mostly reversible, and appropriate hair and scalp care and temporarily wearing a wig may be the most effective coping strategy.

  11. Drug-induced mania.

    PubMed

    Peet, M; Peters, S

    1995-02-01

    Mania can occur by chance association during drug treatment, particularly in patients predisposed to mood disorder. Single case reports are unreliable, and evidence must be sought from large series of treated patients, particularly those with a matched control group. Drugs with a definite propensity to cause manic symptoms include levodopa, corticosteroids and anabolic-androgenic steroids. Antidepressants of the tricyclic and monoamine oxidase inhibitor classes can induce mania in patients with pre-existing bipolar affective disorder. Drugs which are probably capable of inducing mania, but for which the evidence is less scientifically secure, include other dopaminergic anti-Parkinsonian drugs, thyroxine, iproniazid and isoniazid, sympathomimetic drugs, chloroquine, baclofen, alprazolam, captopril, amphetamine and phencyclidine. Other drugs may induce mania rarely and idiosyncratically. Management involves discontinuation or dosage reduction of the suspected drug, if this is medically possible, and treatment of manic symptoms with antipsychotic drugs or lithium.

  12. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  13. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  14. Crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy.

  15. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Adike, Abimbola; Corral, Juan; Rybnicek, David; Sussman, Daniel; Shah, Samir; Quigley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Olmesartan-induced enteropathy mimics celiac disease clinically and pathologically. As in celiac disease, the pathologic findings are villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes. Clinical presentation of olmesartan-induced enteropathy includes diarrhea, weight loss, and nausea. In contrast to celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase is not elevated and there is no response to a gluten-free diet. Including this entity in the differential diagnosis of sprue-like enteropathy is critical for its early diagnosis since replacing olmesartan with an alternative antihypertensive drug can simplify the diagnostic workup and provide both clinical and histologic improvement.

  16. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adike, Abimbola; Corral, Juan; Rybnicek, David; Sussman, Daniel; Shah, Samir; Quigley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Olmesartan-induced enteropathy mimics celiac disease clinically and pathologically. As in celiac disease, the pathologic findings are villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes. Clinical presentation of olmesartan-induced enteropathy includes diarrhea, weight loss, and nausea. In contrast to celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase is not elevated and there is no response to a gluten-free diet. Including this entity in the differential diagnosis of sprue-like enteropathy is critical for its early diagnosis since replacing olmesartan with an alternative antihypertensive drug can simplify the diagnostic workup and provide both clinical and histologic improvement. PMID:28289500

  17. Surgery induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian V; Peter, Mark B; Shenoy, Hrishikesh G; Horgan, Kieran; Hughes, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    Surgery and anaesthesia result in a variety of metabolic and endocrine responses, which result in a generalised state of immunosuppression in the immediate post-operative period. Surgery induced immunosuppression has been implicated in the development of post-operative septic complications and tumour metastasis formation. In addition the effectiveness of many treatments in the adjuvant setting is dependent on a functioning immune system. By understanding the mechanisms contributing to surgery-induced immunosuppression, surgeons may undertake strategies to minimise its effect and reduce potential short-term and long-term consequences to patients.

  18. Geomagnetism and induced voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-07-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of conceptual integrated science over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is initiated by the change in the magnetic flux due to the Earth's magnetic field and movement. This simple and enjoyable experiment will demonstrate how basic concepts in physics and geology can help us think about possible health effects due to the induced voltage.

  19. Drug-induced photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dawe, Robert S; Ibbotson, Sally H

    2014-07-01

    Drug-induced photosensitivity is common. The principal mechanism of systemic drug photosensitivity is phototoxicity and the principal mechanism of topical drug photosensitivity is photoallergy. Photopatch testing is helpful to determine suspected topical agent photoallergies (eg, from ultraviolet filters in sunscreens) but generally not helpful in detecting systemic drug photosensitivity. Drug-induced photosensitivity is usually best managed by stopping the suspected drug. Other measures, including phototherapy using wavelengths that do not elicit the response, are sometimes necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Topological induced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    We propose a topological model of induced gravity (pregeometry) where both Newton’s coupling constant and the cosmological constant appear as integration constants in solving field equations. The matter sector of a scalar field is also considered, and by solving field equations it is shown that various types of cosmological solutions in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe can be obtained. A detailed analysis is given of the meaning of the BRST transformations, which make the induced gravity be a topological field theory, by means of the canonical quantization analysis, and the physical reason why such BRST transformations are needed in the present formalism is clarified. Finally, we propose a dynamical mechanism for fixing the Lagrange multiplier fields by following the Higgs mechanism. The present study clearly indicates that the induced gravity can be constructed at the classical level without recourse to quantum fluctuations of matter and suggests an interesting relationship between the induced gravity and the topological quantum-field theory (TQFT).

  1. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it…

  2. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in a pump including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means 32,36 which cooperate with a first vortex cell 38 and a series of secondary vortex cells 40 to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow.

  3. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, S.Y.

    1989-08-08

    An improvement in a pump is described including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means which cooperate with a first vortex cell and a series of secondary vortex cells to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow. 3 figs.

  4. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  5. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  6. Friction induced rail vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralov, Ivan; Sinapov, Petko; Nedelchev, Krasimir; Ignatov, Ignat

    2012-11-01

    A model of rail, considered as multiple supported beam, subjected on friction induced vibration is studied in this work using FEM. The model is presented as continuous system and the mass and elastic properties of a real object are taken into account. The friction forces are nonlinear functions of the relative velocity during slipping. The problem is solved using Matlab Simulink.

  7. Exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Storms, William W

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) is a relatively common condition that affects both recreational and elite athletes. The latest data suggest that it is an inflammatory process, especially in elite athletes. Proper diagnosis is important to differentiate EIB from other respiratory conditions. Effective treatment usually controls this condition.

  8. Injection-induced earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  9. Pyrazinamide induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Surya; Verma, Sanjay Kumar; Gupta, Vaibhav; Anand, Sunish C.; Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of certain antitubercular drugs and is characterized by rapid destruction of platelets whenever offending drug is taken by a susceptible person. We report a case of pyrazinamide-induced thrombocytopenia in a patient receiving anti tubercular drugs. PMID:20711377

  10. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  11. Schedule-Induced Stereotypy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric; Howard, Denise

    1992-01-01

    The phenomena of the induction and entrainment of adjunctive behaviors was investigated in 8 people (ages 5-51) with severe or profound mental retardation who exhibited stereotypic behaviors. Seven of the eight demonstrated evidence of schedule-induced stereotypic behavior, whereas five also showed evidence of the entrainment of these behaviors by…

  12. Drug-induced uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications have been associated with uveitis. This review highlights both well-established and recently reported systemic, topical, intraocular, and vaccine-associated causes of drug-induced uveitis, and assigns a quantitative score to each medication based upon criteria originally described by Naranjo and associates. PMID:23522744

  13. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  14. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it…

  15. Calotropis procera -induced keratitis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Nidhi; Chandrakar, A K; Garg, M L; Patel, Santosh Singh

    2009-01-01

    Calotropis procera produces copious amounts of latex, which has been shown to possess several pharmacological properities. Its local application produces intense inflammatory response. In the 10 cases of Calotropis procera -induced keratitis reported here, the clinical picture showed corneal edema with striate keratopathy without any evidence of intraocular inflammation. The inflammation was reversed by the local application of steroid drops.

  16. [Chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Spaëth, Dominique; Rosso, Nathalie; Clivot, Laetitia

    2006-11-30

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is frequent with most chemotherapy regimens; mechanisms, evolution and small prevention tools are described. Scalp cooling (helmets or continuous cooling systems) can avoid or diminish hair loss in selected chemotherapy regimens but tolerance can be fair and long harmlessness needs to be confirmed by prospective studies. Drug prevention is only in the first steps of research.

  17. Statin-induced Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Redmond, Elizabeth; Harbor, Cathryn

    2012-05-01

    Heart disease (HD) is the number one killer in the United States.(1) In 2006, the direct and indirect costs associated with cardiovascular disease in the United States were estimated at 400 billion dollars.(2) Statin therapy for cholesterol reduction is a mainstay intervention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as reflected in atorvastatin's status as the number one prescribed medication in the United States.(3) Statin therapy, however, is also associated with side effects that signal mitochondrial distress. A commonly reported statin-induced symptom is myalgia, which is defined as muscle pain without an associated elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK). In clinical trials, the reports of myalgia vary from less than 1% to 25% of patients.(4) Myopathy is a general term defined as an abnormal condition or disease of muscle tissue. Myopathy includes myalgia, myositis (inflammation of muscle tissue associated with elevated CK) and the very serious condition rhabdomyolysis (extreme myositis). Histological findings in statin-induced myopathy demonstrate electron chain dysfunction making "mitochondrial myopathy" the more precise term.(5) Mitochondrial myopathy has been associated with statin-induced CoQ10 depletion.(5) Given the density of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes, and CoQ10's role in mitochondrial energy production, depletion has long been associated with increased risk for heart disease.(6-7) In the case below, mitochondrial-specific organic acids, serum CoQ10, vitamin D and clinical history all suggest statin-induced mitochondrial myopathy, despite normal serum CK.

  18. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  19. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  20. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  1. Lovastatin induces platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Li, Ming; Chen, Mengxing; Zhou, Ling; Zhao, Lili; Hu, Renping; Yan, Rong; Dai, Kesheng

    2016-03-01

    Statins are widely used in the prevention of atherosclerosis and treatment of coronary artery disease because of pleiotropic effects on thrombosis. Thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage occurred in some statin-treated patients, but the reason remains unclear. In the current study, we show that lovastatin dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, leading to up-regulation of Bak, down-regulation of Bcl-XL, and activation of caspase-3/8/9. Lovastatin treatment did not increase the surface expression of P-selectin or PAC-1 binding but led to strongly reduced collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. The integrin αIIbβ3 antagonist, RGDS, inhibited lovastatin-induced apoptosis in both human platelets and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing integrin αIIbβ3. The number of circulating platelets in mice was significantly reduced after intraperitoneal injections with lovastatin. Taken together, these data indicate that lovastatin induced caspase-dependent platelet apoptosis. Lovastatin does not incur platelet activation, whereas impairs platelet function and reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage in patients treated with statins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  3. Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Gounden, Ronald; Blockman, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) is an acquired, transient prothrombotic disorder caused by heparin. The predominant problem is the creation of a prothrombotic milieu, accompanied by a fall in the platelet count. This explains the apparent paradox of thrombosis in the face of thrombocytopaenia and why non-heparin antithrombotic agents are integral to its management.

  4. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessed Oct. 1, 2014. Stickland MK, et al. Effect of warm-up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2012;44:383. Asthma action plans: Help patients take control. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih. ...

  5. Warfarin-induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Casey J; Robertson, Ivan; James, Daniel; McMeniman, Erin

    2015-02-01

    Erythroderma is a potentially serious and life-threatening skin disease with a number of possible aetiologies. Drug reactions are well-documented causes, with carbamazepine, penicillin and allopurinol being the most commonly implicated. This case describes a unique presentation of warfarin-induced erythroderma in a 78-year-old female patient.

  6. Plume-induced subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Stern, R. J.; Baes, M.; Sobolev, S. V.; Whattam, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Dominant present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and/or pre-existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are themselves consequences of plate tectonics. In contrast, recently discovered plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without pre-existing plate tectonics. Here, we investigate this new mechanism with high-resolution 3D numerical thermomechanical modeling experiments. We show that typical plume-induced subduction dynamics is subdivided into five different stages: (1) oceanic plateau formation by arrival of a mantle plume head; (2) formation of an incipient trench and a descending nearly-circular slab at the plateau margins; (3) tearing of the circular slab; (4) formation of several self-sustained retreating subduction zones and (5) cooling and spreading of the new lithosphere formed between the retreating subduction zones. At the final stage of plume-induced subduction initiation, a mosaic of independently moving, growing and cooling small oceanic plates heading toward individual retreating subduction zones forms. The plates are separated by spreading centers, triple junctions and transform faults and thus the newly formed multi-slab subduction system operates as an embryonic plate tectonic cell. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained plume-induced subduction: (1) old negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) intense weakening of the lithosphere by plume-derived magmas; and (3) lubrication of the forming subduction interface by hydrated oceanic crust. We furthermore discuss that plume-induced subduction, which is rare at present day conditions, may have been common in the Precambrian time and likely started global plate tectonics on Earth.

  7. Buckling-Induced Kirigami.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-24

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  8. Cocaine-Induced Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Mark; Paran, Daphna; Elkayam, Ori

    2016-01-01

    The use of cocaine continues to grow worldwide. One of the possible side-effects of cocaine is vasculitis. Two distinct vasculitic syndromes have been described due to cocaine. One is cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion, secondary to a direct vasoconstrictor effect of cocaine, inducing ischemic necrosis of the septal cartilage and perforation of the nasal septum, mimicking findings of granulomatosis with polyangiitis in the upper airways. The other is ANCA-associated vasculitis, attributed to the levamisole component that contaminates about 70% of the cocaine. This type of vasculitis may be myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) positive, and its main manifestations are typical cutaneous findings, arthralgia, otolaryngologic involvement, and agranulocytosis. A high degree of suspicion and awareness is needed in order properly to diagnose and treat these patients. PMID:27824551

  9. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  10. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure.

  11. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  12. Hypoxia-Inducible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is vital for the existence of all multicellular organisms, acting as a signaling molecule regulating cellular activities. Specifically, hypoxia, which occurs when the partial pressure of oxygen falls below 5%, plays a pivotal role during development, regeneration, and cancer. Here we report a novel hypoxia-inducible (HI) hydrogel composed of gelatin and ferulic acid that can form hydrogel networks via oxygen consumption in a laccase-mediated reaction. Oxygen levels and gradients within the hydrogels can be accurately controlled and precisely predicted. We demonstrate that HI hydrogels guide vascular morphogenesis in vitro via hypoxia-inducible factors activation of matrix metalloproteinases and promote rapid neovascularization from the host tissue during subcutaneous wound healing. The HI hydrogel is a new class of biomaterials that may prove useful in many applications, ranging from fundamental studies of developmental, regenerative and disease processes through the engineering of healthy and diseased tissue models towards the treatment of hypoxia-regulated disorders. PMID:24909742

  13. Current induced interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Peter M.; Heide, Carsten; Zhang, Shufeng; Fert, Albert

    2001-03-01

    It has recently been shown that a perpendicular current in a magnetically multilayered structures induces an unusual bilinear coupling between the magnetizations of the layers [1]. While this was demonstrated in the ballistic regime, transport is likely to be diffusive in the structures where this may be relevant to the role of currents in switching the magnetization of the layers. We have derived the current induced coupling by using the Boltzmann equation in terms of the parameters used to describe the giant magnetoresistance of magnetically layered structures, and thereby estimate the strength of this coupling. Work supported in part by DARPA and ONR. [1] C.Heide and R.J.Elliott, Europhys. Lett. 50, 271 (2000).

  14. [Steroid-induced osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Perrot, Serge; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Bone-related steroid involvement is one of the most frequent complications of steroid treatment. Epidemiological data demonstrate that osteoporosis starts early during the treatment, predominantly involves trabecular bone and is correlated to dosage and treatment duration. Mechanisms and consequences of steroid bone involvement are related to osseous and extra-osseous mechanisms. In clinical practice, steroid-induced osteoporosis remains underdiagnosed and undertreated both in preventive and curative approaches. Recently, new molecules as teriparatide and zoledronic acid got indication for the treatment of steroid-induced osteoporosis. To guide treatment strategies, several recommendations are available: French, not updated recommendations since 2003 (Afssaps, 2003), European elaborated by the EULAR in 2007 and those of the ACR updated in 2010. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Buckling-Induced Kirigami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  16. Drug-induced Photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zuba, Ewelina Bogumiła; Koronowska, Sandra; Osmola-Mańkowska, Agnieszka; Jenerowicz, Dorota

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is considered the main environmental physical hazard to the skin. It is responsible for photoaging, sunburns, carcinogenesis, and photodermatoses, including drug-induced photosensitivity. Drug-induced photosensitivity is an abnormal skin reaction either to sunlight or to artificial light. Drugs may be a cause of photoallergic, phototoxic, and photoaggravated dermatitis. There are numerous medications that can be implicated in these types of reactions. Recently, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to be a common cause of photosensitivity. As both systemic and topical medications may promote photosensitive reactions, it is important to take into consideration the potential risk of occurrence such reactions, especially in people chronically exposed to ultraviolet radiation.

  17. Drug-induced hypokalaemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Hmouda, Houssem; Bouraoui, Kamel

    2009-01-01

    Hypokalaemia (defined as a plasma potassium concentration<3.5 mEq/L) is a common electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice. Drugs are a common cause of either asymptomatic or symptomatic hypokalaemia. Drug-induced hypokalaemia is an important problem particularly in the elderly and in patients with cardiovascular, renal or hepatic disease. Hypokalaemia can complicate the use of the drug in the therapeutic concentration range, and can also be precipitated with overdose or conditions leading to drug intoxication. Because the etiologies of hypokalaemia are numerous, the diagnosis of drug-induced hypokalaemia may be overlooked. Physicians should always pay close attention to this common side effect. Evaluation and management of a hypokalaemic patient should include a careful review of medications history to determine if a drug capable of causing or aggravating this electrolyte abnormality is present.

  18. Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML. PMID:22606427

  19. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Powers, Albert R; Gancsos, Mark G; Finn, Emily S; Morgan, Peter T; Corlett, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At subanesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations, a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo-controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of 3 participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced auditory verbal hallucinations in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the MRI scanner and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis - the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs, and it does so more in situations of altered perceptual input. The altered perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine. Such circumstances induce aberrant percepts, including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of auditory verbal hallucinations and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Drug-induced diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Michaux, A; Bergmann, J F

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a relatively frequent adverse event, accounting for about 7% of all drug adverse effects. More than 700 drugs have been implicated in causing diarrhoea; those most frequently involved are antimicrobials, laxatives, magnesium-containing antacids, lactose- or sorbitol-containing products, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prostaglandins, colchicine, antineoplastics, antiarrhythmic drugs and cholinergic agents. Certain new drugs are likely to induce diarrhoea because of their pharmacodynamic properties; examples include anthraquinone-related agents, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, lipase inhibitors and cholinesterase inhibitors. Antimicrobials are responsible for 25% of drug-induced diarrhoea. The disease spectrum of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea ranges from benign diarrhoea to pseudomembranous colitis. Several pathophysiological mechanisms are involved in drug-induced diarrhoea: osmotic diarrhoea, secretory diarrhoea, shortened transit time, exudative diarrhoea and protein-losing enteropathy, and malabsorption or maldigestion of fat and carbohydrates. Often 2 or more mechanisms are present simultaneously. In clinical practice, 2 major types of diarrhoea are seen: acute diarrhoea, which usually appears during the first few days of treatment, and chronic diarrhoea, lasting more than 3 or 4 weeks and which can appear a long time after the start of drug therapy. Both can be severe and poorly tolerated. In a patient presenting with diarrhoea, the medical history is very important, especially the drug history, as it can suggest a diagnosis of drug-induced diarrhoea and thereby avoid multiple diagnostic tests. The clinical examination should cover severity criteria such as fever, rectal emission of blood and mucus, dehydration and bodyweight loss. Establishing a relationship between drug consumption and diarrhoea or colitis can be difficult when the time elapsed between the start of the drug and the onset of symptoms is long, sometimes up to several

  1. Polarization induced doped transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  2. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  3. Allopurinol induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Geeta; Govil, Dinesh Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Allopurinol, a widely prescribed urate lowering agent is responsible for various adverse drug reactions, including erythroderma. A 45-year-old male patient was admitted with the complaints of fever, redness and scaling all over the body after 3-4 weeks of allopurinol treatment for asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Elevated liver enzymes were detected in his blood analysis. Skin biopsy was consistent with drug induced erythroderma. Allopurinol was stopped and steroids were started. Patient improved over a period of 2 weeks.

  4. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Powers, A.R.; Gancsos, M.G.; Finn, E.S.; Morgan, P.T.; Corlett, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At sub-anesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation, and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Methods Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of three participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Results Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. Discussion We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced AVHs in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the magnetic resonance scanner, and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis: the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs and it does so more in situations of reduced perceptual input. The reduced perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine; such circumstances induce aberrant percepts including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of AVHs and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. PMID:26361209

  5. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  6. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  7. Induced QCD I: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Lohmayer, Robert; Wettig, Tilo

    2016-11-01

    We explore an alternative discretization of continuum SU( N c ) Yang-Mills theory on a Euclidean spacetime lattice, originally introduced by Budzcies and Zirnbauer. In this discretization the self-interactions of the gauge field are induced by a path integral over N b auxiliary boson fields, which are coupled linearly to the gauge field. The main progress compared to earlier approaches is that N b can be as small as N c . In the present paper we (i) extend the proof that the continuum limit of the new discretization reproduces Yang-Mills theory in two dimensions from gauge group U( N c ) to SU( N c ), (ii) derive refined bounds on N b for non-integer values, and (iii) perform a perturbative calculation to match the bare parameter of the induced gauge theory to the standard lattice coupling. In follow-up papers we will present numerical evidence in support of the conjecture that the induced gauge theory reproduces Yang-Mills theory also in three and four dimensions, and explore the possibility to integrate out the gauge fields to arrive at a dual formulation of lattice QCD.

  8. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  9. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made.

  10. Baby universes with induced gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yihong; Gao, Hongbo

    1989-12-01

    Some quantum effects of baby universes with induced gravity are discussed. The authors prove that the interactions between the baby-parent universes are non-local, and argue that the induced low-energy cosmological constant is zero. This argument does not depend on the detail of the induced potential.

  11. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  12. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  13. [Drug-induced dyschromatopsias].

    PubMed

    Perdriel, G; Manent, P J

    1982-01-01

    Drug-induced dyschromatopsias are defined as functional or objective alterations of color sense following drug treatment. Drug induced chromatopsias are characterized by a perception of white surfaces as colored and occur following modifications of normally transparent structures or alterations of the chorioretina or higher centers. Digitalic intoxication is responsible for incorrect perception of yellow or blue; the retinal origin of the disorder is confirmed by electroretinograms and histologic modifications in the photoreceptor synapses. Santonin in doses exceeding 1 cg is associated with various color misperceptions due to injury to a peripheral neuron or problems of rhodopsin formation. Some sulfas and antibiotics may cause misperception of yellow, and the anticonvulsant drug Tridione may cause an almost complete disappearance of some colors. Chromotopsias of central origin due to direct action on cerebral neurons are rare but may follow use of phenacetine or atropine. Drug induced dyschromatopsias are more common and may be the initial symptoms of various kinds of drug intoxication. Various simple and reliable tests enable the practicing clinician to detect such disorders at an early stage. Synthetic antimalarial drugs derived from chloroquine and used in longterm treatment of rheumatism or during antimalarial prophylaxis, indomethacine, and the phenotiazins may cause dyschromatopsias due to retinal intoxication. Oral contraceptives diminish the chromatic perception in 20% of cases according to 1 author, and often cause deficits of blue-yellow perception. Disulfiram, certain antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, nystatin, isoniazide, and other drugs may cause dyschromatopsias due to alterations in the optical fibers. Ethambutol is the most harmful to color perception; its effects are usually but not always reversible on discontinuation of the drug. Systematic tests of color perception should be administered prior to and during treatment with any drug known to

  14. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  15. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder.

  16. Neutron Induced Beta Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, A. M.; Shylaja, D.

    2011-07-15

    In the present paper we give a new methodology named, 'neutron induced beta radiography-NIBR' which makes use of neutron activated Dy or In foils as source of (3-radiation. Radiographs are obtained with an aluminium cassette containing image plate, a sample under inspection and the activated Dy or In foil kept in tight contact. The sensitivity of the technique to thickness was evaluated for different materials in the form of step wedges. Some radiographs are presented to demonstrate potential of method to inspect thin samples.

  17. Cannabis induced asystole.

    PubMed

    Brancheau, Daniel; Blanco, Jessica; Gholkar, Gunjan; Patel, Brijesh; Machado, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis or marijuana is the most used recreational, and until recently illegal, drug in the United States. Although cannabis has medicinal use, its consumption has been linked to motor vehicle accidents in dose dependent fashion. Marijuana and other cannabinoids produce a multitude of effects on the human body that may result in these motor vehicle accidents. Some of the effects that marijuana has been known to cause include altered sensorium, diminished reflexes, and increased vagal tone. We present a case of cannabis induced asystole from hypervagotonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lisung, Fausto Gabriel; Shah, Ankit B; Levitt, Howard L; Coplan, Neil B

    2015-01-01

    A woman in her early 70s presented with chest pain, dyspnoea and diaphoresis 30 min after her husband expired in our hospital. Cardiac markers were elevated and there were acute changes in ECG suggestive for acute coronary syndrome. Echocardiogram showed apical akinesis, basal segment hyperkinesis with an ejection fraction of 30%. Cardiac catheterisation was performed showing non-obstructive coronary arteries, leading to the diagnosis of stress-induced cardiomyopathy. The patient improved with medical management. Repeat echocardiogram 2 months later showed resolution of heart failure with an ejection fraction of 65–70%. PMID:25858931

  19. Antacid-induced osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Boutsen, Y; Devogelaer, J P; Malghem, J; Noel, H; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 49-year-old woman suffering from generalized skeletal pain and multiple fractures accompanied by severe hypophosphataemia and low urinary phosphorus excretion is reported. She had been taking large amounts of antacids containing aluminum hydroxide for many years. A diagnosis of antacid-induced osteomalacia was made. It was confirmed by biological work-up, radiographs and bone biopsy. A dramatic biological, osteodensitometric, and clinical improvement was achieved by withdrawal of antacids and phosphorus administration. The literature concerning this unusual condition has been reviewed.

  20. [Amoxicillin-induced hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Oxlund, Jakob; Ferguson, Alan Hamilton

    2011-06-27

    Amoxicillin with and without clavulanic acid is a widely used antibiotic in adults and children alike. The drug is used prophylactically as well as therapeutically. In Denmark, it has not been described that amoxicillin alone can lead to hepatitis. In literature often referenced by Danish physicians (medicin.dk and Lægemiddelkataloget), hepatotoxicity is not listed as a side effect. However, in the present case, a 61 year-old male who suffered a tick bite and was treated prophylactically with amoxicillin without clavulanic acid presented with pharmacologically induced hepatitis 20 days after treatment.

  1. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  2. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  3. Bupropion-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Khazaal, Yasser; Krenz, Sonia; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2003-09-01

    Whereas there are some case reports of bupropion-induced vivid dreaming and nightmares, until now it has not been associated with somnambulism. A case is reported of a patient treated with bupropion as a smoking cessation medication, who developed somnambulism during nicotine withdrawal. Furthermore, the sleepwalking episodes were associated with eating behaviour. Amnesia was reported for all episodes. As, on one hand,bupropion is a noradrenergic and dopaminergic drug and nicotine withdrawal, on the other hand, is associated with alterations in monoaminergic functions, an interaction at the level of these neurotransmitters is suggested as the underlying mechanism.

  4. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Cleva; Kross, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals. PMID:22408440

  5. Trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Cutro, Raymond; Mishkin, Joseph D

    2008-06-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. It improves survival and increases response to chemotherapy. The major side effect of trastuzumab is cardiotoxicity manifesting as a reduction in left ventricular systolic function, either asymptomatic or with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Although reversible in most cases, cardiotoxicity frequently results in the discontinuation of trastuzumab. The objective of this review is to summarize facts about trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity and to highlight the areas of future investigations. We searched PubMed for trials involving trastuzumab used as an adjuvant therapy for breast cancer, including the metastatic breast cancer setting, and focused on cardiotoxicity.

  6. Inducing Pluripotency in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming technologies in general and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in particular have opened the door to a vast number of practical applications in regenerative medicine and biotechnology. It also represents a possible alternative to the still evasive achievement of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolation from refractory species such as Bos. taurus. Herein, we described a protocol for bovine iPSCs (biPSCs) generation and characterization. The protocol is based on the overexpression of the exogenous transcription factors NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, using a pantropic retroviral system.

  7. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B [Chicago, IL; Hoek, Terry Vanden [Chicago, IL; Kasza, Kenneth E [Palos Park, IL

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  8. Isoniazid-induced pellagra.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Calka, Omer; Altun, Faruk

    2011-12-01

    Pellagra is characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death occurring as a result of niacin or its precursor tryptophan deficiency. Although pellagra is a well-known complication of isoniazid (INH) therapy, the clinical diagnosis may be missed or delayed that may cause life-threatening consequences. Due to the diversity of pellagra-related signs and symptoms, the diagnosis can be made with an appropriate index of suspicion. We report a 7-year-old boy presenting with INH-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of the niacin therapy.

  9. GEMCITABINE-INDUCED RETINOPATHY.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Jaclyn L

    2016-10-31

    To report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy associated with gemcitabine. The author reports a 68-year-old woman who presented with a 4-month history of bilateral vision loss. She had a history of diabetes, hypertension, and leiomyosarcoma, diagnosed 5 months before presentation and had completed 5 cycles of combination treatment with gemcitabine and docetaxel. Clinical examination revealed a Purtscher-like retinopathy that improved after gemcitabine cessation without the development of cystoid macular edema or retinal neovascularization. This case highlights the importance of recognizing gemcitabine-induced ischemic retinopathy that can be associated with life-threatening myocardial or renal ischemia.

  10. Drug-induced gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Ari; Dobs, Adrian

    2008-11-01

    Gynecomastia is caused by drugs in 10 - 25% of all cases. The pathophysiologic mechanism for some drugs includes exogenous estrogens exposure, medications that cause hypogonadism, anti-androgenic effects and hyperprolactinemia. This manuscript reviews common examples of drug-induced gynecomastia, discussing the mechanisms and possible treatments. Discontinuing the medication is always the best choice; however, if this is not possible, then testosterone replacement therapy may be needed for hypogonadism. When a man is euogonadal, a trial of the anti-estrogen, tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor may be an option.

  11. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously.

  12. Voriconazole-Induced Photosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Malani, Anurag N.; Aronoff, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Voriconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent indicated for invasive aspergillosis, refractory Candida infections, and other emerging invasive fungal infections. Adverse cutaneous reactions associated with voriconazole therapy occur in fewer than 10% of treated patients and range from mild erythematous eruptions to life-threatening reactions such as the Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Photosensitivity reactions are an uncommon but characteristic dermatitis in voriconazole recipients, particularly following chronic administration. We report a case of voriconazole-induced phototoxicity in a 50-year-old male with Candida parapsilosis endocarditis that reversed on discontinuation of the drug. PMID:18801950

  13. 5-fluorouracil induced pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Killu, Ammar; Madhavan, Malini; Prasad, Kavita; Prasad, Abhiram

    2011-04-15

    Cardiac toxicity is an infrequent, but potentially serious side effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The reported incidence of 5-FU-induced cardiotoxicity is approximately 3%, although estimates vary from 1.2% to 18%. Cardiac death occurs in less than 1%. The prompt recognition of cardiac toxicity demands a thorough understanding of the myriad of potential cardiac manifestations and a high index of suspicion. The most common presentation is angina pectoris while other manifestations, namely myocardial infarction, left ventricular dysfunction, arrhythmias and sudden death have been recognised. The authors report an unusual case of myopericarditis masquerading as myocardial infarction.

  14. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes.

  15. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    Drug-induced lupus (DIL) refers to an idiosyncratic side effect of numerous, apparently unrelated, medications, in which symptoms overlap with those of systemic lupus erythematosus. DIL is reversible by discontinuation of the medication. The etiological mechanism underlying DIL is linked to the inherent susceptibility of the adaptive immune system to lapse into auto-reactivity. Clinical and laboratory features of DIL will be compared with those of idiopathic systemic lupus and with other types of drug reactions with overlapping features. Formerly commonly-used drugs conferred very high risk of developing DIL, although the probability of developing DIL has not been established with most lupus-inducing drugs. Pharmacological or physiochemical properties of the parent compounds are uninformative, but the importance of reactive drug metabolites in initiating autoimmunity will be discussed. As with most systemic autoimmune diseases, the pathogenesis of DIL is complex and obscure. The role of complement and human leukocyte allotypes as well as drug acetylator phenotype inform the underlying mechanism, and several of these non-mutually exclusive concepts will be described. The pros and cons of proposed mechanisms for DIL will be discussed in the context of current understanding of autoimmunity and immune tolerance to self.

  16. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  17. [Gluten induced diseases].

    PubMed

    Frič, P; Zavoral, M; Dvořáková, T

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of cereals in human nutrition 10 000 years ago caused the occurrence of gluten induced diseases. This protein complex is involved in pathogenesis of wheat allergy, celiac disease, and gluten sensitivity. Wheat allergy and celiac disease are mediated by the system of adaptive immunity. Gluten sensitivity is a recently defined entity induced by innate immune mechanisms. These subjects present various intestinal and particularly extraintestinal symptoms. The differences between celiac disease and gluten intolerance include permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, histology of duodenal biopsy, and mucosal gene expression. The symptoms of gluten sensitivity may also have another genetic background of food intolerance independent of the HLADQ2, - DQ8 system and tissue transglutaminase (eg. in some psychiatric disorders). At present, there is no specific bio-marker of gluten sensitivity. The diagnosis is possible only by exclusion of other causes of symptoms and improvement on a glutenfree diet applied in a doubleblind placebo controlled manner with optional sequence of both stages to exclude the placebo effect due to nutritional intervention.

  18. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  19. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  20. Nivolumab induced myxedema crisis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Uqba; Rizvi, Humaira; Sano, Dahlia; Chiu, Jane; Hadid, Tarik

    2017-01-01

    Nivolumab is an anti-programmed cell death (anti-PD-1) monoclonal antibody that is approved by Food and Drug Administration for treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, metastatic melanoma, relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma and advanced renal cell cancer. We report a rare case of myxedema crisis induced by nivolumab in a patient with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of lung. Fifty three-year old woman with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma currently on treatment with nivolumab presented with diffuse facial and tongue swelling, slurred speech, depressed mentation, fatigue and weakness. Initial evaluation revealed severe hypothyroidism with thyroid stimulating hormone of 237 micro Unit/mL (Normal Reference range: 0.27-4.20 micro unit/mL) and undetectable free T4. Patient was diagnosed with nivolumab induced myxedema crisis. She was treated successfully with levothyroxine with complete resolution of her symptoms. Nivolumab was safely restarted once the symptoms of myxedema resolved. Nivolumab can cause immune-mediated endocrinopathies including thyroiditis, hypophysitis, adrenal insufficiency and type 1 diabetes mellitus. High index of suspicion and periodic measurement of thyroid function tests are recommended in patients receiving nivolumab therapy. Our case also suggests that once the myxedema crisis is treated and symptoms are resolved, nivolumab can be safely re-challenged.

  1. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting of a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.

  2. [Exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Gani, Federica; Selvaggi, Lucia; Roagna, Davide

    2008-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) was defined for the first time in 1980. EIA is associated with different kind of exercise, although jogging is the most frequently reported. The clinical manifestations progress from itching, erythema and urticaria to some combination of cutaneous angioedema, gastrointestinal and laryngeal symptoms and signs of angioedema and vascular collapse. Mast cell participation in the pathogenesis of this syndrome has been proved by the finding of an elevated serum histamine level during experimentally-induced attacks and by cutaneous degranulation of mast cells with elevated serum tryptase after attacks. As predisposing factors of EIA, a specific or even aspecific sensitivity to food has been reported and such cases are called "food-dependent EIA". Many foods are implicated but particularly wheat, vegetables, crustacean. Another precipitating factor includes drugs intake (non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), climate variations and menstrual cycle factors. Treatment of an attack should include all the manoeuvres efficacious in the management of conventional anaphylactic syndrome, including the administration of epinephrine and antihistamines. Prevention of the attacks may be achieved with the interruption of the exercise at the appearance of the first premonitory symptoms. To prevent the onset of EIA it is also suitable to delay the exercise practice after at least 4-6 hours from the swallowing of food.

  3. [Induced abortion at home].

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Hilde; Qvigstad, Erik; Jerve, Fridtjof; Melseth, Eldbjørg; Eskild, Anne; Nielsen, Christopher S

    2007-09-20

    Medically induced abortion through week 9 is a well established procedure. The article concerns satisfaction among women who choose to do this at home, and possible associations between satisfaction, socio-demographic--and clinical factors. 110 women with pregnancy duration < 7 weeks, who wished to medically terminate the pregnancy at home and presented themselves at Ullevaal University Hospital, were included in the study. The woman's satisfaction with the procedure was the main variable, but anxiety and pain were also recorded. Data were retrieved from hospital journals and questionnaires filled in before and 1 and 3 weeks after the abortion. The degree of satisfaction was recorded on a scale from 1 to 10, where 1 was not content and 10 was very content. Follow-up data were available for 105 women. 90 of 105 women were very content (> 7 on the satisfaction scale) with the treatment. Discomfort and pain during the abortion and marital status seemed to influence the results. The degree of pain varied much. No serious complications were observed. The study showed a high degree of satisfaction with medically induced abortion at home early in the pregnancy. The study has a relatively small sample size and no control group, so the results on factors affecting satisfaction are uncertain. Medical abortion at home should be an opportunity for women applying for early pregnancy termination; as long as the women are well informed, are offered sufficient pain relief and a well functioning follow-up programme.

  4. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing. PMID:26314514

  5. Drug-induced exanthems.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2005-04-15

    Cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs can comprise a broad spectrum of clinical and histopathological features. Recent evidence from immunohistological and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells suggest that distinct T-cell functions may be responsible for this broad spectrum of different clinical reactions. Maculopapular exanthems represent the most commonly encountered cutaneous drug eruption. Previous studies on maculopapular exanthems indicate that drug-specific CD4+ T cells expressing cytotoxic granule proteins such as perforin and granzyme B are critically involved in killing activated keratinocytes. These cells are particularly found at the dermo-epidermal junction and may contribute to the generation of vacuolar alteration and destruction of basal keratinocytes, which are typical found in drug-induced maculopapular exanthems. In contrast to maculopapular exanthems, the preferential activation of drug-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells may lead to more severe reactions like bullous drug eruptions. Furthermore, activation of drug-specific T with distinct cytokine and chemokines profiles may also explain the different clinical features of drug-induced exanthems. IL-5 and eotaxin are upregulated in maculopapular exanthems and explain the eosinophilia often found in these reactions.

  6. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels.

  7. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  8. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  9. Peripherally induced oromandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, C.; Lai, E.; Jankovic, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a focal dystonia manifested by involuntary muscle contractions producing repetitive, patterned mouth, jaw, and tongue movements. Dystonia is usually idiopathic (primary), but in some cases it follows peripheral injury. Peripherally induced cervical and limb dystonia is well recognised, and the aim of this study was to characterise peripherally induced OMD.
METHODS—The following inclusion criteria were used for peripherally induced OMD: (1) the onset of the dystonia was within a few days or months (up to 1 year) after the injury; (2) the trauma was well documented by the patient's history or a review of their medical and dental records; and (3) the onset of dystonia was anatomically related to the site of injury (facial and oral).
RESULTS—Twenty seven patients were identified in the database with OMD, temporally and anatomically related to prior injury or surgery. No additional precipitant other than trauma could be detected. None of the patients had any litigation pending. The mean age at onset was 50.11 (SD 14.15) (range 23-74) years and there was a 2:1 female preponderance. Mean latency between the initial trauma and the onset of OMD was 65 days (range 1 day-1 year). Ten (37%) patients had some evidence of predisposing factors such as family history of movement disorders, prior exposure to neuroleptic drugs, and associated dystonia affecting other regions or essential tremor. When compared with 21 patients with primary OMD, there was no difference for age at onset, female preponderance, and phenomenology. The frequency of dystonic writer's cramp, spasmodic dysphonia, bruxism, essential tremor, and family history of movement disorder, however, was lower in the post-traumatic group (p<0.05). In both groups the response to botulinum toxin treatment was superior to medical therapy (p<0.005). Surgical intervention for temporomandibular disorders was more frequent in the post-traumatic group and was associated with

  10. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  11. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  12. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  13. Load Induced Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, James S. P.; Lavie, Nilli

    2008-01-01

    Although the perceptual load theory of attention has stimulated a great deal of research, evidence for the role of perceptual load in determining perception has typically relied on indirect measures that infer perception from distractor effects on reaction times or neural activity (see N. Lavie, 2005d`) was consistently reduced with high, compared to low, perceptual load but was unaffected by the level of working memory load. Because alternative accounts in terms of expectation, memory, response bias, and goal-neglect due to the more strenuous high load task were ruled out, these experiments clearly demonstrate that high perceptual load determines conscious perception, impairing the ability to merely detect the presence of a stimulus—a phenomenon of load induced blindness. PMID:18823196

  14. [Designer drug induced psychosis].

    PubMed

    Fullajtar, Mate; Ferencz, Csaba

    2012-06-01

    3,4-methylene-dioxy-pyrovalerone (MDPV) is a popular designer drug in Hungary, known as MP4. We present a case of a 34-year-old man, whose first psychotic episode was observed in the presence of MP4 use. The paranoid ideas of reference and the dereistic thinking could be the consequence of drug-induced psychosis. Within 24 hours after the intoxication was over delirium set in. The patient's history included only the use of MP4, use of other kinds of drugs was negated. The drug tests were negative, amphetamine derivates were not detectable in the urine sample. It is most likely that the MP4 pill contained an amount of MDPV less than detectable. In conclusion we suggest that the clinical picture could be the consequence of regular MDPV use.

  15. [Drug-induced asterixis].

    PubMed

    Rittmannsberger, H; Leblhuber, F

    1994-04-22

    A 54-year-old woman with acute schizoaffective psychosis was treated with lithium carbonate (1,350 mg daily) and zuclopenthixol. On admission, clozapine was added (250 mg daily). Because extrapyramidal symptoms (rigor, akinesia) developed, she was additionally given biperiden retard (4 mg daily) from the fourth hospital day onwards. Eleven days after admission she began to complain of "unsteadiness" and "tremors" in her arms and she had asterixis (flapping tremor) on holding up her arms. The electromyogram showed electrical pauses of 60-120 ms, typical for asterixis. There were no significant metabolic or organic cerebral changes that could have accounted for the symptoms which presumably had been induced by the drugs even though their dosage was not unusual. The symptoms in fact regressed completely after the clozapine dose had been reduced, at first to 125 mg then to 50 mg. Previous experience has suggested that the risk of asterixis is particularly high when lithium and clozapine are taken together.

  16. [Cannabis-induced disorders].

    PubMed

    Soyka, M; Preuss, U; Hoch, E

    2017-03-01

    Use and misuse of cannabis and marihuana are frequent. About 5% of the adult population are current users but only 1.2% are dependent. The medical use of cannabis is controversial but there is some evidence for improvement of chronic pain and spasticity. The somatic toxicity of cannabis is well proven but limited and psychiatric disorders induced by cannabis are of more relevance, e.g. cognitive disorders, amotivational syndrome, psychoses and delusional disorders as well as physical and psychological dependence. The withdrawal symptoms are usually mild and do not require pharmacological interventions. To date there is no established pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention. Psychosocial interventions include psychoeducation, behavioral therapy and motivational enhancement. The CANDIS protocol is the best established German intervention among abstinence-oriented therapies.

  17. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF.

  18. Trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Susen, S

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhage is the leading cause of death in trauma patients who arrive alive at hospital. This type of hemorrhage has a "coagulopathic" component, specific to major trauma and associated with poor outcomes. Over the last decade, a better understanding of this trauma-induced coagulopathy lead to a new therapeutic approach requiring earlier and more aggressive management. This hemostatic resuscitation includes early activation of massive transfusion protocols with: 1) immediate delivery of blood packs with high ratios for RBC units: fresh frozen plasma: platelet-concentrates; 2) antifibrinolytics; 3) substitution of coagulation factors. However, early identification of coagulopathic patients requiring aggressive hemostatic resuscitation remains challenging, with an increasing role of point of care devices for hemostatic diagnosis and monitoring. Efforts have to be focused on the early diagnosis of coagulopathy for immediate delivery of blood products and coagulation factors to the right, accurately screened patients through pre-established protocols within the golden hour. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  19. Pancytopenia induced by hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Lo, Louise; Singer, Sylvia Titi; Vichinsky, Elliott

    2002-11-01

    Hypothermia has been demonstrated to induce pancytopenia in animals, but whether this association exists in humans is unknown. The authors report the case of an 8-year-old girl in whom hypothermia (temperature 33 degrees C-35 degrees C) is the cause of pancytopenia. The patient developed thermoregulatory dysfunction subsequent to surgical resection of a craniopharyngioma. Her recurrent cytopenias could not be explained by any etiology except chronic hypothermia. The pancytopenia improved upon rewarming the patient to a temperature of 36 degrees C. This association between hypothermia and pancytopenia has rarely been reported in humans and may be underdiagnosed especially in cases of transient or milder presentations. The authors recommend careful hematologic monitoring of patients with thermoregulatory dysfunction.

  20. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  1. Induced seismicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1997-09-18

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

  2. [Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Povolný, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous group of diseases of heart muscle accompanied with impaired cardiac function. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC) is caused by prolonged tachycardia leading to dilatation and systolic dysfunction with clinical manifestation of heart failure. This state is reversible after normalization of heart rate. The diagnosis is usually made retrospectively after normalization of heart rate and recovery of left ventricular function (LVF). More than 100 years after the first documented case (described in 1913 in a young patient with atrial fibrillation and symptoms of heart failure [25]) is still limited knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms. The most common arrhythmias responsible for the TIC include atrial fibrillation [1,2], atrial flutter [3], incessant supraventricular tachycardia [4], ventricular tachycardia (VT) [5] and frequent ventricular extrasystoles (VES) [6]. TIC detection and therapeutic intervention is crucial considering potential reversibility of tachycardia. Current options of treatment involve drug therapy and surgical or catheter ablation.

  3. Catatonia induced by levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Marie-Josée; Nguyen, Dang-Khoa; Clément, Jean-François; Bruneau, Marie-Andrée

    2006-02-01

    Levetiracetam (Keppra) is a novel antiepileptic drug approved as adjunctive treatment for adults with partial onset seizures. Although the drug is generally well tolerated, behavioral side effects have been reported in variable frequency. Most behavioral problems are mild in nature (agitation, hostility, anxiety, emotional lability, apathy, depression) and quickly resolve with discontinuation of medication. However, serious psychiatric adverse events may also occur with rare cases of psychosis and suicidal behavior. We report here the case of a 43-year-old woman who developed symptoms compatible with catatonia after being exposed to levetiracetam for the treatment of epilepsy. To our knowledge, it is the first reported case of catatonia induced by levetiracetam. We review the difficulties that may be encountered in the differential diagnosis of medical catatonia.

  4. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  5. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  6. Laser Induced Thermal Keratoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Householder, John; Horwitz, Larry S.; Lowe, Kenneth W.; Murrillo, Adolfo

    1989-09-01

    A technique of corneal surgery that is thermally induced and relatively nonenvasive has been studied by the authors, and the preliminary results of the thermal keratoplasty performed on live rabbits are reported here. A carbon dioxide laser was used with simple optical and pointing systems to thermally induce several arbitrary patterns of corneal reformation. Endothelial photographs were taken before the procedure and then again ten days after. They indicated no damage in the Descemet's membrane nor was there damage observed to the endothelium. As much, as 14 "diopters" of change occurred in the corneal keratometry with both positive and negative directions signs. The magnitude and direction of the change were recorded as functions of the pattern of the therapy produced and the laser energy deposited in the stroma. Any corneal reformation was tracked as a function of time subsequent to the procedure. A-minor decay was observed within the first three days of the procedure and the majority of the reformations have maintained at the time of this writing. Since radiation at this wavelength is highly attenuated and absorbed in cornea, no change was observed beyond mid-stroma and the lens and retina appeared uneffective. The authors believe that this technology will be a significant contributor to corneal refractive procedures in the near future. Unlike any refractive surgery currently practiced, this technology may lead to a procedure that: 1) is reversible, 2) is re.eatable, 3) stren thens rather then weakens the cornea, 4) is a..arentl more stable, 5) is more flexible in the types of corneal curvature changes it can produce, 6) results in very clean mires, 7) is painless, and 8) results in total corneal clarity.

  7. Pertussis-induced cough.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kay; Harnden, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Pertussis (whooping cough) is one of the commonest vaccine preventable diseases in the UK, despite vaccination coverage being maintained for the last 15 years at over 90% among infants and the addition of a pre-school booster to the UK national immunisation programme in 2001. However, it is known that pertussis vaccine does not confer long-term immunity to clinical infection. Evidence of pertussis infection has been reported in 37% of children presenting in UK primary care and 20% of adolescents and adults presenting in Canadian health centres with persistent cough. In children and adults with persistent cough, paroxysmal coughing is the most sensitive indicator of pertussis, but has poor specificity and limited diagnostic value. Vomiting and whooping, particularly in combination, are stronger predictors of pertussis. Cough duration is longer in children than in adults with pertussis (median cough duration 112 days versus 42 days); individuals may take even longer to recover fully and regain previous levels of exercise tolerance. A diagnosis of pertussis may be confirmed by culture, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) or serology. Single estimates of anti-pertussis toxin (PT) antibody titres in blood or oral fluid samples are highly specific. There are currently no proven efficacious treatments for pertussis-induced cough. Treatment with macrolide antibiotics reduces the duration of an individual's infectious period, but does not alter the duration of cough. Further research is needed to re-examine the epidemiology of pertussis in countries with different vaccination schedules, find efficacious treatments and develop methods of measuring cough frequency and severity in patients with pertussis-induced cough. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Raynaud's phenomenon induced by sulphasalazine.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, J.; Holt, S.; Housley, E.; Sneddon, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Sulphasalazine-induced Raynaud's phenomenon is reported in a patient who showed no other features of a drug-induced lupus syndrome. The vascular disturbance disappeared when the drug was withdrawn on 3 occasions. A simple technique for assessing the circulatory abnormality in Raynaud's phenomenon is described. PMID:6104805

  9. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  10. Fishbone-induced perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Bababekov, Yanik J; Stanelle, Eric J; Abujudeh, Hani H; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2015-05-20

    We review the literature and describe a case of fishbone-induced appendicitis. A 63-year-old man presented with abdominal pain. Work up including a focused history and imaging revealed fishbone-induced perforated appendicitis. The patient was managed safely and successfully with laparoscopic removal of the foreign body and appendectomy.

  11. Endopolyploidy in irradiated p53-deficient tumour cell lines: Persistence of cell division activity in giant cells expressing Aurora B- kinase

    PubMed Central

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Andrei; Wheatley, Sally P; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Anisimov, Alim P; Mackey, Michael; Davis, Paul J; Plakhins, Grigorijs; Illidge, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings including computerized live imaging suggest that polyploidy cells transiently emerging after severe genotoxic stress (and named ‘endopolyploid cells’) may have a role in tumour regrowth after anti-cancer treatment. Until now, mostly the factors enabling metaphase were studied in them. Here we investigate the mitotic activities and the role of Aurora B, in view of potential de-polyploidisation of these cells, because Aurora B- kinase is responsible for coordination and completion of mitosis. We observed that endopolyploid giant cells are formed in irradiated p53 tumours in several ways: (1) by division/fusion of daughter cells creating early multi-nucleated cells; (2) by asynchronous division/fusion of sub-nuclei of these multinucleated cells; (3) by a series of polyploidising mitoses reverting replicative interphase from aborted metaphase and forming giant cells with a single nucleus; (4) by micronucleation of arrested metaphases enclosing genome fragments; or (5) by incomplete division in the multipolar mitoses forming late multi-nucleated giant cells. We also observed that these activities are able to release para-diploid cells, although they do so infrequently. Although after a substantial delay, apoptosis typically occurs in these cells, we also found that roughly 2% of endopolyploid cells evade apoptosis and senescence arrest and continue mitotic activities. In this article we describe that catalytically active aurora B-kinase is expressed in the nuclei of many interphase endopolyploid cells, as well as being present at the centromeres, mitotic spindle and cleavage furrow during their mitotic efforts. The totally micronucleated giant cells (containing subgenomic fragments in multiple micronuclei) represented the only minor fraction, which failed to undergo mitosis and Aurora B was absent from it. These observations suggest that most endopolyploid tumour cells are not reproductively inert and that aurora B may contribute to the establishment

  12. Inductive source induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, David; Haber, Eldad; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2013-02-01

    Induced polarization (IP) surveys are commonly performed to map the distribution of electrical chargeability that is a diagnostic physical property in mineral exploration and in many environmental problems. Although these surveys have been successful in the past, the galvanic sources required for traditional IP and magnetic IP (MIP) surveys prevent them from being applied in some geological settings. We develop a new methodology for processing frequency domain EM data to identify the presence of IP effects in observations of the magnetic fields arising from an inductive source. The method makes use of the asymptotic behaviour of the secondary magnetic fields at low frequency. A new quantity, referred to as the ISIP datum, is defined so that it equals zero at low frequencies for any frequency-independent (non-chargeable) conductivity distribution. Thus, any non-zero response in the ISIP data indicates the presence of chargeable material. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the method can be applied even in complicated geological situations. A 3-D inversion algorithm is developed to recover the chargeability from the ISIP data and the inversion is demonstrated on synthetic examples.

  13. [Cold-induced urticaria].

    PubMed

    Delorme, N; Drouet, M; Thibaudeau, A; Verret, J L

    2002-09-01

    Cold urticaria is characterized by the development of urticaria, usually superficial and/or angioedematous reaction after cold contact. It was found predominantly in young women. The diagnosis is based on the history and ice cube test. Patients with a negative ice cube test may have represented systemic cold urticaria (atypical acquired cold urticaria) induced by general body cooling. The pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cold urticaria can be classified into acquired and familial disorders, with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Idiopathic cold urticaria is most common type but the research of a cryopathy is necessary. Therapy is often difficult. It is essential that the patient be warned of the dangers of swimming in cold water because systemic hypotension can occur. H1 antihistamines can be used for treatment of cold urticaria but the clinical responses are highly variable. The combination with an H2 antagonists is more effective. Doxepin may be useful in the treatment. Leukotriene receptor antagonists may be a novel, promising drug entity. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be tried.

  14. Opioid-induced Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Kersten, Judy R.; Riess, Matthias L.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction continue to be leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Activation of opioid, adenosine, bradykinin, adrenergic and other G-protein coupled receptors have been found to be cardioprotective. κ- and/or δ-opioid receptor activation is involved in direct myocardial protection, while the role of μ-opioid receptors seems less clear. In addition, differential affinities to the three opioid-receptor subtypes by various agonists and cross-talk among different G-protein coupled receptors render conclusions regarding opioid-mediated cardioprotection challenging. The present review will focus on the protective effects of endogenously released opioid peptides as well as exogenously administered opioids such as morphine, fentanyl, remifentanil, butorphanol, and methadone against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Receptor heterodimerization and cross-talk as well as interactions with other cardioprotective techniques will be discussed. Implications for opioid-induced cardioprotection in humans and for future drug development to improve myocardial salvage will be provided. PMID:24502571

  15. Laughter-induced syncope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Alexander J; Frishman, William H

    2012-01-01

    Reported cases of syncope caused directly by laughter are rare. The common scenario described in a few reports involved episodes of fortuitous laughter, sometimes followed by a short prodrome of lightheadedness, facial flushing, and dizziness, followed by an episode of definite syncope. There were no seizure-like movements, automatisms, or bladder or bowel incontinence. After the syncopal episodes that were seconds in length, the patients regained consciousness, and at that point were fully oriented. These episodes could recur in a similar situation with such laughter. Many of these patients subsequently underwent full syncope workups, without elucidating a primary cardiac or neurologic cause. In this review of laughter-induced syncope, we describe a patient of ours who fit these descriptions. This phenomenon is likely a subtype of benign Valsalva-related syncope, with autonomic reflex arcs coming into play that ultimately result in global cerebral hypoperfusion. Besides the Valsalva produced by a great fit of laughter, laughter itself has its own neuroendocrine and vasculature effects that may play a role.

  16. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  17. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2009-03-01

    Few dermatologic conditions carry as much emotional distress as chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). The prerequisite for successful development of strategies for CIA prevention is the understanding of the pathobiology of CIA. The incidence and severity of CIA are variable and related to the particular chemotherapeutic protocol. CIA is traditionally categorized as acute diffuse hair loss caused by dystrophic anagen effluvium; however, CIA presents with different clinical patterns of hair loss. When an arrest of mitotic activity occurs, obviously numerous and interacting factors influence the shedding pattern. The major approach to minimize CIA is by scalp cooling. Unfortunately, most published data on scalp cooling are of poor quality. Several experimental approaches to the development of pharmacologic agents are under evaluation and include drug-specific antibodies, hair growth cycle modifiers, cytokines and growth factors, antioxidants, inhibitors of apoptosis, and cell-cycle and proliferation modifiers. Ultimately, the protection should be selective to the hair follicle; for example, topical application, such that the anticancer efficacy of chemotherapy is not hampered. Among the few agents that have been evaluated so far in humans, AS101 and minoxidil were able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration of CIA, but could not prevent CIA.

  18. Geomagnetically Induced Currents: Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.

    2017-10-01

    The geospace, or the space environment near Earth, is constantly subjected to changes in the solar wind flow generated at the Sun. The study of this environment variability is called Space Weather. Examples of effects resulting from this variability are the occurrence of powerful solar disturbances, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The impact of CMEs on the Earth's magnetosphere very often greatly perturbs the geomagnetic field causing the occurrence of geomagnetic storms. Such extremely variable geomagnetic fields trigger geomagnetic effects measurable not only in the geospace but also in the ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and on and in the ground. For example, during extreme cases, rapidly changing geomagnetic fields generate intense geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). Intense GICs can cause dramatic effects on man-made technological systems, such as damage to high-voltage power transmission transformers leading to interruption of power supply, and/or corrosion of oil and gas pipelines. These space weather effects can in turn lead to severe economic losses. In this paper, we supply the reader with theoretical concepts related to GICs as well as their general consequences. As an example, we discuss the GIC effects on a North American power grid located in mid-latitude regions during the 13-14 March 1989 extreme geomagnetic storm. That was the most extreme storm that occurred in the space era age.

  19. [Swimming-induced asthma].

    PubMed

    Fjellbirkeland, L; Gulsvik, A; Walløe, A

    1995-06-30

    Swimming is said to have low asthmogeneity especially when compared with other physical activities. Four young athletes who participated in heavy swimming exercise are reported as having symptoms of exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Three of them started to develop the symptoms after several years of training and had no former history of asthma. In the fourth, the asthma was diagnosed in childhood but the EIA-symptoms here exacerbated by swimming. All four experienced more symptoms when the air in the swimming pool was warm, or when there was a strong smell of chlorine. Two of the athletes reported having no symptoms when they swam in outdoor pools and had only minor symptoms, or none at all, when they did other formes of physical exercise, including running. In all four their swimming performance was hampered by their respiratory symptoms. Two of the swimmers improved when they inhaled steroids and adrenerg-beta 2 agonists, and continued their swimming carrier. The cases suggest that an irritant may provoke asthma symptoms in susceptible swimmers. Volatile compounds from chlorination of the pools are suspected as possible irritant agents.

  20. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, A L; Austen, K F

    1980-08-01

    Sixteen patients were seen because of possibly life-threatening exercise-associated symptoms similar to anaphylactic reactions. Asthma attacks, cholinergic urticaria and angioedema, and cardiac arrythmias are recognized as exertion-related phenomena in predisposed patients but are distinct from the syndrome described here. A syndrome characterized by the exertion-related onset of cutaneous pruritus and warmth, the development of generalized urticaria, and the appearance of such additional manifestations as collapse in 12 patients, gastrointestinal tract symptoms in five patients, and upper respiratory distress in 10 patients has been designated exercise-induced anaphylaxis, because of the striking similarity of this symptom complex to the anaphylactic syndrome elicited by ingestion or injection of a foreign antigenic substance. There is a family history of atopic desease for 11 patients and cold urticaria for two others and a personal history of atopy in six. The size of the wheals, the failure to develop an attack with a warm bath or shower or a fever, and the prominence of syncope rule against the diagnosis of conventional cholinergic urticaria. There is no history or evidence of an encounter with an environmental source of antigen during the exercise period.