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Sample records for induces selective time

  1. Artifacts Induced by Selective Blanking of Time-Domain Data in Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Feng; Valeja, Santosh G.; Beu, Steve C.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-11-01

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) of the isolated isotopic distribution for a highly charged biomolecule produces time-domain signal containing large amplitude signal "beats" separated by extended periods of much lower signal magnitude. Signal-to-noise ratio for data sampled between beats is low because of destructive interference of the signals induced by members of the isotopic distribution. Selective blanking of the data between beats has been used to increase spectral signal-to-noise ratio. However, blanking also eliminates signal components and, thus, can potentially distort the resulting FT spectrum. Here, we simulate the time-domain signal from a truncated isotopic distribution for a single charge state of an antibody. Comparison of the FT spectra produced with or without blanking and with or without added noise clearly show that blanking does not improve mass accuracy and introduces spurious peaks at both ends of the isotopic distribution (thereby making it more difficult to identify posttranslational modifications and/or adducts). Although the artifacts are reduced by use of multiple Gaussian (rather than square wave) windowing, blanking appears to offer no advantages for identifying true peaks or for mass measurement.

  2. Selection of charge methods for lithium ion batteries by considering diffusion induced stress and charge time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Song, Yicheng; Zhang, Junqian

    2016-07-01

    This article demonstrates the design of charging strategies for lithium ion batteries with considering the balance between diffusion induced stress and total charge time for two- and three-stage charge methods. For the two-stage galvanostatic-potentiostatic charge method the low mechanical stress can be achieved without increasing total charge time by switching the galvanostatic to the potentiostatic at the time moment when the lithium concentration at the surface of particles reaches the limit cbarsurf = 0 . A three-stage method, which consists of an initial galvanostatic stage of high current, a galvanostatic stage of low current and a potentiostatic ending stage, is suggested. Employing the initial galvanostatic stage of high current is helpful not only in accelerating the charge process, but also in controlling the mechanical stress once the electrical current and time duration of the initial galvanostatic stage are properly designed.

  3. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and nutritional restriction on barbituate-induced sleeping times and selected blood characteristics in raccoons (Procyon lotor)

    SciTech Connect

    Montz, W.E.; Card, W.C.; Kirkpatrick, R.L.

    1982-05-01

    Hepatic microsomal enzyme activity was induced in wild-trapped raccoons (Procyon lotor) and selected blood characteristics were measured in an effort to detect responses due to PCB ingestion, nutritional restriction, and their interactions. Barbiturate-induced sleeping times were used as an index of hepatic microsomal activity because they have been used reliably by other workers. Blood characteristics examined in the study were nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol, and three ketone bodies (D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone). Results show a reduction in sleeping times, elevated NEFA and D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, and lower cholesterol concentrations in PCB-treated groups. A highly significant interaction between PCB treatment and nutritional restriction was observed in acetoacetate concentrations. (JMT)

  4. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    PubMed

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  5. Estimating fisheries-induced selection: traditional gear selectivity research meets fisheries-induced evolution.

    PubMed

    Kuparinen, Anna; Kuikka, Sakari; Merilä, Juha

    2009-05-01

    The study of fisheries-induced evolution is a research field which is becoming recognized both as an important and interesting problem in applied evolution, as well as a practical management problem in fisheries. Much of the research in fisheries-induced evolution has focussed on quantifying and proving that an evolutionary response has taken place, but less effort has been invested on the actual processes and traits underlying capture of a fish by a fishing gear. This knowledge is not only needed to understand possible phenotypic selection associated to fishing but also to help to device sustainable fisheries and management strategies. Here, we draw attention to the existing knowledge about selectivity of fishing gears and outline the ways in which this information could be utilized in the context of fisheries-induced evolution. To these ends, we will introduce a mathematical framework commonly applied to quantify fishing gear selectivity, illustrate the link between gear selectivity and the change in the distribution of phenotypes induced by fishing, review what is known about selectivity of commonly used fishing gears, and discuss how this knowledge could be applied to improve attempts to predict evolutionary impacts of fishing.

  6. Allostery in the lac operon: population selection or induced dissociation?

    PubMed

    Sharp, Kim A

    2011-11-01

    Allostery, the modulation of function of a protein at one site by the binding of a ligand at a different site, is a property of many proteins. Two kinetically distinct models have been proposed: i) The induced fit model in which the ligand binds to the protein and then induces the conformational change. ii) The population selection model, in which the protein spontaneously undergoes a conformational change, which is then 'captured' by the ligand. Using measured kinetic constants for the lac repressor the contribution of population selection vs. induced dissociation is quantified by simulating the kinetics of allostery. At very low inducer concentration, both mechanisms contribute significantly. Total induction, though, is small under these conditions. At increasing levels of induction the induced dissociation mechanism soon dominates, first due to binding of one inducer, and then from two inducers binding.

  7. Real-time selective sequencing using nanopore technology

    PubMed Central

    Loose, Matthew; Malla, Sunir; Stout, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Oxford Nanopore MinION sequences DNA by sensing changes in electrical current flow in real-time as molecules traverse nanopores. Optionally, the voltage across specific nanopores can be reversed, ejecting the DNA molecule. This enables “Read Until”, the selection of specific DNA molecules for sequencing. We use dynamic time warping to match reads to reference, selecting regions of small genomes, individual amplicons, or normalization of the amplicon set. This first demonstration of direct selection of specific DNA molecules in real-time enables many novel future applications. PMID:27454285

  8. Selective fishing induces density-dependent growth.

    PubMed

    Svedäng, Henrik; Hornborg, Sara

    2014-06-12

    Over the last decades, views on fisheries management have oscillated between alarm and trust in management progress. The predominant policy for remedying the world fishing crisis aims at maximum sustainable yield (MSY) by adjusting gear selectivity and fishing effort. Here we report a case study on how striving for higher yields from the Eastern Baltic cod stock by increasing selectivity has become exceedingly detrimental for its productivity. Although there is a successive increase in numbers of undersized fish, growth potential is severely reduced, and fishing mortality in fishable size has increased. Once density-dependent growth is introduced, the process is self-enforcing as long as the recruitment remains stable. Our findings suggest that policies focusing on maximum yield while targeting greater sizes are risky and should instead prioritize catch rates over yield. Disregarding the underlying population structure may jeopardize stock productivity, with dire consequences for the fishing industry and ecosystem structure and function.

  9. A novel “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method: Event-by-event detection of neutral and charged fragments in collision induced dissociation of mass selected ions

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssier, C.; Fillol, R.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.

    2014-01-15

    A new tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method based on time of flight measurements performed on an event-by-event detection technique is presented. This “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method allows to explore Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) fragmentation processes by directly identifying not only all ions and neutral fragments produced but also their arrival time correlations within each single fragmentation event from a dissociating molecular ion. This constitutes a new step in the characterization of molecular ions. The method will be illustrated here for a prototypical case involving CID of protonated water clusters H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n=1–5} upon collisions with argon atoms.

  10. Onboard Run-Time Goal Selection for Autonomous Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve; McLaren, David

    2010-01-01

    We describe an efficient, online goal selection algorithm for use onboard spacecraft and its use for selecting goals at runtime. Our focus is on the re-planning that must be performed in a timely manner on the embedded system where computational resources are limited. In particular, our algorithm generates near optimal solutions to problems with fully specified goal requests that oversubscribe available resources but have no temporal flexibility. By using a fast, incremental algorithm, goal selection can be postponed in a "just-in-time" fashion allowing requests to be changed or added at the last minute. This enables shorter response cycles and greater autonomy for the system under control.

  11. Model Selection for Cox Models with Time-Varying Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Huang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cox models with time-varying coefficients offer great flexibility in capturing the temporal dynamics of covariate effects on right censored failure times. Since not all covariate coefficients are time-varying, model selection for such models presents an additional challenge, which is to distinguish covariates with time-varying coefficient from those with time-independent coefficient. We propose an adaptive group lasso method that not only selects important variables but also selects between time-independent and time-varying specifications of their presence in the model. Each covariate effect is partitioned into a time-independent part and a time-varying part, the latter of which is characterized by a group of coefficients of basis splines without intercept. Model selection and estimation are carried out through a fast, iterative group shooting algorithm. Our approach is shown to have good properties in a simulation study that mimics realistic situations with up to 20 variables. A real example illustrates the utility of the method. PMID:22506825

  12. Utilizing Response Time Distributions for Item Selection in CAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Zhewen; Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for item selection in computerized adaptive testing only focus on item information without taking into consideration the time required to answer an item. As a result, some examinees may receive a set of items that take a very long time to finish, and information is not accrued as efficiently as possible. The authors propose two…

  13. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  14. Time domain para hydrogen induced polarization.

    PubMed

    Ratajczyk, Tomasz; Gutmann, Torsten; Dillenberger, Sonja; Abdulhussaein, Safaa; Frydel, Jaroslaw; Breitzke, Hergen; Bommerich, Ute; Trantzschel, Thomas; Bernarding, Johannes; Magusin, Pieter C M M; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Para hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) is a powerful hyperpolarization technique, which increases the NMR sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. However the hyperpolarized signal is created as an anti-phase signal, which necessitates high magnetic field homogeneity and spectral resolution in the conventional PHIP schemes. This hampers the application of PHIP enhancement in many fields, as for example in food science, materials science or MRI, where low B(0)-fields or low B(0)-homogeneity do decrease spectral resolution, leading to potential extinction if in-phase and anti-phase hyperpolarization signals cannot be resolved. Herein, we demonstrate that the echo sequence (45°-τ-180°-τ) enables the acquisition of low resolution PHIP enhanced liquid state NMR signals of phenylpropiolic acid derivatives and phenylacetylene at a low cost low-resolution 0.54 T spectrometer. As low field TD-spectrometers are commonly used in industry or biomedicine for the relaxometry of oil-water mixtures, food, nano-particles, or other systems, we compare two variants of para-hydrogen induced polarization with data-evaluation in the time domain (TD-PHIP). In both TD-ALTADENA and the TD-PASADENA strong spin echoes could be detected under conditions when usually no anti-phase signals can be measured due to the lack of resolution. The results suggest that the time-domain detection of PHIP-enhanced signals opens up new application areas for low-field PHIP-hyperpolarization, such as non-invasive compound detection or new contrast agents and biomarkers in low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Finally, solid-state NMR calculations are presented, which show that the solid echo (90y-τ-90x-τ) version of the TD-ALTADENA experiment is able to convert up to 10% of the PHIP signal into visible magnetization.

  15. Selective attention to temporal features on nested time scales.

    PubMed

    Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-02-01

    Meaningful auditory stimuli such as speech and music often vary simultaneously along multiple time scales. Thus, listeners must selectively attend to, and selectively ignore, separate but intertwined temporal features. The current study aimed to identify and characterize the neural network specifically involved in this feature-selective attention to time. We used a novel paradigm where listeners judged either the duration or modulation rate of auditory stimuli, and in which the stimulation, working memory demands, response requirements, and task difficulty were held constant. A first analysis identified all brain regions where individual brain activation patterns were correlated with individual behavioral performance patterns, which thus supported temporal judgments generically. A second analysis then isolated those brain regions that specifically regulated selective attention to temporal features: Neural responses in a bilateral fronto-parietal network including insular cortex and basal ganglia decreased with degree of change of the attended temporal feature. Critically, response patterns in these regions were inverted when the task required selectively ignoring this feature. The results demonstrate how the neural analysis of complex acoustic stimuli with multiple temporal features depends on a fronto-parietal network that simultaneously regulates the selective gain for attended and ignored temporal features.

  16. Method for production of sorghum hybrids with selected flowering times

    DOEpatents

    Mullet, John E.; Rooney, William L.

    2016-08-30

    Methods and composition for the production of sorghum hybrids with selected and different flowering times are provided. In accordance with the invention, a substantially continual and high-yield harvest of sorghum is provided. Improved methods of seed production are also provided.

  17. Resource Selection Using Execution and Queue Wait Time Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Smith; Wong, Parkson; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational grids provide users with many possible places to execute their applications. We wish to help users select where to run their applications by providing predictions of the execution times of applications on space shared parallel computers and predictions of when scheduling systems for such parallel computers will start applications. Our predictions are based on instance based learning techniques and simulations of scheduling algorithms. We find that our execution time prediction techniques have an average error of 37 percent of the execution times for trace data recorded from SGI Origins at NASA Ames Research Center and that this error is 67 percent lower than the error of user estimates. We also find that the error when predicting how long applications will wait in scheduling queues is 95 percent of mean queue wait times when using our execution time predictions and this is 57 percent lower than if we use user execution time estimates.

  18. Selecting Variables for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganson, Eric; TDSS; SDSS; Pan-STARRS1

    2014-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey is an eBOSS subprogram that will obtain spectroscopy for 400,000 objects that vary more than 0.1 magnitudes. 100,000 of these objects will be unique to TDSS and 300,000 will be shared with other subprograms. We use a combination of Pan-STARRS1 and SDSS photometry to select a sample of variables that is 95% pure and 60% complete. This sample is obtained with three dimension Kernel Density Analysis. Our data and method are particularly effective at selecting long term variables, and more than 300,000 of our variables will be quasars.

  19. Quantum mechanics of time travel through post-selected teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo; Garcia-Patron, Raul; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Shikano, Yutaka

    2011-07-01

    This paper discusses the quantum mechanics of closed-timelike curves (CTCs) and of other potential methods for time travel. We analyze a specific proposal for such quantum time travel, the quantum description of CTCs based on post-selected teleportation (P-CTCs). We compare the theory of P-CTCs to previously proposed quantum theories of time travel: the theory is inequivalent to Deutsch’s theory of CTCs, but it is consistent with path-integral approaches (which are the best suited for analyzing quantum-field theory in curved space-time). We derive the dynamical equations that a chronology-respecting system interacting with a CTC will experience. We discuss the possibility of time travel in the absence of general-relativistic closed-timelike curves, and investigate the implications of P-CTCs for enhancing the power of computation.

  20. Real-time fiber selection using the Wii remote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Jan; Scholl, Mike; Köhn, Alexander; Hahn, Horst K.

    2010-02-01

    In the last few years, fiber tracking tools have become popular in clinical contexts, e.g., for pre- and intraoperative neurosurgical planning. The efficient, intuitive, and reproducible selection of fiber bundles still constitutes one of the main issues. In this paper, we present a framework for a real-time selection of axonal fiber bundles using a Wii remote control, a wireless controller for Nintendo's gaming console. It enables the user to select fiber bundles without any other input devices. To achieve a smooth interaction, we propose a novel spacepartitioning data structure for efficient 3D range queries in a data set consisting of precomputed fibers. The data structure which is adapted to the special geometry of fiber tracts allows for queries that are many times faster compared with previous state-of-the-art approaches. In order to extract reliably fibers for further processing, e.g., for quantification purposes or comparisons with preoperatively tracked fibers, we developed an expectationmaximization clustering algorithm that can refine the range queries. Our initial experiments have shown that white matter fiber bundles can be reliably selected within a few seconds by the Wii, which has been placed in a sterile plastic bag to simulate usage under surgical conditions.

  1. Selective excitation of vibrational states by shaping of light-induced potentials

    PubMed

    Sola; Chang; Santamaria; Malinovsky; Krause

    2000-11-13

    In this Letter we describe a method for population transfer using intense, ultrafast laser pulses. The selectivity is accomplished by careful shaping of light-induced potentials (LIPs). Creation and control of the LIPs is accomplished by choosing pairs of pulses with proper frequency detunings and time delays. As an example, selective population transfer is demonstrated for a three-state model of the sodium dimer.

  2. THz-Pulse-Induced Selective Catalytic CO Oxidation on Ru.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Jerry L; Katayama, Tetsuo; Lindenberg, Aaron; Fisher, Alan S; Öström, Henrik; Nilsson, Anders; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2015-07-17

    We demonstrate the use of intense, quasi-half-cycle THz pulses, with an associated electric field component comparable to intramolecular electric fields, to direct the reaction coordinate of a chemical reaction by stimulating the nuclear motions of the reactants. Using a strong electric field from a THz pulse generated via coherent transition radiation from an ultrashort electron bunch, we present evidence that CO oxidation on Ru(0001) is selectively induced, while not promoting the thermally induced CO desorption process. The reaction is initiated by the motion of the O atoms on the surface driven by the electric field component of the THz pulse, rather than thermal heating of the surface.

  3. GPS time transfer with implementation of selective availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, David W.; Granveaud, Michel P.; Klepczynski, William J.; Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.

    1990-01-01

    The international community of time metrology is facing a major challenge with the Selective Availability (SA) degradation of GPS satellite signals. At present there are 6 Block 1 satellites and 8 Block 2 satellites operating. According to the policy of the U.S. Department of Defence the Block 1 satellite signals will not be degraded, but these satellites are old with a finite life. The Block 2 satellites, which have all been launched since 1988, were subject to Selective Availability from March 25, 1990. The effect of SA should be to limit precision to about 100 meters for navigation and 167 ns for timing. A study was conducted in order to understand the nature of the actual introduced degradation, and to elaborate the means of removing the effects of this degradation on time transfer. This study concerns the time extraction from GPS satellites at NIST, USNO and Paris Observatory, and the comparison of atomic clocks between these laboratories by common view approach. The results show that when using the data taken over several days the time extraction can be achieved with uncertainty of a few tens of nanoseconds, while strict common-view has removed entirely the effects of SA during the periods under study.

  4. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Variable Selection and Anticipated Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J.; Myers, Adam D.; Eracleous, Michael; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Bañados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Borissova, Jura; Nielsen Brandt, William; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Flewelling, Heather; Garnavich, Peter; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Isler, Jedidah C.; Kaiser, Nick; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Pâris, Isabelle; Parvizi, Mahmoud; Poleski, Radosław; Price, Paul A.; Salvato, Mara; Shanks, Tom; Schlafly, Eddie F.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Stassun, Keivan; Tonry, John T.; Walter, Fabian; Waters, Chris Z.

    2015-06-01

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg2 selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  5. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J.; Myers, Adam D.; Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Bañados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Borissova, Jura; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth; and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  6. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Su, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yin, Meng; Yang, Feng; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy. PMID:22679374

  7. Transmit alternate laser selection with time diversity for FSO communications.

    PubMed

    García-Zambrana, Antonio; Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, a new transmit alternate laser selection (TALS) scheme for FSO communication systems using intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD) over atmospheric turbulence and misalignment fading channels is presented when limited time diversity is available in the turbulent channel. Assuming channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter and receiver and a time diversity order (TDO) limited, we propose the transmit diversity technique based on the rotating selection of TDO out of the available L lasers corresponding to the optical paths with greater values of scintillation. Implementing repetition coding with blocks of TDO information bits, each information bit will be retransmitted TDO times using the TDO largest order statistics in an alternating way. Closed-form asymptotic bit error-rate (BER) expressions are derived when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to moderate-to-strong turbulence conditions, following a gamma-gamma (GG) distribution, and pointing error effects, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. Fully exploiting the potential time-diversity TDO available in the turbulent channel, a significant diversity gain is achieved, providing a diversity order of (2L + 1 - TDO)TDO/2.

  8. Selectively fired, tubing-conveyed perforating guns save rig time

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, P.M. ); Bond, P.L. )

    1993-07-19

    Selective firing of tubing-conveyed perforating (TCP) guns during drill stem tests (DSTs) added flexibility and saved costs for Marathon Oil Co. As an example, in the Garland field in Wyoming, the guns allowed perforating multiple zones in one trip. This saved 1 1/2--2 days/well in rig time and $25,000--30,000/well in electric wire line and DST tool charges. For international offshore operations, savings of $200,000/well appear possible. Savings result not only from perforating multiple zones, but also from arbitrarily setting firing patterns with or without zone isolation. The paper describes the testing of equipment, the design of the guns, firing heads, crossover assembly, pressure isolation sub, control line, and select-fire sub, and applications for the guns.

  9. Light-inducible pigmentation in Portulaca callus; selection of a high betalain producing cell line.

    PubMed

    Kishima, Y; Nozaki, K; Akashi, R; Adachi, T

    1991-09-01

    We have established a unique betalain pigmentation system in callus cultures that originated from seedlings of Portulaca sp. 'Jewel'. Within three different 'Jewel' lines examined, one line (JR) was clearly superior with regard to callus growth rate and pigment formation. Furthermore, after ten cycles of selection of deeply colored callus patches, the selected clones contained on an average four times the amount of betalain as compared to the non-selected mother line. The colorization was induced by light, but disappeared in the dark. Pigment synthesis was detectable within 30 h after irradiation and showed positive correlation with irradiation periods.

  10. Laser-induced selective copper plating of polypropylene surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratautas, K.; Gedvilas, M.; Stankevičiene, I.; JagminienÄ--, A.; Norkus, E.; Li Pira, N.; Sinopoli, S.; Emanuele, U.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2016-03-01

    Laser writing for selective plating of electro-conductive lines for electronics has several significant advantages, compared to conventional printed circuit board technology. Firstly, this method is faster and cheaper at the prototyping stage. Secondly, material consumption is reduced, because it works selectively. However, the biggest merit of this method is potentiality to produce moulded interconnect device, enabling to create electronics on complex 3D surfaces, thus saving space, materials and cost of production. There are two basic techniques of laser writing for selective plating on plastics: the laser-induced selective activation (LISA) and laser direct structuring (LDS). In the LISA method, pure plastics without any dopant (filler) can be used. In the LDS method, special fillers are mixed in the polymer matrix. These fillers are activated during laser writing process, and, in the next processing step, the laser modified area can be selectively plated with metals. In this work, both methods of the laser writing for the selective plating of polymers were investigated and compared. For LDS approach, new material: polypropylene with carbon-based additives was tested using picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses. Different laser processing parameters (laser pulse energy, scanning speed, the number of scans, pulse durations, wavelength and overlapping of scanned lines) were applied in order to find out the optimal regime of activation. Areal selectivity tests showed a high plating resolution. The narrowest width of a copper-plated line was less than 23 μm. Finally, our material was applied to the prototype of the electronic circuit board on a 2D surface.

  11. Magnetically induced spreading and pattern selection in thin ferrofluid drops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Wu, W-L; Miranda, José A

    2010-11-01

    We report an experimental study of a fingering pattern formation which occurs during the spreading of an immiscible thin ferrofluid drop subjected to a radial magnetic field. Our results indicate that this ferrohydrodynamic system works as a magnetic analog of conventional spin coating, where centrifugal driving is replaced with a magnetic body force induced by the radial applied field. In this context, a magnetically tunable pattern selection mechanism is proposed in which the shape and number of the arising fingered structures can be properly controlled.

  12. Continuous time limits of the utterance selection model.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jérôme

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we derive alternative continuous time limits of the utterance selection model (USM) for language change [G. J. Baxter et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 046118 (2006)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.73.046118]. This is motivated by the fact that the Fokker-Planck continuous time limit derived in the original version of the USM is only valid for a small range of parameters. We investigate the consequences of relaxing these constraints on parameters. Using the normal approximation of the multinomial approximation, we derive a continuous time limit of the USM in the form of a weak-noise stochastic differential equation. We argue that this weak noise, not captured by the Kramers-Moyal expansion, cannot be neglected. We then propose a coarse-graining procedure, which takes the form of a stochastic version of the heterogeneous mean field approximation. This approximation groups the behavior of nodes of the same degree, reducing the complexity of the problem. With the help of this approximation, we study in detail two simple families of networks: the regular networks and the star-shaped networks. The analysis reveals and quantifies a finite-size effect of the dynamics. If we increase the size of the network by keeping all the other parameters constant, we transition from a state where conventions emerge to a state where no convention emerges. Furthermore, we show that the degree of a node acts as a time scale. For heterogeneous networks such as star-shaped networks, the time scale difference can become very large, leading to a noisier behavior of highly connected nodes.

  13. Continuous time limits of the utterance selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Jérôme

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we derive alternative continuous time limits of the utterance selection model (USM) for language change [G. J. Baxter et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 046118 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.046118]. This is motivated by the fact that the Fokker-Planck continuous time limit derived in the original version of the USM is only valid for a small range of parameters. We investigate the consequences of relaxing these constraints on parameters. Using the normal approximation of the multinomial approximation, we derive a continuous time limit of the USM in the form of a weak-noise stochastic differential equation. We argue that this weak noise, not captured by the Kramers-Moyal expansion, cannot be neglected. We then propose a coarse-graining procedure, which takes the form of a stochastic version of the heterogeneous mean field approximation. This approximation groups the behavior of nodes of the same degree, reducing the complexity of the problem. With the help of this approximation, we study in detail two simple families of networks: the regular networks and the star-shaped networks. The analysis reveals and quantifies a finite-size effect of the dynamics. If we increase the size of the network by keeping all the other parameters constant, we transition from a state where conventions emerge to a state where no convention emerges. Furthermore, we show that the degree of a node acts as a time scale. For heterogeneous networks such as star-shaped networks, the time scale difference can become very large, leading to a noisier behavior of highly connected nodes.

  14. Real-time flavour tagging selection in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertella, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    In high-energy physics experiments, online selection is crucial to the identification of the few interesting collisions from the large data volume processed. In the overall ATLAS trigger strategy, b-jet triggers are designed to identify heavy-flavor content in real-time and, in particular, provide the only option to efficiently record events with fully hadronic final states containing b-jets. In doing so, two different, but related, challenges are faced. The physics goal is to optimise as far as possible the rejection for light jets from QCD processes, while retaining a high efficiency on selecting jets from beauty, while maintaining affordable trigger rates without raising jet energy thresholds. This poses a challenging computing task, as charged tracks and their corresponding vertices must be reconstructed and analysed for each jet above the desired threshold, regardless of the increasingly harsh pile-up conditions. The performance of b-jet triggers during the LHC Run I data-taking campaigns is presented, together with an overview of the new online b-tagging strategy and algorithms, designed to face the above mentioned challenges, which will be adopted during Run II.

  15. Human-induced evolution caused by unnatural selection through harvest of wild animals

    PubMed Central

    Allendorf, Fred W.; Hard, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    Human harvest of phenotypically desirable animals from wild populations imposes selection that can reduce the frequencies of those desirable phenotypes. Hunting and fishing contrast with agricultural and aquacultural practices in which the most desirable animals are typically bred with the specific goal of increasing the frequency of desirable phenotypes. We consider the potential effects of harvest on the genetics and sustainability of wild populations. We also consider how harvesting could affect the mating system and thereby modify sexual selection in a way that might affect recruitment. Determining whether phenotypic changes in harvested populations are due to evolution, rather than phenotypic plasticity or environmental variation, has been problematic. Nevertheless, it is likely that some undesirable changes observed over time in exploited populations (e.g., reduced body size, earlier sexual maturity, reduced antler size, etc.) are due to selection against desirable phenotypes—a process we call “unnatural” selection. Evolution brought about by human harvest might greatly increase the time required for over-harvested populations to recover once harvest is curtailed because harvesting often creates strong selection differentials, whereas curtailing harvest will often result in less intense selection in the opposing direction. We strongly encourage those responsible for managing harvested wild populations to take into account possible selective effects of harvest management and to implement monitoring programs to detect exploitation-induced selection before it seriously impacts viability. PMID:19528656

  16. Human-induced evolution caused by unnatural selection through harvest of wild animals.

    PubMed

    Allendorf, Fred W; Hard, Jeffrey J

    2009-06-16

    Human harvest of phenotypically desirable animals from wild populations imposes selection that can reduce the frequencies of those desirable phenotypes. Hunting and fishing contrast with agricultural and aquacultural practices in which the most desirable animals are typically bred with the specific goal of increasing the frequency of desirable phenotypes. We consider the potential effects of harvest on the genetics and sustainability of wild populations. We also consider how harvesting could affect the mating system and thereby modify sexual selection in a way that might affect recruitment. Determining whether phenotypic changes in harvested populations are due to evolution, rather than phenotypic plasticity or environmental variation, has been problematic. Nevertheless, it is likely that some undesirable changes observed over time in exploited populations (e.g., reduced body size, earlier sexual maturity, reduced antler size, etc.) are due to selection against desirable phenotypes-a process we call "unnatural" selection. Evolution brought about by human harvest might greatly increase the time required for over-harvested populations to recover once harvest is curtailed because harvesting often creates strong selection differentials, whereas curtailing harvest will often result in less intense selection in the opposing direction. We strongly encourage those responsible for managing harvested wild populations to take into account possible selective effects of harvest management and to implement monitoring programs to detect exploitation-induced selection before it seriously impacts viability.

  17. Selective Induced Altered Coccidians to Immunize and Prevent Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Microbiomic flora in digestive tract is pivotal to the state of our health and disease. Antibiotics affect GI, control composition of microbiome, and shift equilibrium from health into disease status. Coccidiosis causes gastrointestinal inflammation. Antibiotic additives contaminate animal products and enter food chain, consumed by humans with possible allergic, antibiotic resistance and enigmatic side effects. Purposed study induced nonpathogenic, immunogenic organisms to protect against disease and abolish antibiotics' use in food animals and side effects in man. Diverse species of Coccidia were used as model. Immature organisms were treated with serial purification procedure prior to developmental stages to obtain altered strains. Chicks received oral gavage immunized with serial low doses of normal or altered organisms or sham treatment and were challenged with high infective normal organisms to compare pathogenicity and immunogenicity. Mature induced altered forms of E. tenella and E. necatrix lacked developmental stage of “sporocysts” and contained free sporozoites. In contrast, E. maxima progressed to normal forms or did not mature at all. Animals that received altered forms were considerably protected with higher weight gain and antibody titers against challenge infection compared to those that received normal organisms (p < 0.05). This is the first report to induce selected protective altered organisms for possible preventive measures to minimize antibiotic use in food animals. PMID:27721824

  18. Selective use of a reserved mechanism for inducing calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun Yan; Chen, Chun Ying; Cui, Zong Jie

    2004-12-01

    Concentration-dependent transformation of hormone- and neurotransmitter-induced calcium oscillation is a common phenomenon in diverse types of cells especially of the secretory type. The rodent submandibular acinar cells are an exception to this rule, which show elevated plateau increase in intracellular calcium under all stimulatory concentrations of both norepinephrine and acetylcholine. However, under depolarized state this cell type could also show a variation of periodic calcium changes. This reserved mechanism of calcium oscillation is jump-started by depolarization only with muscarinic cholinergic stimulation, but not with adrenergic stimulation. This latter effect is attributable to alpha receptor activation, not due to simultaneous activation of alpha and beta receptors, with beta receptor activation only serving to enhance the magnitude. These data suggest that this reserved mechanism for inducing calcium oscillation can be selectively used only by specific receptor-signaling pathways, and may therefore partly explain the long-known differences between secretion induced by sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation in the submandibular gland.

  19. Dopamine selectively sensitizes dopaminergic neurons to rotenone-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Ferogh A; Grammatopoulos, Tom N; Poczobutt, Andy M; Jones, Susan M; Snell, Laurence D; Das, Mita; Zawada, W Michael

    2008-05-01

    Among various types of neurons affected in Parkinson's disease, dopamine (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra undergo the most pronounced degeneration. Products of DA oxidation and consequent cellular damage have been hypothesized to contribute to neuronal death. To examine whether elevated intracellular DA will selectively predispose the dopaminergic subpopulation of nigral neurons to damage by an oxidative insult, we first cultured rat primary mesencephalic cells in the presence of rotenone to elevate reactive oxygen species. Although MAP2(+) neurons were more sensitive to rotenone-induced toxicity than type 1 astrocytes, rotenone affected equally both DA (TH(+)) neurons and MAP2(+) neurons. In contrast, when intracellular DA concentration was elevated, DA neurons became selectively sensitized to rotenone. Raising intracellular DA levels in primary DA neurons resulted in dopaminergic neuron death in the presence of subtoxic concentrations of rotenone. Furthermore, mitochondrial superoxide dismutase mimetic, manganese (III) meso-tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin, blocked activation of caspase-3, and consequent cell death. Our results demonstrate that an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I and increased cytosolic DA may cooperatively lead to conditions of elevated oxidative stress and thereby promote selective demise of dopaminergic neurons.

  20. Four decades of opposing natural and human-induced artificial selection acting on Windermere pike (Esox lucius).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Stephanie M; Edeline, Eric; Asbjørn Vøllestad, L; Haugen, Thrond O; Winfield, Ian J; Fletcher, Janice M; Ben James, J; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2007-06-01

    The ability of natural selection to drive local adaptation has been appreciated ever since Darwin. Whether human impacts can impede the adaptive process has received less attention. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying natural selection and harvest selection acting on a freshwater fish (pike) over four decades. Across the time series, directional natural selection tended to favour large individuals whereas the fishery targeted large individuals. Moreover, non-linear natural selection tended to favour intermediate sized fish whereas the fishery targeted intermediate sized fish because the smallest and largest individuals were often not captured. Thus, our results unequivocally demonstrate that natural selection and fishery selection often acted in opposite directions within this natural system. Moreover, the two selective factors combined to produce reduced fitness overall and stronger stabilizing selection relative to natural selection acting alone. The long-term ramifications of such human-induced modifications to adaptive landscapes are currently unknown and certainly warrant further investigation.

  1. Non-gated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water by position-selective detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger

    2015-09-14

    Temporal and spatial evolutions of the laser-induced plasma in bulk water are investigated using fast imaging and emission spectroscopic techniques. By tightly focusing a single-pulse nanosecond Nd: YAG laser beam into the bulk water, we generate a strongly expanded plasma with high reproducibility. Such a strong expanding plasma enables us to obtain well-resolved spectral lines by means of position-selective detection; hence, the time-gated detector becomes abdicable. The present results suggest not only a possible non-gated approach for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy but also give an insight into the plasma generation and expansion in bulk water.

  2. Chiral-selective chemistry induced by spin-polarized secondary electrons from a magnetic substrate.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, R A; Abu Haija, M; Ryan, P J

    2008-10-24

    We demonstrate for the first time that low-energy spin-polarized secondary electrons, produced by irradiation of a magnetic substrate, can induce chiral-selective chemistry. Our approach was to perform detailed measurements of the reaction rate for x-ray induced, secondary electron photolysis of a model chiral compound, (R)- or (S)-2-butanol, adsorbed on a magnetized Permalloy substrate. The results showed that there is an enhancement of approximately 10% in the rate of CO bond cleavage that depends on the chirality of the molecule and the spin polarization of the substrate secondary electrons.

  3. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; ...

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  4. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective mass transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.

  5. Electric Field Induced Selective Disordering in Lamellar Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, Markus A; Pester, Christian W; Langner, Karol M; Sevink, Geert; Schoberth, Heiko; Schmidt, Kristin; Urban, Volker S; Mays, Jimmy; Boker, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    External electric fields align nanostructured block copolymers by either rotation of grains or nucleation and growth depending on how strongly the chemically distinct block copolymer components are segregated. In close vicinity to the orderdisorder transition, theory and simulations suggest a third mechanism: selective disordering. We present a time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering study that demonstrates how an electric field can indeed selectively disintegrate ill-aligned lamellae in a lyotropic block copolymer solution, while lamellae with interfaces oriented parallel to the applied field prevail. The present study adds an additional mechanism to the experimentally corroborated suite of mechanistic pathways, by which nanostructured block copolymers can align with an electric field. Our results further unveil the benefit of electric field assisted annealing for mitigating orientational disorder and topological defects in block copolymer mesophases, both in close vicinity to the orderdisorder transition and well below it.

  6. Electric field induced selective disordering in lamellar block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Markus; Pester, Christian W; Langner, Karol M; Sevink, Geert J A; Schoberth, Heiko G; Schmidt, Kristin; Urban, Volker S; Mays, Jimmy W; Böker, Alexander

    2013-05-28

    External electric fields align nanostructured block copolymers by either rotation of grains or nucleation and growth depending on how strongly the chemically distinct block copolymer components are segregated. In close vicinity to the order-disorder transition, theory and simulations suggest a third mechanism: selective disordering. We present a time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering study that demonstrates how an electric field can indeed selectively disintegrate ill-aligned lamellae in a lyotropic block copolymer solution, while lamellae with interfaces oriented parallel to the applied field prevail. The present study adds an additional mechanism to the experimentally corroborated suite of mechanistic pathways, by which nanostructured block copolymers can align with an electric field. Our results further unveil the benefit of electric field assisted annealing for mitigating orientational disorder and topological defects in block copolymer mesophases, both in close vicinity to the order-disorder transition and well below it.

  7. TAVI device selection: time for a patient-specific approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marcus; Modine, Thomas; Piazza, Nicolo; Mylotte, Darren

    2016-09-18

    Individualised, patient-centred care is a central tenet of modern medicine. The variety of transcatheter heart valves currently available affords the opportunity to select the most appropriate device for each individual patient. Prosthesis selection should be based on operator experience and pre-procedural multimodal three-dimensional imaging. Herein, we outline a number of clinical scenarios where specific transcatheter heart valve technologies have the potential to optimise clinical outcome.

  8. Noise-induced transition in human reaction times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-09-01

    The human reaction/response time can be defined as the time elapsed from the onset of stimulus presentation until a response occurs in many sensory and cognitive processes. A reaction time model based on Piéron’s law is investigated. The model shows a noise-induced transition in the moments of reaction time distributions due to the presence of strong additive noise. The model also demonstrates that reaction times do not follow fluctuation scaling between the mean and the variance but follow a generalized version between the skewness and the kurtosis. The results indicate that noise-induced transitions in the moments govern fluctuations in sensory-motor transformations and open an insight into the macroscopic effects of noise in human perception and action. The conditions that lead to extreme reaction times are discussed based on the transfer of information in neurons.

  9. Timing behavior in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Orduña, Vladimir; Hong, Enrique; Bouzas, Arturo

    2011-10-10

    There is evidence of deterioration of spatial cognition in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Here, we evaluate a possible dissociation in the cognitive deficits due to diabetes by examining another crucial aspect of animal cognition: temporal perception. Timing behavior and temporal memory were evaluated in STZ-induced diabetic rats employing two timing tasks: the peak-interval procedure, with its Gap variant, and the interval bisection task. A spatial memory task, rewarded alternation in the T-maze, was also evaluated to explore spatial cognition. The two timing tasks employed coincide in the finding of a normal timing performance in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The peak-interval procedure provided results that suggest that the timing behavior is equally accurate and precise than in control subjects; in the Gap procedure, an equal change in peak time in both groups indicates that temporal working memory is also intact. In the interval bisection task, we analyzed the acquisition of a temporal discrimination and the sensitivity to changes in the duration of the stimulus; no differences were found in either the acquisition process or the sensitivity index. In contrast, in the rewarded alternation task, STZ-induced diabetic rats exhibited a significant deficit in spatial cognition. The cognitive processes involved in timing behavior and temporal memory are not deteriorated as a consequence of diabetes; the cognitive deficits associated to diabetes thus seem to be restricted to the spatial domain.

  10. The timing of induced resistance and induced susceptibility in the soybean-Mexican bean beetle system.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Nora C

    1998-04-01

    Induced plant responses to herbivory have been demonstrated in many systems. It has been suggested that the timing of these responses may influence the impact of induced resistance on herbivore populations, and may affect the evolution of induced defenses. This study used a bioassay to characterize the time course of systemic induced responses to Mexican bean beetle herbivory in four genotypes of soybeans. The results suggest that the time course of induced responses in this system is more complex than most previous studies have indicated. Herbivory provoked both rapid induced resistance and subsequent induced susceptibility to beetle feeding. All four genotypes of soybean induced significant resistance to beetle damage (beetles preferred undamaged to damaged plants) by 3 days after damage. By 15 days after damage, this resistance had decayed (beetles showed no preference for undamaged over damaged plants), and by 20 days after damage, all four genotypes exhibited significant induced susceptibility (beetles preferred previously damaged plants over undamaged plants). The magnitude of induced resistance in each genotype correlated strongly with the magnitude of induced susceptibility in that genotype.

  11. Effects of hyperbaric nitrogen-induced narcosis on response-selection processes.

    PubMed

    Meckler, Cédric; Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Hasbroucq, Thierry; Schmid, Bruno; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Vidal, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Certain underwater circumstances carry risk of inert gas narcosis. Impairment of sensorimotor information processing due to narcosis, induced by normobaric nitrous oxide or high partial nitrogen pressure, has been broadly evidenced, by a lengthening of the reaction time (RT). However, the locus of this effect remains a matter of debate. We examined whether inert gas narcosis affects the response-selection stage of sensorimotor information processing. We compared an air normobaric condition with a hyperbaric condition in which 10 subjects were subjected to 6 absolute atmospheres of 8.33% O2 Nitrox. In both conditions, subjects performed a between-hand choice-RT task in which we explicitly manipulated the stimulus-response association rule. The effect of this manipulation (which is supposed to affect response-selection processes) was modified by inert gas narcosis. It is concluded, therefore, that response selection processes are among the loci involved in the effect of inert gas narcosis on information processing.

  12. Artificial selection on chill-coma recovery time in Drosophila melanogaster: Direct and correlated responses to selection.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Alison R; Mackay, Trudy F C; Morgan, Theodore J

    2016-07-01

    Artificial selection can be used to create populations with extreme phenotypic responses to environmental stressors. When artificial selection is applied to a single component of a stress response, this selection may result in correlated responses in other stress responses, a phenomenon called cross-tolerance, which is ultimately controlled by the genetic correlations among traits. We selected for extreme responses to cold tolerance by selecting for chill-coma recovery time from a single temperate population of Drosophila melanogaster. Chill-coma recovery time is a common metric of low, but non-lethal, cold temperature tolerance. Replicated divergent artificial selection was applied to a genetically variable base population for 31 generations, resulting in two cold resistant, two cold susceptible, and two unselected control lines. To quantify the relationship between selection on chill-coma recovery and other metrics of thermal performance, we also measured survivorship after acute cold exposure, survivorship after chronic cold exposure, survivorship after cold exposure following a pre-treatment period (rapid cold hardening), starvation tolerance, and heat tolerance. We find that chill-coma recovery time is heritable within this population and that there is an asymmetric response to increased and decreased chill-coma recovery time. Surprisingly, we found no cross-tolerances between selection on chill-coma recovery time and the other environmental stress response traits. These results suggest that although artificial selection has dramatically altered chill-coma recovery time, the correlated response to selection on other stress response phenotypes has been negligible. The lack of a correlated response suggests that chill-coma recovery time in these selection lines is likely genetically independent from measures of cold survivorship tested here.

  13. Continuum model for chiral induced spin selectivity in helical molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Ernesto; González-Arraga, Luis A.; Finkelstein-Shapiro, Daniel; Mujica, Vladimiro; Berche, Bertrand

    2015-05-21

    A minimal model is exactly solved for electron spin transport on a helix. Electron transport is assumed to be supported by well oriented p{sub z} type orbitals on base molecules forming a staircase of definite chirality. In a tight binding interpretation, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) opens up an effective π{sub z} − π{sub z} coupling via interbase p{sub x,y} − p{sub z} hopping, introducing spin coupled transport. The resulting continuum model spectrum shows two Kramers doublet transport channels with a gap proportional to the SOC. Each doubly degenerate channel satisfies time reversal symmetry; nevertheless, a bias chooses a transport direction and thus selects for spin orientation. The model predicts (i) which spin orientation is selected depending on chirality and bias, (ii) changes in spin preference as a function of input Fermi level and (iii) back-scattering suppression protected by the SO gap. We compute the spin current with a definite helicity and find it to be proportional to the torsion of the chiral structure and the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan phase. To describe room temperature transport, we assume that the total transmission is the result of a product of coherent steps.

  14. The Timing of Verb Selection in Japanese Sentence Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momma, Shota; Slevc, L. Robert; Phillips, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Many influential models of sentence production (e.g., Bock & Levelt, 1994; Kempen & Hoenkamp, 1987; Levelt, 1989) emphasize the central role of verbs in structural encoding, and thus predict that verbs should be selected early in sentence formulation, possibly even before the phonological encoding of the first constituent (Ferreira, 2000).…

  15. Long-time observation of meteor induced layers with ionosonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2016-07-01

    It is considered that the main theory explaining appearance of sporadic E is the theory of wind shear, which means (includes) the presence and movement of nodes converging tidal wind through the height region of the most frequent occurrence Es (120-140km) [Mathew et. all, 1998]. However, the appearance of intense layers, following its name, are sporadic, and such variability cannot to explain by the influence of tidal waves only. Another indication inconsistency theory of wind shear is the appearance of so-called transient Es layers [Maruiama, 2003]. The distinctive feature of this trace is the high critical frequency (> 5 MHz), a constant height, weak amplitude, all trace semitransparent and short lifetime [Maruiama et. all, 2003 and 2008 and references there]. Because of duration, such layer is opposite to the traditional persistent Es layer, which we do not consider in this paper. Various researchers have used different terms for such spontaneous Es, it is meteor echo, meteor induced Es, spontaneously formed sporadic Es patches resulting of the Fresnel scattering from a region of enhanced plasma density along the meteor trail, transitory Es and transient Es. Since the term transient Es is unstable, to avoid confusion, we will stick to this term. Since meteor echo is not fully satisfy this term by some parameter, we will describe the properties of transient Es based on the ionogram properties and not from physics of its origin. We used data from our ionosonde with one-minute ionogram repetition rate for 2010-2014 years. For processing performed a method are using to select beatings and the ionosphere reflectivity of the layers by means A-, H-and AΣ-map [Akchurin, 2011; Yusupov, 2014]. This maps allow to collect transient Es appearance over a long-time. Such statistics comparison with meteor showers activity showed good agreement. It shows the presence of the transient Es formation mechanism, which coupling with meteors.

  16. Select timely data and local benchmarks to profile MDs.

    PubMed

    1999-03-01

    DATA BENCHMARKS: Seeking an effective way to let their physicians know their costs were too high and LOS too long, managers at two New York health care organizations began profiling the physicians by using data the physicians themselves deemed most appropriate. Find out what data they selected. And review samples of the reports they prepare for their physicians. It's all part of a new book from the publisher of CRR.

  17. The timing of selection at the human FOXP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Coop, Graham; Bullaughey, Kevin; Luca, Francesca; Przeworski, Molly

    2008-07-01

    Krause J, Lalueza-Fox C, Orlando L, et al. recently examined patterns of genetic variation at FOXP2 in 2 Neanderthals. This gene is of particular interest because it is involved in speech and language and was previously shown to harbor the signature of recent positive selection. The authors found the same 2 amino acid substitutions in Neanderthals as in modern humans. Assuming that these sites were the targets of selection and no interbreeding between the 2 groups, they concluded that selection at FOXP2 occurred before the populations split, over 300 thousand years ago. Here, we show that the data are unlikely under this scenario but may instead be consistent with low rates of gene flow between modern humans and Neanderthals. We also collect additional data and introduce a modeling framework to estimate levels of modern human contamination of the Neanderthal samples. We find that, depending on the assumptions, additional control experiments may be needed to rule out contamination at FOXP2.

  18. Comparative Time Chart of Selected Chemical Discoveries and Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzzell, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    This article chronologically outlines discoveries and achievements made in the field of Chemistry from Ancient times to 1900. These events are classified into three categories: physical, inorganic, and organic chemistry. The approximate dates, scientists, and their countries of origin for each event are included in the time chart. (MA)

  19. Manufacturing time operators: Covariance, selection criteria, and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Hegerfeldt, G. C.; Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J.

    2010-07-15

    We provide the most general forms of covariant and normalized time operators and their probability densities, with applications to quantum clocks, the time of arrival, and Lyapunov quantum operators. Examples are discussed of the profusion of possible operators and their physical meaning. Criteria to define unique, optimal operators for specific cases are given.

  20. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  1. Estimating selection through male fitness: three complementary methods illuminate the nature and causes of selection on flowering time

    PubMed Central

    Austen, Emily J.; Weis, Arthur E.

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of selection through male fitness is limited by the resource demands and indirect nature of the best available genetic techniques. Applying complementary, independent approaches to this problem can help clarify evolution through male function. We applied three methods to estimate selection on flowering time through male fitness in experimental populations of the annual plant Brassica rapa: (i) an analysis of mating opportunity based on flower production schedules, (ii) genetic paternity analysis, and (iii) a novel approach based on principles of experimental evolution. Selection differentials estimated by the first method disagreed with those estimated by the other two, indicating that mating opportunity was not the principal driver of selection on flowering time. The genetic and experimental evolution methods exhibited striking agreement overall, but a slight discrepancy between the two suggested that negative environmental covariance between age at flowering and male fitness may have contributed to phenotypic selection. Together, the three methods enriched our understanding of selection on flowering time, from mating opportunity to phenotypic selection to evolutionary response. The novel experimental evolution method may provide a means of examining selection through male fitness when genetic paternity analysis is not possible. PMID:26911957

  2. Estimating selection through male fitness: three complementary methods illuminate the nature and causes of selection on flowering time.

    PubMed

    Austen, Emily J; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-02-24

    Our understanding of selection through male fitness is limited by the resource demands and indirect nature of the best available genetic techniques. Applying complementary, independent approaches to this problem can help clarify evolution through male function. We applied three methods to estimate selection on flowering time through male fitness in experimental populations of the annual plant Brassica rapa: (i) an analysis of mating opportunity based on flower production schedules, (ii) genetic paternity analysis, and (iii) a novel approach based on principles of experimental evolution. Selection differentials estimated by the first method disagreed with those estimated by the other two, indicating that mating opportunity was not the principal driver of selection on flowering time. The genetic and experimental evolution methods exhibited striking agreement overall, but a slight discrepancy between the two suggested that negative environmental covariance between age at flowering and male fitness may have contributed to phenotypic selection. Together, the three methods enriched our understanding of selection on flowering time, from mating opportunity to phenotypic selection to evolutionary response. The novel experimental evolution method may provide a means of examining selection through male fitness when genetic paternity analysis is not possible.

  3. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  4. Transfer and the Part-Time Student: The Gulf Separating Community Colleges and Selective Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    When representatives from community colleges and selective four-year institutions gather, there is no greater flashpoint than the topic of part-time enrollment. This issue--that students coming from an institution comprising mostly part-time students should be enabled to transfer to selective four-year institutions in which full-time enrollment is…

  5. Field site selection: getting it right first time around.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Colin A; El Sayed, Badria; Babiker, Ahmed; Girod, Romain; Fontenille, Didier; Knols, Bart G J; Nugud, Abdel Hameed; Benedict, Mark Q

    2009-11-16

    The selection of suitable field sites for integrated control of Anopheles mosquitoes using the sterile insect technique (SIT) requires consideration of the full gamut of factors facing most proposed control strategies, but four criteria identify an ideal site: 1) a single malaria vector, 2) an unstructured, relatively low density target population, 3) isolation of the target population and 4) actual or potential malaria incidence. Such a site can exist in a diverse range of situations or can be created. Two contrasting SIT field sites are examined here: the desert-flanked Dongola Reach of the Nile River in Northern State, Sudan, where malaria is endemic, and the island of La Reunion, where autochthonous malaria is rare but risk is persistent. The single malaria-transmitting vector at both sites is Anopheles arabiensis. In Sudan, the target area is a narrow 500 km corridor stretching from the rocky terrain at the Fourth Cataract--just above the new Merowe Dam, to the northernmost edge of the species range, close to Egypt. Vector distribution and temporal changes in density depend on the Nile level, ambient temperature and human activities. On La Reunion, the An. arabiensis population is coastal, limited and divided into three areas by altitude and exposure to the trade winds on the east coast. Mosquito vectors for other diseases are an issue at both sites, but of primary importance on La Reunion due to the recent chikungunya epidemic. The similarities and differences between these two sites in terms of suitability are discussed in the context of area-wide integrated vector management incorporating the SIT.

  6. Field site selection: getting it right first time around

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Colin A; El Sayed, Badria; Babiker, Ahmed; Girod, Romain; Fontenille, Didier; Knols, Bart GJ; Nugud, Abdel Hameed; Benedict, Mark Q

    2009-01-01

    The selection of suitable field sites for integrated control of Anopheles mosquitoes using the sterile insect technique (SIT) requires consideration of the full gamut of factors facing most proposed control strategies, but four criteria identify an ideal site: 1) a single malaria vector, 2) an unstructured, relatively low density target population, 3) isolation of the target population and 4) actual or potential malaria incidence. Such a site can exist in a diverse range of situations or can be created. Two contrasting SIT field sites are examined here: the desert-flanked Dongola Reach of the Nile River in Northern State, Sudan, where malaria is endemic, and the island of La Reunion, where autochthonous malaria is rare but risk is persistent. The single malaria-transmitting vector at both sites is Anopheles arabiensis. In Sudan, the target area is a narrow 500 km corridor stretching from the rocky terrain at the Fourth Cataract - just above the new Merowe Dam, to the northernmost edge of the species range, close to Egypt. Vector distribution and temporal changes in density depend on the Nile level, ambient temperature and human activities. On La Reunion, the An. arabiensis population is coastal, limited and divided into three areas by altitude and exposure to the trade winds on the east coast. Mosquito vectors for other diseases are an issue at both sites, but of primary importance on La Reunion due to the recent chikungunya epidemic. The similarities and differences between these two sites in terms of suitability are discussed in the context of area-wide integrated vector management incorporating the SIT. PMID:19917079

  7. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Adolescents: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharko, Alexander M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the existing literature on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction in adolescents. Method: A literature review of SSRI-induced adverse effects in adolescents focusing on sexual dysfunction was done. Nonsexual SSRI-induced adverse effects were compared in adult and pediatric populations.…

  8. Study of selected phenotype switching strategies in time varying environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Denis; Brutovsky, Branislav

    2016-03-01

    Population heterogeneity plays an important role across many research, as well as the real-world, problems. The population heterogeneity relates to the ability of a population to cope with an environment change (or uncertainty) preventing its extinction. However, this ability is not always desirable as can be exemplified by an intratumor heterogeneity which positively correlates with the development of resistance to therapy. Causation of population heterogeneity is therefore in biology and medicine an intensively studied topic. In this paper the evolution of a specific strategy of population diversification, the phenotype switching, is studied at a conceptual level. The presented simulation model studies evolution of a large population of asexual organisms in a time-varying environment represented by a stochastic Markov process. Each organism disposes with a stochastic or nonlinear deterministic switching strategy realized by discrete-time models with evolvable parameters. We demonstrate that under rapidly varying exogenous conditions organisms operate in the vicinity of the bet-hedging strategy, while the deterministic patterns become relevant as the environmental variations are less frequent. Statistical characterization of the steady state regimes of the populations is done using the Hellinger and Kullback-Leibler functional distances and the Hamming distance.

  9. UV radiation induced surface modulation time evolution in polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, I.; Apostol, D.; Damian, V.; Iordache, I.; Hurduc, N.; Sava, I.; Sacarescu, L.; Stoica, I.

    2010-11-01

    The reorganization processes at submicron level of the polymeric materials have been investigated because of their applications in optoelectronics and bio-science. We have obtained surface relief modulation in single step processing on the photo resist and polysiloxane films. But for technical applications the time evolution and stability of the induced surface structure is an important parameter and is a problem to be discussed. In case of single step surface relief formation on polymeric materials the process is connected with the photochromic behavior of the materials. As it is known the UV light induced effects on the material structure are reversible under the action of visible light, but with different speeds. In this report is analyzed the time evolution of the surface modulation obtained under the action of the UV light for azopolymers with different structures.

  10. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Alborzinia, Hamed; Can, Suzan; Holenya, Pavlo; Scholl, Catharina; Lederer, Elke; Kitanovic, Igor; Wölfl, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin more than 40 years ago and its clinical introduction in the 1970s an enormous amount of research has gone into elucidating the mechanism of action of cisplatin on tumor cells. With a novel cell biosensor chip system allowing continuous monitoring of respiration, glycolysis, and impedance we followed cisplatin treatment of different cancer cell lines in real-time. Our measurements reveal a first effect on respiration, in all cisplatin treated cell lines, followed with a significant delay by interference with glycolysis in HT-29, HCT-116, HepG2, and MCF-7 cells but not in the cisplatin-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231. Most strikingly, cell death started in all cisplatin-sensitive cell lines within 8 to 11 h of treatment, indicating a clear time frame from exposure, first response to cisplatin lesions, to cell fate decision. The time points of most significant changes were selected for more detailed analysis of cisplatin response in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Phosphorylation of selected signal transduction mediators connected with cellular proliferation, as well as changes in gene expression, were analyzed in samples obtained directly from sensor chips at the time points when changes in glycolysis and impedance occurred. Our online cell biosensor measurements reveal for the first time the time scale of metabolic response until onset of cell death under cisplatin treatment, which is in good agreement with models of p53-mediated cell fate decision.

  11. Inducible and Selective Erasure of Memories in the Mouse Brain via Chemical-Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaohua; Wang, Huimin; Mei, Bing; An, Shuming; Yin, Liang; Wang, L. Phillip; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Rapid and selective erasures of certain types of memories in the brain would be desirable under certain clinical circumstances. By employing an inducible and reversible chemical-genetic technique, we find that transient αCaMKII overexpression at the time of recall impairs the retrieval of both newly formed one-hour object recognition memory and fear memories, as well as 1-month-old fear memories. Systematic analyses suggest that excessive αCaMKII activity-induced recall deficits are not caused by disrupting the retrieval access to the stored information but are, rather, due to the active erasure of the stored memories. Further experiments show that the recall-induced erasure of fear memories is highly restricted to the memory being retrieved while leaving other memories intact. Therefore, our study reveals a molecular genetic paradigm through which a given memory, such as new or old fear memory, can be rapidly and specifically erased in a controlled and inducible manner in the brain. PMID:18957226

  12. Timing of Initiation of RRT and Modality Selection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is no shortage of studies and registry data examining outcomes of patients on dialysis and those with a renal transplant. However, recently, there has been a greater focus on the events leading up to the institution of kidney replacement therapy. Associative data suggest that early and consistent predialysis care leads to better outcomes, including greater take-on to home-based therapy, diminished use of tunneled venous hemodialysis catheters, and improved early and even late survival. What transpires during predialysis visits is also important. Simple dissemination of facts to the unprepared patient is unlikely to be effective in moving the patient and family along in the process of the series of choices that have to be made around therapy. A more flexible and circumspect approach is needed, including recognizing when the patient is or is not ready for change. There seems to be no optimal timing of dialysis start that can be applied to the ESRD population as a whole, although the pendulum seems to be swinging back toward symptom-based rather than eGFR-based starts. PMID:25762523

  13. An Examination of Program Selection Criteria for Part-Time MBA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colburn, Michael; Fox, Daniel E.; Westerfelt, Debra Kay

    2011-01-01

    Prospective graduate students select a graduate program as a result of a multifaceted decision-making process. This study examines the selection criteria that part-time MBA students used in selecting a program at a private university. Further, it analyzes the methods by which the students first learned of the MBA program. The authors posed the…

  14. Aberrant Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor as a Signature of Natural Selection.

    PubMed

    Hunter-Zinck, Haley; Clark, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    Natural selection inference methods often target one mode of selection of a particular age and strength. However, detecting multiple modes simultaneously, or with atypical representations, would be advantageous for understanding a population's evolutionary history. We have developed an anomaly detection algorithm using distributions of pairwise time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) to simultaneously detect multiple modes of natural selection in whole-genome sequences. As natural selection distorts local genealogies in distinct ways, the method uses pairwise TMRCA distributions, which approximate genealogies at a nonrecombining locus, to detect distortions without targeting a specific mode of selection. We evaluate the performance of our method, TSel, for both positive and balancing selection over different time-scales and selection strengths and compare TSel's performance with that of other methods. We then apply TSel to the Complete Genomics diversity panel, a set of human whole-genome sequences, and recover loci previously inferred to be under positive or balancing selection.

  15. Earthquake interevent time distribution for induced micro-, nano-, and picoseismicity.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Jörn; Kwiatek, Grzegorz

    2013-02-08

    We examine the temporal statistics of micro-, nano-, and picoseismicity induced by mining as well as by long-term fluid injection. Specifically, we analyze catalogs of seismic events recorded at the Mponeng deep gold mine, South Africa, and at the German deep drilling site. We show that the distribution of time intervals between successive earthquakes is form invariant between the different catalogs. In particular, the distribution can be described by the same scaling function recently established for tectonic seismicity and acoustic emissions from laboratory rock fracture. Thus, our findings bridge the energy gap between those two cases and provide clear evidence that these temporal features of seismicity are independent of the energy scales of the events and whether they are of tectonic or induced origin.

  16. Parity-time-symmetry enhanced optomechanically-induced-transparency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Yunfeng; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme to enhance optomechanically-induced-transparency (OMIT) based on parity-time-symmetric optomechanical system. Our results predict that an OMIT window which does not exist originally can appear in weak optomechanical coupling and driving system via coupling an auxiliary active cavity with optical gain. This phenomenon is quite different from these reported in previous works in which the gain is considered just to damage OMIT phenomenon even leads to electromagnetically induced absorption or inverted-OMIT. Such enhanced OMIT effects are ascribed to the additional gain which can increase photon number in cavity without reducing effective decay. We also discuss the scheme feasibility by analyzing recent experiment parameters. Our work provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation and slow light operation, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum optical device. PMID:27489193

  17. Earthquake Interevent Time Distribution for Induced Micro-, Nano-, and Picoseismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Jörn; Kwiatek, Grzegorz

    2013-02-01

    We examine the temporal statistics of micro-, nano-, and picoseismicity induced by mining as well as by long-term fluid injection. Specifically, we analyze catalogs of seismic events recorded at the Mponeng deep gold mine, South Africa, and at the German deep drilling site. We show that the distribution of time intervals between successive earthquakes is form invariant between the different catalogs. In particular, the distribution can be described by the same scaling function recently established for tectonic seismicity and acoustic emissions from laboratory rock fracture. Thus, our findings bridge the energy gap between those two cases and provide clear evidence that these temporal features of seismicity are independent of the energy scales of the events and whether they are of tectonic or induced origin.

  18. CREB Selectively Controls Learning-Induced Structural Remodeling of Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Spalloni, Alida; Longone, Patrizia; Pittenger, Christopher; O'Mara, Shane M.; Marie, Helene; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of synaptic strength associated with learning is post-synaptically regulated by changes in density and shape of dendritic spines. The transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) is required for memory formation and in vitro dendritic spine rearrangements, but its role in learning-induced remodeling of neurons…

  19. Selective cytoprotective effect of histamine on doxorubicin-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, DJMartinel; Nicoud, MB; Sterle, HA; Carabajal, E; Tesan, F; Perazzo, JC; Cremaschi, GA; Rivera, ES; Medina, VA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the potential protective effect of histamine on Doxorubicin (Dox)-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in different rodent species and in a triple-negative breast tumor-bearing mice model. Male Sprague Dawley rats and Balb/c mice were divided into four groups: control (received saline), histamine (5 mg/kg for rats and 1 mg/kg for mice, daily subcutaneous injection starting 24 h before treatment with Dox), Dox (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally injected three times a week for 2 weeks) and Dox+histamine (received both treatments). Tissue toxicity was evaluated by histopathological studies and oxidative stress and biochemical parameters. The combined effect of histamine and Dox was also investigated in vitro and in vivo in human MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer model. Heart and liver of Dox-treated animals displayed severe histological damage, loss of tissue weight, increased TBARS levels and DNA damage along with an augment in serum creatine kinase-myocardial band. Pretreatment with histamine prevented Dox-induced tissue events producing a significant preservation of the integrity of both rat and mouse myocardium and liver, through the reduction of Dox-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Histamine treatment preserved anti-tumor activity of Dox, exhibiting differential cytotoxicity and increasing the Dox-induced inhibition of breast tumor growth. Findings provide preclinical evidence indicating that histamine could be a promising candidate as a selective cytoprotective agent for the treatment of Dox-induced cardiac and hepatic toxicity, and encourage the translation to clinical practice. PMID:27551485

  20. Parasite Exposure Drives Selective Evolution of Constitutive versus Inducible Defense.

    PubMed

    Westra, Edze R; van Houte, Stineke; Oyesiku-Blakemore, Sam; Makin, Ben; Broniewski, Jenny M; Best, Alex; Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Davidson, Alan; Boots, Mike; Buckling, Angus

    2015-04-20

    In the face of infectious disease, organisms evolved a range of defense mechanisms, with a clear distinction between those that are constitutive (always active) and those that are inducible (elicited by parasites). Both defense strategies have evolved from each other, but we lack an understanding of the conditions that favor one strategy over the other. While it is hard to generalize about their degree of protection, it is possible to make generalizations about their associated fitness costs, which are commonly detected. By definition, constitutive defenses are always "on," and are therefore associated with a fixed cost, independent of parasite exposure. Inducible defenses, on the other hand, may lack costs in the absence of parasites but become costly when defense is elicited through processes such as immunopathology. Bacteria can evolve constitutive defense against phage by modification/masking of surface receptors, which is often associated with reduced fitness in the absence of phage. Bacteria can also evolve inducible defense using the CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat, CRISPR associated) immune system, which is typically elicited upon infection. CRISPR-Cas functions by integrating phage sequences into CRISPR loci on the host genome. Upon re-infection, CRISPR transcripts guide cleavage of phage genomes. In nature, both mechanisms are important. Using a general theoretical model and experimental evolution, we tease apart the mechanism that drives their evolution and show that infection risk determines the relative investment in the two arms of defense.

  1. Method for selectively orienting induced fractures in subterranean earth formations

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1977-02-01

    The orientation of hydraulically-induced fractures in relatively deep subterranean earth formations is normally confined to vertical projections along a plane parallel to the maximum naturally occurring (tectonic) compressive stress field. It was found that this plane of maximum compressive stress may be negated and, in effect, re-oriented in a plane projecting generally orthogonal to the original tectonic stress plane by injecting liquid at a sufficiently high pressure into a wellbore fracture oriented in a plane parallel to the plane of tectonic stress for the purpose of stressing the surrounding earth formation in a plane generally orthogonal to the plane of tectonic stress. With the plane of maximum compressive stress re-oriented due to the presence of the induced compressive stress, liquid under pressure is injected into a second wellbore disposed within the zone influenced by the induced compressive stress but at a location in the earth formation laterally spaced from the fracture in the first wellbore for effecting a fracture in the second wellbore along a plane generally orthogonal to the fracture in the first wellbore.

  2. Sequence selectivity of macrolide-induced translational attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Amber R.; Gohara, David W.; Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2014-01-01

    The prevailing “plug-in-the-bottle” model suggests that macrolide antibiotics inhibit translation by binding inside the ribosome tunnel and indiscriminately arresting the elongation of every nascent polypeptide after the synthesis of six to eight amino acids. To test this model, we performed a genome-wide analysis of translation in azithromycin-treated Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast to earlier predictions, we found that the macrolide does not preferentially induce ribosome stalling near the 5′ end of mRNAs, but rather acts at specific stalling sites that are scattered throughout the entire coding region. These sites are highly enriched in prolines and charged residues and are strikingly similar to other ligand-independent ribosome stalling motifs. Interestingly, the addition of structurally related macrolides had dramatically different effects on stalling efficiency. Our data suggest that ribosome stalling can occur at a surprisingly large number of low-complexity motifs in a fashion that depends only on a few arrest-inducing residues and the presence of a small molecule inducer. PMID:25313041

  3. Induced defences alter the strength and direction of natural selection on reproductive traits in common milkweed.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K A; Cory, K A; Johnson, M T J

    2017-01-30

    Evolutionary biologists have long sought to understand the ecological processes that generate plant reproductive diversity. Recent evidence indicates that constitutive antiherbivore defences can alter natural selection on reproductive traits, but it is unclear whether induced defences will have the same effect and whether reduced foliar damage in defended plants is the cause of this pattern. In a factorial field experiment using common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., we induced plant defences using jasmonic acid (JA) and imposed foliar damage using scissors. We found that JA-induced plants experienced selection for more inflorescences that were smaller in size (fewer flowers), whereas control plants only experienced a trend towards selection for larger inflorescences (more flowers); all effects were independent of foliar damage. Our results demonstrate that induced defences can alter both the strength and direction of selection on reproductive traits, and suggest that antiherbivore defences may promote the evolution of plant reproductive diversity.

  4. Selective-resputtering-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in amorphous TbFe films.

    PubMed

    Harris, V G; Pokhil, T

    2001-08-06

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy in rf magnetron sputtered amorphous TbFe films is measured to increase exponentially with pair-order anisotropy induced by the selective resputtering of surface adatoms during film growth.

  5. Exploring the influential factors in incident clearance time: Disentangling causation from self-selection bias.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chuan; Ma, Xiaolei; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Yunpeng

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationships between influential factors and incident clearance time is crucial to make effective countermeasures for incident management agencies. Although there have been a certain number of achievements on incident clearance time modeling, limited effort is made to investigate the relative role of incident response time and its self-selection in influencing the clearance time. To fill this gap, this study uses the endogenous switching model to explore the influential factors in incident clearance time, and aims to disentangle causation from self-selection bias caused by response process. Under the joint two-stage model framework, the binary probit model and switching regression model are formulated for both incident response time and clearance time, respectively. Based on the freeway incident data collected in Washington State, full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method is utilized to estimate the endogenous switching model parameters. Significant factors affecting incident response time and clearance time can be identified, including incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational attributes. The estimate results reveal the influential effects of incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational factors on incident response time and clearance time. In addition, the causality of incident response time itself and its self-selection correction on incident clearance time are found to be indispensable. These findings suggest that the causal effect of response time on incident clearance time will be overestimated if the self-selection bias is not considered.

  6. Design and Implementation of a Time Source Selecting and Monitoring System for the Telephone Speaking Clock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    TL) Local Office Data Base TCP/IP IRIG -B IRIG -B voice NTPIRIG-B 50 km Figure 1. Architecture of the “117...time signal sources have been designed for the TSMS. They are the external IRIG -B Time, the external NTP Time, and the internal System Time. Generally...the TSMS chooses the IRIG -B Time as its time signal source. If the above source is in a bad condition, the system will switch to select the NTP

  7. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  8. Quantifying Airborne Induced Polarization effects in helicopter time domain electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macnae, James

    2016-12-01

    This paper derives the Airborne Induced Polarization (AIP) response of an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) system to a horizontal, thin sheet conductor. A vertical component double-dipole approximates helicopter systems with towed concentric horizontal transmitter and receiver loops in frequency- or time-domain. In time domain, the AIP effect typically shows up as late-time negative data with amplitude 4 to 5 orders of magnitude smaller than the early-time peak of the positive AEM responses. Because of limited bandwidth from the short sample time after the decay of inductive responses, accurate extraction of intrinsic AIP parameters other than a minimum chargeability is almost impossible. Modelling further suggests that AIP effects in double-dipole AEM systems can only be reliably detected from polarizable material in the top few tens of metres. A titanium mineral exploration case history from the Lac Brûlé area, Quebec, Canada illustrates strong spatial coherence of AIP minimum chargeability estimates and their independence from other effects such as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility.

  9. Debye decomposition of time-lapse spectral induced polarisation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Kemna, A.

    2016-01-01

    Spectral induced polarisation (SIP) measurements capture the low-frequency electrical properties of soils and rocks and provide a non-invasive means to access lithological, hydrogeological, and geochemical properties of the subsurface. The Debye decomposition (DD) approach is now increasingly being used to analyse SIP signatures in terms of relaxation time distributions due to its flexibility regarding the shape of the spectra. Imaging and time-lapse (monitoring) SIP measurements, capturing SIP variations in space and time, respectively, are now more and more conducted and lead to a drastic increase in the number of spectra considered, which prompts the need for robust and reliable DD tools to extract quantitative parameters from such data. We here present an implementation of the DD method for the analysis of a series of SIP data sets which are expected to only smoothly change in terms of spectral behaviour, such as encountered in many time-lapse applications where measurement geometry does not change. The routine is based on a non-linear least-squares inversion scheme with smoothness constraints on the spectral variation and in addition from one spectrum of the series to the next to deal with the inherent ill-posedness and non-uniqueness of the problem. By means of synthetic examples with typical SIP characteristics we elucidate the influence of the number and range of considered relaxation times on the inversion results. The source code of the presented routines is provided under an open source licence as a basis for further applications and developments.

  10. Time-Resolved Aluminum Monoxide Emission Measurements in Laser-Induced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, David; Parigger, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced plasmas are useful for diagnostic applications in a wide variety of fields. One application is the creation of laser-induced plasmas on the surface of an aluminum sample to simulate an aluminized flame. In this study, aluminum monoxide emissions are measured to characterize the temperature along the laser-induced plasma as a function of time delay following laser-induced optical breakdown. The breakdown event is achieved by focusing 1064 nanometer laser radiation from an Nd:YAG laser onto the surface of an aluminum sample. Light from the plasma is dispersed with the use of a Czerny-Turner spectrograph, and time resolved emission spectra are recorded with an intensified, gated detector. Temperatures are inferred from the diatomic molecular emissions by fitting the experimentally collected to theoretically calculated spectra using a Nelder-Mead algorithm. For computation of synthetic spectra we utilize accurate line strengths for selected AlO molecular bands. Atomic emissions from aluminum are also investigated in our study of laser-induced plasma.

  11. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min S.; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A.; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R.; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  12. Capture and real-time display of selected Space Shuttle reentry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiles, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    Because the flight planning for the orbital flight test (OFT) flights of the NASA Space Shuttle required several months, there was very little time to analyze data from one flight before it was necessary to start final planning for the next flight. Real-time and selected immediate postflight data display of the reentry data minimized the postflight computer analysis time required so that the rigid time restraints imposed by the program could be met. This paper describes the methods used to decommutate and provide real-time and immediate postflight data display of selected Space Shuttle reentry data.

  13. Selective inhibition of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation mitigates radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Jenrow, Kenneth A; Brown, Stephen L; Lapanowski, Karen; Naei, Hoda; Kolozsvary, Andrew; Kim, Jae Ho

    2013-05-01

    Cognitive impairment precipitated by irradiation of normal brain tissue is commonly associated with radiation therapy for treatment of brain cancer, and typically manifests more than 6 months after radiation exposure. The risks of cognitive impairment are of particular concern for an increasing number of long-term cancer survivors. There is presently no effective means of preventing or mitigating this debilitating condition. Neuroinflammation mediated by activated microglial cytokines has been implicated in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment in animal models, including the disruption of neurogenesis and activity-induced gene expression in the hippocampus. These pathologies evolve rapidly and are associated with relatively subtle cognitive impairment at 2 months postirradiation. However, recent reports suggest that more profound cognitive impairment develops at later post-irradiation time points, perhaps reflecting a gradual loss of responsiveness within the hippocampus by the disruption of neurogenesis. We hypothesized that inhibiting neuroinflammation using MW01-2-151SRM (MW-151), a selective inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokine production, might mitigate these deleterious radiation effects by preserving/restoring hippocampal neurogenesis. MW-151 therapy was initiated 24 h after 10 Gy whole-brain irradiation (WBI) administered as a single fraction and maintained for 28 days thereafter. Proinflammatory activated microglia in the dentate gyrus were assayed at 2 and 9 months post-WBI. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus were assayed at 2 months post-WBI, whereas novel object recognition and long-term potentiation were assayed at 6 and 9 months post-WBI, respectively. MW-151 mitigated radiation-induced neuroinflammation at both early and late time points post-WBI, selectively mitigated the deleterious effects of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis, and potently mitigated radiation-induced deficits of novel object

  14. Selective Serotonin–norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors-induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Rampal, Upamanyu; Patel, Hiten; Patel, Kunal; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Context: Takotsubo translates to “octopus pot” in Japanese. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by a transient regional systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Catecholamine excess is the one most studied and favored theories explaining the pathophysiology of TTC. Case Report: We present the case of a 52-year-old Hispanic female admitted for venlafaxine-induced TTC with a review literature on all the cases of Serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI)-associated TTC published so far. Conclusion: SNRI inhibit the reuptake of catecholamines into the presynaptic neuron, resulting in a net gain in the concentration of epinephrine and serotonin in the neuronal synapses and causing iatrogenic catecholamine excess, ultimately leading to TTC. PMID:27583240

  15. A nonlinear correlation function for selecting the delay time in dynamical reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio

    1995-02-01

    Numerical results discussed in this paper suggest that a function which detects nonlinear correlations in time series usually indicates shorter correlation times than the linear autocorrelation function which is often used for this purpose. The nonlinear correlation function can also detect changes in the data which cannot be distinguished by the linear counterpart. This affects a number of approaches for the selection of the delay time used in the reconstruction of nonlinear dynamics from a single time series based on time delay coordinates.

  16. Undecylprodigiosin selectively induces apoptosis in human breast carcinoma cells independent of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.-F.; Ma, C.-J.; Lu, C.-H.; Tsai, Yo-Ting; Wei, Y.-H.; Chang, J.-S.; Lai, J.-K.; Cheuh, Pin-Ju; Yeh, C.-T.; Tang, P.-C.; Jingua, T.C.; Ko, J.-L.; Liu, F.-S.; Yen, H.E.

    2007-12-15

    Undecylprodigiosin (UP) is a bacterial bioactive metabolite produced by Streptomyces and Serratia. In this study, we explored the anticancer effect of UP. Human breast carcinoma cell lines BT-20, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and T47D and one nonmalignant human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, were tested in this study. We found that UP exerted a potent cytotoxicity against all breast carcinoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, UP showed limited toxicity to MCF-10A cells, indicating UP's cytotoxic effect is selective for malignant cells. UP's cytotoxic effect was due to apoptosis, as confirmed by positive TUNEL signals, annexin V-binding, caspase 9 activation and PARP cleavage. Notably, UP-induced apoptosis was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD.fmk, further indicating the involvement of caspase activity. Moreover, UP caused a marked decrease of the levels of antiapoptotic BCL-X{sub L}, Survivin and XIAP while enhancing the levels of proapoptotic BIK, BIM, MCL-1S and NOXA, consequently favoring induction of apoptosis. Additionally, we found that cells with functional p53 (MCF-7, T47D) or mutant p53 (BT-20, MDA-MB-231) were both susceptible to UP's cytotoxicity. Importantly, UP was able to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells with p53 knockdown by RNA interference, confirming the dispensability of p53 in UP-induced apoptosis. Overall, our results establish that UP induces p53-independent apoptosis in breast carcinoma cells with no marked toxicity to nonmalignant cells, raising the possibility of its use as a new chemotherapeutic drug for breast cancer irrespective of p53 status.

  17. 76 FR 46840 - Time Extension To Accept Proposals, Select One Lessee, and Contract for Hydroelectric Power...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Time Extension To Accept Proposals, Select One Lessee, and Contract for... proposals detailed in the Notice of Intent to Accept Proposals, Select One Lessee, and Contract...

  18. Selective HDAC6 inhibition prevents TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinyan; Ma, Zhongsen; Shetty, Sreerama; Ma, Mengshi; Fu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Lung endothelial damage contributes to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. New strategies against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction may provide therapeutic benefits against lung vascular injury. Cell-cell junctions and microtubule cytoskeleton are basic components in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. HDAC6, a deacetylase primarily localized in the cytoplasm, has been reported to modulate nonnuclear protein function through deacetylation. Both α-tubulin and β-catenin are substrates for HDAC6. Here, we examined the effects of tubastatin A, a highly selective HDAC6 inhibitor, on TNF-α induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A blocked TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell hyperpermeability, which was associated with increased α-tubulin acetylation and microtubule stability. Tubastatin A pretreatment inhibited TNF-α-induced endothelial cell contraction and actin stress fiber formation with reduced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A also induced β-catenin acetylation in human lung endothelial cells, which was associated with increased membrane localization of β-catenin and stabilization of adherens junctions. HDAC6 knockdown by small interfering RNA also prevented TNF-α-induced barrier dysfunction and increased α-tubulin and β-catenin acetylation in endothelial cells. Furthermore, in a mouse model of endotoxemia, tubastatin A was able to prevent endotoxin-induced deacetylation of α-tubulin and β-catenin in lung tissues, which was associated with reduced pulmonary edema. Collectively, our data indicate that selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A is a potent approach against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  19. Correlation-induced Time Delay in Atomic Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, David A.; Manson, Steven T.; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Kheifets, Anatoli S.

    2016-05-01

    Interchannel coupling has been seen to result in structures in the photoionization cross sections of outer shell electrons in the vicinity of inner-shell thresholds, a result which leads us to ask if the same would be true for the time delay of outer shell electrons near inner-shell thresholds. Using the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA) methodology, a theoretical study of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon were performed to search for these correlation-induced effects. Calculations were performed both with coupling and without coupling to verify that the structures found in the time delay were in fact due to interchannel coupling. Using this method to study the effects of interchannel coupling reveals how much of an impact the coupling has on the time delay, in some cases over a broad energy range. In cases where the spin-orbit doublets' respective thresholds are far enough apart, effects can be found in the j = l + 1/2channels due to interchannel coupling with the j = l-1/2 channels. These structures are purely a relativistic effect and are related to spin-obit activated interchannel coupling effects. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences, DST (India), and the Australian Research Council.

  20. Ferrocifen derivatives that induce senescence in cancer cells: selected examples.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Céline; Mathieu, Véronique; Vessières, Anne; Pigeon, Pascal; Top, Siden; Jaouen, Gérard; Kiss, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Platinum coordination complexes represent an important class of anti-tumor agents. Due to recognized drawbacks, research into other types of metallodrugs has been diversified with the aim of finding new chemical entities with alternative mechanisms of action to overcome classical chemoresistance. P5 and DP1, two closely related ferrocenyl complexes bearing a similar ferrocenyl-ene-phenyl motif and displaying marked differences in their conformations and oxidation state versatility, were assayed in cancer cell models characterized by various sensitivities to pro-apoptotic stimuli. P5 and DP1 exert growth inhibitory effects between 0.5 and 10 μM against glioma and melanoma cells including pluripotent stem-like cells. These effects are due, at least partly, to senescence induction with typical SA-β-galactosidase staining and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) as measured by the secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. Regulation of these cytokines' secretion may be related to AP-1 and other transcription factors unrelated to senescence. An in vivo graft of B16F10 cells after in vitro pre-incubation with DP1 or P5 led to increased survival in mice. In conclusion, P5 and DP1 ferrocenyl complexes induce senescence in various cancer cell models associated with distinct sensitivity to pro-apoptotic stimuli.

  1. Time-reversal-breaking induced quantum spin Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Shao, D. X.; Deng, Ming-Xun; Deng, W. Y.; Sheng, L.

    2017-01-01

    We show that quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect does not occur in a square lattice model due to cancellation of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling coming from different hopping paths. However, we show that QSH effect can be induced by the presence of staggered magnetic fluxes alternating directions square by square. When the resulting Peierls phase takes a special value , the system has a composite symmetry ΘΡ− with Θ the time-reversal operator and Ρ− transforming the Peierls phase from γ to γ − , which protects the gapless edge states. Once the phase deviates from , the edge states open a gap, as the composite symmetry is broken. We further investigate the effect of a Zeeman field on the QSH state, and find that the edge states remain gapless for . This indicates that the QSH effect is immune to the magnetic perturbation. PMID:28220858

  2. Time-reversal-breaking induced quantum spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Shao, D. X.; Deng, Ming-Xun; Deng, W. Y.; Sheng, L.

    2017-02-01

    We show that quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect does not occur in a square lattice model due to cancellation of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling coming from different hopping paths. However, we show that QSH effect can be induced by the presence of staggered magnetic fluxes alternating directions square by square. When the resulting Peierls phase takes a special value , the system has a composite symmetry ΘΡ‑ with Θ the time-reversal operator and Ρ‑ transforming the Peierls phase from γ to γ ‑ , which protects the gapless edge states. Once the phase deviates from , the edge states open a gap, as the composite symmetry is broken. We further investigate the effect of a Zeeman field on the QSH state, and find that the edge states remain gapless for . This indicates that the QSH effect is immune to the magnetic perturbation.

  3. Time-reversal-breaking induced quantum spin Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Shao, D X; Deng, Ming-Xun; Deng, W Y; Sheng, L

    2017-02-21

    We show that quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect does not occur in a square lattice model due to cancellation of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling coming from different hopping paths. However, we show that QSH effect can be induced by the presence of staggered magnetic fluxes alternating directions square by square. When the resulting Peierls phase takes a special value , the system has a composite symmetry ΘΡ- with Θ the time-reversal operator and Ρ- transforming the Peierls phase from γ to γ - , which protects the gapless edge states. Once the phase deviates from , the edge states open a gap, as the composite symmetry is broken. We further investigate the effect of a Zeeman field on the QSH state, and find that the edge states remain gapless for . This indicates that the QSH effect is immune to the magnetic perturbation.

  4. Unidirectional invisibility induced by parity-time symmetric circuit

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bo; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Bian; Li, Rujiang; Zeng, Qingsheng; Yin, Xinhua; Wu, Qun; Gao, Lei; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Liang, Zhiming; Li, Ao; Ma, Ruyu

    2017-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric structures present the unidirectional invisibility at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point. In this paper, we propose a PT-symmetric circuit consisting of a resistor and a microwave tunnel diode (TD) which represent the attenuation and amplification, respectively. Based on the scattering matrix method, the circuit can exhibit an ideal unidirectional performance at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point by tuning the transmission lines between the lumped elements. Additionally, the resistance of the reactance component can alter the bandwidth of the unidirectional invisibility flexibly. Furthermore, the electromagnetic simulation for the proposed circuit validates the unidirectional invisibility and the synchronization with the input energy well. Our work not only provides an unidirectional invisible circuit based on PT-symmetry, but also proposes a potential solution for the extremely selective filter or cloaking applications. PMID:28098258

  5. Unidirectional invisibility induced by parity-time symmetric circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Bo; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Bian; Li, Rujiang; Zeng, Qingsheng; Yin, Xinhua; Wu, Qun; Gao, Lei; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Liang, Zhiming; Li, Ao; Ma, Ruyu

    2017-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric structures present the unidirectional invisibility at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point. In this paper, we propose a PT-symmetric circuit consisting of a resistor and a microwave tunnel diode (TD) which represent the attenuation and amplification, respectively. Based on the scattering matrix method, the circuit can exhibit an ideal unidirectional performance at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point by tuning the transmission lines between the lumped elements. Additionally, the resistance of the reactance component can alter the bandwidth of the unidirectional invisibility flexibly. Furthermore, the electromagnetic simulation for the proposed circuit validates the unidirectional invisibility and the synchronization with the input energy well. Our work not only provides an unidirectional invisible circuit based on PT-symmetry, but also proposes a potential solution for the extremely selective filter or cloaking applications.

  6. Fishery-induced selection on an Alpine whitefish: quantifying genetic and environmental effects on individual growth rate.

    PubMed

    Nusslé, Sébastien; Bornand, Christophe N; Wedekind, Claus

    2009-05-01

    Size-selective fishing, environmental changes and reproductive strategies are expected to affect life-history traits such as the individual growth rate. The relative contribution of these factors is not clear, particularly whether size-selective fishing can have a substantial impact on the genetics and hence on the evolution of individual growth rates in wild populations. We analysed a 25-year monitoring survey of an isolated population of the Alpine whitefish Coregonus palaea. We determined the selection differentials on growth rate, the actual change of growth rate over time and indicators of reproductive strategies that may potentially change over time. The selection differential can be reliably estimated in our study population because almost all the fish are harvested within their first years of life, i.e. few fish escape fishing mortality. We found a marked decline in average adult growth rate over the 25 years and a significant selection differential for adult growth, but no evidence for any linear change in reproductive strategies over time. Assuming that the heritability of growth in this whitefish corresponds to what was found in other salmonids, about a third of the observed decline in growth rate would be linked to fishery-induced evolution. Size-selective fishing seems to affect substantially the genetics of individual growth in our study population.

  7. Fishery-induced selection on an Alpine whitefish: quantifying genetic and environmental effects on individual growth rate

    PubMed Central

    Nusslé, Sébastien; Bornand, Christophe N; Wedekind, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Size-selective fishing, environmental changes and reproductive strategies are expected to affect life-history traits such as the individual growth rate. The relative contribution of these factors is not clear, particularly whether size-selective fishing can have a substantial impact on the genetics and hence on the evolution of individual growth rates in wild populations. We analysed a 25-year monitoring survey of an isolated population of the Alpine whitefish Coregonus palaea. We determined the selection differentials on growth rate, the actual change of growth rate over time and indicators of reproductive strategies that may potentially change over time. The selection differential can be reliably estimated in our study population because almost all the fish are harvested within their first years of life, i.e. few fish escape fishing mortality. We found a marked decline in average adult growth rate over the 25 years and a significant selection differential for adult growth, but no evidence for any linear change in reproductive strategies over time. Assuming that the heritability of growth in this whitefish corresponds to what was found in other salmonids, about a third of the observed decline in growth rate would be linked to fishery-induced evolution. Size-selective fishing seems to affect substantially the genetics of individual growth in our study population. PMID:25567861

  8. Mechanisms and time course of menthol-induced cutaneous vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Craighead, Daniel H; McCartney, Nathaniel B; Tumlinson, James H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2017-03-01

    Menthol is a vasoactive compound that is widely used in topical analgesic agents. Menthol induces cutaneous vasodilation, however the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Determining the rates of appearance and clearance of menthol in the skin is important for optimizing topical treatment formulation and dosing. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms contributing to menthol-mediated cutaneous vasodilation and to establish a time course for menthol appearance/clearance in the skin. Ten young (23±1years, 5 males 5 females) subjects participated in two protocols. In study 1, four intradermal microdialysis fibers were perfused with increasing doses of menthol (0.1-500mM) and inhibitors for nitric oxide (NO), endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs), and sensory nerves. Skin blood flow was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry and normalized to %CVCmax. In study 2, two intradermal microdialysis fibers were perfused with lactated Ringer's solution. 0.017mL·cm(-2) of a 4% menthol gel was placed over each fiber. 5μL samples of dialysate from the microdialysis fibers were collected every 30min and analyzed for the presence of menthol with high performance gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Skin blood flow (laser speckle contrast imaging) and subjective ratings of menthol sensation were simultaneously obtained with dialysate samples. In study 1, menthol induced cutaneous vasodilation at all doses ≥100mM (all p<0.05). However, inhibition of either NO, EDHFs, or sensory nerves fully inhibited menthol-mediated vasodilation (all p>0.05). In study 2, significant menthol was detected in dialysate 30min post menthol application (0.89ng, p=0.0002). Relative to baseline, cutaneous vasodilation was elevated from minutes 15-45 and ratings of menthol sensation were elevated from minute 5-60 post menthol application (all p<0.05). Menthol induces cutaneous vasodilation in the skin through multiple vasodilator pathways, including NO, EDHF, and sensory

  9. Harvest-induced phenotypic selection in an island population of moose, Alces alces.

    PubMed

    Kvalnes, Thomas; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Haanes, Hallvard; Røed, Knut H; Engen, Steinar; Solberg, Erling J

    2016-07-01

    Empirical evidence strongly indicates that human exploitation has frequently led to rapid evolutionary changes in wild populations, yet the mechanisms involved are often poorly understood. Here, we applied a recently developed demographic framework for analyzing selection to data from a 20-year study of a wild population of moose, Alces alces. In this population, a genetic pedigree has been established all the way back to founders. We demonstrate harvest-induced directional selection for delayed birth dates in males and reduced body mass as calf in females. During the study period, birth date was delayed by 0.81 days per year for both sexes, whereas no significant changes occurred in calf body mass. Quantitative genetic analyses indicated that both traits harbored significant additive genetic variance. These results show that selective harvesting can induce strong selection that oppose natural selection. This may cause evolution of less favorable phenotypes that become maladaptive once harvesting ceases.

  10. SEASAT: A satellite scatterometer illumination times of selected in situ sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, L. C.; Goodridge, D. R.; Boberly, J. C.; Hughes, J. K.; Sweet, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A list of times that the SEASAT A Satellite Scatterometer (SASS) illuminated from directly above or directly abeam, selected surface sites where in situ winds were measured is provided. The list is ordered by the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) of the midpoint of the illumination period (hit time) for a given surface site. The site identification, the orbit number and the direction from the subtrack in which the truth lies are provided. The accuracy of these times depends in part upon the ascending node times, which are estimated to be within +.1 sec, and on the illumination time relative to the ascending node, which is estimated to be within +6 seconds. The uncertainties in the times provided were judged to be sufficiently small to allow efficient and accurate extraction of SASS and in situ data at the selected surface sites. The list contains approximately six thousand hit times from 61 geographically dispersed sites.

  11. Selective inhibition of inducible cyclooxygenase 2 in vivo is antiinflammatory and nonulcerogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Masferrer, J L; Zweifel, B S; Manning, P T; Hauser, S D; Leahy, K M; Smith, W G; Isakson, P C; Seibert, K

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the role of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in a model of inflammation in vivo. Carrageenan administration to the subcutaneous rat air pouch induces a rapid inflammatory response characterized by high levels of prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes in the fluid exudate. The time course of the induction of COX-2 mRNA and protein coincided with the production of PGs in the pouch tissue and cellular infiltrate. Carrageenan-induced COX-2 immunoreactivity was localized to macrophages obtained from the fluid exudate as well as to the inner surface layer of cells within the pouch lining. Dexamethasone inhibited both COX-2 expression and PG synthesis in the fluid exudate but failed to inhibit PG synthesis in the stomach. Furthermore, NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, and indomethacin, a nonselective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor, blocked proinflammatory PG synthesis in the air pouch. In contrast, only indomethacin blocked gastric PG and, additionally, produced gastric lesions. These results suggest that inhibitors of COX-2 are potent antiinflammatory agents which do not produce the typical side effects (e.g., gastric ulcers) associated with the nonselective, COX-1-directed antiinflammatory drugs. Images PMID:8159730

  12. Nondestructive nanofabrication on Si(100) surface by tribochemistry-induced selective etching

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Yu, Bingjun; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2015-01-01

    A tribochemistry-induced selective etching approach is proposed for the first time to produce silicon nanostructures without lattice damage. With a ~1 nm thick SiOx film as etching mask grown on Si(100) surface (Si(100)/SiOx) by wet-oxidation technique, nano-trenches can be produced through the removal of local SiOx mask by a SiO2 tip in humid air and the post-etching of the exposed Si in potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. The material removal of SiOx mask and Si under low load is dominated by the tribochemical reaction at the interface between SiO2 tip and Si/SiOx sample, where the contact pressure is much lower than the critical pressure for initial yield of Si. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) observation indicates that neither the material removal induced by tribochemical reaction nor the wet etching in KOH solution leads to lattice damage of the fabricated nanostructures. The proposed approach points out a new route in nondestructive nanofabrication. PMID:26559014

  13. A novel caspase 8 selective small molecule potentiates TRAIL-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Octavian; Gaidos, Gabriel; Yatawara, Achani; Pennarun, Bodvael; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Roux, Jérémie; Andrei, Stefan; Guo, Bingqian; Panaitiu, Alexandra; Pellegrini, Maria; Mierke, Dale F; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2015-05-11

    Recombinant soluble TRAIL and agonistic antibodies against TRAIL receptors (DR4 and DR5) are currently being created for clinical cancer therapy, due to their selective killing of cancer cells and high safety characteristics. However, resistance to TRAIL and other targeted therapies is an important issue facing current cancer research field. An attractive strategy to sensitize resistant malignancies to TRAIL-induced cell death is the design of small molecules that target and promote caspase 8 activation. For the first time, we describe the discovery and characterization of a small molecule that directly binds caspase 8 and enhances its activation when combined with TRAIL, but not alone. The molecule was identified through an in silico chemical screen for compounds with affinity for the caspase 8 homodimer's interface. The compound was experimentally validated to directly bind caspase 8, and to promote caspase 8 activation and cell death in single living cells or population of cells, upon TRAIL stimulation. Our approach is a proof-of-concept strategy leading to the discovery of a novel small molecule that not only stimulates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in cancer cells, but may also provide insights into the structure-function relationship of caspase 8 homodimers as putative targets in cancer.

  14. A novel caspase 8 selective small molecule potentiates TRAIL-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, Octavian; Gaidos, Gabriel; Yatawara, Achani; Pennarun, Bodvael; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Roux, Jérémie; Andrei, Stefan; Guo, Bingqian; Panaitiu, Alexandra; Pellegrini, Maria; Mierke, Dale F.; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant soluble TRAIL and agonistic antibodies against TRAIL receptors (DR4 and DR5) are currently being created for clinical cancer therapy, due to their selective killing of cancer cells and high safety characteristics. However, resistance to TRAIL and other targeted therapies is an important issue facing current cancer research field. An attractive strategy to sensitize resistant malignancies to TRAIL-induced cell death is the design of small molecules that target and promote caspase 8 activation. For the first time, we describe the discovery and characterization of a small molecule that directly binds caspase 8 and enhances its activation when combined with TRAIL, but not alone. The molecule was identified through an in silico chemical screen for compounds with affinity for the caspase 8 homodimer’s interface. The compound was experimentally validated to directly bind caspase 8, and to promote caspase 8 activation and cell death in single living cells or population of cells, upon TRAIL stimulation. Our approach is a proof-of-concept strategy leading to the discovery of a novel small molecule that not only stimulates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in cancer cells, but may also provide insights into the structure-function relationship of caspase 8 homodimers as putative targets in cancer. PMID:25962125

  15. A modelling framework for the analysis of artificial-selection time series.

    PubMed

    Le Rouzic, Arnaud; Houle, David; Hansen, Thomas F

    2011-04-01

    Artificial-selection experiments constitute an important source of empirical information for breeders, geneticists and evolutionary biologists. Selected characters can generally be shifted far from their initial state, sometimes beyond what is usually considered as typical inter-specific divergence. A careful analysis of the data collected during such experiments may thus reveal the dynamical properties of the genetic architecture that underlies the trait under selection. Here, we propose a statistical framework describing the dynamics of selection-response time series. We highlight how both phenomenological models (which do not make assumptions on the nature of genetic phenomena) and mechanistic models (explaining the temporal trends in terms of e.g. mutations, epistasis or canalization) can be used to understand and interpret artificial-selection data. The practical use of the models and their implementation in a software package are demonstrated through the analysis of a selection experiment on the shape of the wing in Drosophila melanogaster.

  16. Bayesian inference of selection in a heterogeneous environment from genetic time-series data.

    PubMed

    Gompert, Zachariah

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary geneticists have sought to characterize the causes and molecular targets of selection in natural populations for many years. Although this research programme has been somewhat successful, most statistical methods employed were designed to detect consistent, weak to moderate selection. In contrast, phenotypic studies in nature show that selection varies in time and that individual bouts of selection can be strong. Measurements of the genomic consequences of such fluctuating selection could help test and refine hypotheses concerning the causes of ecological specialization and the maintenance of genetic variation in populations. Herein, I proposed a Bayesian nonhomogeneous hidden Markov model to estimate effective population sizes and quantify variable selection in heterogeneous environments from genetic time-series data. The model is described and then evaluated using a series of simulated data, including cases where selection occurs on a trait with a simple or polygenic molecular basis. The proposed method accurately distinguished neutral loci from non-neutral loci under strong selection, but not from those under weak selection. Selection coefficients were accurately estimated when selection was constant or when the fitness values of genotypes varied linearly with the environment, but these estimates were less accurate when fitness was polygenic or the relationship between the environment and the fitness of genotypes was nonlinear. Past studies of temporal evolutionary dynamics in laboratory populations have been remarkably successful. The proposed method makes similar analyses of genetic time-series data from natural populations more feasible and thereby could help answer fundamental questions about the causes and consequences of evolution in the wild.

  17. Easy-to-use strategy for reference gene selection in quantitative real-time PCR experiments.

    PubMed

    Klenke, Stefanie; Renckhoff, Kristina; Engler, Andrea; Peters, Jürgen; Frey, Ulrich H

    2016-12-01

    Real-time PCR is an indispensable technique for mRNA expression analysis but conclusions depend on appropriate reference gene selection. However, while reference gene selection has been a topic of publications, this issue is often disregarded when measuring target mRNA expression. Therefore, we (1) evaluated the frequency of appropriate reference gene selection, (2) suggest an easy-to-use tool for least variability reference gene selection, (3) demonstrate application of this tool, and (4) show effects on target gene expression profiles. All 2015 published articles in Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology were screened for the use of quantitative real-time PCR analysis and selection of reference genes. Target gene expression (Vegfa, Grk2, Sirt4, and Timp3) in H9c2 cells was analyzed following various interventions (hypoxia, hyperglycemia, and/or isoflurane exposure with and without subsequent hypoxia) in relation to putative reference genes (Actb, Gapdh, B2m, Sdha, and Rplp1) using the least variability method vs. an arbitrarily selected but established reference gene. In the vast majority (18 of 21) of papers, no information was provided regarding selection of an appropriate reference gene. In only 1 of 21 papers, a method of appropriate reference gene selection was described and in 2 papers reference gene selection remains unclear. The method of reference gene selection had major impact on interpretation of target gene expression. With hypoxia, for instance, the least variability gene was Rplp1 and target gene expression (Vefga) heavily showed a 2-fold up-regulation (p = 0.022) but no change (p = 0.3) when arbitrarily using Gapdh. Frequency of appropriate reference gene selection in this journal is low, and we propose our strategy for reference gene selection as an easy tool for proper target gene expression.

  18. Model selection and change detection for a time-varying mean in process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, Tom; Hamada, Michael S.; Ticknor, Larry; Weaver, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Process monitoring (PM) for nuclear safeguards sometimes requires estimation of thresholds corresponding to small false alarm rates. Threshold estimation is an old topic; however, because possible new roles for PM are being evaluated in nuclear safeguards, it is timely to consider modern model selection options in the context of alarm threshold estimation. One of the possible new PM roles involves PM residuals, where a residual is defined as residual=data-prediction. This paper briefly reviews alarm threshold estimation, introduces model selection options, and considers several assumptions regarding the data-generating mechanism for PM residuals. Four PM examples from nuclear safeguards are included. One example involves frequent by-batch material balance closures where a dissolution vessel has time-varying efficiency, leading to time-varying material holdup. Another example involves periodic partial cleanout of in-process inventory, leading to challenging structure in the time series of PM residuals. Our main focus is model selection to select a defensible model for normal behavior with a time-varying mean in a PM residual stream. We use approximate Bayesian computation to perform the model selection and parameter estimation for normal behavior. We then describe a simple lag-one-differencing option similar to that used to monitor non-stationary times series to monitor for off-normal behavior.

  19. Development of target protein-selective degradation inducer for protein knockdown.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Minoru; Kitaguchi, Risa; Sato, Shinichi; Naito, Mikihiko; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2011-05-15

    Our previous technique for inducing selective degradation of target proteins with ester-type SNIPER (Specific and Nongenetic Inhibitor-of-apoptosis-proteins (IAPs)-dependent Protein ERaser) degrades both the target proteins and IAPs. Here, we designed a small-molecular amide-type SNIPER to overcome this issue. As proof of concept, we synthesized and biologically evaluated an amide-type SNIPER which induces selective degradation of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II), but not IAPs. Such small-molecular, amide-type SNIPERs that induce target protein-selective degradation without affecting IAPs should be effective tools to study the biological roles of target proteins in living cells.

  20. Methylmercury induces the expression of TNF-α selectively in the brain of mice

    PubMed Central

    Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kim, Min-Seok; Fujimura, Masatake; Ito, Hitoyasu; Toyama, Takashi; Naganuma, Akira; Hwang, Gi-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury selectively damages the central nervous system (CNS). The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily includes representative cytokines that participate in the inflammatory response as well as cell survival, and apoptosis. In this study, we found that administration of methylmercury selectively induced TNF-α expression in the brain of mice. Although the accumulated mercury concentration in the liver and kidneys was greater than in the brain, TNF-α expression was induced to a greater extent in brain. Thus, it is possible that there may exist a selective mechanism by which methylmercury induces TNF-α expression in the brain. We also found that TNF-α expression was induced by methylmercury in C17.2 cells (mouse neural stem cells) and NF-κB may participate as a transcription factor in that induction. Further, we showed that the addition of TNF-α antagonist (WP9QY) reduced the toxicity of methylmercury to C17.2 cells. In contrast, the addition of recombinant TNF-α to the culture medium decreased the cell viability. We suggest that TNF-α may play a part in the selective damage of the CNS by methylmercury. Furthermore, our results indicate that the higher TNF-α expression induced by methylmercury maybe the cause of cell death, as TNF-α binds to its receptor after being released extracellularly. PMID:27910896

  1. Selective apoptosis-inducing activity of crinum-type Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.

    PubMed

    McNulty, James; Nair, Jerald J; Codina, Carles; Bastida, Jaume; Pandey, Siyaram; Gerasimoff, Jenny; Griffin, Carly

    2007-04-01

    The selective apoptosis-inducing activity of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids belonging to the crinane-type is reported. A mini-library of natural and synthetic crinane alkaloids was assembled. Biological screening indicated crinamine 4 and haemanthamine 9 to be potent inducers of apoptosis in tumour cells at micromolar concentrations. Structure-activity relationships demonstrated the requirement for both an alpha-C2 bridge and a free hydroxyl at the C-11 position as pharmacophoric requirements for this activity.

  2. Compound Selectivity and Target Residence Time of Kinase Inhibitors Studied with Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Willemsen-Seegers, Nicole; Uitdehaag, Joost C M; Prinsen, Martine B W; de Vetter, Judith R F; de Man, Jos; Sawa, Masaaki; Kawase, Yusuke; Buijsman, Rogier C; Zaman, Guido J R

    2017-02-17

    Target residence time (τ) has been suggested to be a better predictor of the biological activity of kinase inhibitors than inhibitory potency (IC50) in enzyme assays. Surface plasmon resonance binding assays for 46 human protein and lipid kinases were developed. The association and dissociation constants of 80 kinase inhibitor interactions were determined. τ and equilibrium affinity constants (KD) were calculated to determine kinetic selectivity. Comparison of τ and KD or IC50 values revealed a strikingly different view on the selectivity of several kinase inhibitors, including the multi-kinase inhibitor ponatinib, which was tested on 10 different kinases. In addition, known pan-Aurora inhibitors resided much longer on Aurora B than on Aurora A, despite having comparable affinity for Aurora A and B. Furthermore, the γ/δ-selective PI3K inhibitor duvelisib and the δ-selective drug idelalisib had similar 20-fold selectivity for δ- over γ-isoform but duvelisib resided much longer on both targets.

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  4. Conflicting selection on the timing of germination in a natural population of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, R; Ågren, J

    2014-01-01

    The timing of germination is a key life-history trait that may strongly influence plant fitness and that sets the stage for selection on traits expressed later in the life cycle. In seasonal environments, the period favourable for germination and the total length of the growing season are limited. The optimal timing of germination may therefore be governed by conflicting selection through survival and fecundity. We conducted a field experiment to examine the effects of timing of germination on survival, fecundity and overall fitness in a natural population of the annual herb Arabidopsis thaliana in north-central Sweden. Seedlings were transplanted at three different times in late summer and in autumn covering the period of seed germination in the study population. Early germination was associated with low seedling survival, but also with high survival and fecundity among established plants. The advantages of germinating early more than balanced the disadvantage and selection favoured early germination. The results suggest that low survival among early germinating seeds is the main force opposing the evolution of earlier germination and that the optimal timing of germination should vary in space and time as a function of the direction and strength of selection acting during different life-history stages.

  5. Conditioned taste aversion induced by motion is prevented by selective vagotomy in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Mckenna, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The role of the vagus nerve in motion-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was studied in hooded rats. Animals with complete, selective gastric vagotomy failed to form conditioned taste aversion after multiple conditioning sessions in which the conditioned stimulus (a cider vinegar solution) was drunk immediately before a 30-min exposure to vertical axis rotation at 150 deg/s. Results are discussed with reference to the use of CTA as a measure of motion-induced 'sickness' or gastrointestinal disturbance, and because motion-induced CTA requires that both the vagus nerve and the vestibular apparatus be intact, in light of the possible convergence of vegal and vestibular functions.

  6. Directional selection for flowering time leads to adaptive evolution in Raphanus raphanistrum (Wild radish).

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Michael B; Walsh, Michael J; Flower, Ken C; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides have been the primary tool for controlling large populations of yield depleting weeds from agro-ecosystems, resulting in the evolution of widespread herbicide resistance. In response, nonherbicidal techniques have been developed which intercept weed seeds at harvest before they enter the soil seed bank. However, the efficiency of these techniques allows an intense selection for any trait that enables weeds to evade collection, with early-flowering ecotypes considered likely to result in early seed shedding. Using a field-collected wild radish population, five recurrent generations were selected for early maturity and three generations for late maturity. Phenology associated with flowering time and growth traits were measured. Our results demonstrate the adaptive capacity of wild radish to halve its time to flowering following five generations of early-flowering selection. Early-maturing phenotypes had reduced height and biomass at maturity, leading to less competitive, more prostrate growth forms. Following three generations of late-flowering selection, wild radish doubled its time to flowering time leading to increased biomass and flowering height at maturity. This study demonstrates the potential for the rapid evolution in growth traits in response to highly effective seed collection techniques that imposed a selection on weed populations within agro-ecosystems at harvest.

  7. Observation of Doppler-free electromagnetically induced transparency in atoms selected optically with specific velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hoon; Kim, Kwan Su; Kim, Jung Dong; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jung Bog

    2011-11-15

    We observed an electromagnetically induced transparency signal in a four-level system with optically selected rubidium atoms at specific velocities in a room-temperature vaporized cell. Since the atoms behave like cold atoms in the selected atomic view, the observed signals coincide with a trapped atomic system. According to this result, we can observe Doppler-free signals, which correspond from 1.2 to 1.0 K in a Doppler-broadened medium. And the selected atoms have velocity components of {+-}(131 {+-} 3) MHz per wave number. Our experimental results can provide insight for research in cold media.

  8. Strain-induced selective growth in 1.5% temper-rolled Fe;1%Si.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Tricia A; Kalu, Peter N; Rollett, Anthony D

    2011-06-01

    Strain-induced selective growth was investigated in a 1.5% temper-rolled Fe∼1%Si alloy using the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. The EBSD technique was used to quantify the presence of orientation spreads within grains and to show that this particular case of selective growth can be directly related to differences in stored energy as reflected in the geometrically necessary dislocation content. The differences in stored energy were sufficient to give rise to selective growth as evidenced by bi-modal grain sizes.

  9. Effect of individual thinking styles on item selection during study time allocation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoyu; Li, Weijian; Cao, Liren; Li, Ping; Shi, Meiling; Wang, Jingjing; Cao, Wei; Li, Xinyu

    2016-03-14

    The influence of individual differences on learners' study time allocation has been emphasised in recent studies; however, little is known about the role of individual thinking styles (analytical versus intuitive). In the present study, we explored the influence of individual thinking styles on learners' application of agenda-based and habitual processes when selecting the first item during a study-time allocation task. A 3-item cognitive reflection test (CRT) was used to determine individuals' degree of cognitive reliance on intuitive versus analytical cognitive processing. Significant correlations between CRT scores and the choices of first item selection were observed in both Experiment 1a (study time was 5 seconds per triplet) and Experiment 1b (study time was 20 seconds per triplet). Furthermore, analytical decision makers constructed a value-based agenda (prioritised high-reward items), whereas intuitive decision makers relied more upon habitual responding (selected items from the leftmost of the array). The findings of Experiment 1a were replicated in Experiment 2 notwithstanding ruling out the possible effects from individual intelligence and working memory capacity. Overall, the individual thinking style plays an important role on learners' study time allocation and the predictive ability of CRT is reliable in learners' item selection strategy.

  10. Selecting the most appropriate time points to profile in high-throughput studies

    PubMed Central

    Kleyman, Michael; Sefer, Emre; Nicola, Teodora; Espinoza, Celia; Chhabra, Divya; Hagood, James S; Kaminski, Naftali; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2017-01-01

    Biological systems are increasingly being studied by high throughput profiling of molecular data over time. Determining the set of time points to sample in studies that profile several different types of molecular data is still challenging. Here we present the Time Point Selection (TPS) method that solves this combinatorial problem in a principled and practical way. TPS utilizes expression data from a small set of genes sampled at a high rate. As we show by applying TPS to study mouse lung development, the points selected by TPS can be used to reconstruct an accurate representation for the expression values of the non selected points. Further, even though the selection is only based on gene expression, these points are also appropriate for representing a much larger set of protein, miRNA and DNA methylation changes over time. TPS can thus serve as a key design strategy for high throughput time series experiments. Supporting Website: www.sb.cs.cmu.edu/TPS DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18541.001 PMID:28124972

  11. High-speed energy efficient selective removal of large area copper layer by laser induced delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetec, Blaž; Kovačič, Drago; Možina, Janez; Podobnik, Boštjan

    2009-07-01

    An indirect laser-induced method for selective removal of large copper areas from a printed circuit board is theoretically and experimentally investigated. The results show that the threshold condition for the process involves phase transition of the epoxy-based substrate resin. Optimal parameters for maximizing process speed are found and discussed.

  12. Effects of a novel selective androgen receptor modulator on dexamethasone-induced and hypogonadism-induced muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Amanda; Hwang, Dong-Jin; Narayanan, Ramesh; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2010-08-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most widely used antiinflammatory drugs in the world. However, prolonged use of glucocorticoids results in undesirable side effects such as muscle wasting, osteoporosis, and diabetes. Skeletal muscle wasting, which currently has no approved therapy, is a debilitating condition resulting from either reduced muscle protein synthesis or increased degradation. The imbalance in protein synthesis could occur from increased expression and function of muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1), or decreased function of the IGF-I and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt kinase pathways. We examined the effects of a nonsteroidal tissue selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) and testosterone on glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy and castration-induced muscle atrophy. The SARM and testosterone propionate blocked the dexamethasone-induced dephosphorylation of Akt and other proteins involved in protein synthesis, including Forkhead box O (FoxO). Dexamethasone caused a significant up-regulation in the expression of ubiquitin ligases, but testosterone propionate and SARM administration blocked this effect by phosphorylating FoxO. Castration induced rapid myopathy of the levator ani muscle, accompanied by up-regulation of MAFbx and MuRF1 and down-regulation of IGF-I, all of which was attenuated by a SARM. The results suggest that levator ani atrophy caused by hypogonadism may be the result of loss of IGF-I stimulation, whereas that caused by glucocorticoid treatment relies almost solely on up-regulation of MAFbx and MuRF1. Our studies provide the first evidence that glucocorticoid- and hypogonadism-induced muscle atrophy are mediated by distinct but overlapping mechanisms and that SARMs may provide a more effective and selective pharmacological approach to prevent glucocorticoid-induced muscle loss than steroidal androgen therapy.

  13. Estimating Selection Coefficients in Spatially Structured Populations from Time Series Data of Allele Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Iain; McVean, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Inferring the nature and magnitude of selection is an important problem in many biological contexts. Typically when estimating a selection coefficient for an allele, it is assumed that samples are drawn from a panmictic population and that selection acts uniformly across the population. However, these assumptions are rarely satisfied. Natural populations are almost always structured, and selective pressures are likely to act differentially. Inference about selection ought therefore to take account of structure. We do this by considering evolution in a simple lattice model of spatial population structure. We develop a hidden Markov model based maximum-likelihood approach for estimating the selection coefficient in a single population from time series data of allele frequencies. We then develop an approximate extension of this to the structured case to provide a joint estimate of migration rate and spatially varying selection coefficients. We illustrate our method using classical data sets of moth pigmentation morph frequencies, but it has wide applications in settings ranging from ecology to human evolution. PMID:23307902

  14. Adaptation-induced modification of motion selectivity tuning in visual tectal neurons of adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lucks, Valerie; Kurtz, Rafael; Engelmann, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    In the developing brain, training-induced emergence of direction selectivity and plasticity of orientation tuning appear to be widespread phenomena. These are found in the visual pathway across different classes of vertebrates. Moreover, short-term plasticity of orientation tuning in the adult brain has been demonstrated in several species of mammals. However, it is unclear whether neuronal orientation and direction selectivity in nonmammalian species remains modifiable through short-term plasticity in the fully developed brain. To address this question, we analyzed motion tuning of neurons in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish by calcium imaging. In total, orientation and direction selectivity was enhanced by adaptation, responses of previously orientation-selective neurons were sharpened, and even adaptation-induced emergence of selectivity in previously nonselective neurons was observed in some cases. The different observed effects are mainly based on the relative distance between the previously preferred and the adaptation direction. In those neurons in which a shift of the preferred orientation or direction was induced by adaptation, repulsive shifts (i.e., away from the adapter) were more prevalent than attractive shifts. A further novel finding for visually induced adaptation that emerged from our study was that repulsive and attractive shifts can occur within one brain area, even with uniform stimuli. The type of shift being induced also depends on the difference between the adapting and the initially preferred stimulus direction. Our data indicate that, even within the fully developed optic tectum, short-term plasticity might have an important role in adjusting neuronal tuning functions to current stimulus conditions. PMID:26378206

  15. Moving attention - Evidence for time-invariant shifts of visual selective attention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, R.; Pierce, L.

    1984-01-01

    Two experiments measured the time to shift spatial selective attention across the visual field to targets 2 or 10 deg from central fixation. A central arrow cued the most likely target location. The direction of attention was inferred from reaction times to expected, unexpected, and neutral locations. The development of a spatial attentional set with time was examined by presenting target probes at varying times after the cue. There were no effects of distance on the time course of the attentional set. Reaction times for far locations were slower than for near, but the effects of attention were evident by 150 msec in both cases. Spatial attention does not shift with a characteristic, fixed velocity. Rather, velocity is proportional to distance, resulting in a movement time that is invariant over the distances tested.

  16. Aspirin-induced post-gingivectomy haemorrhage: a timely reminder.

    PubMed

    Thomason, J M; Seymour, R A; Murphy, P; Brigham, K M; Jones, P

    1997-02-01

    A case report is described of significant aspirin-induced haemorrhage following a gingivectory procedure in an organ transplant patient. Aspirin-induced platelet impairment secondary to low-dose aspirin was implicated as the cause of the haemorrhage. Haemostasis was eventually achieved after platelet transfusion. The case illustrates the problems that can arise when carrying out gingival surgery on patients medicated with low-dose aspirin.

  17. Estimating Allele Age and Selection Coefficient from Time-Serial Data

    PubMed Central

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Malaspinas, Orestis; Evans, Steven N.; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have made available an ever-increasing amount of ancient genomic data. In particular, it is now possible to target specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in several samples at different time points. Such time-series data are also available in the context of experimental or viral evolution. Time-series data should allow for a more precise inference of population genetic parameters and to test hypotheses about the recent action of natural selection. In this manuscript, we develop a likelihood method to jointly estimate the selection coefficient and the age of an allele from time-serial data. Our method can be used for allele frequencies sampled from a single diallelic locus. The transition probabilities are calculated by approximating the standard diffusion equation of the Wright–Fisher model with a one-step process. We show that our method produces unbiased estimates. The accuracy of the method is tested via simulations. Finally, the utility of the method is illustrated with an application to several loci encoding coat color in horses, a pattern that has previously been linked with domestication. Importantly, given our ability to estimate the age of the allele, it is possible to gain traction on the important problem of distinguishing selection on new mutations from selection on standing variation. In this coat color example for instance, we estimate the age of this allele, which is found to predate domestication. PMID:22851647

  18. Evaluation of Select Sensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Escherichia coli in Water Distribution Systems▿

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Syreeta L.; Sinclair, Ryan G.; Riley, Mark R.; Pepper, Ian L.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated real-time sensing of Escherichia coli as a microbial contaminant in water distribution systems. Most sensors responded to increased E. coli concentrations, showing that select sensors can detect microbial water quality changes and be utilized as part of a contaminant warning system. PMID:21357435

  19. Estimating allele age and selection coefficient from time-serial data.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Malaspinas, Orestis; Evans, Steven N; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have made available an ever-increasing amount of ancient genomic data. In particular, it is now possible to target specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in several samples at different time points. Such time-series data are also available in the context of experimental or viral evolution. Time-series data should allow for a more precise inference of population genetic parameters and to test hypotheses about the recent action of natural selection. In this manuscript, we develop a likelihood method to jointly estimate the selection coefficient and the age of an allele from time-serial data. Our method can be used for allele frequencies sampled from a single diallelic locus. The transition probabilities are calculated by approximating the standard diffusion equation of the Wright-Fisher model with a one-step process. We show that our method produces unbiased estimates. The accuracy of the method is tested via simulations. Finally, the utility of the method is illustrated with an application to several loci encoding coat color in horses, a pattern that has previously been linked with domestication. Importantly, given our ability to estimate the age of the allele, it is possible to gain traction on the important problem of distinguishing selection on new mutations from selection on standing variation. In this coat color example for instance, we estimate the age of this allele, which is found to predate domestication.

  20. First successful pregnancies following embryo selection using Time-lapse technology in Iran: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Azita; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Soleimani, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Embryo selection is a vital part of in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, with morphology-based grading systems having been widely used for decades. Time-lapse imaging combined with embryo morph kinetics may proffer a non-invasive means for improving embryo selection. We report the first ongoing and chemical pregnancies using Time-lapse embryo scope to select best embryos for transfer in Iran. Cases: A case with tubal factor infertility was admitted to IVF program with normozoospermia. After ovarian hyper stimulation, 6 COCs were retrieved and inseminated with 25,000 progressive sperms/ oocyte. Five zygotes were placed individually into the micro wells of equilibrated embryo scope dish for Time-lapse observation, and incubated at 37°C, 5% CO2. On day 3, single embryo transfer (SET) took place based on kinetic parameters of the embryos. Clinical pregnancy was confirmed 7 weeks after SET. The second case with history of previous ICSI failure was admitted with azoospermia. Nine MII oocytes underwent ICSI, and incubated in Time-lapse facilities. The rest of procedures were followed as described for case 1. Chemical pregnancy was confirmed 15 days after SET. Conclusion: This approach opens a way to select best embryo non-invasively for SET; thus, increasing implantation, while reducing multiple pregnancy complications. PMID:26131014

  1. Time-Delayed Two-Step Selective Laser Photodamage of Dye-Biomolecule Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoni, A.; Cubeddu, R.; de Silvestri, S.; Laporta, P.; Svelto, O.

    1980-08-01

    A scheme is proposed for laser-selective photodamage of biological molecules, based on time-delayed two-step photoionization of a dye molecule bound to the biomolecule. The validity of the scheme is experimentally demonstrated in the case of the dye Proflavine, bound to synthetic polynucleotides.

  2. Plant breeding with genomic selection: potential gain per unit time and cost

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advancements in genotyping are rapidly decreasing marker costs and increasing genome coverage. This is facilitating the use of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in plant breeding. Commonly employed MAS strategies, however, are not well suited for complex traits, requiring extra time for field-based ph...

  3. Light-induced hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition: a facile and selective photoclick reaction.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Popik, Vladimir V

    2011-04-13

    2-Napthoquinone-3-methides (oNQMs) generated by efficient photodehydration (Φ=0.2) of 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol undergo facile hetero-Diels-Alder addition (k(D-A)∼ 4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) to electron-rich polarized olefins in an aqueous solution. The resulting photostable benzo[g]chromans are produced in high to quantitative yield. The unreacted oNQM is rapidly hydrated (k(H2O) ∼145 s(-1)) to regenerate the starting diol. This competition between hydration and cycloaddition makes oNQMs highly selective, since only vinyl ethers and enamines are reactive enough to form the Diels-Alder adduct in an aqueous solution; no cycloaddition was observed with other types of alkenes. To achieve photolabeling or photoligation of two substrates, one is derivatized with a vinyl ether moiety, while 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol is attached to the other via an appropriate linker. The light-induced Diels-Alder "click" strategy permits the formation of either a permanent or hydrolytically labile linkage. Rapid kinetics of this photoclick reaction (k=4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) is useful for time-resolved applications. The short lifetime (τ ∼7 ms in H(2)O) of the active form of the photoclick reagent prevents its migration from the site of irradiation, thus, allowing for spatial control of the ligation or labeling.

  4. A method for real-time visual stimulus selection in the study of cortical object perception.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Daniel D; Tarr, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    The properties utilized by visual object perception in the mid- and high-level ventral visual pathway are poorly understood. To better establish and explore possible models of these properties, we adopt a data-driven approach in which we repeatedly interrogate neural units using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to establish each unit's image selectivity. This approach to imaging necessitates a search through a broad space of stimulus properties using a limited number of samples. To more quickly identify the complex visual features underlying human cortical object perception, we implemented a new functional magnetic resonance imaging protocol in which visual stimuli are selected in real-time based on BOLD responses to recently shown images. Two variations of this protocol were developed, one relying on natural object stimuli and a second based on synthetic object stimuli, both embedded in feature spaces based on the complex visual properties of the objects. During fMRI scanning, we continuously controlled stimulus selection in the context of a real-time search through these image spaces in order to maximize neural responses across pre-determined 1cm(3) rain regions. Elsewhere we have reported the patterns of cortical selectivity revealed by this approach (Leeds et al., 2014). In contrast, here our objective is to present more detailed methods and explore the technical and biological factors influencing the behavior of our real-time stimulus search. We observe that: 1) Searches converged more reliably when exploring a more precisely parameterized space of synthetic objects; 2) real-time estimation of cortical responses to stimuli is reasonably consistent; 3) search behavior was acceptably robust to delays in stimulus displays and subject motion effects. Overall, our results indicate that real-time fMRI methods may provide a valuable platform for continuing study of localized neural selectivity, both for visual object representation and beyond.

  5. Functional selectivity and time-dependence of μ-opioid receptor desensitization at nerve terminals in the mouse ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, J D; Bailey, C P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The majority of studies examining desensitization of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) have examined those located at cell bodies. However, MORs are extensively expressed at nerve terminals throughout the mammalian nervous system. This study is designed to investigate agonist-induced MOR desensitization at nerve terminals in the mouse ventral tegmental area (VTA). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH MOR function was measured in mature mouse brain slices containing the VTA using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Presynaptic MOR function was isolated from postsynaptic function and the functional selectivity, time-dependence and mechanisms of agonist-induced MOR desensitization were examined. KEY RESULTS MORs located at GABAergic nerve terminals in the VTA were completely resistant to rapid desensitization induced by the high-efficacy agonists DAMGO and Met-enkephalin. MORs located postsynaptically on GABAergic cell bodies readily underwent rapid desensitization in response to DAMGO. However, after prolonged (>7 h) treatment with Met-enkephalin, profound homologous MOR desensitization was observed. Morphine could induce rapid MOR desensitization at nerve terminals when PKC was activated. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Agonist-induced MOR desensitization in GABAergic neurons in the VTA is compartment-selective as well as agonist-selective. When MORs are located at cell bodies, higher-efficacy agonists induce greater levels of rapid desensitization than lower-efficacy agonists. However, the converse is true at nerve terminals where agonists that induce MOR desensitization via PKC are capable of rapid agonist-induced desensitization while higher-efficacy agonists are not. MOR desensitization induced by higher-efficacy agonists at nerve terminals only takes place after prolonged receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http

  6. The value in rushing: Memory and selectivity when short on time.

    PubMed

    Middlebrooks, Catherine D; Murayama, Kou; Castel, Alan D

    2016-10-01

    While being short on time can certainly limit what one remembers, are there always such costs? The current study investigates the impact of time constraints on selective memory and the self-regulated study of valuable information. Participants studied lists of words ranging in value from 1-10 points, with the goal being to maximize their score during recall. Half of the participants studied these words at a constant presentation rate of either 1 s or 5s. The other half of participants studied under both rates, either fast (1s) during the first several lists and then slow (5s) during later lists, or vice versa. Study was then self-paced during a final segment of lists for all participants to determine how people regulate their study time after experiencing different presentation rates during study. While participants recalled more words overall when studying at a 5-second rate, there were no significant differences in terms of value-based recall, with all participants demonstrating better recall for higher-valued words and similar patterns of selectivity, regardless of study time or prior timing experience. Self-paced study was also value-based, with participants spending more time studying high-value words than low-value. Thus, while being short on time may have impaired memory overall, participants' attention to item value during study was not differentially impacted by the fast and slow timing rates. Overall, these findings offer further insight regarding the influence that timing schedules and task experience have on how people selectively focus on valuable information.

  7. Time-Dependent Tree-Structured Survival Analysis with Unbiased Variable Selection through Permutation Tests

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating time-dependent covariates into tree-structured survival analysis (TSSA) may result in more accurate prognostic models than if only baseline values are used. Available time-dependent TSSA methods exhaustively test every binary split on every covariate; however, this approach may result in selection bias towards covariates with more observed values. We present a method that uses unbiased significance levels from newly proposed permutation tests to select the time-dependent or baseline covariate with the strongest relationship with the survival outcome. The specific splitting value is identified using only the selected covariate. Simulation results show that the proposed time-dependent TSSA method produces tree models of equal or greater accuracy as compared to baseline TSSA models, even with high censoring rates and large within-subject variability in the time-dependent covariate. To illustrate, the proposed method is applied to data from a cohort of bipolar youth to identify subgroups at risk for self-injurious behavior. PMID:25043382

  8. Quantifying selection in evolving populations using time-resolved genetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Christopher J. R.; Mustonen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Methods which uncover the molecular basis of the adaptive evolution of a population address some important biological questions. For example, the problem of identifying genetic variants which underlie drug resistance, a question of importance for the treatment of pathogens, and of cancer, can be understood as a matter of inferring selection. One difficulty in the inference of variants under positive selection is the potential complexity of the underlying evolutionary dynamics, which may involve an interplay between several contributing processes, including mutation, recombination and genetic drift. A source of progress may be found in modern sequencing technologies, which confer an increasing ability to gather information about evolving populations, granting a window into these complex processes. One particularly interesting development is the ability to follow evolution as it happens, by whole-genome sequencing of an evolving population at multiple time points. We here discuss how to use time-resolved sequence data to draw inferences about the evolutionary dynamics of a population under study. We begin by reviewing our earlier analysis of a yeast selection experiment, in which we used a deterministic evolutionary framework to identify alleles under selection for heat tolerance, and to quantify the selection acting upon them. Considering further the use of advanced intercross lines to measure selection, we here extend this framework to cover scenarios of simultaneous recombination and selection, and of two driver alleles with multiple linked neutral, or passenger, alleles, where the driver pair evolves under an epistatic fitness landscape. We conclude by discussing the limitations of the approach presented and outlining future challenges for such methodologies.

  9. A Universal Scaling Law Determines Time Reversibility and Steady State of Substitutions under Selection

    PubMed Central

    Manhart, Michael; Haldane, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Monomorphic loci evolve through a series of substitutions on a fitness landscape. Understanding how mutation, selection, and genetic drift drive this process, and uncovering the structure of the fitness landscape from genomic data are two major goals of evolutionary theory. Population genetics models of the substitution process have traditionally focused on the weak-selection regime, which is accurately described by diffusion theory. Predictions in this regime can be considered universal in the sense that many population models exhibit equivalent behavior in the diffusion limit. However, a growing number of experimental studies suggest that strong selection plays a key role in some systems, and thus there is a need to understand universal properties of models without a priori assumptions about selection strength. Here we study time reversibility in a general substitution model of a monomorphic haploid population. We show that for any time-reversible population model, such as the Moran process, substitution rates obey an exact scaling law. For several other irreversible models, such as the simple Wright-Fisher process and its extensions, the scaling law is accurate up to selection strengths that are well outside the diffusion regime. Time reversibility gives rise to a power-law expression for the steady-state distribution of populations on an arbitrary fitness landscape. The steady-state behavior is dominated by weak selection and is thus adequately described by the diffusion approximation, which guarantees universality of the steady-state formula and its applicability to the problem of reconstructing fitness landscapes from DNA or protein sequence data. PMID:22838027

  10. Effects of furosemide on the racing times of horses with exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Soma, L R; Laster, L; Oppenlander, F; Barr-Alderfer, V

    1985-04-01

    In 3 groups of horses with exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), comparisons of racing times and finishing positions were made between the 5 races before the horses were given furosemide and 5 races after furosemide administration. The horses were grouped according to 3 methods used to diagnose EIPH: group 1, observation of hemorrhage at the nostrils within 1 hour after a workout or race; group 2, observation of pulmonary hemorrhage only by endoscopic examination after a race or workout; and group 3, observation of hemorrhage at the nostrils during a race or immediately after a race. Group 4 horses were randomly selected horses running during the study period and were not given furosemide. The statistical method was analysis of covariance and the dependent variable was horses' time per distance. The study compared the 4 groups of horses, using the estimated value of the horses (less than or equal to +10,000 or greater than +10,000), and the horses' interaction in races 1 through 5 before and races 6 through 10 after furosemide treatment. The horses' times were adjusted by the relevant covariates, distance, track variant, and winning time per distance. Significant changes in horses' time per distance were not noticed when comparing values from races 1 through 5 with those in races 6 through 10 in group 1 horses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Selective taste of ethanol-induced autophagy for mitochondria and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wen-Xing; Li, Min; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2011-02-01

    Alcoholic beverages are one of the most popular drinks in the world, but ethanol can induce significant liver pathology. We have found that ethanol treatment results in autophagy activation, which is at least in part due to the inhibition of mTOR signaling by reactive oxygen species. Autophagy is important in limiting liver injury and hepatocyte apoptosis by removing damaged mitochondria and accumulated lipid droplets, the two most important culprits of ethanol pathogenesis. The selectivity of ethanol-induced autophagy toward these two targets without affecting other cellular substances, such as long-lived proteins, is remarkably in line with its protective effects. However, we still do not quite understand how this selectivity is determined and how the selection process is accomplished, although evidence from other studies indicates that mitophagy involves distinct molecular steps of mobilization of the autophagy machinery and of preparation of mitochondria for recognition. The avoidance of mistargeting to other cellular components may involve additional mechanisms related to how autophagosomes might form in relation to their targets. Ethanol-induced selective mitophagy and lipophagy thus provides an excellent model to study these events in a pathophysiology-relevant context. Most importantly, the understanding of the mechanisms can bring forward new therapeutic modalities to improve the disease outcome.

  12. Integrating fossil preservation biases in the selection of calibrations for molecular divergence time estimation.

    PubMed

    Dornburg, Alex; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Oliver, Jeffrey C; Near, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    The selection of fossil data to use as calibration age priors in molecular divergence time estimates inherently links neontological methods with paleontological theory. However, few neontological studies have taken into account the possibility of a taphonomic bias in the fossil record when developing approaches to fossil calibration selection. The Sppil-Rongis effect may bias the first appearance of a lineage toward the recent causing most objective calibration selection approaches to erroneously exclude appropriate calibrations or to incorporate multiple calibrations that are too young to accurately represent the divergence times of target lineages. Using turtles as a case study, we develop a Bayesian extension to the fossil selection approach developed by Marshall (2008. A simple method for bracketing absolute divergence times on molecular phylogenies using multiple fossil calibrations points. Am. Nat. 171:726-742) that takes into account this taphonomic bias. Our method has the advantage of identifying calibrations that may bias age estimates to be too recent while incorporating uncertainty in phylogenetic parameter estimates such as tree topology and branch lengths. Additionally, this method is easily adapted to assess the consistency of potential calibrations to any one calibration in the candidate pool.

  13. Selective Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibition prevents Ca2+ overload-induced triggered arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Norbert; Kormos, Anita; Kohajda, Zsófia; Szebeni, Áron; Szepesi, Judit; Pollesello, Piero; Levijoki, Jouko; Acsai, Károly; Virág, László; Nánási, Péter P; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Tóth, András

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Augmented Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) activity may play a crucial role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis; however, data regarding the anti-arrhythmic efficacy of NCX inhibition are debatable. Feasible explanations could be the unsatisfactory selectivity of NCX inhibitors and/or the dependence of the experimental model on the degree of Ca2+i overload. Hence, we used NCX inhibitors SEA0400 and the more selective ORM10103 to evaluate the efficacy of NCX inhibition against arrhythmogenic Ca2+i rise in conditions when [Ca2+]i was augmented via activation of the late sodium current (INaL) or inhibition of the Na+/K+ pump. Experimental Approach Action potentials (APs) were recorded from canine papillary muscles and Purkinje fibres by microelectrodes. NCX current (INCX) was determined in ventricular cardiomyocytes utilizing the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Ca2+i transients (CaTs) were monitored with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye, Fluo-4. Key Results Enhanced INaL increased the Ca2+ load and AP duration (APD). SEA0400 and ORM10103 suppressed INCX and prevented/reversed the anemone toxin II (ATX-II)-induced [Ca2+]i rise without influencing APD, CaT or cell shortening, or affecting the ATX-II-induced increased APD. ORM10103 significantly decreased the number of strophanthidin-induced spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ release events; however, SEA0400 failed to restrict the veratridine-induced augmentation in Purkinje-ventricle APD dispersion. Conclusions and Implications Selective NCX inhibition – presumably by blocking revINCX (reverse mode NCX current) – is effective against arrhythmogenesis caused by [Na+]i-induced [Ca2+]i elevation, without influencing the AP waveform. Therefore, selective INCX inhibition, by significantly reducing the arrhythmogenic trigger activity caused by the perturbed Ca2+i handling, should be considered as a promising anti-arrhythmic therapeutic strategy. PMID:25073832

  14. Stable Epigenetic Variants Selected from an Induced Hypomethylated Fragaria vesca Population

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jihua; Tanino, Karen K.; Robinson, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic inheritance was transmitted through selection over five generations of extreme early, but not late flowering time phenotypic lines in Fragaria vesca. Epigenetic variation was initially artificially induced using the DNA demethylation reagent 5-azacytidine (5-azaC). It is the first report to explore epigenetic variant selection and phenotypic trait inheritance in strawberry. Transmission frequency of these traits was determined across generations. The early flowering (EF4) and late stolon (LS) phenotypic traits were successfully transmitted across five and three generations through meiosis, respectively. Stable mitotic transmission of the early flowering phenotype was also demonstrated using clonal daughters derived from the 4th Generation (S4) mother plant. In order to further explore the DNA methylation patterns underlying the early flowering trait, the standard MSAP method using isoschizomers Hpa II/Msp I, and newly modified MSAP method using isoschizomers Tfi I/Pfe I which detected DNA methylation at CG, CHG, CHH sites were used in two early flowering lines, EF lines 1 (P2) and EF lines 2 (P3), and control lines (P1). A significant reduction in the number of fully-methylated bands was detected in P2 and P3 when compared to P1 using the novel MSAP method. In the standard MSAP, the symmetric CG and CHG methylation was maintained over generations in the early flowering lines based on the clustering in P2 and P3, the novel MSAP approach revealed the asymmetric CHH methylation pattern was not maintained over generations. This study provides evidence of stable selection of phenotypic traits, particularly early flowering through both meiosis and mitosis, which is meaningful to both breeding programs and commercial horticulture. The maintenance in CG and CHG methylation over generations suggests the early flowering phenotype might be related to DNA methylation alterations at the CG or CHG sites. Finally, this work provides a new approach for studying the role

  15. Collective effectiveness in the XV de France: selections and time matter.

    PubMed

    Sedeaud, Adrien; Saulière, Guillaume; Marquet, Laurie-Anne; Del Vecchio, Scott; Bar-Hen, Avner; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2017-03-13

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of selections and shared selections in the rugby union. Players' names, positions, and number of selections were collected for all XV de France's games (1906-2014). Every team's percentage of renewal of workforce was calculated for backs and forwards. During the 1987-2014 period, all second row forwards (locks), halfbacks, and centres' shared selections (number of times when two players have competed together) were recreated. The Best vs. Rest method was applied to these remodelled dyads. They were analysed and compared with surrounding teammates as well as opponents. Head coaches similarly change their workforce for upcoming matches after winning or losing (around 30%), but losing teams renew significantly more positions in their line-ups. The recreated halfbacks, locks, and centres reveal a common pattern. Whether victorious or not, the 'renewed couples' victory percentage will congregate towards the XV de France's victory percentage. For all the best recreated couples, the cumulated number of selections for forwards' is always higher than the ones part of less efficient teams: 231.3 ± 80 vs. 212.9 ± 91 selections for locks' teammates (Effect sizes (ES) small, possibly positive, 54.8%). In best recreated couples, number 8's are significantly more experienced than their counterparts in less efficient pairs (ES small, likely positive, 76.3%). The XV de France's collective effectiveness relies on a balance between stability and workforce renewal, which allows the building of specific position interactions and builds on experimented forwards packs. Selections and shared selections are serious collective performance parameters associated with performance.

  16. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and nuclear calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n}) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

  17. Ondansetron, a selective 5-HT3 antagonist, antagonizes methamphetamine-induced anorexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Ginawi, O T; Al-Majed, A A; Al-Suwailem, A K

    2005-03-01

    Effects of some selective serotonergic (5-HT) antagonists on methamphetamine-induced anorexia were investigated in male mice. The least possible dose of methamphetamine alone that caused significant anorectic activity was 11 micromolkg(-1), i.p. (2 mgkg(-1)). Various doses of some selective serotonergic receptor antagonists were administered half an hour before the above mentioned dose of methamphetamine. Methiothepin potentiated, whereas NAN-190, methysergide, mianserin and ondansetron antagonized methamphetamine-induced anorectic activity. The least possible doses of these antagonists which modified methamphetamine-induced anorexia were as follows: methiothepin (1.1 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), NAN-190 (4.2 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), methysergide (2.1 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), mianserin (3.3 micromolkg(-1), i.p.) and ondansetron (0.003 micromolkg(-1), i.p.). The serotonergic antagonists at the above mentioned doses did not modify the food intake of animals not treated with methamphetamine, except for methiothepin, which produced a significant reduction, and mianserin, which produced a significant increase in food intake. The results of the present study indicated that the anorectic activity induced by methamphetamine is related to the interactions of methamphetamine with 5-HT receptor. Since a very small dose (0.003 micromolkg(-1)) of ondansetron (the 5-HT(3) antagonist), as compared with the other antagonists used in this study, antagonized the anorexia induced by methamphetamine, the 5-HT(3) receptor is likely to be the site for this interaction.

  18. Positron Annihilation Induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy of Inner Shell Transitions Using Time-Of Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuping; Jiang, Neng; Weiss, A. H.

    2003-03-01

    Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) has been shown to have unique advantages over conventional electron collision induced Auger techniques, including the ability to eliminate the secondary electron background and selectively probe the top-most atomic layer on the sample surface. Here we report on the development of a new time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer which combines features high efficiency magnetic transport and parrallel energy measurment with high resolution by using an innovative timing method. The new TOF-PAES system, was used to make the first quantitative comparative measurements of the Auger intensities associated with the annihilation of positrons with the deep core levels (1s) of S KLL (180eV), C KLL (270eV), N KLL (360eV), and O KLL (510eV). Experimental results of Auger probabilities at outer core level (3s, 3P) of Cu M2,3VV (60eV), M1VV (105eV) are compared with the theoretical value of Jensen and Weiss. Quantitatively study the surface adsorbate process on Cu is performed and concentration changes of surface components are obtained. These results demonstrate that TOF-PAES can be used to obtain quantitative,top-layer specific, information from chemically important elements including those with relatively deep core levels (e.g. C and O).

  19. Forward-in-Time, Spatially Explicit Modeling Software to Simulate Genetic Lineages Under Selection

    PubMed Central

    Currat, Mathias; Gerbault, Pascale; Di, Da; Nunes, José M.; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    SELECTOR is a software package for studying the evolution of multiallelic genes under balancing or positive selection while simulating complex evolutionary scenarios that integrate demographic growth and migration in a spatially explicit population framework. Parameters can be varied both in space and time to account for geographical, environmental, and cultural heterogeneity. SELECTOR can be used within an approximate Bayesian computation estimation framework. We first describe the principles of SELECTOR and validate the algorithms by comparing its outputs for simple models with theoretical expectations. Then, we show how it can be used to investigate genetic differentiation of loci under balancing selection in interconnected demes with spatially heterogeneous gene flow. We identify situations in which balancing selection reduces genetic differentiation between population groups compared with neutrality and explain conflicting outcomes observed for human leukocyte antigen loci. These results and three previously published applications demonstrate that SELECTOR is efficient and robust for building insight into human settlement history and evolution. PMID:26949332

  20. Precise Spatially Selective Photothermolysis Using Modulated Femtosecond Lasers and Real-time Multimodal Microscopy Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yimei; Lui, Harvey; Zhao, Jianhua; Wu, Zhenguo; Zeng, Haishan

    2017-01-01

    The successful application of lasers in the treatment of skin diseases and cosmetic surgery is largely based on the principle of conventional selective photothermolysis which relies strongly on the difference in the absorption between the therapeutic target and its surroundings. However, when the differentiation in absorption is not sufficient, collateral damage would occur due to indiscriminate and nonspecific tissue heating. To deal with such cases, we introduce a novel spatially selective photothermolysis method based on multiphoton absorption in which the radiant energy of a tightly focused near-infrared femtosecond laser beam can be directed spatially by aiming the laser focal point to the target of interest. We construct a multimodal optical microscope to perform and monitor the spatially selective photothermolysis. We demonstrate that precise alteration of the targeted tissue is achieved while leaving surrounding tissue intact by choosing appropriate femtosecond laser exposure with multimodal optical microscopy monitoring in real time. PMID:28255346

  1. Detecting Selection on Temporal and Spatial Scales: A Genomic Time-Series Assessment of Selective Responses to Devil Facial Tumor Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brüniche-Olsen, Anna; Austin, Jeremy J.; Jones, Menna E.; Holland, Barbara R.; Burridge, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Detecting loci under selection is an important task in evolutionary biology. In conservation genetics detecting selection is key to investigating adaptation to the spread of infectious disease. Loci under selection can be detected on a spatial scale, accounting for differences in demographic history among populations, or on a temporal scale, tracing changes in allele frequencies over time. Here we use these two approaches to investigate selective responses to the spread of an infectious cancer—devil facial tumor disease (DFTD)—that since 1996 has ravaged the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii). Using time-series ‘restriction site associated DNA’ (RAD) markers from populations pre- and post DFTD arrival, and DFTD free populations, we infer loci under selection due to DFTD and investigate signatures of selection that are incongruent among methods, populations, and times. The lack of congruence among populations influenced by DFTD with respect to inferred loci under selection, and the direction of that selection, fail to implicate a consistent selective role for DFTD. Instead genetic drift is more likely driving the observed allele frequency changes over time. Our study illustrates the importance of applying methods with different performance optima e.g. accounting for population structure and background selection, and assessing congruence of the results. PMID:26930198

  2. Detecting Selection on Temporal and Spatial Scales: A Genomic Time-Series Assessment of Selective Responses to Devil Facial Tumor Disease.

    PubMed

    Brüniche-Olsen, Anna; Austin, Jeremy J; Jones, Menna E; Holland, Barbara R; Burridge, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Detecting loci under selection is an important task in evolutionary biology. In conservation genetics detecting selection is key to investigating adaptation to the spread of infectious disease. Loci under selection can be detected on a spatial scale, accounting for differences in demographic history among populations, or on a temporal scale, tracing changes in allele frequencies over time. Here we use these two approaches to investigate selective responses to the spread of an infectious cancer--devil facial tumor disease (DFTD)--that since 1996 has ravaged the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii). Using time-series 'restriction site associated DNA' (RAD) markers from populations pre- and post DFTD arrival, and DFTD free populations, we infer loci under selection due to DFTD and investigate signatures of selection that are incongruent among methods, populations, and times. The lack of congruence among populations influenced by DFTD with respect to inferred loci under selection, and the direction of that selection, fail to implicate a consistent selective role for DFTD. Instead genetic drift is more likely driving the observed allele frequency changes over time. Our study illustrates the importance of applying methods with different performance optima e.g. accounting for population structure and background selection, and assessing congruence of the results.

  3. Effect of Inducers, Incubation Time and Heme Concentration on IC(50) Value Variation in Anti-heme Crystallization Assay.

    PubMed

    Nhien, Nguyen Thanh Thuy; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Uyen, Dinh Thanh; Deharo, Eric; Hoa, Pham Thi Le; Hirayama, Kenji; Harada, Shigeharu; Kamei, Kaeko

    2011-12-01

    Heme detoxification through crystallization into hemozoin has been suggested as a good target for the development of screening assays for new antimalarials. However, comparisons among the data obtained from different experiments are difficult, and the IC(50) values (the concentrations of drug that are required to inhibit 50% of hemozoin formation) for the same drug vary widely. We studied the effects of changes in heme concentration (precursor of β-hematin), incubation time and three inducers (SDS, Tween 20 and linoleic acid) on the IC(50) of some antimalarials (chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, and clotrimazole). The results showed that increasing both inducer concentration and incubation time raised the IC(50) of selected antimalarials. Any change in those factors caused the IC(50) value to vary. Standardization of assay conditions is, therefore, necessary to increase reproducibility and reduce discrepancies in assay performance. Considering all of the variables, the best choice of inducers is in the order of SDS > Tween 20 > linoleic acid.

  4. Selective gastrointestinal uptake of ALA and its benefits for laserlight-induced fluorescence diagnostics (LIFD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressmar, Jochen; Stern, Josef; Boehm, J.; Kohl, B.; Gahlen, Johannes

    1997-12-01

    LIFD and PDT are based on the selective uptake of photosensitizers resp. the selective metabolism of their precursors in malignant tissue. Excitation with laserlight results in fluorescence or phototoxic reactions which can be used for the detection or destruction of colorectal carcinoma and dysplasia. General photosensibilization resulting in an increased photosensitivity of the whole body represents the main side and necessitates avoidance of daylight for days up to weeks. Local application of (delta) - aminolevulinic acid (ALA) may reduce systemic uptake. Rats with DMH induced colorectal cancer were photosensitized for LIFD by oral, intravenous or local application of ALA. Urine concentrations of ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG) representing systemic photosensibilization were determined by two-column chromatography. Local colon application of ALA not only increases the quality of LIFD of colorectal cancer, it also provokes three times lower concentrations of PBG in comparison to oral or intravenous administration and reduces in consequence general photosensibilization.

  5. Imaging multicellular specimens with real-time optimized tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qinyi; Martin, Benjamin L.; Matus, David Q.; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the progress made in selective plane illumination microscopy, high-resolution 3D live imaging of multicellular specimens remains challenging. Tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy (TLS-SPIM) with real-time light-sheet optimization was developed to respond to the challenge. It improves the 3D imaging ability of SPIM in resolving complex structures and optimizes SPIM live imaging performance by using a real-time adjustable tiling light sheet and creating a flexible compromise between spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the 3D live imaging ability of TLS-SPIM by imaging cellular and subcellular behaviours in live C. elegans and zebrafish embryos, and show how TLS-SPIM can facilitate cell biology research in multicellular specimens by studying left-right symmetry breaking behaviour of C. elegans embryos. PMID:27004937

  6. Structure-selection techniques applied to continuous-time nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Luis A.; Freitas, Ubiratan S.; Letellier, Christophe; Maquet, Jean

    2001-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of choosing the multinomials that should compose a polynomial mathematical model starting from data. The mathematical representation used is a nonlinear differential equation of the polynomial type. Some approaches that have been used in the context of discrete-time models are adapted and applied to continuous-time models. Two examples are included to illustrate the main ideas. Models obtained with and without structure selection are compared using topological analysis. The main differences between structure-selected models and complete structure models are: (i) the former are more parsimonious than the latter, (ii) a predefined fixed-point configuration can be guaranteed for the former, and (iii) the former set of models produce attractors that are topologically closer to the original attractor than those produced by the complete structure models.

  7. Selective Real-time Detection of Gaseous Nerve Agent Simulants Using Multiwavelength Photoacoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-15

    Selective real-time detection of gaseous nerve agent simulants using multiwavelength photoacoustics Kristan P. Gurton,* Melvin Felton, and Richard...concentrations. The technique is based on a modified version of conventional laser photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy, in which optical absorption is typically...spec- troscopic approach [1–4]. One of the more direct methods to implement in prac- tice (without sacrificing sensitivity) is laser photoacoustic

  8. Time-frequency based feature selection for discrimination of non-stationary biosignals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D Martínez-Vargas, Juan; I Godino-Llorente, Juan; Castellanos-Dominguez, Germán

    2012-12-01

    This research proposes a generic methodology for dimensionality reduction upon time-frequency representations applied to the classification of different types of biosignals. The methodology directly deals with the highly redundant and irrelevant data contained in these representations, combining a first stage of irrelevant data removal by variable selection, with a second stage of redundancy reduction using methods based on linear transformations. The study addresses two techniques that provided a similar performance: the first one is based on the selection of a set of the most relevant time-frequency points, whereas the second one selects the most relevant frequency bands. The first methodology needs a lower quantity of components, leading to a lower feature space; but the second improves the capture of the time-varying dynamics of the signal, and therefore provides a more stable performance. In order to evaluate the generalization capabilities of the methodology proposed it has been applied to two types of biosignals with different kinds of non-stationary behaviors: electroencephalographic and phonocardiographic biosignals. Even when these two databases contain samples with different degrees of complexity and a wide variety of characterizing patterns, the results demonstrate a good accuracy for the detection of pathologies, over 98 %.The results open the possibility to extrapolate the methodology to the study of other biosignals.

  9. Environmentally induced changes in correlated responses to selection reveal variable pleiotropy across a complex genetic network.

    PubMed

    Sikkink, Kristin L; Reynolds, Rose M; Cresko, William A; Phillips, Patrick C

    2015-05-01

    Selection in novel environments can lead to a coordinated evolutionary response across a suite of characters. Environmental conditions can also potentially induce changes in the genetic architecture of complex traits, which in turn could alter the pattern of the multivariate response to selection. We describe a factorial selection experiment using the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei in which two different stress-related phenotypes (heat and oxidative stress resistance) were selected under three different environmental conditions. The pattern of covariation in the evolutionary response between phenotypes or across environments differed depending on the environment in which selection occurred, including asymmetrical responses to selection in some cases. These results indicate that variation in pleiotropy across the stress response network is highly sensitive to the external environment. Our findings highlight the complexity of the interaction between genes and environment that influences the ability of organisms to acclimate to novel environments. They also make clear the need to identify the underlying genetic basis of genetic correlations in order understand how patterns of pleiotropy are distributed across complex genetic networks.

  10. Health-Care Waste Treatment Technology Selection Using the Interval 2-Tuple Induced TOPSIS Method

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chao; You, Jian-Xin; Liu, Hu-Chen; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Health-care waste (HCW) management is a major challenge for municipalities, particularly in the cities of developing nations. Selecting the best treatment technology for HCW can be regarded as a complex multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) issue involving a number of alternatives and multiple evaluation criteria. In addition, decision makers tend to express their personal assessments via multi-granularity linguistic term sets because of different backgrounds and knowledge, some of which may be imprecise, uncertain and incomplete. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to propose a new hybrid decision making approach combining interval 2-tuple induced distance operators with the technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS) for tackling HCW treatment technology selection problems with linguistic information. The proposed interval 2-tuple induced TOPSIS (ITI-TOPSIS) can not only model the uncertainty and diversity of the assessment information given by decision makers, but also reflect the complex attitudinal characters of decision makers and provide much more complete information for the selection of the optimum disposal alternative. Finally, an empirical example in Shanghai, China is provided to illustrate the proposed decision making method, and results show that the ITI-TOPSIS proposed in this paper can solve the problem of HCW treatment technology selection effectively. PMID:27271652

  11. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site.

    PubMed

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-02-12

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD(+)-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology.

  12. Resveratrol prevents rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and selectively induces apoptosis in TSC2-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Alayev, Anya; Sun, Yang; Snyder, Rose B; Berger, Sara Malka; Yu, Jane J; Holz, Marina K

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway is hyperactivated in a variety of cancers and disorders, including lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), which are characterized by mutations in tumor suppressors TSC1 or TSC2. The concern with the use of mTORC1 inhibitors, such as rapamycin or its analogs (rapalogs), is that they cause upregulation of autophagy and suppress the negative feedback loop to Akt, which promotes cell survival, causing the therapy to be only partially effective, and relapse occurs upon cessation of treatment. In this study, we investigate the use of rapamycin in combination with resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, in TSC2-deficient cells. We tested whether such combination would prevent rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and shift the cell fate toward apoptosis. We found that this combination treatment blocked rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and restored inhibition of Akt. Interestingly, the combination of rapamycin and resveratrol selectively promoted apoptosis of TSC2-deficient cells. Thus, the addition of resveratrol to rapamycin treatment may be a promising option for selective and targeted therapy for diseases with TSC loss and mTORC1 hyperactivation.

  13. Pyrithione Zn selectively inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3.

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence emphasizes the role of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) isoforms in regulating non-HIF substrates, but isoform selective PHD inhibitors under physiological conditions have not yet been reported. Here we have identified pyrithione Zn (PZ) as a potent, isoform-selective PHD3 inhibitor. The IC50 value of PZ was determined as 0.98 μM for PHD3, while it did not show any inhibitory activity toward full length and truncated PHD2 up to 1 mM. The selective efficacy of PZ was further demonstrated at the cellular level by observing inhibition of the PHD3-dependent DNA damage response pathway without stabilization of HIF-1α.

  14. Minimal microwave anisotrophy from perturbations induced at late times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Andrew H.; Stebbins, Albert; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1994-01-01

    Aside from primordial gravitational instability of the cosmological fluid, various mechanisms have been proposed to generate large-scale structure at relatively late times, including, e.g., 'late-time' cosmological phase transitions. In these scenarios, it is envisioned that the universe is nearly homogeneous at the times of last scattering and that perturbations grow rapidly sometimes after the primordial plasma recombines. On this basis, it was suggested that large inhomogeneities could be generated while leaving relatively little imprint on the cosmic microwave background (MBR) anisotropy. In this paper, we calculate the minimal anisotropies possible in any 'late-time' scenario for structure formation, given the level of inhomogeneity observed at present. Since the growth of the inhomogeneity involves time-varying gravitational fields, these scenarios inevitably generate significant MBR anisotropy via the Sachs-Wolfe effect. Moreover, we show that the large-angle MBR anisotropy produced by the rapid post-recombination growth of inhomogeneity is generally greater than that produced by the same inhomogeneity growth via gravitational instability. In 'realistic' scenarios one can decrease the anisotropy compared to models with primordial adiabatic fluctuations, but only on very small angular scales. The value of any particular measure of the anisotropy can be made small in late-time models, but only by making the time-dependence of the gravitational field sufficiently 'pathological'.

  15. Living With Limited Time: Socioemotional Selectivity Theory in the Context of Health Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan-Singh, Sarah J.; Stanton, Annette L.; Low, Carissa A.

    2016-01-01

    The current research was designed to test the applicability of socioemotional selectivity theory (SST; Carstensen, 2006), a life span theory that posits that perceived time remaining in life (time perspective) is a critical determinant of motivation, to individuals who face foreshortened futures (limited time perspective) due to life-limiting medical illness. In Study 1, we investigated whether life goals and biases in attention and memory for valenced emotional stimuli differed between women living with metastatic breast cancer (n = 113; theoretically living under greater limited time perspective than peers without cancer) and similarly aged women without a cancer diagnosis (n = 50; theoretically living under greater expansive time perspective than peers with cancer) in accordance with SST. As hypothesized, metastatic group goals reflected greater emphasis on limited versus expansive time perspective relative to comparison group goals. Hypotheses regarding biases in attention and memory were not supported. Study 2 followed metastatic group participants over 3 months and revealed that, consistent with hypotheses, whereas limited time perspective goals predicted decreased intrusive thoughts about cancer, expansive time perspective goals predicted decreased perceived cancer-related benefits. Together, these studies suggest that SST is a useful lens through which to view some components of motivation and psychological adjustment among individuals confronting medically foreshortened futures. PMID:25984789

  16. Timing and direction selectivity of subthalamic and pallidal neurons in patients with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ziv M; Neimat, Joseph S; Cosgrove, G Rees; Eskandar, Emad N

    2005-05-01

    Current models of basal ganglia function suggest that some manifestations of Parkinson disease (PD) arise from abnormal activity and decreased selectivity of neurons in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (Gpi). Our goal was to examine the timing and direction selectivity of neuronal activity relative to visually guided movements in the STN and Gpi of patients with PD. Recordings were made from 152 neurons in the STN and 33 neurons in the Gpi of awake subjects undergoing surgery for PD. Corresponding EMG data were obtained for half the cells. We employed a structured behavioral task in which the subjects used a joystick to guide a cursor to one of four targets displayed on a monitor. Each direction was tested over multiple trials. Movement-related modulation of STN activity began on average 264+/-10 ms before movement initiation and 92+/-13 ms before initial EMG activity, while modulation of Gpi activity began 204+/-21 ms before overt movement initiation. In the STN, 40% of cells demonstrated perimovement activity, and of these 64% were directionally selective. In Gpi, 45% of cells showed perimovement activity of which 80% were selective. In both nuclei, directionally selective cells had significantly lower baseline firing rates than nonselective cells (41+/-5 vs 59+/-4 spikes/s in STN, and 50+/-9 vs 74+/-15 spikes/s in Gpi). These results suggest that STN activity occurs earlier than previously reported, and that higher neuronal firing rates maybe associated with decreased direction selectivity in PD patients.

  17. Trait Associations across Evolutionary Time within a Drosophila Phylogeny: Correlated Selection or Genetic Constraint?

    PubMed Central

    Kellermann, Vanessa; Overgaard, Johannes; Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Hoffmann, Ary A.

    2013-01-01

    Traits do not evolve independently. To understand how trait changes under selection might constrain adaptive changes, phenotypic and genetic correlations are typically considered within species, but these capture constraints across a few generations rather than evolutionary time. For longer-term constraints, comparisons are needed across species but associations may arise because of correlated selection pressures rather than genetic interactions. Implementing a unique approach, we use known patterns of selection to separate likely trait correlations arising due to correlated selection from those reflecting genetic constraints. We examined the evolution of stress resistance in >90 Drosophila species adapted to a range of environments, while controlling for phylogeny. Initially we examined the role of climate and phylogeny in shaping the evolution of starvation and body size, two traits previously not examined in this context. Following correction for phylogeny only a weak relationship between climate and starvation resistance was detected, while all of the variation in the relationship between body size and climate could be attributed to phylogeny. Species were divided into three environmental groups (hot and dry, hot and wet, cold) with the expectation that, if genetic correlations underpin trait correlations, these would persist irrespective of the environment, whereas selection-driven evolution should produce correlations dependent on the environment. We found positive associations between most traits in hot and dry environments coupled with high trait means. In contrast few trait correlations were observed in hot/wet and cold environments. These results suggest trait associations are primarily driven by correlated selection rather than genetic interactions, highlighting that such interactions are unlikely to limit evolution of stress resistance. PMID:24015206

  18. Directional selection by fisheries and the timing of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) migrations.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Thomas P; Hodgson, Sayre; Flynn, Lucy; Hilborn, Ray; Rogers, Donald E

    2007-04-01

    The timing of migration from feeding to breeding areas is a critical link between the growth and survival of adult animals, their reproduction, and the fitness of their progeny. Commercial fisheries often catch a large fraction of the migrants (e.g., salmon), and exploitation rates can vary systematically over the fishing season. We examined daily records of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in the Egegik and Ugashik management districts in Bristol Bay, Alaska (USA), for evidence of such temporally selective fishing. In recent years, the early migrants have experienced lower fishing rates than later migrants, especially in the Egegik district, and the median migration date of the fish escaping the fisheries has been getting progressively earlier in both districts. Moreover, the overall runs (catch and escapement) in the Egegik district and, to a lesser extent the Ugashik district, have been getting earlier, as predicted in response to the selection on timing. The trends in timing were not correlated with sea surface temperature in the region of the North Pacific Ocean where the salmon tend to concentrate, but the trends in the two districts were correlated with each other, indicating that there may be some common environmental influence in addition to the effect of selection. Despite the selection, both groups of salmon have remained productive. We hypothesize that this resilience may result from representation of all component populations among the early and late migrants, so that the fisheries have not eliminated entire populations, and from density-dependent processes that may have helped maintain the productivity of these salmon populations.

  19. Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Reversed Zinc Chloride-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment via Increasing Cholinergic Marker Expression.

    PubMed

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Azami, Kian; Belaran, Maryam; Soodi, Maliheh; Abdi, Khosrou; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sanati, Mehdi; Mottaghi Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Zinc, an essential micronutrient and biochemical element of the human body, plays structural, catalytic, and regulatory roles in numerous physiological functions. In the current study, the effects of a pretraining oral administration of zinc chloride (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days and post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (10, 50, and 100 μM/side), alone and in combination, on the spatial memory retention in Morris water maze (MWM) were investigated. Animals were trained for 4 days and tested 48 h after completion of training. Also, the molecular effects of these compounds on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), as a cholinergic marker in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA), were evaluated. Behavioral and molecular findings of this study showed that a 2-week oral administration of zinc chloride (50 mg/kg) impaired spatial memory retention in MWM and decreased ChAT expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W revealed a significant increase in ChAT immunoreactivity. Furthermore, post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W into the CA1 region of the hippocampus reversed zinc chloride-induced spatial memory impairment in MWM and significantly increased ChAT expression in comparison with zinc chloride-treated animals. Taken together, these results emphasize the role of selective iNOS inhibitors in reversing zinc chloride-induced spatial memory deficits via modulation of cholinergic marker expression.

  20. Gallic acid as a selective anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guojun; Zhang, Shuqin; Xie, Yanru; Zhang, Ziyu; Zhao, Wenjing

    2016-01-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid; GA) is a naturally occurring plant polyphenol, isolated from water caltrop, which has been reported to exert anticancer effects. The present study investigated the antiproliferative effects of GA on the HepG2 and SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines using MTT and colony formation assays. In particular, the underlying mechanism of GA-induced apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells was studied in vitro by flow cytometry and western blotting. The results of the present study indicated that GA was capable of inhibiting the proliferation of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, as well as inducing the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells. GA induced caspase-3, caspase-9 and reactive oxygen species activity, elevated the expression of apoptosis regulator Bcl-2-like protein 4 and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential in SMMC-7721 cells. When compared with HL-7702 normal human hepatocytes, GA demonstrated selective toxicity for HCC cells. In conclusion, GA is able to induce apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells in vitro via mitochondrial-mediated pathways, and may possess the potential to be a novel therapeutic compound for use in the treatment of HCC.

  1. Time-dependent phenomena in the potential response of ion-selective electrodes treated by the Nernst-Planck-Poisson model. 1. Intramembrane processes and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lingenfelter, Peter; Bedlechowicz-Sliwakowska, Iwona; Sokalski, Tomasz; Maj-Zurawska, Magdalena; Lewenstam, Andrzej

    2006-10-01

    The variability of selectivity coefficients, resulting from potential changes over time and the concentration ratio of primary to interfering ions, impedes many practical applications of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). Existing theoretical interpretations of ISE selectivity are restricted by severe assumptions, such as steady state and electroneutrality, which hinder theorizing on this problem. For this reason, for the first time, the Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations are used to predict and visualize the selectivity variability over time and the concentration ratio. Special emphasis is placed on the non-Nernstian response in the measurements with liquid-ion-exchanger- and neutral-carrier-based ISEs. The conditions under which measured selectivity coefficients are true (unbiased) are demonstrated.

  2. Real time measurement of cytoplasmic ions with ion-selective microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Ion-selective microelectrodes can be used to report intracellular ion concentrations. The ion-selective barrels of microelectrodes are filled with a sensor cocktail containing several different components including an ion-selective molecule, sensor or exchanger, a solvent or plasticizer, lipophilic cation/anion additives, and a matrix to solidify the membrane. For many ions, the readymade membrane cocktail can be purchased, but the individual chemical components can be bought from suppliers and mixing the cocktail saves money. For commercially available liquid membrane cocktails the membrane matrix is often not included. For plants a matrix is essential for intracellular impalements because without it cell turgor will displace the liquid membrane from the electrode tip, giving decreased or even lost sensitivity. The matrix frequently used is a high molecular weight poly(vinyl chloride). This addition increases the electrical resistance of the electrode, slowing the response time of the electrode. The use of multi-barreled electrodes enables the identification of the cellular compartment. For example, the inclusion of a pH-selective electrode enables the cytoplasm and vacuole to be distinguished.

  3. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  4. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  5. Initial tsunami source estimation by inversion with an intelligent selection of model parameters and time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulia, Iyan E.; Asano, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for accurately estimating the initial tsunami source. Our technique is independent of the earthquake parameters, because we only use recorded tsunami waveforms and an auxiliary basis function, instead of a fault model. We first use the measured waveforms to roughly identify the source area using backward propagated travel times, and then infer the initial sea surface deformation through inversion analysis. A computational intelligence approach based on a genetic algorithm combined with a pattern search was used to select appropriate least squares model parameters and time delays. The proposed method significantly reduced the number of parameters and suppressed the negative effect of regularization schemes that decreased the plausibility of the model. Furthermore, the stochastic approach for deriving the time delays is a more flexible strategy for simulating actual phenomena that occur in nature. The selected parameters and time delays increased the accuracy, and the model's ability to reveal the underlying physics associated with the tsunami-generating processes. In this paper, we applied the method to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki tsunami event and examined its effectiveness by comparing the results to those using the conventional method.

  6. Autostereoscopic display concept with time-sequential wavelength-selective filter-barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurk, Silvio; Kuhlmey, Mathias; Bartmann, Roland; Duckstein, Bernd; de la Barré, René

    2016-03-01

    A spatially multiplexed autostereoscopic 3D display design with a strip barrier consisting of RGB-color filters is presented. The wavelength selective filter barrier emits the light from a display area larger than that of common autostereoscopic barrier displays. However, such construction is still used rather rarely. The time sequential operation mode is a supplemental option. Wavelength selective filter barrier arrangements exhibit characteristics different from common barrier displays with similar barrier pitch and ascent. In particular these constructions show strong angular luminance dependency under barrier inclination specified by correspondent slant angle. In time sequential implementation it is important to avoid that quick eye or eyelid movement lead to visible color artifacts. Those circumstances limit the possibility to find well working and usable display designs superior to usual barrier displays. The newly introduced design is usable as a multi user display as well as a single user system with user adaptive control. In case of tracked single user mode the adaption in x-z-direction is continuously. The design has been modelled with simulation software developed for that purpose. The modelling of wavelength-selective barriers was used to calculate the light ray distribution properties of that arrangement. For the experimental verification of the image separation and evaluation of image quality, commercially available display components were combined for a display demonstrator.

  7. Improving the time efficiency of the Fourier synthesis method for slice selection in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, B; Khaneja, N; Johnston, L A; Farrell, P M; Mareels, I M Y

    2016-01-01

    The design of slice selective pulses for magnetic resonance imaging can be cast as an optimal control problem. The Fourier synthesis method is an existing approach to solve these optimal control problems. In this method the gradient field as well as the excitation field are switched rapidly and their amplitudes are calculated based on a Fourier series expansion. Here, we provide a novel insight into the Fourier synthesis method via representing the Bloch equation in spherical coordinates. Based on the spherical Bloch equation, we propose an alternative sequence of pulses that can be used for slice selection which is more time efficient compared to the original method. Simulation results demonstrate that while the performance of both methods is approximately the same, the required time for the proposed sequence of pulses is half of the original sequence of pulses. Furthermore, the slice selectivity of both sequences of pulses changes with radio frequency field inhomogeneities in a similar way. We also introduce a measure, referred to as gradient complexity, to compare the performance of both sequences of pulses. This measure indicates that for a desired level of uniformity in the excited slice, the gradient complexity for the proposed sequence of pulses is less than the original sequence.

  8. Real-time gesture recognition by learning and selective control of visual interest points.

    PubMed

    Kirishima, Toshiyuki; Sato, Kosuke; Chihara, Kunihiro

    2005-03-01

    For the real-time recognition of unspecified gestures by an arbitrary person, a comprehensive framework is presented that addresses two important problems in gesture recognition systems: selective attention and processing frame rate. To address the first problem, we propose the Quadruple Visual Interest Point Strategy. No assumptions are made with regard to scale or rotation of visual features, which are computed from dynamically changing regions of interest in a given image sequence. In this paper, each of the visual features is referred to as a visual interest point, to which a probability density function is assigned, and the selection is carried out. To address the second problem, we developed a selective control method to equip the recognition system with self-load monitoring and controlling functionality. Through evaluation experiments, we show that our approach provides robust recognition with respect to such factors as type of clothing, type of gesture, extent of motion trajectories, and individual differences in motion characteristics. In order to indicate the real-time performance and utility aspects of our approach, a gesture video system is developed that demonstrates full video-rate interaction with displayed image objects.

  9. Real-time Microseismic Processing for Induced Seismicity Hazard Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Matzel, Eric M.

    2016-10-31

    Induced seismicity is inherently associated with underground fluid injections. If fluids are injected in proximity to a pre-existing fault or fracture system, the resulting elevated pressures can trigger dynamic earthquake slip, which could both damage surface structures and create new migration pathways. The goal of this research is to develop a fundamentally better approach to geological site characterization and early hazard detection. We combine innovative techniques for analyzing microseismic data with a physics-based inversion model to forecast microseismic cloud evolution. The key challenge is that faults at risk of slipping are often too small to detect during the site characterization phase. Our objective is to devise fast-running methodologies that will allow field operators to respond quickly to changing subsurface conditions.

  10. Non-Selective Cation Channels Mediate Chloroquine-Induced Relaxation in Precontracted Mouse Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle. PMID:24992312

  11. Induced Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking Observed in Microwave Billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, B.; Friedrich, T.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.; Schaefer, F.; Harney, H. L.; Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2007-02-16

    Using reciprocity, we investigate the breaking of time-reversal (T) symmetry due to a ferrite embedded in a flat microwave billiard. Transmission spectra of isolated single resonances are not sensitive to T violation, whereas those of pairs of nearly degenerate resonances do depend on the direction of time. For their theoretical description a scattering matrix model from nuclear physics is used. The T-violating matrix elements of the effective Hamiltonian for the microwave billiard with the embedded ferrite are determined experimentally as functions of the magnetization of the ferrite.

  12. Induced time-reversal symmetry breaking observed in microwave billiards.

    PubMed

    Dietz, B; Friedrich, T; Harney, H L; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A; Schäfer, F; Weidenmüller, H A

    2007-02-16

    Using reciprocity, we investigate the breaking of time-reversal (T) symmetry due to a ferrite embedded in a flat microwave billiard. Transmission spectra of isolated single resonances are not sensitive to T violation, whereas those of pairs of nearly degenerate resonances do depend on the direction of time. For their theoretical description a scattering matrix model from nuclear physics is used. The T-violating matrix elements of the effective Hamiltonian for the microwave billiard with the embedded ferrite are determined experimentally as functions of the magnetization of the ferrite.

  13. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhi-meng; Hong, Wei; He, Shu-Kai; Teng, Jian; Gu, Yu-qiu

    2017-04-01

    Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED) will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  14. Selective trace enrichment by immunoaffinity capillary electrochromatography on-line with capillary zone electrophoresis - laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D H; Rakestraw, D J; Schoeniger, J S; Lopez-Avila, V; Van Emon, J

    1999-01-01

    Limited by the lack of a sensitive, universal detector, many capillary-based liquid-phase separation techniques might benefit from techniques that overcome modest concentration sensitivity by preconcentrating large injection volumes. The work presented employs selective solid-phase extraction by immunoaffinity capillary electrochromatography (IACEC) to enhance detection limits. A model analyte, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) biotin, is electrokinetically applied to a capillary column packed with an immobilized anti-biotin-IgG support. After selective extraction by the immunoaffinity capillary, the bound analyte is eluted, migrates by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), and is detected by laser-induced fluorescence. The column is regenerated and reused many times. We evaluate the performance of IACEC for selective trace enrichment of analytes prior to CZE. The calibration curve for FITC-biotin bound versus application time is linear from 10 to 300 seconds. Recovery of FITC-biotin spiked into a diluted urinary metabolites solution was 89.4% versus spiked buffer, with a precision of 1.8% relative standard deviation (RSD).

  15. Space-time wiring specificity supports direction selectivity in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Zlateski, Aleksandar; Lee, Kisuk; Richardson, Mark; Turaga, Srinivas C.; Purcaro, Michael; Balkam, Matthew; Robinson, Amy; Behabadi, Bardia F.; Campos, Michael; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    How does the mammalian retina detect motion? This classic problem in visual neuroscience has remained unsolved for 50 years. In search of clues, we reconstructed Off-type starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and bipolar cells (BCs) in serial electron microscopic images with help from EyeWire, an online community of “citizen neuroscientists.” Based on quantitative analyses of contact area and branch depth in the retina, we found evidence that one BC type prefers to wire with a SAC dendrite near the SAC soma, while another BC type prefers to wire far from the soma. The near type is known to lag the far type in time of visual response. A mathematical model shows how such “space-time wiring specificity” could endow SAC dendrites with receptive fields that are oriented in space-time and therefore respond selectively to stimuli that move in the outward direction from the soma. PMID:24805243

  16. Time-resolved photoluminescence for evaluating laser-induced damage during dielectric stack ablation in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parola, Stéphanie; Blanc-Pélissier, Danièle; Barbos, Corina; Le Coz, Marine; Poulain, Gilles; Lemiti, Mustapha

    2016-06-01

    Selective laser ablation of dielectric layers on crystalline silicon wafers was investigated for solar cell fabrication. Laser processing was performed on Al2O3, and bi-layers Al2O3/SiNX:H with a nanosecond UV laser at various energy densities ranging from 0.4 to 2 J cm-2. Ablation threshold was correlated to the simulated temperature at the interface between the dielectric coatings and the silicon substrate. Laser-induced damage to the silicon substrate was evaluated by time-resolved photoluminescence. The minority carrier lifetime deduced from time-resolved photoluminescence was related to the depth of the heat affected zone in the substrate.

  17. Effect of selected water temperatures used in Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine reconstitution on titer at selected time intervals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous methods are currently used throughout the poultry industry for the administration of vaccines. Each utilizes water for vaccine reconstitution and/or administration, including two of the three commercially available live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccines. Selected water temperatures w...

  18. A time course analysis of satiety-induced instrumental outcome devaluation.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Shauna L; Marchand, Alain R; Ferreira, Guillaume; Coutureau, Etienne

    2016-12-01

    Sensory-specific satiety is commonly used in studies of decision making to selectively devalue a food reward. Devaluation is reflected in an immediate reduction in the subsequent intake of the food and in the performance of actions that gain access to that food. Despite its frequent use, the lasting effects of satiety-induced devaluation on instrumental actions are unknown. Here, we examined the time course and contextual dependency of sensory-specific satiety-induced devaluation on instrumental responding and consumption. Rats were trained to perform two instrumental actions for two distinct food rewards. Then, one of the instrumental outcomes was provided ad libitum for 1 hour in separate feeding cages and the effect of this devaluation was assessed 0, 2, or 5 hours after satiation. At a delay of 0 or 2 hours, both intake and instrumental responding were sensitive to the satiety treatment. That is, rats consumed less of the devalued outcome and responded less for the devalued outcome than for the valued outcome. By contrast, after 5 hours, rats showed sensitivity to devaluation in consumption but not in instrumental responding. Strikingly, sensitivity to devaluation was restored for the instrumental response after a 5 hour delay when devaluation was performed in the instrumental context. These results indicate that, in rats, specific satiety-induced devaluation endures and is context-independent for up to 2 hours post-satiation. At longer delays, the impact of sensory-specific satiety on instrumental responding is context-dependent, suggesting that contextual cues may be required for the value of specific outcomes to control instrumental responding.

  19. The Effects of Time on Task in Response Selection - An ERP Study of Mental Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Möckel, Tina; Beste, Christian; Wascher, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Long lasting involvement in a cognitive task leads to mental fatigue. Substantial efforts have been undertaken to understand this phenomenon. However, it has been demonstrated that some changes with time on task are not only related to mental fatigue. The present study intends to clarify these effects of time on task unrelated to mental fatigue on response selection processes at the behavioural and electrophysiological level (using event-related potentials, ERPs). Participants had to perform a Simon task for more than 3 hours and rated their experienced mental fatigue and motivation to continue with the task at several time points during the experiment. The results show that at the beginning of the experiment some unspecific modulations of training and adaptation are evident. With time on task participants’ ability to resolve response conflict appears to become impaired. The results reveal that time on task effects cannot be completely explained by mental fatigue. Instead, it seems that an interplay of adaptation at the beginning and motivational effects in the course of a task modulate performance and neurophysiological parameters. In future studies it will be important to account for the relative contribution of adaptation and motivation parameters when time on task effects are investigated. PMID:26054837

  20. The Effects of Time on Task in Response Selection--An ERP Study of Mental Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Möckel, Tina; Beste, Christian; Wascher, Edmund

    2015-06-09

    Long lasting involvement in a cognitive task leads to mental fatigue. Substantial efforts have been undertaken to understand this phenomenon. However, it has been demonstrated that some changes with time on task are not only related to mental fatigue. The present study intends to clarify these effects of time on task unrelated to mental fatigue on response selection processes at the behavioural and electrophysiological level (using event-related potentials, ERPs). Participants had to perform a Simon task for more than 3 hours and rated their experienced mental fatigue and motivation to continue with the task at several time points during the experiment. The results show that at the beginning of the experiment some unspecific modulations of training and adaptation are evident. With time on task participants' ability to resolve response conflict appears to become impaired. The results reveal that time on task effects cannot be completely explained by mental fatigue. Instead, it seems that an interplay of adaptation at the beginning and motivational effects in the course of a task modulate performance and neurophysiological parameters. In future studies it will be important to account for the relative contribution of adaptation and motivation parameters when time on task effects are investigated.

  1. Selective Attrition and Intraindividual Variability in Response Time Moderate Cognitive Change

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Christie; Stawski, Robert S.; Hultsch, David F.; MacDonald, Stuart W.S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Selection of a developmental time metric is useful for understanding causal processes that underlie aging-related cognitive change, and for the identification of potential moderators of cognitive decline. Building on research suggesting that time to attrition is a metric sensitive to non-normative influences of aging (e.g., subclinical health conditions), we examined reason for attrition and intraindividual variability (IIV) in reaction time as predictors of cognitive performance. Method Three-hundred and four community dwelling older adults (64-92 years) completed annual assessments in a longitudinal study. IIV was calculated from baseline performance on reaction time tasks. Multilevel models were fit to examine patterns and predictors of cognitive change. Results We show that time to attrition was associated with cognitive decline. Greater IIV was associated with declines on executive functioning and episodic memory measures. Attrition due to personal health reasons was also associated with decreased executive functioning compared to individuals who remained in study. Discussion These findings suggest that time to attrition is a useful metric for representing cognitive change, and reason for attrition and IIV are predictive of non-normative influences that may underlie instances of cognitive loss in older adults. PMID:26647008

  2. Nest site selection and induced response in a dominant arboreal ant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejean, Alain; Grangier, Julien; Leroy, Céline; Orivel, Jerôme; Gibernau, Marc

    2008-09-01

    It is well known that arboreal ants, both territorially dominant species and plant ants (e.g., species associated with myrmecophytes or plants housing them in hollow structures), protect their host trees from defoliators. Nevertheless, the presence of an induced defense, suggested by the fact that the workers discovering a leaf wound recruit nestmates, is only known for plant ants. Based on the results from a field study, we show here (1) that colonies of Azteca chartifex, a territorially dominant, neotropical arboreal ant species, mostly selected Goupia glabra (Goupiaceae) trees in which to build their principal carton nests and (2) that plant signals induced workers to recruit nestmates, which patrol the leaves, likely providing the plant with a biotic defense. Furthermore, the number of recruited workers was clearly higher on G. glabra, their most frequently selected host tree species, than on other tree species. These results show that contrary to what was previously believed, induced responses are also found in territorially dominant arboreal ants and so are not limited to the specific associations between myrmecophytes and plant ants.

  3. Engineered cellular gene-replacement platform for selective and inducible proteolytic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Charles W.; Diaz, Juan E.; Zeitlin, Samantha G.; Gray, Daniel C.; Wells, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular demolition during apoptosis is completed by executioner caspases, that selectively cleave more than 1,500 proteins but whose individual roles are challenging to assess. Here, we used an optimized site-specific and inducible protease to examine the role of a classic apoptotic node, the caspase-activated DNase (CAD). CAD is activated when caspases cleave its endogenous inhibitor ICAD, resulting in the characteristic DNA laddering of apoptosis. We describe a posttranscriptional gene replacement (PTGR) approach where endogenous biallelic ICAD is knocked down and simultaneously replaced with an engineered allele that is susceptible to inducible cleavage by tobacco etch virus protease. Remarkably, selective activation of CAD alone does not induce cell death, although hallmarks of DNA damage are detected in human cancer cell lines. Our data strongly support that the highly cooperative action of CAD and inhibition of DNA repair systems are critical for the DNA laddering phenotype in apoptosis. Furthermore, the PTGR approach provides a general means for replacing wild-type protein function with a precisely engineered mutant at the transcriptional level that should be useful for cell engineering studies. PMID:26106156

  4. Current approaches to prevent NSAID-induced gastropathy – COX selectivity and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jan C; Domschke, Wolfram; Pohle, Thorsten

    2004-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is still an important medical and socio-economic problem – despite recent pharmaceutical advances. To prevent NSAID-induced gastropathy, three strategies are followed in clinical routine: (i) coprescription of a gastroprotective drug, (ii) use of selective COX-2 inhibitors, and (iii) eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Proton pump inhibitors are the comedication of choice as they effectively reduce gastrointestinal adverse events of NSAIDs and are safe even in long-term use. Co-medication with vitamin C has only been little studied in the prevention of NSAID-induced gastropathy. Apart from scavenging free radicals it is able to induce haeme-oxgenase 1 in gastric cells, a protective enzyme with antioxidant and vasodilative properties. Final results of the celecoxib outcome study (CLASS study) attenuated the initial enthusiasm about the GI safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors, especially in patients concomitantly taking aspirin for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Helicobacter pylori increases the risk for ulcers particularly in NSAID-naive patients and therefore eradication is recommended prior to long-term NSAID therapy at least in patients at high risk. New classes of COX-inhibitors are currently evaluated in clinical studies with very promising results: NSAIDs combined with a nitric oxide releasing moiety (NO-NSAID) and dual inhibitors of COX and 5-LOX. These drugs offer extended anti-inflammatory potency while sparing gastric mucosa. PMID:15563357

  5. Maskless and low-destructive nanofabrication on quartz by friction-induced selective etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chenfei; Li, Xiaoying; Cui, Shuxun; Dong, Hanshan; Yu, Bingjun; Qian, Linmao

    2013-03-01

    A low-destructive friction-induced nanofabrication method is proposed to produce three-dimensional nanostructures on a quartz surface. Without any template, nanofabrication can be achieved by low-destructive scanning on a target area and post-etching in a KOH solution. Various nanostructures, such as slopes, hierarchical stages and chessboard-like patterns, can be fabricated on the quartz surface. Although the rise of etching temperature can improve fabrication efficiency, fabrication depth is dependent only upon contact pressure and scanning cycles. With the increase of contact pressure during scanning, selective etching thickness of the scanned area increases from 0 to 2.9 nm before the yield of the quartz surface and then tends to stabilise after the appearance of a wear. Refabrication on existing nanostructures can be realised to produce deeper structures on the quartz surface. Based on Arrhenius fitting of the etching rate and transmission electron microscopy characterization of the nanostructure, fabrication mechanism could be attributed to the selective etching of the friction-induced amorphous layer on the quartz surface. As a maskless and low-destructive technique, the proposed friction-induced method will open up new possibilities for further nanofabrication.

  6. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-11-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p’-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis.

  7. Nanofabrication on monocrystalline silicon through friction-induced selective etching of Si3N4 mask.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Yu, Bingjun; Wang, Xiaodong; Qian, Linmao

    2014-01-01

    A new fabrication method is proposed to produce nanostructures on monocrystalline silicon based on the friction-induced selective etching of its Si3N4 mask. With low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si3N4 film as etching mask on Si(100) surface, the fabrication can be realized by nanoscratching on the Si3N4 mask and post-etching in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution in sequence. Scanning Auger nanoprobe analysis indicated that the HF solution could selectively etch the scratched Si3N4 mask and then provide the gap for post-etching of silicon substrate in KOH solution. Experimental results suggested that the fabrication depth increased with the increase of the scratching load or KOH etching period. Because of the excellent masking ability of the Si3N4 film, the maximum fabrication depth of nanostructure on silicon can reach several microns. Compared to the traditional friction-induced selective etching technique, the present method can fabricate structures with lesser damage and deeper depths. Since the proposed method has been demonstrated to be a less destructive and flexible way to fabricate a large-area texture structure, it will provide new opportunities for Si-based nanofabrication.

  8. Selective flow-induced vesicle rupture to sort by membrane mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommella, Angelo; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Seddon, John M.; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-08-01

    Vesicle and cell rupture caused by large viscous stresses in ultrasonication is central to biomedical and bioprocessing applications. The flow-induced opening of lipid membranes can be exploited to deliver drugs into cells, or to recover products from cells, provided that it can be obtained in a controlled fashion. Here we demonstrate that differences in lipid membrane and vesicle properties can enable selective flow-induced vesicle break-up. We obtained vesicle populations with different membrane properties by using different lipids (SOPC, DOPC, or POPC) and lipid:cholesterol mixtures (SOPC:chol and DOPC:chol). We subjected vesicles to large deformations in the acoustic microstreaming flow generated by ultrasound-driven microbubbles. By simultaneously deforming vesicles with different properties in the same flow, we determined the conditions in which rupture is selective with respect to the membrane stretching elasticity. We also investigated the effect of vesicle radius and excess area on the threshold for rupture, and identified conditions for robust selectivity based solely on the mechanical properties of the membrane. Our work should enable new sorting mechanisms based on the difference in membrane composition and mechanical properties between different vesicles, capsules, or cells.

  9. Meditation-induced states predict attentional control over time.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Sellaro, Roberta; Samara, Iliana; Baas, Matthijs; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    Meditation is becoming an increasingly popular topic for scientific research and various effects of extensive meditation practice (ranging from weeks to several years) on cognitive processes have been demonstrated. Here we show that extensive practice may not be necessary to achieve those effects. Healthy adult non-meditators underwent a brief single session of either focused attention meditation (FAM), which is assumed to increase top-down control, or open monitoring meditation (OMM), which is assumed to weaken top-down control, before performing an Attentional Blink (AB) task - which assesses the efficiency of allocating attention over time. The size of the AB was considerably smaller after OMM than after FAM, which suggests that engaging in meditation immediately creates a cognitive-control state that has a specific impact on how people allocate their attention over time.

  10. Inducing and Probing Attosecond-Time-Scale Electronic Wavefunction Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Christian; Raith, Philipp; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Much of the current interest in the field of ultrafast science focuses on the observation of attosecond dynamics of electronic wavepackets. These experiments typically require attosecond pulses either for pumping or probing such dynamics and/or are limited to observing electronic states embedded in the ionization continuum of atoms. Here, we present numerical evidence---based on solutions of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation for a 1-dimensional model atom---that a pump--probe scheme with two few-cycle femtosecond laser pulses provides interferometric access to sub-femtosecond electron wavepacket dynamics. Both continuum- and bound-state electronic wavepacket interference can be simultaneously observed by recording and analyzing time-delay dependent interferences in the ATI spectrum of an atom. Both dipole-allowed and forbidden electronic transition information can be extracted from the data, making this approach a versatile and comprehensive spectroscopic method for probing the bound electronic level structure of an atom.

  11. The effects of celecoxib, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, on acute inflammation induced in irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Khayyal, M T; El-Ghazaly, Mona A; El-Hazek, R M; Nada, A S

    2009-10-01

    The potential value of selective and non-selective COX-2 inhibitors in preventing some of the biochemical changes induced by ionizing radiation was studied in rats exposed to carrageenan-induced paw edema and 6-day-old air pouch models. The animals were exposed to different exposure levels of gamma-radiation, namely either to single doses of 2 and 7.5 Gy or a fractionated dose level of 7.5 Gy delivered as 0.5 Gy twice weekly for 7.5 weeks. The inflammatory response produced by carrageenan in irradiated rats was markedly higher than that induced in non-irradiated animals, and depended on the extent of irradiation. Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in doses of 3, 5, 10, and 15 mg/kg was effective in reducing paw edema in irradiated and non-irradiated rats in a dose-dependent manner as well as diclofenac (3 mg/kg), a non-selective COX inhibitor. Irradiation of animals before the induction of the air pouch by an acute dose of 2 Gy led to a significant increase in leukocytic count, as well as in the level of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), LTB(4), PGE(2) (as an index of COX-2 activity), TXB(2) (as an index of COX-1 activity), and the plasma level of MDA. This increase in level of these parameters was more marked than that observed in the non-irradiated animals subjected to the inflammagen. The blood GSH level was not affected by the dose of irradiation used, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was suppressed. In many respects, celecoxib (5 mg/kg) was as potent as diclofenac in decreasing the elevated levels of IL-6, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, LTB(4), PGE(2), but lacked any significant effect on TXB(2) level. Since it is mostly selective for COX-2 with a rare effect on COX-1 enzyme, both drugs at the selected dose levels showed no effect on level of MDA, GSH, and SOD activity.

  12. Model Estimation and Selection towardsUnconstrained Real-Time Tracking and Mapping.

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, Steffen; Sweeney, Chris; Ventura, Jonathan; Turk, Matthew; Höllerer, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    We present an approach and prototype implementation to initialization-free real-time tracking and mapping that supports any type of camera motion in 3D environments, that is, parallax-inducing as well as rotation-only motions. Our approach effectively behaves like a keyframe-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping system or a panorama tracking and mapping system, depending on the camera movement. It seamlessly switches between the two modes and is thus able to track and map through arbitrary sequences of parallax-inducing and rotation-only camera movements. The system integrates both model-based and model-free tracking, automatically choosing between the two depending on the situation, and subsequently uses the "Geometric Robust Information Criterion" to decide whether the current camera motion can best be represented as a parallax-inducing motion or a rotation-only motion. It continues to collect and map data after tracking failure by creating separate tracks which are later merged if they are found to overlap. This is in contrast to most existing tracking and mapping systems, which suspend tracking and mapping and thus discard valuable data until relocalization with respect to the initial map is successful. We tested our prototype implementation on a variety of video sequences, successfully tracking through different camera motions and fully automatically building combinations of panoramas and 3D structure.

  13. Ultrafast nuclear dynamics in halomethanes studied with time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging and channel-selective Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, Y.; Kaderiya, B.; Pearson, W. L.; Ziaee, F.; Kanaka Raju, P.; Zohrabi, M.; Jensen, K.; Rajput, J.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Halomethanes have recently attracted considerable attention since they often serve as prototype systems for laser-controlled chemistry (e.g., selective bond breaking or concerted elimination reactions), and are important molecules in atmospheric chemistry. Here we combine a femtosecond laser pump-probe setup with coincident 3D ion momentum imaging apparatus to study strong-field induced nuclear dynamics in methane and several of its halogenated derivatives (CH3 I, CH2 I2, CH2 ICl). We apply a time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging technique to map the nuclear motion on both, bound and continuum potential surfaces, disentangle different fragmentation pathways and, for halogenated molecules, observe clear signatures of vibrational wave packets in neutral or ionized states. Channel-selective and kinetic-energy resolved Fourier analysis of these data allows for unique identification of different electronic states and vibrational modes responsible for a particular structure. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. DOE. K. R. P. and W. L. P. supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049. K.J. supported by the NSF-REU Grant No. PHYS-1461251.

  14. Blockade of 5-HT2 Receptor Selectively Prevents MDMA-Induced Verbal Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    van Wel, J H P; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Bosker, W M; Bakker, K; Ramaekers, J G

    2011-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or ‘ecstasy' has been associated with memory deficits during abstinence and intoxication. The human neuropharmacology of MDMA-induced memory impairment is unknown. This study investigated the role of 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A receptors in MDMA-induced memory impairment. Ketanserin is a 5-HT2A receptor blocker and pindolol a 5-HT1A receptor blocker. It was hypothesized that pretreatment with ketanserin and pindolol would protect against MDMA-induced memory impairment. Subjects (N=17) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject design involving six experimental conditions consisting of pretreatment (T1) and treatment (T2). T1 preceded T2 by 30 min. T1–T2 combinations were: placebo–placebo, pindolol 20 mg–placebo, ketanserin 50 mg–placebo, placebo–MDMA 75 mg, pindolol 20 mg–MDMA 75 mg, and ketanserin 50 mg–MDMA 75 mg. Memory function was assessed at Tmax of MDMA by means of a word-learning task (WLT), a spatial memory task and a prospective memory task. MDMA significantly impaired performance in all memory tasks. Pretreatment with a 5-HT2A receptor blocker selectively interacted with subsequent MDMA treatment and prevented MDMA-induced impairment in the WLT, but not in the spatial and prospective memory task. Pretreatment with a 5-HT1A blocker did not affect MDMA-induced memory impairment in any of the tasks. Together, the results demonstrate that MDMA-induced impairment of verbal memory as measured in the WLT is mediated by 5-HT2A receptor stimulation. PMID:21562484

  15. Vascular dysfunction induced by hypochlorite is improved by the selective phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitor vardenafil.

    PubMed

    Radovits, Tamás; Arif, Rawa; Bömicke, Timo; Korkmaz, Sevil; Barnucz, Enikő; Karck, Matthias; Merkely, Béla; Szabó, Gábor

    2013-06-15

    Reactive oxygen species, such as hypochlorite induce oxidative stress, which impairs nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signalling and leads to vascular dysfunction. It has been proposed, that elevated cGMP-levels may contribute to an effective cytoprotection against oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of vardenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterase-5 enzyme on vascular dysfunction induced by hypochlorite. In organ bath experiments for isometric tension, we investigated the endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation of isolated rat aortic rings using cumulative concentrations of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Vascular dysfunction was induced by exposing rings to hypochlorite (100-400 µM). In the treatment groups, rats were pretreated with vardenafil (30 and 300 µg/kg i.v.). Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for the oxidative stress markers nitrotyrosine, poly(ADP-ribose) and for apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). Exposure to hypochlorite resulted in a marked impairment of acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of aortic rings. Pretreatment with vardenafil led to improved endothelial function as reflected by the higher maximal vasorelaxation (Rmax) to acetylcholine. Regarding endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, hypochlorite exposure led to a left-shift of SNP concentration-response curves in the vardenafil groups without any alterations of the Rmax. In the hypochlorite groups immunohistochemical analysis showed enhanced poly(ADP-ribose)-formation and nuclear translocation of AIF, which were prevented by vardenafil-pretreatment. Our results support the view that cytoprotective effects of PDE-5-inhibitors on the endothelium may underlie the improved endothelial function, however, a slight sensitisation of vascular smooth muscle to NO was also confirmed. PDE-5-inhibition may represent a potential therapy approach for treating vascular

  16. Neighbourhood selection for local modelling and prediction of hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, A. W.; Li, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2002-02-01

    The prediction of a time series using the dynamical systems approach requires the knowledge of three parameters; the time delay, the embedding dimension and the number of nearest neighbours. In this paper, a new criterion, based on the generalized degrees of freedom, for the selection of the number of nearest neighbours needed for a better local model for time series prediction is presented. The validity of the proposed method is examined using time series, which are known to be chaotic under certain initial conditions (Lorenz map, Henon map and Logistic map), and real hydro meteorological time series (discharge data from Chao Phraya river in Thailand, Mekong river in Thailand and Laos, and sea surface temperature anomaly data). The predicted results are compared with observations, and with similar predictions obtained by using arbitrarily fixed numbers of neighbours. The results indicate superior predictive capability as measured by the mean square errors and coefficients of variation by the proposed approach when compared with the traditional approach of using a fixed number of neighbours.

  17. Selective deficiency in collagen-induced platelet aggregation during L-asparaginase therapy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R S; Gerrard, J M; Ramsay, N K; Nesbit, M E; Coccia, P F; Stoddard, S F; Plow, E F; White, J G; Krivit, W

    1980-01-01

    Platelet aggregation studies were performed on 10 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving induction therapy with vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. An isolated abnormality in platelet aggregation in response to collagen was found in all patients during the course of therapy. Platelet aggregation in response to collagen normalized following the discontinuation of L-asparaginase, while patients were still on vincristine and prednisone. In contrast to the abnormal collagen response, platelet aggregation induced by epinephrine, arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and thrombin were normal both during and following therapy. In the one patient with a normal platelet count before therapy, aggregation induced by all agents was normal. This selective abnormality in collagen aggregation therefore appears to result from therapy, with the use of L-asparaginase in particular being implicated.

  18. Transformation of diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum by electroporation and establishment of inducible selection marker.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ying-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Zhang, Meng-Han; Zhu, Cong-Cong; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2012-06-01

    Diatoms are important primary producers in the marine ecosystem. Currently it is difficult to genetically transform diatoms due to the technical limitations of existing methods. The promoter/terminator of the nitrate reductase gene of the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was cloned and used to drive chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene expression. The construct was transferred by electroporation into P. tricornutum grown in medium lacking silicon. CAT expression was induced in transformed diatoms in the presence of nitrate, enabling growth in selective medium, and was repressed when ammonium was the only nitrogen source. Expression of CAT transcript and protein were demonstrated by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Our study is the first to report a successful genetic transformation of diatom by electroporation in an economical and efficient manner and provides a tightly regulated inducible gene expression system for diatom.

  19. Recognition of Time-Compressed and Natural Speech with Selective Temporal Enhancements by Young and Elderly Listeners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Fitzgibbons, Peter J.; Friedman, Sarah A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this experiment was to determine whether selective slowing of speech segments improves recognition performance by young and elderly listeners. The hypotheses were (a) the benefits of time expansion occur for rapid speech but not for natural-rate speech, (b) selective time expansion of consonants produces greater score…

  20. Selection of motor programs for suppressing food intake and inducing locomotion in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Schoofs, Andreas; Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Peters, Marc; Zeymer, Malou; Spieß, Roland; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Pankratz, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    Central mechanisms by which specific motor programs are selected to achieve meaningful behaviors are not well understood. Using electrophysiological recordings from pharyngeal nerves upon central activation of neurotransmitter-expressing cells, we show that distinct neuronal ensembles can regulate different feeding motor programs. In behavioral and electrophysiological experiments, activation of 20 neurons in the brain expressing the neuropeptide hugin, a homolog of mammalian neuromedin U, simultaneously suppressed the motor program for food intake while inducing the motor program for locomotion. Decreasing hugin neuropeptide levels in the neurons by RNAi prevented this action. Reducing the level of hugin neuronal activity alone did not have any effect on feeding or locomotion motor programs. Furthermore, use of promoter-specific constructs that labeled subsets of hugin neurons demonstrated that initiation of locomotion can be separated from modulation of its motor pattern. These results provide insights into a neural mechanism of how opposing motor programs can be selected in order to coordinate feeding and locomotive behaviors.

  1. UV-induced changes in antioxidant capacities of selected carotenoids toward lecithin in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Dragan; Markovic, Dejan

    2008-01-01

    Antioxidant action of four selected carotenoids (two carotenes, β-carotene and lycopene, and two xanthophylls, lutein and neoxanthin) on UV-induced lecithin lipid peroxidation in aqueous solution has been studied by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. TBA test is based on absorbance measurements of complex formed between malondialdehyde, secondary product of lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid, at 532 nm. The antioxidant capacities of investigated carotenoids appeared to be strongly affected by UV-action. High energy input of the involved UV-photons plays major governing role, though a certain impact of the carotenoid structures cannot be neglected. The results suggest a minor remained contribution of selected carotenoids to prevention of lecithin peroxidation in the studied system as a result of UV-irradiation.

  2. Time takes space: selective effects of multitasking on concurrent spatial processing.

    PubMed

    Mäntylä, Timo; Coni, Valentina; Kubik, Veit; Todorov, Ivo; Del Missier, Fabio

    2017-03-18

    Many everyday activities require coordination and monitoring of complex relations of future goals and deadlines. Cognitive offloading may provide an efficient strategy for reducing control demands by representing future goals and deadlines as a pattern of spatial relations. We tested the hypothesis that multiple-task monitoring involves time-to-space transformational processes, and that these spatial effects are selective with greater demands on coordinate (metric) than categorical (nonmetric) spatial relation processing. Participants completed a multitasking session in which they monitored four series of deadlines, running on different time scales, while making concurrent coordinate or categorical spatial judgments. We expected and found that multitasking taxes concurrent coordinate, but not categorical, spatial processing. Furthermore, males showed a better multitasking performance than females. These findings provide novel experimental evidence for the hypothesis that efficient multitasking involves metric relational processing.

  3. Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing a deuterium enriched material by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the working material a gas phase photolytically dissociable organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom which is adjacent to a carbonyl group and consisting of molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as deuterium and molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as another isotope of hydrogen. The organic carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of the deuterium containing species to yield a deuterium enriched stable molecular product. Undissociated carbonyl compound, depleted in deuterium, is preferably redeuterated for reuse.

  4. Avoidance of fisheries-induced evolution: management implications for catch selectivity and limit reference points.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2009-08-01

    I examined how the fitness (r) associated with early- and late-maturing genotypes varies with fishing mortality (F) and age-/size-specific probability of capture. Life-history data on Newfoundland's northern Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) allowed for the estimation of r for individuals maturing at 4 and 7 year in the absence of fishing. Catch selectivity data associated with four types of fishing gear (trap, gillnet, handline, otter trawl) were then incorporated to examine how r varied with gear type and with F. The resulting fitness functions were then used to estimate the F above which selection would favour early (4 year) rather than delayed (7 year) maturity. This evolutionarily-sensitive threshold, F evol, identifies a limit reference point somewhat similar to those used to define overfishing (e.g., F msy, F 0.1). Over-exploitation of northern cod resulted in fishing mortalities considerably greater than those required to effect evolutionary change. Selection for early maturity is reduced by the dome-shaped selectivities characteristic of fixed gears such as handlines (the greater the leptokurtosis, the lower the probability of a selection response) and enhanced by the knife-edged selectivities of bottom trawls. Strategies to minimize genetic change are consistent with traditional management objectives (e.g., yield maximization, population increase). Compliance with harvest control rules guided by evolutionarily-sensitive limit reference points, which may be achieved by adherence to traditional reference points such as F msy and F 0.1, should be sufficient to minimize the probability of fisheries-induced evolution for commercially exploited species.

  5. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  6. Real-time observation of liposome bursting induced by acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazunari; Horii, Keitaro; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Izumi

    2014-10-06

    We show the bursting process of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) liposomes in response to the addition of acetonitrile, a small toxic molecule widely used in the fields of chemistry and industry. The percentage of destroyed liposomes is reduced upon decreasing the acetonitrile fraction in the aqueous solution and vesicle bursting is not observed at volume ratios of 4:6 and below. This indicates that a high fraction of acetonitrile causes the bursting of liposomes, and it is proposed that this occurs through insertion of the molecules into outer leaflet of the lipid bilayer. The elapsed time between initial addition of acetonitrile and liposome bursting at each vesicle is also measured and demonstrated to be dependent on the volume fraction of acetonitrile and the vesicle size.

  7. Predicting bacterial resistance using the time inside the mutant selection window: possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Firsov, Alexander A; Portnoy, Yury A; Strukova, Elena N; Shlykova, Darya S; Zinner, Stephen H

    2014-10-01

    The time inside the mutant selection window (TMSW) has been shown to be less predictive of selection of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria than the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC/MIC). To explore the different predictive powers of TMSW and AUC/MIC, enrichment of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants of four Escherichia coli strains was studied in an in vitro dynamic model at widely ranging TMSW values. Each organism was exposed to twice-daily ciprofloxacin for 3 days. Peak antibiotic concentrations were simulated to be close to the MIC, between the MIC and the mutant prevention concentration (MPC), and above the MPC, with TMSW varying from 0% to 100% of the dosing interval. Amplification of resistant mutants was monitored by plating on medium with 8× MIC of the antibiotic. For each organism, TMSW plots of the area under the bacterial mutant concentration-time curve (AUBCM) exhibited a hysteresis loop: at a given TMSW that corresponds to the points on the ascending portion of the bell-shaped AUBCM-AUC/MIC curve [when the time above the MPC (T>MPC) was zero], the AUBCM was greater than at the same TMSW related to the descending portion (T>MPC>0). A sigmoid function fits these separate data sets well for combined data with the four organisms (r(2)=0.81 and 0.92, respectively), in contrast to fitting the whole data pool while ignoring the AUC/MIC-resistance relationship (r(2)=0.61). These data allow the appropriate use of TMSW as a predictor of bacterial resistance.

  8. Selection of single chain variable fragments specific for the human-inducible costimulator using ribosome display.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yangbin; Mao, Weiping; Liu, Xuanxuan; Xu, Chong; He, Zhijuan; Wang, Wenqian; Yan, Hao

    2012-11-01

    We applied a ribosome display technique to a mouse single chain variable fragment (scFv) library to select scFvs specific for the inducible costimulator (ICOS). mRNA was isolated from the spleens of BALB/c mice immunized with ICOS protein. Heavy and κ chain genes (VH and κ) were amplified separately by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and the anti-ICOS VH/κ chain ribosome display library was constructed with a special flexible linker by overlap extension PCR. The VH/κ chain library was transcribed and translated in vitro using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. Then, antibody-ribosome-mRNA complexes were produced and panned against ICOS protein under appropriate conditions. However, in order to isolate specific scFvs for ICOS, negative selection using CD28 was carried out before three rounds of positive selection on ICOS. After three rounds of panning, the selected scFv DNAs were cloned into pET43.1a and detected by SDS-PAGE. Then, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that we successfully constructed a native ribosome display library, and among seven clones, clone 5 had the highest affinity for the ICOS and low for the CD28. Anti-ICOS scFvs are assessed for binding specificity and affinity and may provide the potential for development of the humanized and acute and chronic allograft rejection.

  9. Dependence of the Crossing Time on the Sequence Length in a Diploid Discrete-Time Mutation-Selection Model for a Finite Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    This study examined the crossing time in the diploid discrete-time mutation-selection model in a finite population for a range of dominance parameters and selective advantages by switching on a diploid, asymmetric, bridged landscape, from an initial state, a steady state in a diploid, bridged landscape. The dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length was examined for a fixed extension parameter, which was defined as the mean Hamming distance from the optimal allele of the initial steady state divided by the sequence length. The boundary between the deterministic and stochastic regions in the diploid discrete-time mutation-selection model was characterized using the same formula as that in the haploid discrete-time mutation-selection model. The crossing time in a finite population with various population sizes, dominance parameters and selective advantages began to deviate from the crossing time for an infinite population at the critical sequence length. The crossing time for a finite population in the stochastic region was found to be an exponentially increasing function of the sequence length, whose rate was unchanged, regardless of changes in the population size, dominance parameter and selective advantage with a fixed extension parameter. This work was supported by a 2-Year Research Grant of Pusan National University.

  10. Adaptation through genetic time travel? Fluctuating selection can drive the evolution of bacterial transformation.

    PubMed

    Engelstädter, Jan; Moradigaravand, Danesh

    2014-01-22

    Natural transformation is a process whereby bacteria actively take up DNA from the surrounding environment and incorporate it into their genome. Natural transformation is widespread in bacteria, but its evolutionary significance is still debated. Here, we hypothesize that transformation may confer a fitness advantage in changing environments through a process we term 'genetic time travel': by taking up old genes that were retained in the environment, the bacteria may revert to a past genotypic state that proves advantageous in the present or a future environment. We scrutinize our hypothesis by means of a mathematical model involving two bacterial types (transforming and non-transforming), a single locus under natural selection and a free DNA pool. The two bacterial types were competed in environments with changing selection regimes. We demonstrate that for a wide range of parameter values for the DNA turnover rate, the transformation rate and the frequency of environmental change, the transforming type outcompetes the non-transforming type. We discuss the empirical plausibility of our hypothesis, as well as its relationship to other hypotheses for the evolution of transformation in bacteria and sex more generally, speculating that 'genetic time travel' may also be relevant in eukaryotes that undergo horizontal gene transfer.

  11. Automated selection of brain regions for real-time fMRI brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lührs, Michael; Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Esposito, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) implemented with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) use fMRI time-courses from predefined regions of interest (ROIs). To reach best performances, localizer experiments and on-site expert supervision are required for ROI definition. To automate this step, we developed two unsupervised computational techniques based on the general linear model (GLM) and independent component analysis (ICA) of rt-fMRI data, and compared their performances on a communication BCI. Approach. 3 T fMRI data of six volunteers were re-analyzed in simulated real-time. During a localizer run, participants performed three mental tasks following visual cues. During two communication runs, a letter-spelling display guided the subjects to freely encode letters by performing one of the mental tasks with a specific timing. GLM- and ICA-based procedures were used to decode each letter, respectively using compact ROIs and whole-brain distributed spatio-temporal patterns of fMRI activity, automatically defined from subject-specific or group-level maps. Main results. Letter-decoding performances were comparable to supervised methods. In combination with a similarity-based criterion, GLM- and ICA-based approaches successfully decoded more than 80% (average) of the letters. Subject-specific maps yielded optimal performances. Significance. Automated solutions for ROI selection may help accelerating the translation of rt-fMRI BCIs from research to clinical applications.

  12. The effect of sine-Wiener noises on transition in a genotype selection model with time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan Ning, Li; Liu, Pei

    2016-09-01

    A genotype selection system interplay with sine-Wiener noises and time delays is investigated. Stationary probability distribution function is obtained by numerical simulations. Results show that the multiplicative bounded noise can facilitate the gene separation, while the additive bounded noise suppresses the gene separation. Besides, local time delays α and β, being in gene transformation and gene heredity progress respectively, play opposite roles in the gene selection process. What is more interesting is that there is no transition during the process of gene select when time delays α = β (i.e., the system is subjected to global time delay).

  13. Magnetic-field-induced diameter-selective synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yanjie; Zhang, Yaozhong; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Liling; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yafei

    2012-02-01

    We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process.We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process

  14. Selective Light-Induced Patterning of Carbon Nanotube/Silver Nanoparticle Composite To Produce Extremely Flexible Conductive Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inhyuk; Woo, Kyoohee; Zhong, Zhaoyang; Lee, Eonseok; Kang, Dongwoo; Jeong, Sunho; Choi, Young-Man; Jang, Yunseok; Kwon, Sin; Moon, Jooho

    2017-02-22

    Recently, highly flexible conductive features have been widely demanded for the development of various electronic applications, such as foldable displays, deformable lighting, disposable sensors, and flexible batteries. Herein, we report for the first time a selective photonic sintering-derived, highly reliable patterning approach for creating extremely flexible carbon nanotube (CNT)/silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) composite electrodes that can tolerate severe bending (20 000 cycles at a bending radius of 1 mm). The incorporation of CNTs into a Ag NP film can enhance not only the mechanical stability of electrodes but also the photonic-sintering efficiency when the composite is irradiated by intense pulsed light (IPL). Composite electrodes were patterned on various plastic substrates by a three-step process comprising coating, selective IPL irradiation, and wiping. A composite film selectively exposed to IPL could not be easily wiped from the substrate, because interfusion induced strong adhesion to the underlying polymer substrate. In contrast, a nonirradiated film adhered weakly to the substrate and was easily removed, enabling highly flexible patterned electrodes. The potential of our flexible electrode patterns was clearly demonstrated by fabricating a light-emitting diode circuit and a flexible transparent heater with unimpaired functionality under bending, rolling, and folding.

  15. Phenotypic Selection Exerted by a Seed Predator Is Replicated in Space and Time and among Prey Species.

    PubMed

    Benkman, Craig W; Mezquida, Eduardo T

    2015-11-01

    Although consistent phenotypic selection arising from biotic interactions is thought to be the primary cause of adaptive diversification, studies documenting such selection are relatively few. Here we analyze 12 episodes of phenotypic selection exerted by a predispersal seed predator, the red crossbill (Loxia curvirostra complex), on five species of pines (Pinus). We find that even though the intensity of selection for some traits increased with the strength of the interaction (i.e., proportion of seeds eaten), the relative strength of selection exerted by crossbills on cone and seed traits is replicated across space and time and among species. Such selection (1) can account for repeated patterns of conifer cone evolution and escalation in seed defenses with time and (2) suggests that variation in selection is less the result of variation intrinsic to pairwise biotic interactions than, for example, variation in relative densities of the interacting species, community context, and abiotic factors.

  16. Observational selection biases in time-delay strong lensing and their impact on cosmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Thomas E.; Cunnington, Steven D.

    2016-11-01

    Inferring cosmological parameters from time-delay strong lenses requires a significant investment of telescope time; it is therefore tempting to focus on the systems with the brightest sources, the highest image multiplicities and the widest image separations. We investigate if this selection bias can influence the properties of the lenses studied and the cosmological parameters inferred. Using an ellipsoidal power-law deflector population, we build a sample of double- and quadruple-image systems. Assuming reasonable thresholds on image separation and flux, based on current lens monitoring campaigns, we find that the typical density profile slopes of monitorable lenses are significantly shallower than the input ensemble. From a sample of quads, we find that this selection function can introduce a 3.5 per cent bias on the inferred time-delay distances if the properties of the input ensemble are (incorrectly) used as priors on the lens model. This bias remains at the 2.4 per cent level when high-resolution imaging of the quasar host is used to precisely infer the properties of individual lenses. We also investigate if the lines of sight for monitorable strong lenses are biased. The expectation value for the line-of-sight convergence is increased by 0.009 (0.004) for quads (doubles) implying a 0.9 per cent (0.4 per cent) bias on H0. We therefore conclude that whilst the properties of typical quasar lenses and their lines of sight do deviate from the global population, the total magnitude of this effect is likely to be a subdominant effect for current analyses, but has the potential to be a major systematic for samples of ˜25 or more lenses.

  17. Basis for sensitive and selective time-delayed luminescence detection of hydroxyl radical by lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Katie L; Margherio, Maximilian J; Doan, Phi; Wilke, Kyle T; Pierre, Valérie C

    2013-08-19

    Molecular probes for the detection of hydroxyl radical (HO•) by time-delayed luminescence spectroscopy directly in water at neutral pH with high sensitivity and selectivity are presented. The bimolecular probes consist of a lanthanide complex with open coordination sites and a reactive pre-antenna composed of an aromatic acid or amide; the latter binds to and sensitizes terbium emission upon hydroxylation by HO•. These probes exhibit long luminescence lifetimes compatible with time-delayed measurements that remove interfering background fluorescence from the sample. Six different reactive pre-antenna (benzoate, benzamide, isophthalate, isophthalamide, trimesate, and trimesamide) and two different terbium complexes [Tb-(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-tris(acetic acid)) (Tb-DO3A) and Tb-(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-bis(acetic acid)) (Tb-DO2A)] were evaluated. Of these the trimesamide/Tb-DO3A system enables the most sensitive detection of HO• with an about 1000-fold increase in metal-centered time-delayed emission upon hydroxylation of the pre-antenna to 2-hydroxytrimesamide. Excellent selectivity for both the trimesamide/Tb-DO3A and trimesate/Tb-DO3A systems over other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are observed. Notably, the increase in metal-centered luminescence intensity is not associated with a decrease in the hydration number (q) of Tb-DO3A, suggesting that the antenna is interacting with the lanthanide via a second sphere coordination environment or that coordination by the antenna occurs by displacement of one or more of the carboxylate arms of DO3A. Formation of a weak ternary complex Tb-DO3A•hydroxytrimesamide was confirmed by temperature-dependent titration and a decrease in K(app) with increasing temperature.

  18. Selected scorpion toxin exposures induce cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Espino-Solis, Gerardo Pavel

    2017-03-01

    A cytokine screening on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with selected scorpion toxins (ScTx's) was performed in order to evaluate their effect on human immune cells. The ScTx's chosen for this report were three typical buthid scorpion venom peptides, one with lethal effects on mammals Centruroides suffussus suffusus toxin II (CssII), another, with lethal effects on insects and crustaceans Centruroides noxius toxin 5 (Cn5), and one more without lethal effects Tityus discrepans toxin (Discrepin). A Luminex multiplex analysis was performed in order to determine the amounts chemokines and cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12-p40, IL-13, interferon alpha (IFN-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha TNF-α, and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) secreted from human PBMCs exposed to these toxins. Although, the ScTx Cn5 is not lethal for mammals, it was able to induce the secretion of cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, IL-10 and IP-10 in comparison to the lethal CssII, which was able to induce only IP-10 secretion. Discrepin also was able to induce only IP-10. Interestingly, only low amounts of interferons α and β were induced in the presence of the ScTx's assayed. In a synergic experiment, the combination of Discrepin and Cn5 displayed considerable reverse effects on induction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, but they had a slight synergic effect on IP-10 cytokine production in comparison with the single effect obtained with the Cn5 alone. Thus, the results obtained suggest that the profile of secreted cytokines promoted by ScTx Cn5 is highly related with a cytokine storm event, and also it suggests that the mammalian lethal neurotoxins are not solely responsible of the scorpion envenomation symptomatology.

  19. Memory modulation in the classroom: selective enhancement of college examination performance by arousal induced after lecture.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Kristy A; Arentsen, Timothy J

    2012-07-01

    Laboratory studies examining moderate physiological or emotional arousal induced after learning indicate that it enhances memory consolidation. Yet, no studies have yet examined this effect in an applied context. As such, arousal was induced after a college lecture and its selective effects were examined on later exam performance. Participants were divided into two groups who either watched a neutral video clip (n=66) or an arousing video clip (n=70) after lecture in a psychology course. The final examination occurred two weeks after the experimental manipulation. Only performance on the group of final exam items that covered material from the manipulated lecture were significantly different between groups. Other metrics, such as the midterm examination and the total final examination score, did not differ between groups. The results indicate that post-lecture arousal selectively increased the later retrieval of lecture material, despite the availability of the material for study before and after the manipulation. The results reinforce the role of post-learning arousal on memory consolidation processes, expanding the literature to include a real-world learning context.

  20. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  1. The marine cytotoxin portimine is a potent and selective inducer of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cuddihy, Sarah L; Drake, Sarah; Harwood, D Tim; Selwood, Andrew I; McNabb, Paul S; Hampton, Mark B

    2016-12-01

    Portimine is a recently discovered member of a class of marine micro-algal toxins called cyclic imines. In dramatic contrast to related compounds in this toxin class, portimine has very low acute toxicity to mice but is highly cytotoxic to cultured cells. In this study we show that portimine kills human Jurkat T-lymphoma cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), with LC50 values of 6 and 2.5 nM respectively. Treated cells displayed rapid caspase activation and phosphatidylserine exposure, indicative of apoptotic cell death. Jurkat cells overexpressing the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 or Bax/Bak knockout MEFs were completely protected from portimine. This protection was apparent even at high concentrations of portimine, with no evidence of necrotic cell death, indicating that portimine is a selective chemical inducer of apoptosis. Treatment of the Bcl-2-overexpressing cells with both portimine and the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 proved a powerful combination, causing >90 % death. We conclude that portimine is one of the most potent naturally derived inducers of apoptosis to be discovered, and it displays strong selectivity for the induction of apoptotic pathways.

  2. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Fahad; Harris, Paul D; Zaher, Manal S; Sobhy, Mohamed A; Joudeh, Luay I; Yan, Chunli; Piwonski, Hubert; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Tainer, John A; Habuchi, Satoshi; Hamdan, Samir M

    2017-01-01

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and related structure-specific 5’nucleases precisely identify and incise aberrant DNA structures during replication, repair and recombination to avoid genomic instability. Yet, it is unclear how the 5’nuclease mechanisms of DNA distortion and protein ordering robustly mediate efficient and accurate substrate recognition and catalytic selectivity. Here, single-molecule sub-millisecond and millisecond analyses of FEN1 reveal a protein-DNA induced-fit mechanism that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually ‘locks’ protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme precision. Strikingly, FEN1 never misses cleavage of its cognate substrate while blocking probable formation of catalytically competent interactions with noncognate substrates and fostering their pre-incision dissociation. These findings establish FEN1 has practically perfect precision and that separate control of induced-fit substrate recognition sets up the catalytic selectivity of the nuclease active site for genome stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21884.001 PMID:28230529

  3. Melatonin, a novel selective ATF-6 inhibitor, induces human hepatoma cell apoptosis through COX-2 downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Li-Jia; Yu, Han-Qing; Fan, Lu-Lu; Li, Xiao-Qiu; Wang, Fang; Liu, Jia-Tao; Zhong, Fei; Zhang, Cong-Jun; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hua; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2017-01-01

    AIM To clarify the mechanisms involved in the critical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress initiating unfolded protein response pathway modified by melatonin. METHODS Hepatoma cells, HepG2, were cultured in vitro. Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to measure HepG2 cell apoptosis. Western blotting and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods were used to determine the protein and messenger RNA levels of ER stress and apoptosis related genes’ expression, respectively. Tissue microarray construction from patients was verified by immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS In the present study, we first identified that melatonin selectively blocked activating transcription factor 6 (ATF-6) and then inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, leading to enhanced liver cancer cell apoptosis under ER stress condition. Dramatically increased CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein level, suppressed COX-2 and decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio by melatonin or ATF-6 siRNA contributed the enhanced HepG2 cell apoptosis under tunicamycin (an ER stress inducer) stimulation. In clinical hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the close relationship between ATF-6 and COX-2 was further confirmed. CONCLUSION These findings indicate that melatonin as a novel selective ATF-6 inhibitor can sensitize human hepatoma cells to ER stress inducing apoptosis. PMID:28246472

  4. Conformational selection or induced fit: a flux description of reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hammes, Gordon G; Chang, Yu-Chu; Oas, Terrence G

    2009-08-18

    The mechanism of ligand binding coupled to conformational changes in macromolecules has recently attracted considerable interest. The 2 limiting cases are the "induced fit" mechanism (binding first) or "conformational selection" (conformational change first). Described here are the criteria by which the sequence of events can be determined quantitatively. The relative importance of the 2 pathways is determined not by comparing rate constants (a common misconception) but instead by comparing the flux through each pathway. The simple rules for calculating flux in multistep mechanisms are described and then applied to 2 examples from the literature, neither of which has previously been analyzed using the concept of flux. The first example is the mechanism of conformational change in the binding of NADPH to dihydrofolate reductase. The second example is the mechanism of flavodoxin folding coupled to binding of its cofactor, flavin mononucleotide. In both cases, the mechanism switches from being dominated by the conformational selection pathway at low ligand concentration to induced fit at high ligand concentration. Over a wide range of conditions, a significant fraction of the flux occurs through both pathways. Such a mixed mechanism likely will be discovered for many cases of coupled conformational change and ligand binding when kinetic data are analyzed by using a flux-based approach.

  5. Quantum Mode Selectivity of Plasmon-Induced Water Splitting on Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Wang, Fangwei; Meng, Sheng

    2016-05-24

    Plasmon induced water splitting is a promising research area with the potential for efficient conversion of solar to chemical energy, yet its atomic mechanism is not well understood. Here, ultrafast electron-nuclear dynamics of water splitting on gold nanoparticles upon exposure to femtosecond laser pulses was directly simulated using real time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Strong correlation between laser intensity, hot electron transfer, and reaction rates has been identified. The rate of water splitting is dependent not only on respective optical absorption strength, but also on the quantum oscillation mode of plasmonic excitation. Odd modes are more efficient than even modes, owing to faster decaying into hot electrons whose energy matches well the antibonding orbital of water. This finding suggests photocatalytic activity can be manipulated by adjusting the energy level of plasmon-induced hot carriers, through altering the cluster size and laser parameter, to better overlap adsorbate unoccupied level in plasmon-assisted photochemistry.

  6. Medial prefrontal theta oscillations track the time course of interference during selective memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Catarina S; Marful, Alejandra; Staudigl, Tobias; Bajo, Teresa; Hanslmayr, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Memory retrieval is often challenged by other irrelevant competing memories that cause interference. This phenomenon is typically studied with the retrieval practice paradigm in which a category cue (e.g., Fruits) is presented together with an item-specific cue (e.g., Or::). Presentation of the category cue usually induces interference by reactivating competing memories (e.g., Banana, Apple, etc.), which is thought to be solved by means of inhibition, leading to retrieval-induced forgetting of these competing memories. Previous studies associated interference with an increase in medial prefrontal theta band (4-8 Hz) oscillations, but these studies could not disentangle the interference from the inhibition processes. We here used a retrieval practice procedure in which the category cue was presented before the item-specific cue to disentangle the interference from the inhibition signal. Furthermore, a competitive retrieval condition was contrasted with a noncompetitive condition. At a behavioral level, retrieval-induced forgetting was found in the competitive but not in the noncompetitive condition. At a neural level, presentation of the category cue elicited higher levels of theta power in the competitive condition, when compared with the noncompetitive retrieval condition. Importantly, this difference was localized to the ACC, which has been associated with the detection and mediation of interference. Additionally, theta power decreased upon presentation of the item-specific cue, and this difference was related to later forgetting. Our results therefore disentangle, for the first time, interference and inhibition in episodic memory retrieval and suggest that theta oscillations track the fine-grained temporal dynamics of interference during competitive memory retrieval.

  7. Time constant of round superconducting structures determined from the time development of the induced magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.

    2016-12-01

    It is shown that evaluating the time development of the penetrated magnetic field into the superconductors can be used for the determination of time constant for round structures, too. The calculations are very similar to those used for the flat structures. The method is very simple, both by the practical realization of the experiment and by the evaluation of the time evolution of the penetrated magnetic field above the superconductor. The procedure uses an exponential decrease of the applied magnetic field, which can be easily performed by discharging an external circuit. By determining the position of the maximum of the difference between the penetrated field induction and the applied magnetic field induction, the corresponding time constant can be evaluated by a very simple equation, which is calculated in the paper. The results are very similar to the previous calculations, obtained for the flat superconducting cables. In addition, it is suggested that knowing the time constant of superconducting structures could be in many cases more important both for research aspects and for practical applications.

  8. Selective prostacyclin receptor agonism augments glucocorticoid-induced gene expression in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sylvia M; Shen, Pamela; Rider, Christopher F; Traves, Suzanne L; Proud, David; Newton, Robert; Giembycz, Mark A

    2009-11-15

    Prostacyclin receptor (IP-receptor) agonists display anti-inflammatory and antiviral activity in cell-based assays and in preclinical models of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this study, we have extended these observations by demonstrating that IP-receptor activation also can enhance the ability of glucocorticoids to induce genes with anti-inflammatory activity. BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells stably transfected with a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) luciferase reporter were activated in a concentration-dependent manner by the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. An IP-receptor agonist, taprostene, increased cAMP in these cells and augmented luciferase expression at all concentrations of dexamethasone examined. Analysis of the concentration-response relationship that described this effect showed that taprostene increased the magnitude of transcription without affecting the potency of dexamethasone and was, thus, steroid-sparing in this simple system. RO3244794, an IP-receptor antagonist, and oligonucleotides that selectively silenced the IP-receptor gene, PTGIR, abolished these effects of taprostene. Infection of BEAS-2B GRE reporter cells with an adenovirus vector encoding a highly selective inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) also prevented taprostene from enhancing GRE-dependent transcription. In BEAS-2B cells and primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells, taprostene and dexamethasone interacted either additively or cooperatively in the expression of three glucocorticoid-inducible genes (GILZ, MKP-1, and p57(kip2)) that have anti-inflammatory potential. Collectively, these data show that IP-receptor agonists can augment the ability of glucocorticoids to induce anti-inflammatory genes in human airway epithelial cells by activating a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism. This observation may have clinical relevance in the treatment of airway inflammatory diseases that are either refractory or respond suboptimally to

  9. Evaluating Varied Label Designs for Use with Medical Devices: Optimized Labels Outperform Existing Labels in the Correct Selection of Devices and Time to Select

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Do Chan; Ladoni, Moslem; Brunk, Eric; Becker, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Effective standardization of medical device labels requires objective study of varied designs. Insufficient empirical evidence exists regarding how practitioners utilize and view labeling. Objective Measure the effect of graphic elements (boxing information, grouping information, symbol use and color-coding) to optimize a label for comparison with those typical of commercial medical devices. Design Participants viewed 54 trials on a computer screen. Trials were comprised of two labels that were identical with regard to graphics, but differed in one aspect of information (e.g., one had latex, the other did not). Participants were instructed to select the label along a given criteria (e.g., latex containing) as quickly as possible. Dependent variables were binary (correct selection) and continuous (time to correct selection). Participants Eighty-nine healthcare professionals were recruited at Association of Surgical Technologists (AST) conferences, and using a targeted e-mail of AST members. Results Symbol presence, color coding and grouping critical pieces of information all significantly improved selection rates and sped time to correct selection (α = 0.05). Conversely, when critical information was graphically boxed, probability of correct selection and time to selection were impaired (α = 0.05). Subsequently, responses from trials containing optimal treatments (color coded, critical information grouped with symbols) were compared to two labels created based on a review of those commercially available. Optimal labels yielded a significant positive benefit regarding the probability of correct choice ((P<0.0001) LSM; UCL, LCL: 97.3%; 98.4%, 95.5%)), as compared to the two labels we created based on commercial designs (92.0%; 94.7%, 87.9% and 89.8%; 93.0%, 85.3%) and time to selection. Conclusions Our study provides data regarding design factors, namely: color coding, symbol use and grouping of critical information that can be used to significantly enhance

  10. Time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries, Houston, Texas, August 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.; Schaer, Jasper D.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a time-of-travel study in the Buffalo Bayou watershed during low flow in August 1999. The study was done as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Monitoring for Public Access and Community Tracking (EMPACT) program. The EMPACT program was designed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to work with communities to “make timely, accurate, and understandable environmental information available to millions of people in the largest metropolitan areas across the country.” (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2000). Buffalo Bayou, located in Houston, Texas, was chosen as a pilot project because it is a frequently used recreational water source, it has many water-treatment facilities located along its stream segments, and it has a history of water-quality problems (Houston-Galveston Area Council, 2000). One component of the pilot project is to develop a water-quality simulation model that can be used to assess the effects of noncompliance events on Buffalo Bayou. Because accurate estimates of time of travel during low flow are required to develop the model, the time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries was determined using dye tracing methods. The study was conducted during low flow in a 38.7-mile reach of Buffalo Bayou, a 9.6-mile reach of Whiteoak Bayou, a 5.9-mile reach of Mason Creek, and a 6.6-mile reach of Bear Creek. Efforts to determine the time of travel in a 7.5-mile reach of Horsepen Creek were unsuccessful. This report explains the approach used to conduct the study and presents the results of the study

  11. Selective white matter pathology induces a specific impairment in spatial working memory.

    PubMed

    Coltman, Robin; Spain, Aisling; Tsenkina, Yanina; Fowler, Jill H; Smith, Jessica; Scullion, Gillian; Allerhand, Mike; Scott, Fiona; Kalaria, Rajesh N; Ihara, Masafumi; Daumas, Stephanie; Deary, Ian J; Wood, Emma; McCulloch, James; Horsburgh, Karen

    2011-12-01

    The integrity of the white matter is critical in regulating efficient neuronal communication and maintaining cognitive function. Damage to brain white matter putatively contributes to age-related cognitive decline. There is a growing interest in animal models from which the mechanistic basis of white matter pathology in aging can be elucidated but to date there has been a lack of systematic behavior and pathology in the same mice. Anatomically widespread, diffuse white matter damage was induced, in 3 different cohorts of C57Bl/6J mice, by chronic hypoperfusion produced by bilateral carotid stenosis. A comprehensive assessment of spatial memory (spatial reference learning and memory; cohort 1) and serial spatial learning and memory (cohort 2) using the water maze, and spatial working memory (cohort 3) using the 8-arm radial arm maze, was conducted. In parallel, a systematic assessment of white matter components (myelin, axon, glia) was conducted using immunohistochemical markers (myelin-associated glycoprotein [MAG], degraded myelin basic protein [dMBP], anti-amyloid precursor protein [APP], anti-ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule [Iba-1]). Ischemic neuronal perikarya damage, assessed using histology (hematoxylin and eosin; H&E), was absent in all shams but was present in some hypoperfused mice (2/11 in cohort 1, 4/14 in cohort 2, and 17/24 in cohort 3). All animals with neuronal perikaryal damage were excluded from further study. Diffuse white matter damage occurred, throughout the brain, in all hypoperfused mice in each cohort and was essentially absent in sham-operated controls. There was a selective impairment in spatial working memory, with all other measures of spatial memory remaining intact, in hypoperfused mice with selective white matter damage. The results demonstrate that diffuse white matter pathology, in the absence of gray matter damage, induces a selective impairment of spatial working memory. This highlights the importance of assessing

  12. Thymic involution perturbs negative selection leading to autoreactive T cells that induce chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Coder, Brandon D; Wang, Hongjun; Ruan, Linhui; Su, Dong-Ming

    2015-06-15

    Thymic involution and the subsequent amplified release of autoreactive T cells increase the susceptibility toward developing autoimmunity, but whether they induce chronic inflammation with advanced age remains unclear. The presence of chronic low-level proinflammatory factors in elderly individuals (termed inflammaging) is a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality in virtually every chronic age-related disease. To determine how thymic involution leads to the persistent release and activation of autoreactive T cells capable of inducing inflammaging, we used a Foxn1 conditional knockout mouse model that induces accelerated thymic involution while maintaining a young periphery. We found that thymic involution leads to T cell activation shortly after thymic egress, which is accompanied by a chronic inflammatory phenotype consisting of cellular infiltration into non-lymphoid tissues, increased TNF-α production, and elevated serum IL-6. Autoreactive T cell clones were detected in the periphery of Foxn1 conditional knockout mice. A failure of negative selection, facilitated by decreased expression of Aire rather than impaired regulatory T cell generation, led to autoreactive T cell generation. Furthermore, the young environment can reverse age-related regulatory T cell accumulation in naturally aged mice, but not inflammatory infiltration. Taken together, these findings identify thymic involution and the persistent activation of autoreactive T cells as a contributing source of chronic inflammation (inflammaging).

  13. Skeletal unloading induces selective resistance to the anabolic actions of growth hormone on bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Autry, C. P.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S.; Patterson-Buckendahl, P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of skeletal weight bearing or physical unloading of bone in the growing animal inhibits bone formation and induces a bone mineral deficit. To determine whether the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading in the growing animal is a consequence of diminished sensitivity to growth hormone (GH) we studied the effects of skeletal unloading in young hypophysectomized rats treated with GH (0, 50, 500 micrograms/100 g body weight/day). Skeletal unloading reduced serum osteocalcin, impaired uptake of 3H-proline into bone, decreased proximal tibial mass, and diminished periosteal bone formation at the tibiofibular junction. When compared with animals receiving excipient alone, GH administration increased bone mass in all animals. The responses in serum osteocalcin, uptake of 3H-proline and 45Ca into the proximal tibia, and proximal tibial mass in non-weight bearing animals were equal to those in weight bearing animals. The responses in trabecular bone volume in the proximal tibia and bone formation at the tibiofibular junction to GH, however, were reduced significantly by skeletal unloading. Bone unloading prevented completely the increase in metaphyseal trabecular bone normally induced by GH and severely dampened the stimulatory effect (158% vs. 313%, p < 0.002) of GH on periosteal bone formation. These results suggest that while GH can stimulate the overall accumulation of bone mineral in both weight bearing and non-weight bearing animals, skeletal unloading selectively impairs the response of trabecular bone and periosteal bone formation to the anabolic actions of GH.

  14. Classifying Human Voices by Using Hybrid SFX Time-Series Preprocessing and Ensemble Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Voice biometrics is one kind of physiological characteristics whose voice is different for each individual person. Due to this uniqueness, voice classification has found useful applications in classifying speakers' gender, mother tongue or ethnicity (accent), emotion states, identity verification, verbal command control, and so forth. In this paper, we adopt a new preprocessing method named Statistical Feature Extraction (SFX) for extracting important features in training a classification model, based on piecewise transformation treating an audio waveform as a time-series. Using SFX we can faithfully remodel statistical characteristics of the time-series; together with spectral analysis, a substantial amount of features are extracted in combination. An ensemble is utilized in selecting only the influential features to be used in classification model induction. We focus on the comparison of effects of various popular data mining algorithms on multiple datasets. Our experiment consists of classification tests over four typical categories of human voice data, namely, Female and Male, Emotional Speech, Speaker Identification, and Language Recognition. The experiments yield encouraging results supporting the fact that heuristically choosing significant features from both time and frequency domains indeed produces better performance in voice classification than traditional signal processing techniques alone, like wavelets and LPC-to-CC. PMID:24288684

  15. SHORT DISSIPATION TIMES OF PROTO-PLANETARY DISKS: AN ARTIFACT OF SELECTION EFFECTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Pfalzner, Susanne; Steinhausen, Manuel; Menten, Karl

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of disks around young stars, a key parameter for understanding planet formation, is most readily determined in young stellar clusters where many relatively coeval stars are located in close proximity. Observational studies seem to show that the disk frequency decreases rapidly with cluster age with <10% of cluster stars retaining their disks for longer than 2-6 Myr. Given that at least half of all stars in the field seem to harbor one or more planets, this would imply extremely fast disk dispersal and rapid planet growth. Here we question the validity of this constraint by demonstrating that the short disk dissipation times inferred to date might have been heavily underestimated by selection effects. Critically, for ages >3 Myr only stars that originally populated the densest areas of very populous clusters, which are prone to disk erosion, are actually considered. This tiny sample may not be representative of the majority of stars. In fact, the higher disk fractions in co-moving groups indicate that it is likely that over 30% of all field stars retain their disks well beyond 10 Myr, leaving ample time for planet growth. Equally, our solar system, with a likely formation time >10 Myr, need no longer be an exception but in fact typical of planetary systems.

  16. Recommendations for appropriate activated partial thromboplastin time reagent selection and utilization.

    PubMed

    Fritsma, George A; Dembitzer, Francine R; Randhawa, Ankush; Marques, Marisa B; Van Cott, Elizabeth M; Adcock-Funk, Dorothy; Peerschke, Ellinor I

    2012-06-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is widely used as a screening coagulation test and for monitoring unfractionated heparin therapy. Various commercial reagents are available, with different performance characteristics, particularly responsiveness to the lupus anticoagulant (LA). Because aPTT reagent selection significantly affects the interpretation of results, we reviewed College of American Pathologists proficiency testing data involving approximately 4,000 coagulation laboratories, and conducted a survey of coagulation laboratories (n = 93) using The Fritsma Factor hemostasis Web site to determine the basis for aPTT reagent selection. The data demonstrate that for routine aPTT testing, most laboratories use reagents with high/moderate responsiveness to LA. Significant misunderstanding was apparent regarding the use of appropriate aPTT reagent for routine testing and LA identification. We recommend aPTT reagents with low LA responsiveness to screen for coagulation factor deficiencies and heparin monitoring, and suggest continued education of laboratory professionals and reagent manufacturers about appropriate aPTT reagent use.

  17. Sensitive and selective real-time electrochemical monitoring of DNA repair (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason D.; McWilliams, Marc; Anka, Fadwa; Balkus, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    Unrepaired DNA damage can lead to mutation, cancer, and death of cells or organisms. However, due to the subtlety of DNA damage, it is difficult to sense the repair of damage products with high selectivity and sensitivity. Here, we show sensitive and selective electrochemical sensing of the repair activity of 8-oxoguanine and uracil glycosylases within DNA monolayers on gold by multiplexed analysis with silicon chips and low-cost electrospun nanofibers. Our approach involves comparing the electrochemical signal of redox probe modified monolayers containing the defect versus the rational control of defect-free monolayers. We find sequence-specific sensitivity thresholds on the order of femtomoles of proteins and dynamic ranges of over two orders of magnitude for each target. For 8-oxoguanine repair, temperature-dependent kinetics are extracted, showing exponential signal loss with time constants of seconds. Electrospun fibers are shown to behave similarly to conventional gold-on-silicon devices, showing the potential of these low-cost devices for sensing applications.

  18. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nealy, Jennifer; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  19. Double Point Source W-phase Inversion: Real-time Implementation and Automated Model Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, J. L.; Hayes, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever-evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquakes. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match previously published analyses of the same events.

  20. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  1. Selection of Reference Genes for Real-Time Quantitative PCR in Pinus massoniana Post Nematode Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongcheng; Liu, Qinghua; Dong, Hongyu; Zhou, Zhichun; Hao, Yanping; Chen, Xuelian; Xu, Liuyi

    2016-01-01

    Pinus massoniaia Lamb has gained more and more attention as the most important tree species for timber and forestation in South China. Gene expression studies are of great importance to identify new and elite cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR, a highly sensitive and specific method, is commonly used in the analysis of gene expression. The appropriate reference genes must be employed to normalize the calculation program for ascertaining repeatable and significant results. Herein, eleven housekeeping genes were evaluated during different stages of P. massoniana post nematode inoculation in this study. Three statistical approaches such as geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper were selected to analyze the stability of candidate genes. The results indicated that U2af and β-TUB were the most stable reference genes. These two genes could be used for the normalization in most of the experiments of P. massoniana, while Histone and AK were the least stable ones. In addition, EF expressed at the lowest average Ct value was the most abundant candidate gene. As an important gene associated with defense mechanisms, ABC transporter was analyzed by qRT-PCR, and the results were used to confirm the reliability of two genes. The selected reference genes in the present study will be conducive to future gene expression normalized by qRT-PCR in P. massoniana. PMID:26800152

  2. Selection of Reference Genes for Real-Time Quantitative PCR in Pinus massoniana Post Nematode Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongcheng; Liu, Qinghua; Dong, Hongyu; Zhou, Zhichun; Hao, Yanping; Chen, Xuelian; Xu, Liuyi

    2016-01-01

    Pinus massoniaia Lamb has gained more and more attention as the most important tree species for timber and forestation in South China. Gene expression studies are of great importance to identify new and elite cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR, a highly sensitive and specific method, is commonly used in the analysis of gene expression. The appropriate reference genes must be employed to normalize the calculation program for ascertaining repeatable and significant results. Herein, eleven housekeeping genes were evaluated during different stages of P. massoniana post nematode inoculation in this study. Three statistical approaches such as geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper were selected to analyze the stability of candidate genes. The results indicated that U2af and β-TUB were the most stable reference genes. These two genes could be used for the normalization in most of the experiments of P. massoniana, while Histone and AK were the least stable ones. In addition, EF expressed at the lowest average Ct value was the most abundant candidate gene. As an important gene associated with defense mechanisms, ABC transporter was analyzed by qRT-PCR, and the results were used to confirm the reliability of two genes. The selected reference genes in the present study will be conducive to future gene expression normalized by qRT-PCR in P. massoniana.

  3. Carbon induced selective regulation of cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts by ethylene treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng; Chen, Pei-Pei; Xie, Jinglin; Liu, Jin-Xun; Zhao, Huabo; Lin, Lili; Zhao, Bo; Su, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Qingjun; Li, Wei-Xue; Ma, Ding

    2017-02-10

    Various carbonaceous species were controllably deposited on Co/Al2O3 catalysts using ethylene as carbon source during the activation process for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). Atomic, polymeric and graphitic carbon were distinguished by Raman spectroscopy, thermoanalysis and temperature programmed hydrogenation. Significant changes occurred in both the catalytic activity and selectivity toward hydrocarbon products after ethylene treatment. The activity decreased along with an increase in CH4 selectivity, at the expense of a remarkable decrease of heavy hydrocarbon production, resulting in enhanced selectivity for the gasoline fraction. In situ XPS experiments show the possible electron transfer from cobalt to carbon and the blockage of metallic cobalt sites, which is responsible for the deactivation of the catalyst. DFT calculations reveal that the activation barrier (Ea) of methane formation decreases by 0.61 eV on the carbon-absorbed Co(111) surface, whereas the Ea of the CH + CH coupling reaction changes unnoticeably. Hydrogenation of CHx to methane becomes the preferable route among the elementary reactions on the Co(111) surface, leading to dramatic changes in the product distribution. Detailed coke-induced deactivation mechanisms of Co-based catalysts during FTS are discussed.

  4. Microbially induced selective flotation of sphalerite from galena using mineral-adapted strains of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Vasanthakumar, B; Ravishankar, H; Subramanian, S

    2013-12-01

    The selective flotation of sphalerite from a sphalerite-galena mineral mixture has been achieved using cells and extracellular secretions of Bacillus megaterium after adaptation to the chosen minerals. The extracellular secretions obtained after thermolysis of bacterial cells adapted to sphalerite yield the highest flotation recovery of sphalerite with a selectivity index value of 24.5, in comparison to the other cellular and extra-cellular bio-reagents studied. The protein profile for the unadapted and mineral-adapted cells has been found to differ distinctly, attesting to variation in the yield and nature of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS). The changes induced in the bacterial cell wall components after adaptation to sphalerite or galena with respect to the contents of phosphate, uronic acid and acetylated sugars of B. megaterium have been quantified. The role of the dissolved metal ions from the minerals as well as that of the constituents of extracellular secretions in modulating the surface charge of the bacterial cells as well as the minerals under study has been confirmed using various enzymatic treatments of the bacterial cells. It has been demonstrated that the induction of additional molecular weight protein fractions as well as the higher amount of extracellular proteins and phosphate secreted after adaptation to sphalerite vis-à-vis galena are contributory factors for the selective separation of sphalerite from galena.

  5. Preferential and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors reduce inflammation during lipopolysaccharide-induced synovitis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison J; Campbell, Nigel B; Gayle, J'mai M; Redding, W Rich; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2005-04-01

    Synovitis in horses is frequently treated by administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which inhibit cyclooxygenase isoforms (COX-1 and COX-2). Constitutively expressed COX-1 is involved in physiologic functions such as maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity, whereas COX-2 is up-regulated at sites of inflammation. Thus, COX-2 inhibitors reduce inflammation with reduced gastrointestinal side effects as compared to non-selective COX inhibitors. The objective of the present study was to compare the anti-inflammatory effects of the preferential COX-2 inhibitor etodolac with the non-selective COX inhibitor phenylbutazone in horses with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced synovitis. Three groups of horses (n=6) received no treatment, phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg, IV, q12h), or etodolac (23 mg/kg, IV, q12h), respectively, 2-h following injection of LPS into one middle carpal joint. Synovial fluid was analyzed for white blood cell (WBC) count, and TXB2 and PGE2 levels. Phenylbutazone and etodolac significantly reduced WBC count 6 and 24-h following injection of LPS compared to untreated horses. In addition, both drugs significantly reduced PGE2 levels (P<0.05) 6-h following LPS injection, whereas the probable COX-1 prostanoid TXB2 was significantly reduced by phenylbutazone (P<0.05), but not etodolac. Etodolac may serve as a more selective anti-inflammatory agent than phenylbutazone for treatment of equine synovitis.

  6. Tumor-selective mitochondrial network collapse induced by atmospheric gas plasma-activated medium.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Sahara, Junki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Noboru; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Soma, Masayoshi; Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-12

    Non-thermal atmospheric gas plasma (AGP) exhibits cytotoxicity against malignant cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. However, the mechanisms of its tumor-selective cytotoxicity remain unclear. Here we report that AGP-activated medium increases caspase-independent cell death and mitochondrial network collapse in a panel of human cancer cells, but not in non-transformed cells. AGP irradiation stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGP-activated medium, and in turn the resulting stable ROS, most likely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) accumulation. Culture in AGP-activated medium resulted in cell death and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering, and these responses were inhibited by ROS scavengers. AGP-activated medium also increased dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission in a tumor-specific manner, and H2O2 administration showed similar effects. Moreover, the vulnerability of tumor cells to mitochondrial network collapse appeared to result from their higher sensitivity to mROS accumulation induced by AGP-activated medium or H2O2. The present findings expand our previous observations on death receptor-mediated tumor-selective cell killing and reinforce the importance of mitochondrial network remodeling as a powerful target for tumor-selective cancer treatment.

  7. A zinc-binding site by negative selection induces metallodrug susceptibility in an essential chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Cun, Shujian; Sun, Hongzhe

    2010-01-01

    GroES is an indispensable chaperonin virtually found throughout all life forms. Consequently, mutations of this protein must be critically scrutinized by natural selection. Nevertheless, the homolog from a potentially virulent gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori, strikingly features a histidine/cysteine-rich C terminus that shares no significant homology with other family members. Additionally, three more (H45, C51, and C53) are uniquely present in its apical domain. The statistical analyses show that these residues may have originated from negative selection, presumably driven by either dependent or independent amino acid mutations. In the absence of the C-terminal metal-binding domain, the mutant protein still exhibits a substantial capacity for zinc binding in vivo. The biochemical properties of site-directed mutants indicate that H45, C51, and C53 make up an oxidation-sensitive zinc-binding site that may donate the bound metal to a zinc acceptor. Of interest, bismuth antiulcer drugs strongly bind at this site (Kd of approximately 7 × 10-26 M), replacing the bound zinc and consequently inducing the disruption of the quaternary structure. Because biological features by negative selection are usually inert to change during evolution, this study sheds light on a promising field whereby medicines can be designed or improved to specifically target the residues that uniquely evolved in pathogenic proteins so as to retard the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:20194796

  8. Noise-induced cochlear neuropathy is selective for fibers with low spontaneous rates

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Adam C.; Kujawa, Sharon G.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic overexposure can cause a permanent loss of auditory nerve fibers without destroying cochlear sensory cells, despite complete recovery of cochlear thresholds (Kujawa and Liberman 2009), as measured by gross neural potentials such as the auditory brainstem response (ABR). To address this nominal paradox, we recorded responses from single auditory nerve fibers in guinea pigs exposed to this type of neuropathic noise (4- to 8-kHz octave band at 106 dB SPL for 2 h). Two weeks postexposure, ABR thresholds had recovered to normal, while suprathreshold ABR amplitudes were reduced. Both thresholds and amplitudes of distortion-product otoacoustic emissions fully recovered, suggesting recovery of hair cell function. Loss of up to 30% of auditory-nerve synapses on inner hair cells was confirmed by confocal analysis of the cochlear sensory epithelium immunostained for pre- and postsynaptic markers. In single fiber recordings, at 2 wk postexposure, frequency tuning, dynamic range, postonset adaptation, first-spike latency and its variance, and other basic properties of auditory nerve response were all completely normal in the remaining fibers. The only physiological abnormality was a change in population statistics suggesting a selective loss of fibers with low- and medium-spontaneous rates. Selective loss of these high-threshold fibers would explain how ABR thresholds can recover despite such significant noise-induced neuropathy. A selective loss of high-threshold fibers may contribute to the problems of hearing in noisy environments that characterize the aging auditory system. PMID:23596328

  9. Construction of PAH-degrading mixed microbial consortia by induced selection in soil.

    PubMed

    Zafra, German; Absalón, Ángel E; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Ángel; Fernandez, Francisco J; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2017-04-01

    Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils through the biostimulation and bioaugmentation processes can be a strategy for the clean-up of oil spills and environmental accidents. In this work, an induced microbial selection method using PAH-polluted soils was successfully used to construct two microbial consortia exhibiting high degradation levels of low and high molecular weight PAHs. Six fungal and seven bacterial native strains were used to construct mixed consortia with the ability to tolerate high amounts of phenanthrene (Phe), pyrene (Pyr) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and utilize these compounds as a sole carbon source. In addition, we used two engineered PAH-degrading fungal strains producing heterologous ligninolytic enzymes. After a previous selection using microbial antagonism tests, the selection was performed in microcosm systems and monitored using PCR-DGGE, CO2 evolution and PAH quantitation. The resulting consortia (i.e., C1 and C2) were able to degrade up to 92% of Phe, 64% of Pyr and 65% of BaP out of 1000 mg kg(-1) of a mixture of Phe, Pyr and BaP (1:1:1) after a two-week incubation. The results indicate that constructed microbial consortia have high potential for soil bioremediation by bioaugmentation and biostimulation and may be effective for the treatment of sites polluted with PAHs due to their elevated tolerance to aromatic compounds, their capacity to utilize them as energy source.

  10. Bond selectivity in electron-induced reaction due to directed recoil on an anisotropic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggara, Kelvin; Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Chatterjee, Avisek; Cheng, Fang; Polanyi, John C.

    2016-12-01

    Bond-selective reaction is central to heterogeneous catalysis. In heterogeneous catalysis, selectivity is found to depend on the chemical nature and morphology of the substrate. Here, however, we show a high degree of bond selectivity dependent only on adsorbate bond alignment. The system studied is the electron-induced reaction of meta-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). Of the adsorbate's C-I bonds, C-I aligned `Along' the copper row dissociates in 99.3% of the cases giving surface reaction, whereas C-I bond aligned `Across' the rows dissociates in only 0.7% of the cases. A two-electronic-state molecular dynamics model attributes reaction to an initial transition to a repulsive state of an Along C-I, followed by directed recoil of C towards a Cu atom of the same row, forming C-Cu. A similar impulse on an Across C-I gives directed C that, moving across rows, does not encounter a Cu atom and hence exhibits markedly less reaction.

  11. Emergence of drug tolerance in cancer cell populations: an evolutionary outcome of selection, nongenetic instability, and stress-induced adaptation.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Rebecca H; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Larsen, Annette K; de Almeida, Luís Neves; Escargueil, Alexandre; Clairambault, Jean

    2015-03-15

    In recent experiments on isogenetic cancer cell lines, it was observed that exposure to high doses of anticancer drugs can induce the emergence of a subpopulation of weakly proliferative and drug-tolerant cells, which display markers associated with stem cell-like cancer cells. After a period of time, some of the surviving cells were observed to change their phenotype to resume normal proliferation and eventually repopulate the sample. Furthermore, the drug-tolerant cells could be drug resensitized following drug washout. Here, we propose a theoretical mechanism for the transient emergence of such drug tolerance. In this framework, we formulate an individual-based model and an integro-differential equation model of reversible phenotypic evolution in a cell population exposed to cytotoxic drugs. The outcomes of both models suggest that nongenetic instability, stress-induced adaptation, selection, and the interplay between these mechanisms can push an actively proliferating cell population to transition into a weakly proliferative and drug-tolerant state. Hence, the cell population experiences much less stress in the presence of the drugs and, in the long run, reacquires a proliferative phenotype, due to phenotypic fluctuations and selection pressure. These mechanisms can also reverse epigenetic drug tolerance following drug washout. Our study highlights how the transient appearance of the weakly proliferative and drug-tolerant cells is related to the use of high-dose therapy. Furthermore, we show how stem-like characteristics can act to stabilize the transient, weakly proliferative, and drug-tolerant subpopulation for a longer time window. Finally, using our models as in silico laboratories, we propose new testable hypotheses that could help uncover general principles underlying the emergence of cancer drug tolerance.

  12. The slowing down times of positrons emitted from selected β+ isotopes into metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Horodek, Paweł; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2012-11-01

    We report the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations and the approximated calculations of the slowing down time (SDT) for positrons emitted from three β+ isotopes, i.e., 22Na, 68Ge/68Ga and 48V. The first two isotopes are commonly used in the positron annihilation spectroscopy. The results revealed that the SDT exhibits the nonsymmetrical distribution and its average value depends on the end point energy of the isotope, the density and atomic number of the implanted material. For metals the average SDT varies from 0.4 ps to a few ps. We argue that this can affect the analysis of the measured positron lifetime and should be considered in theoretical calculations. The SDT in selected gases was simulated as well and in this case its average values are about four orders higher than in metals.

  13. Measuring JHH values with a selective constant-time 2D NMR protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Proton-proton scalar couplings play important roles in molecule structure elucidation. However, measurements of JHH values in complex coupled spin systems remain challenging. In this study, we develop a selective constant-time (SECT) 2D NMR protocol with which scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons can be revealed, and corresponding JHH values can be measured through doublets along the F1 dimension. All JHH values within a network of n fully coupled protons can be separately determined with (n - 1) SECT experiments. Additionally, the proposed pulse sequence possesses satisfactory sensitivity and handy implementation. Therefore, it will interest scientists who intend to address structural analyzes of molecules with overcrowded spectra, and may greatly facilitate the applications of scalar-coupling constants in molecule structure studies.

  14. Control of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis by tuning nanoparticle properties and reactor residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Elad; Liu, Jack Hung-Chang; Toste, F. Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2012-11-01

    A combination of the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis could enable the development of sustainable catalysts with novel reactivity and selectivity. Although heterogeneous catalysts are often recycled more easily than their homogeneous counterparts, they can be difficult to apply in traditional organic reactions and modification of their properties towards a desired reactivity is, at best, complex. In contrast, tuning the properties of homogeneous catalysts by, for example, modifying the ligands that coordinate a metal centre is better understood. Here, using olefin cyclopropanation reactions catalysed by dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters as examples, we demonstrate that changing the dendrimer properties allows the catalytic reactivity to be tuned in a similar fashion to ligand modification in a homogeneous catalyst. Furthermore, we show that these heterogeneous catalysts employed in a fixed-bed flow reactor allow fine control over the residence time of the reactants and thus enables the control over product distribution in a way that is not easily available for homogeneous catalysts.

  15. Control of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis by tuning nanoparticle properties and reactor residence time.

    PubMed

    Gross, Elad; Liu, Jack Hung-Chang; Toste, F Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2012-11-01

    A combination of the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis could enable the development of sustainable catalysts with novel reactivity and selectivity. Although heterogeneous catalysts are often recycled more easily than their homogeneous counterparts, they can be difficult to apply in traditional organic reactions and modification of their properties towards a desired reactivity is, at best, complex. In contrast, tuning the properties of homogeneous catalysts by, for example, modifying the ligands that coordinate a metal centre is better understood. Here, using olefin cyclopropanation reactions catalysed by dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters as examples, we demonstrate that changing the dendrimer properties allows the catalytic reactivity to be tuned in a similar fashion to ligand modification in a homogeneous catalyst. Furthermore, we show that these heterogeneous catalysts employed in a fixed-bed flow reactor allow fine control over the residence time of the reactants and thus enables the control over product distribution in a way that is not easily available for homogeneous catalysts.

  16. Extraordinary reflection and transmission with direction dependent wavelength selectivity based on parity-time-symmetric multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shulin; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-01-14

    In this paper, we present a kind of periodical ternary parity-time (PT) -symmetric multilayers to realize nearly 100% reflectance and transmittance simultaneously when light is incident from a certain direction. This extraordinary reflection and transmission is original from unidirectional Bragg reflection of PT-symmetric systems as the symmetry spontaneous breaking happens at PT thresholds. The extra energy involved in reflection and transmission lights is obtained from pumping light to the gain regions of the structure. Moreover, we find that our PT-symmetric structure shows direction dependent wavelength selectivity. When the illumination light is incident from two opposite directions into the multilayer structure, such extraordinary reflection and transmission appear at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, respectively. Such distinguishing properties may provide these structures with attractive applications as beam splitters, laser mirrors, narrow band filters, and multiband PT-symmetric optical devices.

  17. Bifurcations Induced in a Bistable Oscillator via Joint Noises and Time Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jin; Sun, Zhongkui; Xiao, Yuzhu; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, noise-induced and delay-induced bifurcations in a bistable Duffing-van der Pol (DVP) oscillator under time delay and joint noises are discussed theoretically and numerically. Based on the qualitative changes of the plane phase, delay-induced bifurcations are investigated in the deterministic case. However, in the stochastic case, the response of the system is a stochastic non-Markovian process owing to the existence of noise and time delay. Then, methods have been employed to derive the stationary probability density function (PDF) of the amplitude of the response. Accordingly, stochastic P-bifurcations can be observed with the variations in the qualitative behavior of the stationary PDF for amplitude. Furthermore, results from both theoretical analyses and numerical simulations best demonstrate the appearance of noise-induced and delay-induced bifurcations, which are in good agreement.

  18. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine selectively inhibits interleukin 8 (IL-8)-induced neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Capannolo, Marta; Fasciani, Irene; Romeo, Stefania; Aloisi, Gabriella; Rossi, Mario; Bellio, Pierangelo; Celenza, Giuseppe; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Scarselli, Marco; Maggio, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic to date, but its benefits are counterbalanced by the risk of severe hematological effects. In this study, we analyzed whether clozapine inhibits polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte chemotaxis. We found that clozapine, within the therapeutic concentration range, potently and selectively inhibits PMN chemotaxis induced by interleukin 8 (IL-8), a chemokine inducing neutrophil migration. The effect was not due to its action at dopamine, serotonin and muscarinic receptors, or to a direct antagonism to IL-8 receptors. Furthermore, clozapine did not inhibit PMN chemotaxis by its presumed toxic mechanism. In fact, after an overnight incubation in cell culture, the drug did not increase the physiological PMN apoptosis. An interference of clozapine with the autocrine release of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a secondary chemoattractant secreted by neutrophils in response to the primary chemoattractant IL-8, was hypothesized. In agreement with this hypothesis, clozapine attenuated the IL-8-induced release of LTB4 in PMNs. A series of experiments with an antagonist of the LTB4 receptor, U75302, and an inhibitor of LTB4 synthesis, zileuton, provided support to this conjecture. Intriguingly MK-571, an inhibitor of the multi-drug resistance protein MRP4, playing a pivotal role in effluxing LTB4, completely blocked PMN chemotaxis induced by IL-8, but gave conflicting results when tested for its ability to reduce LTB4 release, increasing LTB4 efflux by itself but reducing the release when in combination with IL-8. The reduction of PMN chemotaxis due to clozapine could predispose patients to infections. Whether this effect is a prelude to clozapine agranulocytosis requires further investigation.

  19. Host-Selective Toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis Induce Common Responses Associated with Host Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pandelova, Iovanna; Figueroa, Melania; Wilhelm, Larry J.; Manning, Viola A.; Mankaney, Aakash N.; Mockler, Todd C.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr), a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs) necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA) and Ptr ToxB (ToxB), are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death. PMID:22792250

  20. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18–82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  1. Cardiovascular control and time domain Granger causality: insights from selective autonomic blockade.

    PubMed

    Porta, Alberto; Castiglioni, Paolo; Di Rienzo, Marco; Bassani, Tito; Bari, Vlasta; Faes, Luca; Nollo, Giandomenico; Cividjan, Andrei; Quintin, Luc

    2013-08-28

    We studied causal relations among heart period (HP), systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and respiration (R) according to the definition of Granger causality in the time domain. Autonomic pharmacological challenges were used to alter the complexity of cardiovascular control. Atropine (AT), propranolol and clonidine (CL) were administered to block muscarinic receptors, β-adrenergic receptors and centrally sympathetic outflow, respectively. We found that: (i) at baseline, HP and SAP interacted in a closed loop with a dominant causal direction from HP to SAP; (ii) pharmacological blockades did not alter the bidirectional closed-loop interactions between HP and SAP, but AT reduced the dominance of the causal direction from HP to SAP; (iii) at baseline, bidirectional interactions between HP and R were frequently found; (iv) the closed-loop relation between HP and R was unmodified by the administration of drugs; (v) at baseline, unidirectional interactions from R to SAP were often found; and (vi) while AT induced frequently an uncoupling between R and SAP, CL favoured bidirectional interactions. These results prove that time domain measures of Granger causality can contribute to the description of cardiovascular control by suggesting the temporal direction of the interactions and by separating different causality schemes (e.g. closed loop versus unidirectional relations).

  2. Time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 by sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Yuki

    2013-11-01

    Drug-drug interactions associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely known. A major interaction by SSRIs is the inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated hepatic drug metabolism. The SSRI, sertraline, is also reported to increase the blood concentration of co-administered drugs. The potency of sertraline directly to inhibit hepatic drug metabolism is relatively weak compared with the other SSRIs, implying that additional mechanisms are involved in the interactions. The study examined whether sertraline produces time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 and/or other P450 enzymes. Incubation of human liver microsomes with sertraline in the presence of NADPH resulted in marked decreases in testosterone 6β-hydroxylation activities, indicating that sertraline metabolism leads to CYP3A4 inactivation. This inactivation required NADPH and was not protected by glutathione. No significant inactivation was observed for other P450 enzymes. Spectroscopic evaluation revealed that microsomes with and without sertraline in the presence of NADPH gave a Soret peak at 455 nm, suggesting the formation of metabolic intermediate (MI) complexes of sertraline metabolite(s) with the reduced form of P450. This is the first report indicating that sertraline produced time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4, which may be associated with MI complex formation.

  3. The Galex Time Domain Survey. I. Selection And Classification of Over a Thousand Ultraviolet Variable Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, S.; Martin, D. C.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.; Huber, M.; Heckman, T.; Bianchi, L.; Morrissey, P.; Neff, S. G.; Seibert, M.; Schiminovich, D.; Wyder, T. K.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Price, P. A.; Tonry, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in approximately 40 deg(exp 2) of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of approximately 3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5 sigma level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). We detect a large-amplitude tail in the UV variability distribution for M-dwarf flare stars and RR Lyrae, reaching up to absolute value(?m) = 4.6 mag and 2.9 mag, respectively. The mean amplitude of the structure function for quasars on year timescales is five times larger than observed at optical wavelengths. The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV less than 23 mag and absolute value(?m) greater than 0.2 mag of approximately 8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg(exp -2) for quasars, active galactic nuclei, and RR Lyrae stars

  4. THE GALEX TIME DOMAIN SURVEY. I. SELECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF OVER A THOUSAND ULTRAVIOLET VARIABLE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Gezari, S.; Martin, D. C.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.; Morrissey, P.; Wyder, T. K.; Huber, M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Heckman, T.; Bianchi, L.; Neff, S. G.; Seibert, M.; Schiminovich, D.; Price, P. A.

    2013-03-20

    We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in {approx}40 deg{sup 2} of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of {approx}3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5{sigma} level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). We detect a large-amplitude tail in the UV variability distribution for M-dwarf flare stars and RR Lyrae, reaching up to |{Delta}m| = 4.6 mag and 2.9 mag, respectively. The mean amplitude of the structure function for quasars on year timescales is five times larger than observed at optical wavelengths. The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV < 23 mag and |{Delta}m| > 0.2 mag of {approx}8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg{sup -2} for quasars, active galactic nuclei, and RR Lyrae stars, respectively. We also calculate a surface density rate in the

  5. Effects of Selection and Training on Unit-Level Performance over Time: A Latent Growth Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H.; Ferris, Gerald R.; Perrewe, Pamela L.; Perryman, Alexa A.; Blass, Fred R.; Heetderks, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly few data exist concerning whether and how utilization of job-related selection and training procedures affects different aspects of unit or organizational performance over time. The authors used longitudinal data from a large fast-food organization (N = 861 units) to examine how change in use of selection and training relates to…

  6. A selectable system for mutation detection in the Big Blue lacI transgenic mouse system: what happens to the mutational spectra over time.

    PubMed

    Knöll, A; Jacobson, D P; Nishino, H; Kretz, P L; Short, J M; Sommer, S S

    1996-06-10

    Transgenic animals offer a powerful tool to study the mechanisms of spontaneous and induced mutagenesis in vivo. Herein we used a test version of a growth selectable assay to obtain spontaneous mutants in a lacI target transgene recovered from lacI transgenic B6C3F1 mice (Big Blue). This selection system may have certain advantages relative to the more established plaque screening system for mutation detection because: (1) the plating density of the phage is up to 60 times higher in the selectable assay, reducing the number of plates needed to be screened for a comparable amount of mutants; and (2) the mutant frequency obtained from the selectable assay is higher compared to the plaque assay, possibly due to a higher sensitivity for weaker mutants. However, the longer incubation time of the growth selectable assay might allow E. coli host derived mutants to appear. To address this issue, we investigated the sequence changes in the amino-terminal domain of the lacI gene of 405 mutants derived from the liver, spleen, brain, germ cells and skin of five untreated 6-week-old mice. The mutant colonies were isolated after 60, 84, 108 and 150 h of incubation under growth selectable conditions. Tissue-specific differences in the mutational pattern obtained after 60 and 84 h disappear after a longer time of incubation, possibly due to an increasing contribution of E. coli derived mutants. The evolving selectable systems offer the potential to increase screening efficiency, but the results suggest caution in interpreting data from this system because repair by E. coli of DNA lesions or mismatched heteroduplexes either originating in mouse in vivo or produced by ex vivo manipulation as well as de novo mutations in E. coli might contribute significantly to the observed mutational spectra at each timepoint.

  7. Time gating for energy selection and scatter rejection: High-energy pulsed neutron imaging at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Alicia; Schirato, Richard; McKigney, Edward; Hunter, James; Temple, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a linear accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico that accelerates a proton beam to 800 MeV, which then produces spallation neutron beams. Flight path FP15R uses a tungsten target to generate neutrons of energy ranging from several hundred keV to ~600 MeV. The beam structure has micropulses of sub-ns width and period of 1.784 ns, and macropulses of 625 μs width and frequency of either 50 Hz or 100 Hz. This corresponds to 347 micropulses per macropulse, or 1.74 x 104 micropulses per second when operating at 50 Hz. Using a very fast, cooled ICCD camera (Princeton Instruments PI-Max 4), gated images of various objects were obtained on FP15R in January 2015. Objects imaged included blocks of lead and borated polyethylene; a tungsten sphere; and a tungsten, polyethylene, and steel cylinder. Images were obtained in 36 min or less, with some in as little as 6 min. This is novel because the gate widths (some as narrow as 10 ns) were selected to reject scatter and other signal not of interest (e.g. the gamma flash that precedes the neutron pulse), which has not been demonstrated at energies above 14 MeV. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that time gating is possible above 14MeV and is useful for selecting neutron energy and reducing scatter, thus forming clearer images. Future work (simulation and experimental) is being undertaken to improve camera shielding and system design and to precisely determine optical properties of the imaging system.

  8. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies in virus-infected monocots using quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Niu, Shaofang; Di, Dianping; Shi, Lindan; Liu, Deshui; Cao, Xiuling; Miao, Hongqin; Wang, Xianbing; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Yongliang

    2013-10-10

    Both genome-wide transcriptomic surveys of the mRNA expression profiles and virus-induced gene silencing-based molecular studies of target gene during virus-plant interaction involve the precise estimation of the transcript abundance. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the most widely adopted technique for mRNA quantification. In order to obtain reliable quantification of transcripts, identification of the best reference genes forms the basis of the preliminary work. Nevertheless, the stability of internal controls in virus-infected monocots needs to be fully explored. In this work, the suitability of ten housekeeping genes (ACT, EF1α, FBOX, GAPDH, GTPB, PP2A, SAND, TUBβ, UBC18 and UK) for potential use as reference genes in qPCR were investigated in five different monocot plants (Brachypodium, barley, sorghum, wheat and maize) under infection with different viruses including Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), Brome mosaic virus (BMV), Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV). By using three different algorithms, the most appropriate reference genes or their combinations were identified for different experimental sets and their effectiveness for the normalisation of expression studies were further validated by quantitative analysis of a well-studied PR-1 gene. These results facilitate the selection of desirable reference genes for more accurate gene expression studies in virus-infected monocots.

  9. Digitized pressure-time records, selected nuclear events. Technical report, 1 September 1982-1 April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    McMullan, F.W.; Bryant, E.J.

    1986-04-30

    Pressure-time records are presented for selected atmospheric nuclear events. The records were extracted from published test reports, digitized, and given uniform pressure-time scales for a given event and a given range to permit easier comparison. Data include p-t, q-t, p(tot)-t, Mach No-t, and Impulse-t as appropriate. Selected data were scaled to 1 kT.

  10. Built-in microscale electrostatic fields induced by anatase–rutile-phase transition in selective areas promote osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Chengyun; Yu, Peng; Zhu, Ye; Yao, Mengyu; Zhu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xiaolan; Lin, Zefeng; Li, Weiping; Wang, Shuangying; Tan, Guoxin; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yingjun; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Bone has a built-in electric field because of the presence of piezoelectric collagen. To date, only externally applied electric fields have been used to direct cell behavior; however, these fields are not safe or practical for in vivo use. In this work, for the first time, we use a periodic microscale electric field (MEF) built into a titanium implant to induce osteogenesis. Such a MEF is generated by the periodic organization of a junction made of two parallel semiconducting TiO2 zones: anatase and rutile with lower and higher electron densities, respectively. The junctions were formed through anatase–rutile-phase transition in selective areas using laser irradiation on the implants. The in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the built-in MEF was an efficient electrical cue for inducing osteogenic differentiation in the absence of osteogenic supplements and promoted bone regeneration around the implants. Our work opens up a new avenue toward bone repair and regeneration using built-in MEF. PMID:27818718

  11. The sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide induces selective apoptosis of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Steele, A J; Jones, D T; Ganeshaguru, K; Duke, V M; Yogashangary, B C; North, J M; Lowdell, M W; Kottaridis, P D; Mehta, A B; Prentice, A G; Hoffbrand, A V; Wickremasinghe, R G

    2006-06-01

    We have studied the in vitro actions of the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide (PTL) on cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Dye reduction viability assays showed that the median LD(50) for PTL was 6.2 muM (n=78). Fifteen of these isolates were relatively resistant to the conventional agent chlorambucil but retained sensitivity to PTL. Brief exposures to PTL (1-3 h) were sufficient to induce caspase activation and commitment to cell death. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells were more sensitive towards PTL than were normal T lymphocytes or CD34(+) haematopoietic progenitor cells. The mechanism of cell killing was via PTL-induced generation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in turn in a proapoptotic Bax conformational change, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and caspase activation. Parthenolide also decreased nuclear levels of the antiapoptotic transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B and diminished phosphorylation of its negative regulator IkappaB. Killing of CLL cells by PTL was apparently independent of p53 induction. This is the first report showing the relative selectivity of PTL towards CLL cells. The data here warrant further investigation of this class of natural product as potential therapeutic agents for CLL.

  12. Salinomycin inhibits Wnt signaling and selectively induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Desheng; Choi, Michael Y; Yu, Jian; Castro, Januario E; Kipps, Thomas J; Carson, Dennis A

    2011-08-09

    Salinomycin, an antibiotic potassium ionophore, has been reported recently to act as a selective breast cancer stem cell inhibitor, but the biochemical basis for its anticancer effects is not clear. The Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway plays a central role in stem cell development, and its aberrant activation can cause cancer. In this study, we identified salinomycin as a potent inhibitor of the Wnt signaling cascade. In Wnt-transfected HEK293 cells, salinomycin blocked the phosphorylation of the Wnt coreceptor lipoprotein receptor related protein 6 (LRP6) and induced its degradation. Nigericin, another potassium ionophore with activity against cancer stem cells, exerted similar effects. In otherwise unmanipulated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with constitutive Wnt activation nanomolar concentrations of salinomycin down-regulated the expression of Wnt target genes such as LEF1, cyclin D1, and fibronectin, depressed LRP6 levels, and limited cell survival. Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes resisted salinomycin toxicity. These results indicate that ionic changes induced by salinomycin and related drugs inhibit proximal Wnt signaling by interfering with LPR6 phosphorylation, and thus impair the survival of cells that depend on Wnt signaling at the plasma membrane.

  13. Evaluation of region selective bilirubin-induced brain damage as a basis for a pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dal Ben, Matteo; Bottin, Cristina; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Tiribelli, Claudio; Gazzin, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The neurologic manifestations of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in the central nervous system (CNS) exhibit high variations in the severity and appearance of motor, auditory and cognitive symptoms, which is suggestive of a still unexplained selective topography of bilirubin-induced damage. By applying the organotypic brain culture (OBC: preserving in vitro the cellular complexity, connection and architecture of the in vivo brain) technique to study hyperbilirubinemia, we mapped the regional target of bilirubin-induced damage, demonstrated a multifactorial toxic action of bilirubin, and used this information to evaluate the efficacy of drugs applicable to newborns to protect the brain. OBCs from 8-day-old rat pups showed a 2–13 fold higher sensitivity to bilirubin damage than 2-day-old preparations. The hippocampus, inferior colliculus and cerebral cortex were the only brain regions affected, presenting a mixed inflammatory-oxidative mechanism. Glutamate excitotoxicity was appreciable in only the hippocampus and inferior colliculus. Single drug treatment (indomethacin, curcumin, MgCl2) significantly improved cell viability in all regions, while the combined (cocktail) administration of the three drugs almost completely prevented damage in the most affected area (hippocampus). Our data may supports an innovative (complementary to phototherapy) approach for directly protecting the newborn brain from bilirubin neurotoxicity. PMID:28102362

  14. Polarity-Induced Selective Area Epitaxy of GaN Nanowires.

    PubMed

    de Souza Schiaber, Ziani; Calabrese, Gabriele; Kong, Xiang; Trampert, Achim; Jenichen, Bernd; Dias da Silva, José Humberto; Geelhaar, Lutz; Brandt, Oliver; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio

    2017-01-11

    We present a conceptually novel approach to achieve selective area epitaxy of GaN nanowires. The approach is based on the fact that these nanostructures do not form in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on structurally and chemically uniform cation-polar substrates. By in situ depositing and nitridating Si on a Ga-polar GaN film, we locally reverse the polarity to induce the selective area epitaxy of N-polar GaN nanowires. We show that the nanowire number density can be controlled over several orders of magnitude by varying the amount of predeposited Si. Using this growth approach, we demonstrate the synthesis of single-crystalline and uncoalesced nanowires with diameters as small as 20 nm. The achievement of nanowire number densities low enough to prevent the shadowing of the nanowire sidewalls from the impinging fluxes paves the way for the realization of homogeneous core-shell heterostructures without the need of using ex situ prepatterned substrates.

  15. Tuning a strain-induced orbital selective Mott transition in epitaxial VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shantanu; Quackenbush, N. F.; Paik, H.; Schlueter, C.; Lee, T.-L.; Schlom, D. G.; Piper, L. F. J.; Lee, Wei-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We present evidence of strain-induced modulation of electron correlation effects and increased orbital anisotropy in the rutile phase of epitaxial VO2/TiO2 films from hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and soft V L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy, respectively. By using the U(1) slave spin formalism, we further argue that the observed anisotropic correlation effects can be understood by a model of orbital selective Mott transition at a filling that is noninteger but close to the half filling. Because the overlaps of wave functions between d orbitals are modified by the strain, orbital-dependent renormalizations of the bandwidths and the onsite energy occur. These renormalizations generally result in different occupation numbers in different orbitals. We find that if the system has a noninteger filling number near the half filling such as for VO2, certain orbitals could reach an occupation number closer to half filling under the strain, resulting in a strong reduction in the quasiparticle weight Zα of that orbital. Our work demonstrates that such an orbital selective Mott transition, defined as the case with Zα=0 in some but not all orbitals, could be accessed by epitaxial-strain engineering of correlated electron systems.

  16. The Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 selectively induces vesiculation from phosphatidylserine-enriched membranes.

    PubMed

    Soni, Smita P; Stahelin, Robert V

    2014-11-28

    Ebola virus is from the Filoviridae family of viruses and is one of the most virulent pathogens known with ∼ 60% clinical fatality. The Ebola virus negative sense RNA genome encodes seven proteins including viral matrix protein 40 (VP40), which is the most abundant protein found in the virions. Within infected cells VP40 localizes at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM), binds lipids, and regulates formation of new virus particles. Expression of VP40 in mammalian cells is sufficient to form virus-like particles that are nearly indistinguishable from the authentic virions. However, how VP40 interacts with the PM and forms virus-like particles is for the most part unknown. To investigate VP40 lipid specificity in a model of viral egress we employed giant unilamellar vesicles with different lipid compositions. The results demonstrate VP40 selectively induces vesiculation from membranes containing phosphatidylserine (PS) at concentrations of PS that are representative of the PM inner leaflet content. The formation of intraluminal vesicles was not significantly detected in the presence of other important PM lipids including cholesterol and polyvalent phosphoinositides, further demonstrating PS selectivity. Taken together, these studies suggest that PM phosphatidylserine may be an important component of Ebola virus budding and that VP40 may be able to mediate PM scission.

  17. Insensitivity to pain induced by a potent selective closed-state Nav1.7 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Flinspach, M; Xu, Q; Piekarz, A D; Fellows, R; Hagan, R; Gibbs, A; Liu, Y; Neff, R A; Freedman, J; Eckert, W A; Zhou, M; Bonesteel, R; Pennington, M W; Eddinger, K A; Yaksh, T L; Hunter, M; Swanson, R V; Wickenden, A D

    2017-01-03

    Pain places a devastating burden on patients and society and current pain therapeutics exhibit limitations in efficacy, unwanted side effects and the potential for drug abuse and diversion. Although genetic evidence has clearly demonstrated that the voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.7, is critical to pain sensation in mammals, pharmacological inhibitors of Nav1.7 have not yet fully recapitulated the dramatic analgesia observed in Nav1.7-null subjects. Using the tarantula venom-peptide ProTX-II as a scaffold, we engineered a library of over 1500 venom-derived peptides and identified JNJ63955918 as a potent, highly selective, closed-state Nav1.7 blocking peptide. Here we show that JNJ63955918 induces a pharmacological insensitivity to pain that closely recapitulates key features of the Nav1.7-null phenotype seen in mice and humans. Our findings demonstrate that a high degree of selectivity, coupled with a closed-state dependent mechanism of action is required for strong efficacy and indicate that peptides such as JNJ63955918 and other suitably optimized Nav1.7 inhibitors may represent viable non-opioid alternatives for the pharmacological treatment of severe pain.

  18. Selective and protracted effect of nifedipine on fear memory extinction correlates with induced stress response.

    PubMed

    Waltereit, Robert; Mannhardt, Sönke; Nescholta, Sabine; Maser-Gluth, Christiane; Bartsch, Dusan

    2008-05-01

    Memory extinction, defined as a decrease of a conditioned response as a function of a non-reinforced conditioned stimulus presentation, has high biological and clinical relevance. Extinction is not a passive reversing or erasing of the plasticity associated with acquisition, but a novel, active learning process. Nifedipine blocks L-type voltage gated calcium channels (LVGCC) and has been shown previously to selectively interfere with the extinction, but not the acquisition, of fear memory. We studied here the effect of retrograde and anterograde shifts of nifedipine application, with respect to an extinction training, on the extinction of fear conditioning. Subcutaneous injection of 30 mg/kg nifedipine, at least up to 4 h before the extinction session, significantly impaired extinction, as did intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg nifedipine, at least up to 2 h before extinction training. However, the injection of nifedipine also induced a strong and protracted stress response. The pharmacokinetics of nifedipine suggest that it was mainly this stress response that triggered the specific inhibition of extinction, not the blockade of LVGCC in the brain. Our results support recent findings that stress selectively interferes with the extinction, but not the acquisition, of fear memory. They also indicate that a pharmacological approach is not sufficient to study the role of brain LVGCC in learning and memory. Further research using specific genetically modified animals is necessary to delineate the role of LVGCC in fear memory extinction.

  19. Maskless micro/nanofabrication on GaAs surface by friction-induced selective etching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a friction-induced selective etching method was developed to produce nanostructures on GaAs surface. Without any resist mask, the nanofabrication can be achieved by scratching and post-etching in sulfuric acid solution. The effects of the applied normal load and etching period on the formation of the nanostructure were studied. Results showed that the height of the nanostructure increased with the normal load or the etching period. XPS and Raman detection demonstrated that residual compressive stress and lattice densification were probably the main reason for selective etching, which eventually led to the protrusive nanostructures from the scratched area on the GaAs surface. Through a homemade multi-probe instrument, the capability of this fabrication method was demonstrated by producing various nanostructures on the GaAs surface, such as linear array, intersecting parallel, surface mesas, and special letters. In summary, the proposed method provided a straightforward and more maneuverable micro/nanofabrication method on the GaAs surface. PMID:24495647

  20. Insensitivity to pain induced by a potent selective closed-state Nav1.7 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Flinspach, M.; Xu, Q.; Piekarz, A. D.; Fellows, R.; Hagan, R.; Gibbs, A.; Liu, Y.; Neff, R. A.; Freedman, J.; Eckert, W. A.; Zhou, M.; Bonesteel, R.; Pennington, M. W.; Eddinger, K. A.; Yaksh, T. L.; Hunter, M.; Swanson, R. V.; Wickenden, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Pain places a devastating burden on patients and society and current pain therapeutics exhibit limitations in efficacy, unwanted side effects and the potential for drug abuse and diversion. Although genetic evidence has clearly demonstrated that the voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.7, is critical to pain sensation in mammals, pharmacological inhibitors of Nav1.7 have not yet fully recapitulated the dramatic analgesia observed in Nav1.7-null subjects. Using the tarantula venom-peptide ProTX-II as a scaffold, we engineered a library of over 1500 venom-derived peptides and identified JNJ63955918 as a potent, highly selective, closed-state Nav1.7 blocking peptide. Here we show that JNJ63955918 induces a pharmacological insensitivity to pain that closely recapitulates key features of the Nav1.7-null phenotype seen in mice and humans. Our findings demonstrate that a high degree of selectivity, coupled with a closed-state dependent mechanism of action is required for strong efficacy and indicate that peptides such as JNJ63955918 and other suitably optimized Nav1.7 inhibitors may represent viable non-opioid alternatives for the pharmacological treatment of severe pain. PMID:28045073

  1. Ozone-induced dissociation: elucidation of double bond position within mass-selected lipid ions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael C; Mitchell, Todd W; Harman, David G; Deeley, Jane M; Nealon, Jessica R; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Ions formed from lipids during electrospray ionization of crude lipid extracts have been mass-selected within a quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer and allowed to react with ozone vapor. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions between unsaturated lipid ions and ozone are found to yield two primary product ions for each carbon-carbon double bond within the molecule. The mass-to-charge ratios of these chemically induced fragments are diagnostic of the position of unsaturation within the precursor ion. This novel analytical technique, dubbed ozone-induced dissociation (OzID), can be applied both in series and in parallel with conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID) to provide near-complete structural assignment of unknown lipids within complex mixtures without prior fractionation or derivatization. In this study, OzID is applied to a suite of complex lipid extracts from sources including human lens, bovine kidney, and commercial olive oil, thus demonstrating the technique to be applicable to a broad range of lipid classes including both neutral and acidic glycerophospholipids, sphingomyelins, and triacylglycerols. Gas-phase ozonolysis reactions are also observed with different types of precursor ions including [M+H]+, [M+Li]+, [M+Na]+, and [M-H]-: in each case yielding fragmentation data that allow double bond position to be unambiguously assigned. Within the human lens lipid extract, three sphingomyelin regioisomers, namely SM(d18:0/15Z-24:1), SM(d18:0/17Z-24:1), and SM(d18:0/19Z-24:1), and a novel phosphatidylethanolamine alkyl ether, GPEtn(11Z-18:1e/9Z-18:1), are identified using a combination of CID and OzID. These discoveries demonstrate that lipid identification based on CID alone belies the natural structural diversity in lipid biochemistry and illustrate the potential of OzID as a complementary approach within automated, high-throughput lipid analysis protocols.

  2. Nucleic acid determinants for selective deamination of DNA over RNA by activation-induced deaminase.

    PubMed

    Nabel, Christopher S; Lee, Jae W; Wang, Laura C; Kohli, Rahul M

    2013-08-27

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID), a member of the larger AID/APOBEC family, is the key catalyst in initiating antibody somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination. The DNA deamination model accounting for AID's functional role posits that AID deaminates genomic deoxycytosine bases within the immunoglobulin locus, activating downstream repair pathways that result in antibody maturation. Although this model is well supported, the molecular basis for AID's selectivity for DNA over RNA remains an open and pressing question, reflecting a broader need to elucidate how AID/APOBEC enzymes engage their substrates. To address these questions, we have synthesized a series of chimeric nucleic acid substrates and characterized their reactivity with AID. These chimeric substrates feature targeted variations at the 2'-position of nucleotide sugars, allowing us to interrogate the steric and conformational basis for nucleic acid selectivity. We demonstrate that modifications to the target nucleotide can significantly alter AID's reactivity. Strikingly, within a substrate that is otherwise DNA, a single RNA-like 2'-hydroxyl substitution at the target cytosine is sufficient to compromise deamination. Alternatively, modifications that favor a DNA-like conformation (or sugar pucker) are compatible with deamination. AID's closely related homolog APOBEC1 is similarly sensitive to RNA-like substitutions at the target cytosine. Inversely, with unreactive 2'-fluoro-RNA substrates, AID's deaminase activity was rescued by introducing a trinucleotide DNA patch spanning the target cytosine and two nucleotides upstream. These data suggest a role for nucleotide sugar pucker in explaining the molecular basis for AID's DNA selectivity and, more generally, suggest how other nucleic acid-modifying enzymes may distinguish DNA from RNA.

  3. A laser-induced pulsed water jet for layer-selective submucosal dissection of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Nakano, T; Sato, C; Yamada, M; Nakagawa, A; Yamamoto, H; Fujishima, F; Tominaga, T; Satomi, S; Ohuchi, N

    2016-10-01

    Background and aims: Conventional water jet devices have been used for injecting fluid to lift up lesions during endoscopic submucosal dissection or endoscopic mucosal resection procedures. However, these devices cannot dissect the submucosal layer effectively. Here we aim to elucidate the dissection capability of a laser-induced pulsed water jet and to clarify the mechanism of dissection with layer selectivity. Materials (Subjects) and methods: Pulsed water jets were ejected from a stainless nozzle by accelerating saline using the energy of a pulsed holmium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The impact force (strength) of the jet was evaluated using a force meter. Injection of the pulsed jet into the submucosal layer was documented by high-speed imaging. The physical properties of the swine esophagus were evaluated by measuring the breaking strength. Submucosal dissection of the swine esophagus was performed and the resection bed was evaluated histologically. Results: Submucosal dissection of the esophagus was accomplished at an impact force of 1.11-1.47 N/pulse (laser energy: 1.1-1.5 J/pulse; standoff distance: 60 mm). Histological specimens showed clear dissection at the submucosal layer without thermal injury. The mean static breaking strength of the submucosa (0.11 ± 0.04 MPa) was significantly lower than that of the mucosa (1.32 ± 0.18 MPa), and propria muscle (1.45 ± 0.16 MPa). Conclusions: The pulsed water jet device showed potential for achieving selective submucosal dissection. It could achieve mucosal, submucosal, and muscle layer selectivity owing to the varied breaking strengths.

  4. A laser-induced pulsed water jet for layer-selective submucosal dissection of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, C; Yamada, M; Nakagawa, A; Yamamoto, H; Fujishima, F; Tominaga, T; Satomi, S; Ohuchi, N

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Conventional water jet devices have been used for injecting fluid to lift up lesions during endoscopic submucosal dissection or endoscopic mucosal resection procedures. However, these devices cannot dissect the submucosal layer effectively. Here we aim to elucidate the dissection capability of a laser-induced pulsed water jet and to clarify the mechanism of dissection with layer selectivity. Materials (Subjects) and methods: Pulsed water jets were ejected from a stainless nozzle by accelerating saline using the energy of a pulsed holmium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The impact force (strength) of the jet was evaluated using a force meter. Injection of the pulsed jet into the submucosal layer was documented by high-speed imaging. The physical properties of the swine esophagus were evaluated by measuring the breaking strength. Submucosal dissection of the swine esophagus was performed and the resection bed was evaluated histologically. Results: Submucosal dissection of the esophagus was accomplished at an impact force of 1.11–1.47 N/pulse (laser energy: 1.1–1.5 J/pulse; standoff distance: 60 mm). Histological specimens showed clear dissection at the submucosal layer without thermal injury. The mean static breaking strength of the submucosa (0.11 ± 0.04 MPa) was significantly lower than that of the mucosa (1.32 ± 0.18 MPa), and propria muscle (1.45 ± 0.16 MPa). Conclusions: The pulsed water jet device showed potential for achieving selective submucosal dissection. It could achieve mucosal, submucosal, and muscle layer selectivity owing to the varied breaking strengths. PMID:27853343

  5. Sensitivity- and effort-gain analysis: multilead ECG electrode array selection for activation time imaging.

    PubMed

    Hintermüller, Christoph; Seger, Michael; Pfeifer, Bernhard; Fischer, Gerald; Modre, Robert; Tilg, Bernhard

    2006-10-01

    Methods for noninvasive imaging of electric function of the heart might become clinical standard procedure the next years. Thus, the overall procedure has to meet clinical requirements as an easy and fast application. In this paper, we propose a new electrode array which improves the resolution of methods for activation time imaging considering clinical constraints such as easy to apply and compatibility with routine leads. For identifying the body-surface regions where the body surface potential (BSP) is most sensitive to changes in transmembrane potential (TMP), a virtual array method was used to compute local linear dependency (LLD) maps. The virtual array method computes a measure for the LLD in every point on the body surface. The most suitable number and position of the electrodes within the sensitive body surface regions was selected by constructing effort gain (EG) plots. Such a plot depicts the relative attainable rank of the leadfield matrix in relation to the increase in number of electrodes required to build the electrode array. The attainable rank itself was computed by a detector criterion. Such a criterion estimates the maximum number of source space eigenvectors not covered by noise when being mapped to the electrode space by the leadfield matrix and recorded by a detector. From the sensitivity maps, we found that the BSP is most sensitive to changes in TMP on the upper left frontal and dorsal body surface. These sensitive regions are covered best by an electrode array consisting of two L-shaped parts of approximately 30 cm x 30 cm and approximately 20 cm x 20 cm. The EG analysis revealed that the array meeting clinical requirements best and improving the resolution of activation time imaging consists of 125 electrodes with a regular horizontal and vertical spacing of 2-3 cm.

  6. Time-dependent effects of rapamycin on consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal.

    PubMed

    Fifield, Kathleen; Hebert, Mark; Williams, Kimberly; Linehan, Victoria; Whiteman, Jesse D; Mac Callum, Phillip; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that rapamycin, a potent inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, blocks consolidation of shock-induced associative fear memories. Moreover, rapamycin's block of associative fear memories is time-dependent. It is unknown, however, if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced non-associative fear memories. Furthermore, the temporal pattern of mTOR activation following predator stress is unknown. Thus, the goal of the current studies was to determine if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced fear memories and if so, whether rapamycin's effect is time-dependent. Male rats were injected systemically with rapamycin at various time points following predator stress. Predator stress involves an acute, unprotected exposure of a rat to a cat, which causes long-lasting non-associative fear memories manifested as generalized hyperarousal and increased anxiety-like behaviour. We show that rapamycin injected immediately after predator stress blocked consolidation of stress-induced startle. However, rapamycin injected 9, 24 or 48h post predator stress potentiated stress-induced startle. Consistent with shock-induced associative fear memories, we show that mTOR signalling is essential for consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal. However, unlike shock-induced fear memories, a second, persistent, late phase mTOR-dependent process following predator stress actually dampens startle. Consistent with previous findings, our data support the potential role for rapamycin in treatment of stress related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder. However, our data suggest timing of rapamycin administration is critical.

  7. Approach towards sensor placement, selection and fusion for real-time condition monitoring of precision machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Poi Voon; Teo, Chek Sing; Tan, Kok Kiong

    2016-02-01

    Moving mechanical parts in a machine will inevitably generate vibration profiles reflecting its operating conditions. Vibration profile analysis is a useful tool for real-time condition monitoring to avoid loss of performance and unwanted machine downtime. In this paper, we propose and validate an approach for sensor placement, selection and fusion for continuous machine condition monitoring. The main idea is to use a minimal series of sensors mounted at key locations of a machine to measure and infer the actual vibration spectrum at a critical point where it is not suitable to mount a sensor. The locations for sensors' mountings which are subsequently used for vibration inference are identified based on sensitivity calibration at these locations moderated with normalized Fisher Information (NFI) associated with the measurement quality of the sensor at that location. Each of the identified sensor placement location is associated with one or more sensitive frequencies for which it ranks top in terms of the moderated sensitivities calibrated. A set of Radial Basis Function (RBF), each of them associated with a range of sensitive frequencies, is used to infer the vibration at the critical point for that frequency. The overall vibration spectrum of the critical point is then fused from these components. A comprehensive set of experimental results for validation of the proposed approach is provided in the paper.

  8. Novel space-time trellis codes for free-space optical communications using transmit laser selection.

    PubMed

    García-Zambrana, Antonio; Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, the deployment of novel space-time trellis codes (STTCs) with transmit laser selection (TLS) for free-space optical (FSO) communication systems using intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD) over atmospheric turbulence and misalignment fading channels is presented. Combining TLS and STTC with rate 1 bit/(s · Hz), a new code design criterion based on the use of the largest order statistics is here proposed for multiple-input/single-output (MISO) FSO systems in order to improve the diversity order gain by properly chosing the transmit lasers out of the available L lasers. Based on a pairwise error probability (PEP) analysis, closed-form asymptotic bit error-rate (BER) expressions in the range from low to high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are derived when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to moderate-to-strong turbulence conditions, following a gamma-gamma (GG) distribution, and pointing error effects, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. Obtained results show diversity orders of 2L and 3L when simple two-state and four-state STTCs are considered, respectively. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the analytical results.

  9. Does human-induced habitat transformation modify pollinator-mediated selection? A case study in Viola portalesia (Violaceae).

    PubMed

    Murúa, Maureen; Espinoza, Claudia; Bustamante, Ramiro; Marín, Víctor H; Medel, Rodrigo

    2010-05-01

    Pollinator-mediated selection is one of the most important factors driving adaptation in flowering plants. However, as ecological conditions change through habitat loss and fragmentation, the interactions among species may evolve in new and unexpected directions. Human-induced environmental variation is likely to affect selection regimes, but as yet no empirical examples have been reported. In the study reported here, we examined the influence of human-induced habitat transformation on the composition of pollinator assemblages and, hence, pollinator-mediated selection on the flower phenotype of Viola portalesia (Violaceae). Our results indicate that pollinator assemblages differed substantially in terms of species composition and visitation rate between nearby native and transformed habitats. Similarly, the insect species that contributed most to visitation rates differed between plant populations. While the magnitude and sign of pollinator-mediated selection on flower length and width did not differ between sites, selection for flower number lost significance in the transformed habitat, and a significant pattern of disruptive selection for flower shape, undetected in the native habitat, was present in the transformed one. Overall, the results of this study suggest that human-induced habitat change may not only modify the species composition of pollinator assemblages, relaxing the selection process on some flower characters, but they may also create new opportunities for fitness-trait covariation not present in pristine conditions.

  10. Nanoparticle-induced potentiometric biosensing of NADH at copper ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin Y; Wang, Joseph

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate the first example of using potentiometry at ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) for probing in real-time monitoring of biometallization processes. A copper ISE is used for real-time monitoring of the NADH-mediated reduction of copper in the presence of gold nanoparticle seeds. Such potentiometric detection of NADH is not susceptible to surface fouling common with analogous amperometric measurements of this co-factor. Biosensing of ethanol is illustrated in the presence of alcohol dehydrogenase and NAD(+), along with potentiometric detection of the NADH product at the copper ISE. The concept can be readily expanded to the monitoring of various biometallization processes in connection to different enzymatic transformations and ISE, and used for ultrasensitive detection of bioaffinity interactions in connection to common enzyme tags.

  11. [A method for time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement].

    PubMed

    Pan, Cong-Yuan; Han, Zhen-Yu; Li, Chao-Yang; Yu, Yun-Si; Wang, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Qiu-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is strongly time related. Time-resolved LIBS measurement is an important technique for the research on laser induced plasma evolution and self-absorption of the emission lines. Concerning the temporal characteristics of LIBS spectrum, a method is proposed in the present paper which can achieve micros-scale time-resolved LIBS measurement by using general ms-scale detector. By setting different integration delay time of the ms-scale spectrum detector, a series of spectrum are recorded. And the integration delay time interval should be longer than the worst temporal precision. After baseline correction and spectrum fitting, the intensity of the character line was obtained. Calculating this intensity with differential method at a certain time interval and then the difference value is the time-resolved line intensity. Setting the plasma duration time as X-axis and the time-resolved line intensity as Y-axis, the evolution curve of the character line intensity can be plotted. Character line with overlap-free and smooth background should be a priority to be chosen for analysis. Using spectrometer with ms-scale integration time and a control system with temporal accuracy is 0.021 micros, experiments carried out. The results validate that this method can be used to characterize the evolution of LIBS characteristic lines and can reduce the cost of the time-resolved LIBS measurement system. This method makes high time-resolved LIBS spectrum measurement possible with cheaper system.

  12. Unilateral deactivation of macaque dorsolateral prefrontal cortex induces biases in stimulus selection

    PubMed Central

    Lomber, Stephen G.; Everling, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Following unilateral brain injury, patients are often unable to detect a stimulus presented in the contralesional field when another is presented simultaneously ipsilesionally. This phenomenon has been referred to as extinction and has been conceptualized as a deficit in selective attention. Although most commonly observed following damage to posterior parietal areas, extinction has been observed following lesions of prefrontal cortex (PFC) in both humans and nonhuman primates. To date, most studies in nonhuman primates have examined lesions of multiple PFC subregions, including the frontal eye fields (FEF). Theoretical accounts of attentional disturbances from human patients, however, also implicate other PFC areas, including the middle frontal gyrus. Here, we investigated the effects of deactivating PFC areas anterior to the FEF on stimulus selection using a free-choice task. Macaque monkeys were presented with two peripheral stimuli appearing either simultaneously, or at varying stimulus onset asynchronies, and their performance was evaluated during unilateral cryogenic deactivation of part of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or the cortex lining the caudal principal sulcus, the likely homologue of the human middle frontal gyrus. A decreased proportion of saccades was made to stimuli presented in the hemifield contralateral to the deactivated PFC. We also observed increases in reaction times to contralateral stimuli and decreases for stimuli presented in the hemifield ipsilateral to the deactivated hemisphere. In both cases, these results were greatest when both PFC subregions were deactivated. These findings demonstrate that selection biases result from PFC deactivation and support a role of dorsolateral prefrontal subregions anterior to FEF in stimulus selection. PMID:26792881

  13. Selective JAK3 Inhibitors with a Covalent Reversible Binding Mode Targeting a New Induced Fit Binding Pocket.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael; Chaikuad, Apirat; Bauer, Silke M; Holstein, Julia; Robers, Matthew B; Corona, Cesear R; Gehringer, Matthias; Pfaffenrot, Ellen; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Knapp, Stefan; Laufer, Stefan A

    2016-11-17

    Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of cytoplasmatic tyrosine kinases that are attractive targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs given their roles in cytokine signaling. One question regarding JAKs and their inhibitors that remains under intensive debate is whether JAK inhibitors should be isoform selective. Since JAK3 functions are restricted to immune cells, an isoform-selective inhibitor for JAK3 could be especially valuable to achieve clinically more useful and precise effects. However, the high degree of structural conservation makes isoform-selective targeting a challenging task. Here, we present picomolar inhibitors with unprecedented kinome-wide selectivity for JAK3. Selectivity was achieved by concurrent covalent reversible targeting of a JAK3-specific cysteine residue and a ligand-induced binding pocket. We confirmed that in vitro activity and selectivity translate well into the cellular environment and suggest that our inhibitors are powerful tools to elucidate JAK3-specific functions.

  14. Dynamics of Time Delay-Induced Multiple Synchronous Behaviors in Inhibitory Coupled Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huaguang; Zhao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory synapse can induce synchronous behaviors different from the anti-phase synchronous behaviors, which have been reported in recent studies. In the present paper, synchronous behaviors are investigated in the motif model composed of reciprocal inhibitory coupled neurons with endogenous bursting and time delay. When coupling strength is weak, synchronous behavior appears at a single interval of time delay within a bursting period. When coupling strength is strong, multiple synchronous behaviors appear at different intervals of time delay within a bursting period. The different bursting patterns of synchronous behaviors, and time delays and coupling strengths that can induce the synchronous bursting patterns can be well interpreted by the dynamics of the endogenous bursting pattern of isolated neuron, which is acquired by the fast-slow dissection method, combined with the inhibitory coupling current. For an isolated neuron, when a negative impulsive current with suitable strength is applied at different phases of the bursting, multiple different bursting patterns can be induced. For a neuron in the motif, the inhibitory coupling current, of which the application time and strength is modulated by time delay and coupling strength, can cause single or multiple synchronous firing patterns like the negative impulsive current when time delay and coupling strength is suitable. The difference compared to the previously reported multiple synchronous behaviors that appear at time delays wider than a period of the endogenous firing is discussed. The results present novel examples of synchronous behaviors in the neuronal network with inhibitory synapses and provide a reasonable explanation. PMID:26394224

  15. Time-dependent inhibition of pan-inflammatory cytokines mitigates radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jenrow, Kenneth A; Brown, Stephen L; Kolozsvary, Andrew J J; Lapanowski, Karen; Kim, Jae Ho

    2014-09-01

    Radiation injury to skin poses substantial morbidity risks in the curative treatment of cancers and is also of concern in the context of radiological attack or nuclear accident scenarios. Late effects can be severe and are frequently characterized by subcutaneous fibrosis and morbidity. These experiments presented here assess the potential of MW01-2-151SRM (MW-151), a novel small-molecule inhibitor of microglial activation and associated proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, as a mitigator of radiation-induced skin injury. Groups of C57BL/6 mice received focal irradiation of the right hind leg at a dose of 30 Gy. Therapy was initiated either on day 3, day 7 or day 14 postirradiation and maintained subsequently for 21 days by intraperitoneal injections administered three times per week. The primary end point was skin injury, which was assessed three times a week for at least 60 days postirradiation and scored using a semi-quantitative scale. Secondary end points measured at selected times included histology (primarily H&E) and immunofluorescence labeling of various macrophage (F4-80) and inflammatory (TGF-β, TNF-α, MMP9) markers. Relative to untreated controls, mitigation of radiation-induced skin injury in mice receiving MW-151 was highly dependent on the timing of therapy initiation. Initiation on day 3 postirradiation had no discernable effect, whereas mitigating effects were maximal following initiation on day 7 and present to a lesser degree following initiation on day 14. The response to MW-151 therapy in individual animals was essentially all-or-none and the relative benefits associated with the timing of therapy initiation primarily reflected differences in the number of responders. These data support the hypothesis that proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines play complex roles in orchestrating the response to radiation-induced skin injury and suggest that there is a critical period during which they initiate the pathogenesis resulting in late

  16. TRIASSIC: the Time-Resolved Industrial Alpha-Source Scanning Induced Current microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Arthur

    Time-resolved ion beam induced current (TRIBIC) microscopy yields useful information such as carrier mobility and lifetimes in semiconductors and defect locations in devices; however, traditional TRIBIC uses large, expensive particle accelerators that require specialized training to operate and maintain. The time-resolved industrial alpha-source scanning induced current (TRIASSIC) microscope transforms TRIBIC by replacing the particle accelerator facility with an affordable, tabletop instrument suitable for use in research and education at smaller colleges and universities. I will discuss the development of, successes with, setbacks to and future directions for TRIASSIC.

  17. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion.

    PubMed

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C

    2016-03-22

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing.

  18. Investigating the time clustering of induced microseismicity generated by hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesca, Luciano; Eisner, Leo; Stabile, Tony A.; Vlček, Josef

    2016-12-01

    By using the global and local coefficient of variation and the Allan Factor we investigated the time-clustering properties of the time dynamics of fluid-injection–induced microseismicity. The experiment consists of a microseismic monitoring through a nearly vertical borehole of 12 receivers of a hydraulic fracturing stimulation along a horizontal well separated into more than 20 sections (stages) The main finding of the applied methodology is the discrimination between fault triggering and new fracturing, being the first characterized by a clusterization of the induced microseismic events and the second by a Poissonian behaviour of the generated events.

  19. Robust estimates of divergence times and selection with a poisson random field model: a case study of comparative phylogeographic data.

    PubMed

    Amei, Amei; Smith, Brian Tilston

    2014-01-01

    Mutation frequencies can be modeled as a Poisson random field (PRF) to estimate speciation times and the degree of selection on newly arisen mutations. This approach provides a quantitative theory for comparing intraspecific polymorphism with interspecific divergence in the presence of selection and can be used to estimate population genetic parameters. Although the original PRF model has been extended to more general biological settings to make statistical inference about selection and divergence among model organisms, it has not been incorporated into phylogeographic studies that focus on estimating population genetic parameters for nonmodel organisms. Here, we modified a recently developed time-dependent PRF model to independently estimate genetic parameters from a nuclear and mitochondrial DNA data set of 22 sister pairs of birds that have diverged across a biogeographic barrier. We found that species that inhabit humid habitats had more recent divergence times and larger effective population sizes than those that inhabit drier habitats, and divergence time estimated from the PRF model were similar to estimates from a coalescent species-tree approach. Selection coefficients were higher in sister pairs that inhabited drier habitats than in those in humid habitats, but overall the mitochondrial DNA was under weak selection. Our study indicates that PRF models are useful for estimating various population genetic parameters and serve as a framework for incorporating estimates of selection into comparative phylogeographic studies.

  20. Effects of spring temperatures on the strength of selection on timing of reproduction in a long-distance migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Visser, Marcel E; Gienapp, Phillip; Husby, Arild; Morrisey, Michael; de la Hera, Iván; Pulido, Francisco; Both, Christiaan

    2015-04-01

    Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction intensified in the first two decades (1980-2000) but weakened during the last decade (2001-2010). Against expectation, this pattern could not be explained by the temporal variation in the phenological mismatch with food abundance. We therefore explored an alternative hypothesis that selection on timing was affected by conditions individuals experience when arriving in spring at the breeding grounds: arriving early in cold conditions may reduce survival. First, we show that in female recruits, spring arrival date in the first breeding year correlates positively with hatch date; hence, early-hatched individuals experience colder conditions at arrival than late-hatched individuals. Second, we show that when temperatures at arrival in the recruitment year were high, early-hatched young had a higher recruitment probability than when temperatures were low. We interpret this as a potential cost of arriving early in colder years, and climate warming may have reduced this cost. We thus show that higher temperatures in the arrival year of recruits were associated with stronger selection for early reproduction in the years these birds were born. As arrival temperatures in the beginning of the study increased, but recently declined again, directional selection on timing of reproduction showed a nonlinear change. We demonstrate that environmental conditions with a lag of up to two years can alter selection on phenological traits in natural populations, something that has important

  1. Effects of Spring Temperatures on the Strength of Selection on Timing of Reproduction in a Long-Distance Migratory Bird

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Marcel E.; Gienapp, Phillip; Husby, Arild; Morrisey, Michael; de la Hera, Iván; Pulido, Francisco; Both, Christiaan

    2015-01-01

    Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction intensified in the first two decades (1980–2000) but weakened during the last decade (2001–2010). Against expectation, this pattern could not be explained by the temporal variation in the phenological mismatch with food abundance. We therefore explored an alternative hypothesis that selection on timing was affected by conditions individuals experience when arriving in spring at the breeding grounds: arriving early in cold conditions may reduce survival. First, we show that in female recruits, spring arrival date in the first breeding year correlates positively with hatch date; hence, early-hatched individuals experience colder conditions at arrival than late-hatched individuals. Second, we show that when temperatures at arrival in the recruitment year were high, early-hatched young had a higher recruitment probability than when temperatures were low. We interpret this as a potential cost of arriving early in colder years, and climate warming may have reduced this cost. We thus show that higher temperatures in the arrival year of recruits were associated with stronger selection for early reproduction in the years these birds were born. As arrival temperatures in the beginning of the study increased, but recently declined again, directional selection on timing of reproduction showed a nonlinear change. We demonstrate that environmental conditions with a lag of up to two years can alter selection on phenological traits in natural populations, something that has important

  2. Blood culture series benefit may be limited to selected clinical conditions: time to reassess.

    PubMed

    Khatib, R; Simeunovic, G; Sharma, M; Fakih, M G; Johnson, L B; Briski, L; Lebar, W

    2015-04-01

    Blood cultures are often submitted as series (two to three sets per 24 hours) to maximize sample recovery. We assessed the actual benefit of additional sets. Blood cultures submitted from adults (≥ 18 years old) over 1 year (1 February 2012 to 31 January 2013) were examined. The medical records of patients with positive cultures were reviewed. Cultures with commensal organisms were considered contamination in the absence of a source and clinical findings. The impact of additional sets on antibiotic therapy was estimated. We evaluated 15,394 blood cultures. They were submitted as two to five sets per 24 hours in 12,236 (79.5%) instances. Pathogens were detected in 1227 sets, representing 741 bacteremias, of which 618 (83.4%) were detected in the first set and 123 (16.6%) in the additional sets. Pathogens missed in the first set were recovered from patients receiving antibiotics (n = 72; 58.5%) and after undergoing a procedure (n = 54; 43.9%). The additional sets' results could have influenced antibiotic therapy in 76/6235 (1.2%) instances, including 40 (0.6%) antibiotic switches and 36 (0.6%) possible extensions of therapy. The potential impact of the detection of missed pathogens on antibiotic therapy was not apparent in patients who had an endovascular infection (26/27, 96.3%) and those who lacked an obvious source of pathogens (10/10, 100%). These findings suggest that one blood culture is probably adequate in patients with an obvious source of pathogens. Blood culture series are beneficial in patients without an obvious source of pathogens and in those with endovascular infections. It is time to reassess the benefit of blood culture series, perhaps limiting them to selected conditions.

  3. LATE-TIME RADIO EMISSION FROM X-RAY-SELECTED TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Metzger, Brian D.

    2013-02-15

    We present new observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of seven X-ray-selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The radio observations were carried out between 9 and 22 years after the initial X-ray discovery, and thus probe the late-time formation of relativistic jets and jet interactions with the interstellar medium in these systems. We detect a compact radio source in the nucleus of the galaxy IC 3599 and a compact radio source that is a possible counterpart to RX J1420.4+5334. We find no radio counterparts for five other sources with flux density upper limits between 51 and 200 {mu}Jy (3{sigma}). If the detections truly represent late radio emission associated with a TDE, then our results suggest that a fraction, {approx}> 10%, of X-ray-detected TDEs are accompanied by relativistic jets. We explore several models for producing late radio emission, including interaction of the jet with gas in the circumnuclear environment (blast wave model), and emission from the core of the jet itself. Upper limits on the radio flux density from archival observations suggest that the jet formation may have been delayed for years after the TDE, possibly triggered by the accretion rate dropping below a critical threshold of {approx}10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} M-dot {sub Edd}. The non-detections are also consistent with this scenario; deeper radio observations can determine whether relativistic jets are present in these systems. The emission from RX J1420.4+5334 is also consistent with the predictions of the blast wave model; however, the radio emission from IC 3599 is substantially underluminous, and its spectral slope is too flat, relative to the blast wave model expectations. Future radio monitoring of IC 3599 and RX J1420.4+5334 will help to better constrain the nature of the jets in these systems.

  4. Disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis in hepatocyte nodules: selective proliferative stimulus induced by fumonisin B1.

    PubMed

    van der Westhuizen, Liana; Gelderblom, Wentzel C A; Shephard, Gordon S; Swanevelder, Sonja

    2004-07-15

    In order to investigate the role of sphingolipid disruption in the cancer promoting potential of fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) in the development of hepatocyte nodules, male Fischer 344 rats were subjected to cancer initiation (FB(1) containing diet or diethylnitrosamine (DEN) by i.p. injection) and promotion (2-acetylaminofluorene with partial hepatectomy, 2-AAF/PH) treatments followed by a secondary FB(1) dietary regimen. Sphinganine (Sa) and sphingosine (So) levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography in control, surrounding and nodular liver tissues of the rats. The disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis by the secondary FB(1) treatment in the control rats was significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced by the 2-AAF/PH cancer promotion treatment. The nodular and surrounding Sa levels returned to baseline following FB(1) initiation and 2-AAF/PH promotion. When comparing the groups subjected to the secondary FB(1) treatment, the initiation effected by FB(1) was less (P < 0.01) sensitive to the accumulation of Sa in the nodular and surrounding tissues than DEN initiation and the 2-AAF/PH control treatment. In contrast, the So level of FB(1) initiation was marginally increased in the nodules compared to the surrounding liver after 2-AAF/PH promotion and significantly (P < 0.05) higher with the secondary FB(1) treatment. Although, the FB(1)-induced hepatocyte nodules were not resistant to the disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis, the nodular So levels were increased and might provide a selective growth stimulus possibly induced by bio-active sphingoid intermediates such as sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P).

  5. Selective phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor olprinone attenuates meconium-induced oxidative lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Drgova, Anna; Pullmann, Rudolf; Calkovska, Andrea

    2012-06-01

    Since inflammation and oxidation play a key role in the pathophysiology of neonatal meconium aspiration syndrome, various anti-inflammatory drugs have been tested in the treatment. This study evaluated whether the phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 inhibitor olprinone can alleviate meconium-induced inflammation and oxidative lung injury. Oxygen-ventilated rabbits intratracheally received 4 ml/kg of meconium (25 mg/ml) or saline. Thirty minutes after meconium/saline instillation, meconium-instilled animals were treated by intravenous olprinone (0.2 mg/kg) or were left without treatment. All animals were oxygen-ventilated for an additional 5 h. A bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of the left lungs was performed and differential leukocyte count in the sediment was estimated. The right lungs were used to determine lung edema by wet/dry weight ratio, as well as to detect oxidative damage to the lungs. In the lung tissue homogenate, total antioxidant status (TAS) was determined. In isolated lung mitochondria, the thiol group content, conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), dityrosine, lysine-lipid peroxidation products, and activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) were estimated. To evaluate the effects of meconium instillation and olprinone treatment on the systemic level, TBARS and TAS were determined in the blood plasma, as well. Meconium instillation increased the relative numbers of neutrophils and eosinophils in the BAL fluid, increased edema formation and concentrations of oxidation markers, and decreased TAS. Treatment with olprinone reduced the numbers of polymorphonuclears in the BAL fluid, decreased the formation of most oxidation markers in the lungs, reduced lung edema and prevented a decrease in TAS in the lung homogenate compared to non-treated animals. In the blood plasma, olprinone decreased TBARS and increased TAS compared to the non-treated group. Conclusion, the selective PDE3 inhibitor olprinone has shown potent antioxidative and anti

  6. Developing a Methodology for Observing Stress-Induced Temporal Variations in Travel Time: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, P. G.; Niu, F.; Daley, T. M.; Majer, E. L.

    2005-12-01

    The dependence of crack properties on stress means that crustal seismic velocity exhibits stress dependence. This dependence constitutes, in principle, a powerful means of studying transient changes in stress at seismogenic depth through the repeat measurement of travel time from a controlled source. While the scientific potential of this stress dependence has been known for decades, time-dependent seismic imaging has yet to become a reliable means of measuring subsurface stress changes in fault-zone environments. This is due to 1) insufficient delay-time precision necessary to detect small changes in stress, and 2) the difficulty in establishing a reliable in-situ calibration between stress and seismic velocity. These two problems are coupled because the best sources of calibration, solid-earth tides and barometric pressure, produce weak stress perturbations of order 10{2}-10{3} Pa that require precision in the measurement of the fractional velocity change dlnv of order 10-6, based on laboratory experiments. We have thus focused on developing a methodology that is capable of providing this high level of precision. For example, we have shown that precision in dlnv is maximized when there are Q/π wavelengths in the source-receiver path. This relationship provides a means of selecting an optimal geometry and/or source characteristic frequency in the planning of experiments. We have initiated a series of experiments to demonstrate the detectability of these stress-calibration signals in progressively more tectonically relevant settings. Initial tests have been completed on the smallest scale, with two boreholes 17 m deep and 3 meters apart. We have used a piezoelectric source (0.1ms source pulse repeated every 100ms) and a string of 24 hydrophones to record P waves with a dominant frequency of 10KHz. Recording was conducted for 160 hours. The massive stacking of ~36,000 high-SNR traces/hr leads to delay-time precision of 6ns (hour sampling) corresponding to dlnv

  7. O-naphthoquinone isolated from Capraria biflora L. induces selective cytotoxicity in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    de S Wisintainer, G G N; Scola, G; Moura, S; Lemos, T L G; Pessoa, C; de Moraes, M O; Souza, L G S; Roesch-Ely, M; Henriques, J A P

    2015-12-21

    Biflorin is an o-naphthoquinone isolated from the roots of the plant Capraria biflora L. (Scrophulariaceae). In this study, the cytotoxic effects of biflorin were verified, and late apoptosis was detected in various cancer cell lines by in situ analysis. The cytotoxicity was further evaluated exclusively for 48 h of treatment in different tumor and non-tumor cell lines (Hep-2, HeLa, HT-29, A-375, and A-549, and HEK-293, respectively). The results indicated that biflorin induced selective cytotoxicity in tumor cells. HeLa cells were more susceptible to biflorin, followed by HT-29, A-549, A-375, and Hep-2 at all concentrations (range 5-50 μg/mL), and the highest half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 (56.01 ± 1.17 μg/mL) was observed in HEK-293 cells. Late apoptotic/necrotic events, observed by in situ immunostaining with Annexin V, varied with each cell line; an increase in late apoptotic events was observed corresponding to the increase in biflorin dosage. Hep-2 cells showed a greater percentage of late apoptotic events among the tumor cell lines when treated with higher concentrations of biflorin (69.63 ± 2.28%). The non-tumor HEK-293 line showed greater resistance to late apoptotic events, as well as a lower level of cytotoxicity (77.69 ± 6.68%) than the tested tumor lines. The data presented indicate that biflorin showed an important, possibly selective, cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines, thereby revealing a promising novel substance with potential anticancer activity for tumor therapy.

  8. Modeling the Time-Course of Responses for the Border Ownership Selectivity Based on the Integration of Feedforward Signals and Visual Cortical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wagatsuma, Nobuhiko; Sakai, Ko

    2017-01-01

    modulations for time-courses were induced by selective enhancement of early-level features due to interactions between V1 and PP. Our proposed model suggests fundamental roles of surrounding suppression/facilitation based on feedforward inputs as well as the interactions between early and parietal visual areas with respect to the ambiguity dependence of the neural dynamics in intermediate-level vision. PMID:28163688

  9. Intermodal selective attention in monkeys. I: distribution and timing of effects across visual areas.

    PubMed

    Mehta, A D; Ulbert, I; Schroeder, C E

    2000-04-01

    This study quantified the magnitude and timing of selective attention effects across areas of the macaque visual system, including the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), lower cortical areas V1 and V2, and multiple higher visual areas in the dorsal and ventral processing streams. We used one stimulus configuration and behavioral paradigm, with simultaneous recordings from different areas to allow direct comparison of the distribution and timing of attention effects across the system. Streams of interdigitated auditory and visual stimuli were presented at a high rate with an irregular interstimulus interval (mean of 4/s). Attention to visual stimuli was manipulated by requiring subjects to make discriminative behavioral responses to stimuli in one sensory modality, ignoring all stimuli in the other. The attended modality was alternated across trial blocks, and difficulty of discrimination was equated across modalities. Stimulus presentation was gated, so that no stimuli were presented unless the subject gazed at the center of the visual stimulus display. Visual stimuli were diffuse light flashes differing in intensity or color and subtending 12 degrees centered at the point of gaze. Laminar event-related potential (ERP) and current source density (CSD) response profiles were sampled during multiple paired penetrations in multiple visual areas with linear array multicontact electrodes. Attention effects were assessed by comparing responses to specific visual stimuli when attended versus when visual stimuli were looked at the same way, but ignored. Effects were quantified by computing a modulation index (MI), a ratio of the differential CSD response produced by attention to the sum responses to attended and ignored visual stimuli. The average MI increased up levels of the lower visual pathways from none in the LGN to 0.0278 in V1 to 0.101 in V2 to 0.170 in V4. Above the V2 level, attention effects were larger in ventral stream areas (MI = 0. 152) than in dorsal stream

  10. Detection of selected intestinal helminths and protozoa at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia using multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Basuni, M; Mohamed, Z; Ahmad, M; Zakaria, N Z; Noordin, R

    2012-09-01

    Intestinal parasites are the causative agents of a number of important human infections in developing countries. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of selected helminths and protozoan infections among patients admitted with gastrointestinal disorders at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia using multiplex real-time PCR. In addition microscopic examination was also performed following direct smear, zinc sulphate concentration and Kato-Katz thick smear techniques; and the presence of protozoan parasites was confirmed using trichrome and acid-fast stains. Of the 225 faecal samples analysed, 26.2% were positive for intestinal parasites by the multiplex real-time PCR, while 5.3% were positive by microscopy. As compared to microscopy, the multiplex real-time PCR detected 5.8 and 4.5 times more positives for the selected helminth and protozoan infections respectively. Among the selected helminths detected in this study, hookworm was the most prevalent by real-time PCR, while Ascaris lumbricoides was detected the most by microscopy. Meanwhile, among the selected protozoa detected in this study, Entamoeba histolytica was the most prevalent by real-time PCR, however microscopy detected equal number of cases with E. histolytica and Giardia lamblia. This study showed that real-time PCR can be used to obtain a more accurate prevalence data on intestinal helminths and protozoa.

  11. Optimum imaging time selection algorithm for inverse synthetic aperture radar images using geometric features and image gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulin, Su; Hongxin, Yang

    2016-07-01

    For better using of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images of ship targets, it is more desirable to select a proper imaging time to obtain high quality top-view or side-view images. However, optimum imaging time selection is not robust enough for the restriction of traditional geometric feature extraction methods. In our study, we propose a method based on the geometric features and gradient maximization. First, we select the imaging instant from radar echoes by the centerline and mainmast of the ship. In this part, we propose a geometric features extraction method to improve the robustness of instant selection in different scenarios. Then, an image gradient maximization is employed to estimate the period for ISAR imaging. Finally, experimental results of both simulated and real signals are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and practicability of the algorithm.

  12. Acoustic signal characteristics of laser induced cavitation in DDFP droplet: Spectrum and time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Qin, Dui; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Chenxiang; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation has great application potential in microvessel damage and targeted drug delivery. Concerning cavitation, droplet vaporization has been widely investigated in vitro and in vivo with plasmonic nanoparticles. Droplets with a liquid dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) core enclosed in an albumin shell have a stable and simple structure with good characteristics of laser absorbing; thus, DDFP droplets could be an effective aim for laser-induced cavitation. The DDPF droplet was prepared and perfused in a mimic microvessel in the optical microscopic system with a passive acoustic detection module. Three patterns of laser-induced cavitation in the droplets were observed. The emitted acoustic signals showed specific spectrum components at specific time points. It was suggested that a nanosecond laser pulse could induce cavitation in DDPF droplets, and specific acoustic signals would be emitted. Analyzing its characteristics could aid in monitoring the laser-induced cavitation process in droplets, which is meaningful to theranostic application.

  13. Enhanced analyte detection using in-source fragmentation of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-selected ions in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lauren J; Smith, Robert W; Toutoungi, Danielle E; Reynolds, James C; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew; Sage, Ashley; Wilson, Ian D; Weston, Daniel J; Boyle, Billy; Creaser, Colin S

    2012-05-01

    Miniaturized ultra high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is used for the selective transmission of differential mobility-selected ions prior to in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) analysis. The FAIMS-in-source collision induced dissociation-TOFMS (FISCID-MS) method requires only minor modification of the ion source region of the mass spectrometer and is shown to significantly enhance analyte detection in complex mixtures. Improved mass measurement accuracy and simplified product ion mass spectra were observed following FAIMS preselection and subsequent in-source CID of ions derived from pharmaceutical excipients, sufficiently close in m/z (17.7 ppm mass difference) that they could not be resolved by TOFMS alone. The FISCID-MS approach is also demonstrated for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of peptides with FAIMS used to filter out unrelated precursor ions thereby simplifying the resulting product ion mass spectra. Liquid chromatography combined with FISCID-MS was applied to the analysis of coeluting model peptides and tryptic peptides derived from human plasma proteins, allowing precursor ion selection and CID to yield product ion data suitable for peptide identification via database searching. The potential of FISCID-MS for the quantitative determination of a model peptide spiked into human plasma in the range of 0.45-9.0 μg/mL is demonstrated, showing good reproducibility (%RSD < 14.6%) and linearity (R(2) > 0.99).

  14. Effect of selective and non-selective serotonin receptor activation on L-DOPA-induced therapeutic efficacy and dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Tronci, E; Fidalgo, C; Stancampiano, R; Carta, M

    2015-10-01

    Selective activation of 5-HT1 receptors has been shown to produce near to full suppression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however, a reduction of the therapeutic effect of L-DOPA has been reported in several studies. Conversely, we recently found that increasing the serotonergic tone with chronic administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can reduce LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, without affecting L-DOPA efficacy. To directly compare the effects of selective versus non-selective serotonin receptor activation, here we first tested different acute doses of the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine and 5-HTP on LID in order to identify doses of the individual compounds showing similar anti-dyskinetic efficacy in L-DOPA-primed dyskinetic rats. About 50% reduction of LID was observed with 0.1 mg/kg and 24 mg/kg of eltoprazine and 5-HTP, respectively; we then compared the effect of the two drugs, individually and in combination, on L-DOPA-induced stepping test in L-DOPA-naïve parkinsonian animals and LID over three weeks of L-DOPA treatment. Results showed that eltoprazine induced significant worsening of L-DOPA-mediated performance in the stepping test, while 5-HTP did not. Interestingly, combination of 5-HTP with eltoprazine prevented the reduction in the forelimb use induced by eltoprazine. Moreover, 5-HTP and eltoprazine given individually showed similar efficacy also upon chronic treatment, and had additive effect in dampening the appearance of LID when given in combination. Finally, chronic administration of eltoprazine and/or 5-HTP did not affect striatal serotonin innervation, compared to l-DOPA alone, as measured by serotonin transporter expression.

  15. FAS-Based Cell Depletion Facilitates the Selective Isolation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warlich, Eva; Schambach, Axel; Lock, Dominik; Wedekind, Dirk; Glage, Silke; Eckardt, Dominik; Bosio, Andreas; Knöbel, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) opens up new avenues for basic research and regenerative medicine. However, the low efficiency of the procedure remains a major limitation. To identify iPSC, many studies to date relied on the activation of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Such strategies are either retrospective or depend on genetically modified reporter cells. We aimed at identifying naturally occurring surface proteins in a systematic approach, focusing on antibody-targeted markers to enable live-cell identification and selective isolation. We tested 170 antibodies for differential expression between mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and mouse pluripotent stem cells (PSC). Differentially expressed markers were evaluated for their ability to identify and isolate iPSC in reprogramming cultures. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) and stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA1) were upregulated early during reprogramming and enabled enrichment of OCT4 expressing cells by magnetic cell sorting. Downregulation of somatic marker FAS was equally suitable to enrich OCT4 expressing cells, which has not been described so far. Furthermore, FAS downregulation correlated with viral transgene silencing. Finally, using the marker SSEA-1 we exemplified that magnetic separation enables the establishment of bona fide iPSC and propose strategies to enrich iPSC from a variety of human source tissues. PMID:25029550

  16. Microcystin-LR modulates selected immune parameters and induces necrosis/apoptosis of carp leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Rymuszka, Anna; Sierosławska, Anna; Bownik, Adam; Skowroński, Tadeusz

    2010-03-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are potent hepatotoxins acting by the inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A, and may promote liver tumors. Moreover, studies also suggest they are nephrotoxic. The aim of the present study was to assess possible in vitro effects of microcystin-LR (which contains the amino acids leucine and arginine, the most widely studied and distributed variant of all microcystins) on the selected immune functions of the cells isolated from the head kidney of carp. In the experiments, pure microcystin-LR (MC-LR), was used at concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 microg/ml RPMI-1640 medium. Leucocytes (lymphocytes and phagocytes) were isolated by centrifugation on a density gradient. Lymphocyte proliferation, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species by phagocytes, and the presence of apoptotic and/or necrotic cells were assessed. The respiratory burst activity of phagocytic cells was increased at the lowest toxin concentration used in the study, but it was decreased at higher concentrations. Using a sensitive luminescent immunoassay, MC-LR was observed to have no influence on the T-cell proliferation but decreased the proliferation of B lymphocytes. Moreover, it was noted that MC-LR induced necrosis to a higher degree than apoptosis in fish leucocytes. The results of the present study suggest the modulatory potency of microcystin-LR on fish leucocytes.

  17. Resveratrol attenuates exercise-induced adaptive responses in rats selectively bred for low running performance.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nikolett; Sarga, Linda; Csende, Zsolt; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Davies, Kelvin J A; Radak, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Low capacity runner (LCR) rats have been developed by divergent artificial selection for treadmill endurance capacity to explore an aerobic biology-disease connection. The beneficial effects of resveratrol supplementation have been demonstrated in endurance running. In this study it was examined whether 12 weeks of treadmill exercise training and/or resveratrol can retrieve the low running performance of the LCR and impact mitochondrial biogenesis and quality control. Resveratrol regressed running performance in trained LCR (p<0.05). Surprisingly, exercise and resveratrol treatments significantly decreased pAMPK/AMPK, SIRT1, SIRT4, forkhead transcription factor 1 (FOXO1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) levels in these animals (p<0.05). Mitochondrial fusion protein, HSP78 and polynucleotide phosphorylase were significantly induced in LCR-trained, LCR-resveratrol treated, LCR-trained and resveratol treated groups compared to LCR-controls. The data indicate that the AMPK-SIRT1-NAMPT-FOXO1 axis could be important to the limited aerobic endurance capacity of low running capacity rats. Resveratrol supplementation was not beneficial in terms of aerobic endurance performance, mitochondrial biogenesis, or quality control.

  18. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants potentiate methylphenidate (Ritalin)-induced gene regulation in the adolescent striatum.

    PubMed

    Van Waes, Vincent; Beverley, Joel; Marinelli, Michela; Steiner, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (Ritalin) is used in conjunction with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of medical conditions such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder with anxiety/depression comorbidity and major depression. Co-exposure also occurs in patients on SSRIs who use psychostimulant 'cognitive enhancers'. Methylphenidate is a dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that produces altered gene expression in the forebrain; these effects partly mimic gene regulation by cocaine (dopamine/norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor). We investigated whether the addition of SSRIs (fluoxetine or citalopram; 5 mg/kg) modified gene regulation by methylphenidate (2-5 mg/kg) in the striatum and cortex of adolescent rats. Our results show that SSRIs potentiate methylphenidate-induced expression of the transcription factor genes zif268 and c-fos in the striatum, rendering these molecular changes more cocaine-like. Present throughout most of the striatum, this potentiation was most robust in its sensorimotor parts. The methylphenidate + SSRI combination also enhanced behavioral stereotypies, consistent with dysfunction in sensorimotor striatal circuits. In so far as such gene regulation is implicated in psychostimulant addiction, our findings suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction potential of methylphenidate.

  19. Utility of extinction-induced response variability for the selection of mands.

    PubMed

    Grow, Laura L; Kelley, Michael E; Roane, Henry S; Shillingsburg, M Alice

    2008-01-01

    Functional communication training (FCT; Carr & Durand, 1985) is a commonly used differential reinforcement procedure for replacing problem behavior with socially acceptable alternative responses. Most studies in the FCT literature consist of demonstrations of the maintenance of responding when various treatment components (e.g., extinction, punishment) are present and absent (e.g., Fisher et al., 1993; Wacker et al., 1990). Relatively little research on FCT has (a) evaluated the conditions under which alternative responses are acquired or (b) described procedures with technological precision. Thus, additional research on a cogent technology for response acquisition appears to be warranted. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of exposing problem behavior to extinction for inducing response variability as a tool for selecting an alternative response during FCT. Once participants engaged in appropriate alternative responses, the reinforcer identified in the functional analysis as maintaining problem behavior was delivered contingent on the alternative behavior. Results showed that exposing problem behavior to extinction was a useful method for producing alternative behaviors during FCT.

  20. Serum factor induces selective increase in Na-channel expression in cultured skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, C.; Sampson, S.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have examined effects of horse serum (HS) and various fractions (1 million-1M, 300K, 100K, and 30K nominal molecular weight limit) obtained by ultrafiltration on expression of TTX-sensitive Na-channels and on activities of the Na-K pump and glucose transport systems in cultured myotubes obtained from 1-2-day-old neonatal rat pups. Five-day-old cells were transferred to serum-free medium with no hormone or growth factor supplements (DMEM) for 24 hr and then treated with the various serum fractions for 48 hr. Measurements were made of specific (3H)-saxitoxin (STX) binding, action potential properties, 86Rb-uptake and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake. HS significantly increased all parameters compared to DMEM (increases in STX-binding, 69%; Rb-uptake, 65%; 2-DG uptake, 93%). Results of treatment with the separate fractions showed that the 300K fraction caused a significantly greater increase in STX-binding than either HS or the other fractions. In contrast, the increases in Rb and 2-DG uptakes induced by the different fractions were not different from that obtained with HS. They conclude that serum contains a factor that selectively increases expression of TTX-sensitive Na-channels in skeletal muscle.

  1. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  2. Neisseria lactamica selectively induces mitogenic proliferation of the naive B cell pool via cell surface Ig.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Brackenbury, Louise S; Massari, Paola; Davenport, Victoria; Gorringe, Andrew; Heyderman, Robert S; Williams, Neil A

    2010-09-15

    Neisseria lactamica is a commensal bacteria that colonizes the human upper respiratory tract mucosa during early childhood. In contrast to the closely related opportunistic pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, there is an absence of adaptive cell-mediated immunity to N. lactamica during the peak age of carriage. Instead, outer membrane vesicles derived from N. lactamica mediate a B cell-dependent proliferative response in mucosal mononuclear cells that is associated with the production of polyclonal IgM. We demonstrate in this study that this is a mitogenic human B cell response that occurs independently of T cell help and any other accessory cell population. The ability to drive B cell proliferation is a highly conserved property and is present in N. lactamica strains derived from diverse clonal complexes. CFSE staining of purified human tonsillar B cells demonstrated that naive IgD(+) and CD27(-) B cells are selectively induced to proliferate by outer membrane vesicles, including the innate CD5(+) subset. Neither purified lipooligosaccharide nor PorB from N. lactamica is likely to be responsible for this activity. Prior treatment of B cells with pronase to remove cell-surface Ig or treatment with BCR-specific Abs abrogated the proliferative response to N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles, suggesting that this mitogenic response is dependent upon the BCR.

  3. Spatially-Selective Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Cell-Solution Electrode Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Hokari, Yutaro; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Gene transfection, which is the process of deliberately introducing nucleic acids into cells, is expected to play an important role in medical treatment because the process is necessary for gene therapy and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional transfection methods have some problems, so we focus attention on promising transfection methods by atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). We have previously reported that the cell membrane permeability, which is closely related with gene transfection, is improved using a cell-solution electrode for generating He-APP. He-APP is irradiated to the solution containing the adherent cells and delivery materials such as fluorescent dyes (YOYO-1) and plasmid DNA (GFP). In case of YOYO-1 delivery, more than 80% of cells can be transferred only in the plasma-irradiated area and the spatially-selective membrane permeabilization is realized by the plasma irradiation. In addition, it is confirmed that plasmid DNA is transfected and the GFP genes are expressed using same APP irradiation system with no obvious cellular damage.

  4. Hypoxia-induced gene expression results from selective mRNA partitioning to the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Jonas J.; Naarmann-de Vries, Isabel S.; Ujvari, Stefanie J.; Klinger, Bertram; Kasim, Mumtaz; Benko, Edgar; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H.; Bondke Persson, Anja; Lorenzen, Stephan; Meier, Jochen C.; Blüthgen, Nils; Persson, Pontus B.; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Mrowka, Ralf; Fähling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a primary energy-consuming process in the cell. Therefore, under hypoxic conditions, rapid inhibition of global mRNA translation represents a major protective strategy to maintain energy metabolism. How some mRNAs, especially those that encode crucial survival factors, continue to be efficiently translated in hypoxia is not completely understood. By comparing specific transcript levels in ribonucleoprotein complexes, cytoplasmic polysomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound ribosomes, we show that the synthesis of proteins encoded by hypoxia marker genes is favoured at the ER in hypoxia. Gene expression profiling revealed that transcripts particularly increased by the HIF-1 transcription factor network show hypoxia-induced enrichment at the ER. We found that mRNAs favourably translated at the ER have higher conservation scores for both the 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) and contain less upstream initiation codons (uAUGs), indicating the significance of these sequence elements for sustained mRNA translation under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, we found enrichment of specific cis-elements in mRNA 5′- as well as 3′-UTRs that mediate transcript localization to the ER in hypoxia. We conclude that transcriptome partitioning between the cytoplasm and the ER permits selective mRNA translation under conditions of energy shortage. PMID:25753659

  5. Ciborinia camelliae (Sclerotiniaceae) induces variable plant resistance responses in selected species of Camellia.

    PubMed

    Denton-Giles, Matthew; Bradshaw, Rosie E; Dijkwel, Paul P

    2013-07-01

    Ciborinia camelliae is the causal agent of Camellia flower blight. This fungal pathogen is a significant pest of the Camellia floriculture industry because it specifically infects the floral tissue of ornamental camellia cultivars leading to the rapid development of necrotic lesions and blight. This study aims to characterize natural resistance to Ciborinia camelliae within a selection of Camellia spp. Based on macroscopic lesion development, Camellia 'Nicky Crisp' and Camellia lutchuensis were chosen as compatible and incompatible hosts, respectively. Microscopic analyses of the incompatible Camellia lutchuensis-Ciborinia camelliae interaction revealed several hallmarks of induced plant resistance, including papillae formation, H2O2 accumulation, and localized cell death. The compatible Camellia Nicky Crisp-Ciborinia camelliae interaction failed to trigger a similar resistance response. Ciborinia camelliae growth in compatible tissue demonstrated a switch from biotrophy to necrotrophy, evident from the simultaneous development of secondary hyphae and necrotic lesions. Extension of resistance analyses to 39 additional Camellia spp. identified variable levels of resistance within the Camellia genus. The evidence presented supports a resistance breeding strategy for controlling Ciborinia camelliae on ornamental Camellia hybrids.

  6. Selective killing of K-ras mutant cancer cells by small molecule inducers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Winslow, Monte M.; Magendantz, Margaret; Ouyang, Chensi; Dowdle, James; Subramanian, Aravind; Lewis, Timothy A.; Maglathin, Rebecca L.; Tolliday, Nicola; Jacks, Tyler

    2011-01-01

    Activating K-RAS mutations are the most frequent oncogenic mutations in human cancer. Numerous downstream signaling pathways have been shown to be deregulated by oncogenic K-ras. However, to date there are still no effective targeted therapies for this genetically defined subset of patients. Here we report the results of a small molecule, synthetic lethal screen using mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from a mouse model harboring a conditional oncogenic K-rasG12D allele. Among the >50,000 compounds screened, we identified a class of drugs with selective activity against oncogenic K-ras–expressing cells. The most potent member of this class, lanperisone, acts by inducing nonapoptotic cell death in a cell cycle- and translation-independent manner. The mechanism of cell killing involves the induction of reactive oxygen species that are inefficiently scavenged in K-ras mutant cells, leading to oxidative stress and cell death. In mice, treatment with lanperisone suppresses the growth of K-ras–driven tumors without overt toxicity. Our findings establish the specific antitumor activity of lanperisone and reveal oxidative stress pathways as potential targets in Ras-mediated malignancies. PMID:21555567

  7. External magnetic field-induced selective biodistribution of magnetoliposomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at the effect of an external magnet on the biodistribution of magnetoliposomes intravenously administrated in mice (8 mg iron/kg) with and without induced acute inflammation. Our results showed that due to enhanced vascular permeability, magnetoliposomes accumulated at the site of inflammation in the absence of an external magnetic field, but the amount of iron present increased under the effect of a magnet located at the inflammation zone. This increase was dependent on the time (20 or 60 min) of exposure of the external magnetic field. It was also observed that the presence of the magnet was associated with lower amounts of iron in the liver, spleen, and plasma than was found in mice in which a magnet had not been applied. The results of this study confirm that it is possible to target drugs encapsulated in magnetic particles by means of an external magnet. PMID:22883385

  8. Two-step feature selection for predicting survival time of patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Motoki

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is the major cause of death in prostate cancer patients. Even though some options for treatment of mCRPC have been developed, the most effective therapies remain unclear. Thus finding key patient clinical variables related with mCRPC is an important issue for understanding the disease progression mechanism of mCRPC and clinical decision making for these patients. The Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge is a crowd-based competition to tackle this essential challenge using new large clinical datasets. This paper proposes an effective procedure for predicting global risks and survival times of these patients, aimed at sub-challenge 1a and 1b of the Prostate Cancer DREAM challenge. The procedure implements a two-step feature selection procedure, which first implements sparse feature selection for numerical clinical variables and statistical hypothesis testing of differences between survival curves caused by categorical clinical variables, and then implements a forward feature selection to narrow the list of informative features. Using Cox’s proportional hazards model with these selected features, this method predicted global risk and survival time of patients using a linear model whose input is a median time computed from the hazard model. The challenge results demonstrated that the proposed procedure outperforms the state of the art model by correctly selecting more informative features on both the global risk prediction and the survival time prediction. PMID:27990267

  9. Riding the Lexical Speedway: A Critical Review on the Time Course of Lexical Selection in Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Strijkers, Kristof; Costa, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Speech requires time. How much time often depends on the amount of labor the brain has to perform in order to retrieve the linguistic information related to the ideas we want to express. Although most psycholinguistic research in the field of language production has focused on the net result of time required to utter words in various experimental conditions, over the last years more and more researchers pursued the objective to flesh out the time course of particular stages implicated in language production. Here we critically review these studies, with particular interest for the time course of lexical selection. First, we evaluate the data underlying the estimates of an influential temporal meta-analysis on language production (Indefrey and Levelt, 2004). We conclude that those data alone are not sufficient to provide a reliable time frame of lexical selection. Next, we discuss recent neurophysiological evidence which we argue to offer more explicit insights into the time course of lexical selection. Based on this evidence we suggest that, despite the absence of a clear time frame of how long lexical selection takes, there is sufficient direct evidence to conclude that the brain initiates lexical access within 200 ms after stimulus presentation, hereby confirming Indefrey and Levelt’s estimate. In a final section, we briefly review the proposed mechanisms which could lead to this rapid onset of lexical access, namely automatic spreading activation versus specific concept selection, and discuss novel data which support the notion of spreading activation, but indicate that the speed with which this principle takes effect is driven by a top-down signal in function of the intention to engage in a speech act. PMID:22144973

  10. Natural soil microbes alter flowering phenology and the intensity of selection on flowering time in a wild Arabidopsis relative.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Maggie R; Lundberg, Derek S; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Tringe, Susannah G; Dangl, Jeffery L; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Plant phenology is known to depend on many different environmental variables, but soil microbial communities have rarely been acknowledged as possible drivers of flowering time. Here, we tested separately the effects of four naturally occurring soil microbiomes and their constituent soil chemistries on flowering phenology and reproductive fitness of Boechera stricta, a wild relative of Arabidopsis. Flowering time was sensitive to both microbes and the abiotic properties of different soils; varying soil microbiota also altered patterns of selection on flowering time. Thus, soil microbes potentially contribute to phenotypic plasticity of flowering time and to differential selection observed between habitats. We also describe a method to dissect the microbiome into single axes of variation that can help identify candidate organisms whose abundance in soil correlates with flowering time. This approach is broadly applicable to search for microbial community members that alter biological characteristics of interest.

  11. Intense habitat-specific fisheries-induced selection at the molecular Pan I locus predicts imminent collapse of a major cod fishery.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Einar; Hernandez, Ubaldo Benitez; Kristinsson, Kristján

    2009-05-27

    Predation is a powerful agent in the ecology and evolution of predator and prey. Prey may select multiple habitats whereby different genotypes prefer different habitats. If the predator is also habitat-specific the prey may evolve different habitat occupancy. Drastic changes can occur in the relation of the predator to the evolved prey. Fisheries exert powerful predation and can be a potent evolutionary force. Fisheries-induced selection can lead to phenotypic changes that influence the collapse and recovery of the fishery. However, heritability of the phenotypic traits involved and selection intensities are low suggesting that fisheries-induced evolution occurs at moderate rates at decadal time scales. The Pantophysin I (Pan I) locus in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), representing an ancient balanced polymorphism predating the split of cod and its sister species, is under an unusual mix of balancing and directional selection including current selective sweeps. Here we show that Pan I alleles are highly correlated with depth with a gradient of 0.44% allele frequency change per meter. AA fish are shallow-water and BB deep-water adapted in accordance with behavioral studies using data storage tags showing habitat selection by Pan I genotype. AB fish are somewhat intermediate although closer to AA. Furthermore, using a sampling design covering space and time we detect intense habitat-specific fisheries-induced selection against the shallow-water adapted fish with an average 8% allele frequency change per year within year class. Genotypic fitness estimates (0.08, 0.27, 1.00 of AA, AB, and BB respectively) predict rapid disappearance of shallow-water adapted fish. Ecological and evolutionary time scales, therefore, are congruent. We hypothesize a potential collapse of the fishery. We find that probabilistic maturation reaction norms for Atlantic cod at Iceland show declining length and age at maturing comparable to changes that preceded the collapse of northern cod at

  12. Mapping radiation-induced defects in CCDs through space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David; Bush, Nathan; Wood, Daniel; Murray, Neil J.; Gow, Jason; Skottfelt, Jesper; Holland, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    cycle of these traps through time after irradiation. In orbit, most devices will be operating cold to suppress dark current and the devices are therefore cold whilst undergoing damage from the radiation environment. The mobility of defects varies as a function of temperature such that the mix of defects present following a cryogenic irradiation may vary significantly from that found following a room temperature irradiation or after annealing. It is therefore essential to study the trap formation and migration in orbit-like conditions and over longer timescales. In this paper we present a selection of the latest methods and results in the trap pumping of n- and p-channel devices and demonstrate how this technique now allows us to map radiation-induced defects in CCDs through both space and time.

  13. Ligustrazine-Oleanolic Acid Glycine Derivative, G-TOA, Selectively Inhibited the Proliferation and Induced Apoptosis of Activated HSC-T6 Cells.

    PubMed

    Bi, Siling; Chu, Fuhao; Wang, Mina; Li, Bi; Mao, Pei; Zhang, Huazheng; Wang, Penglong; Guo, Wenbo; Xu, Liang; Ren, Liwei; Lei, Haimin; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2016-11-23

    Hepatic fibrosis is a naturally occurring wound-healing reaction, with an imbalance of extracellular matrix (ECM) during tissue repair response, which can further deteriorate to hepatocellular carcinoma without timely treatment. Inhibiting activated hepatic stellate cell (HSC) proliferation and inducing apoptosis are the main methods for the treatment of liver fibrosis. In our previous study, we found that the TOA-glycine derivative (G-TOA) had exhibited more significant inhibitory activity against HepG2 cells and better hydrophilicity than TOA, ligustrazine (TMP), and oleanolic acid (OA). However, inhibiting activated HSC proliferation and inducing apoptosis by G-TOA had not been reported. In this paper, the selective cytotoxicity of G-TOA was evaluated on HSC-T6 cells and L02 cells, and apoptosis mechanisms were explored. It was found that G-TOA could selectively inhibit the proliferation of activated HSC-T6 cells, induce morphological changes, early apoptosis, and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization, increase intracellular free calcium levels, downregulate the expression of NF-κB/p65 and COX-2 protein, and decrease the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, thereby inducing HSC-T6 cell apoptosis. Thence, G-TOA might be a potential antifibrosis agent for the therapy of hepatic fibrosis, provided that it exerts anti-fibrosis effects on activated HSC-T6 cells.

  14. Acute Footshock Stress Induces Time-Dependent Modifications of AMPA/NMDA Protein Expression and AMPA Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Daniela; Mora, Cristina; Tornese, Paolo; Sala, Nathalie; Filippini, Alice; La Via, Luca; Milanese, Marco; Calza, Stefano; Bonanno, Gianbattista; Racagni, Giorgio; Gennarelli, Massimo; Popoli, Maurizio; Musazzi, Laura; Barbon, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on patients with stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders reported functional and morphological changes in brain areas where glutamatergic transmission is predominant, including frontal and prefrontal areas. In line with this evidence, several preclinical works suggest that glutamate receptors are targets of both rapid and long-lasting effects of stress. Here we found that acute footshock- (FS-) stress, although inducing no transcriptional and RNA editing alterations of ionotropic AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor subunits, rapidly and transiently modulates their protein expression, phosphorylation, and localization at postsynaptic spines in prefrontal and frontal cortex. In total extract, FS-stress increased the phosphorylation levels of GluA1 AMPA subunit at Ser(845) immediately after stress and of GluA2 Ser(880) 2 h after start of stress. At postsynaptic spines, stress induced a rapid decrease of GluA2 expression, together with an increase of its phosphorylation at Ser(880), suggesting internalization of GluA2 AMPA containing receptors. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA receptor subunits were found markedly upregulated in postsynaptic spines, 2 h after start of stress. These results suggest selected time-dependent changes in glutamatergic receptor subunits induced by acute stress, which may suggest early and transient enhancement of AMPA-mediated currents, followed by a transient activation of NMDA receptors.

  15. Acute Footshock Stress Induces Time-Dependent Modifications of AMPA/NMDA Protein Expression and AMPA Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Daniela; Mora, Cristina; Tornese, Paolo; Sala, Nathalie; Filippini, Alice; La Via, Luca; Milanese, Marco; Calza, Stefano; Bonanno, Gianbattista; Racagni, Giorgio; Gennarelli, Massimo; Popoli, Maurizio; Musazzi, Laura; Barbon, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on patients with stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders reported functional and morphological changes in brain areas where glutamatergic transmission is predominant, including frontal and prefrontal areas. In line with this evidence, several preclinical works suggest that glutamate receptors are targets of both rapid and long-lasting effects of stress. Here we found that acute footshock- (FS-) stress, although inducing no transcriptional and RNA editing alterations of ionotropic AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor subunits, rapidly and transiently modulates their protein expression, phosphorylation, and localization at postsynaptic spines in prefrontal and frontal cortex. In total extract, FS-stress increased the phosphorylation levels of GluA1 AMPA subunit at Ser845 immediately after stress and of GluA2 Ser880 2 h after start of stress. At postsynaptic spines, stress induced a rapid decrease of GluA2 expression, together with an increase of its phosphorylation at Ser880, suggesting internalization of GluA2 AMPA containing receptors. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA receptor subunits were found markedly upregulated in postsynaptic spines, 2 h after start of stress. These results suggest selected time-dependent changes in glutamatergic receptor subunits induced by acute stress, which may suggest early and transient enhancement of AMPA-mediated currents, followed by a transient activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:26966584

  16. The good, the bad, and the timely: how temporal order and moral judgment influence causal selection.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Kevin; Kirfel, Lara; van Riel, Raphael; Barlassina, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Causal selection is the cognitive process through which one or more elements in a complex causal structure are singled out as actual causes of a certain effect. In this paper, we report on an experiment in which we investigated the role of moral and temporal factors in causal selection. Our results are as follows. First, when presented with a temporal chain in which two human agents perform the same action one after the other, subjects tend to judge the later agent to be the actual cause. Second, the impact of temporal location on causal selection is almost canceled out if the later agent did not violate a norm while the former did. We argue that this is due to the impact that judgments of norm violation have on causal selection-even if the violated norm has nothing to do with the obtaining effect. Third, moral judgments about the effect influence causal selection even in the case in which agents could not have foreseen the effect and did not intend to bring it about. We discuss our findings in connection to recent theories of the role of moral judgment in causal reasoning, on the one hand, and to probabilistic models of temporal location, on the other.

  17. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock. II. Boost-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide 240Pu as an example. Methods: Following upon the work presented in Goddard et al. [Phys. Rev. C 92, 054610 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.054610, quadrupole-constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickly absorbed by the nucleus. In instantaneous boosts, this leads to fast shape rearrangements and violent dynamics that can ultimately lead to fission. This is a qualitatively different process than the deformation-induced fission. Boosts induced within a finite time window excite the system in a relatively gentler way and do induce fission but with a smaller energy deposition. Conclusions: The fission products obtained using boost-induced fission in time-dependent Hartree-Fock are more asymmetric than the fragments obtained in deformation-induced fission or the corresponding adiabatic approaches.

  18. Effect of nicotinic acid on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Basilio, C.; Toro, A.; Yojay, L.

    1986-05-01

    The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration (50 mg/kg) of nicotinic acid (NA), markedly decreased the sleep time of rats pretreated (10 min before), post-treated (10 min after) or simultaneously treated with ethanol (4 g/Kg i.p.). A similar effect was observed on the sleep time induced by pentobarbital (37 mg/Kg i.p.). Blood alcohol levels (BAL) were the same or slightly higher in the animals pretreated with NA than in the control animals pre-injected with saline. Nicotinamide and NAD had no effect. A total of three doses of ethanol, each one administered weekly or biweekly, induced tolerance, which persisted for approximately six weeks. After this period, a hypersensitivity to ethanol appeared to develop. This phenomenon was not observed when NA was pre-injected 10 min before each dose of ethanol. The sleep time of the latter animals did not change neither during the treatment period nor after six weeks without any treatment. BAL were slightly higher in NA treated than in control animals. The authors concluded that the effect of NA on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol is not due to an increased rate of its metabolism and/or elimination but to a long-lasting effect that decreases the sensitivity of the nervous cells to ethanol. The mechanisms involved in the shortening of the sleep time as well as those responsible for the loss of the capacity to develop tolerance are under current investigation.

  19. Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence on an oscillatory xenon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-11-15

    A novel approach to time-synchronizing laser-induced fluorescence measurements to an oscillating current in a 60 Hz xenon discharge lamp using a continuous wave laser is presented. A sample-hold circuit is implemented to separate out signals at different phases along a current cycle, and is followed by a lock-in amplifier to pull out the resulting time-synchronized fluorescence trace from the large background signal. The time evolution of lower state population is derived from the changes in intensity of the fluorescence excitation line shape resulting from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 6s{sup Prime }[1/2]{sub 1}{sup 0}-6p{sup Prime }[3/2]{sub 2} xenon atomic transition at {lambda}= 834.68 nm. Results show that the lower state population oscillates at twice the frequency of the discharge current, 120 Hz.

  20. The Effects of Population Size Histories on Estimates of Selection Coefficients from Time-Series Genetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Ethan M.; Steinrücken, Matthias; Song, Yun S.

    2016-01-01

    Many approaches have been developed for inferring selection coefficients from time series data while accounting for genetic drift. These approaches have been motivated by the intuition that properly accounting for the population size history can significantly improve estimates of selective strengths. However, the improvement in inference accuracy that can be attained by modeling drift has not been characterized. Here, by comparing maximum likelihood estimates of selection coefficients that account for the true population size history with estimates that ignore drift by assuming allele frequencies evolve deterministically in a population of infinite size, we address the following questions: how much can modeling the population size history improve estimates of selection coefficients? How much can mis-inferred population sizes hurt inferences of selection coefficients? We conduct our analysis under the discrete Wright–Fisher model by deriving the exact probability of an allele frequency trajectory in a population of time-varying size and we replicate our results under the diffusion model. For both models, we find that ignoring drift leads to estimates of selection coefficients that are nearly as accurate as estimates that account for the true population history, even when population sizes are small and drift is high. This result is of interest because inference methods that ignore drift are widely used in evolutionary studies and can be many orders of magnitude faster than methods that account for population sizes. PMID:27550904

  1. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  2. Impurity mapping in sulphide minerals using Time-resolved Ion Beam Induced Current imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Jamie S.; Johnson, Brett C.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kandasamy, Sasikaran; Davidson, Garry; Borg, Stacey; Ryan, Chris G.

    2010-06-01

    The semiconducting properties and charge transport within natural minerals like pyrite are postulated to drive certain geochemical processes which can lead to precious metal ore genesis. In this paper we outline electrical measurements on mineral samples and present spatio-temporally resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge or Current studies on a Schottky pyrite junction. Au-Schottky contacts were fabricated in regions selected by thermoelectric and 4-point probe resistivity measurements. The complexity in charge transport due to impurity variations results in imaging contrast which is deemed important for fluid electrochemistry. The relevance of understanding charge collection in pyrite in the context of complex geochemical processes is briefly discussed.

  3. Selective presynaptic terminal remodeling induced by spatial, but not cued, learning: a quantitative confocal study.

    PubMed

    McGonigal, R; Tabatadze, N; Routtenberg, A

    2012-06-01

    The hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs) are capable of behaviorally selective, use-dependent structural remodeling. Indeed, we previously observed a new layer of Timm's staining induced in the stratum oriens (SO) in CA3 after spatial but not cued water maze learning (Rekart et al., (2007) Learn Mem 14:416-421). This led to the prediction that there is a learning-specific induction of presynaptic terminal plasticity of MF axons. This study confirms this prediction demonstrating, at the confocal level of analysis, terminal-specific, and behavior-selective presynaptic structural plasticity linked to long-term memory. Male adult Wistar rats were trained for 5 days to locate a hidden or visible platform in a water maze and a retention test was performed 7 days later. MF terminal subtypes, specifically identified by an antibody to zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3), were counted from confocal z-stacks in the stratum lucidum (SL) and the SO. In hidden platform trained rats, there was a significant increase in the number of large MF terminals (LMTs, 2.5-10 μm diameter, >2 μm(2) area) compared to controls both in the proximal SL (P < 0.05) and in the SO (P < 0.01). Surprisingly, there was no detectable increase in small MF terminals (SMTs, 0.5-2 μm diameter, <2 μm(2) area) in either SL or SO as a consequence of training. This distinction of the two MF terminal types is functionally important as LMTs synapse on CA3 pyramidal neurons, while SMTs are known to target inhibitory interneurons. The present findings highlight the pivotal role in memory of presynaptic structural plasticity. Because the "sprouting" observed is specific to the LMT, with no detectable change in the number of the SMT, learning may enhance net excitatory input to CA3 pyramidal neurons. Given the sparse coding of the MF-CA3 connection, and the role that granule cells play in pattern separation, the remodeling observed here may be expected to have a major impact on the long-term integration of spatial context into

  4. Selective presynaptic terminal remodeling induced by spatial, but not cued, learning: a quantitative confocal study

    PubMed Central

    McGonigal, R.; Tabatadze, N.; Routtenberg, A.

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs) are capable of behaviorally-selective, use-dependent structural remodeling. Indeed, we previously observed a new layer of Timm’s staining induced in the stratum oriens (SO) in CA3 after spatial but not cued water maze learning (Rekart et al., Learn. Mem. 2007; 14:416–421). This led to the prediction that there is a learning-specific induction of presynaptic terminal plasticity of MF axons. The present study confirms this prediction demonstrating, at the confocal level of analysis, terminal-specific and behavior-selective presynaptic structural plasticity linked to long-term memory. Male adult Wistar rats were trained for 5d to locate a hidden or visible platform in a water maze and a retention test was performed 7d later. MF terminal subtypes, specifically identified by an antibody to zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3), were counted from confocal z-stacks in the stratum lucidum (SL) and the SO. In hidden platform trained rats there was a significant increase in the number of large MF terminals (LMTs, 2.5–10µm diameter, >2µm2 area) compared to controls both in the proximal SL (p <0.05) and in the SO (p < 0.01). Surprisingly, there was no detectable increase in small MF terminals (SMTs, 0.5–2µm diameter, <2µm2 area) in either SL or SO as a consequence of training. This distinction of the two MF terminal types is functionally important as LMTs synapse on CA3 pyramidal neurons, while SMTs are known to target inhibitory interneurons. The present findings highlight the pivotal role in memory of presynaptic structural plasticity. Because the ‘sprouting’ observed is specific to the LMT, with no detectable change in the number of the SMT, learning may enhance net excitatory input to CA3 pyramidal neurons. Given the sparse coding of the MF-CA3 connection, and the role that granule cells play in pattern separation, the remodeling observed here may be expected to have a major impact on the long-term integration of spatial context into

  5. Time and dose-response effects of honokiol on UVB-induced skin cancer development.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Ruth F; Chilampalli, Chandeshwari; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zeman, David; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2012-06-01

    Honokiol has shown chemopreventive effects in chemically-induced and UVB-induced skin cancer in mice. In this investigation, we assessed the time-effects of a topical low dose of honokiol (30 μg), and then the effects of different honokiol doses (30, 45, and 60 μg) on a UVB-induced skin cancer model to find an optimal dose and time for desirable chemopreventive effects. UVB radiation (30 mJ/cm(2), 5 days/week for 25 or 27 weeks) was used to induce skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. For the time-response experiment 30 μg honokiol in acetone was applied topically to the animals before the UVB exposure (30 min, 1 h, and 2 h) and after the UVB exposure (immediately, 30 min, and 1 h). Control groups were treated with acetone. For the dose-response study, animals were treated topically with acetone or honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) one hour before the UVB exposure. In the time-response experiment, honokiol inhibited skin tumor multiplicity by 49-58% while reducing tumor volumes by 70-89%. In the dose-response study, honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) significantly decreased skin tumor multiplicity by 36-78% in a dose-dependent manner, while tumor area was reduced by 76-94%. Honokiol (60 μg) significantly reduced tumor incidence by 40% as compared to control group. Honokiol applied in very low doses (30 μg) either before or after UVB radiation shows chemopreventive effects. Honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) prevents UVB-induced skin cancer in a dose-dependent manner. Honokiol can be an effective chemopreventive agent against skin cancer.

  6. Measuring time-domain spectral induced polarization in the on-time: decreasing acquisition time and increasing signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Per-Ivar; Dahlin, Torleif; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben

    2015-12-01

    Combined resistivity and time-domain direct current induced polarization (DCIP) measurements are traditionally carried out with a 50% duty cycle current waveform, taking the resistivity measurements during the on-time and the IP measurements during the off-time. One drawback with this method is that only half of the acquisition time is available for resistivity and IP measurements, respectively. In this paper, this limitation is solved by using a current injection with 100% duty cycle and also taking the IP measurements in the on-time. With numerical modelling of current waveforms with 50% and 100% duty cycles we show that the waveforms have comparable sensitivity for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters and that signal level is increased up to a factor of 2 if the 100% duty cycle waveform is used. The inversion of field data acquired with both waveforms confirms the modelling results and shows that it is possible to retrieve similar inversion models with either of the waveforms when inverting for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters with the waveform of the injected current included in the forward computations. Consequently, our results show that on-time measurements of IP can reduce the acquisition time by up to 50% and increase the signal-to-noise ratio by up to 100% almost without information loss. Our findings can contribute and have a large impact for DCIP surveys in general and especially for surveys where time and reliable data quality are important factors. Specifically, the findings are of value for DCIP surveys conducted in urban areas where anthropogenic noise is an issue and the heterogeneous subsurface demands time-consuming 3D acquisitions.

  7. Effects of Morphine on Temporal Discrimination and Color Matching: General Disruption of Stimulus Control or Selective Effects on Timing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Ryan D.; Odum, Amy L.

    2005-01-01

    Discrepant effects of drugs on behavior maintained by temporal-discrimination procedures make conclusive statements about the neuropharmacological bases of timing difficult. The current experiment examined the possible contribution of a general, drug-induced disruption of stimulus control. Four pigeons responded on a three-component multiple…

  8. Effects of selection and training on unit-level performance over time: a latent growth modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Ferris, Gerald R; Perrewé, Pamela L; Blass, Fred R; Heetderks, Thomas D; Perryman, Alexa A

    2009-07-01

    Surprisingly few data exist concerning whether and how utilization of job-related selection and training procedures affects different aspects of unit or organizational performance over time. The authors used longitudinal data from a large fast-food organization (N = 861 units) to examine how change in use of selection and training relates to change in unit performance. Latent growth modeling analyses revealed significant variation in both the use and the change in use of selection and training across units. Change in selection and training was related to change in 2 proximal unit outcomes: customer service performance and retention. Change in service performance, in turn, was related to change in the more distal outcome of unit financial performance (i.e., profits). Selection and training also affected financial performance, both directly and indirectly (e.g., through service performance). Finally, results of a cross-lagged panel analysis suggested the existence of a reciprocal causal relationship between the utilization of the human resources practices and unit performance. However, there was some evidence to suggest that selection and training may be associated with different causal sequences, such that use of the training procedure appeared to lead to unit performance, whereas unit performance appeared to lead to use of the selection procedure.

  9. A novel manganese complex selectively induces malignant glioma cell death by targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ji; Li, Jing; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Kaidi; Chen, Qiuyun; Guo, Wenjie; Gao, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Despite advances in treatment, malignant glioma commonly exhibits recurrence, subsequently leading to a poor prognosis. As manganese (Mn) compounds can be transported by the transferrin‑transferrin receptor system, the present study synthesized and examined the potential use of Adpa‑Mn as a novel antitumor agent. Adpa‑Mn time and dose‑dependently inhibited U251 and C6 cell proliferation; however, it had little effect on normal astrocytes. Apoptosis was significantly elevated following treatment with Adpa‑Mn, as detected by chromatin condensation, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, and the activation of caspases‑9, ‑7 and ‑3 and poly (ADP‑ribose) polymerase. In addition, Adpa‑Mn enhanced fluorescence intensity of monodansylcadaverine and elevated the expression levels of the autophagy‑related protein microtubule‑associated protein 1 light chain 3. Pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitors 3‑methyladenine and chloroquine enhanced Adpa‑Mn‑induced cell inhibition, thus indicating that autophagy has an essential role in this process. Furthermore, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction was detected in the Adpa‑Mn‑treated group, including disrupted membrane potential, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted adenosine triphosphate. Conversely, treatment with the mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporin A reversed Adpa‑Mn‑induced ROS production, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis, thus suggesting that Adpa‑Mn may target the mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggested that Adpa‑Mn may be considered for use as a novel anti‑glioma therapeutic option.

  10. Selective Influence of Circadian Modulation and Task Characteristics on Motor Imagery Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debarnot, Ursula; Sahraoui, Djafar; Champely, Stephane; Collet, Christian; Guillot, Aymeric

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of circadian modulation on motor imagery (MI) time while also considering the effects of task complexity and duration. The ability to imagine in real time was influenced by circadian modulation in a simple walking condition, with longer MI times in the morning and evening sessions. By contrast, there was no…

  11. Selective endothelin B receptor blockade does not influence BNP-induced natriuresis in man.

    PubMed

    van der Zander, K; Houben, A J H M; Webb, D J; Udo, E; Kietselaer, B; Hofstra, L; De Mey, J G R; de Leeuw, P W

    2006-03-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) both exhibit natriuretic activity within the human kidney. Furthermore, they both act partly through activation of the endothelial nitric oxide pathway. Since ET-1 may cause vasodilation and natriuresis via stimulation of the ET-B receptor, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether renal ET-B receptors participate in the renal actions of BNP. In this placebo-controlled, crossover study, we infused BNP (4 pmol/kg/min) or placebo (i.v.) for 1 h, with or without co-infusion of the ET-B receptor antagonist BQ-788 (50 nmol/min) for 15 min on 4 separate days, in 10 healthy subjects (mean age 54+/-6 years.). During infusion, we measured effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using PAH/inulin clearance. Cardiac output was measured before and after infusion, using echocardiography. Blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were monitored as well. Urine and plasma samples were taken every hour to measure diuresis, natriuresis, cyclic 3',5' guanosine monophosphate, and ET-1 levels. BNP with or without ET-B receptor blockade increased natriuresis and diuresis. In addition, BNP alone increased GFR and filtered load, without changing ERPF. BQ-788 infusion did not affect renal hemodynamics or natriuresis. Neither BNP nor BQ-788 altered cardiac output, blood pressure, and heart rate. In conclusion, the present study shows that selective ET-B receptor blockade has no effect on the BNP-induced natriuresis and glomerular filtration rate.

  12. Estradiol selectively reduces central neural activation induced by hypertonic NaCl infusion in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexis B; Bass, Eryn E; Fan, Liming; Curtis, Kathleen S

    2012-09-10

    We recently reported that the latency to begin drinking water during slow, intravenous infusion of a concentrated NaCl solution was shorter in estradiol-treated ovariectomized rats compared to oil vehicle-treated rats, despite comparably elevated plasma osmolality. To test the hypothesis that the decreased latency to begin drinking is attributable to enhanced detection of increased plasma osmolality by osmoreceptors located in the CNS, the present study used immunocytochemical methods to label fos, a marker of neural activation. Increased plasma osmolality did not activate the subfornical organ (SFO), organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), or the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in either oil vehicle-treated rats or estradiol-treated rats. In contrast, hyperosmolality increased fos labeling in the area postrema (AP), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in both groups; however, the increase was blunted in estradiol-treated rats. These results suggest that estradiol has selective effects on the sensitivity of a population of osmo-/Na(+)-receptors located in the AP, which, in turn, alters activity in other central areas associated with responses to increased osmolality. In conjunction with previous reports that hyperosmolality increases blood pressure and that elevated blood pressure inhibits drinking, the current findings of reduced activation in AP, PVN, and RVLM-areas involved in sympathetic nerve activity-raise the possibility that estradiol blunts HS-induced blood pressure changes. Thus, estradiol may eliminate or reduce the initial inhibition of water intake that occurs during increased osmolality, and facilitate a more rapid behavioral response, as we observed in our recent study.

  13. Low-temperature laser-induced selective area growth of compound semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Uppili, S.

    1990-01-01

    Laser induced epitaxial growth of gallium phosphide was investigated as a low temperature, spatially selective process using both pyrolytic and photolytic reaction. A focussed beam from an argon ion laser operating at 514.5 nm was used to direct-write epitaxial microstructures of homoepitaxial GaP using a pyrolytic process. The precursors were trimethyl gallium (TMG) and tertiary butylphosphine (TBP). Dependence of the epitaxial growth on several deposition parameters was examined. An ArF excimer laser was also used to achieve homoepitaxy and heteroepitaxy of gallium phosphide on gallium arsenide at 500 C using TMG and TBP as the precusor gases. Dependence of homoepitaxial growth of GaP on several parameters is examined. The crystalline properties of the film were determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electrical properties of p-n diodes fabricated via Zn doping were also examined. Defect structures in excimer laser-assisted epitaxial GaP on (100) GaP and (100) GaAs were examined using TEM. Periodic structures were obtained using nominally unpolarized excimer laser radiation, during heteroepitaxial growth of GaP on GaAs. Both crystalline properties and chemical composition of these structures were examined. Microanalysis showed modulation in composition in the ripple structure resulting from the thermal variation caused by the optical interference during growth. Electrical conductivity measurements of GaP during pulsed lasers irradiation indicated that in the absence of gases, there was appreciable heating of the semiconductor. However, a very small quantity of hydrogen or helium cooled the substrate appreciably. This suggested that the average temperature rise of the substrate was not an important factor in the temperature calculations used in the present investigation.

  14. Effects of Location, Frequency Region, and Time Course of Selective Attention on Auditory Scene Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusack, Rhodri; Decks, John; Aikman, Genevieve; Carlyon, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    Often, the sound arriving at the ears is a mixture from many different sources, but only 1 is of interest. To assist with selection, the auditory system structures the incoming input into streams, each of which ideally corresponds to a single source. Some authors have argued that this process of streaming is automatic and invariant, but recent…

  15. Stimulus Similarity and Encoding Time Influence Incidental Recognition Memory in Adult Monkeys with Selective Hippocampal Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeamer, Alyson; Meunier, Martine; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Recognition memory impairment after selective hippocampal lesions in monkeys is more profound when measured with visual paired-comparison (VPC) than with delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS). To clarify this issue, we assessed the impact of stimuli similarity and encoding duration on the VPC performance in monkeys with hippocampal lesions and…

  16. Mental Aptitude and Comprehension of Time-Compressed and Compressed-Expanded Listening Selections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticht, Thomas G.

    The comprehensibility of materials compressed and then expanded by means of an electromechanical process was tested with 280 Army inductees divided into groups of high and low mental aptitude. Three short listening selections relating to military activities were subjected to compression and compression-expansion to produce seven versions. Data…

  17. The iSelect 9 K SNP analysis revealed polyploidization induced revolutionary changes and intense human selection causing strong haplotype blocks in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Chenyang; Wang, Yuquan; Chao, Shiaoman; Li, Tian; Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Lanfen; Zhang, Xueyong

    2017-01-01

    A Chinese wheat mini core collection was genotyped using the wheat 9 K iSelect SNP array. Total 2420 and 2396 polymorphic SNPs were detected on the A and the B genome chromosomes, which formed 878 haplotype blocks. There were more blocks in the B genome, but the average block size was significantly (P < 0.05) smaller than those in the A genome. Intense selection (domestication and breeding) had a stronger effect on the A than on the B genome chromosomes. Based on the genetic pedigrees, many blocks can be traced back to a well-known Strampelli cross, which was made one century ago. Furthermore, polyploidization of wheat (both tetraploidization and hexaploidization) induced revolutionary changes in both the A and the B genomes, with a greater increase of gene diversity compared to their diploid ancestors. Modern breeding has dramatically increased diversity in the gene coding regions, though obvious blocks were formed on most of the chromosomes in both tetraploid and hexaploid wheats. Tag-SNP markers identified in this study can be used for marker assisted selection using haplotype blocks as a wheat breeding strategy. This strategy can also be employed to facilitate genome selection in other self-pollinating crop species. PMID:28134278

  18. Revisiting the Impact of Part-Time Work on Adolescent Adjustment: Distinguishing between Selection and Socialization Using Propensity Score Matching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Kathryn C.; Lee, Joanna M.; Steinberg, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    The impact of part-time employment on adolescent functioning remains unclear because most studies fail to adequately control for differential selection into the workplace. The present study reanalyzes data from L. Steinberg, S. Fegley, and S. M. Dornbusch (1993) using multiple imputation, which minimizes bias in effect size estimation, and 2 types…

  19. Caterpillars selected for large body size and short development time are more susceptible to oxygen-related stress

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jon F; Cease, Arianne J; VandenBrooks, John M; Albert, Todd; Davidowitz, Goggy

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that higher growth rates may be associated with reduced capacities for stress tolerance and increased accumulated damage due to reactive oxygen species. We tested the response of Manduca sexta (Sphingidae) lines selected for large or small body size and short development time to hypoxia (10 kPa) and hyperoxia (25, 33, and 40 kPa); both hypoxia and hyperoxia reduce reproduction and oxygen levels over 33 kPa have been shown to increase oxidative damage in insects. Under normoxic (21 kPa) conditions, individuals from the large-selected (big-fast) line were larger and had faster growth rates, slightly longer developmental times, and reduced survival rates compared to individuals from a line selected for small size (small-fast) or an unselected control line. Individuals from the big-fast line exhibited greater negative responses to hyperoxia with greater reductions in juvenile and adult mass, growth rate, and survival than the other two lines. Hypoxia generally negatively affected survival and growth/size, but the lines responded similarly. These results are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that simultaneous acquisition of large body sizes and short development times leads to reduced capacities for coping with stressful conditions including oxidative damage. This result is of particular importance in that natural selection tends to decrease development time and increase body size. PMID:23762517

  20. Acquisition of Some Selected Prepositions of Time by English Major Undergraduates at Balqa Applied University in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Qudah, Ayat Khalid

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the acquisition of some selected prepositions of time by English major undergraduates at Balqa Applied University in Jordan and to reveal any significant differences among their acquisition attributed to the academic level (1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year levels) and to studying "English Basic Grammar" course. A…

  1. Initiation time of near-infrared laser-induced slip on the surface of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungho; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2014-06-23

    We have determined the initiation time of laser-induced slip on a silicon wafer surface subjected to a near-infrared continuous-wave laser by numerical simulations and experiments. First, numerical analysis was performed based on the heat transfer and thermoelasticity model to calculate the resolved shear stress and the temperature-dependent yield stress. Slip initiation time was predicted by finding the time at which the resolved shear stress reached the yield stress. Experimentally, the slip initiation time was measured by using a laser scattering technique that collects scattered light from the silicon wafer surface and detects strong scattering when the surface slip is initiated. The surface morphology of the silicon wafer surface after laser irradiation was also observed using an optical microscope to confirm the occurrence of slip. The measured slip initiation times agreed well with the numerical predictions.

  2. Transient Induced Molecular Electronic Spectroscopy (TIMES) for study of protein-ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiantian; Ku, Ti-Hsuan; Han, Yuanyuan; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Niaz, Iftikhar Ahmad; Luo, Hua; Chang, Derrick; Huang, Jian-Jang; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    We present a method, Transient Induced Molecular Electronic Spectroscopy (TIMES), to detect protein-ligand interactions without any protein engineering or chemical modification. We developed a physics model for the TIMES signal and mathematically formulated the problem to attain physical insight of protein-ligand interactions without any disturbances by molecular probes, fluorescent labels, or immobilization of molecules. To demonstrate the functionality of this method, we have used the TIMES signals to find the dissociation constants for the affinity of reactions, the shear-stress dependent adsorption time of molecules on surface, and other interesting features of protein-ligand interaction in native conditions. As a unique tool, TIMES offers a simple and effective method to investigate fundamental protein chemistry and drug discoveries. PMID:27759045

  3. Real-time imaging of inflation-induced ATP release in the ex vivo rat lung.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Kishio; Tan, Ju Jing; Boudreault, Francis; Sokabe, Masahiro; Berthiaume, Yves; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular ATP and other nucleotides are important autocrine/paracrine mediators that regulate diverse processes critical for lung function, including mucociliary clearance, surfactant secretion, and local blood flow. Cellular ATP release is mechanosensitive; however, the impact of physical stimuli on ATP release during breathing has never been tested in intact lungs in real time and remains elusive. In this pilot study, we investigated inflation-induced ATP release in rat lungs ex vivo by real-time luciferin-luciferase (LL) bioluminescence imaging coupled with simultaneous infrared tissue imaging to identify ATP-releasing sites. With LL solution introduced into air spaces, brief inflation of such edematous lung (1 s, ∼20 cmH2O) induced transient (<30 s) ATP release in a limited number of air-inflated alveolar sacs during their recruitment/opening. Released ATP reached concentrations of ∼10(-6) M, relevant for autocrine/paracrine signaling, but it remained spatially restricted to single alveolar sacs or their clusters. ATP release was stimulus dependent: prolonged (100 s) inflation evoked long-lasting ATP release that terminated upon alveoli deflation/derecruitment while cyclic inflation/suction produced cyclic ATP release. With LL introduced into blood vessels, inflation induced transient ATP release in many small patchlike areas the size of alveolar sacs. Findings suggest that inflation induces ATP release in both alveoli and the surrounding blood capillary network; the functional units of ATP release presumably consist of alveolar sacs or their clusters. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of real-time ATP release imaging in ex vivo lungs and provides the first direct evidence of inflation-induced ATP release in lung air spaces and in pulmonary blood capillaries, highlighting the importance of purinergic signaling in lung function.

  4. Time-resolved characterization of laser-induced plasma from fresh potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wenqi; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Boueri, Myriam; Ma, Qianli; Zhang, Dacheng; Zheng, Lijuan; Zeng, Heping; Yu, Jin

    2009-09-01

    Optical emission of laser-induced plasma on the surface of fresh vegetables provides sensitive analysis of trace elements for in situ or online detection of these materials. This emergent technique promises applications with expected outcomes in food security or nutrition quality, as well as environment pollution detection. Characterization of the plasma induced on such soft and humid materials represents the first step towards quantitative measurement using this technique. In this paper, we present the experimental setup and protocol that optimize the plasma generation on fresh vegetables, potatoes for instance. The temporal evolution of the plasma properties are investigated using time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In particular, the electron density and the temperatures of the plasma are reported as functions of its decay time. The temperatures are evaluated from the well known Boltzmann and Saha-Boltzmann plot methods. These temperatures are further compared to that of the typical molecular species, CN, for laser-induced plasma from plant materials. This comparison validates the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the specific case of fresh vegetables ablated in the typical LIBS conditions. A study of the temporal evolution of the signal to noise ratio also provides practical indications for an optimized detection of trace elements. We demonstrate finally that, under certain conditions, the calibration-free LIBS procedure can be applied to determine the concentrations of trace elements in fresh vegetables.

  5. Direct Observation of the Surface Segregation of Cu in Pd by Time-Resolved Positron-Annihilation-Induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Schreckenbach, K.

    2010-11-12

    Density functional theory calculations predict the surface segregation of Cu in the second atomic layer of Pd which has not been unambiguously confirmed by experiment so far. We report measurements on Pd surfaces covered with three and six monolayers of Cu using element selective positron-annihilation-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) which is sensitive to the topmost atomic layer. Moreover, time-resolved PAES, which was applied for the first time, enables the investigation of the dynamics of surface atoms and hence the observation of the segregation process. The time constant for segregation was experimentally determined to {tau}=1.38(0.21) h, and the final segregated configuration was found to be consistent with calculations. Time-dependent PAES is demonstrated to be a novel element selective technique applicable for the investigation of, e.g., heterogeneous catalysis, corrosion, or surface alloying.

  6. Precise time technology for selected Air Force systems: Present status and future requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yannoni, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    Precise time and time interval (PTTI) technology is becoming increasingly significant to Air Force operations as digital techniques find expanded utility in military missions. Timing has a key role in the function as well as in navigation. A survey of the PTTI needs of several Air Force systems is presented. Current technology supporting these needs was reviewed and new requirements are emphasized for systems as they transfer from initial development to final operational deployment.

  7. Method and system for selecting data sampling phase for self timed interface logic

    DOEpatents

    Hoke, Joseph Michael; Ferraiolo, Frank D.; Lo, Tin-Chee; Yarolin, John Michael

    2005-01-04

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention is a method for transmitting data among processors over a plurality of parallel data lines and a clock signal line. A receiver processor receives both data and a clock signal from a sender processor. At the receiver processor a bit of the data is phased aligned with the transmitted clock signal. The phase aligning includes selecting a data phase from a plurality of data phases in a delay chain and then adjusting the selected data phase to compensate for a round-off error. Additional embodiments include a system and storage medium for transmitting data among processors over a plurality of parallel data lines and a clock signal line.

  8. Bilberry extract (Antho 50) selectively induces redox-sensitive caspase 3-related apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by targeting the Bcl-2/Bad pathway

    PubMed Central

    Alhosin, Mahmoud; León-González, Antonio J.; Dandache, Israa; Lelay, Agnès; Rashid, Sherzad K.; Kevers, Claire; Pincemail, Joël; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu; Mauvieux, Laurent; Herbrecht, Raoul; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B.

    2015-01-01

    Defect in apoptosis has been implicated as a major cause of resistance to chemotherapy observed in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B CLL). This study evaluated the pro-apoptotic effect of an anthocyanin-rich dietary bilberry extract (Antho 50) on B CLL cells from 30 patients and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy subjects, and determined the underlying mechanism. Antho 50 induced concentration- and time-dependent pro-apoptotic effects in B CLL cells but little or no effect in PBMCs. Among the main phenolic compounds of the bilberry extract, delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and delphinidin-3-O-rutinoside induced a pro-apoptotic effect. Antho 50-induced apoptosis is associated with activation of caspase 3, down-regulation of UHRF1, a rapid dephosphorylation of Akt and Bad, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Antho 50 significantly induced PEG-catalase-sensitive formation of reactive oxygen species in B CLL cells. PEG-catalase prevented the Antho 50-induced induction of apoptosis and related signaling. The present findings indicate that Antho 50 exhibits strong pro-apoptotic activity through redox-sensitive caspase 3 activation-related mechanism in B CLL cells involving dysregulation of the Bad/Bcl-2 pathway. This activity of Antho 50 involves the glucoside and rutinoside derivatives of delphinidin. They further suggest that Antho 50 has chemotherapeutic potential by targeting selectively B CLL cells. PMID:25757575

  9. Tracing thought through time and space: a selective review of bibliometrics in social work.

    PubMed

    Holden, Gary; Rosenberg, Gary; Barker, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Bibliometrics is a field of research that examines bodies of knowledge within and across disciplines. Citation analysis, a component of bibliometrics, focuses on the quantitative assessment of citation patterns within a body of literature. Citation analysis has been used in social work to examine the quantity and the impact of the work of individuals and academic institutions. This paper presents a selective review of these uses of bibliometrics within social work.

  10. Learning Effects on Strategy Selection in a Dynamic Task Environment as a Function of Time Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    MANAGEMENT UI1TREKSEL Previous research on strategy selection in dynamic task environments indicated that subjects preferred to request information first...I febwari 1994 is de naam Instituut voor Zintuigfysiologie TNO gewijzigd in TNO Technische Menskunde. 2 CONTENTS Page SUMMARY 3 SAMENVAITING 4 I...waarin men gebruik maakt van de continue feedback over de toestand van het systeem . Proefpersonen moesten het veranderende conditieniveau van een atleet

  11. The application of time decay characteristics of laser-induced fluorescence in the classification of vegetation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei; Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Du, Lin; Sun, Jia; Song, Shalei

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the time decay of the chlorophyll fluorescence intensity (TDCFI) of vegetation was measured based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology with a 355 nm laser serving as the excitation light source. The pseudo-color diagram of the TDCFI (PDTDCFIs) was proposed for use as a characteristic fingerprint for the analysis of various plant species based on variations in the fluorescence intensity over time. Compared with the steady-state fluorescence spectra, two-dimensional PDTDCFIs contained more spectral information, including variations in both the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra and the relative intensity. The experimental results demonstrated that the PDTDCFIs of various plant species show distinct differences, and this was successfully applied in the classification of plant species. Therefore, the PDTDCFIs of plants could provide researchers with a more reliable and useful tool for the characterization of vegetation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing. PMID:27003445

  13. A quantitative method for evaluating numerical simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation with its applications to selecting appropriate element size and time step.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Tse, Peter W; Tan, Haihui

    2016-01-01

    Lamb wave technique has been widely used in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). However, due to the multi-mode characteristics and dispersive nature, Lamb wave propagation behavior is much more complex than that of bulk waves. Numerous numerical simulations on Lamb wave propagation have been conducted to study its physical principles. However, few quantitative studies on evaluating the accuracy of these numerical simulations were reported. In this paper, a method based on cross correlation analysis for quantitatively evaluating the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb waves propagation is proposed. Two kinds of error, affecting the position and shape accuracies are firstly identified. Consequently, two quantitative indices, i.e., the GVE (group velocity error) and MACCC (maximum absolute value of cross correlation coefficient) derived from cross correlation analysis between a simulated signal and a reference waveform, are proposed to assess the position and shape errors of the simulated signal. In this way, the simulation accuracy on the position and shape is quantitatively evaluated. In order to apply this proposed method to select appropriate element size and time step, a specialized 2D-FEM program combined with the proposed method is developed. Then, the proper element size considering different element types and time step considering different time integration schemes are selected. These results proved that the proposed method is feasible and effective, and can be used as an efficient tool for quantitatively evaluating and verifying the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation.

  14. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Ivan I; Vinding, Mads S; Tse, Desmond H Y; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Shah, N Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  15. Neutron-induced fission measurements at the time-of-flight facility nELBE

    SciTech Connect

    Kögler, T.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2015-05-18

    Neutron-induced fission of ²⁴²Pu is studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The relative fast neutron fission cross section was determined using actinide fission chambers in a time-of-flight experiment. A good agreement of present nuclear data with evalua- tions has been achieved in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV.

  16. Multitechnique Determination of Halogens in Soil after Selective Volatilization Using Microwave-Induced Combustion.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L S F; Pedrotti, M F; Enders, M S P; Albers, C N; Pereira, J S F; Flores, E M M

    2017-01-03

    A method for digestion of soils with high inorganic matter content (ranging from 50 to 92%) by microwave-induced combustion (MIC) is proposed for the first time for further halogens (F, Cl, Br, and I) determination by ion chromatography (IC) and also by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Microcrystalline cellulose (100-500 mg), used as a combustion aid, was mixed with sample and water or NH4OH solutions (10-100 mmol L(-1)) were investigated for analytes absorption. The use of cellulose (400 mg) was mandatory to volatilize the halogens from soils with high inorganic matter. It was possible to use diluted absorbing solutions (up to 100 mmol L(-1) NH4OH) for halogens retention, providing limits of quantification in the range of 0.06 (I) to 60 (Cl) μg g(-1). Accuracy was evaluated using certified reference materials (CRMs), spiked samples, and pyrohydrolysis method. Recoveries for halogens after spiked samples were in the range of 94 to 103% and the results after digestion of CRMs by MIC were in agreement better than 95% to certified values. Blanks were low, relative standard deviation was below 8% for all soils and no statistical difference was observed for results by pyrohydrolysis and MIC methods showing the feasibility of the proposed method for further halogens determination in soil samples.

  17. Pursuing Benefit or Avoiding Detriment: Term-Time Job Selection of Sports Major Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Huan-Hung; Chen, Shan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Higher education expansion accompanied with the tuition rising has resulted in the increasing number of term-time employed students in many countries. Taiwan is no exception to this trend. Thus, there were a few studies to explore the impact of term-time employment on undergraduates. However, very few researchers focus on how undergraduates make…

  18. Lag time for germination of Penicillium chrysogenum conidia is induced by temperature shifts.

    PubMed

    Kalai, Safaa; Bensoussan, Maurice; Dantigny, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    In the environment, fungal conidia are subject to transient conditions. In particular, temperature is varying according to day/night periods. All predictive models for germination assume that fungal spores can adapt instantaneously to changes of temperature. The only study that supports this assumption (Gougouli and Koutsoumanis, 2012, Modelling germination of fungal spores at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 152: 153-161) was carried out on Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger conidia that, in most cases, already produced germ tubes. In contrast, the present study focuses on temperature shifts applied during the first stages of germination (i.e., before the apparition of the germ tubes). Firstly, germination times were determined in steady state conditions at 10, 15, 20 and 25 °C. Secondly, temperature shifts (e.g., up-shifts and down-shifts) were applied at 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4 of germination times, with 5, 10 and 15 °C magnitudes. Experiments were carried out in triplicate on Penicillium chrysogenum conidia on Potato Dextrose Agar medium according to a full factorial design. Statistical analysis of the results clearly demonstrated that the assumption of instantaneous adaptation of the conidia should be rejected. Temperature shifts during germination led to an induced lag time or an extended germination time as compared to the experiments conducted ay steady state. The induced lag time was maximized when the amplitude of the shift was equal to 10 °C. Interaction between the instant and the direction of the shift was highlighted. A negative lag time was observed for a 15 °C down-shift applied at 1/4 of the germination time. This result suggested that at optimal temperature the rate of germination decreased with time, and that the variation of this rate with time depended on temperature.

  19. [The influence of dialysis's day and time shifts on selected nutrients intake by patients with end stage renal disease].

    PubMed

    Wyszomierska, Agnieszka; Narojek, Lucyna; Myszkowska-Ryciak, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    The influence of dialysis's day and time shifts on selected nutrients intake was examined on 38 patients with end stage renal disease. Time shift of dialysis influenced significantly carbohydrates content all groups) and energy content (time shift II vs. III) in daily food rations. There were no differences in energy, protein, fat, carbohydrates potassium (women) and phosphorous intake between day with and without dialysis. Our data strongly suggest that constant dietician care might be essential to correct nu:ients intake and prevent possible deficiencies among patients with end stage renal disease.

  20. Physical origin of the incubation time of self-induced GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consonni, V.; Trampert, A.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2011-07-01

    The nucleation process of self-induced GaN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements. It is found that stable nuclei in the form of spherical cap-shaped islands develop only after an incubation time that is strongly dependent upon the growth conditions. Its evolution with the growth temperature and gallium rate has been described within standard island nucleation theory, revealing a nucleation energy of 4.9 ± 0.1 eV and a very small nucleus critical size. The consideration of the incubation time is critical for the control of the nanowire morphology.

  1. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  2. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, I; Luchinsky, D G; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Q(f) at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Q(f)=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Q(f) for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q(f) leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Q(f)(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca(2+)/Na(+) valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls.

  3. Isobar Separation in a Multiple-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer by Mass-Selective Re-Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, Timo; Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Lippert, Wayne; Lang, Johannes; Yavor, Mikhail I.; Geissel, Hans; Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    A novel method for (ultra-)high-resolution spatial mass separation in time-of-flight mass spectrometers is presented. Ions are injected into a time-of-flight analyzer from a radio frequency (rf) trap, dispersed in time-of-flight according to their mass-to-charge ratios and then re-trapped dynamically in the same rf trap. This re-trapping technique is highly mass-selective and after sufficiently long flight times can provide even isobaric separation. A theoretical treatment of the method is presented and the conditions for optimum performance of the method are derived. The method has been implemented in a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer and mass separation powers (FWHM) in excess of 70,000, and re-trapping efficiencies of up to 35% have been obtained for the protonated molecular ion of caffeine. The isobars glutamine and lysine (relative mass difference of 1/4000) have been separated after a flight time of 0.2 ms only. Higher mass separation powers can be achieved using longer flight times. The method will have important applications, including isobar separation in nuclear physics and (ultra-)high-resolution precursor ion selection in multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry.

  4. Time-of-day effects in implicit racial in-group preferences are likely selection effects, not circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Time-of-day effects in human psychological functioning have been known of since the 1800s. However, outside of research specifically focused on the quantification of circadian rhythms, their study has largely been neglected. Moves toward online data collection now mean that psychological investigations take place around the clock, which affords researchers the ability to easily study time-of-day effects. Recent analyses have shown, for instance, that implicit attitudes have time-of-day effects. The plausibility that these effects indicate circadian rhythms rather than selection effects is considered in the current study. There was little evidence that the time-of-day effects in implicit attitudes shifted appropriately with factors known to influence the time of circadian rhythms. Moreover, even variables that cannot logically show circadian rhythms demonstrated stronger time-of-day effects than did implicit attitudes. Taken together, these results suggest that time-of-day effects in implicit attitudes are more likely to represent processes of selection rather than circadian rhythms, but do not rule out the latter possibility. PMID:27114886

  5. Time-of-day effects in implicit racial in-group preferences are likely selection effects, not circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    Time-of-day effects in human psychological functioning have been known of since the 1800s. However, outside of research specifically focused on the quantification of circadian rhythms, their study has largely been neglected. Moves toward online data collection now mean that psychological investigations take place around the clock, which affords researchers the ability to easily study time-of-day effects. Recent analyses have shown, for instance, that implicit attitudes have time-of-day effects. The plausibility that these effects indicate circadian rhythms rather than selection effects is considered in the current study. There was little evidence that the time-of-day effects in implicit attitudes shifted appropriately with factors known to influence the time of circadian rhythms. Moreover, even variables that cannot logically show circadian rhythms demonstrated stronger time-of-day effects than did implicit attitudes. Taken together, these results suggest that time-of-day effects in implicit attitudes are more likely to represent processes of selection rather than circadian rhythms, but do not rule out the latter possibility.

  6. Isobar Separation in a Multiple-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer by Mass-Selective Re-Trapping.

    PubMed

    Dickel, Timo; Plaß, Wolfgang R; Lippert, Wayne; Lang, Johannes; Yavor, Mikhail I; Geissel, Hans; Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2017-03-15

    A novel method for (ultra-)high-resolution spatial mass separation in time-of-flight mass spectrometers is presented. Ions are injected into a time-of-flight analyzer from a radio frequency (rf) trap, dispersed in time-of-flight according to their mass-to-charge ratios and then re-trapped dynamically in the same rf trap. This re-trapping technique is highly mass-selective and after sufficiently long flight times can provide even isobaric separation. A theoretical treatment of the method is presented and the conditions for optimum performance of the method are derived. The method has been implemented in a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer and mass separation powers (FWHM) in excess of 70,000, and re-trapping efficiencies of up to 35% have been obtained for the protonated molecular ion of caffeine. The isobars glutamine and lysine (relative mass difference of 1/4000) have been separated after a flight time of 0.2 ms only. Higher mass separation powers can be achieved using longer flight times. The method will have important applications, including isobar separation in nuclear physics and (ultra-)high-resolution precursor ion selection in multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. An Integral Method for Determining Induced Voltage in Time-Varying Wire Inductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D; Rockway, J

    2005-05-27

    This report documents the creation of software tools to model time-varying wire inductors. The class of inductors studied consists of arbitrary wire shapes in nonmagnetic material. When the wire structures are deformed, the inductance changes, and a voltage is induced. This voltage is of interest, for instance when the inductor is used to measure or sense a shockwave. An integral technique, which only requires integrating over the wire segments, is used to find the inductance at each time step, with backwards-difference approximations being used on successive time steps to determine the voltage. This method allows for arbitrary time-varying wire structures. It was tested for several canonical problems and used to model a double helix solenoid compressed by a shockwave.

  8. Ketogenic diet and fasting induce the expression of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein with time-dependent hypothermia in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Yamamoto, Saori; Uchida, Daisuke; Doi, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRBP) induced by cold stress modulates the molecular circadian clock in vitro. The present study examines the effect of a ketogenic diet (KD) and fasting on Cirbp expression in the mouse liver. Chronic KD administration induced time-dependent Cirbp expression with hypothermia in mice. The circadian expression of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Clock was phase-advanced and augmented in the liver of mice fed with a KD. Transient food deprivation also induced time-dependent Cirbp expression with hypothermia in mice. These findings suggest that hypothermia is involved in the increased expression of Cirbp under ketogenic or fasting conditions.

  9. Nickel Ions Selectively Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Interleukin-6 Production by Decreasing Its mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Sanki; Kishimoto, Yu; Takano, Takayuki; Okita, Kiyuki; Takakuwa, Shiho; Sato, Taiki; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2015-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) ions easily elute from many alloys and elicit inflammation and allergies. Previous studies have shown that infections due to the implantation of medical devices cause inflammation and enhance the elution of Ni ions (Ni2+). However, cross-talk between infection- and Ni2+-induced signaling pathways has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ni2+ on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of cytokines in a LPS-induced air pouch-type inflammation model in BALB/c mice and the murine macrophage cell line RAW264. We demonstrated that Ni2+ inhibited the LPS-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6, but not that of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α both in vivo and in vitro. This inhibitory effect was also observed with cobalt ion (Co2+), but not with chloride ion (Cl-), zinc ion (Zn2+), or palladium ion (Pd2+), and was highly selective to the production of IL-6. Ni2+ did not inhibit the activation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, or JNK. Although Ni2+ decreased IL-6 mRNA levels, it failed to inhibit the LPS-induced activation of the IL-6 promoter. An experiment using actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor, revealed that Ni2+ decreased the stability of IL-6 mRNA. Moreover, Ni2+ inhibited the LPS-induced expression of Arid5a, but not regnase-1. These results demonstrated that Ni2+ may have selectively inhibited the LPS-induced production of IL-6 by decreasing the Arid5a-dependent stabilization of IL-6 mRNA. PMID:25742007

  10. Selective inhibitory effects of niflumic acid on 5-HT-induced contraction of the rat isolated stomach fundus.

    PubMed

    Scarparo, H C; Santos, G C; Leal-Cardoso, J H; Criddle, D N

    2000-06-01

    The effects of niflumic acid (NFA), an inhibitor of calcium-activated chloride currents I(Cl(Ca)), were compared with the actions of the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) blocker nifedipine on 5-hydroxtryptamine (5-HT)- and acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractions of the rat isolated fundus. NFA (1 - 30 microM) elicited a concentration-dependent inhibition of contractions induced by 5-HT (10 microM) with a reduction to 15. 5+/-6.0% of the control value at 30 microM. 1 microM nifedipine reduced 5-HT-induced contraction to 15.2+/-4.9% of the control, an effect not greater in the additional presence of 30 microM NFA. In contrast, the contractile response to ACh (10 microM) was not inhibited by NFA in concentrations induced by either 20 mM or 60 mM KCl, suggesting that this drug was not acting via blockade of VDCCs or activation of potassium channels. In contrast, 3, 5-dichlorophenylamine-2-carboxylic acid and 4, 4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid were less selective in their inhibitory effects, inducing reductions of 60 mM KCl-induced contraction at concentrations >/=10 microM. Our results show that NFA can exert selective inhibitory effects on the chloride-dependent 5-HT-induced contractions of the rat fundus. The data support the hypothesis that activation of Cl((Ca)) channels leading to calcium entry via VDCCs is a mechanism utilized by 5-HT, but not by ACh, to elicit contraction of the rat fundus.

  11. Selective therapeutic effect of cornus officinalis fruits on the damage of different organs in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunkyung; Jung, Hyo Won; Park, Yong-Ki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the selective therapeutic effects of Corni Fructus (Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc.) on different organs in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes in rats was induced by intraperitonal injection with STZ at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight (bw) for 3 days (once per a day). STZ-induced diabetic rats were orally administrated Corni Fructus (CF) extract at 300 mg/kg or metformin at 250 mg/kg daily for 4 weeks. Blood glucose and triglyceride (TG) in sera and urine total volume were measured. Histopathological changes of different organs, pancreas, liver, kidney, and lung tissues were observed by H&E staining. The expression of insulin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was investigated in pancreas, and kidney by immunohistochemistry, respectively. The results revealed that CF extract significantly decreased the serum levels of blood glucose, and TG, and also urine total volume in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The histological examinations revealed amelioration of diabetes-induced pancreas injury including pathological changes of the Langerhans's islet and glomerular with their loss after the administration of CF extraction. Moreover, the administration of CF extract increased the numbers of insulin releasing beta cells in pancreas and also inhibited the expression of α-SMA in kidney of STZ-induced diabetic rats. On the other hand, CF extract showed no effect on the pathological damages of liver and lung in STZ-induced diabetic rats. These results demonstrated that CF extract may have a selective therapeutic potential through the control of hyperglycemia, and the protection of pancreas and kidney against diabetic damage.

  12. Exploring the phase space of time of flight mass selected Pt(x)Y nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Masini, Federico; Hernández-Fernández, Patricia; Deiana, Davide; Strebel, Christian Ejersbo; McCarthy, David Norman; Bodin, Anders; Malacrida, Paolo; Stephens, Ifan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2014-12-28

    Mass-selected nanoparticles can be conveniently produced using magnetron sputtering and aggregation techniques. However, numerous pitfalls can compromise the quality of the samples, e.g. double or triple mass production, dendritic structure formation or unpredicted particle composition. We stress the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) for verifying the morphology, size distribution and chemical composition of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, we correlate the morphology and the composition of the PtxY nanoparticles with their catalytic properties for the oxygen reduction reaction. Finally, we propose a completely general diagnostic method, which allows us to minimize the occurrence of undesired masses.

  13. Magnetic state selection in atomic frequency and time standards. [hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic standards such as those based upon cesium and hydrogen rely upon magnetic state selection to obtain population inversion in the hyperfine transition levels. Use of new design approaches and improved magnetic materials has made it possible to fabricate improved state selectors of small size, and thus the efficiency of utilization of beam flux is greatly improved and the size and weight of the standard is reduced. The sensitivity to magnetic perturbations is also decreased, so that the accuracy and stability of the standard is improved. Several new state selector designs are illustrated and the application to standards utilizing different atomic species is analyzed.

  14. Limitations Placed on the Time Coverage, Isoplanatic Patch Size and Exposure Time for Solar Observations Using Image Selection Procedures in the Presence of Telescope Aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J. M.; Rimmele, T. R.

    1996-12-01

    Image selection, adaptive optics and post-facto image restoration methods are all techniques being used for diffraction limited imaging with ground-based solar and stellar telescopes. Often these techniques are used in a hybrid form like e.g. the application of adaptive optics and/or post-facto image restoration in combination with already good images obtained by image selection in periods of good seeing. Fried (JOSA 56, 1372, 1966), Hecquet and Coupinot (J. Optics/Paris 16, 21, 1985) and Beckers ("Solar and Stellar Granulation", Kluwer, Rutten & Severino Eds, 55, 1988) already discussed the usefulness of image selection, or the "Lucky Observer" mode, for high resolution imaging. All assumed perfect telescope optics. In case of moderate telescope aberrations image selection can still lead to diffraction limited imaging but only when the atmospheric wavefront aberration happens to compensate that of the telescope. In this "Very Lucky Observer" mode the probability of obtaining a good image is reduced over the un-aberrated case, as are the size of the isoplanatic patch and the exposure time. We describe an analysis of these effects for varying telescope aberrations. These result in a strong case for the removal of telescope aberrations either by initial implementation or by the use of slow active optics.

  15. JOINT STRUCTURE SELECTION AND ESTIMATION IN THE TIME-VARYING COEFFICIENT COX MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wei; Lu, Wenbin; Zhang, Hao Helen

    2016-01-01

    Time-varying coefficient Cox model has been widely studied and popularly used in survival data analysis due to its flexibility for modeling covariate effects. It is of great practical interest to accurately identify the structure of covariate effects in a time-varying coefficient Cox model, i.e. covariates with null effect, constant effect and truly time-varying effect, and estimate the corresponding regression coefficients. Combining the ideas of local polynomial smoothing and group nonnegative garrote, we develop a new penalization approach to achieve such goals. Our method is able to identify the underlying true model structure with probability tending to one and simultaneously estimate the time-varying coefficients consistently. The asymptotic normalities of the resulting estimators are also established. We demonstrate the performance of our method using simulations and an application to the primary biliary cirrhosis data. PMID:27540275

  16. Selective influence of circadian modulation and task characteristics on motor imagery time.

    PubMed

    Debarnot, Ursula; Sahraoui, Djafar; Champely, Stéphane; Collet, Christian; Guillot, Aymeric

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of circadian modulation on motor imagery (MI) time while also considering the effects of task complexity and duration. The ability to imagine in real time was influenced by circadian modulation in a simple walking condition, with longer MI times in the morning and evening sessions. By contrast, there was no effect of circadian rhythm in the complex, short or long walking conditions. We concluded that motor imagery time is modulated during the course of the day, but the effect of task difficulty is stronger than circadian modulation in altering the temporal congruence between physical practice and MI performance. Practical applications in motor learning and rehabilitation are discussed.

  17. Effects of Type and Strength of Force Feedback on Movement Time in a Target Selection Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorie, Robert Conrad; Vu, Kim-Phuong L.; Marayong, Panadda; Robles, Jose; Strybel, Thomas Z.; Battiste, Vernol

    2013-01-01

    Future cockpits will likely include new onboard technologies, such as cockpit displays of traffic information, to help support future flight deck roles and responsibilities. These new technologies may benefit from multimodal feedback to aid pilot information processing. The current study investigated the effects of multiple levels of force feedback on operator performance in an aviation task. Participants were presented with two different types of force feedback (gravitational and spring force feedback) for a discrete targeting task, with multiple levels of gain examined for each force feedback type. Approach time and time in target were recorded. Results suggested that the two highest levels of gravitational force significantly reduced approach times relative to the lowest level of gravitational force. Spring force level only affected time in target. Implications of these findings for the design of future cockpit displays will be discussed.

  18. A chromatochemometric approach for evaluating and selecting the perfume maceration time.

    PubMed

    López-Nogueroles, Marina; Chisvert, Alberto; Salvador, Amparo

    2010-04-30

    A chemometric treatment of the data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detector (FID) has been proposed to study the maceration time involved in perfumes manufacture with the final purpose of reducing this time but preserving the organoleptic characteristics of the perfume that is being elaborated. In this sense, GC-FID chromatograms were used as a fingerprint of perfume samples subjected to different maceration times, and data were treated by linear discriminant analysis (LDA), by comparing to a set of samples known to be macerated or not, which were used as calibration objects. The GC-FID methodology combined with the treatment of data by LDA has been applied successfully to seven different perfumes. The constructed LDA models exhibited excellent Wilks' lambdas (0.013-0.118, depending on the perfume), and up to a reduction of 57% has been achieved with respect to the maceration time initially established.

  19. Real-Time and Selective Detection of Single Nucleotide DNA Mutations Using Surface Engineered Microtoroids.

    PubMed

    Toren, Pelin; Ozgur, Erol; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2015-11-03

    Mictoroids, as optical biosensors, can provide beneficial biosensing platforms to understand DNA alterations. These alterations could have significant clinical importance, such as the case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a commonly found pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients-causing poor prognosis by undergoing mutations during disease steps, gaining virulence and drug resistance. To provide a preliminary diagnosis platform for early-stage bacterial mutations, biosensing with a selective microtoroid surface was suggested. For this purpose, microtoroids with high quality factors were fabricated. The microtoroid surfaces were coated with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES)/trimethylmethoxysilane (TMMS) mixed silane solution followed by EDC/NHS chemistry for covalent conjugation of DNA probes. Ethanolamine capping was applied to avoid unspecific interactions. The confocal studies confirmed homogeneous functionalization of the microtoroid surface. The DNA hybridization was demonstrated to be affected from the probe length. The optical biosensors showed a significant response (∼22 pm) to the complementary strand of the mutated type P. aeruginosa DNA, while showing substantially low and late response (∼5 pm) to the point mismatch strand. The limit of detection (LOD) for the complementary strand was calculated as 2.32 nM. No significant response was obtained for the noncomplementary strand. The results showed the microtoroids possessed selective surfaces in terms of distinguishing DNA alterations.

  20. Excess selenium increases Ca sup ++ -induced clotting times in chicks and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Herz, W.C.; Combs, G.F. Jr. )

    1991-03-11

    Calcium (Ca{sup ++})-induced clotting times (i.e., prothrombin times, PT times) in young White Leghorn chickens and male weanling Sprague Dawley rats were shown to be elevated in animals fed diets for 20-30 days containing excess Se. Clotting times of chicks were prolonged from those of controls in animals fed either deficient or excess Se, although all dietary treatment groups showed comparable concentrations of total plasma protein. Rats showed significantly prolonged PT times when fed Se at either 5 ppm or 10 ppm. The plasma activities of certain enzymes of hepatic origin (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase) in rats fed excess Se were comparable to those of controls, despite the increase in the PT times. Body weights and liver weights were significantly depressed in those animals only at the 10 ppm Se level. These results demonstrate increased PT times in both chicks and rats. In each species, this effect is independent of feed intake and body weight, and is apparent at levels of Se intake that do not affect other indicators of hepatic damage. Therefore, prolonged PT time may be an early indicator of sub-acute selenosis.

  1. Phenology and Phenotypic Natural Selection on the Flowering Time of a Deceit-pollinated Tropical Orchid, Myrmecophila christinae

    PubMed Central

    PARRA-TABLA, VÍCTOR; VARGAS, CARLOS F.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and aims. Flowering phenology is described and the effect of flowering time on pollination success is evaluated in the deceit-pollinated tropical orchid, Myrmecophila christinae. It was expected that, due to this species' deceit pollination strategy and low observed pollinator visit rate, there would be a higher probability of natural selection events favouring individuals flowering away from the population flowering peak. • Methods. The study covers two consecutive years and four populations of M. christinae located along the north coast of the Yucatán Peninsula. For phenological and pollination success data, a total of 110 individuals were monitored weekly in 1998, and 83 individuals in 1999, during all the flowering and fruiting season. • Key results. The results showed significant differences in the probability of donating and receiving pollen throughout the flowering season. The probability of receiving or donating pollen increased the further an individual flowering was from the flowering peak. Regression analysis showed directional and disruptive phenotypic natural selection gradients, suggesting the presence of selection events unfavourable to flowering during flowering peak, for both male success (pollen removal) and female success (fruit production). However, the intensity and significance of the natural selection events varied between populations from year to year. The variation between seasons and populations was apparently due to variations in the density of reproductive individuals in each population and each season. • Conclusions. As in other deceit-pollinated orchids, natural selection in M. christinae favours individuals flowering early or late in relation to population peak flowering. However, results also suggested a fluctuating regime of selective events act on flowering time of M. christinae. PMID:15205176

  2. Real-time single cell analysis of Bid cleavage and translocation in cisplatin-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Xing, Da; Pei, Yihui; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    Cancer cell apoptosis can be induced by cisplatin, an efficient anticancer agent. However, its mechanism is not fully understood. Bcl-2 homology domain (BH) 3-only proteins couple stress signals to mitochondrial apoptotic pathways. Calpain-mediated cleavage of the BH3-only protein Bid into a 14 kD truncated protein (tBid) has been implicated in cisplatin-induced apoptotic pathway. We utilized a recombinant fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) Bid probe to determine the kinetics of Bid cleavage during cisplatin-induced apoptosis in ASTC-a-1 cells. The cells were also co-transfected with Bid-CFP and DsRed-Mit to dynamically detect tBid translocation. Cells showed a cleavage of the Bid-FRET probe occurring at about 4-5 h after treated with 20 µM cisplatin. Cleavage of the Bid-FRET probe coincided with a translocation of tBid from the cytosolic to the mitochondria, and the translocation lasted about 1.5 h. Using real-time single-cell analysis, we first observed the kinetics of Bid cleavage and translocation to mitochondria in living cells during cisplatin-induced apoptosis.

  3. Appropriateness of selecting different averaging times for modelling chronic and acute exposure to environmental odours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, G. H.; Smith, R.; Gerard, V.; Burge, C.; Lowe, M.; Kinnersley, R.; Sneath, R.; Longhurst, P. J.

    Odour emissions are episodic, characterised by periods of high emission rates, interspersed with periods of low emissions. It is frequently the short term, high concentration peaks that result in annoyance in the surrounding population. Dispersion modelling is accepted as a useful tool for odour impact assessment, and two approaches can be adopted. The first approach of modelling the hourly average concentration can underestimate total odour concentration peaks, resulting in annoyance and complaints. The second modelling approach involves the use of short averaging times. This study assesses the appropriateness of using different averaging times to model the dispersion of odour from a landfill site. We also examine perception of odour in the community in conjunction with the modelled odour dispersal, by using community monitors to record incidents of odour. The results show that with the shorter averaging times, the modelled pattern of dispersal reflects the pattern of observed odour incidents recorded in the community monitoring database, with the modelled odour dispersing further in a north easterly direction. Therefore, the current regulatory method of dispersion modelling, using hourly averaging times, is less successful at capturing peak concentrations, and does not capture the pattern of odour emission as indicated by the community monitoring database. The use of short averaging times is therefore of greater value in predicting the likely nuisance impact of an odour source and in framing appropriate regulatory controls.

  4. Real-time monitoring of flavivirus induced cytopathogenesis using cell electric impedance technology.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Ye, Peifang; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Reisen, William

    2011-05-01

    A real-time cell analysis (RTCA) system based on cell-substrate electric impedance technology was used to monitor cytopathic effects (CPE) in Vero cell cultures infected with West Nile virus (WNV) and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) at infectious doses ranging from 10(1) to 10(6) plaque forming units (PFU) of virus. A kinetic parameter characterizing virus-induced CPE, CIT(50) or the time to 50% decrease in cell impedance, was inversely proportional to virus infectious dose. In WNV-infected cells, the onset and rate of CPE was earlier and faster than in SLEV-infected cells, which was consistent with viral cytolytic activity. A mathematical model simulating impedance-based CPE kinetic curves indicated that the replication rate of WNV was about 3 times faster than SLEV. The RTCA system also was used for quantifying the level of cell protection by specific neutralizing antibodies against WNV and SLEV. The onset of WNV or SLEV-induced CPE was delayed in the presence of specific anti-sera, and this delay in the CIT(50) was well correlated with the titer of the neutralizing antibody as measured independently by plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT). The RTCA system provided a high throughput and quantitative method for real-time monitoring viral growth in cell culture and its inhibition by neutralizing antibodies.

  5. Relaxation Time Distribution (RTD) of Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) data from environmental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Ustra, A.; Slater, L. D.; Zhang, C.; Mendonça, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present an alternative formulation of the Debye Decomposition (DD) of complex conductivity spectra, with a new set of parameters that are directly related to the continuous Debye relaxation model. The procedure determines the relaxation time distribution (RTD) and two frequency-independent parameters that modulate the induced polarization spectra. The distribution of relaxation times quantifies the contribution of each distinct relaxation process, which can in turn be associated with specific polarization processes and characterized in terms of electrochemical and interfacial parameters as derived from mechanistic models. Synthetic tests show that the procedure can successfully fit spectral induced polarization (SIP) data and accurately recover the RTD. The procedure was applied to different data sets, focusing on environmental applications. We focus on data of sand-clay mixtures artificially contaminated with toluene, and crude oil-contaminated sands experiencing biodegradation. The results identify characteristic relaxation times that can be associated with distinct polarization processes resulting from either the contaminant itself or transformations associated with biodegradation. The inversion results provide information regarding the relative strength and dominant relaxation time of these polarization processes.

  6. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa.

  7. Salmonella typhimurium contains an anion-selective outer membrane porin induced by phosphate starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, K; Benz, R; Brass, J; Boos, W

    1985-01-01

    A mutant of Salmonella typhimurium was selected that is constitutive for the pho regulon. It exhibited constitutive glycerol-3-phosphate transport activity and synthesized a new outer membrane porin. Upon measurement of porin activity in black lipid films, it exhibited anion selectivity. It therefore appears analogous to the Escherichia coli PhoE porin. Images PMID:2981826

  8. Antagonistic selection factors induce a continuous population divergence in a polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Y; Nagata, N; Kawata, M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the relative importance of selection and stochastic factors in population divergence of adaptive traits is a classical topic in evolutionary biology. However, it is difficult to separate these factors and detect the effects of selection when two or more contrasting selective factors are simultaneously acting on a single locus. In the damselfly Ischnura senegalensis, females exhibit color dimorphism and morph frequencies change geographically. We here evaluated the role of selection and stochastic factors in population divergence of morph frequencies by comparing the divergences in color locus and neutral loci. Comparisons between population pairwise FST for neutral loci and for the color locus did not detect any stochastic factors affecting color locus. Although comparison between population divergence in color and neutral loci using all populations detected only divergent selection, we detected two antagonistic selective factors acting on the color locus, that is, balancing and divergent selection, when considering geographical distance between populations. Our results suggest that a combination of two antagonistic selective factors, rather than stochastic factors, establishes the geographic cline in morph frequency in this system. PMID:24281546

  9. Line Graph or Scatter Plot? Automatic Selection of Methods for Visualizing Trends in Time Series.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunhai; Han, Fubo; Zhu, Lifeng; Deussen, Oliver; Chen, Baoquan

    2017-01-16

    Line graphs are usually considered to be the best choice for visualizing time series data, whereas sometimes also scatter plots are used for showing main trends. So far there are no guidelines that indicate which of these visualization methods better display trends in time series for a given canvas. Assuming that the main information in a time series is its overall trend, we propose an algorithm that automatically picks the visualization method that reveals this trend best. This is achieved by measuring the visual consistency between the trend curve represented by a LOESS fit and the trend described by a scatter plot or a line graph. To measure the consistency between our algorithm and user choices, we performed an empirical study with a series of controlled experiments that show a large correspondence. In a factor analysis we furthermore demonstrate that various visual and data factors have effects on the preference for a certain type of visualization.

  10. On the selection and evaluation of visual display symbology Factors influencing search and identification times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger; Williams, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    Three single-target visual search tasks were used to evaluate a set of cathode-ray tube (CRT) symbols for a helicopter situation display. The search tasks were representative of the information extraction required in practice, and reaction time was used to measure the efficiency with which symbols could be located and identified. Familiar numeric symbols were responded to more quickly than graphic symbols. The addition of modifier symbols, such as a nearby flashing dot or surrounding square, had a greater disruptive effect on the graphic symbols than did the numeric characters. The results suggest that a symbol set is, in some respects, like a list that must be learned. Factors that affect the time to identify items in a memory task, such as familiarity and visual discriminability, also affect the time to identify symbols. This analogy has broad implications for the design of symbol sets. An attempt was made to model information access with this class of display.

  11. Numerical analysis of curved frequency selective surface by finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin-yi; Wang, Jian-bo; Chen, Gui-bo; Sun, Guan-cheng; Lu, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Frequency selective surface is a monolayer or multilayer 2D periodic structure which is composed of multiple resonance units scattering by a two-dimensional periodic array on dielectric layer. FSS can't absorb radio frequency energy, but can filter the frequency which is therefore applied in microwave technique or stealth technology. The relative research on curved FSS is relatively scarce since the curved FSS structure can be obtained only when FSS is attached on the materials surfaces of curved structures in engineering application. However, curved FSS is widely applied in practical engineering; therefore, the research on curved FSS structure has important significance. In this paper, a curved FSS structure model of Y-pore unit is established and numerical simulated by means of FDTD. The influence of curvature on FSS transmission characteristics is studied according to the analysis on the changing of radar cross section (RCS). The results show: the center frequency point of the plane band pass FSS structure drifts after the curve surface deformation of the structure; the center frequency point of the curved band pass FSS structure drifts with the changing of the curvature radius, i. e. with the decreasing of curvature radius, the frequency point drifts towards high points and the transmittance decreases. The design of FSS radome demands of accurate and stable center resonance frequency; therefore, the actual situation of curved surface should be considered in practical engineering application when band pass FSS is made into frequency selection filtering radome. The curvature radius should be long enough to avoid center frequency drifting and transmittance deceasing.

  12. TCDD‑induced chick cardiotoxicity is abolished by a selective cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) inhibitor NS398.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Nozomi; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2014-09-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), are known to cause severe heart defects in avian species. However, the mechanism of TCDD-induced chick cardiovascular toxicity is unclear. In this study, we investigated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) as a possible mechanism of TCDD-induced cardiotoxicity. Fertile chicken eggs were injected with TCDD and a COX-2 selective inhibitor, NS398, and we investigated chick heart failure on day 10. We found that the chick heart to body weight ratio and atrial natriuretic factor mRNA expression were increased, but this increase was abolished with treatment of NS398. In addition, the morphological abnormality of an enlarged ventricle resulting from TCDD exposure was also abolished with co-treatment of TCDD and NS398. Our results suggested that TCDD-induced chick heart defects are mediated via the nongenomic pathway and that they do not require the genomic pathway.

  13. Differentiating induced and natural seismicity using space-time-magnitude statistics applied to the Coso Geothermal field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenball, Martin; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable characteristic of earthquakes is their clustering in time and space, displaying their self-similarity. It remains to be tested if natural and induced earthquakes share the same behavior. We study natural and induced earthquakes comparatively in the same tectonic setting at the Coso Geothermal Field. Covering the preproduction and coproduction periods from 1981 to 2013, we analyze interevent times, spatial dimension, and frequency-size distributions for natural and induced earthquakes. Individually, these distributions are statistically indistinguishable. Determining the distribution of nearest neighbor distances in a combined space-time-magnitude metric, lets us identify clear differences between both kinds of seismicity. Compared to natural earthquakes, induced earthquakes feature a larger population of background seismicity and nearest neighbors at large magnitude rescaled times and small magnitude rescaled distances. Local stress perturbations induced by field operations appear to be strong enough to drive local faults through several seismic cycles and reactivate them after time periods on the order of a year.

  14. Time Management Abilities of School Principals According to Gender: A Case Study in Selected Gauteng Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botha, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    According to the literature on school effectiveness and school improvement and the role of the school principal in this regard, the lack of time management skills and abilities among school principals can be regarded as one of the main factors that lead to principal inefficiency and ineffectiveness in the school context. But, how do male and…

  15. Time-Resolved Fluorescence in Lipid Bilayers: Selected Applications and Advantages over Steady State

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Mariana; Šachl, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Coutinho, Ana; Prieto, Manuel; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence methods are versatile tools for obtaining dynamic and topological information about biomembranes because the molecular interactions taking place in lipid membranes frequently occur on the same timescale as fluorescence emission. The fluorescence intensity decay, in particular, is a powerful reporter of the molecular environment of a fluorophore. The fluorescence lifetime can be sensitive to the local polarity, hydration, viscosity, and/or presence of fluorescence quenchers/energy acceptors within several nanometers of the vicinity of a fluorophore. Illustrative examples of how time-resolved fluorescence measurements can provide more valuable and detailed information about a system than the time-integrated (steady-state) approach will be presented in this review: 1), determination of membrane polarity and mobility using time-dependent spectral shifts; 2), identification of submicroscopic domains by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy; 3), elucidation of membrane leakage mechanisms from dye self-quenching assays; and 4), evaluation of nanodomain sizes by time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25517142

  16. Asymptotic Time Decay in Quantum Physics: a Selective Review and Some New Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Domingos H. U.; Wreszinski, Walter F.

    2013-05-01

    Decay of various quantities (return or survival probability, correlation functions) in time are the basis of a multitude of important and interesting phenomena in quantum physics, ranging from spectral properties, resonances, return and approach to equilibrium, to dynamical stability properties and irreversibility and the "arrow of time" in [Asymptotic Time Decay in Quantum Physics (World Scientific, 2013)]. In this review, we study several types of decay — decay in the average, decay in the Lp-sense, and pointwise decay — of the Fourier-Stieltjes transform of a measure, usually identified with the spectral measure, which appear naturally in different mathematical and physical settings. In particular, decay in the Lp-sense is related both to pointwise decay and to decay in the average and, from a physical standpoint, relates to a rigorous form of the time-energy uncertainty relation. Both decay on the average and in the Lp-sense are related to spectral properties, in particular, absolute continuity of the spectral measure. The study of pointwise decay for singular continuous measures (Rajchman measures) provides a bridge between ergodic theory, number theory and analysis, including the method of stationary phase. The theory is illustrated by some new results in the theory of sparse models.

  17. Evidence that accumulation of mutants in a biofilm reflects natural selection rather than stress-induced adaptive mutation.

    PubMed

    Banas, Jeffrey A; Miller, Justin D; Fuschino, Meghan E; Hazlett, Karsten R O; Toyofuku, Wendy; Porter, Kristen A; Reutzel, Sarah B; Florczyk, Matthew A; McDonough, Kathleen A; Michalek, Suzanne M

    2007-01-01

    The accumulation of mutant genotypes within a biofilm evokes the controversy over whether the biofilm environment induces adaptive mutation or whether the accumulation can be explained by natural selection. A comparison of the virulence of two strains of the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans showed that rats infected with one of the strains accumulated a high proportion (average, 22%) of organisms that had undergone a deletion between two contiguous and highly homologous genes. To determine if the accumulation of deletion mutants was due to selection or to an increased mutation rate, accumulations of deletion mutants within in vitro planktonic and biofilm cultures and within rats inoculated with various proportions of deletion organisms were quantified. We report here that natural selection was the primary force behind the accumulation of the deletion mutants.

  18. Comparative performance of selected variability detection techniques in photometric time series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovsky, K. V.; Gavras, P.; Karampelas, A.; Antipin, S. V.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benni, P.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Burdanov, A. Y.; Derlopa, S.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Khokhryakova, A. D.; Kolesnikova, D. M.; Korotkiy, S. A.; Lapukhin, E. G.; Moretti, M. I.; Popov, A. A.; Pouliasis, E.; Samus, N. N.; Spetsieri, Z.; Veselkov, S. A.; Volkov, K. V.; Yang, M.; Zubareva, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Photometric measurements are prone to systematic errors presenting a challenge to low-amplitude variability detection. In search for a general-purpose variability detection technique able to recover a broad range of variability types including currently unknown ones, we test 18 statistical characteristics quantifying scatter and/or correlation between brightness measurements. We compare their performance in identifying variable objects in seven time series data sets obtained with telescopes ranging in size from a telephoto lens to 1 m-class and probing variability on time-scales from minutes to decades. The test data sets together include light curves of 127 539 objects, among them 1251 variable stars of various types and represent a range of observing conditions often found in ground-based variability surveys. The real data are complemented by simulations. We propose a combination of two indices that together recover a broad range of variability types from photometric data characterized by a wide variety of sampling patterns, photometric accuracies and percentages of outlier measurements. The first index is the interquartile range (IQR) of magnitude measurements, sensitive to variability irrespective of a time-scale and resistant to outliers. It can be complemented by the ratio of the light-curve variance to the mean square successive difference, 1/η, which is efficient in detecting variability on time-scales longer than the typical time interval between observations. Variable objects have larger 1/η and/or IQR values than non-variable objects of similar brightness. Another approach to variability detection is to combine many variability indices using principal component analysis. We present 124 previously unknown variable stars found in the test data.

  19. A Linear-Time Burrows-Wheeler Transform Using Induced Sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okanohara, Daisuke; Sadakane, Kunihiko

    To compute Burrows-Wheeler Transform (BWT), one usually builds a suffix array (SA) first, and then obtains BWT using SA, which requires much redundant working space. In previous studies to compute BWT directly [5,12], one constructs BWT incrementally, which requires O(n logn) time where n is the length of the input text. We present an algorithm for computing BWT directly in linear time by modifying the suffix array construction algorithm based on induced sorting [15]. We show that the working space is O(n logσloglog σ n) for any σ where σ is the alphabet size, which is the smallest among the known linear time algorithms.

  20. Real-Time Control of Ultrafast Laser Micromachining by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Tao; Li, Jinggao; Longtin, Jon P.

    2004-03-01

    Ultrafast laser micromachining provides many advantages for precision micromachining. One challenging problem, however, particularly for multilayer and heterogeneous materials, is how to prevent a given material from being ablated, as ultrafast laser micromachining is generally material insensitive. We present a real-time feedback control system for an ultrafast laser micromachining system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The characteristics of ultrafast LIBS are reviewed and discussed so as to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Comparison methods to identify the material emission patterns are developed, and several of the resulting algorithms were implemented into a real-time computer control system. LIBS-controlled micromachining is demonstrated for the fabrication of microheater structures on thermal sprayed materials. Compared with a strictly passive machining process without any such feedback control, the LIBS-based system provides several advantages including less damage to the substrate layer, reduced machining time, and more-uniform machining features.

  1. Time of flight spectrometer for background-free positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Shastry, K; Anto, C V; Joglekar, P V; Nadesalingam, M P; Xie, S; Jiang, N; Weiss, A H

    2016-03-01

    We describe a novel spectrometer designed for positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy employing a time-of-flight spectrometer. The spectrometer's new configuration enables us to implant monoenergetic positrons with kinetic energies as low as 1.5 eV on the sample while simultaneously allowing for the detection of electrons emitted from the sample surface at kinetic energies ranging from ∼500 eV to 0 eV. The spectrometer's unique characteristics made it possible to perform (a) first experiments demonstrating the direct transition of a positron from an unbound scattering state to a bound surface state and (b) the first experiments demonstrating that Auger electron spectra can be obtained down to 0 eV without the beam induced secondary electron background obscuring the low energy part of the spectra. Data are presented which show alternative means of estimating positron surface state binding energy and background-free Auger spectra.

  2. Selected time-lapse movies of the east rift zone eruption of KĪlauea Volcano, 2004–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has used mass-market digital time-lapse cameras and network-enabled Webcams for visual monitoring and research. The 26 time-lapse movies in this report were selected from the vast collection of images acquired by these camera systems during 2004–2008. Chosen for their content and broad aesthetic appeal, these image sequences document a variety of flow-field and vent processes from Kīlauea's east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983 and is still (as of 2011) ongoing.

  3. Experience-induced malleability in neural encoding of pitch, timbre, and timing.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Nina; Skoe, Erika; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Ashley, Richard

    2009-07-01

    Speech and music are highly complex signals that have many shared acoustic features. Pitch, Timbre, and Timing can be used as overarching perceptual categories for describing these shared properties. The acoustic cues contributing to these percepts also have distinct subcortical representations which can be selectively enhanced or degraded in different populations. Musically trained subjects are found to have enhanced subcortical representations of pitch, timbre, and timing. The effects of musical experience on subcortical auditory processing are pervasive and extend beyond music to the domains of language and emotion. The sensory malleability of the neural encoding of pitch, timbre, and timing can be affected by lifelong experience and short-term training. This conceptual framework and supporting data can be applied to consider sensory learning of speech and music through a hearing aid or cochlear implant.

  4. QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT SELECTION ALGORITHM USING TIME VARIABILITY AND MACHINE LEARNING: SELECTION OF 1620 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT CANDIDATES FROM MACHO LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae-Won; Protopapas, Pavlos; Alcock, Charles; Trichas, Markos; Byun, Yong-Ik; Khardon, Roni

    2011-07-10

    We present a new quasi-stellar object (QSO) selection algorithm using a Support Vector Machine, a supervised classification method, on a set of extracted time series features including period, amplitude, color, and autocorrelation value. We train a model that separates QSOs from variable stars, non-variable stars, and microlensing events using 58 known QSOs, 1629 variable stars, and 4288 non-variables in the MAssive Compact Halo Object (MACHO) database as a training set. To estimate the efficiency and the accuracy of the model, we perform a cross-validation test using the training set. The test shows that the model correctly identifies {approx}80% of known QSOs with a 25% false-positive rate. The majority of the false positives are Be stars. We applied the trained model to the MACHO Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) data set, which consists of 40 million light curves, and found 1620 QSO candidates. During the selection none of the 33,242 known MACHO variables were misclassified as QSO candidates. In order to estimate the true false-positive rate, we crossmatched the candidates with astronomical catalogs including the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution LMC catalog and a few X-ray catalogs. The results further suggest that the majority of the candidates, more than 70%, are QSOs.

  5. Sinogram-based coil selection for streak artifact reduction in undersampled radial real-time magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Background Streak artifacts are a common problem in radial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We therefore developed a method for automatically excluding receiver coil elements which lead to these artifacts. Methods The proposed coil selection relates to real-time MRI data based on highly undersampled radial acquisitions. It exploits differences between high- and low-resolution sinograms reconstructed from datasets acquired during preparatory scans. Apart from phantom validations, the performance was assessed for real-time MRI studies of different human organ systems in vivo. Results The algorithm greatly reduces streak artifact strength without compromising image quality in other parts of the image. It is robust with respect to different experimental settings and fast to be included in the online reconstruction pipeline for real-time MRI. Conclusions The proposed method enables a fast reduction of streak artifacts in radial real-time MRI. PMID:27942475

  6. Selective quantification of human DNA by real-time PCR of FOXP2.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Mikiko; Hiroshige, Kenichi; Yoshimoto, Joji; Koda, Yoshiro

    2012-07-01

    We established a simple quantitative PCR procedure with high specificity and sensitivity using TaqMan probes targeting the FOXP2 sequence. This assay distinguished human and nonhuman, including primates, samples with the exception of mouse, turtle, lizard, and fishes. However, the specific amplification of mouse, lizard, and turtle fragments of FOXP2 could be confirmed by electrophoresis after real-time PCR. Because the C(T) values obtained for human DNA were not affected by contaminating animal DNA at concentrations up to 30 times that of human DNA, we were able to estimate the concentration of human DNA in mixed specimens. This assay provides a reliable and useful method for routine quantification of human-specific DNA in forensic practice.

  7. Variation of solar-selective properties of black chrome with plating time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.; Curtis, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral reflectance properties of a commercially prepared black chrome over dull nickel, both plated on steel, for various plating times of the black chrome were measured. The plating current was 180 amperes per square foot. Values of absorptance integrated over the solar spectrum, and of infrared emittance integrated over black-body radiation at 250 F were obtained. It is shown that plating between one and two minutes produces the optimum combination of highest heat absorbed and lowest heat lost by radiation.

  8. Liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry selective determination of ochratoxin A in wine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, T; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Cela, R

    2016-05-15

    The performance of liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) for ochratoxin A (OTA) determination in wine is evaluated for the first time. Sample preparation was optimized to obtain quantitative recoveries at the same time that the efficiency of electrospray ionization (ESI) remained unaltered between sample extracts and calibration standards. Under final conditions, samples (20 mL) were concentrated using a reversed-phase solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge, followed by OTA elution with 1 mL of ethyl acetate. The absolute recoveries of the method, established against calibration standards, were 91-121% and 90-113% (without and with internal standard correction, respectively), for wines fortified at 3 concentration levels. The attained LOQ (0.05 ng mL(-1)) remained below the maximum permitted OTA concentration (2 ng mL(-1)) in dry wines. The method was applied to different samples, with OTA being found in some dessert wines at concentrations below 1 ng mL(-1). The ethyl ester of OTA (OTC) could be identified in the same wine samples from its accurate full product ion spectra.

  9. The impact of germination time on the some selected parameters through malting process.

    PubMed

    Farzaneh, Vahid; Ghodsvali, Alireza; Bakhshabadi, Hamid; Zare, Zahra; Carvalho, Isabel S

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the impacts of germination time on the enzymes activity attributed in malting and some polysaccharides contents of the malt prepared from the Joseph barley variety have been screened using a completely random design with three levels of germination time(3, 5 and 7days). The archived outcomes revealed that the highest quantity of starch has been observed in the malt resulted from 3days germination, and an enhancement in the germination period from 3 to 7days decreased the quantity of available starch. An enhancement in the germination period presented a reduction in the beta-glucan quantity in the malting seeds. The malt produced 7days after germination had the highest enzymatic activity(253U.kg(-1)). The comparison of data average using Duncan test showed that the minimum and maximum value of α-Amylase enzyme activity and diastatic power were recorded in the malts produced 3 and 7days after germination, respectively. Increasing in the germination time led to a reduction in malting efficiency, however the efficiency of the hot water extraction showed enhancement. The outcomes of the correlation between the studied parameters showed that the beta-glucan and starch quantities are negatively affected by the activities of beta-Glucanase and α-Amylase.

  10. Depletion-Induced Shape and Size Selection of Gold Nanoparticles (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Chem. B 1999, 103 (16), 3073–3077. (35) Rosen, M. J. Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena , 3rd ed.; Wiley- Interscience: Hoboken, NJ, 2004. (36...NPs) through the formation of reversible flocculates by surfactant micelle induced depletion interaction. Au NP flocculates form at a critical... surfactant micelle molar concentration, Cm* where the number of surfactant micelles is sufficient to induce an attractive potential energy between the Au NPs

  11. Model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the major idea and mathematical aspects of model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are presented. In particular, a computational framework and its major components developed by authors in recent years are reviewed. The framework provides the backbone for not only treatment planning but also real-time surgical monitoring and control with a focus on MR thermometry enabled predictive control and applications to image-guided LITT, or MRgLITT. Although this computational framework is designed for LITT in treating prostate cancer, it is further applicable to other thermal therapies in focal lesions induced by radio-frequency (RF), microwave and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). Moreover, the model-based dynamic closed-loop predictive control algorithms in the framework, facilitated by the coupling of mathematical modelling and computer simulation with real-time imaging feedback, has great potential to enable a novel methodology in thermal medicine. Such technology could dramatically increase treatment efficacy and reduce morbidity. PMID:22098360

  12. Time-dependent Liouville density functional theory for laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization in ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guoping; Bai, Yihua; George, Thomas F.

    Abstract: The traditional time-dependent density functional theory is very powerful to simulate the dynamic process, but is very time consuming. When it was first used to understand laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization in ferromagnets, the results were disappointing, with the laser amplitude at least three orders of magnitude larger than the experimental one to achieve the similar spin reduction. We develop a new theory within the density functional theory (DFT) for laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization in ferromagnets. We first solve the Liouville equation in the time domain and then feed the excited state density into the DFT code, so the dynamics proceeds on the excited and constraint potential surface. We test this for several magnetic systems and find a significantly larger demagnetization than the static approach, but is still smaller than the experimental finding. Both the local density approximation and the generalized gradient approximation fail. Our finding strongly suggests that a new functional must be developed. As a first test, we introduce a spin power scaling method. Some primitive results will be presented. This work was solely supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46304. The research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.

  13. Real-time fMRI data analysis using region of interest selection based on fast ICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Baoquan; Ma, Xinyue; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying; Zhao, Xiaojie

    2011-03-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) is a new technique which can present (feedback) brain activity during scanning. Through fast acquisition and online analysis of BOLD signal, fMRI data are processed within one TR. Current rtfMRI provides an activation map under specific task mainly through the GLM analysis to select region of interest (ROI). This study was based on independent component analysis (ICA) and used the result of fast ICA analysis to select the node of the functional network as the ROI. Real-time brain activity within the ROI was presented to the subject who needed to find strategies to control his brain activity. The whole real-time processes involved three parts: pre-processing (including head motion correction and smoothing), fast ICA analysis and feedback. In addition, the result of fast head motion correction was also presented to the experimenter in a curve diagram. Based on the above analysis processes, a real time feedback experiment with a motor imagery task was performed. An overt finger movement task as localizer session was adopted for ICA analysis to get the motor network. Supplementary motor area (SMA) in such network was selected as the ROI. During the feedback session, the average of BOLD signals within ROI was presented to the subjects for self-regulation under a motor imagery task. In this experiment, TR was 1.5 seconds, and the whole time of processing and presentation was within 1 second. Experimental results not only showed that the SMA was controllable, but also proved that the analysis method was effective.

  14. Respiratory-Induced Prostate Motion Using Wavelet Decomposition of the Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuting; Liu, Tian; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuenan; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to characterize and quantify the impact of respiratory-induced prostate motion. Methods and Materials: Real-time intrafraction motion is observed with the Calypso 4-dimensional nonradioactive electromagnetic tracking system (Calypso Medical Technologies, Inc. Seattle, Washington). We report the results from a total of 1024 fractions from 31 prostate cancer patients. Wavelet transform was used to decompose the signal to extract and isolate the respiratory-induced prostate motion from the total prostate displacement. Results: Our results show that the average respiratory motion larger than 0.5 mm can be observed in 68% of the fractions. Fewer than 1% of the patients showed average respiratory motion of less than 0.2 mm, whereas 99% of the patients showed average respiratory-induced motion ranging between 0.2 and 2 mm. The maximum respiratory range of motion of 3 mm or greater was seen in only 25% of the fractions. In addition, about 2% patients showed anxiety, indicated by a breathing frequency above 24 times per minute. Conclusions: Prostate motion is influenced by respiration in most fractions. Real-time intrafraction data are sensitive enough to measure the impact of respiration by use of wavelet decomposition methods. Although the average respiratory amplitude observed in this study is small, this technique provides a tool that can be useful if one moves to smaller treatment margins (≤5 mm). This also opens ups the possibility of being able to develop patient specific margins, knowing that prostate motion is not unpredictable.

  15. Effect of Powder Reuse Times on Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Qian, M.; Liu, N.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, G. Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-03-01

    An advantage of the powder-bed-based metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes is that the powder can be reused. The powder reuse or recycling times directly affect the affordability of the additively manufactured parts, especially for the AM of titanium parts. This study examines the influence of powder reuse times on the characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V powder, including powder composition, particle size distribution (PSD), apparent density, tap density, flowability, and particle morphology. In addition, tensile samples were manufactured and evaluated with respect to powder reuse times and sample locations in the powder bed. The following findings were made from reusing the same batch of powder 21 times for AM by selective electron beam melting: (i) the oxygen (O) content increased progressively with increasing reuse times but both the Al content and the V content remained generally stable (a small decrease only); (ii) the powder became less spherical with increasing reuse times and some particles showed noticeable distortion and rough surfaces after being reused 16 times; (iii) the PSD became narrower and few satellite particles were observed after 11 times of reuse; (iv) reused powder showed improved flowability; and (v) reused powder showed no measurable undesired influence on the AM process and the samples exhibited highly consistent tensile properties, irrespective of their locations in the powder bed. The implications of these findings were discussed.

  16. Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid1 receptor antagonist, protects against light-induced retinal degeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tomoyo; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yuki; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Ohno, Yuta; Ogami, Shiho; Yamane, Shinsaku; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-03-16

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous constellation of proteins related to cannabinoid1 receptor signaling, including free fatty acids, diacylglycerol lipase, and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase, are localized in the murine retina. Moreover, the expression levels of endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors are changed in the vitreous fluid. However, the role of the endocannabinoid system in the retina, particularly in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration, remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated involvement of the cannabinoid1 receptor in light-induced retinal degeneration using in vitro and in vivo models. To evaluate the effect of cannabinoid1 receptors in light irradiation-induced cell death, the mouse retinal cone-cell line (661W) was treated with a cannabinoid1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant. Time-dependent changes of expression and localization of retinal cannabinoid1 receptors were measured using Western blot and immunostaining. Retinal damage was induced in mice by exposure to light, followed by intravitreal injection of rimonabant. Electroretinograms and histologic analyses were performed. Rimonabant suppressed light-induced photoreceptor cell death. Cannabinoid1 receptor expression was upregulated by light exposure. Treatment with rimonabant improved both a- and b-wave amplitudes and the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. These results suggest that the cannabinoid1 receptor is involved in light-induced retinal degeneration and it may represent a therapeutic target in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration related diseases.

  17. Selective inhibition by chloramphenicol of pregnenolone-16. cap alpha. -carbonitrile-inducible rat liver cytochrome P-450 isozymes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, P.E.; Kaminsky, L.S.; Halpert, J.

    1986-03-01

    Pregnenolone-16 ..cap alpha..-carbonitrile (PCN) has been shown to induce, in male rats, cytochrome P-450 isozymes responsible for the formation of R-10-hydroxywarfarin and R-dehydrowarfarin. Antibodies to the major PCN-inducible isozyme (PB/PCN-E) inhibit both activities in microsomal preparations. Recently the authors have shown that PCN treatment of female rats also induces the formation of both R-warfarin metabolites. However, in both sexes chloramphenicol (CAP) treatment selectively inhibits only the rate of formation of the R-dehydrowarfarin. A decrease in microsomal P-450 content occurs after in vivo administration of CAP to PCN-treated rats of both sexes. This is in contrast to the lack of effect of CAP on P-450 levels in phenobarbital-treated rats. Covalent binding of /sup 14/C-CAP to microsomal protein in vitro was increased 3 to 4-fold following PCN treatment. Chromatographic evidences suggests the presence of at least two PCN-induced isozymes of similar molecular weights in both male and female rat liver microsomes. These data are consistent with the multiplicity of PCN-inducible P-450 in rat liver.

  18. Spermine selectively inhibits high-conductance, but not low-conductance calcium-induced permeability transition pore.

    PubMed

    Elustondo, Pia A; Negoda, Alexander; Kane, Constance L; Kane, Daniel A; Pavlov, Evgeny V

    2015-02-01

    The permeability transition pore (PTP) is a large channel of the mitochondrial inner membrane, the opening of which is the central event in many types of stress-induced cell death. PTP opening is induced by elevated concentrations of mitochondrial calcium. It has been demonstrated that spermine and other polyamines can delay calcium-induced swelling of isolated mitochondria, suggesting their role as inhibitors of the mitochondrial PTP. Here we further investigated the mechanism by which spermine inhibits the calcium-induced, cyclosporine A (CSA) -sensitive PTP by using three indicators: 1) calcium release from the mitochondria detected with calcium green, 2) mitochondrial membrane depolarization using TMRM, and 3) mitochondrial swelling by measuring light absorbance. We found that despite calcium release and membrane depolarization, indicative of PTP activation, mitochondria underwent only partial swelling in the presence of spermine. This was in striking contrast to the high-amplitude swelling detected in control mitochondria and in mitochondria treated with the PTP inhibitor CSA. We conclude that spermine selectively prevents opening of the high-conductance state, while allowing activation of the lower conductance state of the PTP. We propose that the existence of lower conductance, stress-induced PTP might play an important physiological role, as it is expected to allow the release of toxic levels of calcium, while keeping important molecules (e.g., NAD) within the mitochondrial matrix.

  19. Shotgun collision-induced dissociation of peptides using a time of flight mass analyzer.

    PubMed

    Purvine, Samuel; Eppel, Jason-Thomas; Yi, Eugene C; Goodlett, David R

    2003-06-01

    Parallel collision-induced dissociation (CID) of peptides rather than serial, as is customary, results in loss of the obvious parent-fragment ion lineage available from CID on a single ion. We report proof-of-principle results suggesting the feasibility of parallel peptide CID, referred to here as shotgun CID, for protein identification when using the measured mass accuracies available from a time of flight mass analyzer and currently available search routines such as SEQUEST. Additionally, we report that parent-fragment ion lineage may be reconstructed from information encoded in the chromatographic single ion current traces of peptides.

  20. Time delay signature concealment of optical feedback induced chaos in an external cavity semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Gui; Xia, Guang-Qiong; Tang, Xi; Lin, Xiao-Dong; Deng, Tao; Fan, Li; Wu, Zheng-Mao

    2010-03-29

    The time delay (TD) signature concealment of optical feedback induced chaos in an external cavity semiconductor laser is experimentally demonstrated. Both the evolution curve and the distribution map of TD signature are obtained in the parameter space of external feedback strength and injection current. The optimum parameter scope of the TD signature concealment is also specified. Furthermore, the approximately periodic evolution relation between TD signature and external cavity length is observed and indicates that the intrinsic relaxation oscillation of semiconductor laser may play an important role during the process of TD signature suppression.

  1. Dynamics of traffic flows on crossing roads induced by real-time information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Minoru; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2013-02-01

    Traffic flows on crossing roads with an information board installed at the intersection have been simulated by a cellular automaton model. In the model, drivers have to enter the road with a shorter trip-time indicated on the information board, by making a turn at the intersection if necessary. The movement of drivers induces various traffic states, which are classified into six phases as a function of the car density. The dynamics of the traffic is expressed as the return map in the density-flow space, and analyzed on the basis of the car configuration on the roads.

  2. Controversial issues of optimal surgical timing and patient selection in the treatment planning of otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shiao, An-Suey; Kuo, Chin-Lung; Cheng, Hsiu-Lien; Wang, Mao-Che; Chu, Chia-Huei

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of clinical factors on the outcomes of otosclerosis surgery and support patients' access to evidence-based information in pre-operative counseling to optimize their choices. A total of 109 ears in 93 patients undergoing stapes surgery in a tertiary referral center were included. Variables with a potential impact on hearing outcomes were recorded, with an emphasis on factors that were readily available pre-operatively. Hearing success was defined as a post-operative air-bone gap ≤10 dB. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors independently contributing to the prediction of hearing success. The mean follow-up period was 18.0 months. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that none of the pre-operative factors (piston type, age, sex, affected side, tinnitus, vertigo, and pre-operative hearing thresholds) affected hearing success significantly (all p > 0.05). In conclusion, self-crimping Nitinol piston provides comparable hearing outcomes with conventional manual-crimping prostheses. However, Nitinol piston offers a technical simplification of a surgical procedure and an easier surgical choice for patients. In addition, age is not a detriment to hearing gain and instead might result in better use of hearing aids in older adults, thus facilitating social hearing recovery. Finally, hearing success does not depend on the extent of pre-operative hearing loss. Hence, patients with poor cochlear function should not be considered poor candidates for surgery. The predictive model has established recommendations for otologists for better case selection, and factors that are readily available pre-operatively may inform patients more explicitly about expected post-operative audiometric results.

  3. Modeling Injection Induced Seismicity with Poro-Elasticity and Time-Dependent Earthquake Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S.; Segall, P.

    2014-12-01

    The standard approach to modeling injection-induced seismicity (IIS) considers Coulomb failure stress changes accounting only for pore-pressure changes, which are solved by the diffusion equation. However, this "diffusion" triggering mechanism is not comprehensive. Lab experiments indicate earthquake nucleation also depends on stress history. Here we add two effects in modeling IIS: 1) poro-elastic coupling between solid stresses and pore-pressure, and 2) time dependent earthquake nucleation under applied stresses. In this model, we compute stress and pore-pressure changes due to a point source injecting in a homogeneous, poro-elastic full space (Rudnicki, 1986). The Coulomb stress history is used to compute seismicity rate changes based on the time-dependent nucleation model of Dieterich (1994). Our new model reveals: 1) poro-elastic coupling breaks the radial symmetry in seismicity, 2) nucleation introduces a characteristic nucleation time ta, which affects the temporal evolution of seismicity rates, and 3) for some fault geometries, the seismicity rate may increase following shut in. For constant injection flux, the log of seismicity rate scales with the change in Coulomb stress at short time, consistent with diffusion profiles. At longer time, the model predicts seismicity rates decaying with time, consistent with some observations. The contour shape and decay time are characterized by ta. For finite injection with box-car flux history, seismicity rates plummet near the injector, but may continue for some time at greater distance. Depending on fault orientations, seismicity rates may increase after shut-in due to coupling effects. It has been observed in some cases that the maximum magnitude of induced quakes occurs after shut-in. This may be understood by the fact that the volume of perturbed crust increases with injection time, which influences probability of triggering an event of a given magnitude. Whether coupling effects are important in post shut

  4. Revisiting the time domain induced polarization technique, from linearization to inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Oldenburg, D.

    2015-12-01

    The induced polarization (IP) technique has been successful in mineral exploration, particularly for finding disseminated sulphide or porphyry deposits, but also in helping solve geotechnical and environmental problems. Electrical induced polarization (EIP) surveys use grounded electrodes and take measurements of the electric field while the current is both "on" and "off". Currently, 2D and 3D inversions of EIP data are generally carried out by first finding a background conductivity from the asymptotic "on-time" measurements. The DC resistivity problem is then linearized about that conductivity to obtain a linear relationship between the off-time data and the "pseudo-chargeability". The distribution of pseudo-chargeability in the earth is then interpreted within the context of the initial geoscience problem pursued. Despite its success, the current EIP implementation does have challenges. A fundamental assumption, that there is no electromagnetic induction (EM) effect, breaks down when the background is conductive. This is especially problematic in regions having conductive overburden. EM induction complicates, and sometimes overwhelms, the IP signal. To ameliorate this effect, we estimate the inductive signal, subtract it from the "off-time" data and invert the resultant IP data using the linearized formulation. We carefully examine the conditions under which this works. We also investigate the potential alterations to the linearized sensitivity function that are needed to allow a linearized inversion to be carried out. Inversions of EIP data recover a "chargeability" but this is not a uniquely defined quantity. There are multiple definitions of this property because there are a diverse number of ways in which an IP datum is defined. In time domain IP surveys, the data might be mV/V or a time-integrated voltage with units of ms. In reality however, data from an EIP survey have many time channels and each one can be inverted separately to produce a chargeability

  5. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine induces a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-resistant depression like phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Kumar, K; Rudra, Anjuman; Sreedhara, M V; Siva Subramani, T; Prasad, Durga Shiva; Das, Manish Lal; Murugesan, Senthil; Yadav, Rajbharan; Trivedi, Ravi Kumar; Louis, Justin V; Li, Yu-Wen; Bristow, Linda J; Naidu, Pattipati S; Vikramadithyan, Reeba Kannimel

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine induces depression-like behaviors in mice; however, the effect of antidepressant drug treatment has not been reported earlier. In the present study, we induced depression-like behavior by administering BCG vaccine to BALB/c mice. BCG treatment produced robust serum sickness as shown by a decrease in body weight, reduced spontaneous locomotor activity and reduced voluntary wheel running activity. BCG treatment also elevated plasma IL6 and IFNγ levels and produced a marked activation of lung IDO activity. At a time point when serum sickness-related behaviors had fully recovered (i.e., day 14) BCG-treated mice showed a significant increase in immobility in the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) indicative of a pro-depressant phenotype. We observed significant increase in [(3)H]PK11195 binding in cortex and hippocampus regions of BGC-treated mice in comparison to saline-treated mice indicating prominent neuroinflammation. Pharmacological evaluation of FST behavior in BCG-treated mice demonstrated selective resistance to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) fluoxetine and escitalopram. In contrast the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, the dual serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine, and the dual dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (DNRI) nomifensine retained antidepressant efficacy in these mice. The lack of efficacy with acute treatment with SSRIs could not be explained either by differences in drug exposure or serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy. Our results demonstrate that BCG-vaccine induced depression like behavior is selectively resistant to SSRIs and could potentially be employed to evaluate novel therapeutic agents being developed to treat SSRI-resistance in humans.

  6. Testosterone attenuates and the selective estrogen receptor modulator, raloxifene, potentiates amphetamine-induced locomotion in male rats.

    PubMed

    Purves-Tyson, Tertia D; Boerrigter, Danny; Allen, Katherine; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Karl, Tim; Djunaidi, Vanezha; Double, Kay L; Desai, Reena; Handelsman, David J; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2015-04-01

    Although sex steroids are known to modulate brain dopamine, it is still unclear how testosterone modifies locomotor behaviour controlled, at least in part, by striatal dopamine in adolescent males. Our previous work suggests that increasing testosterone during adolescence may bias midbrain neurons to synthesise more dopamine. We hypothesised that baseline and amphetamine-induced locomotion would differ in adult males depending on testosterone exposure during adolescence. We hypothesised that concomitant stimulation of estrogen receptor signaling, through a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), raloxifene, can counter testosterone effects on locomotion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at postnatal day 45 were gonadectomised (G) or sham-operated (S) prior to the typical adolescent testosterone increase. Gonadectomised rats were either given testosterone replacement (T) or blank implants (B) for six weeks and sham-operated (i.e. intact or endogenous testosterone group) were given blank implants. Subgroups of sham-operated, gonadectomised and gonadectomised/testosterone-replaced rats were treated with raloxifene (R, 5mg/kg) or vehicle (V), daily for the final four weeks. There were six groups (SBV, GBV, GTV, SBR, GBR, GTR). Saline and amphetamine-induced (1.25mg/kg) locomotion in the open field was measured at PND85. Gonadectomy increased amphetamine-induced locomotion compared to rats with endogenous or with exogenous testosterone. Raloxifene increased amphetamine-induced locomotion in rats with either endogenous or exogenous testosterone. Amphetamine-induced locomotion was negatively correlated with testosterone and this relationship was abolished by raloxifene. Lack of testosterone during adolescence potentiates and testosterone exposure during adolescence attenuates amphetamine-induced locomotion. Treatment with raloxifene appears to potentiate amphetamine-induced locomotion and to have an opposite effect to that of testosterone in male rats.

  7. Computer simulation for the growing probability of additional offspring with an advantageous reversal allele in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2016-01-01

    This study calculated the growing probability of additional offspring with the advantageous reversal allele in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape using the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model. The growing probability was calculated for various population sizes, N, sequence lengths, L, selective advantages, s, fitness parameters, k and measuring parameters, C. The saturated growing probability in the stochastic region was approximately the effective selective advantage, s*, when C≫1/Ns* and s*≪1. The present study suggests that the growing probability in the stochastic region in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model can be described using the theoretical formula for the growing probability in the Moran two-allele model. The selective advantage ratio, which represents the ratio of the effective selective advantage to the selective advantage, does not depend on the population size, selective advantage, measuring parameter and fitness parameter; instead the selective advantage ratio decreases with the increasing sequence length.

  8. Renoprotective Effects of a Highly Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonist in a Mouse Model of Adriamycin-induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of adenosine in the normal kidney increases markedly during renal hypoxia, ischemia, and inflammation. A recent study reported that an A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) antagonist attenuated the progression of renal fibrosis. The adriamycin (ADX)-induced nephropathy model induces podocyte injury, which results in severe proteinuria and progressive glomerulosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a highly selective A3AR antagonist (LJ1888) in ADX-induced nephropathy. Three groups of six-week-old Balb/c mice were treated with ADX (11 mg/kg) for four weeks and LJ1888 (10 mg/kg) for two weeks as following: 1) control; 2) ADX; and 3) ADX + LJ1888. ADX treatment decreased body weight without a change in water and food intake, but this was ameliorated by LJ1888 treatment. Interestingly, LJ1888 lowered plasma creatinine level, proteinuria, and albuminuria, which had increased during ADX treatment. Furthermore, LJ1888 inhibited urinary nephrin excretion as a podocyte injury marker, and urine 8-isoprostane and kidney lipid peroxide concentration, which are markers of oxidative stress, increased after injection of ADX. ADX also induced the activation of proinflammatory and profibrotic molecules such as TGF-β1, MCP-1, PAI-1, type IV collagen, NF-κB, NOX4, TLR4, TNFα, IL-1β, and IFN-γ, but they were remarkably suppressed after LJ1888 treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that LJ1888 has a renoprotective effect in ADX-induced nephropathy, which might be associated with podocyte injury through oxidative stress. Therefore, LJ1888, a selective A3AR antagonist, could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent in renal glomerular diseases which include podocyte injury and proteinuria. PMID:27510383

  9. Selective pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor attenuates light and 8-OH-DPAT induced phase shifts of mouse circadian wheel running activity

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Jonathan; Yun, Sujin; Losee Olson, Susan; Turek, Fred; Bonaventure, Pascal; Dvorak, Curt; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have illustrated a reciprocal relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor may provide a crucial link between the two sides of this equation since the receptor plays a critical role in sleep, depression, and circadian rhythm regulation. To further define the role of the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential pharmacotherapy to correct circadian rhythm disruptions, the current study utilized the selective 5-HT7 antagonist JNJ-18038683 (10 mg/kg) in three different circadian paradigms. While JNJ-18038683 was ineffective at phase shifting the onset of wheel running activity in mice when administered at different circadian time (CT) points across the circadian cycle, pretreatment with JNJ-18038683 blocked non-photic phase advance (CT6) induced by the 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (3 mg/kg). Since light induced phase shifts in mammals are partially mediated via the modulation of the serotonergic system, we determined if JNJ-18038683 altered phase shifts induced by a light pulse at times known to phase delay (CT15) or advance (CT22) wheel running activity in free running mice. Light exposure resulted in a robust shift in the onset of activity in vehicle treated animals at both times tested. Administration of JNJ-18038683 significantly attenuated the light induced phase delay and completely blocked the phase advance. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor by JNJ-18038683 blunts both non-photic and photic phase shifts of circadian wheel running activity in mice. These findings highlight the importance of the 5-HT7 receptor in modulating circadian rhythms. Due to the opposite modulating effects of light resetting between diurnal and nocturnal species, pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT7 receptor in conjunction with bright light therapy may prove therapeutically beneficial by correcting the desynchronization of internal rhythms observed in depressed individuals. PMID:25642174

  10. Selective pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor attenuates light and 8-OH-DPAT induced phase shifts of mouse circadian wheel running activity.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Jonathan; Yun, Sujin; Losee Olson, Susan; Turek, Fred; Bonaventure, Pascal; Dvorak, Curt; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have illustrated a reciprocal relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor may provide a crucial link between the two sides of this equation since the receptor plays a critical role in sleep, depression, and circadian rhythm regulation. To further define the role of the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential pharmacotherapy to correct circadian rhythm disruptions, the current study utilized the selective 5-HT7 antagonist JNJ-18038683 (10 mg/kg) in three different circadian paradigms. While JNJ-18038683 was ineffective at phase shifting the onset of wheel running activity in mice when administered at different circadian time (CT) points across the circadian cycle, pretreatment with JNJ-18038683 blocked non-photic phase advance (CT6) induced by the 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (3 mg/kg). Since light induced phase shifts in mammals are partially mediated via the modulation of the serotonergic system, we determined if JNJ-18038683 altered phase shifts induced by a light pulse at times known to phase delay (CT15) or advance (CT22) wheel running activity in free running mice. Light exposure resulted in a robust shift in the onset of activity in vehicle treated animals at both times tested. Administration of JNJ-18038683 significantly attenuated the light induced phase delay and completely blocked the phase advance. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor by JNJ-18038683 blunts both non-photic and photic phase shifts of circadian wheel running activity in mice. These findings highlight the importance of the 5-HT7 receptor in modulating circadian rhythms. Due to the opposite modulating effects of light resetting between diurnal and nocturnal species, pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT7 receptor in conjunction with bright light therapy may prove therapeutically beneficial by correcting the desynchronization of internal rhythms observed in depressed individuals.

  11. Biochemical and histopathological changes induced by different time intervals of methomyl treatment in mice liver.

    PubMed

    El-Demerdash, Fatma; Attia, Azza A; Elmazoudy, Reda H

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the toxic effects induced by different time intervals of methomyl exposure on liver antioxidant defense system, oxidative stress, liver function biomarkers and histopathology in CD-1 mice. Ten male mice per group were assigned to one of four treatment groups. Group one served as control while group 2, 3 and 4 were orally treated with one mg methomyl/kg BW for 10, 20 and 30 days, respectively. Results obtained showed that methomyl significantly induced TBARS and decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase and catalase and the levels of reduced glutathione in mice liver. Aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly decreased in liver due to methomyl administration, while the activities of these enzymes were significantly increased in serum. In addition, liver lactate dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased. On the contrary, methomyl treatment caused a significant decrease in liver acid phosphatase. The histology of mice liver treated with methomyl for 10, 20 and 30 days of duration showed dilation of central vein, sinusoids between hypertrophied hepatocytes and nuclear degeneration with mononuclear cell infiltration. In conclusion, exposure to methomyl induced toxicity and oxidative stress in mice liver via free radicals mechanism. Also, methomyl might have affected cell metabolism, cell membrane permeability and the detoxification system in liver.

  12. SELECTIVE VULNERABILITY OF EMBRYONIC CELL POPULATIONS TO ETHANOL-INDUCED APOPTOSIS: IMPLICATIONS FOR ALCOHOL RELATED BIRTH DEFECTS AND NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The locations of cell death and resulting malformations in embryos following teratogen exposure vary depending on the teratogen used, the genotype of the conceptus, and the developmental stage of the embryo at time of exposure. To date, ethanol-induced cell death has been charac...

  13. Self-selected duty cycle times for grip force, wrist flexion postures and three grip types.

    PubMed

    Finneran, Aoife; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Performance and health issues are common in industry. On-the-job productivity gains related to good design, which could help justify ergonomics intervention, are often not considered. More quantitative data are needed to model the discomfort/productivity relationship for upper limb activity in simulated repetitive assembly type work. Eighteen participants completed an experiment, simulating a repetitive upper limb task with force, posture and grip type recorded as independent variables. Duty cycle time and discomfort were recorded as dependent variables. Participants performed 18 experiment combinations (block designed around force); each treatment lasted 35 min, including breaks. Analysis indicated a significant two-way interaction between posture and grip type. Results from this experiment were used to model the effect of these variables on operator discomfort and performance.

  14. Presynaptic partner selection during retinal circuit reassembly varies with timing of neuronal regeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Takeshi; D'Orazi, Florence D.; Gamlin, Clare R.; Suzuki, Sachihiro C.; Suli, Arminda; Kimelman, David; Raible, David W.; Wong, Rachel O.

    2016-01-01

    Whether neurons can restore their original connectivity patterns during circuit repair is unclear. Taking advantage of the regenerative capacity of zebrafish retina, we show here the remarkable specificity by which surviving neurons reassemble their connectivity upon regeneration of their major input. H3 horizontal cells (HCs) normally avoid red and green cones, and prefer ultraviolet over blue cones. Upon ablation of the major (ultraviolet) input, H3 HCs do not immediately increase connectivity with other cone types. Instead, H3 dendrites retract and re-extend to contact new ultraviolet cones. But, if regeneration is delayed or absent, blue-cone synaptogenesis increases and ectopic synapses are made with red and green cones. Thus, cues directing synapse specificity can be maintained following input loss, but only within a limited time period. Further, we postulate that signals from the major input that shape the H3 HC's wiring pattern during development persist to restrict miswiring after damage. PMID:26838932

  15. Selection and Validation of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-time PCR in Gentiana macrophylla

    PubMed Central

    He, Yihan; Yan, Hailing; Hua, Wenping; Huang, Yaya; Wang, Zhezhi

    2016-01-01

    Real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR or qPCR) has been extensively applied for analyzing gene expression because of its accuracy, sensitivity, and high throughput. However, the unsuitable choice of reference gene(s) can lead to a misinterpretation of results. We evaluated the stability of 10 candidates – five traditional housekeeping genes (UBC21, GAPC2, EF-1α4, UBQ10, and UBC10) and five novel genes (SAND1, FBOX, PTB1, ARP, and Expressed1) – using the transcriptome data of Gentiana macrophylla. Common statistical algorithms ΔCt, GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper were run with samples collected from plants under various experimental conditions. For normalizing expression levels from tissues at different developmental stages, GAPC2 and UBC21 had the highest rankings. Both SAND1 and GAPC2 proved to be the optimal reference genes for roots from plants exposed to abiotic stresses while EF-1α4 and SAND1 were optimal when examining expression data from the leaves of stressed plants. Based on a comprehensive ranking of stability under different experimental conditions, we recommend that SAND1 and EF-1α4 are the most suitable overall. In this study, to find a suitable reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for G. macrophylla DNA content quantification, we evaluated three target genes including WRKY30, G10H, and SLS, through qualitative and absolute quantitative PCR with leaves under elicitors stressed experimental conditions. Arbitrary use of reference genes without previous evaluation can lead to a misinterpretation of the data. Our results will benefit future research on the expression of genes related to secoiridoid biosynthesis in this species under different experimental conditions. PMID:27446172

  16. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR normalization in Quercus suber.

    PubMed

    Marum, Liliana; Miguel, Andreia; Ricardo, Cândido P; Miguel, Célia

    2012-01-01

    The use of reverse transcription quantitative PCR technology to assess gene expression levels requires an accurate normalization of data in order to avoid misinterpretation of experimental results and erroneous analyses. Despite being the focus of several transcriptomics projects, oaks, and particularly cork oak (Quercus suber), have not been investigated regarding the identification of reference genes suitable for the normalization of real-time quantitative PCR data. In this study, ten candidate reference genes (Act, CACs, EF-1α, GAPDH, His3, PsaH, Sand, PP2A, ß-Tub and Ubq) were evaluated to determine the most stable internal reference for quantitative PCR normalization in cork oak. The transcript abundance of these genes was analysed in several tissues of cork oak, including leaves, reproduction cork, and periderm from branches at different developmental stages (1-, 2-, and 3-year old) or collected in different dates (active growth period versus dormancy). The three statistical methods (geNorm, NormFinder, and CV method) used in the evaluation of the most suitable combination of reference genes identified Act and CACs as the most stable candidates when all the samples were analysed together, while ß-Tub and PsaH showed the lowest expression stability. However, when different tissues, developmental stages, and collection dates were analysed separately, the reference genes exhibited some variation in their expression levels. In this study, and for the first time, we have identified and validated reference genes in cork oak that can be used for quantification of target gene expression in different tissues and experimental conditions and will be useful as a starting point for gene expression studies in other oaks.

  17. Getting the timing right: antler growth phenology and sexual selection in a wild red deer population.

    PubMed

    Clements, Michelle N; Clutton-Brock, Tim H; Albon, Steve D; Pemberton, Josephine M; Kruuk, Loeske E B

    2010-10-01

    There has been growing interest in the determinants of the annual timing of biological phenomena, or phenology, in wild populations, but research on vertebrate taxa has primarily focused on the phenology of reproduction. We present here analyses of the phenology of the annual growth of a secondary sexual characteristic, antlers in red deer (Cervus elaphus) males. The long-term individual-based data from a wild population of red deer on the Isle of Rum, Scotland allow us to consider ecological factors influencing variation in the phenology of growth of antlers, and the implications of variation in antler growth phenology with respect to the phenotype of antler grown (antler mass) and annual breeding success. The phenology of antler growth was influenced by local environmental conditions: higher population density delayed both the start date (during spring) and the relative end date (in late summer) of antler growth, and warmer temperatures in the September and April prior to growth advanced start and end dates, respectively. Furthermore, there was variation between individuals in this phenotypic plasticity of start date, although not in that of end date of growth. The phenology of antler growth impacted on the morphology of antlers grown, with individuals who started and ended growth earliest having the heaviest antlers. The timing of antler growth phenology was associated with breeding success in the following mating season, independently of the mass of antlers grown: an earlier start of antler growth was associated with siring a higher number of the calves born the following spring. Our results suggest that the phenology of traits that are not directly correlated with offspring survival may also regularly show correlations with fitness.

  18. Effects of Incubation Time and Temperature on In Vitro Selective Delignification of Silver Leaf Oak by Ganoderma colossum.

    PubMed

    Adaskaveg, J E; Gilbertson, R L; Dunlap, M R

    1995-01-01

    The effects of incubation time and temperature on the ability of isolates of the chlamydosporic and thermophilic fungus Ganoderma colossum (Fr.) C. F. Baker to cause selective delignification of Quercus hypoleucoides A. Camus were evaluated by standard in vitro agar block tests. Chemical and scanning electron microscopy studies of decayed wood were used to determine the extent of selective delignification or simultaneous decay caused by each fungal isolate. At 35 deg C, the percent weight loss increased from 6.1% after 4 weeks to a maximum of 32.5 to 33.0% after 16 and 20 weeks of incubation. The average percent Klason lignin-chlorite holocellulose ratios (PKL/CHC) decreased from 0.35 in the control wood block to 0.22 in wood blocks incubated for 12 weeks; this indicated selective delignification. The average PKL/CHC increased for the 16- and 20-week incubation periods, indicating greater removal of polysaccharides during longer incubation periods. In temperature studies, the percent weight loss after 12 weeks was 26 to 27% between 30 and 40 deg C and less than 16% for the 25 and 45 deg C treatments. The average PKL/CHC ranged from 0.18 to 0.16 between 35 and 40 deg C, whereas they were 0.23 and 0.31 for the 25 and 45 deg C treatments, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed an optimum temperature range near 35 to 40 deg C and incubation times of 8 to 12 weeks for selective delignification. Under these conditions, ray parenchyma, fiber tracheids, and vessels were devoid of middle lamella; pit regions of cells were visible with significantly enlarged apertures; and individual cells were separated and clearly delimited. Extensive delignification of wood occurred throughout the wood blocks evaluated. Incubation times longer than 12 weeks resulted in greater degradation of wood cell walls and thus in greater removal of the polysaccharide component of the wood. For incubation times of 4 weeks or a temperature of 25 deg C, limited to no degradation of cells

  19. Relative controls of external and internal variability on time-variable transit time distributions, and the importance of StorAge Selection function approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Pangle, L. A.; Cardoso, C.; Lora, M.; Meira, A.; Volkmann, T. H. M.; Wang, Y.; Harman, C. J.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Transit time distributions (TTDs) are an efficient way of characterizing complex transport dynamics of a hydrologic system. Time-invariant TTD has been studied extensively, but TTDs are time-varying under unsteady hydrologic systems due to both external variability (e.g., time-variability in fluxes), and internal variability (e.g., time-varying flow pathways). The use of "flow-weighted time" has been suggested to account for the effect of external variability on TTDs, but neglects the role of internal variability. Recently, to account both types of variability, StorAge Selection (SAS) function approaches were developed. One of these approaches enables the transport characteristics of a system - how the different aged water in the storage is sampled by the outflow - to be parameterized by time-variable probability distribution called the rank SAS (rSAS) function, and uses it directly to determine the time-variable TTDs resulting from a given timeseries of fluxes in and out of a system. Unlike TTDs, the form of the rSAS function varies only due to changes in flow pathways, but is not affected by the timing of fluxes alone. However, the relation between physical mechanisms and the time-varying rSAS functions are not well understood. In this study, relative effects of internal and external variability on the TTDs are examined using observations from a homogeneously packed 1 m3 sloping soil lysimeter. The observations suggest the importance of internal variability on TTDs, and reinforce the need to account for this variability using time-variable rSAS functions. Furthermore, the relative usefulness of two other formulations of SAS functions and the mortality rate (which plays a similar role to SAS functions in the McKendrick-von Foerster model of age-structured population dynamics) are also discussed. Finally, numerical modeling is used to explore the role of internal and external variability for hydrologic systems with diverse geomorphic and climate characteristics