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Sample records for induces selective time

  1. Artifacts induced by selective blanking of time-domain data in Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xian, Feng; Valeja, Santosh G; Beu, Steve C; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Marshall, Alan G

    2013-11-01

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) of the isolated isotopic distribution for a highly charged biomolecule produces time-domain signal containing large amplitude signal "beats" separated by extended periods of much lower signal magnitude. Signal-to-noise ratio for data sampled between beats is low because of destructive interference of the signals induced by members of the isotopic distribution. Selective blanking of the data between beats has been used to increase spectral signal-to-noise ratio. However, blanking also eliminates signal components and, thus, can potentially distort the resulting FT spectrum. Here, we simulate the time-domain signal from a truncated isotopic distribution for a single charge state of an antibody. Comparison of the FT spectra produced with or without blanking and with or without added noise clearly show that blanking does not improve mass accuracy and introduces spurious peaks at both ends of the isotopic distribution (thereby making it more difficult to identify posttranslational modifications and/or adducts). Although the artifacts are reduced by use of multiple Gaussian (rather than square wave) windowing, blanking appears to offer no advantages for identifying true peaks or for mass measurement.

  2. Selection of charge methods for lithium ion batteries by considering diffusion induced stress and charge time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Song, Yicheng; Zhang, Junqian

    2016-07-01

    This article demonstrates the design of charging strategies for lithium ion batteries with considering the balance between diffusion induced stress and total charge time for two- and three-stage charge methods. For the two-stage galvanostatic-potentiostatic charge method the low mechanical stress can be achieved without increasing total charge time by switching the galvanostatic to the potentiostatic at the time moment when the lithium concentration at the surface of particles reaches the limit cbarsurf = 0 . A three-stage method, which consists of an initial galvanostatic stage of high current, a galvanostatic stage of low current and a potentiostatic ending stage, is suggested. Employing the initial galvanostatic stage of high current is helpful not only in accelerating the charge process, but also in controlling the mechanical stress once the electrical current and time duration of the initial galvanostatic stage are properly designed.

  3. Dose and time-dependent selective neurotoxicity induced by mephedrone in mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Clemente, José; López-Arnau, Raúl; Abad, Sonia; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena; Camarasa, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Mephedrone is a drug of abuse marketed as 'bath salts". There are discrepancies concerning its long-term effects. We have investigated the neurotoxicity of mephedrone in mice following different exposition schedules. Schedule 1: four doses of 50 mg/kg. Schedule 2: four doses of 25 mg/kg. Schedule 3: three daily doses of 25 mg/kg, for two consecutive days. All schedules induced, in some animals, an aggressive behavior and hyperthermia as well as a decrease in weight gain. Mephedrone (schedule 1) induced dopaminergic and serotoninergic neurotoxicity that persisted 7 days after exposition. At a lower dose (schedule 2) only a transient dopaminergic injury was found. In the weekend consumption pattern (schedule 3), mephedrone induced dopamine and serotonin transporter loss that was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 expression one week after exposition. Also, mephedrone induced a depressive-like behavior, as well as a reduction in striatal D2 density, suggesting higher susceptibility to addictive drugs. In cultured cortical neurons, mephedrone induced a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect. Using repeated doses for 2 days in an elevated ambient temperature we evidenced a loss of frontal cortex dopaminergic and hippocampal serotoninergic neuronal markers that suggest injuries at nerve endings.

  4. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and nutritional restriction on barbituate-induced sleeping times and selected blood characteristics in raccoons (Procyon lotor)

    SciTech Connect

    Montz, W.E.; Card, W.C.; Kirkpatrick, R.L.

    1982-05-01

    Hepatic microsomal enzyme activity was induced in wild-trapped raccoons (Procyon lotor) and selected blood characteristics were measured in an effort to detect responses due to PCB ingestion, nutritional restriction, and their interactions. Barbiturate-induced sleeping times were used as an index of hepatic microsomal activity because they have been used reliably by other workers. Blood characteristics examined in the study were nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol, and three ketone bodies (D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone). Results show a reduction in sleeping times, elevated NEFA and D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, and lower cholesterol concentrations in PCB-treated groups. A highly significant interaction between PCB treatment and nutritional restriction was observed in acetoacetate concentrations. (JMT)

  5. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    PubMed

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  6. Predator-induced defences in Daphnia pulex: Selection and evaluation of internal reference genes for gene expression studies with real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The planktonic microcrustacean Daphnia pulex is among the best-studied animals in ecological, toxicological and evolutionary research. One aspect that has sustained interest in the study system is the ability of D. pulex to develop inducible defence structures when exposed to predators, such as the phantom midge larvae Chaoborus. The available draft genome sequence for D. pulex is accelerating research to identify genes that confer plastic phenotypes that are regularly cued by environmental stimuli. Yet for quantifying gene expression levels, no experimentally validated set of internal control genes exists for the accurate normalization of qRT-PCR data. Results In this study, we tested six candidate reference genes for normalizing transcription levels of D. pulex genes; alpha tubulin (aTub), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), TATA box binding protein (Tbp) syntaxin 16 (Stx16), X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1) and CAPON, a protein associated with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase, were selected on the basis of an earlier study and from microarray studies. One additional gene, a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), was tested to validate its transcriptional response to Chaoborus, which was earlier observed in a microarray study. The transcription profiles of these seven genes were assessed by qRT-PCR from RNA of juvenile D. pulex that showed induced defences in comparison to untreated control animals. We tested the individual suitability of genes for expression normalization using the programs geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Intriguingly, Xbp1, Tbp, CAPON and Stx16 were selected as ideal reference genes. Analyses on the relative expression level using the software REST showed that both classical housekeeping candidate genes (aTub and GAPDH) were significantly downregulated, whereas the MMP gene was shown to be significantly upregulated, as predicted. aTub is a particularly ill suited reference gene because five copies are found in the D. pulex

  7. Minima Times of Selected Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimucha, S.; Dubovsky, P.; Kudak, V.; Perig, V.

    2016-05-01

    We present 221 CCD minima times of the 76 selected eclipsing binaries obtained during 2013-2016 at Observatory at Kolonica Saddle in Slovakia and Observatory of Laboratory of Space Research, Uzhhorod National University in Ukraine

  8. OPTIMAL TIME-SERIES SELECTION OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.

    2011-03-15

    We present a novel method for the optimal selection of quasars using time-series observations in a single photometric bandpass. Utilizing the damped random walk model of Kelly et al., we parameterize the ensemble quasar structure function in Sloan Stripe 82 as a function of observed brightness. The ensemble model fit can then be evaluated rigorously for and calibrated with individual light curves with no parameter fitting. This yields a classification in two statistics-one describing the fit confidence and the other describing the probability of a false alarm-which can be tuned, a priori, to achieve high quasar detection fractions (99% completeness with default cuts), given an acceptable rate of false alarms. We establish the typical rate of false alarms due to known variable stars as {approx}<3% (high purity). Applying the classification, we increase the sample of potential quasars relative to those known in Stripe 82 by as much as 29%, and by nearly a factor of two in the redshift range 2.5 < z < 3, where selection by color is extremely inefficient. This represents 1875 new quasars in a 290 deg{sup 2} field. The observed rates of both quasars and stars agree well with the model predictions, with >99% of quasars exhibiting the expected variability profile. We discuss the utility of the method at high redshift and in the regime of noisy and sparse data. Our time-series selection complements well-independent selection based on quasar colors and has strong potential for identifying high-redshift quasars for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations and other cosmology studies in the LSST era.

  9. Environment induced time arrow and the Closed Time Path method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonyi, Janos

    2013-06-01

    It is shown in the framework of a harmonic system that the thermodynamical time arrow is induced by the environmental initial conditions in a manner similar to spontaneous symmetry breaking. The Closed Time Path formalism is introduced in classical mechanics to handle Green functions for initial condition problems by the action principle, in a systematic manner. The application of this scheme for quantum systems shows the common dynamical origin of the thermodynamical and the quantum time arrows. It is furthermore conjectured that the quantum-classical transition is strongly coupled.

  10. Objective assessment of hypnotically induced time distortion.

    PubMed

    Zimbardo, P G; Marshall, G; White, G; Maslach, C

    1973-07-20

    The objective precision of operant conditioning methodology validates the power of hypnosis to induce alterations in time perception. Personal tempo was systematically modified by instructions to trained hypnotic subjects, with significant behavioral effects observed on a variety of response rate measures.

  11. Hydrodynamic flows can induce selective advantages among species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesser, Francesca; Benzi, Roberto; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Nelson, David R.; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2013-11-01

    Evolutionary forces such as genetic drift, selection, mutation and spatial diffusion act to change the genetic composition of populations. Such problems can be modeled as a system of binary reactions between competing individuals, involving births and deaths, and progressing at specific rates. An inhomogeneous or time-dependent spatial structure has the effect of modulating the interaction between individuals. To explore this problem further, we consider the dynamics and evolution of genetically diverse populations in a fluid environment where a flow field transports individuals in combination with birth and death processes, thus driving genetic inhomogeneities. An individual-based model in continuous space with spatial diffusion implements stochastic demographic rules for a fluctuating population size and introduces the advection of simple realistic flow fields. The system is analyzed in terms of fixation probabilities and fixation times as well as the behavior of spatial correlations. Provided organismic reproduction times are faster than the characteristic time scales of the flow, fluid ecosystems can by themselves induce spatially non-homogeneous selective advantages.

  12. Chiral Selective Chemistry Induced by Natural Selection of Spin-Polarized Electrons.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Richard A; Mishra, Debabrata; Naaman, Ron

    2015-06-15

    The search to understand the origin of homochirality in nature has been ongoing since the time of Pasteur. Previous work has shown that DNA can act as a spin filter for low-energy electrons and that spin-polarized secondary electrons produced by X-ray irradiation of a magnetic substrate can induce chiral selective chemistry. In the present work it is demonstrated that secondary electrons from a substrate that are transmitted through a chiral overlayer cause enantiomeric selective chemistry in an adsorbed adlayer. We determine the quantum yields (QYs) for dissociation of (R)- or (S)-epichlorohydrin adsorbed on a chiral self-assembled layer of DNA on gold and on bare gold (for control). The results show that there is a significant difference in the QYs between the two enantiomers when adsorbed on DNA, but none when they are adsorbed on bare Au. We propose that the effect results from natural spin filtering effects cause by the chiral monolayer.

  13. Opposing selection and environmental variation modify optimal timing of breeding.

    PubMed

    Tarwater, Corey E; Beissinger, Steven R

    2013-09-17

    Studies of evolution in wild populations often find that the heritable phenotypic traits of individuals producing the most offspring do not increase proportionally in the population. This paradox may arise when phenotypic traits influence both fecundity and viability and when there is a tradeoff between these fitness components, leading to opposing selection. Such tradeoffs are the foundation of life history theory, but they are rarely investigated in selection studies. Timing of breeding is a classic example of a heritable trait under directional selection that does not result in an evolutionary response. Using a 22-y study of a tropical parrot, we show that opposing viability and fecundity selection on the timing of breeding is common and affects optimal breeding date, defined by maximization of fitness. After accounting for sampling error, the directions of viability (positive) and fecundity (negative) selection were consistent, but the magnitude of selection fluctuated among years. Environmental conditions (rainfall and breeding density) primarily and breeding experience secondarily modified selection, shifting optimal timing among individuals and years. In contrast to other studies, viability selection was as strong as fecundity selection, late-born juveniles had greater survival than early-born juveniles, and breeding later in the year increased fitness under opposing selection. Our findings provide support for life history tradeoffs influencing selection on phenotypic traits, highlight the need to unify selection and life history theory, and illustrate the importance of monitoring survival as well as reproduction for understanding phenological responses to climate change.

  14. Opposing selection and environmental variation modify optimal timing of breeding.

    PubMed

    Tarwater, Corey E; Beissinger, Steven R

    2013-09-17

    Studies of evolution in wild populations often find that the heritable phenotypic traits of individuals producing the most offspring do not increase proportionally in the population. This paradox may arise when phenotypic traits influence both fecundity and viability and when there is a tradeoff between these fitness components, leading to opposing selection. Such tradeoffs are the foundation of life history theory, but they are rarely investigated in selection studies. Timing of breeding is a classic example of a heritable trait under directional selection that does not result in an evolutionary response. Using a 22-y study of a tropical parrot, we show that opposing viability and fecundity selection on the timing of breeding is common and affects optimal breeding date, defined by maximization of fitness. After accounting for sampling error, the directions of viability (positive) and fecundity (negative) selection were consistent, but the magnitude of selection fluctuated among years. Environmental conditions (rainfall and breeding density) primarily and breeding experience secondarily modified selection, shifting optimal timing among individuals and years. In contrast to other studies, viability selection was as strong as fecundity selection, late-born juveniles had greater survival than early-born juveniles, and breeding later in the year increased fitness under opposing selection. Our findings provide support for life history tradeoffs influencing selection on phenotypic traits, highlight the need to unify selection and life history theory, and illustrate the importance of monitoring survival as well as reproduction for understanding phenological responses to climate change. PMID:24003118

  15. A novel “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method: Event-by-event detection of neutral and charged fragments in collision induced dissociation of mass selected ions

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssier, C.; Fillol, R.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.

    2014-01-15

    A new tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method based on time of flight measurements performed on an event-by-event detection technique is presented. This “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method allows to explore Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) fragmentation processes by directly identifying not only all ions and neutral fragments produced but also their arrival time correlations within each single fragmentation event from a dissociating molecular ion. This constitutes a new step in the characterization of molecular ions. The method will be illustrated here for a prototypical case involving CID of protonated water clusters H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n=1–5} upon collisions with argon atoms.

  16. Onboard Run-Time Goal Selection for Autonomous Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve; McLaren, David

    2010-01-01

    We describe an efficient, online goal selection algorithm for use onboard spacecraft and its use for selecting goals at runtime. Our focus is on the re-planning that must be performed in a timely manner on the embedded system where computational resources are limited. In particular, our algorithm generates near optimal solutions to problems with fully specified goal requests that oversubscribe available resources but have no temporal flexibility. By using a fast, incremental algorithm, goal selection can be postponed in a "just-in-time" fashion allowing requests to be changed or added at the last minute. This enables shorter response cycles and greater autonomy for the system under control.

  17. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  18. Utilizing Response Time Distributions for Item Selection in CAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Zhewen; Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for item selection in computerized adaptive testing only focus on item information without taking into consideration the time required to answer an item. As a result, some examinees may receive a set of items that take a very long time to finish, and information is not accrued as efficiently as possible. The authors propose two…

  19. Using Response Times for Item Selection in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a second-level model for the distribution of the…

  20. Identification and real-time expression analysis of selected Toxoplasma gondii in-vivo induced antigens recognized by IgG and IgM in sera of acute toxoplasmosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular zoonotic parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa which infects a wide range of warm-blooded animals, including humans. In this study in-vivo induced antigens of this parasite was investigated using in-vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) and pooled sera from patients with serological evidence of acute infection. Methods The pooled sera was first pre-absorbed against three different preparations of antigens from in-vitro-grown cells of each T. gondii and E. coli XL1-Blue MRF’, subsequently it was used to screen T. gondii cDNA phage expression library. Positive clones from each group were subjected to quantitative real-time PCR expression analysis on mRNA of in-vivo and in-vitro grown parasites. Results A total of 29 reactive clones from each IgM and IgG immunoscreenings were found to have high homology to T. gondii genes. Quantitative real-time PCR expression analysis showed that 20 IgM-detected genes and 11 IgG-detected genes were up-regulated in-vivo relative to their expression levels in-vitro. These included genes encoding micronemes, sterol-regulatory element binding protein site, SRS34A, MIC2-associated protein M2AP, nucleoredoxin, protein phosphatase 2C and several hypothetical proteins. A hypothetical protein (GenBank accession no. 7899266) detected by IgG had the highest in-vivo over in-vitro fold change of 499.86; while another up-regulated hypothetical protein (GenBank accession no. 7898829) recognized by IgM showed high sensitivity (90%) and moderate specificity (70%) in detecting T. gondii antibodies when tested with 20 individual serum samples. Conclusion The highly up-regulated genes and the corresponding proteins, in particular the hypothetical proteins, may be useful in further studies on understanding the disease pathogenesis and as potential vaccine candidates. PMID:23800344

  1. Method for production of sorghum hybrids with selected flowering times

    DOEpatents

    Mullet, John E.; Rooney, William L.

    2016-08-30

    Methods and composition for the production of sorghum hybrids with selected and different flowering times are provided. In accordance with the invention, a substantially continual and high-yield harvest of sorghum is provided. Improved methods of seed production are also provided.

  2. Resource Selection Using Execution and Queue Wait Time Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Smith; Wong, Parkson; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational grids provide users with many possible places to execute their applications. We wish to help users select where to run their applications by providing predictions of the execution times of applications on space shared parallel computers and predictions of when scheduling systems for such parallel computers will start applications. Our predictions are based on instance based learning techniques and simulations of scheduling algorithms. We find that our execution time prediction techniques have an average error of 37 percent of the execution times for trace data recorded from SGI Origins at NASA Ames Research Center and that this error is 67 percent lower than the error of user estimates. We also find that the error when predicting how long applications will wait in scheduling queues is 95 percent of mean queue wait times when using our execution time predictions and this is 57 percent lower than if we use user execution time estimates.

  3. Selective excitation of vibrational states by shaping of light-induced potentials

    PubMed

    Sola; Chang; Santamaria; Malinovsky; Krause

    2000-11-13

    In this Letter we describe a method for population transfer using intense, ultrafast laser pulses. The selectivity is accomplished by careful shaping of light-induced potentials (LIPs). Creation and control of the LIPs is accomplished by choosing pairs of pulses with proper frequency detunings and time delays. As an example, selective population transfer is demonstrated for a three-state model of the sodium dimer.

  4. Real-time fiber selection using the Wii remote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Jan; Scholl, Mike; Köhn, Alexander; Hahn, Horst K.

    2010-02-01

    In the last few years, fiber tracking tools have become popular in clinical contexts, e.g., for pre- and intraoperative neurosurgical planning. The efficient, intuitive, and reproducible selection of fiber bundles still constitutes one of the main issues. In this paper, we present a framework for a real-time selection of axonal fiber bundles using a Wii remote control, a wireless controller for Nintendo's gaming console. It enables the user to select fiber bundles without any other input devices. To achieve a smooth interaction, we propose a novel spacepartitioning data structure for efficient 3D range queries in a data set consisting of precomputed fibers. The data structure which is adapted to the special geometry of fiber tracts allows for queries that are many times faster compared with previous state-of-the-art approaches. In order to extract reliably fibers for further processing, e.g., for quantification purposes or comparisons with preoperatively tracked fibers, we developed an expectationmaximization clustering algorithm that can refine the range queries. Our initial experiments have shown that white matter fiber bundles can be reliably selected within a few seconds by the Wii, which has been placed in a sterile plastic bag to simulate usage under surgical conditions.

  5. Perceptual task induces saccadic adaptation by target selection.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Alexander C; Souto, David

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation of saccades can be induced by different error signals, such as retinal position errors, prediction errors, or reinforcement learning. Recently, we showed that a shift in the spatial goal of a perceptual task can induce saccadic adaptation, in the absence of a bottom-up position error. Here, we investigated whether this top-down effect is mediated by the visibility of the task-relevant object, by reinforcement due to the feedback about the perceptual judgment or by a target selection mechanism. Participants were asked to discriminate visual stimuli arranged in a vertical compound. To induce adaptation, the discrimination target was presented at eccentric locations in the compound. In the first experiment, we compared adaptation with an easy and difficult discrimination. In the second experiment, we compared adaptation when feedback about the perceptual task was valid and when feedback was provided but was unrelated to performance. In the third experiment, we compared adaptation with instructions to fixate one of the elements in the compound-target selection-to the perceptual task condition-target selection and discrimination. To control for a bottom-up stimulus effect, we ran a fourth experiment in which the only instruction was to look at the compound. The saccade amplitude data were fitted by a two-state model distinguishing between an immediate and a gradual error correction process. We replicated our finding that a perceptual task can drive adaptation of saccades. Adaptation showed no effect of feedback reliability, nor an effect of the perceptual task beyond target selection. Adaptation was induced by a top-down signal since it was absent when there was no target selection instruction and no perceptual task. The immediate error correction was larger for the difficult than for the easy condition, suggesting that task difficulty affects mainly voluntary saccade targeting. In addition, the repetition of experiments one week later increased the magnitude

  6. GPS time transfer with implementation of selective availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, David W.; Granveaud, Michel P.; Klepczynski, William J.; Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.

    1990-01-01

    The international community of time metrology is facing a major challenge with the Selective Availability (SA) degradation of GPS satellite signals. At present there are 6 Block 1 satellites and 8 Block 2 satellites operating. According to the policy of the U.S. Department of Defence the Block 1 satellite signals will not be degraded, but these satellites are old with a finite life. The Block 2 satellites, which have all been launched since 1988, were subject to Selective Availability from March 25, 1990. The effect of SA should be to limit precision to about 100 meters for navigation and 167 ns for timing. A study was conducted in order to understand the nature of the actual introduced degradation, and to elaborate the means of removing the effects of this degradation on time transfer. This study concerns the time extraction from GPS satellites at NIST, USNO and Paris Observatory, and the comparison of atomic clocks between these laboratories by common view approach. The results show that when using the data taken over several days the time extraction can be achieved with uncertainty of a few tens of nanoseconds, while strict common-view has removed entirely the effects of SA during the periods under study.

  7. Relationships between mood state, time estimation, and selected movement speed.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Kumi

    2004-10-01

    We investigated whether different aspects of mood state influence sense of time estimation and movement speed. Mood states were measured on the Multiple Mood Scale for 142 female undergraduate students, who were then asked to estimate the interval of time elapsed between the words "start" and "stop" spoken by a tester. Next, the same subjects were told to draw circles inside 1-cm squares printed on an A4 size sheet of paper in succession at their freely elected comfortable speed. Scores on Concentration (r=-.22, p<.01) and Being Startled (r=-.26, p<.01) each correlated significantly and negatively with time estimation, while scores on Boredom (r =.17, p <.05) had a significant positive correlation with movement speed. These results suggest that different aspects of mood state have some association with time estimation and selected movement speed. Values account for small common variance. PMID:15560352

  8. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J.; Myers, Adam D.; Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Bañados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Borissova, Jura; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth; and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  9. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Variable Selection and Anticipated Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J.; Myers, Adam D.; Eracleous, Michael; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Bañados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Borissova, Jura; Nielsen Brandt, William; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Flewelling, Heather; Garnavich, Peter; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Isler, Jedidah C.; Kaiser, Nick; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Pâris, Isabelle; Parvizi, Mahmoud; Poleski, Radosław; Price, Paul A.; Salvato, Mara; Shanks, Tom; Schlafly, Eddie F.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Stassun, Keivan; Tonry, John T.; Walter, Fabian; Waters, Chris Z.

    2015-06-01

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg2 selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  10. Transmit alternate laser selection with time diversity for FSO communications.

    PubMed

    García-Zambrana, Antonio; Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a new transmit alternate laser selection (TALS) scheme for FSO communication systems using intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD) over atmospheric turbulence and misalignment fading channels is presented when limited time diversity is available in the turbulent channel. Assuming channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter and receiver and a time diversity order (TDO) limited, we propose the transmit diversity technique based on the rotating selection of TDO out of the available L lasers corresponding to the optical paths with greater values of scintillation. Implementing repetition coding with blocks of TDO information bits, each information bit will be retransmitted TDO times using the TDO largest order statistics in an alternating way. Closed-form asymptotic bit error-rate (BER) expressions are derived when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to moderate-to-strong turbulence conditions, following a gamma-gamma (GG) distribution, and pointing error effects, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. Fully exploiting the potential time-diversity TDO available in the turbulent channel, a significant diversity gain is achieved, providing a diversity order of (2L + 1 - TDO)TDO/2.

  11. Visual analytics for model selection in time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Bögl, Markus; Aigner, Wolfgang; Filzmoser, Peter; Lammarsch, Tim; Miksch, Silvia; Rind, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Model selection in time series analysis is a challenging task for domain experts in many application areas such as epidemiology, economy, or environmental sciences. The methodology used for this task demands a close combination of human judgement and automated computation. However, statistical software tools do not adequately support this combination through interactive visual interfaces. We propose a Visual Analytics process to guide domain experts in this task. For this purpose, we developed the TiMoVA prototype that implements this process based on user stories and iterative expert feedback on user experience. The prototype was evaluated by usage scenarios with an example dataset from epidemiology and interviews with two external domain experts in statistics. The insights from the experts' feedback and the usage scenarios show that TiMoVA is able to support domain experts in model selection tasks through interactive visual interfaces with short feedback cycles.

  12. Laser-induced selective copper plating of polypropylene surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratautas, K.; Gedvilas, M.; Stankevičiene, I.; JagminienÄ--, A.; Norkus, E.; Li Pira, N.; Sinopoli, S.; Emanuele, U.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2016-03-01

    Laser writing for selective plating of electro-conductive lines for electronics has several significant advantages, compared to conventional printed circuit board technology. Firstly, this method is faster and cheaper at the prototyping stage. Secondly, material consumption is reduced, because it works selectively. However, the biggest merit of this method is potentiality to produce moulded interconnect device, enabling to create electronics on complex 3D surfaces, thus saving space, materials and cost of production. There are two basic techniques of laser writing for selective plating on plastics: the laser-induced selective activation (LISA) and laser direct structuring (LDS). In the LISA method, pure plastics without any dopant (filler) can be used. In the LDS method, special fillers are mixed in the polymer matrix. These fillers are activated during laser writing process, and, in the next processing step, the laser modified area can be selectively plated with metals. In this work, both methods of the laser writing for the selective plating of polymers were investigated and compared. For LDS approach, new material: polypropylene with carbon-based additives was tested using picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses. Different laser processing parameters (laser pulse energy, scanning speed, the number of scans, pulse durations, wavelength and overlapping of scanned lines) were applied in order to find out the optimal regime of activation. Areal selectivity tests showed a high plating resolution. The narrowest width of a copper-plated line was less than 23 μm. Finally, our material was applied to the prototype of the electronic circuit board on a 2D surface.

  13. Targeting Mitochondria with Avocatin B Induces Selective Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Angka, Leonard; Rota, Sarah-Grace; Hanlon, Thomas; Mitchell, Andrew; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiao Ming; Gronda, Marcela; Boyaci, Ezel; Bojko, Barbara; Minden, Mark; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffery L; Edginton, Andrea; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Joseph, Jamie W; Quadrilatero, Joe; Schimmer, Aaron D; Spagnuolo, Paul A

    2015-06-15

    Treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continue to offer weak clinical outcomes. Through a high-throughput cell-based screen, we identified avocatin B, a lipid derived from avocado fruit, as a novel compound with cytotoxic activity in AML. Avocatin B reduced human primary AML cell viability without effect on normal peripheral blood stem cells. Functional stem cell assays demonstrated selectivity toward AML progenitor and stem cells without effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Mechanistic investigations indicated that cytotoxicity relied on mitochondrial localization, as cells lacking functional mitochondria or CPT1, the enzyme that facilitates mitochondria lipid transport, were insensitive to avocatin B. Furthermore, avocatin B inhibited fatty acid oxidation and decreased NADPH levels, resulting in ROS-dependent leukemia cell death characterized by the release of mitochondrial proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor, and cytochrome c. This study reveals a novel strategy for selective leukemia cell eradication based on a specific difference in mitochondrial function. PMID:26077472

  14. Graphical LASSO based Model Selection for Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Alexander; Hannak, Gabor; Goertz, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    We propose a novel graphical model selection (GMS) scheme for high-dimensional stationary time series or discrete time process. The method is based on a natural generalization of the graphical LASSO (gLASSO), introduced originally for GMS based on i.i.d. samples, and estimates the conditional independence graph (CIG) of a time series from a finite length observation. The gLASSO for time series is defined as the solution of an l1-regularized maximum (approximate) likelihood problem. We solve this optimization problem using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Our approach is nonparametric as we do not assume a finite dimensional (e.g., an autoregressive) parametric model for the observed process. Instead, we require the process to be sufficiently smooth in the spectral domain. For Gaussian processes, we characterize the performance of our method theoretically by deriving an upper bound on the probability that our algorithm fails to correctly identify the CIG. Numerical experiments demonstrate the ability of our method to recover the correct CIG from a limited amount of samples.

  15. Highly Selective Artificial K(+) Channels: An Example of Selectivity-Induced Transmembrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Arnaud; Barboiu, Mihail

    2016-01-13

    Natural KcsA K(+) channels conduct at high rates with an extraordinary selectivity for K(+) cations, excluding the Na(+) or other cations. Biomimetic artificial channels have been designed in order to mimick the ionic activity of KcSA channels, but simple artificial systems presenting high K(+)/Na(+) selectivity are rare. Here we report an artificial ion channel of H-bonded hexyl-benzoureido-15-crown-5-ether, where K(+) cations are highly preferred to Na(+) cations. The K(+)-channel conductance is interpreted as arising in the formation of oligomeric highly cooperative channels, resulting in the cation-induced membrane polarization and enhanced transport rates without or under pH-active gradient. These channels are selectively responsive to the presence of K(+) cations, even in the presence of a large excess of Na(+). From the conceptual point of view, these channels express a synergistic adaptive behavior: the addition of the K(+) cation drives the selection and the construction of constitutional polarized ion channels toward the selective conduction of the K(+) cation that promotes their generation in the first place.

  16. Ventricular assist devices: history, patient selection, and timing of therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Daniel G; Oyer, Philip E; Mallidi, Hari R

    2009-06-01

    Timing of therapy and selection of patients in the use of ventricular assist devices (VADs) can be difficult. In general, consideration for VAD implantation is appropriate in patients with endstage heart failure who are failing optimal medical therapy and in whom no alternative traditional surgical treatment options are available. However, identifying when a particular patient has reached this point is not always straightforward. There are a broad range of medical and surgical therapies for patients with overt heart failure, and this armamentarium is constantly expanding. The risks, benefits, and expected outcomes with VAD therapy have also undergone dramatic changes over the last decade. Advances in technology have led to a proliferation of newer generation devices that are smaller, lighter, easier to implant, and more reliable than previous generation devices. This, in turn, has led to a markedly improved risk-benefit ratio, with increased durability and reduced morbidity. The indications for the implantation of ventricular assist devices have also evolved over the last several years, and specific patient presentations and goals of therapy have led to specific indications. Device therapy has traditionally been classified as bridge to recovery, bridge to transplantation, and destination therapy. However, such designations may not be well defined at the time of implantation, and recovery and response following initiation of VAD support may allow patients to change from one classification to another. The current data regarding indications and timing of device implantation are reviewed. PMID:20559983

  17. Total body irradiation selectively induces murine hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Schulte, Bradley A; LaRue, Amanda C; Ogawa, Makio; Zhou, Daohong

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) and certain chemotherapeutic agents not only causes acute bone marrow (BM) suppression but also leads to long-term residual hematopoietic injury. This latter effect has been attributed to damage to hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal. Using a mouse model, we investigated whether IR induces senescence in HSCs, as induction of HSC senescence can lead to the defect in HSC self-renewal. It was found that exposure of C57BL/6 mice to a sublethal dose (6.5 Gy) of total body irradiation (TBI) resulted in a sustained quantitative and qualitative reduction of LKS+ HSCs. In addition, LKS+ HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited an increased expression of the 2 commonly used biomarkers of cellular senescence, p16(Ink4a) and SA-beta-gal. In contrast, no such changes were observed in irradiated LKS- hematopoietic progenitor cells. These results provide the first direct evidence demonstrating that IR exposure can selectively induce HSC senescence. Of interest, the induction of HSC senescence was associated with a prolonged elevation of p21(Cip1/Waf1), p19(Arf), and p16(Ink4a) mRNA expression, while the expression of p27(Kip1) and p18(Ink4c) mRNA was not increased following TBI. This suggests that p21(Cip1/Waf1), p19(Arf), and p16(Ink4a) may play an important role in IR-induced senescence in HSCs.

  18. Selective Induced Altered Coccidians to Immunize and Prevent Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Microbiomic flora in digestive tract is pivotal to the state of our health and disease. Antibiotics affect GI, control composition of microbiome, and shift equilibrium from health into disease status. Coccidiosis causes gastrointestinal inflammation. Antibiotic additives contaminate animal products and enter food chain, consumed by humans with possible allergic, antibiotic resistance and enigmatic side effects. Purposed study induced nonpathogenic, immunogenic organisms to protect against disease and abolish antibiotics' use in food animals and side effects in man. Diverse species of Coccidia were used as model. Immature organisms were treated with serial purification procedure prior to developmental stages to obtain altered strains. Chicks received oral gavage immunized with serial low doses of normal or altered organisms or sham treatment and were challenged with high infective normal organisms to compare pathogenicity and immunogenicity. Mature induced altered forms of E. tenella and E. necatrix lacked developmental stage of “sporocysts” and contained free sporozoites. In contrast, E. maxima progressed to normal forms or did not mature at all. Animals that received altered forms were considerably protected with higher weight gain and antibody titers against challenge infection compared to those that received normal organisms (p < 0.05). This is the first report to induce selected protective altered organisms for possible preventive measures to minimize antibiotic use in food animals. PMID:27721824

  19. Non-gated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water by position-selective detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger

    2015-09-14

    Temporal and spatial evolutions of the laser-induced plasma in bulk water are investigated using fast imaging and emission spectroscopic techniques. By tightly focusing a single-pulse nanosecond Nd: YAG laser beam into the bulk water, we generate a strongly expanded plasma with high reproducibility. Such a strong expanding plasma enables us to obtain well-resolved spectral lines by means of position-selective detection; hence, the time-gated detector becomes abdicable. The present results suggest not only a possible non-gated approach for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy but also give an insight into the plasma generation and expansion in bulk water.

  20. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  1. Single molecule insights on conformational selection and induced fit mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hatzakis, Nikos S

    2014-02-01

    Biomolecular interactions regulate a plethora of vital cellular processes, including signal transduction, metabolism, catalysis and gene regulation. Regulation is encoded in the molecular properties of the constituent proteins; distinct conformations correspond to different functional outcomes. To describe the molecular basis of this behavior, two main mechanisms have been advanced: 'induced fit' and 'conformational selection'. Our understanding of these models relies primarily on NMR, computational studies and kinetic measurements. These techniques report the average behavior of a large ensemble of unsynchronized molecules, often masking intrinsic dynamic behavior of proteins and biologically significant transient intermediates. Single molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool for characterizing protein function. They offer the direct observation and quantification of the activity, abundance and lifetime of multiple states and transient intermediates in the energy landscape, that are typically averaged out in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Here we survey new insights from single molecule studies that advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying biomolecular recognition. PMID:24342874

  2. Protein recognition and selection through conformational and mutually induced fit

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Pengzhi; Hoffman, Laurel; Tripathi, Swarnendu; Homouz, Dirar; Liu, Yin; Waxham, M. Neal; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions drive most every biological process, but in many instances the domains mediating recognition are disordered. How specificity in binding is attained in the absence of defined structure contrasts with well-established experimental and theoretical work describing ligand binding to protein. The signaling protein calmodulin presents a unique opportunity to investigate mechanisms for target recognition given that it interacts with several hundred different targets. By advancing coarse-grained computer simulations and experimental techniques, mechanistic insights were gained in defining the pathways leading to recognition and in how target selectivity can be achieved at the molecular level. A model requiring mutually induced conformational changes in both calmodulin and target proteins was necessary and broadly informs how proteins can achieve both high affinity and high specificity. PMID:24297894

  3. Polystyrene nanoparticle exposure induces ion-selective pores in lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Negoda, Alexander; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.; Worden, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A diverse range of molecular interactions can occur between engineered nanomaterials (ENM) and biomembranes, some of which could lead to toxic outcomes following human exposure to ENM. In this study, we adapted electrophysiology methods to investigate the ability of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (PNP) to induce pores in model bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) that mimic biomembranes. PNP charge was varied using PNP decorated with either positive (amidine) groups or negative (carboxyl) groups, and BLM charge was varied using dioleoyl phospholipids having cationic (ethylphosphocholine), zwitterionic (phosphocholine), or anionic (phosphatidic acid) headgroups. Both positive and negative PNP induced BLM pores for all lipid compositions studied, as evidenced by current spikes and integral conductance. Stable PNP-induced pores exhibited ion selectivity, with the highest selectivity for K+ (PK/PCl ~ 8.3) observed when both the PNP and lipids were negatively charged, and the highest selectivity for Cl− (PK/PCl ~ 0.2) observed when both the PNP and lipids were positively charged. This trend is consistent with the finding that selectivity for an ion in channel proteins is imparted by oppositely charged functional groups within the channel’s filter region. The PK/PCl value was unaffected by the voltage-ramp method, the pore conductance, or the side of the BLM to which the PNP were applied. These results demonstrate for the first time that PNP can induce ion-selective pores in BLM, and that the degree of ion selectivity is influenced synergistically by the charges of both the lipid headgroups and functional groups on the PNP. PMID:23747366

  4. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development.

  5. Factors associated with induced abortion at selected hospitals in the Volta Region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Klutsey, Ellen Eyi; Ankomah, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Background Induced abortion rates remained persistently high in the Volta Region of Ghana in the 5 years from 2006 to 2011. Some hospitals, both rural and urban, report induced abortion-related complications as one of the top ten conditions in hospital admissions. This study explored demographic and other factors associated with induced abortion, and also assessed awareness of abortion-related complications among women of reproductive age in the Volta Region. Methods A quantitative, hospital-based, unmatched case-control study was performed. The Volta Region was stratified into two health administration zones, ie, north and south. For each zone, hospitals were stratified into government and private hospitals. Employing simple random sampling, one private and three government hospitals were selected from each zone. This study is therefore based on eight hospitals, ie, six government hospitals and two private hospitals. Results Marital status, employment status, number of total pregnancies, and knowledge about contraception were found to be associated with induced abortion. Multiple logistic regression showed a 4% reduction in the odds of induced abortion in married women compared with women who were single (odds ratio [OR] 0.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07–0.22). Unemployed women of reproductive age were found to be 0.35 times less likely to seek induced abortion compared with their employed counterparts (OR 0.35, CI 0.19–0.65). It was also observed that women with their second pregnancies were 3.8 times more likely to seek induced abortion and women with more than two pregnancies were 6.6 times more likely to do so (OR 3.81, CI 1.94–7.49 and OR 6.58, CI 2.58–16.79, respectively). Women with no knowledge of contraceptive methods were 4.6 times likely to seek induced abortion (OR 4.64, CI 1.39–15.4). Compared with women who had not had induced abortion, women with a high number of pregnancies and no contraceptive knowledge were more likely to have

  6. Electric field induced selective disordering in lamellar block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Markus; Pester, Christian W; Langner, Karol M; Sevink, Geert J A; Schoberth, Heiko G; Schmidt, Kristin; Urban, Volker S; Mays, Jimmy W; Böker, Alexander

    2013-05-28

    External electric fields align nanostructured block copolymers by either rotation of grains or nucleation and growth depending on how strongly the chemically distinct block copolymer components are segregated. In close vicinity to the order-disorder transition, theory and simulations suggest a third mechanism: selective disordering. We present a time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering study that demonstrates how an electric field can indeed selectively disintegrate ill-aligned lamellae in a lyotropic block copolymer solution, while lamellae with interfaces oriented parallel to the applied field prevail. The present study adds an additional mechanism to the experimentally corroborated suite of mechanistic pathways, by which nanostructured block copolymers can align with an electric field. Our results further unveil the benefit of electric field assisted annealing for mitigating orientational disorder and topological defects in block copolymer mesophases, both in close vicinity to the order-disorder transition and well below it. PMID:23573901

  7. Combination of Sleeping Beauty transposition and chemically induced dimerization selection for robust production of engineered cells

    PubMed Central

    Kacherovsky, Nataly; Harkey, Michael A.; Blau, C. Anthony; Giachelli, Cecilia M.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2012-01-01

    The main methods for producing genetically engineered cells use viral vectors for which safety issues and manufacturing costs remain a concern. In addition, selection of desired cells typically relies on the use of cytotoxic drugs with long culture times. Here, we introduce an efficient non-viral approach combining the Sleeping Beauty (SB) Transposon System with selective proliferation of engineered cells by chemically induced dimerization (CID) of growth factor receptors. Minicircles carrying a SB transposon cassette containing a reporter transgene and a gene for the F36VFGFR1 fusion protein were delivered to the hematopoietic cell line Ba/F3. Stably-transduced Ba/F3 cell populations with >98% purity were obtained within 1 week using this positive selection strategy. Copy number analysis by quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed that CID-selected cells contain on average higher copy numbers of transgenes than flow cytometry-selected cells, demonstrating selective advantage for cells with multiple transposon insertions. A diverse population of cells is present both before and after culture in CID media, although site-specific qPCR of transposon junctions show that population diversity is significantly reduced after selection due to preferential expansion of clones with multiple integration events. This non-viral, positive selection approach is an attractive alternative for producing engineered cells. PMID:22402491

  8. On selection of the optimal data time interval for real-time hydrological forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Han, D.

    2013-09-01

    With the advancement in modern telemetry and communication technologies, hydrological data can be collected with an increasingly higher sampling rate. An important issue deserving attention from the hydrological community is which suitable time interval of the model input data should be chosen in hydrological forecasting. Such a problem has long been recognised in the control engineering community but is a largely ignored topic in operational applications of hydrological forecasting. In this study, the intrinsic properties of rainfall-runoff data with different time intervals are first investigated from the perspectives of the sampling theorem and the information loss using the discrete wavelet transform tool. It is found that rainfall signals with very high sampling rates may not always improve the accuracy of rainfall-runoff modelling due to the catchment low-pass-filtering effect. To further investigate the impact of a data time interval in real-time forecasting, a real-time forecasting system is constructed by incorporating the probability distributed model (PDM) with a real-time updating scheme, the autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) model. Case studies are then carried out on four UK catchments with different concentration times for real-time flow forecasting using data with different time intervals of 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min. A positive relation is found between the forecast lead time and the optimal choice of the data time interval, which is also highly dependent on the catchment concentration time. Finally, based on the conclusions from the case studies, a hypothetical pattern is proposed in three-dimensional coordinates to describe the general impact of the data time interval and to provide implications of the selection of the optimal time interval in real-time hydrological forecasting. Although nowadays most operational hydrological systems still have low data sampling rates (daily or hourly), the future is that higher sampling rates will become

  9. On selection of the optimal data time interval for real-time hydrological forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Han, D.

    2012-09-01

    With the advancement in modern telemetry and communication technologies, hydrological data can be collected with an increasingly higher sampling rate. An important issue deserving attention from the hydrological community is what suitable time interval of the model input data should be chosen in hydrological forecasting. Such a problem has long been recognised in the control engineering community but is a largely ignored topic in operational applications of hydrological forecasting. In this study, the intrinsic properties of rainfall-runoff data with different time intervals are first investigated from the perspectives of the sampling theorem and the information loss using the discrete wavelet decomposition tool. It is found that rainfall signals with very high sampling rates may not always improve the accuracy of rainfall-runoff modelling due to the catchment low-pass filtering effect. To further investigate the impact of data time interval in real-time forecasting, a real-time forecasting system is constructed by incorporating the Probability Distributed Model (PDM) with a real-time updating scheme, the autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) model. Case studies are then carried out on four UK catchments with different concentration times for real-time flow forecasting using data with different time intervals of 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 60 min, 90 min and 120 min. A positive relation is found between the forecast lead time and the optimal choice of the data time interval, which is also highly dependent on the catchment concentration time. Finally, based on the conclusions from the case studies, a hypothetical pattern is proposed in three-dimensional coordinates to describe the general impact of the data time interval and to provide implications on the selection of the optimal time interval in real-time hydrological forecasting. Although nowadays most operational hydrological systems still have low data sampling rates (daily or hourly), the trend in the future is that

  10. Noise-induced transition in human reaction times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-09-01

    The human reaction/response time can be defined as the time elapsed from the onset of stimulus presentation until a response occurs in many sensory and cognitive processes. A reaction time model based on Piéron’s law is investigated. The model shows a noise-induced transition in the moments of reaction time distributions due to the presence of strong additive noise. The model also demonstrates that reaction times do not follow fluctuation scaling between the mean and the variance but follow a generalized version between the skewness and the kurtosis. The results indicate that noise-induced transitions in the moments govern fluctuations in sensory-motor transformations and open an insight into the macroscopic effects of noise in human perception and action. The conditions that lead to extreme reaction times are discussed based on the transfer of information in neurons.

  11. Photo-SRM: laser-induced dissociation improves detection selectivity of Selected Reaction Monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Enjalbert, Quentin; Simon, Romain; Salvador, Arnaud; Antoine, Rodolphe; Redon, Sébastien; Ayhan, Mehmet Menaf; Darbour, Florence; Chambert, Stéphane; Bretonnière, Yann; Dugourd, Philippe; Lemoine, Jérôme

    2011-11-30

    Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) carried out on triple-quadrupole mass spectrometers coupled to liquid chromatography has been a reference method to develop quantitative analysis of small molecules in biological or environmental matrices for years and is currently emerging as a promising tool in clinical proteomic. However, sensitive assays in complex matrices are often hampered by the presence of co-eluted compounds that share redundant transitions with the target species. On-the-fly better selection of the precursor ion by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) or increased quadrupole resolution is one way to escape from interferences. In the present work we document the potential interest of substituting classical gas-collision activation mode by laser-induced dissociation in the visible wavelength range to improve the specificity of the fragmentation step. Optimization of the laser beam pathway across the different quadrupoles to ensure high photo-dissociation yield in Q2 without detectable fragmentation in Q1 was assessed with sucrose tagged with a push-pull chromophore. Next, the proof of concept that photo-SRM ensures more specific detection than does conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID)-based SRM was carried out with oxytocin peptide. Oxytocin was derivatized by the thiol-reactive QSY® 7 C(5)-maleimide quencher on cysteine residues to shift its absorption property into the visible range. Photo-SRM chromatograms of tagged oxytocin spiked in whole human plasma digest showed better detection specificity and sensitivity than CID, that resulted in extended calibration curve linearity. We anticipate that photo-SRM might significantly improve the limit of quantification of classical SRM-based assays targeting cysteine-containing peptides. PMID:22002689

  12. Expert opinion: Time to ban formal CI selection criteria?

    PubMed

    Govaerts, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    This contribution addresses cochlear implantation (CI) selection criteria as a discussion topic. It expresses a personal viewpoint that challenges the usefulness and necessity of formal selection criteria. Scientifically, it is argued that CI selection must be highly individual, whereas the current criteria are general, not valid, not based on a wide consensus, and not up-to-date. Morally, it is argued that it is not legitimate to presume equality between patients and CI centers, that the current selection criteria create an ethical dilemma, and that an unresolvable contradiction exists between quality of life and measurability. Finally, liberalizing the criteria would probably have only a minimal impact on current practice and budget. PMID:27099117

  13. TAVI device selection: time for a patient-specific approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marcus; Modine, Thomas; Piazza, Nicolo; Mylotte, Darren

    2016-09-18

    Individualised, patient-centred care is a central tenet of modern medicine. The variety of transcatheter heart valves currently available affords the opportunity to select the most appropriate device for each individual patient. Prosthesis selection should be based on operator experience and pre-procedural multimodal three-dimensional imaging. Herein, we outline a number of clinical scenarios where specific transcatheter heart valve technologies have the potential to optimise clinical outcome. PMID:27640029

  14. Long-time observation of meteor induced layers with ionosonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2016-07-01

    It is considered that the main theory explaining appearance of sporadic E is the theory of wind shear, which means (includes) the presence and movement of nodes converging tidal wind through the height region of the most frequent occurrence Es (120-140km) [Mathew et. all, 1998]. However, the appearance of intense layers, following its name, are sporadic, and such variability cannot to explain by the influence of tidal waves only. Another indication inconsistency theory of wind shear is the appearance of so-called transient Es layers [Maruiama, 2003]. The distinctive feature of this trace is the high critical frequency (> 5 MHz), a constant height, weak amplitude, all trace semitransparent and short lifetime [Maruiama et. all, 2003 and 2008 and references there]. Because of duration, such layer is opposite to the traditional persistent Es layer, which we do not consider in this paper. Various researchers have used different terms for such spontaneous Es, it is meteor echo, meteor induced Es, spontaneously formed sporadic Es patches resulting of the Fresnel scattering from a region of enhanced plasma density along the meteor trail, transitory Es and transient Es. Since the term transient Es is unstable, to avoid confusion, we will stick to this term. Since meteor echo is not fully satisfy this term by some parameter, we will describe the properties of transient Es based on the ionogram properties and not from physics of its origin. We used data from our ionosonde with one-minute ionogram repetition rate for 2010-2014 years. For processing performed a method are using to select beatings and the ionosphere reflectivity of the layers by means A-, H-and AΣ-map [Akchurin, 2011; Yusupov, 2014]. This maps allow to collect transient Es appearance over a long-time. Such statistics comparison with meteor showers activity showed good agreement. It shows the presence of the transient Es formation mechanism, which coupling with meteors.

  15. Continuum model for chiral induced spin selectivity in helical molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Ernesto; González-Arraga, Luis A.; Finkelstein-Shapiro, Daniel; Mujica, Vladimiro; Berche, Bertrand

    2015-05-21

    A minimal model is exactly solved for electron spin transport on a helix. Electron transport is assumed to be supported by well oriented p{sub z} type orbitals on base molecules forming a staircase of definite chirality. In a tight binding interpretation, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) opens up an effective π{sub z} − π{sub z} coupling via interbase p{sub x,y} − p{sub z} hopping, introducing spin coupled transport. The resulting continuum model spectrum shows two Kramers doublet transport channels with a gap proportional to the SOC. Each doubly degenerate channel satisfies time reversal symmetry; nevertheless, a bias chooses a transport direction and thus selects for spin orientation. The model predicts (i) which spin orientation is selected depending on chirality and bias, (ii) changes in spin preference as a function of input Fermi level and (iii) back-scattering suppression protected by the SO gap. We compute the spin current with a definite helicity and find it to be proportional to the torsion of the chiral structure and the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan phase. To describe room temperature transport, we assume that the total transmission is the result of a product of coherent steps.

  16. Thiram and ziram stimulate non-selective cation channel and induce apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Sook Han, Myoung; Shin, Kum Joo; Kim, Yun Hee; Kim, Sun Hee; Lee, Taehoon; Kim, Euikyung; Ho Ryu, Sung; Suh, Pann Ghill

    2003-06-01

    The neurotoxicity of dithiocarbamates has been previously reported, however, the detailed mechanism underlying the neurotoxicity is still not fully understood. Among the dithiocarbamates, we investigated thiram and ziram in a neuronal-like pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Thiram and ziram strongly induced cell death in both dose- and time-dependent manners with the LC(50) of 0.3 and 2 microM, respectively. The cell death showed typical apoptotic features, such as DNA fragmentation and an increase of subdiploidy nuclei. Interestingly, both thiram and ziram induced rapid and sustained increases of intracellular Ca(2+) in PC12 cells, which were almost completely blocked by flufenamic acid (FFA), an inhibitor of non-selective cation channel. BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, inhibited the thiram- and ziram-induced apoptotic cell death. These results suggest that thiram and ziram induce apoptotic neuronal cell death by Ca(2+) influx through non-selective cation channels. The present study may provide a clue for understanding the mechanism of neurotoxicity of thiram and ziram.

  17. Artificial selection on chill-coma recovery time in Drosophila melanogaster: Direct and correlated responses to selection.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Alison R; Mackay, Trudy F C; Morgan, Theodore J

    2016-07-01

    Artificial selection can be used to create populations with extreme phenotypic responses to environmental stressors. When artificial selection is applied to a single component of a stress response, this selection may result in correlated responses in other stress responses, a phenomenon called cross-tolerance, which is ultimately controlled by the genetic correlations among traits. We selected for extreme responses to cold tolerance by selecting for chill-coma recovery time from a single temperate population of Drosophila melanogaster. Chill-coma recovery time is a common metric of low, but non-lethal, cold temperature tolerance. Replicated divergent artificial selection was applied to a genetically variable base population for 31 generations, resulting in two cold resistant, two cold susceptible, and two unselected control lines. To quantify the relationship between selection on chill-coma recovery and other metrics of thermal performance, we also measured survivorship after acute cold exposure, survivorship after chronic cold exposure, survivorship after cold exposure following a pre-treatment period (rapid cold hardening), starvation tolerance, and heat tolerance. We find that chill-coma recovery time is heritable within this population and that there is an asymmetric response to increased and decreased chill-coma recovery time. Surprisingly, we found no cross-tolerances between selection on chill-coma recovery time and the other environmental stress response traits. These results suggest that although artificial selection has dramatically altered chill-coma recovery time, the correlated response to selection on other stress response phenotypes has been negligible. The lack of a correlated response suggests that chill-coma recovery time in these selection lines is likely genetically independent from measures of cold survivorship tested here. PMID:27264892

  18. Artificial selection on chill-coma recovery time in Drosophila melanogaster: Direct and correlated responses to selection.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Alison R; Mackay, Trudy F C; Morgan, Theodore J

    2016-07-01

    Artificial selection can be used to create populations with extreme phenotypic responses to environmental stressors. When artificial selection is applied to a single component of a stress response, this selection may result in correlated responses in other stress responses, a phenomenon called cross-tolerance, which is ultimately controlled by the genetic correlations among traits. We selected for extreme responses to cold tolerance by selecting for chill-coma recovery time from a single temperate population of Drosophila melanogaster. Chill-coma recovery time is a common metric of low, but non-lethal, cold temperature tolerance. Replicated divergent artificial selection was applied to a genetically variable base population for 31 generations, resulting in two cold resistant, two cold susceptible, and two unselected control lines. To quantify the relationship between selection on chill-coma recovery and other metrics of thermal performance, we also measured survivorship after acute cold exposure, survivorship after chronic cold exposure, survivorship after cold exposure following a pre-treatment period (rapid cold hardening), starvation tolerance, and heat tolerance. We find that chill-coma recovery time is heritable within this population and that there is an asymmetric response to increased and decreased chill-coma recovery time. Surprisingly, we found no cross-tolerances between selection on chill-coma recovery time and the other environmental stress response traits. These results suggest that although artificial selection has dramatically altered chill-coma recovery time, the correlated response to selection on other stress response phenotypes has been negligible. The lack of a correlated response suggests that chill-coma recovery time in these selection lines is likely genetically independent from measures of cold survivorship tested here.

  19. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  20. The Timing of Verb Selection in Japanese Sentence Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momma, Shota; Slevc, L. Robert; Phillips, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Many influential models of sentence production (e.g., Bock & Levelt, 1994; Kempen & Hoenkamp, 1987; Levelt, 1989) emphasize the central role of verbs in structural encoding, and thus predict that verbs should be selected early in sentence formulation, possibly even before the phonological encoding of the first constituent (Ferreira, 2000).…

  1. Manufacturing time operators: Covariance, selection criteria, and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Hegerfeldt, G. C.; Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J.

    2010-07-15

    We provide the most general forms of covariant and normalized time operators and their probability densities, with applications to quantum clocks, the time of arrival, and Lyapunov quantum operators. Examples are discussed of the profusion of possible operators and their physical meaning. Criteria to define unique, optimal operators for specific cases are given.

  2. Histogram bin width selection for time-dependent Poisson processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2004-07-01

    In constructing a time histogram of the event sequences derived from a nonstationary point process, we wish to determine the bin width such that the mean squared error of the histogram from the underlying rate of occurrence is minimized. We find that the optimal bin widths obtained for a doubly stochastic Poisson process and a sinusoidally regulated Poisson process exhibit different scaling relations with respect to the number of sequences, time scale and amplitude of rate modulation, but both diverge under similar parametric conditions. This implies that under these conditions, no determination of the time-dependent rate can be made. We also apply the kernel method to these point processes, and find that the optimal kernels do not exhibit any critical phenomena, unlike the time histogram method.

  3. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development. PMID:27209747

  4. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  5. Estimating selection through male fitness: three complementary methods illuminate the nature and causes of selection on flowering time.

    PubMed

    Austen, Emily J; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-02-24

    Our understanding of selection through male fitness is limited by the resource demands and indirect nature of the best available genetic techniques. Applying complementary, independent approaches to this problem can help clarify evolution through male function. We applied three methods to estimate selection on flowering time through male fitness in experimental populations of the annual plant Brassica rapa: (i) an analysis of mating opportunity based on flower production schedules, (ii) genetic paternity analysis, and (iii) a novel approach based on principles of experimental evolution. Selection differentials estimated by the first method disagreed with those estimated by the other two, indicating that mating opportunity was not the principal driver of selection on flowering time. The genetic and experimental evolution methods exhibited striking agreement overall, but a slight discrepancy between the two suggested that negative environmental covariance between age at flowering and male fitness may have contributed to phenotypic selection. Together, the three methods enriched our understanding of selection on flowering time, from mating opportunity to phenotypic selection to evolutionary response. The novel experimental evolution method may provide a means of examining selection through male fitness when genetic paternity analysis is not possible.

  6. Estimating selection through male fitness: three complementary methods illuminate the nature and causes of selection on flowering time.

    PubMed

    Austen, Emily J; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-02-24

    Our understanding of selection through male fitness is limited by the resource demands and indirect nature of the best available genetic techniques. Applying complementary, independent approaches to this problem can help clarify evolution through male function. We applied three methods to estimate selection on flowering time through male fitness in experimental populations of the annual plant Brassica rapa: (i) an analysis of mating opportunity based on flower production schedules, (ii) genetic paternity analysis, and (iii) a novel approach based on principles of experimental evolution. Selection differentials estimated by the first method disagreed with those estimated by the other two, indicating that mating opportunity was not the principal driver of selection on flowering time. The genetic and experimental evolution methods exhibited striking agreement overall, but a slight discrepancy between the two suggested that negative environmental covariance between age at flowering and male fitness may have contributed to phenotypic selection. Together, the three methods enriched our understanding of selection on flowering time, from mating opportunity to phenotypic selection to evolutionary response. The novel experimental evolution method may provide a means of examining selection through male fitness when genetic paternity analysis is not possible. PMID:26911957

  7. Selective functional characteristics of rate-induced fatigue in rabbit atrioventricular node.

    PubMed

    Billette, J; Métayer, R; St-Vincent, M

    1988-04-01

    The slowly developing rate-induced prolongation in atrioventricular nodal conduction time, termed "fatigue," was selectively studied using specifically designed stimulation protocols in isolated rabbit heart preparations. A nodal recovery curve (A2H2 versus H1A2 intervals; nodal conduction time of each premature beat plotted against corresponding recovery time) was obtained before and after a stable and nearly maximum fatigue had been reached by driving the atrium for 5 minutes at a fast rate close to the upper limit of 1:1 nodal conduction. The fatigue uniformly prolonged all A2H2 intervals (12.3 +/- 1.3 msec) and systematically increased the minimum H1A2 interval at which complete nodal block occurred (24.8 +/- 4.0 msec) (p less than 0.01, n = 6). To study the rate and time dependence of fatigue, nodal conduction times were obtained during three rapid 5-minute pacings corresponding to 50%, 75%, and 100% shortening of the pacing interval in the 1:1 nodal conduction range. The respective maximum fatigue-induced increases in conduction time were 5.4 +/- 1.8, 9.0 +/- 2.7, and 12.5 +/- 2.1 msec (p less than 0.01, n = 6). However, the pacing interval had no significant effect on the time required to reach either 50% (17.1 +/- 3.5 seconds) or 90% (92.6 +/- 15.4 seconds) of the fatigue observed after 5 minutes of fast rate. At the termination of any rapid stimulation, the fatigue effect dissipated with a time course that was inverse but symmetrical to that of its induction. These findings support the existence of an independent, slow, nodal memory process by which the conduction time changes according to past events with a long time constant.

  8. Time Adaptation Shows Duration Selectivity in the Human Parietal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masamichi J; Ditye, Thomas; Harada, Tokiko; Hashiguchi, Maho; Sadato, Norihiro; Carlson, Synnöve; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    Although psychological and computational models of time estimation have postulated the existence of neural representations tuned for specific durations, empirical evidence of this notion has been lacking. Here, using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation paradigm, we show that the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) (corresponding to the supramarginal gyrus) exhibited reduction in neural activity due to adaptation when a visual stimulus of the same duration was repeatedly presented. Adaptation was strongest when stimuli of identical durations were repeated, and it gradually decreased as the difference between the reference and test durations increased. This tuning property generalized across a broad range of durations, indicating the presence of general time-representation mechanisms in the IPL. Furthermore, adaptation was observed irrespective of the subject's attention to time. Repetition of a nontemporal aspect of the stimulus (i.e., shape) did not produce neural adaptation in the IPL. These results provide neural evidence for duration-tuned representations in the human brain. PMID:26378440

  9. Time Adaptation Shows Duration Selectivity in the Human Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Masamichi J.; Ditye, Thomas; Harada, Tokiko; Hashiguchi, Maho; Sadato, Norihiro; Carlson, Synnöve; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    Although psychological and computational models of time estimation have postulated the existence of neural representations tuned for specific durations, empirical evidence of this notion has been lacking. Here, using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation paradigm, we show that the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) (corresponding to the supramarginal gyrus) exhibited reduction in neural activity due to adaptation when a visual stimulus of the same duration was repeatedly presented. Adaptation was strongest when stimuli of identical durations were repeated, and it gradually decreased as the difference between the reference and test durations increased. This tuning property generalized across a broad range of durations, indicating the presence of general time-representation mechanisms in the IPL. Furthermore, adaptation was observed irrespective of the subject’s attention to time. Repetition of a nontemporal aspect of the stimulus (i.e., shape) did not produce neural adaptation in the IPL. These results provide neural evidence for duration-tuned representations in the human brain. PMID:26378440

  10. Transfer and the Part-Time Student: The Gulf Separating Community Colleges and Selective Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    When representatives from community colleges and selective four-year institutions gather, there is no greater flashpoint than the topic of part-time enrollment. This issue--that students coming from an institution comprising mostly part-time students should be enabled to transfer to selective four-year institutions in which full-time enrollment is…

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy in probing spontaneous and induced aggregation amongst size-selective gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Dewan S.; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by borohydride reduction using poly(N-vinyl 2-pyrrolidone) as the stabilizing agent in aqueous medium in the size regime of 1-5 nm. Aggregation amongst these polymer-stabilized gold nanoparticles has been accomplished by the controlled addition of hydrazine or aggregation may occur spontaneously (devoid of any chemicals) that is ubiquitous to nanoparticulate systems. Now, fluorescencein isothiocyanate (FITC), a prototype molecular probe has been employed in understanding the physical principles of aggregation phenomenon of the size-selective gold nanoparticles undergoing spontaneous and induced-aggregation under stipulated conditions. It is seen that there is enhancement of fluorescence intensity of FITC in the presence of both spontaneously and induced-aggregated gold nanoclusters as compared to free FITC. Interestingly, it is observed that the fluorescence sensitivity is able to distinguish seven different sizes of the gold nanoparticles in the aggregates and maximum enhancement of intensity arises at higher concentration with increase in size of gold particles within the aggregates. With increase in concentration of gold nanoparticle aggregates, the intensity increases, initially, reaches a maximum at a threshold concentration and then, gradually decreases in the presence of both spontaneously and induced-aggregated gold particles. However, the salient feature of physical significance is that the maximum enhancement of intensity with time has remained almost same for induced-aggregated gold while decreases exponentially with spontaneously aggregated gold particles.

  12. Field site selection: getting it right first time around

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Colin A; El Sayed, Badria; Babiker, Ahmed; Girod, Romain; Fontenille, Didier; Knols, Bart GJ; Nugud, Abdel Hameed; Benedict, Mark Q

    2009-01-01

    The selection of suitable field sites for integrated control of Anopheles mosquitoes using the sterile insect technique (SIT) requires consideration of the full gamut of factors facing most proposed control strategies, but four criteria identify an ideal site: 1) a single malaria vector, 2) an unstructured, relatively low density target population, 3) isolation of the target population and 4) actual or potential malaria incidence. Such a site can exist in a diverse range of situations or can be created. Two contrasting SIT field sites are examined here: the desert-flanked Dongola Reach of the Nile River in Northern State, Sudan, where malaria is endemic, and the island of La Reunion, where autochthonous malaria is rare but risk is persistent. The single malaria-transmitting vector at both sites is Anopheles arabiensis. In Sudan, the target area is a narrow 500 km corridor stretching from the rocky terrain at the Fourth Cataract - just above the new Merowe Dam, to the northernmost edge of the species range, close to Egypt. Vector distribution and temporal changes in density depend on the Nile level, ambient temperature and human activities. On La Reunion, the An. arabiensis population is coastal, limited and divided into three areas by altitude and exposure to the trade winds on the east coast. Mosquito vectors for other diseases are an issue at both sites, but of primary importance on La Reunion due to the recent chikungunya epidemic. The similarities and differences between these two sites in terms of suitability are discussed in the context of area-wide integrated vector management incorporating the SIT. PMID:19917079

  13. Field site selection: getting it right first time around.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Colin A; El Sayed, Badria; Babiker, Ahmed; Girod, Romain; Fontenille, Didier; Knols, Bart G J; Nugud, Abdel Hameed; Benedict, Mark Q

    2009-01-01

    The selection of suitable field sites for integrated control of Anopheles mosquitoes using the sterile insect technique (SIT) requires consideration of the full gamut of factors facing most proposed control strategies, but four criteria identify an ideal site: 1) a single malaria vector, 2) an unstructured, relatively low density target population, 3) isolation of the target population and 4) actual or potential malaria incidence. Such a site can exist in a diverse range of situations or can be created. Two contrasting SIT field sites are examined here: the desert-flanked Dongola Reach of the Nile River in Northern State, Sudan, where malaria is endemic, and the island of La Reunion, where autochthonous malaria is rare but risk is persistent. The single malaria-transmitting vector at both sites is Anopheles arabiensis. In Sudan, the target area is a narrow 500 km corridor stretching from the rocky terrain at the Fourth Cataract--just above the new Merowe Dam, to the northernmost edge of the species range, close to Egypt. Vector distribution and temporal changes in density depend on the Nile level, ambient temperature and human activities. On La Reunion, the An. arabiensis population is coastal, limited and divided into three areas by altitude and exposure to the trade winds on the east coast. Mosquito vectors for other diseases are an issue at both sites, but of primary importance on La Reunion due to the recent chikungunya epidemic. The similarities and differences between these two sites in terms of suitability are discussed in the context of area-wide integrated vector management incorporating the SIT. PMID:19917079

  14. Developmental Trajectories of Regulating Attentional Selection Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Sabine; Keil, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in learning environments requires both the maintenance of an attentional focus on a task-set and suppression of distracting stimuli. This may be especially difficult when the competing information is more appealing than the target event. The aptitude to “pay attention” and resist distraction has often been noted as an important prerequisite of successful acquisition of intellectual abilities in children. This focused review draws on research that highlights interindividual differences in the temporal dynamics of attentional engagement and disengagement under competition, and their relation with age and cognitive/academic skills. Although basic strategies of attention control are present in very young children, the more refined ability to manage attentional resources over time in an economic and adaptive fashion appears during early school years, dramatically improves until the early teen years, and continues to develop into late adolescence. Across studies, parameters of attention control over time predict specific aspects of academic performance, rather than general intellectual ability. We conclude that the ability to strategically regulate the dynamic allocation of attention at rapid rates may represent an important element of cognitive and academic development. PMID:22905028

  15. Study of selected phenotype switching strategies in time varying environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Denis; Brutovsky, Branislav

    2016-03-01

    Population heterogeneity plays an important role across many research, as well as the real-world, problems. The population heterogeneity relates to the ability of a population to cope with an environment change (or uncertainty) preventing its extinction. However, this ability is not always desirable as can be exemplified by an intratumor heterogeneity which positively correlates with the development of resistance to therapy. Causation of population heterogeneity is therefore in biology and medicine an intensively studied topic. In this paper the evolution of a specific strategy of population diversification, the phenotype switching, is studied at a conceptual level. The presented simulation model studies evolution of a large population of asexual organisms in a time-varying environment represented by a stochastic Markov process. Each organism disposes with a stochastic or nonlinear deterministic switching strategy realized by discrete-time models with evolvable parameters. We demonstrate that under rapidly varying exogenous conditions organisms operate in the vicinity of the bet-hedging strategy, while the deterministic patterns become relevant as the environmental variations are less frequent. Statistical characterization of the steady state regimes of the populations is done using the Hellinger and Kullback-Leibler functional distances and the Hamming distance.

  16. Developmental trajectories of regulating attentional selection over time.

    PubMed

    Heim, Sabine; Keil, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in learning environments requires both the maintenance of an attentional focus on a task-set and suppression of distracting stimuli. This may be especially difficult when the competing information is more appealing than the target event. The aptitude to "pay attention" and resist distraction has often been noted as an important prerequisite of successful acquisition of intellectual abilities in children. This focused review draws on research that highlights interindividual differences in the temporal dynamics of attentional engagement and disengagement under competition, and their relation with age and cognitive/academic skills. Although basic strategies of attention control are present in very young children, the more refined ability to manage attentional resources over time in an economic and adaptive fashion appears during early school years, dramatically improves until the early teen years, and continues to develop into late adolescence. Across studies, parameters of attention control over time predict specific aspects of academic performance, rather than general intellectual ability. We conclude that the ability to strategically regulate the dynamic allocation of attention at rapid rates may represent an important element of cognitive and academic development. PMID:22905028

  17. Selective heterocyclic amidine inhibitors of human inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Moormann, A E; Metz, S; Toth, M V; Moore, W M; Jerome, G; Kornmeier, C; Manning, P; Hansen, D W; Pitzele, B S; Webber, R K

    2001-10-01

    The potency and selectivity of a series of 5-hetero-2-iminohexahydroazepines were examined as inhibitors of the three human NOS isoforms. The effect of ring substitution of the 5-carbon for a heteroatom is presented. Potencies (IC(50)'s) for these inhibitors are in the low micromolar range for hi-NOS with some examples exhibiting a 500x selectivity versus hec-NOS.

  18. Parity-time-symmetry enhanced optomechanically-induced-transparency.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Yunfeng; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme to enhance optomechanically-induced-transparency (OMIT) based on parity-time-symmetric optomechanical system. Our results predict that an OMIT window which does not exist originally can appear in weak optomechanical coupling and driving system via coupling an auxiliary active cavity with optical gain. This phenomenon is quite different from these reported in previous works in which the gain is considered just to damage OMIT phenomenon even leads to electromagnetically induced absorption or inverted-OMIT. Such enhanced OMIT effects are ascribed to the additional gain which can increase photon number in cavity without reducing effective decay. We also discuss the scheme feasibility by analyzing recent experiment parameters. Our work provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation and slow light operation, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum optical device. PMID:27489193

  19. Parity-time-symmetry enhanced optomechanically-induced-transparency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Yunfeng; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme to enhance optomechanically-induced-transparency (OMIT) based on parity-time-symmetric optomechanical system. Our results predict that an OMIT window which does not exist originally can appear in weak optomechanical coupling and driving system via coupling an auxiliary active cavity with optical gain. This phenomenon is quite different from these reported in previous works in which the gain is considered just to damage OMIT phenomenon even leads to electromagnetically induced absorption or inverted-OMIT. Such enhanced OMIT effects are ascribed to the additional gain which can increase photon number in cavity without reducing effective decay. We also discuss the scheme feasibility by analyzing recent experiment parameters. Our work provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation and slow light operation, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum optical device. PMID:27489193

  20. Earthquake interevent time distribution for induced micro-, nano-, and picoseismicity.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Jörn; Kwiatek, Grzegorz

    2013-02-01

    We examine the temporal statistics of micro-, nano-, and picoseismicity induced by mining as well as by long-term fluid injection. Specifically, we analyze catalogs of seismic events recorded at the Mponeng deep gold mine, South Africa, and at the German deep drilling site. We show that the distribution of time intervals between successive earthquakes is form invariant between the different catalogs. In particular, the distribution can be described by the same scaling function recently established for tectonic seismicity and acoustic emissions from laboratory rock fracture. Thus, our findings bridge the energy gap between those two cases and provide clear evidence that these temporal features of seismicity are independent of the energy scales of the events and whether they are of tectonic or induced origin.

  1. Earthquake Interevent Time Distribution for Induced Micro-, Nano-, and Picoseismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Jörn; Kwiatek, Grzegorz

    2013-02-01

    We examine the temporal statistics of micro-, nano-, and picoseismicity induced by mining as well as by long-term fluid injection. Specifically, we analyze catalogs of seismic events recorded at the Mponeng deep gold mine, South Africa, and at the German deep drilling site. We show that the distribution of time intervals between successive earthquakes is form invariant between the different catalogs. In particular, the distribution can be described by the same scaling function recently established for tectonic seismicity and acoustic emissions from laboratory rock fracture. Thus, our findings bridge the energy gap between those two cases and provide clear evidence that these temporal features of seismicity are independent of the energy scales of the events and whether they are of tectonic or induced origin.

  2. Denoising time-domain induced polarisation data using wavelet techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deo, Ravin N.; Cull, James P.

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain induced polarisation (TDIP) methods are routinely used for near-surface evaluations in quasi-urban environments harbouring networks of buried civil infrastructure. A conventional technique for improving signal to noise ratio in such environments is by using analogue or digital low-pass filtering followed by stacking and rectification. However, this induces large distortions in the processed data. In this study, we have conducted the first application of wavelet based denoising techniques for processing raw TDIP data. Our investigation included laboratory and field measurements to better understand the advantages and limitations of this technique. It was found that distortions arising from conventional filtering can be significantly avoided with the use of wavelet based denoising techniques. With recent advances in full-waveform acquisition and analysis, incorporation of wavelet denoising techniques can further enhance surveying capabilities. In this work, we present the rationale for utilising wavelet denoising methods and discuss some important implications, which can positively influence TDIP methods.

  3. Parity-time-symmetry enhanced optomechanically-induced-transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Yunfeng; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-08-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme to enhance optomechanically-induced-transparency (OMIT) based on parity-time-symmetric optomechanical system. Our results predict that an OMIT window which does not exist originally can appear in weak optomechanical coupling and driving system via coupling an auxiliary active cavity with optical gain. This phenomenon is quite different from these reported in previous works in which the gain is considered just to damage OMIT phenomenon even leads to electromagnetically induced absorption or inverted-OMIT. Such enhanced OMIT effects are ascribed to the additional gain which can increase photon number in cavity without reducing effective decay. We also discuss the scheme feasibility by analyzing recent experiment parameters. Our work provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation and slow light operation, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum optical device.

  4. Selection on the timing of adult emergence results in altered circadian clocks in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailesh; Kumar, Dhanya; Paranjpe, Dhanashree A; R, Akarsh C; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2007-03-01

    To investigate whether circadian clocks in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster evolve as a consequence of selection on the timing of adult emergence, we raised four replicate populations each of early (early(1..4)) and late (late(1..4)) emerging flies by selecting for adults that emerged during the morning and the evening hours. We estimated the percentage of flies that emerged during the two selection windows to evaluate the direct response to selection, and the circadian phenotypes of adult emergence and locomotor activity rhythms under light/dark (LD) and constant darkness (DD) to assess the correlated response to selection. After 55 generations, the percentage of flies emerging during the morning window increased in the early populations, but decreased in the late populations. The percentage of flies emerging during the evening window increased in the late populations, but decreased in the early populations. The time course and waveform of emergence and locomotor activity rhythms of the selected populations diverged from each other as well as from the controls. Further, the circadian periodicity of the early populations was significantly shorter than the controls, while that of the late populations was significantly longer than the controls. The light-induced phase response curve of the selected populations differed significantly within groups as well as from the controls. Such modifications in the circadian phenotypes of the selected populations due to heritable changes in genetic architecture, in response to imposed selection pressure, suggest that the circadian clocks underlying emergence and locomotor activity rhythms in D. melanogaster evolve as a correlated response to selection on the timing of adult emergence.

  5. An Examination of Program Selection Criteria for Part-Time MBA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colburn, Michael; Fox, Daniel E.; Westerfelt, Debra Kay

    2011-01-01

    Prospective graduate students select a graduate program as a result of a multifaceted decision-making process. This study examines the selection criteria that part-time MBA students used in selecting a program at a private university. Further, it analyzes the methods by which the students first learned of the MBA program. The authors posed the…

  6. Mainstream time-capnography: an aid to select an appropriate uncuffed endotracheal tube in small children.

    PubMed

    Neema, Praveen Kumar; Jayant, Aveek; Sethuraman, Manikandan; Rathod, Ramesh C

    2008-12-01

    Uncuffed endotracheal tubes are commonly used in children in an attempt to decrease the potential for pressure induced tracheal injury. However, uncuffed endotracheal tube may increase the risk of aspiration and lead to erratic delivery of preset tidal volume during mechanical ventilation. Therefore, it is desirable to intubate trachea with an appropriate but not an oversized endotracheal tube. In children, for selecting an endotracheal tube, a variety of formulas and techniques are used to find the endotracheal tube size that minimizes both pressure induced tracheal injury and aspiration potential or variable ventilation. Air-leak following tracheal intubation can be recognized by the presence of audible leak, by auscultation over the trachea, by palpation over the trachea and by observing effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on inspiratory expiratory tidal volume difference during mechanical ventilation. We describe mainstream time-capnograph as an aid to recognize leak around the endotracheal tube and its utility to determine appropriate endotracheal tube size in small children. PMID:19083104

  7. Mesostructure-Induced Selectivity in CO2 Reduction Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Anthony Shoji; Yoon, Youngmin; Wuttig, Anna; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2015-12-01

    Gold inverse opal (Au-IO) thin films are active for CO2 reduction to CO with high efficiency at modest overpotentials and high selectivity relative to hydrogen evolution. The specific activity for hydrogen evolution diminishes by 10-fold with increasing porous film thickness, while CO evolution activity is largely unchanged. We demonstrate that the origin of hydrogen suppression in Au-IO films stems from the generation of diffusional gradients within the pores of the mesostructured electrode rather than changes in surface faceting or Au grain size. For electrodes with optimal mesoporosity, 99% selectivity for CO evolution can be obtained at overpotentials as low as 0.4 V. These results establish electrode mesostructuring as a complementary method for tuning selectivity in CO2-to-fuels catalysis. PMID:26536054

  8. CREB Selectively Controls Learning-Induced Structural Remodeling of Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Spalloni, Alida; Longone, Patrizia; Pittenger, Christopher; O'Mara, Shane M.; Marie, Helene; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of synaptic strength associated with learning is post-synaptically regulated by changes in density and shape of dendritic spines. The transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) is required for memory formation and in vitro dendritic spine rearrangements, but its role in learning-induced remodeling of neurons…

  9. High time resolution laser induced fluorescence in pulsed argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Biloiu, Ioana A.; Sun Xuan; Scime, Earl E.

    2006-10-15

    A submillisecond time resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method for obtaining the temporal evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in pulsed argon plasma is presented. A basic LIF system that employs a continuous laser wave pumping and lock-in aided detection of the subsequent fluorescence radiation is modified by addition of a high frequency acousto-optic modulator to provide measurements of the ion flow velocity and ion temperature in a helicon generated pulsed argon plasma with temporal resolutions as high as 30 {mu}s.

  10. Aberrant Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor as a Signature of Natural Selection.

    PubMed

    Hunter-Zinck, Haley; Clark, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    Natural selection inference methods often target one mode of selection of a particular age and strength. However, detecting multiple modes simultaneously, or with atypical representations, would be advantageous for understanding a population's evolutionary history. We have developed an anomaly detection algorithm using distributions of pairwise time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) to simultaneously detect multiple modes of natural selection in whole-genome sequences. As natural selection distorts local genealogies in distinct ways, the method uses pairwise TMRCA distributions, which approximate genealogies at a nonrecombining locus, to detect distortions without targeting a specific mode of selection. We evaluate the performance of our method, TSel, for both positive and balancing selection over different time-scales and selection strengths and compare TSel's performance with that of other methods. We then apply TSel to the Complete Genomics diversity panel, a set of human whole-genome sequences, and recover loci previously inferred to be under positive or balancing selection.

  11. Selective cytoprotective effect of histamine on doxorubicin-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, DJMartinel; Nicoud, MB; Sterle, HA; Carabajal, E; Tesan, F; Perazzo, JC; Cremaschi, GA; Rivera, ES; Medina, VA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the potential protective effect of histamine on Doxorubicin (Dox)-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in different rodent species and in a triple-negative breast tumor-bearing mice model. Male Sprague Dawley rats and Balb/c mice were divided into four groups: control (received saline), histamine (5 mg/kg for rats and 1 mg/kg for mice, daily subcutaneous injection starting 24 h before treatment with Dox), Dox (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally injected three times a week for 2 weeks) and Dox+histamine (received both treatments). Tissue toxicity was evaluated by histopathological studies and oxidative stress and biochemical parameters. The combined effect of histamine and Dox was also investigated in vitro and in vivo in human MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer model. Heart and liver of Dox-treated animals displayed severe histological damage, loss of tissue weight, increased TBARS levels and DNA damage along with an augment in serum creatine kinase-myocardial band. Pretreatment with histamine prevented Dox-induced tissue events producing a significant preservation of the integrity of both rat and mouse myocardium and liver, through the reduction of Dox-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Histamine treatment preserved anti-tumor activity of Dox, exhibiting differential cytotoxicity and increasing the Dox-induced inhibition of breast tumor growth. Findings provide preclinical evidence indicating that histamine could be a promising candidate as a selective cytoprotective agent for the treatment of Dox-induced cardiac and hepatic toxicity, and encourage the translation to clinical practice. PMID:27551485

  12. Time-Resolved Aluminum Monoxide Emission Measurements in Laser-Induced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, David; Parigger, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced plasmas are useful for diagnostic applications in a wide variety of fields. One application is the creation of laser-induced plasmas on the surface of an aluminum sample to simulate an aluminized flame. In this study, aluminum monoxide emissions are measured to characterize the temperature along the laser-induced plasma as a function of time delay following laser-induced optical breakdown. The breakdown event is achieved by focusing 1064 nanometer laser radiation from an Nd:YAG laser onto the surface of an aluminum sample. Light from the plasma is dispersed with the use of a Czerny-Turner spectrograph, and time resolved emission spectra are recorded with an intensified, gated detector. Temperatures are inferred from the diatomic molecular emissions by fitting the experimentally collected to theoretically calculated spectra using a Nelder-Mead algorithm. For computation of synthetic spectra we utilize accurate line strengths for selected AlO molecular bands. Atomic emissions from aluminum are also investigated in our study of laser-induced plasma.

  13. Sequence selectivity of macrolide-induced translational attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Amber R.; Gohara, David W.; Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2014-01-01

    The prevailing “plug-in-the-bottle” model suggests that macrolide antibiotics inhibit translation by binding inside the ribosome tunnel and indiscriminately arresting the elongation of every nascent polypeptide after the synthesis of six to eight amino acids. To test this model, we performed a genome-wide analysis of translation in azithromycin-treated Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast to earlier predictions, we found that the macrolide does not preferentially induce ribosome stalling near the 5′ end of mRNAs, but rather acts at specific stalling sites that are scattered throughout the entire coding region. These sites are highly enriched in prolines and charged residues and are strikingly similar to other ligand-independent ribosome stalling motifs. Interestingly, the addition of structurally related macrolides had dramatically different effects on stalling efficiency. Our data suggest that ribosome stalling can occur at a surprisingly large number of low-complexity motifs in a fashion that depends only on a few arrest-inducing residues and the presence of a small molecule inducer. PMID:25313041

  14. Method for selectively orienting induced fractures in subterranean earth formations

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1977-02-01

    The orientation of hydraulically-induced fractures in relatively deep subterranean earth formations is normally confined to vertical projections along a plane parallel to the maximum naturally occurring (tectonic) compressive stress field. It was found that this plane of maximum compressive stress may be negated and, in effect, re-oriented in a plane projecting generally orthogonal to the original tectonic stress plane by injecting liquid at a sufficiently high pressure into a wellbore fracture oriented in a plane parallel to the plane of tectonic stress for the purpose of stressing the surrounding earth formation in a plane generally orthogonal to the plane of tectonic stress. With the plane of maximum compressive stress re-oriented due to the presence of the induced compressive stress, liquid under pressure is injected into a second wellbore disposed within the zone influenced by the induced compressive stress but at a location in the earth formation laterally spaced from the fracture in the first wellbore for effecting a fracture in the second wellbore along a plane generally orthogonal to the fracture in the first wellbore.

  15. Time-resolved electric-field-induced second harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshulam, Guilia; Berkovic, Garry; Kotler, Zvi

    2001-12-01

    One limitation of using electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) to determine the molecular first hyperpolarizability (beta) of nonlinear optical molecules lies in the fact that part of the second harmonic signal comes from the second hyperpolarizability (gamma) produced by mixing two optical fields with the DC field. In analyzing EFISH results, the second hyperpolarizability contribution of the studied molecules is generally neglected. We present a modified time resolved EFISH technique that allows us, in a single experiment, to determine separately the beta and the gamma contributions. We study para-nitro aniline dissolved in Glycerol, a highly viscous solvent, and apply the DC field via a high voltage pulse with a fast rise time of approximately 40 nsec. As a result, the orientation of the molecules under the applied electric field is slow relative to the build-up of the field, enabling us to directly measure only the DC induced second harmonic (gamma contribution), at the beginning of the HV pulse. The pure beta contribution is determined from the difference between this signal and the conventional EFISH signal at the plateau of the HV pulse. Our result confirm that the gamma contribution is indeed less than 10% of the total.

  16. Selective inhibition of human inducible nitric oxide synthase by S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Park, J M; Higuchi, T; Kikuchi, K; Urano, Y; Hori, H; Nishino, T; Aoki, J; Inoue, K; Nagano, T

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides towards three partially purified recombinant human nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes, as well as the effects of these compounds on cytokine-induced NO production by human DLD-1 cells. In an in vitro assay, S-methyl-L-isothiocitrulline (L-MIT) was slightly selective for human neuronal NOS (nNOS) over the inducible (iNOS) or endothelial (eNOS) isozyme, but the combination of a hydrophobic L-amino acid (L-Phe, L-Leu or L-Trp) with L-MIT dramatically altered the inhibition pattern to give selective iNOS inhibitors. Introduction of a hydroxy, nitro, amino or methoxy group at the para position of the aromatic ring of L-MIT-L-Phe (MILF) decreased the selectivity and inhibitory potency. A longer or larger S-alkyl group also decreased the selectivity and potency. Dixon analysis showed that all of the dipeptides were competitive inhibitors of the three isoforms of human NOS. The enzymatic time course curves indicated that MILF was a slow binding inhibitor of human iNOS. These results suggest that the human NOS isozymes have different-sized cavities in the binding site near the position to which the C-terminal of L-arginine binds, and the cavity of iNOS is hydrophobic. Interestingly, L-MIT-D-Phe (MIDF) showed little inhibitory activity or selectivity, suggesting that the cavity of human iNOS is located in a well-defined direction from the alpha carbon atom. NO production in cytokine-stimulated human DLD-1 cells was measured with a fluorescent indicator, DAF-FM. MILF, L-MIT-L-Trp(-CHO) (MILW) and L-MIT-L-Tyr (MILY) showed more potent activity than L-MIT in this whole-cell assay. Thus, S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides are selective inhibitors of human iNOS, and work efficiently in cell-based assay. PMID:11309260

  17. Selective inhibition of human inducible nitric oxide synthase by S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Min; Higuchi, Tsunehiko; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Urano, Yasuteru; Hori, Hiroyuki; Nishino, Takeshi; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Keizo; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides towards three partially purified recombinant human nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes, as well as the effects of these compounds on cytokine-induced NO production by human DLD-1 cells.In an in vitro assay, S-methyl-L-isothiocitrulline (L-MIT) was slightly selective for human neuronal NOS (nNOS) over the inducible (iNOS) or endothelial (eNOS) isozyme, but the combination of a hydrophobic L-amino acid (L-Phe, L-Leu or L-Trp) with L-MIT dramatically altered the inhibition pattern to give selective iNOS inhibitors. Introduction of a hydroxy, nitro, amino or methoxy group at the para position of the aromatic ring of L-MIT-L-Phe (MILF) decreased the selectivity and inhibitory potency. A longer or larger S-alkyl group also decreased the selectivity and potency. Dixon analysis showed that all of the dipeptides were competitive inhibitors of the three isoforms of human NOS. The enzymatic time course curves indicated that MILF was a slow binding inhibitor of human iNOS.These results suggest that the human NOS isozymes have different-sized cavities in the binding site near the position to which the C-terminal of L-arginine binds, and the cavity of iNOS is hydrophobic. Interestingly, L-MIT-D-Phe (MIDF) showed little inhibitory activity or selectivity, suggesting that the cavity of human iNOS is located in a well-defined direction from the α carbon atom.NO production in cytokine-stimulated human DLD-1 cells was measured with a fluorescent indicator, DAF-FM. MILF, L-MIT-L-Trp(-CHO) (MILW) and L-MIT-L-Tyr (MILY) showed more potent activity than L-MIT in this whole-cell assay.Thus, S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides are selective inhibitors of human iNOS, and work efficiently in cell-based assay. PMID:11309260

  18. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  19. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, Amy K; Lee, Min S; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment.

  20. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min S.; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A.; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R.; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  1. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, Amy K; Lee, Min S; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  2. A geographic cline induced by negative frequency-dependent selection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Establishment of geographic morph frequency clines is difficult to explain in organisms with limited gene flow. Balancing selection, such as negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS), is instead suggested to establish a morph frequency cline on a geographic scale at least theoretically. Here we tested whether a large-scale smooth cline in morph frequency is established by NFDS in the female-dimorphic damselfly, Ischnura senegalensis, where andromorphs and gynomorphs are maintained by NFDS. Results We found a large-scale latitudinal cline in the morph frequency: andromorph frequency ranged from 0.05 (South) to 0.79 (North). Based on the empirical data on the numbers of eggs, the number of ovariole, abdomen length and latitude, the potential fitness of andromorphs was estimated to be lower than that of gynomorphs in the south, and higher in the north, suggesting the gene-by-environment interaction. From the morph-specific latitudinal cline in potential fitness, the frequency of andromorphs was expected to shift from 0 to 1 without NFDS, because a morph with higher potential fitness wins completely and the two morphs will switch at some point. In contrast, NFDS led to the coexistence of two morphs with different potential fitness in a certain geographic range along latitude due to rare morph advantage, and resulted in a smooth geographic cline of morph frequency. Conclusion Our results provide suggestive evidence that the combination of NFDS and gene-by-environment interaction, i.e., multi-selection pressure on color morphs, can explain the geographic cline in morph frequency in the current system. PMID:21917171

  3. Microgravity induced selective lesions in immunosignaling: Upstream targets in lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N.

    Microgravity is a novel milieu for cells where re-ordering of forces induces different responses. Human lymphocytes undergo a suppression of activation and locomotion in space and modeled microgravity. Based on recovery of activation and locomotion with the phorbol ester PMA, the lesion induced by microgravity is presumed up- stream of the level of PKC signaling. Lymphocytes cultured in ground-based microgravity analog conditions display depressed calcium independent PKC isoforms. Upstream signaling molecules such as Phospholipase C gamma were not sufficiently activated in modeled microgravity. Immunoblotting revealed LAT, which is an adaptor protein crucial for Phospholipase C gamma recruitment in T cell activation, was down regulated in lymphocytes cultured at 72 and 96 hours in modeled microgravity. Also, ZAP 70 kinase, which is a LAT activator, down- regulated (>2 fold) at 96 hours modeled microgravity culture. Microarray analysis of lymphocytes cultured in 1g and modeled microgravity revealed significant down- regulation in upstream T cell activation molecules such as Diacylglycerol kinase, serine/threonine kinases, and tyrosine kinases. All up-stream targets in T cell activation are negatively affected in microgravity. Optimal immune function is critical in the ISS era where long term space travel is inevitable. Elucidation of the key mechanisms affected by microgravity lays the foundation for development of treatments that can counter these deleterious effects.

  4. Exploring the influential factors in incident clearance time: Disentangling causation from self-selection bias.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chuan; Ma, Xiaolei; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Yunpeng

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationships between influential factors and incident clearance time is crucial to make effective countermeasures for incident management agencies. Although there have been a certain number of achievements on incident clearance time modeling, limited effort is made to investigate the relative role of incident response time and its self-selection in influencing the clearance time. To fill this gap, this study uses the endogenous switching model to explore the influential factors in incident clearance time, and aims to disentangle causation from self-selection bias caused by response process. Under the joint two-stage model framework, the binary probit model and switching regression model are formulated for both incident response time and clearance time, respectively. Based on the freeway incident data collected in Washington State, full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method is utilized to estimate the endogenous switching model parameters. Significant factors affecting incident response time and clearance time can be identified, including incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational attributes. The estimate results reveal the influential effects of incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational factors on incident response time and clearance time. In addition, the causality of incident response time itself and its self-selection correction on incident clearance time are found to be indispensable. These findings suggest that the causal effect of response time on incident clearance time will be overestimated if the self-selection bias is not considered.

  5. Exploring the influential factors in incident clearance time: Disentangling causation from self-selection bias.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chuan; Ma, Xiaolei; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Yunpeng

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationships between influential factors and incident clearance time is crucial to make effective countermeasures for incident management agencies. Although there have been a certain number of achievements on incident clearance time modeling, limited effort is made to investigate the relative role of incident response time and its self-selection in influencing the clearance time. To fill this gap, this study uses the endogenous switching model to explore the influential factors in incident clearance time, and aims to disentangle causation from self-selection bias caused by response process. Under the joint two-stage model framework, the binary probit model and switching regression model are formulated for both incident response time and clearance time, respectively. Based on the freeway incident data collected in Washington State, full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method is utilized to estimate the endogenous switching model parameters. Significant factors affecting incident response time and clearance time can be identified, including incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational attributes. The estimate results reveal the influential effects of incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational factors on incident response time and clearance time. In addition, the causality of incident response time itself and its self-selection correction on incident clearance time are found to be indispensable. These findings suggest that the causal effect of response time on incident clearance time will be overestimated if the self-selection bias is not considered. PMID:26373988

  6. A Locked Nucleic Acid Probe Based on Selective Salt-Induced Effect Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Huizhe; Chen, Qiuchen; Zhao, Pengfei; Zhao, Haishan; Yao, Weifan; Wei, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    Detection of single based genetic mutation by using oligonucleotide probes is one of the common methods of detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms at known loci. In this paper, we demonstrated a hybridization system which included a buffer solution that produced selective salt-induced effect and a locked nucleic acid modified 12 nt oligonucleotide probe. The hybridization system is suitable for hybridization under room temperature. By using magnetic nanoparticles as carriers for PCR products, the SNPs (MDR1 C3435T/A) from 45 volunteers were analyzed, and the results were consistent with the results from pyrophosphoric acid sequencing. The method presented in this paper differs from the traditional method of using molecular beacons to detect SNPs in that it is suitable for research institutions lacking real-time quantitative PCR detecting systems, to detect PCR products at room temperature. PMID:26347880

  7. Neuronal polarity selection by topography-induced focal adhesion control.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Aldo; Cecchini, Marco; Serresi, Michela; Faraci, Paolo; Pisignano, Dario; Beltram, Fabio

    2010-06-01

    Interaction between differentiating neurons and the extracellular environment guides the establishment of cell polarity during nervous system development. Developing neurons read the physical properties of the local substrate in a contact-dependent manner and retrieve essential guidance cues. In previous works we demonstrated that PC12 cell interaction with nanogratings (alternating lines of ridges and grooves of submicron size) promotes bipolarity and alignment to the substrate topography. Here, we investigate the role of focal adhesions, cell contractility, and actin dynamics in this process. Exploiting nanoimprint lithography techniques and a cyclic olefin copolymer, we engineered biocompatible nanostructured substrates designed for high-resolution live-cell microscopy. Our results reveal that neuronal polarization and contact guidance are based on a geometrical constraint of focal adhesions resulting in an angular modulation of their maturation and persistence. We report on ROCK1/2-myosin-II pathway activity and demonstrate that ROCK-mediated contractility contributes to polarity selection during neuronal differentiation. Importantly, the selection process confined the generation of actin-supported membrane protrusions and the initiation of new neurites at the poles. Maintenance of the established polarity was independent from NGF stimulation. Altogether our results imply that focal adhesions and cell contractility stably link the topographical configuration of the extracellular environment to a corresponding neuronal polarity state. PMID:20304485

  8. Time course of ozone-induced neutrophilia in normal humans

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Siefkin, A.D.; McDonald, R.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Five normal human subjects were exposed for 1 h to filtered air (FA) once and to 0.3 ppm O{sub 3} on 3 separate days. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was obtained less than 1 h after FA and either less than 1, 6, or 24 h after O{sub 3} exposure. FEV1 was measured before the exposures and the BAL. The first aliquot (proximal airway (PA) sample) was analyzed separately from the pooled Aliquots 2 through 4 (distal airway and alveolar surface (DAAS) sample). The data from the PA and DAAS samples were then combined to calculate the values that would have been obtained by pooling all BAL washes. FEV1 was significantly (p less than 0.05) decreased 1 h after O{sub 3} exposure, but it returned to preexposure values at 6 and 24 h after O{sub 3}. The percent of neutrophils in the PA sample was significantly elevated at less than 1 h (3.7%) at 6 h (16.5%), and at 24 h (9.2%) after O{sub 3}. The percent of neutrophils in the DAAS sample and calculated pooled values were significantly elevated at 6 h (4.1 and 7.6%) and at 24 h (5.1 and 5.8%) after O{sub 3}. These data demonstrate that O{sub 3}-induced symptoms, FEV1 decrements, and airway neutrophilia follow different time courses and indicate that the pooling of BAL washes may obscure the detection of an O{sub 3}-induced bronchiolitis. The degree of neutrophilia in the BAL did not correlate with the sensitivity of the individual subjects when measured by acute changes in FEV1, suggesting a dichotomy of pathways that result in O{sub 3}-induced airway neutrophilia and pulmonary function decrements.

  9. Selective Inhibition of Microglia-Mediated Neuroinflammation Mitigates Radiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Jenrow, Kenneth A; Brown, Stephen L.; Lapanowski, Karen; Naei, Hoda; Kolozsvary, Andrew; Kim, Jae Ho

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment precipitated by irradiation of normal brain tissue is commonly associated with radiation therapy for treatment of brain cancer, and typically manifests more than 6 months after radiation exposure. The risks of cognitive impairment are of particular concern for an increasing number of long-term cancer survivors. There is presently no effective means of preventing or mitigating this debilitating condition. Neuroinflammation mediated by activated microglial cytokines has been implicated in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment in animal models, including the disruption of neurogenesis and activity-induced gene expression in the hippocampus. These pathologies evolve rapidly and are associated with relatively subtle cognitive impairment at 2 months postirradiation. However, recent reports suggest that more profound cognitive impairment develops at later post-irradiation time points, perhaps reflecting a gradual loss of responsiveness within the hippocampus by the disruption of neurogenesis. We hypothesized that inhibiting neuroinflammation using MW01-2-151SRM (MW-151), a selective inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokine production, might mitigate these deleterious radiation effects by preserving/restoring hippocampal neurogenesis. MW-151 therapy was initiated 24 h after 10 Gy whole-brain irradiation (WBI) administered as a single fraction and maintained for 28 days thereafter. Proinflammatory activated microglia in the dentate gyrus were assayed at 2 and 9 months post-WBI. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus were assayed at 2 months post-WBI, whereas novel object recognition and long-term potentiation were assayed at 6 and 9 months post-WBI, respectively. MW-151 mitigated radiation-induced neuroinflammation at both early and late time points post-WBI, selectively mitigated the deleterious effects of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis, and potently mitigated radiation-induced deficits of novel object

  10. Selective inhibition of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation mitigates radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Jenrow, Kenneth A; Brown, Stephen L; Lapanowski, Karen; Naei, Hoda; Kolozsvary, Andrew; Kim, Jae Ho

    2013-05-01

    Cognitive impairment precipitated by irradiation of normal brain tissue is commonly associated with radiation therapy for treatment of brain cancer, and typically manifests more than 6 months after radiation exposure. The risks of cognitive impairment are of particular concern for an increasing number of long-term cancer survivors. There is presently no effective means of preventing or mitigating this debilitating condition. Neuroinflammation mediated by activated microglial cytokines has been implicated in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment in animal models, including the disruption of neurogenesis and activity-induced gene expression in the hippocampus. These pathologies evolve rapidly and are associated with relatively subtle cognitive impairment at 2 months postirradiation. However, recent reports suggest that more profound cognitive impairment develops at later post-irradiation time points, perhaps reflecting a gradual loss of responsiveness within the hippocampus by the disruption of neurogenesis. We hypothesized that inhibiting neuroinflammation using MW01-2-151SRM (MW-151), a selective inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokine production, might mitigate these deleterious radiation effects by preserving/restoring hippocampal neurogenesis. MW-151 therapy was initiated 24 h after 10 Gy whole-brain irradiation (WBI) administered as a single fraction and maintained for 28 days thereafter. Proinflammatory activated microglia in the dentate gyrus were assayed at 2 and 9 months post-WBI. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus were assayed at 2 months post-WBI, whereas novel object recognition and long-term potentiation were assayed at 6 and 9 months post-WBI, respectively. MW-151 mitigated radiation-induced neuroinflammation at both early and late time points post-WBI, selectively mitigated the deleterious effects of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis, and potently mitigated radiation-induced deficits of novel object

  11. Selective Serotonin–norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors-induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Rampal, Upamanyu; Patel, Hiten; Patel, Kunal; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Context: Takotsubo translates to “octopus pot” in Japanese. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by a transient regional systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Catecholamine excess is the one most studied and favored theories explaining the pathophysiology of TTC. Case Report: We present the case of a 52-year-old Hispanic female admitted for venlafaxine-induced TTC with a review literature on all the cases of Serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI)-associated TTC published so far. Conclusion: SNRI inhibit the reuptake of catecholamines into the presynaptic neuron, resulting in a net gain in the concentration of epinephrine and serotonin in the neuronal synapses and causing iatrogenic catecholamine excess, ultimately leading to TTC. PMID:27583240

  12. Correlation-induced Time Delay in Atomic Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, David A.; Manson, Steven T.; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Kheifets, Anatoli S.

    2016-05-01

    Interchannel coupling has been seen to result in structures in the photoionization cross sections of outer shell electrons in the vicinity of inner-shell thresholds, a result which leads us to ask if the same would be true for the time delay of outer shell electrons near inner-shell thresholds. Using the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA) methodology, a theoretical study of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon were performed to search for these correlation-induced effects. Calculations were performed both with coupling and without coupling to verify that the structures found in the time delay were in fact due to interchannel coupling. Using this method to study the effects of interchannel coupling reveals how much of an impact the coupling has on the time delay, in some cases over a broad energy range. In cases where the spin-orbit doublets' respective thresholds are far enough apart, effects can be found in the j = l + 1/2channels due to interchannel coupling with the j = l-1/2 channels. These structures are purely a relativistic effect and are related to spin-obit activated interchannel coupling effects. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences, DST (India), and the Australian Research Council.

  13. An integrated analysis of phenotypic selection on insect body size and development time.

    PubMed

    Eck, Daniel J; Shaw, Ruth G; Geyer, Charles J; Kingsolver, Joel G

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of phenotypic selection do not estimate selection or fitness surfaces for multiple components of fitness within a unified statistical framework. This makes it difficult or impossible to assess how selection operates on traits through variation in multiple components of fitness. We describe a new generation of aster models that can evaluate phenotypic selection by accounting for timing of life-history transitions and their effect on population growth rate, in addition to survival and reproductive output. We use this approach to estimate selection on body size and development time for a field population of the herbivorous insect, Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae). Estimated fitness surfaces revealed strong and significant directional selection favoring both larger adult size (via effects on egg counts) and more rapid rates of early larval development (via effects on larval survival). Incorporating the timing of reproduction and its influence on population growth rate into the analysis resulted in larger values for size in early larval development at which fitness is maximized, and weaker selection on size in early larval development. These results illustrate how the interplay of different components of fitness can influence selection on size and development time. This integrated modeling framework can be readily applied to studies of phenotypic selection via multiple fitness components in other systems. PMID:26257167

  14. Undecylprodigiosin selectively induces apoptosis in human breast carcinoma cells independent of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.-F.; Ma, C.-J.; Lu, C.-H.; Tsai, Yo-Ting; Wei, Y.-H.; Chang, J.-S.; Lai, J.-K.; Cheuh, Pin-Ju; Yeh, C.-T.; Tang, P.-C.; Jingua, T.C.; Ko, J.-L.; Liu, F.-S.; Yen, H.E.

    2007-12-15

    Undecylprodigiosin (UP) is a bacterial bioactive metabolite produced by Streptomyces and Serratia. In this study, we explored the anticancer effect of UP. Human breast carcinoma cell lines BT-20, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and T47D and one nonmalignant human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, were tested in this study. We found that UP exerted a potent cytotoxicity against all breast carcinoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, UP showed limited toxicity to MCF-10A cells, indicating UP's cytotoxic effect is selective for malignant cells. UP's cytotoxic effect was due to apoptosis, as confirmed by positive TUNEL signals, annexin V-binding, caspase 9 activation and PARP cleavage. Notably, UP-induced apoptosis was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD.fmk, further indicating the involvement of caspase activity. Moreover, UP caused a marked decrease of the levels of antiapoptotic BCL-X{sub L}, Survivin and XIAP while enhancing the levels of proapoptotic BIK, BIM, MCL-1S and NOXA, consequently favoring induction of apoptosis. Additionally, we found that cells with functional p53 (MCF-7, T47D) or mutant p53 (BT-20, MDA-MB-231) were both susceptible to UP's cytotoxicity. Importantly, UP was able to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells with p53 knockdown by RNA interference, confirming the dispensability of p53 in UP-induced apoptosis. Overall, our results establish that UP induces p53-independent apoptosis in breast carcinoma cells with no marked toxicity to nonmalignant cells, raising the possibility of its use as a new chemotherapeutic drug for breast cancer irrespective of p53 status.

  15. Curvature-induced symmetry breaking selects elastic wrinkling patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Norbert; Lagrange, Romain; Terwagne, Denis; Reis, Pedro; Dunkel, Joern

    2015-03-01

    Wrinkling in curved bilayer surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon, including embryogenesis, biological tissue differentiation or structure formation in heterogenous thin films. Due to curved substrate and the strong nonlinearities in the elastic strains, predictions for the wrinkling morphology are notoriously difficult to obtain using classical analysis. Here, we derive a generalized Swift-Hohenberg theory to describe these morphologies and their pattern selection. Testing the theory against experiments on spherically shaped surfaces, we find quantitative agreement with analytical predictions for the phase transition curves separating labyrinth, hybrid and hexagonal wrinkling phases. Our approach builds on general differential-geometric principles and can be extended to arbitrarily shaped surfaces. Present address: Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

  16. Flexibility of inorganic tennis ball structures inducing anion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Park, Jung Su; Kang, Tae Yi; Oh, Kyungeun; Seo, Mi-Sook; Sohn, Youn Soo; Jun, Moo-Jin; Nam, Wonwoo; Kim, Kwan Mook

    2006-09-18

    Inorganic tennis balls (ITBs), [[{Pt(betmp)(dach)}(2)Cu](2)(X)][X](3) (in which X=ClO(4) (-) (3), NO(3) (-) (4), Cl(-) (5) and Br(-) (6); dach=trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane and betmp=bisethylthiomethylidenepropanedioate) and [[{Pt(dteym)(dach)}(2)Cu](2)(PF(6))][PF(6)](3) (7; dteym=1,3-dithiepane-2-ylidenemalonate), were prepared as crystals. Investigation of their X-ray crystal structures revealed that shapes of the cavities in ITBs show significant distortions that depend on the properties of the encapsulated anions. The CuCu* distance was observed to be longest in 7 and shortest in 5, the difference between them being 2.05 A. The flexibility of cavity structures of ITBs makes it possible to encapsulate various anions inside the cavity, while their distortions may be a reason for the difference in the encapsulating ability for anions, that is, anion selectivity. Especially, the distortions observed in 7 are so severe that the encapsulating ability of the cavity for PF(6) (-) is very low compared to other anions. The shapes of ITBs with ClO(4) (-) and BF(4) (-) ions inside their cavities are very similar; however, ClO(4) (-) is encapsulated by the cavity better than BF(4) (-), which is explicable by the difference of metal-anion interactions. This structural study on ITBs gives a clue to the origin of the anion selectivity of the cavity in ITBs previously investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy of the ITBs in methanol.

  17. Flexibility of inorganic tennis ball structures inducing anion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Park, Jung Su; Kang, Tae Yi; Oh, Kyungeun; Seo, Mi-Sook; Sohn, Youn Soo; Jun, Moo-Jin; Nam, Wonwoo; Kim, Kwan Mook

    2006-09-18

    Inorganic tennis balls (ITBs), [[{Pt(betmp)(dach)}(2)Cu](2)(X)][X](3) (in which X=ClO(4) (-) (3), NO(3) (-) (4), Cl(-) (5) and Br(-) (6); dach=trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane and betmp=bisethylthiomethylidenepropanedioate) and [[{Pt(dteym)(dach)}(2)Cu](2)(PF(6))][PF(6)](3) (7; dteym=1,3-dithiepane-2-ylidenemalonate), were prepared as crystals. Investigation of their X-ray crystal structures revealed that shapes of the cavities in ITBs show significant distortions that depend on the properties of the encapsulated anions. The CuCu* distance was observed to be longest in 7 and shortest in 5, the difference between them being 2.05 A. The flexibility of cavity structures of ITBs makes it possible to encapsulate various anions inside the cavity, while their distortions may be a reason for the difference in the encapsulating ability for anions, that is, anion selectivity. Especially, the distortions observed in 7 are so severe that the encapsulating ability of the cavity for PF(6) (-) is very low compared to other anions. The shapes of ITBs with ClO(4) (-) and BF(4) (-) ions inside their cavities are very similar; however, ClO(4) (-) is encapsulated by the cavity better than BF(4) (-), which is explicable by the difference of metal-anion interactions. This structural study on ITBs gives a clue to the origin of the anion selectivity of the cavity in ITBs previously investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy of the ITBs in methanol. PMID:16800019

  18. 76 FR 46840 - Time Extension To Accept Proposals, Select One Lessee, and Contract for Hydroelectric Power...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... notice was originally published in the Federal Register on April 20, 2011 (76 FR 22143). The due date was... Bureau of Reclamation Time Extension To Accept Proposals, Select One Lessee, and Contract for... proposals detailed in the Notice of Intent to Accept Proposals, Select One Lessee, and Contract...

  19. Strain-induced time-reversal odd superconductivity in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juricic, Vladimir; Roy, Bitan

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the possibility of realizing a time-reversal-symmetry breaking superconducting state that exhibits an f + is pairing symmetry in strained graphene. Although the underlying attractive interactions need to be sufficiently strong and comparable in pristine graphene to support such pairing state, I will argue that strain can be conducive for its formation even for weak interactions. I will show that quantum-critical behavior near the transition is controlled by a fermionic multicritical point, characterized by various critical exponents computed in the framework of an ɛ-expansion near four spacetime dimensions. I will then discuss the scaling of the superconducting gap with the strain-induced axial pseudo-magnetic field. Furthermore, a vortex in this mixed superconducting state hosts a pair of Majorana fermions supporting a quartet of insulating and superconducting orders, among which quantum spin Hall topological insulator. Finally, I will mention some experimental signatures of this f + is time-reversal odd superconductor. These findings suggest that strained graphene could provide a platform for the realization of exotic superconducting states of Dirac fermions. VJ is supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  20. Fishery-induced selection on an Alpine whitefish: quantifying genetic and environmental effects on individual growth rate

    PubMed Central

    Nusslé, Sébastien; Bornand, Christophe N; Wedekind, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Size-selective fishing, environmental changes and reproductive strategies are expected to affect life-history traits such as the individual growth rate. The relative contribution of these factors is not clear, particularly whether size-selective fishing can have a substantial impact on the genetics and hence on the evolution of individual growth rates in wild populations. We analysed a 25-year monitoring survey of an isolated population of the Alpine whitefish Coregonus palaea. We determined the selection differentials on growth rate, the actual change of growth rate over time and indicators of reproductive strategies that may potentially change over time. The selection differential can be reliably estimated in our study population because almost all the fish are harvested within their first years of life, i.e. few fish escape fishing mortality. We found a marked decline in average adult growth rate over the 25 years and a significant selection differential for adult growth, but no evidence for any linear change in reproductive strategies over time. Assuming that the heritability of growth in this whitefish corresponds to what was found in other salmonids, about a third of the observed decline in growth rate would be linked to fishery-induced evolution. Size-selective fishing seems to affect substantially the genetics of individual growth in our study population. PMID:25567861

  1. Harvest-induced phenotypic selection in an island population of moose, Alces alces.

    PubMed

    Kvalnes, Thomas; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Haanes, Hallvard; Røed, Knut H; Engen, Steinar; Solberg, Erling J

    2016-07-01

    Empirical evidence strongly indicates that human exploitation has frequently led to rapid evolutionary changes in wild populations, yet the mechanisms involved are often poorly understood. Here, we applied a recently developed demographic framework for analyzing selection to data from a 20-year study of a wild population of moose, Alces alces. In this population, a genetic pedigree has been established all the way back to founders. We demonstrate harvest-induced directional selection for delayed birth dates in males and reduced body mass as calf in females. During the study period, birth date was delayed by 0.81 days per year for both sexes, whereas no significant changes occurred in calf body mass. Quantitative genetic analyses indicated that both traits harbored significant additive genetic variance. These results show that selective harvesting can induce strong selection that oppose natural selection. This may cause evolution of less favorable phenotypes that become maladaptive once harvesting ceases.

  2. Harvest-induced phenotypic selection in an island population of moose, Alces alces.

    PubMed

    Kvalnes, Thomas; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Haanes, Hallvard; Røed, Knut H; Engen, Steinar; Solberg, Erling J

    2016-07-01

    Empirical evidence strongly indicates that human exploitation has frequently led to rapid evolutionary changes in wild populations, yet the mechanisms involved are often poorly understood. Here, we applied a recently developed demographic framework for analyzing selection to data from a 20-year study of a wild population of moose, Alces alces. In this population, a genetic pedigree has been established all the way back to founders. We demonstrate harvest-induced directional selection for delayed birth dates in males and reduced body mass as calf in females. During the study period, birth date was delayed by 0.81 days per year for both sexes, whereas no significant changes occurred in calf body mass. Quantitative genetic analyses indicated that both traits harbored significant additive genetic variance. These results show that selective harvesting can induce strong selection that oppose natural selection. This may cause evolution of less favorable phenotypes that become maladaptive once harvesting ceases. PMID:27174031

  3. Selective inhibition of inducible cyclooxygenase 2 in vivo is antiinflammatory and nonulcerogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Masferrer, J L; Zweifel, B S; Manning, P T; Hauser, S D; Leahy, K M; Smith, W G; Isakson, P C; Seibert, K

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the role of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in a model of inflammation in vivo. Carrageenan administration to the subcutaneous rat air pouch induces a rapid inflammatory response characterized by high levels of prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes in the fluid exudate. The time course of the induction of COX-2 mRNA and protein coincided with the production of PGs in the pouch tissue and cellular infiltrate. Carrageenan-induced COX-2 immunoreactivity was localized to macrophages obtained from the fluid exudate as well as to the inner surface layer of cells within the pouch lining. Dexamethasone inhibited both COX-2 expression and PG synthesis in the fluid exudate but failed to inhibit PG synthesis in the stomach. Furthermore, NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, and indomethacin, a nonselective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor, blocked proinflammatory PG synthesis in the air pouch. In contrast, only indomethacin blocked gastric PG and, additionally, produced gastric lesions. These results suggest that inhibitors of COX-2 are potent antiinflammatory agents which do not produce the typical side effects (e.g., gastric ulcers) associated with the nonselective, COX-1-directed antiinflammatory drugs. Images PMID:8159730

  4. Nondestructive nanofabrication on Si(100) surface by tribochemistry-induced selective etching

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Yu, Bingjun; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2015-01-01

    A tribochemistry-induced selective etching approach is proposed for the first time to produce silicon nanostructures without lattice damage. With a ~1 nm thick SiOx film as etching mask grown on Si(100) surface (Si(100)/SiOx) by wet-oxidation technique, nano-trenches can be produced through the removal of local SiOx mask by a SiO2 tip in humid air and the post-etching of the exposed Si in potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. The material removal of SiOx mask and Si under low load is dominated by the tribochemical reaction at the interface between SiO2 tip and Si/SiOx sample, where the contact pressure is much lower than the critical pressure for initial yield of Si. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) observation indicates that neither the material removal induced by tribochemical reaction nor the wet etching in KOH solution leads to lattice damage of the fabricated nanostructures. The proposed approach points out a new route in nondestructive nanofabrication. PMID:26559014

  5. Directional versus Stabilizing Selection for Developmental Time in Natural and Laboratory Populations of Flour Beetles.

    PubMed

    Dawson, P S

    1975-08-01

    Artificial selection for fast development is successful in long-established laboratory populations of Tribolium, but not in strains recently derived from natural populations. It is shown that selection against fast development in dense, synchronized cultures operates through cannibalism of early pupae by larvae. Since standard husbandry procedures for laboratory strains involve the periodic creation of dense, synchronized cultures, it is suggested that these populations are subjected to stabilizing selection for intermediate developmental time. Natural populations, on the other hand, are probably subjected to directional selection for rapid development. PMID:17248688

  6. SEASAT: A satellite scatterometer illumination times of selected in situ sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, L. C.; Goodridge, D. R.; Boberly, J. C.; Hughes, J. K.; Sweet, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A list of times that the SEASAT A Satellite Scatterometer (SASS) illuminated from directly above or directly abeam, selected surface sites where in situ winds were measured is provided. The list is ordered by the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) of the midpoint of the illumination period (hit time) for a given surface site. The site identification, the orbit number and the direction from the subtrack in which the truth lies are provided. The accuracy of these times depends in part upon the ascending node times, which are estimated to be within +.1 sec, and on the illumination time relative to the ascending node, which is estimated to be within +6 seconds. The uncertainties in the times provided were judged to be sufficiently small to allow efficient and accurate extraction of SASS and in situ data at the selected surface sites. The list contains approximately six thousand hit times from 61 geographically dispersed sites.

  7. Vessel-selective, non-contrast enhanced, time-resolved MR angiography with vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT) in intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Yoneyama, Masami; Tabuchi, Takashi; Takemura, Atsushi; Obara, Makoto; Tatsuno, Satoshi; Sawano, Seishi

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vessel-selective, non-contrast, time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique, "contrast inherent inflow enhanced multi-phase angiography combining vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT)". This sequence consists of two major techniques: pulsed star labeling of arterial regions (PULSAR) and Look-Locker sampling. We hypothesize that this technique allows selective labeling of single intracranial arteries, consisting of high-resolution four-dimensional data with a wide coverage of the brain. In this study, a new vessel-selective, time-resolved angiographic technique is demonstrated that can produce individual angiograms non-invasively by labeling the principal arterial vessels proximal to the circle of Willis. Clear vessel delineation is achieved, and the separation of the three vessels is evident in healthy volunteers. This technique could play an important role in the assessment of the structure and hemodynamics of intracranial arteries without the use of contrast agents. PMID:23475783

  8. Cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in rats selectively bred for high or low saccharin intake and in rats selected for high or low impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Regier, Paul S; Carroll, Marilyn E; Meisel, Robert L

    2012-08-01

    Sweet preference and impulsivity are predictors of cocaine self-administration; however, no research has been conducted to investigate neuronal activation in key brain reward areas after first time exposure to cocaine in rats that differ in their propensity for cocaine-seeking and -taking behavior. In this study we used rats that had been selectively bred for high vs. low saccharin intake and rats selected for high vs. low impulsivity for food. The goal of this study was to investigate whether there are differences of c-Fos reactivity between high and low phenotypes and determine whether these differences are similar between the two animal models. A group of rats was bred for high or low saccharin intake. Another group of rats was selected as high or low impulsive based on performance in a delay-discounting task. Subsequently, rats were given an acute injection of cocaine or saline and then c-Fos expression was observed and analyzed in several brain regions. The low reward-seeking phenotypes showed higher cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in several of these regions. Low saccharin preferring rats showed higher cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in the nucleus accumbens shell, and low impulsive rats showed higher cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in the orbitofrontal cortex and cingulate gyrus 1 area. In addition, both low impulsive and low saccharin rats had higher cocaine-induced c-Fos in the dorsal medial and dorsal lateral caudate putamen. The results indicate that individual differences in neuronal reactivity exist prior to chronic exposure to drugs of abuse. Furthermore, similar differences between the two animal models may be indicative of a common mechanism underlying vulnerability to drugs of abuse.

  9. Bayesian inference of selection in a heterogeneous environment from genetic time-series data.

    PubMed

    Gompert, Zachariah

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary geneticists have sought to characterize the causes and molecular targets of selection in natural populations for many years. Although this research programme has been somewhat successful, most statistical methods employed were designed to detect consistent, weak to moderate selection. In contrast, phenotypic studies in nature show that selection varies in time and that individual bouts of selection can be strong. Measurements of the genomic consequences of such fluctuating selection could help test and refine hypotheses concerning the causes of ecological specialization and the maintenance of genetic variation in populations. Herein, I proposed a Bayesian nonhomogeneous hidden Markov model to estimate effective population sizes and quantify variable selection in heterogeneous environments from genetic time-series data. The model is described and then evaluated using a series of simulated data, including cases where selection occurs on a trait with a simple or polygenic molecular basis. The proposed method accurately distinguished neutral loci from non-neutral loci under strong selection, but not from those under weak selection. Selection coefficients were accurately estimated when selection was constant or when the fitness values of genotypes varied linearly with the environment, but these estimates were less accurate when fitness was polygenic or the relationship between the environment and the fitness of genotypes was nonlinear. Past studies of temporal evolutionary dynamics in laboratory populations have been remarkably successful. The proposed method makes similar analyses of genetic time-series data from natural populations more feasible and thereby could help answer fundamental questions about the causes and consequences of evolution in the wild.

  10. Development of target protein-selective degradation inducer for protein knockdown.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Minoru; Kitaguchi, Risa; Sato, Shinichi; Naito, Mikihiko; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2011-05-15

    Our previous technique for inducing selective degradation of target proteins with ester-type SNIPER (Specific and Nongenetic Inhibitor-of-apoptosis-proteins (IAPs)-dependent Protein ERaser) degrades both the target proteins and IAPs. Here, we designed a small-molecular amide-type SNIPER to overcome this issue. As proof of concept, we synthesized and biologically evaluated an amide-type SNIPER which induces selective degradation of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II), but not IAPs. Such small-molecular, amide-type SNIPERs that induce target protein-selective degradation without affecting IAPs should be effective tools to study the biological roles of target proteins in living cells.

  11. How to Distinguish Conformational Selection and Induced Fit Based on Chemical Relaxation Rates.

    PubMed

    Paul, Fabian; Weikl, Thomas R

    2016-09-01

    Protein binding often involves conformational changes. Important questions are whether a conformational change occurs prior to a binding event ('conformational selection') or after a binding event ('induced fit'), and how conformational transition rates can be obtained from experiments. In this article, we present general results for the chemical relaxation rates of conformational-selection and induced-fit binding processes that hold for all concentrations of proteins and ligands and, thus, go beyond the standard pseudo-first-order approximation of large ligand concentration. These results allow to distinguish conformational-selection from induced-fit processes-also in cases in which such a distinction is not possible under pseudo-first-order conditions-and to extract conformational transition rates of proteins from chemical relaxation data. PMID:27636092

  12. Model selection and change detection for a time-varying mean in process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, Tom; Hamada, Michael S.; Ticknor, Larry; Weaver, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Process monitoring (PM) for nuclear safeguards sometimes requires estimation of thresholds corresponding to small false alarm rates. Threshold estimation is an old topic; however, because possible new roles for PM are being evaluated in nuclear safeguards, it is timely to consider modern model selection options in the context of alarm threshold estimation. One of the possible new PM roles involves PM residuals, where a residual is defined as residual=data-prediction. This paper briefly reviews alarm threshold estimation, introduces model selection options, and considers several assumptions regarding the data-generating mechanism for PM residuals. Four PM examples from nuclear safeguards are included. One example involves frequent by-batch material balance closures where a dissolution vessel has time-varying efficiency, leading to time-varying material holdup. Another example involves periodic partial cleanout of in-process inventory, leading to challenging structure in the time series of PM residuals. Our main focus is model selection to select a defensible model for normal behavior with a time-varying mean in a PM residual stream. We use approximate Bayesian computation to perform the model selection and parameter estimation for normal behavior. We then describe a simple lag-one-differencing option similar to that used to monitor non-stationary times series to monitor for off-normal behavior.

  13. Selective inhibition of the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 by Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Choo, Hyunah; Chung, Hak Suk; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2015-07-01

    We report herein that Zn(II) selectively inhibits the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 over PHD2, and does not compete with Fe(II). Independent of the oligomer formation induced by Zn(II), inhibition of the activity of PHD3 by Zn(II) involves Cys42 and Cys52 residues distantly located from the active site. PMID:26051901

  14. The causes of selection on flowering time through male fitness in a hermaphroditic annual plant.

    PubMed

    Austen, Emily J; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a key life-history event whose timing almost certainly affects both male and female fitness, but tests of selection on flowering time through male fitness are few. Such selection may arise from direct effects of flowering time, and indirect effects through covariance between flowering time and the environment experienced during reproduction. To isolate these intrinsically correlated associations, we staggered planting dates of Brassica rapa families with known flowering times, creating populations in which age at flowering (i.e., flowering time genotype) and Julian date of flowering (i.e., flowering time environment) were positively, negatively, or uncorrelated. Genetic paternity analysis revealed that male fitness was not strongly influenced by seasonal environmental changes. Instead, when age and date were uncorrelated, selection through male fitness strongly favored young age at flowering. Strategic sampling offspring for paternity analysis rejected covariance between sire age at flowering and dam quality as the cause of this selection. Results instead suggest a negative association between age at flowering and pollen competitive ability. The manipulation also revealed that, at least in B. rapa, the often-observed correlation between flowering time and flowering duration is environmental, not genetic, in origin.

  15. The causes of selection on flowering time through male fitness in a hermaphroditic annual plant.

    PubMed

    Austen, Emily J; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a key life-history event whose timing almost certainly affects both male and female fitness, but tests of selection on flowering time through male fitness are few. Such selection may arise from direct effects of flowering time, and indirect effects through covariance between flowering time and the environment experienced during reproduction. To isolate these intrinsically correlated associations, we staggered planting dates of Brassica rapa families with known flowering times, creating populations in which age at flowering (i.e., flowering time genotype) and Julian date of flowering (i.e., flowering time environment) were positively, negatively, or uncorrelated. Genetic paternity analysis revealed that male fitness was not strongly influenced by seasonal environmental changes. Instead, when age and date were uncorrelated, selection through male fitness strongly favored young age at flowering. Strategic sampling offspring for paternity analysis rejected covariance between sire age at flowering and dam quality as the cause of this selection. Results instead suggest a negative association between age at flowering and pollen competitive ability. The manipulation also revealed that, at least in B. rapa, the often-observed correlation between flowering time and flowering duration is environmental, not genetic, in origin. PMID:26596860

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  17. Conditioned taste aversion induced by motion is prevented by selective vagotomy in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Mckenna, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The role of the vagus nerve in motion-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was studied in hooded rats. Animals with complete, selective gastric vagotomy failed to form conditioned taste aversion after multiple conditioning sessions in which the conditioned stimulus (a cider vinegar solution) was drunk immediately before a 30-min exposure to vertical axis rotation at 150 deg/s. Results are discussed with reference to the use of CTA as a measure of motion-induced 'sickness' or gastrointestinal disturbance, and because motion-induced CTA requires that both the vagus nerve and the vestibular apparatus be intact, in light of the possible convergence of vegal and vestibular functions.

  18. Observation of Doppler-free electromagnetically induced transparency in atoms selected optically with specific velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hoon; Kim, Kwan Su; Kim, Jung Dong; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jung Bog

    2011-11-15

    We observed an electromagnetically induced transparency signal in a four-level system with optically selected rubidium atoms at specific velocities in a room-temperature vaporized cell. Since the atoms behave like cold atoms in the selected atomic view, the observed signals coincide with a trapped atomic system. According to this result, we can observe Doppler-free signals, which correspond from 1.2 to 1.0 K in a Doppler-broadened medium. And the selected atoms have velocity components of {+-}(131 {+-} 3) MHz per wave number. Our experimental results can provide insight for research in cold media.

  19. Conflicting selection on the timing of germination in a natural population of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, R; Ågren, J

    2014-01-01

    The timing of germination is a key life-history trait that may strongly influence plant fitness and that sets the stage for selection on traits expressed later in the life cycle. In seasonal environments, the period favourable for germination and the total length of the growing season are limited. The optimal timing of germination may therefore be governed by conflicting selection through survival and fecundity. We conducted a field experiment to examine the effects of timing of germination on survival, fecundity and overall fitness in a natural population of the annual herb Arabidopsis thaliana in north-central Sweden. Seedlings were transplanted at three different times in late summer and in autumn covering the period of seed germination in the study population. Early germination was associated with low seedling survival, but also with high survival and fecundity among established plants. The advantages of germinating early more than balanced the disadvantage and selection favoured early germination. The results suggest that low survival among early germinating seeds is the main force opposing the evolution of earlier germination and that the optimal timing of germination should vary in space and time as a function of the direction and strength of selection acting during different life-history stages.

  20. Selective endothelin-A receptor blockade attenuates endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endothelin-1 is a potent mediator of sepsis-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH). The pulmonary vascular effects of selective blockade of endothelin receptor subtype A (ETAR) during endotoxemia remain unknown. We hypothesized that selective ETAR antagonism attenuates endotoxin-induced PH and improves pulmonary artery (PA) vasoreactivity. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–450 g) received lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Salmonella typhimurium; 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle 6 hours before hemodynamic assessment and tissue harvest. The selective ETAR antagonist sitaxsentan (10 or 20 mg/kg) or vehicle was injected intravenously 3 hours after receipt of LPS. Right ventricular systolic pressure, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), oxygenation (P/F ratio), and serum bicarbonate were measured. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell differential and lung wet-to-dry ratios were obtained. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxations were determined in isolated PA rings. PA interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) messenger RNA (mRNA) were measured. LPS caused PH, decreased MAP, CO, and serum bicarbonate, and increased PA IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and iNOS mRNA. Sitaxsentan attenuated sepsis-induced PH and increased MAP. The P/F ratio, CO, serum bicarbonate, and BAL neutrophilia were not affected by sitaxsentan. In isolated PA rings, while not affecting phenylephrine-induced vasocontraction or endothelium-dependent relaxation, sitaxsentan dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced alterations in endothelium-independent relaxation. PA cytokine mRNA levels were not significantly attenuated by ETAR blockade. We conclude that ETAR blockade attenuates endotoxin-induced alterations in systemic and PA pressures without negatively affecting oxygenation. This protective effect appears to be mediated not by attenuation of sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction, acidosis, or alveolar

  1. Directional selection for flowering time leads to adaptive evolution in Raphanus raphanistrum (Wild radish).

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Michael B; Walsh, Michael J; Flower, Ken C; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides have been the primary tool for controlling large populations of yield depleting weeds from agro-ecosystems, resulting in the evolution of widespread herbicide resistance. In response, nonherbicidal techniques have been developed which intercept weed seeds at harvest before they enter the soil seed bank. However, the efficiency of these techniques allows an intense selection for any trait that enables weeds to evade collection, with early-flowering ecotypes considered likely to result in early seed shedding. Using a field-collected wild radish population, five recurrent generations were selected for early maturity and three generations for late maturity. Phenology associated with flowering time and growth traits were measured. Our results demonstrate the adaptive capacity of wild radish to halve its time to flowering following five generations of early-flowering selection. Early-maturing phenotypes had reduced height and biomass at maturity, leading to less competitive, more prostrate growth forms. Following three generations of late-flowering selection, wild radish doubled its time to flowering time leading to increased biomass and flowering height at maturity. This study demonstrates the potential for the rapid evolution in growth traits in response to highly effective seed collection techniques that imposed a selection on weed populations within agro-ecosystems at harvest. PMID:27099626

  2. Directional selection for flowering time leads to adaptive evolution in Raphanus raphanistrum (Wild radish).

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Michael B; Walsh, Michael J; Flower, Ken C; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides have been the primary tool for controlling large populations of yield depleting weeds from agro-ecosystems, resulting in the evolution of widespread herbicide resistance. In response, nonherbicidal techniques have been developed which intercept weed seeds at harvest before they enter the soil seed bank. However, the efficiency of these techniques allows an intense selection for any trait that enables weeds to evade collection, with early-flowering ecotypes considered likely to result in early seed shedding. Using a field-collected wild radish population, five recurrent generations were selected for early maturity and three generations for late maturity. Phenology associated with flowering time and growth traits were measured. Our results demonstrate the adaptive capacity of wild radish to halve its time to flowering following five generations of early-flowering selection. Early-maturing phenotypes had reduced height and biomass at maturity, leading to less competitive, more prostrate growth forms. Following three generations of late-flowering selection, wild radish doubled its time to flowering time leading to increased biomass and flowering height at maturity. This study demonstrates the potential for the rapid evolution in growth traits in response to highly effective seed collection techniques that imposed a selection on weed populations within agro-ecosystems at harvest.

  3. Conformational selection or induced-fit? A critical appraisal of the kinetic mechanism†

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Austin D.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    For almost five decades, two competing mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced-fit - have dominated our interpretation of ligand binding in biological macromolecules. When binding/dissociation events are fast compared to conformational transitions, the rate of approach to equilibrium, kobs, becomes diagnostic of conformational selection or induced-fit based on whether it decreases or increases with the ligand concentration, [L]. However, this simple conclusion based on the rapid-equilibrium approximation is not valid in general. Here we show that conformational selection is associated with a rich repertoire of kinetic properties, with kobs decreasing or increasing with [L] depending on the relative magnitude of the rate of ligand dissociation, koff, and the rate of conformational isomerization, kr. We prove that, even for the simplest two-step mechanism of ligand binding, a decrease of kobs with [L] is unequivocal evidence of conformational selection, but an increase of kobs with [L] is not unequivocal evidence of induced-fit. Ligand binding to glucokinase, thrombin and its precursor prethrombin-2 are used as relevant examples. We conclude that conformational selection as a mechanism for ligand binding to its target may be far more common than currently believed. PMID:22775458

  4. How to Distinguish Conformational Selection and Induced Fit Based on Chemical Relaxation Rates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein binding often involves conformational changes. Important questions are whether a conformational change occurs prior to a binding event (‘conformational selection’) or after a binding event (‘induced fit’), and how conformational transition rates can be obtained from experiments. In this article, we present general results for the chemical relaxation rates of conformational-selection and induced-fit binding processes that hold for all concentrations of proteins and ligands and, thus, go beyond the standard pseudo-first-order approximation of large ligand concentration. These results allow to distinguish conformational-selection from induced-fit processes—also in cases in which such a distinction is not possible under pseudo-first-order conditions—and to extract conformational transition rates of proteins from chemical relaxation data. PMID:27636092

  5. Resource competition induces heterogeneity and can increase cohort survivorship: selection-event duration matters.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Jennifer L; Anderson, James J

    2013-12-01

    Determining when resource competition increases survivorship can reveal processes underlying population dynamics and reinforce the importance of heterogeneity among individuals in conservation. We ran an experiment mimicking the effects of competition in a growing season on survivorship during a selection event (e.g., overwinter starvation, drought). Using a model fish species (Poecilia reticulata), we studied how food availability and competition affect mass in a treatment stage, and subsequently survivorship in a challenge stage of increased temperature and starvation. The post-treatment mean mass was strongly related to the mean time to mortality and mass at mortality at all levels of competition. However, competition increased variance in mass and extended the right tail of the survivorship curve, resulting in a greater number of individuals alive beyond a critical temporal threshold ([Formula: see text]) than without competition. To realize the benefits from previously experienced competition, the duration of the challenge ([Formula: see text]) following the competition must exceed the critical threshold [Formula: see text] (i.e., competition increases survivorship when [Formula: see text]). Furthermore, this benefit was equivalent to increasing food availability by 20 % in a group without competition in our experiment. The relationship of [Formula: see text] to treatment and challenge conditions was modeled by characterizing mortality through mass loss in terms of the stochastic rate of loss of vitality (individual's survival capacity). In essence, when the duration of a selection event exceeds [Formula: see text], competition-induced heterogeneity buffers against mortality through overcompensation processes among individuals of a cohort. Overall, our study demonstrates an approach to quantify how early life stage heterogeneity affects survivorship. PMID:23912261

  6. Fabrication mechanism of friction-induced selective etching on Si(100) surface

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As a maskless nanofabrication technique, friction-induced selective etching can easily produce nanopatterns on a Si(100) surface. Experimental results indicated that the height of the nanopatterns increased with the KOH etching time, while their width increased with the scratching load. It has also found that a contact pressure of 6.3 GPa is enough to fabricate a mask layer on the Si(100) surface. To understand the mechanism involved, the cross-sectional microstructure of a scratched area was examined, and the mask ability of the tip-disturbed silicon layer was studied. Transmission electron microscope observation and scanning Auger nanoprobe analysis suggested that the scratched area was covered by a thin superficial oxidation layer followed by a thick distorted (amorphous and deformed) layer in the subsurface. After the surface oxidation layer was removed by HF etching, the residual amorphous and deformed silicon layer on the scratched area can still serve as an etching mask in KOH solution. The results may help to develop a low-destructive, low-cost, and flexible nanofabrication technique suitable for machining of micro-mold and prototype fabrication in micro-systems. PMID:22356699

  7. Selective Rac1 inhibition protects renal tubular epithelial cells from oxalate-induced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative cell injury.

    PubMed

    Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Menon, Mani; Thamilselvan, Sivagnanam

    2012-08-01

    Oxalate-induced oxidative cell injury is one of the major mechanisms implicated in calcium oxalate nucleation, aggregation and growth of kidney stones. We previously demonstrated that oxalate-induced NADPH oxidase-derived free radicals play a significant role in renal injury. Since NADPH oxidase activation requires several regulatory proteins, the primary goal of this study was to characterize the role of Rac GTPase in oxalate-induced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative injury in renal epithelial cells. Our results show that oxalate significantly increased membrane translocation of Rac1 and NADPH oxidase activity of renal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. We found that NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac1, blocked oxalate-induced membrane translocation of Rac1 and NADPH oxidase activity. In the absence of Rac1 inhibitor, oxalate exposure significantly increased hydrogen peroxide formation and LDH release in renal epithelial cells. In contrast, Rac1 inhibitor pretreatment, significantly decreased oxalate-induced hydrogen peroxide production and LDH release. Furthermore, PKC α and δ inhibitor, oxalate exposure did not increase Rac1 protein translocation, suggesting that PKC resides upstream from Rac1 in the pathway that regulates NADPH oxidase. In conclusion, our data demonstrate for the first time that Rac1-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase might be a crucial mechanism responsible for oxalate-induced oxidative renal cell injury. These findings suggest that Rac1 signaling plays a key role in oxalate-induced renal injury, and may serve as a potential therapeutic target to prevent calcium oxalate crystal deposition in stone formers and reduce recurrence.

  8. Induced responses to competition and herbivory: natural selection on multi-trait phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Boege, Karina

    2010-09-01

    Herbivory and competition are two of the most common biotic stressors for plants. When occurring simultaneously, responses to one interaction can constrain the induction of responses to the other interaction due to resource limitation and other interactive effects. Thus, to maximize fitness when interacting with competitors and herbivores, plants are likely to express particular combinations of plastic responses. This study reports the interactive effects of herbivory and competition on responses induced in Tithonia tubaeformis plants and describes how natural selection acts on particular plastic responses and on their different combinations. Competition induced a stem elongation response, expressed through an increase in height and mean internode length, together with a decrease in basal diameter. Interestingly, realized resistance increased in both competition and herbivory treatments, suggesting a plastic response in both constitutive and induced resistance traits. Particular combinations of plastic responses defined three plant phenotypes: vigorous, elongated, and resistant plants. The ecological context in which plants grew modified the traits and the particular combinations of plastic responses that were favored by selection. Vigorous plants were favored by selection in all environments, except when they were damaged by herbivores in the absence of neighbors. The combination of responses defining an elongated plant phenotype was favored by selection in crowded conditions. Resistance was negatively selected in the absence of competition and herbivory but favored in the presence of both interactions. In addition, contextual analyses detected that population structure in heterogeneous environments can also influence the outcomes of selection. These findings suggest that natural selection can act on particular combinations of plastic responses, which may allow plants to adjust their phenotypes to those that promote greater fitness under particular ecological

  9. Selection of outputs for distributed parameter systems by identifiability analysis in the time-scale domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teergele, Jane; Danai, Kourosh

    2015-12-01

    A method of sensor location selection is introduced for distributed parameter systems. In this method, the sensitivities of spatial outputs to model parameters are computed by a model and transformed via continuous wavelet transforms into the time-scale domain to characterise the shape attributes of output sensitivities and accentuate their differences. Regions are then sought in the time-scale plane wherein the wavelet coefficient of an output sensitivity surpasses all the others' as indication of the output sensitivity's distinctness. This yields a comprehensive account of identifiability each output provides to the model parameters as the basis of output selection. The proposed output selection strategy is demonstrated for a numerical case of pollutant dispersion by advection and diffusion in a two-dimensional area.

  10. Dust and radiation quantum perfect fluid cosmology: selection of time variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, I.-Chin

    2005-05-01

    We studied the expectation value of the scale factor in radiation and dust quantum perfect fluid cosmology. We used Schutz’s variational formalism to describe the perfect fluid and selected the conjugate coordinate of the perfect fluid to be the dynamical variable. After quantization and solving the Wheeler-DeWitt equation we obtained an exact solution. By superposition of exact solutions, we obtained one wave packet and used it to compute the expectation value of the scale factor. We found that if one selects a different dynamical variable being the time variable in each of these two systems, the expectation value of the scale factor of these two systems can fit in with the prediction of General Relativity. Therefore we thought that the selection of a reference time can be different for different quantum perfect fluid systems.

  11. Moving attention - Evidence for time-invariant shifts of visual selective attention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, R.; Pierce, L.

    1984-01-01

    Two experiments measured the time to shift spatial selective attention across the visual field to targets 2 or 10 deg from central fixation. A central arrow cued the most likely target location. The direction of attention was inferred from reaction times to expected, unexpected, and neutral locations. The development of a spatial attentional set with time was examined by presenting target probes at varying times after the cue. There were no effects of distance on the time course of the attentional set. Reaction times for far locations were slower than for near, but the effects of attention were evident by 150 msec in both cases. Spatial attention does not shift with a characteristic, fixed velocity. Rather, velocity is proportional to distance, resulting in a movement time that is invariant over the distances tested.

  12. Evaluation of Select Sensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Escherichia coli in Water Distribution Systems▿

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Syreeta L.; Sinclair, Ryan G.; Riley, Mark R.; Pepper, Ian L.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated real-time sensing of Escherichia coli as a microbial contaminant in water distribution systems. Most sensors responded to increased E. coli concentrations, showing that select sensors can detect microbial water quality changes and be utilized as part of a contaminant warning system. PMID:21357435

  13. Estimating Allele Age and Selection Coefficient from Time-Serial Data

    PubMed Central

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Malaspinas, Orestis; Evans, Steven N.; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have made available an ever-increasing amount of ancient genomic data. In particular, it is now possible to target specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in several samples at different time points. Such time-series data are also available in the context of experimental or viral evolution. Time-series data should allow for a more precise inference of population genetic parameters and to test hypotheses about the recent action of natural selection. In this manuscript, we develop a likelihood method to jointly estimate the selection coefficient and the age of an allele from time-serial data. Our method can be used for allele frequencies sampled from a single diallelic locus. The transition probabilities are calculated by approximating the standard diffusion equation of the Wright–Fisher model with a one-step process. We show that our method produces unbiased estimates. The accuracy of the method is tested via simulations. Finally, the utility of the method is illustrated with an application to several loci encoding coat color in horses, a pattern that has previously been linked with domestication. Importantly, given our ability to estimate the age of the allele, it is possible to gain traction on the important problem of distinguishing selection on new mutations from selection on standing variation. In this coat color example for instance, we estimate the age of this allele, which is found to predate domestication. PMID:22851647

  14. Selective regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis under ketamine-induced apoptosis of cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianli; Yu, Yang; Wang, Bei; Wu, Honghai; Xue, Gai; Hou, Yanning

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that ketamine administration can induce neuroapoptosis in primary cultured cortical neurons. Neurosteroids modulate neuronal function and serve important roles in the central nervous system, however the role of neurosteroids in neuroapoptosis induced by ketamine remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to explore whether neurosteroidogenesis was a pivotal mechanism for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis, and whether it may be selectively regulated under ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis conditions in primary cultured cortical neurons. To study this hypothesis, the effect of ketamine exposure on neurosteroidogenesis in primary cultured cortical neurons was investigated. Cholesterol, a substrate involved in the synthesis of neurosteroids, was added to the culture medium, and neurosteroids were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The data demonstrated that cholesterol blocked ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis by promoting the synthesis of various neurosteroids, and the pathway of neurosteroid testosterone conversion into estradiol was inhibited by ketamine exposure. These data suggest that endogenous neurosteroids biosynthesis is critical for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis and inhibiting the biosynthesis of neuroprotective-neurosteroid estradiol is of notable importance for ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:26709052

  15. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and nuclear calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n}) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

  16. Selective Activation of the Prostaglandin E2 Circuit in Chronic Injury-Induced Pathologic Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liclican, Elvira L.; Nguyen, Van; Sullivan, Aaron B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a prevalent and established mediator of inflammation and pain in numerous tissues and diseases. Distribution and expression of the four PGE2 receptors (EP1-EP4) can dictate whether PGE2 exerts an anti-inflammatory or a proinflammatory and/or a proangiogenic effect. The role and mechanism of endogenous PGE2 in the cornea, and the regulation of EP expression during a dynamic and complex inflammatory/reparative response remain to be clearly defined. Methods. Chronic or acute self-resolving inflammation was induced in mice by corneal suture or epithelial abrasion, respectively. Reepithelialization was monitored by fluorescein staining and neovascularization quantified by CD31/PECAM-1 immunofluorescence. PGE2 formation was analyzed by lipidomics and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration quantified by myeloperoxidase activity. Expression of EPs and inflammatory/angiogenic mediators was assessed by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Mice eyes were treated with PGE2 (100 ng topically, three times a day) for up to 7 days. Results. COX-2, EP-2, and EP-4 expression was upregulated with chronic inflammation that correlated with increased corneal PGE2 formation and marked neovascularization. In contrast, acute abrasion injury did not alter PGE2 or EP levels. PGE2 treatment amplified PMN infiltration and the angiogenic response to chronic inflammation but did not affect wound healing or PMN infiltration after epithelial abrasion. Exacerbated inflammatory neovascularization with PGE2 treatment was independent of the VEGF circuit but was associated with a significant induction of the eotaxin-CCR3 axis. Conclusions. These findings place the corneal PGE2 circuit as an endogenous mediator of inflammatory neovascularization rather than general inflammation and demonstrate that chronic inflammation selectively regulates this circuit at the level of biosynthetic enzyme and receptor expression. PMID:20610836

  17. PRE-084, a sigma selective PCP derivative, attenuates MK-801-induced impairment of learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Maurice, T; Su, T P; Parish, D W; Nabeshima, T; Privat, A

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the effect of the sigma selective PCP derivative PRE-084 on the impairment of learning induced in mice by the noncompetitive NMDA antagonist MK-801. Learning capacities were evaluated using the spontaneous alternation in a Y-maze test for spatial working memory, the step-down passive avoidance and the elevated plus-maze test for long-term memory. At doses about 1 mg/kg IP, PRE-084 significantly attenuated MK-801 (0.2 mg/kg IP) induced impairment of learning. The dose-response curve was bell-shaped which is typical for cognition enhancers. The effect of PRE-084 was antagonized by BMY-14802 (10 mg/kg IP) and suppressed by a chronic treatment with haloperidol (4 mg/kg/day SC for 7 days). Furthermore, PRE-084 did not affect scopolamine (1 mg/kg SC) induced amnesia but significantly attenuated mecamylamine (10 mg/kg IP) induced amnesia. These results show that sigma sites mediate a modulation of the NMDA receptor complex-dependent learning processes and may similarly affect the cholinergic nicotinic memory processes. Moreover, the PCP derivative PRE-084, acting selectively at sigma sites, reverses the amnesia induced by a drug acting at the PCP site.

  18. ARP101, a selective MMP-2 inhibitor, induces autophagy-associated cell death in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yoon Kyung; Park, So Jung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Yunha; Hwang, Jung Jin; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2011-01-28

    Autophagy is a catabolic cellular process involving self-digestion and turnover of macromolecules and entire organelles. Autophagy is primarily a protective process in response to cellular stress, but it can be associated with cell death. Genetic evidence also supports autophagy function as a tumor suppressor mechanism. To identify specific regulators to autophagy, we screened the Lopac 1280 and the Prestwick chemical libraries using a cell-based screening system with autophagy marker (green fluorescence protein conjugated LC3 protein (GFP-LC3)). We identified ARP101, a selective matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) inhibitor as one of the most potent inducer of autophagy. ARP101 treatment was highly effective in inducing the formation of autophagosome and conversion of LC3I into LC3II. Moreover, ARP101-induced autophagy was completely blocked in mouse embryo fibroblasts that lacked autophagy related gene 5 (ATG5(-/-) MEF). Interestingly, cell death induced by ARP101 was not inhibited by zVAD, a pan caspase inhibitor, whereas, it was efficiently suppressed by addition of 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results suggest that the selective MMP-2 inhibitor, ARP101, induces autophagy and autophagy-associated cell death. PMID:21187062

  19. Selection of time-variant features for earthquake classification at the Nevado-del-Ruiz volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-Peña, David; Orozco-Alzate, Mauricio; Castellanos-Dominguez, German

    2013-02-01

    Seismic event recognition is an important task for hazard assessment, eruption prediction and risk mitigation, since it can be used to determine the state of a volcano. Usually, expert technicians read features extracted from the seismogram, such as, cepstral derived coefficients, energy centroids, instant frequency, instant envelop, among others. However, there are few studies about the selection of important features for classifying several types of seismic events, i.e., taking into account the temporal contribution of each considered feature. This paper presents a feature selection strategy based on a relevance measure of time-variant features for seismic event classification. In this research, features are selected as those with the maximal information preserved within the time analysis. Since features selection stage is performed by incremental training, a simple k-nearest neighbor classification rule is used to properly determine the dimension of the final feature set. The employed feature extraction and feature selection methodologies are tested on an isolated event recognition task. The database used to test the methodology is composed of the following classes: volcano-tectonic, long period earthquakes, tremors and hybrid events. Data was recorded at the seismic monitoring stations located at the Nevado-del-Ruiz volcano, Colombia. Using a classifier based on hidden Markov models, accomplished results exhibit a performance improvement from 78% to 88% using the proposed methodology in comparison to the state-of-the-art feature sets.

  20. Prediction of spectral shifts proportional to source distances by time-varying frequency or wavelength selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruprasad, V.

    2008-08-01

    Any frequency selective device with an ongoing drift will cause observed spectra to be variously and simultaneously scaled in proportion to their source distances. The reason is that detectors after the drifting selection will integrate instantaneous electric or magnetic field values from successive sinusoids, and these sinusoids would differ in both frequency and phase. Phase differences between frequencies are ordinarily irrelevant, and recalibration procedures at most correct for frequency differences. With drifting selection, however, each integrated field value comes from the sinusoid of the instantaneously selected frequency at its instantaneous received phase, hence the waveform constructed by the integration will follow the drifting selection with a phase acceleration given by the drift rate times the slope of the received phase spectrum. A phase acceleration is literally a frequency shift, and the phase spectrum slope of a received waveform is an asymptotic measure of the source distance, as the path delay presents phase offsets proportional to frequency times the distance, and eventually exceeding all initial phase differences. Tunable optics may soon be fast enough for realizing such shifts by Fourier switching, and could lead to pocket X-ray devices; sources continuously variable from RF to gamma rays; capacity multiplication with jamming and noise immunity in both fibre and radio channels, passive ranging from ground to deep space; etc.

  1. Quantifying selection in evolving populations using time-resolved genetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Christopher J. R.; Mustonen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Methods which uncover the molecular basis of the adaptive evolution of a population address some important biological questions. For example, the problem of identifying genetic variants which underlie drug resistance, a question of importance for the treatment of pathogens, and of cancer, can be understood as a matter of inferring selection. One difficulty in the inference of variants under positive selection is the potential complexity of the underlying evolutionary dynamics, which may involve an interplay between several contributing processes, including mutation, recombination and genetic drift. A source of progress may be found in modern sequencing technologies, which confer an increasing ability to gather information about evolving populations, granting a window into these complex processes. One particularly interesting development is the ability to follow evolution as it happens, by whole-genome sequencing of an evolving population at multiple time points. We here discuss how to use time-resolved sequence data to draw inferences about the evolutionary dynamics of a population under study. We begin by reviewing our earlier analysis of a yeast selection experiment, in which we used a deterministic evolutionary framework to identify alleles under selection for heat tolerance, and to quantify the selection acting upon them. Considering further the use of advanced intercross lines to measure selection, we here extend this framework to cover scenarios of simultaneous recombination and selection, and of two driver alleles with multiple linked neutral, or passenger, alleles, where the driver pair evolves under an epistatic fitness landscape. We conclude by discussing the limitations of the approach presented and outlining future challenges for such methodologies.

  2. Temperature-Dependent Nanofabrication on Silicon by Friction-Induced Selective Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenning; Yu, Bingjun; Xiao, Chen; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2016-04-01

    Friction-induced selective etching provides a convenient and practical way for fabricating protrusive nanostructures. A further understanding of this method is very important for establishing a controllable nanofabrication process. In this study, the effect of etching temperature on the formation of protrusive hillocks and surface properties of the etched silicon surface was investigated. It is found that the height of the hillock produced by selective etching increases with the etching temperature before the collapse of the hillock. The temperature-dependent selective etching rate can be fitted well by the Arrhenius equation. The etching at higher temperature can cause rougher silicon surface with a little lower elastic modulus and hardness. The contact angle of the etched silicon surface decreases with the etching temperature. It is also noted that no obvious contamination can be detected on silicon surface after etching at different temperatures. As a result, the optimized condition for the selective etching was addressed. The present study provides a new insight into the control and application of friction-induced selective nanofabrication.

  3. Natural selection underlies apparent stress-induced mutagenesis in a bacteriophage infection model.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Edgar, Rotem; Levy, Asaf; Amitai, Gil; Sorek, Rotem; Munitz, Ariel; Qimron, Udi

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of mutations following growth-limiting conditions underlies bacterial drug resistance, viral escape from the immune system and fundamental evolution-driven events. Intriguingly, whether mutations are induced by growth limitation conditions or are randomly generated during growth and then selected by growth limitation conditions remains an open question(1). Here, we show that bacteriophage T7 undergoes apparent stress-induced mutagenesis when selected for improved recognition of its host's receptor. In our unique experimental set-up, the growth limitation condition is physically and temporally separated from mutagenesis: growth limitation occurs while phage DNA is outside the host, and spontaneous mutations occur during phage DNA replication inside the host. We show that the selected beneficial mutations are not pre-existing and that the initial slow phage growth is enabled by the phage particle's low-efficiency DNA injection into the host. Thus, the phage particle allows phage populations to initially extend their host range without mutagenesis by virtue of residual recognition of the host receptor. Mutations appear during non-selective intracellular replication, and the frequency of mutant phages increases by natural selection acting on free phages, which are not capable of mutagenesis. PMID:27572836

  4. Temperature-Dependent Nanofabrication on Silicon by Friction-Induced Selective Etching.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chenning; Yu, Bingjun; Xiao, Chen; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2016-12-01

    Friction-induced selective etching provides a convenient and practical way for fabricating protrusive nanostructures. A further understanding of this method is very important for establishing a controllable nanofabrication process. In this study, the effect of etching temperature on the formation of protrusive hillocks and surface properties of the etched silicon surface was investigated. It is found that the height of the hillock produced by selective etching increases with the etching temperature before the collapse of the hillock. The temperature-dependent selective etching rate can be fitted well by the Arrhenius equation. The etching at higher temperature can cause rougher silicon surface with a little lower elastic modulus and hardness. The contact angle of the etched silicon surface decreases with the etching temperature. It is also noted that no obvious contamination can be detected on silicon surface after etching at different temperatures. As a result, the optimized condition for the selective etching was addressed. The present study provides a new insight into the control and application of friction-induced selective nanofabrication. PMID:27119157

  5. Coevolution of strategy-selection time scale and cooperation in spatial prisoner's dilemma game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Zhihai; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Chen, Guanrong

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate a networked prisoner's dilemma game where individuals' strategy-selection time scale evolves based on their historical learning information. We show that the more times the current strategy of an individual is learnt by his neighbors, the longer time he will stick on the successful behavior by adaptively adjusting the lifetime of the adopted strategy. Through characterizing the extent of success of the individuals with normalized payoffs, we show that properly using the learned information can form a positive feedback mechanism between cooperative behavior and its lifetime, which can boost cooperation on square lattices and scale-free networks.

  6. Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection with Random Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhiyong

    2013-12-15

    This paper examines the continuous-time mean-variance optimal portfolio selection problem with random market parameters and random time horizon. Treating this problem as a linearly constrained stochastic linear-quadratic optimal control problem, I explicitly derive the efficient portfolios and efficient frontier in closed forms based on the solutions of two backward stochastic differential equations. Some related issues such as a minimum variance portfolio and a mutual fund theorem are also addressed. All the results are markedly different from those in the problem with deterministic exit time. A key part of my analysis involves proving the global solvability of a stochastic Riccati equation, which is interesting in its own right.

  7. L-Acetylcarnitine induces analgesia by selectively up-regulating mGlu2 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiechio, S; Caricasole, A; Barletta, E; Storto, M; Catania, M V; Copani, A; Vertechy, M; Nicolai, R; Calvani, M; Melchiorri, D; Nicoletti, F

    2002-05-01

    L-Acetylcarnitine (LAC, 100 mg/kg, s.c.), a drug commonly used for the treatment of painful neuropathies, substantially reduced mechanical allodynia in rats subjected to monolateral chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve and also attenuated acute thermal pain in intact rats. In both cases, induction of analgesia required repeated injections of LAC, suggesting that the drug induces plastic changes within the nociceptive pathway. In both CCI- and sham-operated rats, a 24-day treatment with LAC increased the expression of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors 2 and 3 in the lumbar segment of the spinal cord, without changing the expression of mGlu1a or -5 receptors. A similar up-regulation of mGlu2/3 receptors was detected in the dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglia of intact rats treated with LAC for 5-7 days, a time sufficient for the induction of thermal analgesia. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LAC treatment enhanced mGlu2/3 immunoreactivity in the inner part of lamina II and in laminae III and IV of the spinal cord. An increased mGlu2/3 receptor expression was also observed in the cerebral cortex but not in the hippocampus or cerebellum of LAC-treated animals. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction combined with Northern blot analysis showed that repeated LAC injections selectively induced mGlu2 mRNA in the dorsal horns and cerebral cortex (but not in the hippocampus). mGlu3 mRNA levels did not change in any brain region of LAC-treated animals. To examine whether the selective up-regulation of mGlu2 receptors had any role in LAC-induced analgesia, we have used the novel compound LY 341495, which is a potent and systemically active mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist. LAC-induced analgesia was largely reduced 45 to 75 min after a single injection of LY 341495 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in both CCI rats tested for mechanical allodynia and intact rats tested for thermal pain. We conclude that LAC produces analgesia against chronic pain produced not

  8. Difference-NMR techniques for selection of components on the basis of relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Douglas J.; de Azevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2003-05-01

    This work describes a numerical methodology to obtain more efficient relaxation filters to selectively retain or remove components based on relaxation times. The procedure uses linear combinations of spectra with various recycle or filter delays to obtain components that are both quantitative and pure. Modulation profiles are calculated assuming exponential relaxation behavior. The method is general and can be applied to a wide range of solution or solid-state NMR experiments including direct-polarization (DP), or filtered cross-polarization (CP) spectra. 13C NMR experiments on isotactic poly(1-butene) and dimethyl sulfone showed the utility of the technique for selectively suppressing peaks.

  9. Fishery-Induced Selection for Slow Somatic Growth in European Eel

    PubMed Central

    Bevacqua, Daniele; Capoccioni, Fabrizio; Melià, Paco; Vincenzi, Simone; Pujolar, José M.; De Leo, Giulio A.; Ciccotti, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Both theoretical and experimental studies have shown that fishing mortality can induce adaptive responses in body growth rates of fishes in the opposite direction of natural selection. We compared body growth rates in European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from three Mediterranean stocks subject to different fishing pressure. Results are consistent with the hypotheses that i) fast-growing individuals are more likely to survive until sexual maturity than slow-growing ones under natural conditions (no fishing) and ii) fishing can select for slow-growing individuals by removing fast-growing ones. Although the possibility of human-induced evolution seems remote for a panmictic species like such as the European eel, further research is desirable to assess the implications of the intensive exploitation on this critically endangered fish. PMID:22666373

  10. Aggregation-induced fabrication of fluorescent organic nanorings: selective biosensing of cysteine and application to molecular logic gate.

    PubMed

    Mati, Soumya Sundar; Chall, Sayantani; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra

    2015-05-12

    Self-aggregation behavior in aqueous medium of four naphthalimide derivatives has exhibited substitution-dependent, unusual, aggregation induced emission enhancement (AIEE) phenomena. Absorption, emission, and time-resolved study initially indicated the formation of J-type fluorescent organic nanoaggregates (FONs). Simultaneous applications of infrared spectroscopy, theoretical studies, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements explored the underlying mechanism of such substitution-selective aggregation of a chloro-naphthalimide organic molecule. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) visually confirmed the formation of ring like FONs with average size of 7.5-9.5 nm. Additionally, naphthalimide FONs also exhibited selective and specific cysteine amino acid sensing property. The specific behavior of NPCl aggregation toward amino acids was also employed as a molecular logic gate in information technology (IT). PMID:25893428

  11. Forward-in-Time, Spatially Explicit Modeling Software to Simulate Genetic Lineages Under Selection

    PubMed Central

    Currat, Mathias; Gerbault, Pascale; Di, Da; Nunes, José M.; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    SELECTOR is a software package for studying the evolution of multiallelic genes under balancing or positive selection while simulating complex evolutionary scenarios that integrate demographic growth and migration in a spatially explicit population framework. Parameters can be varied both in space and time to account for geographical, environmental, and cultural heterogeneity. SELECTOR can be used within an approximate Bayesian computation estimation framework. We first describe the principles of SELECTOR and validate the algorithms by comparing its outputs for simple models with theoretical expectations. Then, we show how it can be used to investigate genetic differentiation of loci under balancing selection in interconnected demes with spatially heterogeneous gene flow. We identify situations in which balancing selection reduces genetic differentiation between population groups compared with neutrality and explain conflicting outcomes observed for human leukocyte antigen loci. These results and three previously published applications demonstrate that SELECTOR is efficient and robust for building insight into human settlement history and evolution. PMID:26949332

  12. Selective source reduction to identify masked sources using time reversal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Anderson, Brian E.; Griffa, M.; Johnson, Paul A.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2008-08-01

    The presence of strong sources of elastic waves often makes it impossible to localize weaker ones, which are sometimes the most meaningful, e.g. in the characterization of complexity of active Earth faults or of microdamage in a composite structural material. To address this problem, a selective source reduction method is proposed here which, applied in conjunction with time reversal acoustics (TRA), provides the means to selectively reduce the contribution of strong sources allowing full illumination of the weak ones. The method is complementary to other methods based on TRA which aim at the selective illumination of scatterers in the propagation medium. In this paper, a description of the method is given along with presentation of a few numerical results to demonstrate its usefulness for localization of sources. Validation and some experimental results are also presented.

  13. Population dynamics under selection and mutation: Long-time behavior for differential equations in measure spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackleh, Azmy S.; Cleveland, John; Thieme, Horst R.

    2016-07-01

    We study the long-time behavior of solutions to a measure-valued selection-mutation model that we formulated in [14]. We establish permanence results for the full model, and we study the limiting behavior even when there is more than one strategy of a given fitness; a case that arises in applications. We show that for the pure selection case the solution of the dynamical system converges to a Dirac measure centered at the fittest strategy class provided that the support of the initial measure contains a fittest strategy; thus we term this Dirac measure an Asymptotically Stable Strategy. We also show that when the strategy space is discrete, the selection-mutation model with small mutation has a locally asymptotically stable equilibrium that attracts all initial conditions that are positive at the fittest strategy.

  14. Microevolution in time and space: SNP analysis of historical DNA reveals dynamic signatures of selection in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Therkildsen, Nina O; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Als, Thomas D; Swain, Douglas P; Morgan, M Joanne; Trippel, Edward A; Palumbi, Stephen R; Meldrup, Dorte; Nielsen, Einar E

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about how quickly natural populations adapt to changes in their environment and how temporal and spatial variation in selection pressures interact to shape patterns of genetic diversity. We here address these issues with a series of genome scans in four overfished populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) studied over an 80-year period. Screening of >1000 gene-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified 77 loci that showed highly elevated levels of differentiation, likely as an effect of directional selection, in either time, space or both. Exploratory analysis suggested that temporal allele frequency shifts at certain loci may correlate with local temperature variation and with life history changes suggested to be fisheries induced. Interestingly, however, largely nonoverlapping sets of loci were temporal outliers in the different populations and outliers from the 1928 to 1960 period showed almost complete stability during later decades. The contrasting microevolutionary trajectories among populations resulted in sequential shifts in spatial outliers, with no locus maintaining elevated spatial differentiation throughout the study period. Simulations of migration coupled with observations of temporally stable spatial structure at neutral loci suggest that population replacement or gene flow alone could not explain all the observed allele frequency variation. Thus, the genetic changes are likely to at least partly be driven by highly dynamic temporally and spatially varying selection. These findings have important implications for our understanding of local adaptation and evolutionary potential in high gene flow organisms and underscore the need to carefully consider all dimensions of biocomplexity for evolutionarily sustainable management.

  15. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis): selective filters and signal mismatch on two time scales.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Matti Michael; Hennig, Ralf Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as "Gryllus assimilis", the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2-3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz) emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems. PMID:22970154

  16. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis): Selective Filters and Signal Mismatch on Two Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Rothbart, Matti Michael; Hennig, Ralf Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as “Gryllus assimilis”, the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2–3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz) emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems. PMID:22970154

  17. Detecting Selection on Temporal and Spatial Scales: A Genomic Time-Series Assessment of Selective Responses to Devil Facial Tumor Disease.

    PubMed

    Brüniche-Olsen, Anna; Austin, Jeremy J; Jones, Menna E; Holland, Barbara R; Burridge, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Detecting loci under selection is an important task in evolutionary biology. In conservation genetics detecting selection is key to investigating adaptation to the spread of infectious disease. Loci under selection can be detected on a spatial scale, accounting for differences in demographic history among populations, or on a temporal scale, tracing changes in allele frequencies over time. Here we use these two approaches to investigate selective responses to the spread of an infectious cancer--devil facial tumor disease (DFTD)--that since 1996 has ravaged the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii). Using time-series 'restriction site associated DNA' (RAD) markers from populations pre- and post DFTD arrival, and DFTD free populations, we infer loci under selection due to DFTD and investigate signatures of selection that are incongruent among methods, populations, and times. The lack of congruence among populations influenced by DFTD with respect to inferred loci under selection, and the direction of that selection, fail to implicate a consistent selective role for DFTD. Instead genetic drift is more likely driving the observed allele frequency changes over time. Our study illustrates the importance of applying methods with different performance optima e.g. accounting for population structure and background selection, and assessing congruence of the results. PMID:26930198

  18. Detecting Selection on Temporal and Spatial Scales: A Genomic Time-Series Assessment of Selective Responses to Devil Facial Tumor Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brüniche-Olsen, Anna; Austin, Jeremy J.; Jones, Menna E.; Holland, Barbara R.; Burridge, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Detecting loci under selection is an important task in evolutionary biology. In conservation genetics detecting selection is key to investigating adaptation to the spread of infectious disease. Loci under selection can be detected on a spatial scale, accounting for differences in demographic history among populations, or on a temporal scale, tracing changes in allele frequencies over time. Here we use these two approaches to investigate selective responses to the spread of an infectious cancer—devil facial tumor disease (DFTD)—that since 1996 has ravaged the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii). Using time-series ‘restriction site associated DNA’ (RAD) markers from populations pre- and post DFTD arrival, and DFTD free populations, we infer loci under selection due to DFTD and investigate signatures of selection that are incongruent among methods, populations, and times. The lack of congruence among populations influenced by DFTD with respect to inferred loci under selection, and the direction of that selection, fail to implicate a consistent selective role for DFTD. Instead genetic drift is more likely driving the observed allele frequency changes over time. Our study illustrates the importance of applying methods with different performance optima e.g. accounting for population structure and background selection, and assessing congruence of the results. PMID:26930198

  19. A NOVEL SPECTRAL METHOD FOR INFERRING GENERAL DIPLOID SELECTION FROM TIME SERIES GENETIC DATA

    PubMed Central

    Steinrücken, Matthias; Bhaskar, Anand; Song, Yun S.

    2014-01-01

    The increased availability of time series genetic variation data from experimental evolution studies and ancient DNA samples has created new opportunities to identify genomic regions under selective pressure and to estimate their associated fitness parameters. However, it is a challenging problem to compute the likelihood of non-neutral models for the population allele frequency dynamics, given the observed temporal DNA data. Here, we develop a novel spectral algorithm to analytically and efficiently integrate over all possible frequency trajectories between consecutive time points. This advance circumvents the limitations of existing methods which require fine-tuning the discretization of the population allele frequency space when numerically approximating requisite integrals. Furthermore, our method is flexible enough to handle general diploid models of selection where the heterozygote and homozygote fitness parameters can take any values, while previous methods focused on only a few restricted models of selection. We demonstrate the utility of our method on simulated data and also apply it to analyze ancient DNA data from genetic loci associated with coat coloration in horses. In contrast to previous studies, our exploration of the full fitness parameter space reveals that a heterozygote-advantage form of balancing selection may have been acting on these loci. PMID:25598858

  20. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-11-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of (13)C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against (13)C' or (13)C(α) spins coupled to (15)N. As a result, (1)H-(15)N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns.

  1. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J.; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M.; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of 13C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against 13C’ or 13Cα spins coupled to 15N. As a result, 1H-15N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns. PMID:25442777

  2. Time course of shape and category selectivity revealed by EEG rapid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Clara A; Jiang, Xiong; Martin, Jacob G; Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2014-02-01

    A hallmark of human cognition is the ability to rapidly assign meaning to sensory stimuli. It has been suggested that this fast visual object categorization ability is accomplished by a feedforward processing hierarchy consisting of shape-selective neurons in occipito-temporal cortex that feed into task circuits in frontal cortex computing conceptual category membership. We performed an EEG rapid adaptation study to test this hypothesis. Participants were trained to categorize novel stimuli generated with a morphing system that precisely controlled both stimulus shape and category membership. We subsequently performed EEG recordings while participants performed a category matching task on pairs of successively presented stimuli. We used space-time cluster analysis to identify channels and latencies exhibiting selective neural responses. Neural signals before 200 msec on posterior channels demonstrated a release from adaptation for shape changes, irrespective of category membership, compatible with a shape- but not explicitly category-selective neural representation. A subsequent cluster with anterior topography appeared after 200 msec and exhibited release from adaptation consistent with explicit categorization. These signals were subsequently modulated by perceptual uncertainty starting around 300 msec. The degree of category selectivity of the anterior signals was strongly predictive of behavioral performance. We also observed a posterior category-selective signal after 300 msec exhibiting significant functional connectivity with the initial anterior category-selective signal. In summary, our study supports the proposition that perceptual categorization is accomplished by the brain within a quarter second through a largely feedforward process culminating in frontal areas, followed by later category-selective signals in posterior regions. PMID:24001003

  3. Changes in selective effects over time facilitate turnover of enhancer sequences.

    PubMed

    Bullaughey, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    Correct gene expression is often critical and consequently stabilizing selection on expression is widespread. Yet few genes possess highly conserved regulatory DNA, and for the few enhancers that have been carefully characterized, substantial functional reorganization has often occurred. Given that natural selection removes mutations of even very small deleterious effect, how can transcription factor binding evolve so readily when it underlies a conserved phenotype? As a first step toward addressing this question, I combine a computational model for regulatory function that incorporates many aspects of our present biological knowledge with a model for the fitness effects of misexpression. I then use this model to study the evolution of enhancers. Several robust behaviors emerge: First, the selective effects of mutations at a site change dramatically over time due to substitutions elsewhere in the enhancer, and even the overall degree of constraint across the enhancer can change considerably. Second, many of the substitutions responsible for changes in binding occur at sites where previously the mutation would have been strongly deleterious, suggesting that fluctuations in selective effects at a site are important for functional turnover. Third, most substitutions contributing to the repatterning of binding and constraint are effectively neutral, highlighting the importance of genetic drift-even for enhancers underlying conserved phenotypes. These findings have important implications for phylogenetic inference of function and for interpretations of selection coefficients estimated for regulatory DNA.

  4. Environmentally induced changes in correlated responses to selection reveal variable pleiotropy across a complex genetic network.

    PubMed

    Sikkink, Kristin L; Reynolds, Rose M; Cresko, William A; Phillips, Patrick C

    2015-05-01

    Selection in novel environments can lead to a coordinated evolutionary response across a suite of characters. Environmental conditions can also potentially induce changes in the genetic architecture of complex traits, which in turn could alter the pattern of the multivariate response to selection. We describe a factorial selection experiment using the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei in which two different stress-related phenotypes (heat and oxidative stress resistance) were selected under three different environmental conditions. The pattern of covariation in the evolutionary response between phenotypes or across environments differed depending on the environment in which selection occurred, including asymmetrical responses to selection in some cases. These results indicate that variation in pleiotropy across the stress response network is highly sensitive to the external environment. Our findings highlight the complexity of the interaction between genes and environment that influences the ability of organisms to acclimate to novel environments. They also make clear the need to identify the underlying genetic basis of genetic correlations in order understand how patterns of pleiotropy are distributed across complex genetic networks.

  5. Imaging multicellular specimens with real-time optimized tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qinyi; Martin, Benjamin L; Matus, David Q; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the progress made in selective plane illumination microscopy, high-resolution 3D live imaging of multicellular specimens remains challenging. Tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy (TLS-SPIM) with real-time light-sheet optimization was developed to respond to the challenge. It improves the 3D imaging ability of SPIM in resolving complex structures and optimizes SPIM live imaging performance by using a real-time adjustable tiling light sheet and creating a flexible compromise between spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the 3D live imaging ability of TLS-SPIM by imaging cellular and subcellular behaviours in live C. elegans and zebrafish embryos, and show how TLS-SPIM can facilitate cell biology research in multicellular specimens by studying left-right symmetry breaking behaviour of C. elegans embryos. PMID:27004937

  6. Imaging multicellular specimens with real-time optimized tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qinyi; Martin, Benjamin L.; Matus, David Q.; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the progress made in selective plane illumination microscopy, high-resolution 3D live imaging of multicellular specimens remains challenging. Tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy (TLS-SPIM) with real-time light-sheet optimization was developed to respond to the challenge. It improves the 3D imaging ability of SPIM in resolving complex structures and optimizes SPIM live imaging performance by using a real-time adjustable tiling light sheet and creating a flexible compromise between spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the 3D live imaging ability of TLS-SPIM by imaging cellular and subcellular behaviours in live C. elegans and zebrafish embryos, and show how TLS-SPIM can facilitate cell biology research in multicellular specimens by studying left-right symmetry breaking behaviour of C. elegans embryos. PMID:27004937

  7. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site.

    PubMed

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD(+)-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology. PMID:25672491

  8. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J.; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I.; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A.; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD+-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology. PMID:25672491

  9. Health-Care Waste Treatment Technology Selection Using the Interval 2-Tuple Induced TOPSIS Method

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chao; You, Jian-Xin; Liu, Hu-Chen; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Health-care waste (HCW) management is a major challenge for municipalities, particularly in the cities of developing nations. Selecting the best treatment technology for HCW can be regarded as a complex multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) issue involving a number of alternatives and multiple evaluation criteria. In addition, decision makers tend to express their personal assessments via multi-granularity linguistic term sets because of different backgrounds and knowledge, some of which may be imprecise, uncertain and incomplete. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to propose a new hybrid decision making approach combining interval 2-tuple induced distance operators with the technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS) for tackling HCW treatment technology selection problems with linguistic information. The proposed interval 2-tuple induced TOPSIS (ITI-TOPSIS) can not only model the uncertainty and diversity of the assessment information given by decision makers, but also reflect the complex attitudinal characters of decision makers and provide much more complete information for the selection of the optimum disposal alternative. Finally, an empirical example in Shanghai, China is provided to illustrate the proposed decision making method, and results show that the ITI-TOPSIS proposed in this paper can solve the problem of HCW treatment technology selection effectively. PMID:27271652

  10. The response of correlated traits following cessation of fishery-induced selection

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Santiago; Perez, Kestrel O; Duffy, Tara A; Sabatino, Stephen J; Hice, Lyndie A; Munch, Stephan B; Conover, David O

    2012-01-01

    The application of evolutionary principles to the management of fisheries has gained considerable attention recently. Harvesting of fish may apply directional or disruptive selection to key life-history traits, and evidence for fishery-induced evolution is growing. The traits that are directly selected upon are often correlated (genetically or phenotypically) with a suite of interrelated physiological, behavioral, and morphological characters. A question that has received comparatively little attention is whether or not, after cessation of fishery-induced selection, these correlated traits revert back to previous states. Here, we empirically examine this question. In experiments with the Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia, we applied size-selective culling for five generations and then maintained the lines a further five generations under random harvesting. We found that some traits do return to preharvesting levels (e.g., larval viability), some partially recover (e.g., egg volume, size-at-hatch), and others show no sign of change (e.g., food consumption rate, vertebral number). Such correlations among characters could, in theory, greatly accelerate or decelerate the recovery of fish populations. These results may explain why some fish stocks fail to recover after fishing pressure is relaxed. PMID:23144653

  11. Health-Care Waste Treatment Technology Selection Using the Interval 2-Tuple Induced TOPSIS Method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; You, Jian-Xin; Liu, Hu-Chen; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Health-care waste (HCW) management is a major challenge for municipalities, particularly in the cities of developing nations. Selecting the best treatment technology for HCW can be regarded as a complex multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) issue involving a number of alternatives and multiple evaluation criteria. In addition, decision makers tend to express their personal assessments via multi-granularity linguistic term sets because of different backgrounds and knowledge, some of which may be imprecise, uncertain and incomplete. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to propose a new hybrid decision making approach combining interval 2-tuple induced distance operators with the technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS) for tackling HCW treatment technology selection problems with linguistic information. The proposed interval 2-tuple induced TOPSIS (ITI-TOPSIS) can not only model the uncertainty and diversity of the assessment information given by decision makers, but also reflect the complex attitudinal characters of decision makers and provide much more complete information for the selection of the optimum disposal alternative. Finally, an empirical example in Shanghai, China is provided to illustrate the proposed decision making method, and results show that the ITI-TOPSIS proposed in this paper can solve the problem of HCW treatment technology selection effectively. PMID:27271652

  12. Pyrithione Zn selectively inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3.

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence emphasizes the role of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) isoforms in regulating non-HIF substrates, but isoform selective PHD inhibitors under physiological conditions have not yet been reported. Here we have identified pyrithione Zn (PZ) as a potent, isoform-selective PHD3 inhibitor. The IC50 value of PZ was determined as 0.98 μM for PHD3, while it did not show any inhibitory activity toward full length and truncated PHD2 up to 1 mM. The selective efficacy of PZ was further demonstrated at the cellular level by observing inhibition of the PHD3-dependent DNA damage response pathway without stabilization of HIF-1α. PMID:26940742

  13. Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Reversed Zinc Chloride-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment via Increasing Cholinergic Marker Expression.

    PubMed

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Azami, Kian; Belaran, Maryam; Soodi, Maliheh; Abdi, Khosrou; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sanati, Mehdi; Mottaghi Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Zinc, an essential micronutrient and biochemical element of the human body, plays structural, catalytic, and regulatory roles in numerous physiological functions. In the current study, the effects of a pretraining oral administration of zinc chloride (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days and post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (10, 50, and 100 μM/side), alone and in combination, on the spatial memory retention in Morris water maze (MWM) were investigated. Animals were trained for 4 days and tested 48 h after completion of training. Also, the molecular effects of these compounds on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), as a cholinergic marker in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA), were evaluated. Behavioral and molecular findings of this study showed that a 2-week oral administration of zinc chloride (50 mg/kg) impaired spatial memory retention in MWM and decreased ChAT expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W revealed a significant increase in ChAT immunoreactivity. Furthermore, post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W into the CA1 region of the hippocampus reversed zinc chloride-induced spatial memory impairment in MWM and significantly increased ChAT expression in comparison with zinc chloride-treated animals. Taken together, these results emphasize the role of selective iNOS inhibitors in reversing zinc chloride-induced spatial memory deficits via modulation of cholinergic marker expression.

  14. Hesperetin, a Selective Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, Effectively Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness without Influencing Xylazine/Ketamine-Induced Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chung-Hung; Lin, Ling-Hung; Hsu, Hsin-Te; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Lai, Chi-Yin; Chen, Chien-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Hesperetin, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE)4 inhibitor, is present in the traditional Chinese medicine, "Chen Pi." Therefore, we were interested in investigating its effects on ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced airway hyperresponsiveness, and clarifying its rationale for ameliorating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hesperetin was revealed to have a therapeutic (PDE4(H)/PDE4(L)) ratio of >11. Hesperetin (10 ~ 30 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by methacholine. It also significantly suppressed the increases in total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). It dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in the BALF and serum. However, hesperetin did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia, suggesting that hesperetin has few or no emetic effects. In conclusion, the rationales for ameliorating allergic asthma and COPD by hesperetin are anti-inflammation, immunoregulation, and bronchodilation.

  15. Hesperetin, a Selective Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, Effectively Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness without Influencing Xylazine/Ketamine-Induced Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chung-Hung; Lin, Ling-Hung; Hsu, Hsin-Te; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Lai, Chi-Yin; Chen, Chien-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Hesperetin, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE)4 inhibitor, is present in the traditional Chinese medicine, "Chen Pi." Therefore, we were interested in investigating its effects on ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced airway hyperresponsiveness, and clarifying its rationale for ameliorating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hesperetin was revealed to have a therapeutic (PDE4(H)/PDE4(L)) ratio of >11. Hesperetin (10 ~ 30 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by methacholine. It also significantly suppressed the increases in total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). It dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in the BALF and serum. However, hesperetin did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia, suggesting that hesperetin has few or no emetic effects. In conclusion, the rationales for ameliorating allergic asthma and COPD by hesperetin are anti-inflammation, immunoregulation, and bronchodilation. PMID:22454667

  16. Gallic acid as a selective anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SUN, GUOJUN; ZHANG, SHUQIN; XIE, YANRU; ZHANG, ZIYU; ZHAO, WENJING

    2016-01-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid; GA) is a naturally occurring plant polyphenol, isolated from water caltrop, which has been reported to exert anticancer effects. The present study investigated the antiproliferative effects of GA on the HepG2 and SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines using MTT and colony formation assays. In particular, the underlying mechanism of GA-induced apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells was studied in vitro by flow cytometry and western blotting. The results of the present study indicated that GA was capable of inhibiting the proliferation of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, as well as inducing the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells. GA induced caspase-3, caspase-9 and reactive oxygen species activity, elevated the expression of apoptosis regulator Bcl-2-like protein 4 and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential in SMMC-7721 cells. When compared with HL-7702 normal human hepatocytes, GA demonstrated selective toxicity for HCC cells. In conclusion, GA is able to induce apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells in vitro via mitochondrial-mediated pathways, and may possess the potential to be a novel therapeutic compound for use in the treatment of HCC. PMID:26870182

  17. Non-selective cation channels mediate chloroquine-induced relaxation in precontracted mouse airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Sai, Wen-Bo; Yu, Meng-Fei; Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle.

  18. Recirculating photonic filter: a wavelength-selective time delay for optically controlled phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegnanarayanan, Siva; Trinh, Paul D.; Jalali, Bahram

    1996-11-01

    A wavelength-selective photonic time delay filter is proposed and demonstrated. The device consists of an optical phased-array waveguide grating in a recirculating feedback configuration. It can function as a true-time-delay generator for squint-free beam steering in optically- controlled phased-array antennas. As the photonic filter uses the optical carrier wavelength to select the desired time delay, a one-to-one map is established between the optical carrier wavelength and the desired antenna direction, thus eliminating complex switching networks required to select the appropriate delay line. The proposed device can also function as the encoder/decoder in wavelength-CDMA. The concept uses a waveguide prism in a symmetric feedback (recirculating) configuration. The modulated optical carrier is steered by the waveguide prism to the appropriate integrated delay line depending on the carrier wavelength. The signal is delayed and is fed back into the symmetric input port. The prism then focuses the delayed beam into the common output port. Thus three sequential operations are performed: (1) wavelength demultiplexing, (2) time delay, and (3) wavelength multiplexing. It is important to note that the recirculating photonic filter has no 1/N loss; all the power at a given wavelength is diffracted into the output port. Furthermore, high resolution (6 - 8 bits) can be obtained in a compact integrated device. A prototype regular recirculating photonic filter true-time delay device was realized using a 8-channel arrayed-waveguide grating demultiplexer and external (off-chip) fiber delay lines. The grating was fabricated in the silica waveguide technology with 0.8 nm channel spacing (FSR equals 6.4 nm) and operating in the 1.5 micrometers wavelength range. Light from an external cavity tunable laser was rf modulated at 10 - 40 MHz and was coupled into the arrayed waveguide grating chip and time/phase measurements were performed sing a digital oscilloscope. Feedback delay

  19. Living With Limited Time: Socioemotional Selectivity Theory in the Context of Health Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan-Singh, Sarah J.; Stanton, Annette L.; Low, Carissa A.

    2016-01-01

    The current research was designed to test the applicability of socioemotional selectivity theory (SST; Carstensen, 2006), a life span theory that posits that perceived time remaining in life (time perspective) is a critical determinant of motivation, to individuals who face foreshortened futures (limited time perspective) due to life-limiting medical illness. In Study 1, we investigated whether life goals and biases in attention and memory for valenced emotional stimuli differed between women living with metastatic breast cancer (n = 113; theoretically living under greater limited time perspective than peers without cancer) and similarly aged women without a cancer diagnosis (n = 50; theoretically living under greater expansive time perspective than peers with cancer) in accordance with SST. As hypothesized, metastatic group goals reflected greater emphasis on limited versus expansive time perspective relative to comparison group goals. Hypotheses regarding biases in attention and memory were not supported. Study 2 followed metastatic group participants over 3 months and revealed that, consistent with hypotheses, whereas limited time perspective goals predicted decreased intrusive thoughts about cancer, expansive time perspective goals predicted decreased perceived cancer-related benefits. Together, these studies suggest that SST is a useful lens through which to view some components of motivation and psychological adjustment among individuals confronting medically foreshortened futures. PMID:25984789

  20. Trait associations across evolutionary time within a drosophila phylogeny: correlated selection or genetic constraint?

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Vanessa; Overgaard, Johannes; Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2013-01-01

    Traits do not evolve independently. To understand how trait changes under selection might constrain adaptive changes, phenotypic and genetic correlations are typically considered within species, but these capture constraints across a few generations rather than evolutionary time. For longer-term constraints, comparisons are needed across species but associations may arise because of correlated selection pressures rather than genetic interactions. Implementing a unique approach, we use known patterns of selection to separate likely trait correlations arising due to correlated selection from those reflecting genetic constraints. We examined the evolution of stress resistance in >90 Drosophila species adapted to a range of environments, while controlling for phylogeny. Initially we examined the role of climate and phylogeny in shaping the evolution of starvation and body size, two traits previously not examined in this context. Following correction for phylogeny only a weak relationship between climate and starvation resistance was detected, while all of the variation in the relationship between body size and climate could be attributed to phylogeny. Species were divided into three environmental groups (hot and dry, hot and wet, cold) with the expectation that, if genetic correlations underpin trait correlations, these would persist irrespective of the environment, whereas selection-driven evolution should produce correlations dependent on the environment. We found positive associations between most traits in hot and dry environments coupled with high trait means. In contrast few trait correlations were observed in hot/wet and cold environments. These results suggest trait associations are primarily driven by correlated selection rather than genetic interactions, highlighting that such interactions are unlikely to limit evolution of stress resistance.

  1. Assessment of exercise-induced minor muscle lesions: the accuracy of Cyriax's diagnosis by selective tension paradigm.

    PubMed

    Franklin, M E; Conner-Kerr, T; Chamness, M; Chenier, T C; Kelly, R R; Hodge, T

    1996-09-01

    The Cyriax selective tension assessment paradigm is commonly used by clinicians for the diagnosis of soft tissue lesions; however, studies have not demonstrated that it is a valid method. The purpose of this study was to examine the construct validity of the active motion, passive motion, resisted movement, and palpation components of the Cyriax selective tension diagnosis paradigm in subjects with an exercise-induced minor hamstring muscle lesion. Nine female subjects with a mean age of 23.6 years (SD = 4.7) and a mass of 57.3 kg (SD = 10.7) performed two sets of 20 maximal eccentric isokinetic knee flexor contractions designed to induce a minor muscle lesion of the hamstrings. Active range of motion, passive range of motion, knee extension end-feel pain relative to resistance sequence, knee flexor isometric strength, pain perception during knee flexor resisted movement testing, and palpation pain of the hamstrings were assessed at 0, 5, 2, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise and compared with Cyriax's hypothesized selective tension paradigm results. Consistent with Cyriax's paradigm, passive range of motion remained unchanged, and perceived pain of the hamstrings increased with resistance testing at 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise when compared with baseline. In addition, palpation pain of the hamstrings was significantly elevated at 48 and 72 hours after exercise (p < 0.05). In contrast of Cyriax's paradigm, active range of motion was significantly reduced over time (p < 0.05), with the least amount of motion compared to baseline (85%) occurring at 48 hours postexercise. Further, resisted movement testing found significant knee flexor isometric strength reductions over time (p < 0.05), with the greatest reductions (33%) occurring at 48 hours postexercise. According to Cyriax, when a minor muscle lesion is tested, it should be strong and painful; however, none of the postexercise time frames exhibited results that were strong and painful. This study

  2. Meditation-induced states predict attentional control over time.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Sellaro, Roberta; Samara, Iliana; Baas, Matthijs; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    Meditation is becoming an increasingly popular topic for scientific research and various effects of extensive meditation practice (ranging from weeks to several years) on cognitive processes have been demonstrated. Here we show that extensive practice may not be necessary to achieve those effects. Healthy adult non-meditators underwent a brief single session of either focused attention meditation (FAM), which is assumed to increase top-down control, or open monitoring meditation (OMM), which is assumed to weaken top-down control, before performing an Attentional Blink (AB) task - which assesses the efficiency of allocating attention over time. The size of the AB was considerably smaller after OMM than after FAM, which suggests that engaging in meditation immediately creates a cognitive-control state that has a specific impact on how people allocate their attention over time.

  3. ``Ultrasonic stars'' for time reversal focusing using induced cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernot, Mathieu; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2006-05-01

    Time reversal focusing with ultrasonic arrays is a way to focus waves through heterogeneous media. It requires a reference signal either sent by a small active source embedded in the medium or backscattered by a strong scatterer acting as a passive source. The potential of this method in ultrasonic medical imaging was already envisioned for aberration corrections. However, in many practical situations it is not possible to insert an active source in the medium or to rely on the presence of a unique strong scaterrer at focus in order to generate the reference signal. In analogy with the field of adaptive optics in astronomy, we propose here to create artificial ``ultrasonic stars'' in the body. The trick consists in creating cavitation bubbles inside the medium using one part of the ultrasonic probe. The bubble cavitation generates a spherical wave that propagates through medium heterogeneities to a time reversal array and is used as a reference signal for the time reversal method. This novel method is here experimentally validated for aberrations corrections in tissue mimicking phantoms.

  4. A new threshold selection method for peak over for nonstationary time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. R.; Chen, Y. F.; Gu, S. H.; Huang, Q.; Yuan, J. C.; Yu, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    In the context of global climate change, human activities dramatically damage the consistency of hydrological time series. Peak Over Threshold (POT) series have become an alternative to the traditional Annual Maximum series, but it is still underutilized due to its complexity. Most literature about POT tended to employ only one threshold regardless of the non-stationarity of the whole series. Obviously, it is unwise to ignore the fact that our hydrological time series may no longer be a stationary stochastic process. Hence, in this paper, we take the daily runoff time series of the Yichang gauge station on the Yangtze River in China as an example, and try to shed light on the selection of the threshold provided non- stationarity of our time series. The Mann-Kendall test is applied to detect the change points; then, we gave different thresholds according to the change points to the sub-series. Comparing the goodness-of-fit of the series with one and several thresholds, it clearly investigates the series that employs different thresholds performs much better than that just fixes one threshold during the selection of the peak events.

  5. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  6. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  7. Initial tsunami source estimation by inversion with an intelligent selection of model parameters and time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulia, Iyan E.; Asano, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for accurately estimating the initial tsunami source. Our technique is independent of the earthquake parameters, because we only use recorded tsunami waveforms and an auxiliary basis function, instead of a fault model. We first use the measured waveforms to roughly identify the source area using backward propagated travel times, and then infer the initial sea surface deformation through inversion analysis. A computational intelligence approach based on a genetic algorithm combined with a pattern search was used to select appropriate least squares model parameters and time delays. The proposed method significantly reduced the number of parameters and suppressed the negative effect of regularization schemes that decreased the plausibility of the model. Furthermore, the stochastic approach for deriving the time delays is a more flexible strategy for simulating actual phenomena that occur in nature. The selected parameters and time delays increased the accuracy, and the model's ability to reveal the underlying physics associated with the tsunami-generating processes. In this paper, we applied the method to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki tsunami event and examined its effectiveness by comparing the results to those using the conventional method.

  8. Real time measurement of cytoplasmic ions with ion-selective microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Ion-selective microelectrodes can be used to report intracellular ion concentrations. The ion-selective barrels of microelectrodes are filled with a sensor cocktail containing several different components including an ion-selective molecule, sensor or exchanger, a solvent or plasticizer, lipophilic cation/anion additives, and a matrix to solidify the membrane. For many ions, the readymade membrane cocktail can be purchased, but the individual chemical components can be bought from suppliers and mixing the cocktail saves money. For commercially available liquid membrane cocktails the membrane matrix is often not included. For plants a matrix is essential for intracellular impalements because without it cell turgor will displace the liquid membrane from the electrode tip, giving decreased or even lost sensitivity. The matrix frequently used is a high molecular weight poly(vinyl chloride). This addition increases the electrical resistance of the electrode, slowing the response time of the electrode. The use of multi-barreled electrodes enables the identification of the cellular compartment. For example, the inclusion of a pH-selective electrode enables the cytoplasm and vacuole to be distinguished.

  9. Action recognition based on a selective sampling strategy for real-time video surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Hong; Yuan, Ding

    2015-12-01

    Action recognition is a very challenging task in the field of real-time video surveillance. The traditional models on action recognition are constructed of Spatial-temporal features and Bag-of-Feature representations. Based on this model, current research work tends to introduce dense sampling to achieve better performance. However, such approaches are computationally intractable when dealing with large video dataset. Hence, there are some recent works focused on feature reduction to speed up the algorithm without reducing accuracy. In this paper, we proposed a novel selective feature sampling strategy on action recognition. Firstly, the optical flow field is estimated throughout the input video. And then the sparse FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment Test) points are selected within the motion regions detected by using the optical flows on the temporally down-sampled image sequences. The selective features, sparse FAST points, are the seeds to generate the 3D patches. Consequently, the simplified LPM (Local Part Model) which greatly speeds up the model is formed via 3D patches. Moreover, MBHs (Motion Boundary Histograms) calculated by optical flows are also adopted in the framework to further improve the efficiency. Experimental results on UCF50 dataset and our artificial dataset show that our method could reach more real-time effect and achieve a higher accuracy compared with the other competitive methods published recently.

  10. Autostereoscopic display concept with time-sequential wavelength-selective filter-barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurk, Silvio; Kuhlmey, Mathias; Bartmann, Roland; Duckstein, Bernd; de la Barré, René

    2016-03-01

    A spatially multiplexed autostereoscopic 3D display design with a strip barrier consisting of RGB-color filters is presented. The wavelength selective filter barrier emits the light from a display area larger than that of common autostereoscopic barrier displays. However, such construction is still used rather rarely. The time sequential operation mode is a supplemental option. Wavelength selective filter barrier arrangements exhibit characteristics different from common barrier displays with similar barrier pitch and ascent. In particular these constructions show strong angular luminance dependency under barrier inclination specified by correspondent slant angle. In time sequential implementation it is important to avoid that quick eye or eyelid movement lead to visible color artifacts. Those circumstances limit the possibility to find well working and usable display designs superior to usual barrier displays. The newly introduced design is usable as a multi user display as well as a single user system with user adaptive control. In case of tracked single user mode the adaption in x-z-direction is continuously. The design has been modelled with simulation software developed for that purpose. The modelling of wavelength-selective barriers was used to calculate the light ray distribution properties of that arrangement. For the experimental verification of the image separation and evaluation of image quality, commercially available display components were combined for a display demonstrator.

  11. Engineered cellular gene-replacement platform for selective and inducible proteolytic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Charles W.; Diaz, Juan E.; Zeitlin, Samantha G.; Gray, Daniel C.; Wells, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular demolition during apoptosis is completed by executioner caspases, that selectively cleave more than 1,500 proteins but whose individual roles are challenging to assess. Here, we used an optimized site-specific and inducible protease to examine the role of a classic apoptotic node, the caspase-activated DNase (CAD). CAD is activated when caspases cleave its endogenous inhibitor ICAD, resulting in the characteristic DNA laddering of apoptosis. We describe a posttranscriptional gene replacement (PTGR) approach where endogenous biallelic ICAD is knocked down and simultaneously replaced with an engineered allele that is susceptible to inducible cleavage by tobacco etch virus protease. Remarkably, selective activation of CAD alone does not induce cell death, although hallmarks of DNA damage are detected in human cancer cell lines. Our data strongly support that the highly cooperative action of CAD and inhibition of DNA repair systems are critical for the DNA laddering phenotype in apoptosis. Furthermore, the PTGR approach provides a general means for replacing wild-type protein function with a precisely engineered mutant at the transcriptional level that should be useful for cell engineering studies. PMID:26106156

  12. Estrogen receptor subtypes selectively mediate female mouse reproductive abnormalities induced by neonatal exposure to estrogenic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Watanabe, Hajime; Iguchi, Taisen

    2008-11-20

    Perinatal exposure to estrogens such as diethylstilbestrol (DES), and to estrogenic chemicals, induces persistent anovulation caused by alteration of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, polyovular follicles, uterine abnormalities and persistent vaginal changes in mice. Most activities of estrogenic chemicals are mediated through estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and/or ERbeta. However, little was known about the relative contribution of the individual ER subtypes in induction of abnormalities. We tested the effects of neonatal exposure to ER selective ligands and DES on female mice. Transactivation assays using mouse ERalpha and ERbeta showed that 10(-10)M DES activated both ER subtypes and that the ERalpha agonist (propyl pyrazole triol, PPT) and the ERbeta agonist (diarylpropionitrile, DPN) selectively activated their respective ERs at 10(-9)M. Neonatal female mice were injected subcutaneously with DES, PPT or DPN and the animals were examined at 13 and 15 weeks of age, respectively. Persistent estrous smears and anovulation were induced in all mice by 0.025-2.5 microg DES and 2.5-25 microg PPT, but not by DPN, suggesting that the observed anovulation was primarily mediated through ERalpha. Disorganization of uterine musculature and ovary-independent vaginal epithelial cell proliferation accompanied by persistent expression of EGF-related genes and interleukin-1-related genes were also mediated through ERalpha. In contrast, polyovular follicles were induced by neonatal treatment with both ERalpha and ERbeta ligands, suggesting that ovarian abnormalities are mediated through both ER subtypes.

  13. Nest site selection and induced response in a dominant arboreal ant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejean, Alain; Grangier, Julien; Leroy, Céline; Orivel, Jerôme; Gibernau, Marc

    2008-09-01

    It is well known that arboreal ants, both territorially dominant species and plant ants (e.g., species associated with myrmecophytes or plants housing them in hollow structures), protect their host trees from defoliators. Nevertheless, the presence of an induced defense, suggested by the fact that the workers discovering a leaf wound recruit nestmates, is only known for plant ants. Based on the results from a field study, we show here (1) that colonies of Azteca chartifex, a territorially dominant, neotropical arboreal ant species, mostly selected Goupia glabra (Goupiaceae) trees in which to build their principal carton nests and (2) that plant signals induced workers to recruit nestmates, which patrol the leaves, likely providing the plant with a biotic defense. Furthermore, the number of recruited workers was clearly higher on G. glabra, their most frequently selected host tree species, than on other tree species. These results show that contrary to what was previously believed, induced responses are also found in territorially dominant arboreal ants and so are not limited to the specific associations between myrmecophytes and plant ants.

  14. Current approaches to prevent NSAID-induced gastropathy – COX selectivity and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jan C; Domschke, Wolfram; Pohle, Thorsten

    2004-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is still an important medical and socio-economic problem – despite recent pharmaceutical advances. To prevent NSAID-induced gastropathy, three strategies are followed in clinical routine: (i) coprescription of a gastroprotective drug, (ii) use of selective COX-2 inhibitors, and (iii) eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Proton pump inhibitors are the comedication of choice as they effectively reduce gastrointestinal adverse events of NSAIDs and are safe even in long-term use. Co-medication with vitamin C has only been little studied in the prevention of NSAID-induced gastropathy. Apart from scavenging free radicals it is able to induce haeme-oxgenase 1 in gastric cells, a protective enzyme with antioxidant and vasodilative properties. Final results of the celecoxib outcome study (CLASS study) attenuated the initial enthusiasm about the GI safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors, especially in patients concomitantly taking aspirin for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Helicobacter pylori increases the risk for ulcers particularly in NSAID-naive patients and therefore eradication is recommended prior to long-term NSAID therapy at least in patients at high risk. New classes of COX-inhibitors are currently evaluated in clinical studies with very promising results: NSAIDs combined with a nitric oxide releasing moiety (NO-NSAID) and dual inhibitors of COX and 5-LOX. These drugs offer extended anti-inflammatory potency while sparing gastric mucosa. PMID:15563357

  15. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis.

  16. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p’-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis. PMID:26601698

  17. Selective flow-induced vesicle rupture to sort by membrane mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Pommella, Angelo; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Seddon, John M.; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Vesicle and cell rupture caused by large viscous stresses in ultrasonication is central to biomedical and bioprocessing applications. The flow-induced opening of lipid membranes can be exploited to deliver drugs into cells, or to recover products from cells, provided that it can be obtained in a controlled fashion. Here we demonstrate that differences in lipid membrane and vesicle properties can enable selective flow-induced vesicle break-up. We obtained vesicle populations with different membrane properties by using different lipids (SOPC, DOPC, or POPC) and lipid:cholesterol mixtures (SOPC:chol and DOPC:chol). We subjected vesicles to large deformations in the acoustic microstreaming flow generated by ultrasound-driven microbubbles. By simultaneously deforming vesicles with different properties in the same flow, we determined the conditions in which rupture is selective with respect to the membrane stretching elasticity. We also investigated the effect of vesicle radius and excess area on the threshold for rupture, and identified conditions for robust selectivity based solely on the mechanical properties of the membrane. Our work should enable new sorting mechanisms based on the difference in membrane composition and mechanical properties between different vesicles, capsules, or cells. PMID:26302783

  18. Selection bias in dynamically measured supermassive black hole samples: consequences for pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesana, Alberto; Shankar, Francesco; Bernardi, Mariangela; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2016-11-01

    Supermassive black hole -- host galaxy relations are key to the computation of the expected gravitational wave background (GWB) in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band. It has been recently pointed out that standard relations adopted in GWB computations are in fact biased-high. We show that when this selection bias is taken into account, the expected GWB in the PTA band is a factor of about three smaller than previously estimated. Compared to other scaling relations recently published in the literature, the median amplitude of the signal at $f=1$yr$^{-1}$ drops from $1.3\\times10^{-15}$ to $4\\times10^{-16}$. Although this solves any potential tension between theoretical predictions and recent PTA limits without invoking other dynamical effects (such as stalling, eccentricity or strong coupling with the galactic environment), it also makes the GWB detection more challenging.

  19. Space-time wiring specificity supports direction selectivity in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinseop S; Greene, Matthew J; Zlateski, Aleksandar; Lee, Kisuk; Richardson, Mark; Turaga, Srinivas C; Purcaro, Michael; Balkam, Matthew; Robinson, Amy; Behabadi, Bardia F; Campos, Michael; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H Sebastian

    2014-05-15

    How does the mammalian retina detect motion? This classic problem in visual neuroscience has remained unsolved for 50 years. In search of clues, here we reconstruct Off-type starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and bipolar cells (BCs) in serial electron microscopic images with help from EyeWire, an online community of 'citizen neuroscientists'. On the basis of quantitative analyses of contact area and branch depth in the retina, we find evidence that one BC type prefers to wire with a SAC dendrite near the SAC soma, whereas another BC type prefers to wire far from the soma. The near type is known to lag the far type in time of visual response. A mathematical model shows how such 'space-time wiring specificity' could endow SAC dendrites with receptive fields that are oriented in space-time and therefore respond selectively to stimuli that move in the outward direction from the soma.

  20. Space-time wiring specificity supports direction selectivity in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Zlateski, Aleksandar; Lee, Kisuk; Richardson, Mark; Turaga, Srinivas C.; Purcaro, Michael; Balkam, Matthew; Robinson, Amy; Behabadi, Bardia F.; Campos, Michael; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    How does the mammalian retina detect motion? This classic problem in visual neuroscience has remained unsolved for 50 years. In search of clues, we reconstructed Off-type starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and bipolar cells (BCs) in serial electron microscopic images with help from EyeWire, an online community of “citizen neuroscientists.” Based on quantitative analyses of contact area and branch depth in the retina, we found evidence that one BC type prefers to wire with a SAC dendrite near the SAC soma, while another BC type prefers to wire far from the soma. The near type is known to lag the far type in time of visual response. A mathematical model shows how such “space-time wiring specificity” could endow SAC dendrites with receptive fields that are oriented in space-time and therefore respond selectively to stimuli that move in the outward direction from the soma. PMID:24805243

  1. Space-time wiring specificity supports direction selectivity in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinseop S; Greene, Matthew J; Zlateski, Aleksandar; Lee, Kisuk; Richardson, Mark; Turaga, Srinivas C; Purcaro, Michael; Balkam, Matthew; Robinson, Amy; Behabadi, Bardia F; Campos, Michael; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H Sebastian

    2014-05-15

    How does the mammalian retina detect motion? This classic problem in visual neuroscience has remained unsolved for 50 years. In search of clues, here we reconstruct Off-type starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and bipolar cells (BCs) in serial electron microscopic images with help from EyeWire, an online community of 'citizen neuroscientists'. On the basis of quantitative analyses of contact area and branch depth in the retina, we find evidence that one BC type prefers to wire with a SAC dendrite near the SAC soma, whereas another BC type prefers to wire far from the soma. The near type is known to lag the far type in time of visual response. A mathematical model shows how such 'space-time wiring specificity' could endow SAC dendrites with receptive fields that are oriented in space-time and therefore respond selectively to stimuli that move in the outward direction from the soma. PMID:24805243

  2. The effects of celecoxib, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, on acute inflammation induced in irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Khayyal, M T; El-Ghazaly, Mona A; El-Hazek, R M; Nada, A S

    2009-10-01

    The potential value of selective and non-selective COX-2 inhibitors in preventing some of the biochemical changes induced by ionizing radiation was studied in rats exposed to carrageenan-induced paw edema and 6-day-old air pouch models. The animals were exposed to different exposure levels of gamma-radiation, namely either to single doses of 2 and 7.5 Gy or a fractionated dose level of 7.5 Gy delivered as 0.5 Gy twice weekly for 7.5 weeks. The inflammatory response produced by carrageenan in irradiated rats was markedly higher than that induced in non-irradiated animals, and depended on the extent of irradiation. Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in doses of 3, 5, 10, and 15 mg/kg was effective in reducing paw edema in irradiated and non-irradiated rats in a dose-dependent manner as well as diclofenac (3 mg/kg), a non-selective COX inhibitor. Irradiation of animals before the induction of the air pouch by an acute dose of 2 Gy led to a significant increase in leukocytic count, as well as in the level of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), LTB(4), PGE(2) (as an index of COX-2 activity), TXB(2) (as an index of COX-1 activity), and the plasma level of MDA. This increase in level of these parameters was more marked than that observed in the non-irradiated animals subjected to the inflammagen. The blood GSH level was not affected by the dose of irradiation used, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was suppressed. In many respects, celecoxib (5 mg/kg) was as potent as diclofenac in decreasing the elevated levels of IL-6, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, LTB(4), PGE(2), but lacked any significant effect on TXB(2) level. Since it is mostly selective for COX-2 with a rare effect on COX-1 enzyme, both drugs at the selected dose levels showed no effect on level of MDA, GSH, and SOD activity.

  3. Methods to characterize selective sweeps using time serial samples: an ancient DNA perspective.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo

    2016-01-01

    With hundreds of ancient genomes becoming available this year, ancient DNA research has now entered the genomics era. Utilizing the temporal aspect of these new data, we can now address fundamental evolutionary questions such as the characterization of selection processes shaping the genomes. The temporal dimension in the data has spurred the development in the last 10 years of new methods allowing the detection of loci evolving non-neutrally but also the inference of selection coefficients across genomes capitalizing on these time serial data. To guide empirically oriented researchers towards the statistical approach most appropriate for their data, this article reviews several of those methods, discussing their underlying assumptions and the parameter ranges for which they have been developed. While I discuss some methods developed for experimental evolution, the main focus is ancient DNA. PMID:26613371

  4. In vivo Target Residence Time and Kinetic Selectivity: The Association Rate Constant as Determinant.

    PubMed

    de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Danhof, Meindert; van der Graaf, Piet H; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2016-10-01

    It is generally accepted that, in conjunction with pharmacokinetics, the first-order rate constant of target dissociation is a major determinant of the time course and duration of in vivo target occupancy. Here we show that the second-order rate constant of target association can be equally important. On the basis of the commonly used mathematical models for drug-target binding, it is shown that a high target association rate constant can increase the (local) concentration of the drug, which decreases the rate of decline of target occupancy. The increased drug concentration can also lead to increased off-target binding and decreased selectivity. Therefore, the kinetics of both target association and dissociation need to be taken into account in the selection of drug candidates with optimal pharmacodynamic properties.

  5. Approach for Selection of Rayleigh Damping Parameters Used for Time History Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. E. Spears; S. R. Jensen

    2009-07-01

    Nonlinearities, whether geometric or material, need to be addressed in seismic analysis. One good analysis method that can address these nonlinearities is direct time integration with Rayleigh damping. Modal damping is the damping typically specified in seismic analysis Codes and Standards. Modal damping is constant for all frequencies where Rayleigh damping varies with frequency. An approach is proposed here for selection of Rayleigh damping coefficients to be used in seismic analyses that are consistent with given Modal damping. The approach uses the difference between the modal damping response and the Rayleigh damping response along with effective mass properties of the model being evaluated to match overall system response levels. This paper provides a simple example problem to demonstrate the approach. It also provides results for a finite element model representing an existing piping system. Displacement, acceleration, and stress results are compared from model runs using modal damping and model runs using Rayleigh damping with coefficients selected using the proposed method.

  6. In vivo Target Residence Time and Kinetic Selectivity: The Association Rate Constant as Determinant.

    PubMed

    de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Danhof, Meindert; van der Graaf, Piet H; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2016-10-01

    It is generally accepted that, in conjunction with pharmacokinetics, the first-order rate constant of target dissociation is a major determinant of the time course and duration of in vivo target occupancy. Here we show that the second-order rate constant of target association can be equally important. On the basis of the commonly used mathematical models for drug-target binding, it is shown that a high target association rate constant can increase the (local) concentration of the drug, which decreases the rate of decline of target occupancy. The increased drug concentration can also lead to increased off-target binding and decreased selectivity. Therefore, the kinetics of both target association and dissociation need to be taken into account in the selection of drug candidates with optimal pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:27394919

  7. Developing and Selecting Auditory Warnings for a Real-Time Behavioral Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bellettiere, John; Hughes, Suzanne C.; Liles, Sandy; Boman-Davis, Marie; Klepeis, Neil; Blumberg, Elaine; Mills, Jeff; Berardi, Vincent; Obayashi, Saori; Allen, T. Tracy; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time sensing and computing technologies are increasingly used in the delivery of real-time health behavior interventions. Auditory signals play a critical role in many of these interventions, impacting not only behavioral response but also treatment adherence and participant retention. Yet, few behavioral interventions that employ auditory feedback report the characteristics of sounds used and even fewer design signals specifically for their intervention. This paper describes a four-step process used in developing and selecting auditory warnings for a behavioral trial designed to reduce indoor secondhand smoke exposure. In step one, relevant information was gathered from ergonomic and behavioral science literature to assist a panel of research assistants in developing criteria for intervention-specific auditory feedback. In step two, multiple sounds were identified through internet searches and modified in accordance with the developed criteria, and two sounds were selected that best met those criteria. In step three, a survey was conducted among 64 persons from the primary sampling frame of the larger behavioral trial to compare the relative aversiveness of sounds, determine respondents' reported behavioral reactions to those signals, and assess participant's preference between sounds. In the final step, survey results were used to select the appropriate sound for auditory warnings. Ultimately, a single-tone pulse, 500 milliseconds (ms) in length that repeats every 270 ms for 3 cycles was chosen for the behavioral trial. The methods described herein represent one example of steps that can be followed to develop and select auditory feedback tailored for a given behavioral intervention. PMID:25745633

  8. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  9. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  10. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  11. Computer simulation for the dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length in a diploid, coupled, discrete-time, mutation-selection model for a finite population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study, the crossing time for the overdominant case in an infinite population was found to be saturated at a long sequence length in the diploid, coupled, discrete-time, mutation-selection model. The present study focused on the effect of a finite population size on the crossing time for the overdominant case. The dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length was simulated for a range of dominance parameters and selective advantages by switching on a diploid, asymmetric, bridged landscape from an initial state, a steady state in a diploid, bridged landscape. The boundary between the deterministic and the stochastic regions in the diploid, coupled, discrete-time, mutation-selection model was characterized using the same formula as that in the haploid, coupled, discrete-time, mutation-selection model. The crossing time in a finite population with various population sizes, dominance parameters and selective advantages began to deviate from the crossing time for an infinite population at a critical sequence length. The crossing time for a finite population in the stochastic region was found to be an exponentially increasing function of the sequence length, whose rate was unchanged, regardless of changes in the population size, dominance parameter and selective advantage with a fixed extension parameter. Therefore, the saturation of the crossing time at a long sequence length, which was observed for the overdominant case in an infinite population, could not be realized for a finite population.

  12. Effect of selected water temperatures used in Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine reconstitution on titer at selected time intervals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous methods are currently used throughout the poultry industry for the administration of vaccines. Each utilizes water for vaccine reconstitution and/or administration, including two of the three commercially available live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccines. Selected water temperatures w...

  13. Subtype selective NMDA receptor antagonists induce recovery of synapses lost following exposure to HIV-1 Tat

    PubMed Central

    Shin, AH; Kim, HJ; Thayer, SA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Neurocognitive disorders afflict approximately 20% of HIV-infected patients. HIV-1-infected cells in the brain shed viral proteins such as transactivator of transcription (Tat). Tat elicits cell death and synapse loss via processes initiated by NMDA receptor activation but mediated by separate downstream signalling pathways. Subunit selective NMDA receptor antagonists may differentially modulate survival relative to synaptic changes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Tat-evoked cell death was quantified by measuring propidium iodide uptake into rat hippocampal neurons in culture. The effects of Tat on synaptic changes were measured using an imaging-based assay that quantified clusters of the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95 fused to green fluorescent protein. KEY RESULTS Dizocilpine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, inhibited Tat-induced synapse loss, subsequent synapse recovery and Tat-induced cell death with comparable potencies. Memantine (10 µM) and ifenprodil (10 µM), which preferentially inhibit GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, protected from Tat-induced cell death with no effect on synapse loss. Surprisingly, memantine and ifenprodil induced synapse recovery in the presence of Tat. In contrast, the GluN2A-prefering antagonist TCN201 prevented synapse loss and recovery with no effect on cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Synapse loss is a protective mechanism that enables the cell to cope with excess excitatory input. Thus, memantine and ifenprodil are promising neuroprotective drugs because they spare synaptic changes and promote survival. These GluN2B-preferring drugs induced recovery from Tat-evoked synapse loss, suggesting that synaptic pharmacology changed during the neurotoxic process. NMDA receptor subtypes differentially participate in the adaptation and death induced by excitotoxic insult. PMID:22142193

  14. Vascular dysfunction induced by hypochlorite is improved by the selective phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitor vardenafil.

    PubMed

    Radovits, Tamás; Arif, Rawa; Bömicke, Timo; Korkmaz, Sevil; Barnucz, Enikő; Karck, Matthias; Merkely, Béla; Szabó, Gábor

    2013-06-15

    Reactive oxygen species, such as hypochlorite induce oxidative stress, which impairs nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signalling and leads to vascular dysfunction. It has been proposed, that elevated cGMP-levels may contribute to an effective cytoprotection against oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of vardenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterase-5 enzyme on vascular dysfunction induced by hypochlorite. In organ bath experiments for isometric tension, we investigated the endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation of isolated rat aortic rings using cumulative concentrations of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Vascular dysfunction was induced by exposing rings to hypochlorite (100-400 µM). In the treatment groups, rats were pretreated with vardenafil (30 and 300 µg/kg i.v.). Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for the oxidative stress markers nitrotyrosine, poly(ADP-ribose) and for apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). Exposure to hypochlorite resulted in a marked impairment of acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of aortic rings. Pretreatment with vardenafil led to improved endothelial function as reflected by the higher maximal vasorelaxation (Rmax) to acetylcholine. Regarding endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, hypochlorite exposure led to a left-shift of SNP concentration-response curves in the vardenafil groups without any alterations of the Rmax. In the hypochlorite groups immunohistochemical analysis showed enhanced poly(ADP-ribose)-formation and nuclear translocation of AIF, which were prevented by vardenafil-pretreatment. Our results support the view that cytoprotective effects of PDE-5-inhibitors on the endothelium may underlie the improved endothelial function, however, a slight sensitisation of vascular smooth muscle to NO was also confirmed. PDE-5-inhibition may represent a potential therapy approach for treating vascular

  15. The Effects of Time on Task in Response Selection--An ERP Study of Mental Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Möckel, Tina; Beste, Christian; Wascher, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Long lasting involvement in a cognitive task leads to mental fatigue. Substantial efforts have been undertaken to understand this phenomenon. However, it has been demonstrated that some changes with time on task are not only related to mental fatigue. The present study intends to clarify these effects of time on task unrelated to mental fatigue on response selection processes at the behavioural and electrophysiological level (using event-related potentials, ERPs). Participants had to perform a Simon task for more than 3 hours and rated their experienced mental fatigue and motivation to continue with the task at several time points during the experiment. The results show that at the beginning of the experiment some unspecific modulations of training and adaptation are evident. With time on task participants' ability to resolve response conflict appears to become impaired. The results reveal that time on task effects cannot be completely explained by mental fatigue. Instead, it seems that an interplay of adaptation at the beginning and motivational effects in the course of a task modulate performance and neurophysiological parameters. In future studies it will be important to account for the relative contribution of adaptation and motivation parameters when time on task effects are investigated.

  16. The Effects of Time on Task in Response Selection - An ERP Study of Mental Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Möckel, Tina; Beste, Christian; Wascher, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Long lasting involvement in a cognitive task leads to mental fatigue. Substantial efforts have been undertaken to understand this phenomenon. However, it has been demonstrated that some changes with time on task are not only related to mental fatigue. The present study intends to clarify these effects of time on task unrelated to mental fatigue on response selection processes at the behavioural and electrophysiological level (using event-related potentials, ERPs). Participants had to perform a Simon task for more than 3 hours and rated their experienced mental fatigue and motivation to continue with the task at several time points during the experiment. The results show that at the beginning of the experiment some unspecific modulations of training and adaptation are evident. With time on task participants’ ability to resolve response conflict appears to become impaired. The results reveal that time on task effects cannot be completely explained by mental fatigue. Instead, it seems that an interplay of adaptation at the beginning and motivational effects in the course of a task modulate performance and neurophysiological parameters. In future studies it will be important to account for the relative contribution of adaptation and motivation parameters when time on task effects are investigated. PMID:26054837

  17. Laser-Induced Selectivity for Dimerization Versus Polymerization of Butadiene Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citroni, Margherita; Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2002-03-01

    The pressure-induced chemical reaction of liquid butadiene was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell. Dimerization was found to occur above 0.7 gigapascal, giving vinylcyclohexene according to a cyclo-addiction reaction and only a trace amount of polybutadiene forms. By irradiating the high-pressure sample with a few milliwatts of the 488-nanometer argon+ laser line, the dimerization was completely inhibited, and the rapid formation of pure trans-polybutadiene was observed. The use of different excitation wavelength allows us to emphasize the selectivity of the process and to identify the active role of the 21Ag state in this pressure- and laser-induced chemical reaction.

  18. Transformation of diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum by electroporation and establishment of inducible selection marker.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ying-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Zhang, Meng-Han; Zhu, Cong-Cong; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2012-06-01

    Diatoms are important primary producers in the marine ecosystem. Currently it is difficult to genetically transform diatoms due to the technical limitations of existing methods. The promoter/terminator of the nitrate reductase gene of the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was cloned and used to drive chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene expression. The construct was transferred by electroporation into P. tricornutum grown in medium lacking silicon. CAT expression was induced in transformed diatoms in the presence of nitrate, enabling growth in selective medium, and was repressed when ammonium was the only nitrogen source. Expression of CAT transcript and protein were demonstrated by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Our study is the first to report a successful genetic transformation of diatom by electroporation in an economical and efficient manner and provides a tightly regulated inducible gene expression system for diatom.

  19. Model Estimation and Selection towardsUnconstrained Real-Time Tracking and Mapping.

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, Steffen; Sweeney, Chris; Ventura, Jonathan; Turk, Matthew; Höllerer, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    We present an approach and prototype implementation to initialization-free real-time tracking and mapping that supports any type of camera motion in 3D environments, that is, parallax-inducing as well as rotation-only motions. Our approach effectively behaves like a keyframe-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping system or a panorama tracking and mapping system, depending on the camera movement. It seamlessly switches between the two modes and is thus able to track and map through arbitrary sequences of parallax-inducing and rotation-only camera movements. The system integrates both model-based and model-free tracking, automatically choosing between the two depending on the situation, and subsequently uses the "Geometric Robust Information Criterion" to decide whether the current camera motion can best be represented as a parallax-inducing motion or a rotation-only motion. It continues to collect and map data after tracking failure by creating separate tracks which are later merged if they are found to overlap. This is in contrast to most existing tracking and mapping systems, which suspend tracking and mapping and thus discard valuable data until relocalization with respect to the initial map is successful. We tested our prototype implementation on a variety of video sequences, successfully tracking through different camera motions and fully automatically building combinations of panoramas and 3D structure. PMID:26357301

  20. Model Estimation and Selection towards Unconstrained Real-Time Tracking and Mapping.

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, Steffen; Sweeney, Chris; Ventura, Jonathan; Turk, Matthew; Höllerer, Tobias

    2013-10-16

    We present an approach and prototype implementation to initialization-free real-time tracking and mapping that supports any type of camera motion in 3D environments, that is, parallax-inducing as well as rotation-only motions. Our approach effectively behaves like a keyframe-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping system or a panorama tracking and mapping system, depending on the camera movement. It seamlessly switches between the two modes and is thus able to track and map through arbitrary sequences of parallax-inducing and rotation-only camera movements. The system integrates both model-based and model-free tracking, automatically choosing between the two depending on the situation, and subsequently uses the `Geometric Robust Information Criterion' to decide whether the current camera motion can best be represented as a parallax inducing motion or a rotation-only motion. It continues to collect and map data after tracking failure, thus creating separate tracks which are later merged if they are found to overlap. This is in contrast to most existing tracking and mapping systems, which suspend tracking and mapping and thus discard valuable data until relocalization with respect to the initial map is successful. We tested our prototype implementation on a variety of video sequences, successfully tracking through different camera motions and fully automatically building combinations of panoramas and 3D structure. PMID:24144984

  1. Tanshinone IIA induces TRAIL sensitization of human lung cancer cells through selective ER stress induction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ok; Kang, Shi Eun; Im, Chang Rak; Lee, Jun-Hee; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Yang, Woong Mo; Um, Jae-Young; Lee, Seok-Geun; Yun, Miyong

    2016-05-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promised anticancer medicine targeting only the tumor, most cancers show resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. For this reason, new therapeutic strategies to overcome the TRAIL resistance are required for more effective tumor treatment. In the present study, potential of tanshinone IIA as a TRAIL sensitizer was evaluated in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. NSCLC cells showed resistance to TRAIL-mediated cell death, but combination treatment of Tanshinone IIA and TRAIL synergistically decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant NSCLC cells. Tanshinone IIA greatly induced death receptor 5 (DR5), but not death receptor 4 (DR4). Furthermore, DR5 knockdown attenuated the combination treatment of tanshinone IIA with TRAIL-mediated cell death in human NSCLC cells. Tanshinone IIA also increased CHOP and activated the PERK-ATF4 pathway suggesting that tanshinone IIA increased DR5 and CHOP by activating the PERK-ATF4 pathway. Tanshinone IIA also downregulated phosphorylation of STAT3 and expression of survivin. Taken together, these results indicate that tanshinone IIA increases TRAIL-induced cell death via upregulating DR5 and downregulating survivin mediated by, respectively, selective activation of PERK/ATF4 and inhibition of STAT3, suggesting combinatorial intervention of tanshinone IIA and TRAIL as a new therapeutic strategy for human NSCLC. PMID:26983803

  2. In vivo selective cytoskeleton dynamics quantification in interphase cells induced by pulsed ultraviolet laser nanosurgery.

    PubMed

    Colombelli, Julien; Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Rietdorf, Jens; Pepperkok, Rainer; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2005-12-01

    We report on the manipulation of intracellular filaments using a nanosurgery system based on a subnanosecond pulsed UV laser optimized for the localized severing of biological polymers. By inducing artificial catastrophe of selected microtubules (MTs), we perform shrinkage-rate measurements in interphase Ptk-2 cells throughout the entire cell. We quantify the impact of two labeling methods and three fluorescent markers, showing a 25% faster depolymerization with Alexa-488 tubulin compared with Rhodamine and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) tubulins and a 20% higher variability induced by microinjection compared with stable transfection. Using EB3-GFP as a tip marker, we establish a new protocol to measure shrinkage rate, growth rate and rescue frequency simultaneously with high temporal and spatial specificity in live cells. As our analysis shows, laser-induced MT dynamics are physiologically relevant. The high statistical efficiency that the method offers in terms of numbers of measured events and therefore reduced standard deviations represents an important quantitative improvement in the measurement of dynamic instability parameters in vivo. We extend the application of the method by demonstrating induced dynamic behavior of actin-stress fibers after severing. This new method enables the quantitative investigation of cytoskeleton dynamics in a local confinement. PMID:16262721

  3. Isolation of pathogen-induced Chinese cabbage genes by subtractive hybridization employing selective adaptor ligation.

    PubMed

    Ryang, Seung Ho; Chung, Sam Young; Lee, Sung Hee; Cha, Jae Soon; Yong Kim, Hak; Cho, Tae Ju

    2002-12-01

    We have developed a subtractive cloning method in which target sequences are effectively enriched by selective adaptor ligation and PCR after hybridization. In this method both tester and driver DNAs are digested with RsaI, ligated with the linker DNA containing a KpnI recognition site, and amplified by PCR. The tester DNA samples are divided into two aliquots, each digested with either RsaI or KpnI. The two DNA samples are then combined and hybridized with an excess of the driver DNA retaining the linker. After hybridization, the DNA mixture is ligated to a new adaptor compatible only with double-stranded tester/tester DNAs. Therefore, only the tester/tester is selectively amplified in subsequent PCR. This also leads to complete elimination of the tester DNA hybridized with driver DNA from the tester DNA population. Although our protocol employs enzymatic treatments, the efficiency of the enzymatic treatments does not affect the subtraction efficiency. This new subtractive enrichment method was applied to isolate Chinese cabbage defense-related genes induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), which elicits a hypersensitive response in Chinese cabbage. After two or three rounds of subtractive hybridization, the sequences of enriched DNAs were determined and examined by BLAST analysis. Northern blot hybridization showed that 12 of the 19 genes analyzed were strongly induced by Pst treatment. Among the 12 Pst-induced genes five represent pathogenesis-related genes encoding PR1a, two chitinases, a thaumatin-like protein, and a PR4 protein. Other Pst-induced genes include two cytochrome P450 genes responsible for glucosinolate biosynthesis, a disease resistance gene homolog, and several genes encoding proteins with unknown functions.

  4. Velocity Selective Optical Pumping of Rb Hyperfine Lines Induced by a Train of Femtosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Aumiler, D.; Ban, T.; Skenderovic, H.; Pichler, G.

    2005-12-02

    We present direct observation of the velocity-selective optical pumping of the Rb ground state hyperfine levels induced by 5S{sub 1/2}{yields}5P{sub 1/2} femtosecond pulse-train excitation. A modified direct frequency comb spectroscopy based on the fixed frequency comb and a weak cw scanning probe laser was developed. The femtosecond pulse-train excitation of a Doppler-broadened Rb four-level atomic vapor is investigated theoretically in the context of the density matrix formalism and the results are compared with the experiment.

  5. Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing a deuterium enriched material by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the working material a gas phase photolytically dissociable organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom which is adjacent to a carbonyl group and consisting of molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as deuterium and molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as another isotope of hydrogen. The organic carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of the deuterium containing species to yield a deuterium enriched stable molecular product. Undissociated carbonyl compound, depleted in deuterium, is preferably redeuterated for reuse.

  6. Ultrafast nuclear dynamics in halomethanes studied with time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging and channel-selective Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, Y.; Kaderiya, B.; Pearson, W. L.; Ziaee, F.; Kanaka Raju, P.; Zohrabi, M.; Jensen, K.; Rajput, J.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Halomethanes have recently attracted considerable attention since they often serve as prototype systems for laser-controlled chemistry (e.g., selective bond breaking or concerted elimination reactions), and are important molecules in atmospheric chemistry. Here we combine a femtosecond laser pump-probe setup with coincident 3D ion momentum imaging apparatus to study strong-field induced nuclear dynamics in methane and several of its halogenated derivatives (CH3 I, CH2 I2, CH2 ICl). We apply a time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging technique to map the nuclear motion on both, bound and continuum potential surfaces, disentangle different fragmentation pathways and, for halogenated molecules, observe clear signatures of vibrational wave packets in neutral or ionized states. Channel-selective and kinetic-energy resolved Fourier analysis of these data allows for unique identification of different electronic states and vibrational modes responsible for a particular structure. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. DOE. K. R. P. and W. L. P. supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049. K.J. supported by the NSF-REU Grant No. PHYS-1461251.

  7. Avoidance of fisheries-induced evolution: management implications for catch selectivity and limit reference points.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2009-08-01

    I examined how the fitness (r) associated with early- and late-maturing genotypes varies with fishing mortality (F) and age-/size-specific probability of capture. Life-history data on Newfoundland's northern Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) allowed for the estimation of r for individuals maturing at 4 and 7 year in the absence of fishing. Catch selectivity data associated with four types of fishing gear (trap, gillnet, handline, otter trawl) were then incorporated to examine how r varied with gear type and with F. The resulting fitness functions were then used to estimate the F above which selection would favour early (4 year) rather than delayed (7 year) maturity. This evolutionarily-sensitive threshold, F evol, identifies a limit reference point somewhat similar to those used to define overfishing (e.g., F msy, F 0.1). Over-exploitation of northern cod resulted in fishing mortalities considerably greater than those required to effect evolutionary change. Selection for early maturity is reduced by the dome-shaped selectivities characteristic of fixed gears such as handlines (the greater the leptokurtosis, the lower the probability of a selection response) and enhanced by the knife-edged selectivities of bottom trawls. Strategies to minimize genetic change are consistent with traditional management objectives (e.g., yield maximization, population increase). Compliance with harvest control rules guided by evolutionarily-sensitive limit reference points, which may be achieved by adherence to traditional reference points such as F msy and F 0.1, should be sufficient to minimize the probability of fisheries-induced evolution for commercially exploited species.

  8. A Unified Conformational Selection and Induced Fit Approach to Protein-Peptide Docking

    PubMed Central

    Trellet, Mikael; Melquiond, Adrien S. J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-peptide interactions are vital for the cell. They mediate, inhibit or serve as structural components in nearly 40% of all macromolecular interactions, and are often associated with diseases, making them interesting leads for protein drug design. In recent years, large-scale technologies have enabled exhaustive studies on the peptide recognition preferences for a number of peptide-binding domain families. Yet, the paucity of data regarding their molecular binding mechanisms together with their inherent flexibility makes the structural prediction of protein-peptide interactions very challenging. This leaves flexible docking as one of the few amenable computational techniques to model these complexes. We present here an ensemble, flexible protein-peptide docking protocol that combines conformational selection and induced fit mechanisms. Starting from an ensemble of three peptide conformations (extended, a-helix, polyproline-II), flexible docking with HADDOCK generates 79.4% of high quality models for bound/unbound and 69.4% for unbound/unbound docking when tested against the largest protein-peptide complexes benchmark dataset available to date. Conformational selection at the rigid-body docking stage successfully recovers the most relevant conformation for a given protein-peptide complex and the subsequent flexible refinement further improves the interface by up to 4.5 Å interface RMSD. Cluster-based scoring of the models results in a selection of near-native solutions in the top three for ∼75% of the successfully predicted cases. This unified conformational selection and induced fit approach to protein-peptide docking should open the route to the modeling of challenging systems such as disorder-order transitions taking place upon binding, significantly expanding the applicability limit of biomolecular interaction modeling by docking. PMID:23516555

  9. Temperature-induced shifts in selective pressure at a critical developmental transition.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, Monica; McCormick, Mark I; Meekan, Mark G

    2007-05-01

    Selective mortality within a population, based on the phenotype of individuals, is the foundation of the theory of natural selection. We examined temperature-induced shifts in the relationships among early life history traits and survivorship over the embryonic and larval stages of a tropical damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis. Our experiments show that temperature determines the intensity of selective mortality, and that this changes with ontogeny. The size of energy stores determined survival through to hatching, after which egg size became a good indicator of fitness as predicted by theoretical models. Yet, the benefits associated with egg size were not uniform among test temperatures. Initial egg size positively influenced larval survival at control temperature (29 degrees C). However, this embryonic trait had no effect on post-hatching longevity of individuals reared at the higher (31 degrees C) and lower (25 degrees C) end of the temperature range. Overall, our findings indicate that the outcome of selective mortality is strongly dependent on the interaction between environment conditions and intrinsic developmental schedules. PMID:17242907

  10. Born at the Wrong Time: Selection Bias in the NHL Draft

    PubMed Central

    Deaner, Robert O.; Lowen, Aaron; Cobley, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Relative age effects (RAEs) occur when those who are relatively older for their age group are more likely to succeed. RAEs occur reliably in some educational and athletic contexts, yet the causal mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide the first direct test of one mechanism, selection bias, which can be defined as evaluators granting fewer opportunities to relatively younger individuals than is warranted by their latent ability. Because RAEs are well-established in hockey, we analyzed National Hockey League (NHL) drafts from 1980 to 2006. Compared to those born in the first quarter (i.e., January–March), those born in the third and fourth quarters were drafted more than 40 slots later than their productivity warranted, and they were roughly twice as likely to reach career benchmarks, such as 400 games played or 200 points scored. This selection bias in drafting did not decrease over time, apparently continues to occur, and reduces the playing opportunities of relatively younger players. This bias is remarkable because it is exhibited by professional decision makers evaluating adults in a context where RAEs have been widely publicized. Thus, selection bias based on relative age may be pervasive. PMID:23460902

  11. Selective translocation of protein kinase C-delta in PC12 cells during nerve growth factor-induced neuritogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, K R; Teng, K K; Fabbro, D; Greene, L A; Weinstein, I B

    1995-01-01

    The specific intracellular signals initiated by nerve growth factor (NGF) that lead to neurite formation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells are as of yet unclear. Protein kinase C-delta (PKC delta) is translocated from the soluble to the particulate subcellular fraction during NGF-induced-neuritogenesis; however, this does not occur after treatment with the epidermal growth factor, which is mitogenic but does not induce neurite formation. PC12 cells also contain both Ca(2+)-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent PKC enzymatic activities, and express mRNA and immunoreactive proteins corresponding to the PKC isoforms alpha, beta, delta, epsilon, and zeta. There are transient decreases in the levels of immunoreactive PKCs alpha, beta, and epsilon after 1-3 days of NGF treatment, and after 7 days there is a 2.5-fold increase in the level of PKC alpha, and a 1.8-fold increase in total cellular PKC activity. NGF-induced PC12 cell neuritogenesis is enhanced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in a TPA dose- and time-dependent manner, and this differentiation coincides with abrogation of the down-regulation of PKC delta and other PKC isoforms, when the cells are treated with TPA. Thus a selective activation of PKC delta may play a role in neuritogenic signals in PC12 cells. Images PMID:7626808

  12. Neighbourhood selection for local modelling and prediction of hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, A. W.; Li, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2002-02-01

    The prediction of a time series using the dynamical systems approach requires the knowledge of three parameters; the time delay, the embedding dimension and the number of nearest neighbours. In this paper, a new criterion, based on the generalized degrees of freedom, for the selection of the number of nearest neighbours needed for a better local model for time series prediction is presented. The validity of the proposed method is examined using time series, which are known to be chaotic under certain initial conditions (Lorenz map, Henon map and Logistic map), and real hydro meteorological time series (discharge data from Chao Phraya river in Thailand, Mekong river in Thailand and Laos, and sea surface temperature anomaly data). The predicted results are compared with observations, and with similar predictions obtained by using arbitrarily fixed numbers of neighbours. The results indicate superior predictive capability as measured by the mean square errors and coefficients of variation by the proposed approach when compared with the traditional approach of using a fixed number of neighbours.

  13. K+-selective nanospheres: maximising response range and minimising response time.

    PubMed

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2006-12-01

    Cross-linked K(+) ion-selective copolymer nanospheres have been prepared by free-radical photo-initiated polymerization of n-butyl acrylate (nBA) with hexanedioldiacrylate (HDDA). Nanospheres (<200 nm) containing H(+)-chromoionophore (ETH 5294) and lipophilic salt (KTClPB) for H(+)-sensors, or ETH 5294, a K(+)-selective ionophore (valinomycin) and anionic sites for K(+)-sensors were compared, and the effect of varying the normalised concentrations for beta (R(T)(-)/L(T)) and gamma (C(m)(T)/L(T)) was studied. Experimental data were fitted to theoretical curves for the dynamic response range, based on the effect of changes in the concentration of these lipophilic sensing components incorporated into the spheres, and conditions identified for maximising the response range. A complex valinomycin-K(+) formation constant, log K(IL) = 13.13 +/- 2.22, was obtained in the nBA matrix, and from the calibration curves the apparent acid-dissociation equilibrium constant (pK(a) = 12.92 +/- 0.03) was extracted for the H(+)-sensing system, and the equilibrium exchange constant (pK(exch) = 6.16 +/- 0.03, at pH 7) calculated for the K(+)-sensing nanospheres. A basis for establishing optimum performance was identified, whereby response range and response time were balanced with maximum fluorescence yield. Parameters for achieving nanospheres with a response time <5 minutes, covering 2-3 orders of magnitude change in activity were identified, demanding nanospheres with radius <300 nm and beta(crit) approximately 0.6. An RSD(%) approximately 3% was obtained in a study of the reproducibility of the response of the proposed nanospheres, and selectivity was also evaluated for a K(+)-selective nanosensor using several cations as interfering agents. In most cases, the fluorescent emission spectra showed no response to the cations tested, confirming the selectivity of nanospheres to potassium ion. The nanosensors were satisfactorily applied to the determination of K(+) in samples mimicking

  14. K+-selective nanospheres: maximising response range and minimising response time.

    PubMed

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2006-12-01

    Cross-linked K(+) ion-selective copolymer nanospheres have been prepared by free-radical photo-initiated polymerization of n-butyl acrylate (nBA) with hexanedioldiacrylate (HDDA). Nanospheres (<200 nm) containing H(+)-chromoionophore (ETH 5294) and lipophilic salt (KTClPB) for H(+)-sensors, or ETH 5294, a K(+)-selective ionophore (valinomycin) and anionic sites for K(+)-sensors were compared, and the effect of varying the normalised concentrations for beta (R(T)(-)/L(T)) and gamma (C(m)(T)/L(T)) was studied. Experimental data were fitted to theoretical curves for the dynamic response range, based on the effect of changes in the concentration of these lipophilic sensing components incorporated into the spheres, and conditions identified for maximising the response range. A complex valinomycin-K(+) formation constant, log K(IL) = 13.13 +/- 2.22, was obtained in the nBA matrix, and from the calibration curves the apparent acid-dissociation equilibrium constant (pK(a) = 12.92 +/- 0.03) was extracted for the H(+)-sensing system, and the equilibrium exchange constant (pK(exch) = 6.16 +/- 0.03, at pH 7) calculated for the K(+)-sensing nanospheres. A basis for establishing optimum performance was identified, whereby response range and response time were balanced with maximum fluorescence yield. Parameters for achieving nanospheres with a response time <5 minutes, covering 2-3 orders of magnitude change in activity were identified, demanding nanospheres with radius <300 nm and beta(crit) approximately 0.6. An RSD(%) approximately 3% was obtained in a study of the reproducibility of the response of the proposed nanospheres, and selectivity was also evaluated for a K(+)-selective nanosensor using several cations as interfering agents. In most cases, the fluorescent emission spectra showed no response to the cations tested, confirming the selectivity of nanospheres to potassium ion. The nanosensors were satisfactorily applied to the determination of K(+) in samples mimicking

  15. Ultra-small time-delay estimation via a weak measurement technique with post-selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chen; Huang, Jing-Zheng; Yu, Yang; Li, Qinzheng; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-09-01

    Weak measurement is a novel technique for parameter estimation with higher precision. In this paper we develop a general theory for the parameter estimation based on a weak measurement technique with arbitrary post-selection. The weak-value amplification model and the joint weak measurement model are two special cases in our theory. Applying the developed theory, time-delay estimation is investigated in both theory and experiments. The experimental results show that when the time delay is ultra-small, the joint weak measurement scheme outperforms the weak-value amplification scheme, and is robust against not only misalignment errors but also the wavelength dependence of the optical components. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions that have not been previously verified by any experiment.

  16. Maternal exposures in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study: time trends of selected exposures

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, April L.; Razzaghi, Hilda; Arth, Annelise; Canfield, Mark A.; Parker, Samantha E.; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2015-01-01

    Background Our objective was to describe time trends in selected pregnancy exposures in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). Methods We analyzed data from the NBDPS, a multi-site case-control study of major birth defects, for mothers of live-born infants without birth defects (controls), with an expected date of delivery (EDD) from 1998 –2011. Mothers from the 10 participating centers across the United States were interviewed by phone between six weeks and two years after the EDD. We focused on maternal race/ethnicity and five maternal risk factors: obesity, use of folic acid-containing multivitamins, opioid analgesics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and loratadine because of their prevalence of use and some reports of associations with major birth defects. Prevalence time trends were examined using the Kendall’s τβ test statistic. Results The exposure trend analysis included 11,724 control mothers with EDDs from 1998–2011. We observed a significant increase in obesity prevalence among control mothers, as well as use of SSRIs and loratadine. We also observed an increase in periconceptional use of folic acid-containing multivitamins. Some of the time trends varied by race/ethnicity. No remarkable trend in the overall use of opioid analgesics was observed. The racial/ethnic distribution of mothers changed slightly during the study period. Conclusions Long-term, population-based case-control studies continue to be an effective way to assess exposure-birth defects associations and provide guidance to health care providers. However, investigators examining rare outcomes covering many years of data collection need to be cognizant of time trends in exposures. PMID:25884728

  17. Dependence of the Crossing Time on the Sequence Length in a Diploid Discrete-Time Mutation-Selection Model for a Finite Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    This study examined the crossing time in the diploid discrete-time mutation-selection model in a finite population for a range of dominance parameters and selective advantages by switching on a diploid, asymmetric, bridged landscape, from an initial state, a steady state in a diploid, bridged landscape. The dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length was examined for a fixed extension parameter, which was defined as the mean Hamming distance from the optimal allele of the initial steady state divided by the sequence length. The boundary between the deterministic and stochastic regions in the diploid discrete-time mutation-selection model was characterized using the same formula as that in the haploid discrete-time mutation-selection model. The crossing time in a finite population with various population sizes, dominance parameters and selective advantages began to deviate from the crossing time for an infinite population at the critical sequence length. The crossing time for a finite population in the stochastic region was found to be an exponentially increasing function of the sequence length, whose rate was unchanged, regardless of changes in the population size, dominance parameter and selective advantage with a fixed extension parameter. This work was supported by a 2-Year Research Grant of Pusan National University.

  18. Source selection for real-time user intent recognition toward volitional control of artificial legs.

    PubMed

    Fan Zhang; He Huang

    2013-09-01

    Various types of data sources have been used to recognize user intent for volitional control of powered artificial legs. However, there is still a debate on what exact data sources are necessary for accurately and responsively recognizing the user's intended tasks. Motivated by this widely interested question, in this study we aimed to 1) investigate the usefulness of different data sources commonly suggested for user intent recognition and 2) determine an informative set of data sources for volitional control of prosthetic legs. The studied data sources included eight surface electromyography (EMG) signals from the residual thigh muscles of transfemoral (TF) amputees, ground reaction forces/moments from a prosthetic pylon, and kinematic measurements from the residual thigh and prosthetic knee. We then ranked and included data sources based on the usefulness for user intent recognition and selected a reduced number of data sources that ensured accurate recognition of the user's intended task by using three source selection algorithms. The results showed that EMG signals and ground reaction forces/moments were more informative than prosthesis kinematics. Nine to eleven of all the initial data sources were sufficient to maintain 95% accuracy for recognizing the studied seven tasks without missing additional task transitions in real time. The selected data sources produced consistent system performance across two experimental days for four recruited TF amputee subjects, indicating the potential robustness of the selected data sources. Finally, based on the study results, we suggested a protocol for determining the informative data sources and sensor configurations for future development of volitional control of powered artificial legs.

  19. Quantum Mode Selectivity of Plasmon-Induced Water Splitting on Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Wang, Fangwei; Meng, Sheng

    2016-05-24

    Plasmon induced water splitting is a promising research area with the potential for efficient conversion of solar to chemical energy, yet its atomic mechanism is not well understood. Here, ultrafast electron-nuclear dynamics of water splitting on gold nanoparticles upon exposure to femtosecond laser pulses was directly simulated using real time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Strong correlation between laser intensity, hot electron transfer, and reaction rates has been identified. The rate of water splitting is dependent not only on respective optical absorption strength, but also on the quantum oscillation mode of plasmonic excitation. Odd modes are more efficient than even modes, owing to faster decaying into hot electrons whose energy matches well the antibonding orbital of water. This finding suggests photocatalytic activity can be manipulated by adjusting the energy level of plasmon-induced hot carriers, through altering the cluster size and laser parameter, to better overlap adsorbate unoccupied level in plasmon-assisted photochemistry.

  20. Direct selection of cloned DNA in Bacillus subtilis based on sucrose-induced lethality.

    PubMed Central

    Bramucci, M G; Nagarajan, V

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus amyloliquefaciens sacB gene in the presence of sucrose is lethal for a variety of bacteria. Sucrose-induced lethality can be used to select for inactivation of sacB by insertion of heterologous DNA in sensitive bacteria. This procedure has not been applicable to B. subtilis heretofore because expression of wild-type sacB is not detrimental to B. subtilis. The W29 mutation in the B. amyloliquefaciens sacB gene interferes with processing of the levansucrase signal peptide. The W29 mutation does not affect growth of B. subtilis in media lacking sucrose. However, this mutation inhibited growth of B. subtilis in media containing sucrose. Inactivation of the fructose polymerase activity encoded by sacB indicated that levan production was essential for sucrose-induced lethality. As a result, it was possible to select for cloned DNA in B. subtilis by insertional inactivation of the mutant sacB gene located on a multicopy plasmid vector in medium containing sucrose. PMID:8899981

  1. The effect of sine-Wiener noises on transition in a genotype selection model with time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan Ning, Li; Liu, Pei

    2016-09-01

    A genotype selection system interplay with sine-Wiener noises and time delays is investigated. Stationary probability distribution function is obtained by numerical simulations. Results show that the multiplicative bounded noise can facilitate the gene separation, while the additive bounded noise suppresses the gene separation. Besides, local time delays α and β, being in gene transformation and gene heredity progress respectively, play opposite roles in the gene selection process. What is more interesting is that there is no transition during the process of gene select when time delays α = β (i.e., the system is subjected to global time delay).

  2. Bifurcations Induced in a Bistable Oscillator via Joint Noises and Time Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jin; Sun, Zhongkui; Xiao, Yuzhu; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, noise-induced and delay-induced bifurcations in a bistable Duffing-van der Pol (DVP) oscillator under time delay and joint noises are discussed theoretically and numerically. Based on the qualitative changes of the plane phase, delay-induced bifurcations are investigated in the deterministic case. However, in the stochastic case, the response of the system is a stochastic non-Markovian process owing to the existence of noise and time delay. Then, methods have been employed to derive the stationary probability density function (PDF) of the amplitude of the response. Accordingly, stochastic P-bifurcations can be observed with the variations in the qualitative behavior of the stationary PDF for amplitude. Furthermore, results from both theoretical analyses and numerical simulations best demonstrate the appearance of noise-induced and delay-induced bifurcations, which are in good agreement.

  3. Volumetric Late Gadolinium-Enhanced Myocardial Imaging with Retrospective Inversion Time Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kecskemeti, Steve; Johnson, Kevin; François, Christopher J.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Unal, Orhan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a novel free-breathing three-dimensional radial late Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique (3D LGE-MRI) with isotropic resolution and retrospective inversion time (TI) selection for myocardial viability imaging. Materials and Methods The 3D LGE-MRI featuring an interleaved and bit-reversed radial k-space trajectory was evaluated in twelve subjects that also had clinical breathhold Cartesian 2D LGE-MRI. The 3D LGE-MRI acquisition requires a predicted TI and a user controlled data acquisition window that determines the sampling width around the predicted TI. Sliding window reconstructions with update rates of 1x the repetition time (TR) allow for a user selectable TI to obtain the maximum nulling of the myocardium. The retrospective nature of the acquisition allows the user to choose from a range of possible TI times centered on the expected TI. Those projections most corrupted by respiratory motion, as determined by a respiratory bellows signal, were re-sampled according to the diminishing variance algorithm. The quality of the left ventricular myocardial nulling on the 3D LGE-MRI and 2D LGE-MRI was assessed using a 4-point Likert scale by two experienced radiologists. Comparison of image quality scores for the two methods was performed using generalized estimating equations. Results All 3D LGE-MRI cases produced similar nulling of myocardial signal as the 2D LGE-MRI. The image quality of myocardial nulling was not significantly different between the two acquisitions (mean nulling of 3.4 for 2D vs. 3.1 for 3D, and p=0.0645). The average absolute deviation from mean scores was also not determined to be statistically significant (1.8 for 2D and 0.4 for 3D and p = 0.1673). Total acquisition time was approximately 9 minutes for 3D LGE-MRI with voxel sizes ranging from 1.63 to 2.03 mm3. Conversely, the total imaging time was twice as long for the 2D DCE-MRI (>17 minutes) with an eight times larger voxel size of 1.4 mm

  4. Phenotypic Selection Exerted by a Seed Predator Is Replicated in Space and Time and among Prey Species.

    PubMed

    Benkman, Craig W; Mezquida, Eduardo T

    2015-11-01

    Although consistent phenotypic selection arising from biotic interactions is thought to be the primary cause of adaptive diversification, studies documenting such selection are relatively few. Here we analyze 12 episodes of phenotypic selection exerted by a predispersal seed predator, the red crossbill (Loxia curvirostra complex), on five species of pines (Pinus). We find that even though the intensity of selection for some traits increased with the strength of the interaction (i.e., proportion of seeds eaten), the relative strength of selection exerted by crossbills on cone and seed traits is replicated across space and time and among species. Such selection (1) can account for repeated patterns of conifer cone evolution and escalation in seed defenses with time and (2) suggests that variation in selection is less the result of variation intrinsic to pairwise biotic interactions than, for example, variation in relative densities of the interacting species, community context, and abiotic factors.

  5. Selection and investigation of sites for the disposal of radioactive wastes in hydraulically induced subsurface fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Injection of intermediate-level radioactive wastes (specific activity of less than 6 x 10/sup 3/ ..mu..Ci/mL, consisting mainly of radionuclides, such as strontium and cesium, having half-lives of less than 50 years) mixed with cement into a thick shale formation is a promising and feasible disposal method. Hydraulic fracturing provides openings in the shale to accommodate the wastes. Ion exchange and radionuclide-adsorption materials can be added to the grout during mixing to further increase the radionuclide-retaining capacity of the grout. After solidification of the grout, the injected wastes become an integral part of the shale formation, and therefore the wastes will remain at depth and in place as long as the injection zone is not subjected to erosion and dissolution. Problems concerning safety of the disposal method are (1) the potential for inducing vertical fractures, (2) phase separation during and after the injections, (3) the reliability of methods for determining the orientation of induced fractures, (4) the possibility of triggering earthquakes, and (5) radionuclides being leached and transported by ground water. Theoretical considerations about inducing nearly horizontal bedding-plane fractures in shale are discussed, as are field procedures for site selection, safety, and the monitoring and operation of radioactive waste disposal. Case histories are used as examples to demonstrate the application of the theory and techniques of field operations. (JMT)

  6. Selection and investigation of sites for the disposal of radioactive wastes in hydraulically induced subsurface fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Injection of intermediate-level radioactive wastes (specific activity of less than 6 x 10/sup 3/..mu..Ci/mL, consisting mainly of radionuclides, such as strontium and cesium, having half-lives of less than 50 years) mixed with cement into a thick shale formation is a promising and feasible disposal method. Hydraulic fracturing provides openings in the shale to accommodate the wastes. Ion exchange and radionuclide-adsorption materials can be added to the grout during mixing to further increase the radionuclide-retaining capacity of the grout. After solidification of the grout, the injected wastes become an integral part of the shale formation, and therefore the wastes will remain at depth and in place as long as the injection zone is not subjected to erosion or dissolution. Problems concerning safety of the disposal method are: (1) the potential for inducing vertical fractures, (2) phase separation during and after the injections, (3) the reliability of methods for determining the orientation of induced fractures, (4) the possibility of triggering earthquakes, and (5) radionuclides being leached and transported by ground water. Theoretical considerations about inducing nearly horizontal bedding-plane fractures in shale are discussed, as are field procedures for site selection, safety, and the monitoring and operation of radioactive waste disposal. Case histories are used as examples to demonstrate the application of the theory and techniques of field operations.

  7. Skeletal unloading induces selective resistance to the anabolic actions of growth hormone on bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Autry, C. P.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S.; Patterson-Buckendahl, P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of skeletal weight bearing or physical unloading of bone in the growing animal inhibits bone formation and induces a bone mineral deficit. To determine whether the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading in the growing animal is a consequence of diminished sensitivity to growth hormone (GH) we studied the effects of skeletal unloading in young hypophysectomized rats treated with GH (0, 50, 500 micrograms/100 g body weight/day). Skeletal unloading reduced serum osteocalcin, impaired uptake of 3H-proline into bone, decreased proximal tibial mass, and diminished periosteal bone formation at the tibiofibular junction. When compared with animals receiving excipient alone, GH administration increased bone mass in all animals. The responses in serum osteocalcin, uptake of 3H-proline and 45Ca into the proximal tibia, and proximal tibial mass in non-weight bearing animals were equal to those in weight bearing animals. The responses in trabecular bone volume in the proximal tibia and bone formation at the tibiofibular junction to GH, however, were reduced significantly by skeletal unloading. Bone unloading prevented completely the increase in metaphyseal trabecular bone normally induced by GH and severely dampened the stimulatory effect (158% vs. 313%, p < 0.002) of GH on periosteal bone formation. These results suggest that while GH can stimulate the overall accumulation of bone mineral in both weight bearing and non-weight bearing animals, skeletal unloading selectively impairs the response of trabecular bone and periosteal bone formation to the anabolic actions of GH.

  8. Observational selection biases in time-delay strong lensing and their impact on cosmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Thomas E.; Cunnington, Steven D.

    2016-11-01

    Inferring cosmological parameters from time-delay strong lenses requires a significant investment of telescope time; it is therefore tempting to focus on the systems with the brightest sources, the highest image multiplicities and the widest image separations. We investigate if this selection bias can influence the properties of the lenses studied and the cosmological parameters inferred. Using an ellipsoidal power-law deflector population, we build a sample of double- and quadruple-image systems. Assuming reasonable thresholds on image separation and flux, based on current lens monitoring campaigns, we find that the typical density profile slopes of monitorable lenses are significantly shallower than the input ensemble. From a sample of quads, we find that this selection function can introduce a 3.5 per cent bias on the inferred time-delay distances if the properties of the input ensemble are (incorrectly) used as priors on the lens model. This bias remains at the 2.4 per cent level when high-resolution imaging of the quasar host is used to precisely infer the properties of individual lenses. We also investigate if the lines of sight for monitorable strong lenses are biased. The expectation value for the line-of-sight convergence is increased by 0.009 (0.004) for quads (doubles) implying a 0.9 per cent (0.4 per cent) bias on H0. We therefore conclude that whilst the properties of typical quasar lenses and their lines of sight do deviate from the global population, the total magnitude of this effect is likely to be a subdominant effect for current analyses, but has the potential to be a major systematic for samples of ˜25 or more lenses.

  9. A zinc-binding site by negative selection induces metallodrug susceptibility in an essential chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Cun, Shujian; Sun, Hongzhe

    2010-03-16

    GroES is an indispensable chaperonin virtually found throughout all life forms. Consequently, mutations of this protein must be critically scrutinized by natural selection. Nevertheless, the homolog from a potentially virulent gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori, strikingly features a histidine/cysteine-rich C terminus that shares no significant homology with other family members. Additionally, three more (H45, C51, and C53) are uniquely present in its apical domain. The statistical analyses show that these residues may have originated from negative selection, presumably driven by either dependent or independent amino acid mutations. In the absence of the C-terminal metal-binding domain, the mutant protein still exhibits a substantial capacity for zinc binding in vivo. The biochemical properties of site-directed mutants indicate that H45, C51, and C53 make up an oxidation-sensitive zinc-binding site that may donate the bound metal to a zinc acceptor. Of interest, bismuth antiulcer drugs strongly bind at this site (K(d) of approximately 7 x 10(-26) M), replacing the bound zinc and consequently inducing the disruption of the quaternary structure. Because biological features by negative selection are usually inert to change during evolution, this study sheds light on a promising field whereby medicines can be designed or improved to specifically target the residues that uniquely evolved in pathogenic proteins so as to retard the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:20194796

  10. Identification of an Allosteric Small Molecule Inhibitor Selective for Inducible Form of Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Matthew K.; Bodoor, Khaldon; Carlson, David A.; Hughes, Philip F.; Alwarawrah, Yazan; Loiselle, David R.; Jaeger, Alex M.; Darr, David B.; Jordan, Jamie L.; Hunter, Lucas M.; Molzberger, Eileen T.; Gobillot, Theodore A.; Thiele, Dennis J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Spector, Neil L.; Haystead, Timothy A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Inducible Hsp70 (Hsp70i) is overexpressed in a wide spectrum of human tumors and its expression correlates with metastasis, poor outcomes, and resistance to chemotherapy in patients. Identification of small molecule inhibitors selective for Hsp70i could provide new therapeutic tools for cancer treatment. In this work, we used fluorescence-linked enzyme chemoproteomic strategy (FLECS) to identify HS-72, an allosteric inhibitor selective for Hsp70i. HS-72 displays the hallmarks of Hsp70 inhibition in cells, promoting substrate protein degradation and growth inhibition. Importantly, HS-72 is selective for Hsp70i over the closely related constitutively active Hsc70. Studies with purified protein show HS-72 acts as an allosteric inhibitor, reducing ATP affinity. In vivo HS-72 is well-tolerated, showing bioavailability and efficacy, inhibiting tumor growth and promoting survival in a HER2+ model of breast cancer. The HS-72 scaffold is amenable to resynthesis and iteration, suggesting an ideal starting point for a new generation of anticancer therapeutics targeting Hsp70i. PMID:25500222

  11. Tumor-selective mitochondrial network collapse induced by atmospheric gas plasma-activated medium.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Sahara, Junki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Noboru; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Soma, Masayoshi; Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-12

    Non-thermal atmospheric gas plasma (AGP) exhibits cytotoxicity against malignant cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. However, the mechanisms of its tumor-selective cytotoxicity remain unclear. Here we report that AGP-activated medium increases caspase-independent cell death and mitochondrial network collapse in a panel of human cancer cells, but not in non-transformed cells. AGP irradiation stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGP-activated medium, and in turn the resulting stable ROS, most likely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) accumulation. Culture in AGP-activated medium resulted in cell death and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering, and these responses were inhibited by ROS scavengers. AGP-activated medium also increased dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission in a tumor-specific manner, and H2O2 administration showed similar effects. Moreover, the vulnerability of tumor cells to mitochondrial network collapse appeared to result from their higher sensitivity to mROS accumulation induced by AGP-activated medium or H2O2. The present findings expand our previous observations on death receptor-mediated tumor-selective cell killing and reinforce the importance of mitochondrial network remodeling as a powerful target for tumor-selective cancer treatment.

  12. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in a transistor-selected resistive switching memory.

    PubMed

    Ambrogio, S; Balatti, S; Nardi, F; Facchinetti, S; Ielmini, D

    2013-09-27

    In a neural network, neuron computation is achieved through the summation of input signals fed by synaptic connections. The synaptic activity (weight) is dictated by the synchronous firing of neurons, inducing potentiation/depression of the synaptic connection. This learning function can be supported by the resistive switching memory (RRAM), which changes its resistance depending on the amplitude, the pulse width and the bias polarity of the applied signal. This work shows a new synapse circuit comprising a MOS transistor as a selector and a RRAM as a variable resistance, displaying spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) similar to the one originally experienced in biological neural networks. We demonstrate long-term potentiation and long-term depression by simulations with an analytical model of resistive switching. Finally, the experimental demonstration of the new STDP scheme is presented. PMID:23999495

  13. Thioflavin T as an efficient inducer and selective fluorescent sensor for the human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Jyotirmayee; Barooah, Nilotpal; Dhamodharan, V; Harikrishna, S; Pradeepkumar, P I; Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C

    2013-01-01

    The quest for a G-quadruplex specific fluorescent sensor among other DNA forms under physiological salt conditions has been addressed in this article. We demonstrate for the first time the application of a water-soluble fluorogenic dye, Thioflavin T (ThT), in a dual role of exclusively inducing quadruplex folding in the 22AG human telomeric DNA, both in the presence and absence of Tris buffer/salt, and sensing the same through its fluorescence light-up having emission enhancement of the order of 2100-fold in the visible region. Appropriate conditions allow an apparent switch over of the parallel quadruplex structure in 22AG-ThT (50 mM Tris, pH 7.2) solution to the antiparallel form just by the addition of K(+) ions in the range 10-50 mM. Moreover, addition of ThT cooperatively stabilizes the K(+) induced antiparallel quadruplexes by a ΔT(m) ∼11 °C. The distinction of ThT as a quadruplex inducer has been contrasted with the erstwhile used structurally related dye, Thiazole Orange (TO), which did not induce any quadruplex folding in the 22AG strand in the absence of salt. The striking fluorescence light-up in ThT on binding to the human telomeric G-quadruplex is shown to be highly specific compared to the less than 250-fold enhancement observed with other single/double strand DNA forms. This work has implication in designing new generation dyes based on the ThT scaffold, which are highly selective for telomeric DNA, for potential diagnostic, therapeutic, and ion-sensing applications.

  14. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine selectively inhibits interleukin 8 (IL-8)-induced neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Capannolo, Marta; Fasciani, Irene; Romeo, Stefania; Aloisi, Gabriella; Rossi, Mario; Bellio, Pierangelo; Celenza, Giuseppe; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Scarselli, Marco; Maggio, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic to date, but its benefits are counterbalanced by the risk of severe hematological effects. In this study, we analyzed whether clozapine inhibits polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte chemotaxis. We found that clozapine, within the therapeutic concentration range, potently and selectively inhibits PMN chemotaxis induced by interleukin 8 (IL-8), a chemokine inducing neutrophil migration. The effect was not due to its action at dopamine, serotonin and muscarinic receptors, or to a direct antagonism to IL-8 receptors. Furthermore, clozapine did not inhibit PMN chemotaxis by its presumed toxic mechanism. In fact, after an overnight incubation in cell culture, the drug did not increase the physiological PMN apoptosis. An interference of clozapine with the autocrine release of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a secondary chemoattractant secreted by neutrophils in response to the primary chemoattractant IL-8, was hypothesized. In agreement with this hypothesis, clozapine attenuated the IL-8-induced release of LTB4 in PMNs. A series of experiments with an antagonist of the LTB4 receptor, U75302, and an inhibitor of LTB4 synthesis, zileuton, provided support to this conjecture. Intriguingly MK-571, an inhibitor of the multi-drug resistance protein MRP4, playing a pivotal role in effluxing LTB4, completely blocked PMN chemotaxis induced by IL-8, but gave conflicting results when tested for its ability to reduce LTB4 release, increasing LTB4 efflux by itself but reducing the release when in combination with IL-8. The reduction of PMN chemotaxis due to clozapine could predispose patients to infections. Whether this effect is a prelude to clozapine agranulocytosis requires further investigation.

  15. Time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries, Houston, Texas, August 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.; Schaer, Jasper D.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a time-of-travel study in the Buffalo Bayou watershed during low flow in August 1999. The study was done as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Monitoring for Public Access and Community Tracking (EMPACT) program. The EMPACT program was designed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to work with communities to “make timely, accurate, and understandable environmental information available to millions of people in the largest metropolitan areas across the country.” (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2000). Buffalo Bayou, located in Houston, Texas, was chosen as a pilot project because it is a frequently used recreational water source, it has many water-treatment facilities located along its stream segments, and it has a history of water-quality problems (Houston-Galveston Area Council, 2000). One component of the pilot project is to develop a water-quality simulation model that can be used to assess the effects of noncompliance events on Buffalo Bayou. Because accurate estimates of time of travel during low flow are required to develop the model, the time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries was determined using dye tracing methods. The study was conducted during low flow in a 38.7-mile reach of Buffalo Bayou, a 9.6-mile reach of Whiteoak Bayou, a 5.9-mile reach of Mason Creek, and a 6.6-mile reach of Bear Creek. Efforts to determine the time of travel in a 7.5-mile reach of Horsepen Creek were unsuccessful. This report explains the approach used to conduct the study and presents the results of the study

  16. SHORT DISSIPATION TIMES OF PROTO-PLANETARY DISKS: AN ARTIFACT OF SELECTION EFFECTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Pfalzner, Susanne; Steinhausen, Manuel; Menten, Karl

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of disks around young stars, a key parameter for understanding planet formation, is most readily determined in young stellar clusters where many relatively coeval stars are located in close proximity. Observational studies seem to show that the disk frequency decreases rapidly with cluster age with <10% of cluster stars retaining their disks for longer than 2-6 Myr. Given that at least half of all stars in the field seem to harbor one or more planets, this would imply extremely fast disk dispersal and rapid planet growth. Here we question the validity of this constraint by demonstrating that the short disk dissipation times inferred to date might have been heavily underestimated by selection effects. Critically, for ages >3 Myr only stars that originally populated the densest areas of very populous clusters, which are prone to disk erosion, are actually considered. This tiny sample may not be representative of the majority of stars. In fact, the higher disk fractions in co-moving groups indicate that it is likely that over 30% of all field stars retain their disks well beyond 10 Myr, leaving ample time for planet growth. Equally, our solar system, with a likely formation time >10 Myr, need no longer be an exception but in fact typical of planetary systems.

  17. Classifying human voices by using hybrid SFX time-series preprocessing and ensemble feature selection.

    PubMed

    Fong, Simon; Lan, Kun; Wong, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Voice biometrics is one kind of physiological characteristics whose voice is different for each individual person. Due to this uniqueness, voice classification has found useful applications in classifying speakers' gender, mother tongue or ethnicity (accent), emotion states, identity verification, verbal command control, and so forth. In this paper, we adopt a new preprocessing method named Statistical Feature Extraction (SFX) for extracting important features in training a classification model, based on piecewise transformation treating an audio waveform as a time-series. Using SFX we can faithfully remodel statistical characteristics of the time-series; together with spectral analysis, a substantial amount of features are extracted in combination. An ensemble is utilized in selecting only the influential features to be used in classification model induction. We focus on the comparison of effects of various popular data mining algorithms on multiple datasets. Our experiment consists of classification tests over four typical categories of human voice data, namely, Female and Male, Emotional Speech, Speaker Identification, and Language Recognition. The experiments yield encouraging results supporting the fact that heuristically choosing significant features from both time and frequency domains indeed produces better performance in voice classification than traditional signal processing techniques alone, like wavelets and LPC-to-CC.

  18. Classifying Human Voices by Using Hybrid SFX Time-Series Preprocessing and Ensemble Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Voice biometrics is one kind of physiological characteristics whose voice is different for each individual person. Due to this uniqueness, voice classification has found useful applications in classifying speakers' gender, mother tongue or ethnicity (accent), emotion states, identity verification, verbal command control, and so forth. In this paper, we adopt a new preprocessing method named Statistical Feature Extraction (SFX) for extracting important features in training a classification model, based on piecewise transformation treating an audio waveform as a time-series. Using SFX we can faithfully remodel statistical characteristics of the time-series; together with spectral analysis, a substantial amount of features are extracted in combination. An ensemble is utilized in selecting only the influential features to be used in classification model induction. We focus on the comparison of effects of various popular data mining algorithms on multiple datasets. Our experiment consists of classification tests over four typical categories of human voice data, namely, Female and Male, Emotional Speech, Speaker Identification, and Language Recognition. The experiments yield encouraging results supporting the fact that heuristically choosing significant features from both time and frequency domains indeed produces better performance in voice classification than traditional signal processing techniques alone, like wavelets and LPC-to-CC. PMID:24288684

  19. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1. PMID:27568820

  20. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1.

  1. Selection of Reference Genes for Real-Time Quantitative PCR in Pinus massoniana Post Nematode Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongcheng; Liu, Qinghua; Dong, Hongyu; Zhou, Zhichun; Hao, Yanping; Chen, Xuelian; Xu, Liuyi

    2016-01-01

    Pinus massoniaia Lamb has gained more and more attention as the most important tree species for timber and forestation in South China. Gene expression studies are of great importance to identify new and elite cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR, a highly sensitive and specific method, is commonly used in the analysis of gene expression. The appropriate reference genes must be employed to normalize the calculation program for ascertaining repeatable and significant results. Herein, eleven housekeeping genes were evaluated during different stages of P. massoniana post nematode inoculation in this study. Three statistical approaches such as geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper were selected to analyze the stability of candidate genes. The results indicated that U2af and β-TUB were the most stable reference genes. These two genes could be used for the normalization in most of the experiments of P. massoniana, while Histone and AK were the least stable ones. In addition, EF expressed at the lowest average Ct value was the most abundant candidate gene. As an important gene associated with defense mechanisms, ABC transporter was analyzed by qRT-PCR, and the results were used to confirm the reliability of two genes. The selected reference genes in the present study will be conducive to future gene expression normalized by qRT-PCR in P. massoniana. PMID:26800152

  2. Selection of Reference Genes for Real-Time Quantitative PCR in Pinus massoniana Post Nematode Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongcheng; Liu, Qinghua; Dong, Hongyu; Zhou, Zhichun; Hao, Yanping; Chen, Xuelian; Xu, Liuyi

    2016-01-01

    Pinus massoniaia Lamb has gained more and more attention as the most important tree species for timber and forestation in South China. Gene expression studies are of great importance to identify new and elite cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR, a highly sensitive and specific method, is commonly used in the analysis of gene expression. The appropriate reference genes must be employed to normalize the calculation program for ascertaining repeatable and significant results. Herein, eleven housekeeping genes were evaluated during different stages of P. massoniana post nematode inoculation in this study. Three statistical approaches such as geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper were selected to analyze the stability of candidate genes. The results indicated that U2af and β-TUB were the most stable reference genes. These two genes could be used for the normalization in most of the experiments of P. massoniana, while Histone and AK were the least stable ones. In addition, EF expressed at the lowest average Ct value was the most abundant candidate gene. As an important gene associated with defense mechanisms, ABC transporter was analyzed by qRT-PCR, and the results were used to confirm the reliability of two genes. The selected reference genes in the present study will be conducive to future gene expression normalized by qRT-PCR in P. massoniana. PMID:26800152

  3. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  4. [Teratozoospermia at the time of intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI)].

    PubMed

    Junca, A-M; Cohen-Bacrie, P; Belloc, S; Dumont, M; Ménézo, Y

    2009-06-01

    Until now, the morphological sperm analysis (spermocytogram) allows to define sperm normality, but the relationship between sperm morphology and fertility is not yet assessed. Although several studies do not report any relationship between abnormal sperm morphology and ICSI results, nevertheless, the success rate of ICSI sems to be dependent on injected sperm morphological aspect. Detailed morphological sperm examination (especially sperm head) at high magnification (from x 6600 to x 12500) (MSOME) in real time allows to select the best spermatozoa before oocyte injection (IMSI). In some cases, implantation and ongoing pregnancy rates were improved with this sperm selection method. Ultramorphologic criteria were established and the most predictive factor of sperm quality is the presence of vacuoles in the sperm head. Those vacuoles appear to be related to DNA damage (fragmentation and/or denaturation) and affect embryo development. To standardize those observations, several authors tried to establish sperm MSOME classifications in order to be used in routine and to replace the conventional spermocytogram in the next future.

  5. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nealy, Jennifer; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  6. Timing and selection for renal revascularization in an era of negative trials: what to do?

    PubMed

    Textor, Stephen C; McKusick, Michael M; Misra, Sanjay; Glockner, James

    2009-01-01

    Management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis has become more complex with advances in both medical therapy and endovascular procedures. Results from recent trials fail to demonstrate major benefits of endovascular stenting in addition to optimal medical therapy. The general applicability of these results to many patients is limited by short-term follow-up and selection biases in recruitment. Many patients at highest risk were excluded from these studies and some were included with trivial lesions. Identification of patients with hemodynamically significant lesions remains a challenge and has led to more stringent criteria for Doppler ultrasound, measurement of translesional gradients and quantitative angiography. Although many patients can now be managed with medical therapy, it should be recognized that long-term reduction in antihypertensive drug requirements and recovery of kidney function are limited to those undergoing renal revascularization. As with any major vascular lesion, follow-up for disease stability and/or progression is essential. The ambiguity of present trial data may lead some to overlook selected subgroups that would benefit from restoring renal blood supply through revascularization. Further studies to more precisely identify kidneys that can recover function and/or are beyond meaningful recovery are essential. Considering the comorbid risks for the atherosclerotic population, it will remain imperative for clinicians to consider the hazards, costs and benefits carefully for each patient to determine the role and timing for both medical therapy and revascularization.

  7. Characterization of powellite-based solid solutions by site-selective time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Moritz; Heck, Stephanie; Bosbach, Dirk; Ganschow, Steffen; Walther, Clemens; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2013-06-21

    We present a comprehensive study of the solid solution system Ca2(MoO4)2-NaGd(MoO4)2 on the molecular scale, by means of site-selective time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Eu(3+) is used as a trace fluorescent probe, homogeneously substituting for Gd(3+) in the solid solution crystal structure. Site-selective TRLFS of a series of polycrystalline samples covering the whole composition range of the solid solution series from 10% substitution of Ca(2+) to the NaGd end-member reveals it to be homogeneous throughout the whole range. The trivalent ions are incorporated into the powellite structure in only one coordination environment, which exhibits a very strong ligand-metal interaction. Polarization-dependent measurements of a single crystal of NaGd(Eu)(MoO4)2 identify the coordination geometry to be of C2v point symmetry. The S4 symmetry of the Ca site within the powellite lattice can be transformed into C2v assuming minor motion in the first coordination sphere.

  8. Structure-activity relationship of 9-methylstreptimidone, a compound that induces apoptosis selectively in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Takeiri, Masatoshi; Ota, Eisuke; Nishiyama, Shigeru; Kiyota, Hiromasa; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that 9-methylstreptimidone, a piperidine compound isolated from a culture filtrate of Streptomyces, induces apoptosis selectively in adult T-cell leukemia cells. It was screened for a compound that inhibits LPS-induced NF-kappaB and NO production in mouse macrophages. However, 9-methystreptimidone is poorly obtained from the producing microorganism and difficult to synthesize. Therefore, in the present research, we studied the structure-activity relationship to look for new selective inhibitors. We found that the structure of the unsaturated hydrophobic portion of 9-methylstreptimidone was essential for the inhibition of LPS-induced NO production. Among the 9-methylstreptimidone-related compounds tested, (+/-)-4,alpha-diepi-streptovitacin A inhibited NO production in macrophage-like cells as potently as 9-methylstreptimidone and without cellular toxicity. Moreover, this compound selectively induced apoptosis in adult T-cell leukemia MT-1 cells.

  9. Measuring JHH values with a selective constant-time 2D NMR protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Proton-proton scalar couplings play important roles in molecule structure elucidation. However, measurements of JHH values in complex coupled spin systems remain challenging. In this study, we develop a selective constant-time (SECT) 2D NMR protocol with which scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons can be revealed, and corresponding JHH values can be measured through doublets along the F1 dimension. All JHH values within a network of n fully coupled protons can be separately determined with (n - 1) SECT experiments. Additionally, the proposed pulse sequence possesses satisfactory sensitivity and handy implementation. Therefore, it will interest scientists who intend to address structural analyzes of molecules with overcrowded spectra, and may greatly facilitate the applications of scalar-coupling constants in molecule structure studies.

  10. On the non-stationarity of financial time series: impact on optimal portfolio selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livan, Giacomo; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Scalas, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the possible drawbacks of employing the standard Pearson estimator to measure correlation coefficients between financial stocks in the presence of non-stationary behavior, and we provide empirical evidence against the well-established common knowledge that using longer price time series provides better, more accurate, correlation estimates. Then, we investigate the possible consequences of instabilities in empirical correlation coefficient measurements on optimal portfolio selection. We rely on previously published works which provide a framework allowing us to take into account possible risk underestimations due to the non-optimality of the portfolio weights being used in order to distinguish such non-optimality effects from risk underestimations genuinely due to non-stationarities. We interpret such results in terms of instabilities in some spectral properties of portfolio correlation matrices.

  11. Extraordinary reflection and transmission with direction dependent wavelength selectivity based on parity-time-symmetric multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shulin; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-01-14

    In this paper, we present a kind of periodical ternary parity-time (PT) -symmetric multilayers to realize nearly 100% reflectance and transmittance simultaneously when light is incident from a certain direction. This extraordinary reflection and transmission is original from unidirectional Bragg reflection of PT-symmetric systems as the symmetry spontaneous breaking happens at PT thresholds. The extra energy involved in reflection and transmission lights is obtained from pumping light to the gain regions of the structure. Moreover, we find that our PT-symmetric structure shows direction dependent wavelength selectivity. When the illumination light is incident from two opposite directions into the multilayer structure, such extraordinary reflection and transmission appear at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, respectively. Such distinguishing properties may provide these structures with attractive applications as beam splitters, laser mirrors, narrow band filters, and multiband PT-symmetric optical devices.

  12. SELECTIVE INHIBITION OF PROLINE-INDUCED PIGMENTATION IN WASHED CELLS OF SERRATIA MARCESCENS.

    PubMed

    BLIZZARD, J L; PETERSON, G E

    1963-05-01

    Blizzard, John L. (University of Houston, Houston, Texas) and G. E. Peterson. Selective inhibition of proline-induced pigmentation in washed cells of Serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol. 85:1136-1140. 1963.-Streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracyclines inhibited the synthesis of prodigiosin by Serratia marcescens strain D1. This occurred at concentrations of the antibiotic too low to inhibit the growth of the organism in either agar media or broth cultures. Nonpigmented cells were produced in broth by either adding streptomycin or incubating at 37 C. After being washed and resuspended in aqueous saline containing either casein hydrolysate, l-proline, or a glycine-succinate mixture and incubated at 27 C for 24 hr, these cells formed pigment. The appearance of pigment was preceded by a lag period of 10 hr. Prodigiosin production by these washed suspensions of cells was completely inhibited by either streptomycin or glucose, or by incubation at 37 C instead of 27 C. Even though pigmentation by washed-cell suspensions was induced by proline, the utilization of proline was not affected by streptomycin or glucose, or by incubation at 37 C. To block pigmentation completely, streptomycin had to be added to proline-supplemented cells before they were 10 hr old. Addition of the antibiotic after the end of the induction period caused either partial or no inhibition of pigment production. Streptomycin caused an increase in the endogenous respiration of S. marcescens but failed to affect the constitutive enzymes that oxidize glucose. The possible relationships of these phenomena are discussed. Weil (1952) reported that low concentrations of chloramphenicol and certain tetracyclines inhibit the synthesis of prodigiosin while permitting growth by Serratia marcescens. He noted the potential value to "mode-of-action" studies of an organism having certain functions selectively inhibited by antibiotics. We confirmed Weil's (1952) observations and found that streptomycin at low

  13. Transgenerational changes of metabolic phenotypes in two selectively bred mouse colonies for different susceptibilities to diet-induced glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Mototsugu; Asai, Akira; Sugihara, Hitoshi; Oikawa, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    We recently established 2 mouse lines with different susceptibilities (prone and resistant) to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced glucose intolerance by selective breeding (designated selectively bred diet-induced glucose intolerance-prone [SDG-P] and -resistant [SDG-R], respectively). In the present study, we analyzed transgenerational changes in metabolic phenotypes in these 2 mouse colonies to explore how the distinct phenotypes have emerged through the repetitive selection. Using C57BL/6, C3H, and AKR as background strains, mice showing inferior and superior glucose tolerance after HFD feeding were selected and bred repetitively over 20 generations to produce SDG-P and SDG-R, respectively. In addition to the blood glucose levels, HFD intake and body weight were also measured over the selective breeding period. As the generations proceeded, SDG-P mice became more susceptible to HFD-induced glucose intolerance and body weight gain, whereas SDG-R mice had gradually reduced HFD intake. The differences in fasting and post-glucose challenge blood glucose levels, body weight, and HFD intake became more evident between the 2 colonies through the selective breeding, mainly due to the HFD-induced glucose metabolism impairment and body weight gain in SDG-P mice and the reduction of HFD intake in SDG-R mice. These transgenerational changes in the metabolic phenotypes suggest that the genetic loci associated with the quantitative traits have been selectively enriched in SDG-P and SDG-R.

  14. Anion induced azo-hydrazone tautomerism for the selective colorimetric sensing of fluoride ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheshkumar, A.; El-Mossalamy, E. H.; Manivannan, R.; Parthiban, C.; Al-Harbi, L. M.; Kosa, S.; Elango, Kuppanagounder P.

    2014-07-01

    The design, synthesis, characterization and their anion sensing properties of two receptors capable of exhibiting azo-hydrazone tautomerism are reported. The anion sensing properties have been investigated using electronic, fluorescence and nuclear magnetic spectral studies in addition to electrochemical and visual detection experiments. Both the receptors selectively bind fluoride ion with >100 nm red-shift in the electronic spectrum and the color changes from yellow to red. The results of the spectral studies revealed that the sensing mechanism involves fluoride ion induced change of chromophore from Cdbnd N (hydrazone form) to Ndbnd N (azo form) in these receptors leading to the visible color change. Density Functional Theory calculations were conducted to rationalize the optical response of the receptors.

  15. Moiré induced organization of size-selected Pt clusters soft landed on epitaxial graphene

    PubMed Central

    Linas, Sébastien; Jean, Fabien; Zhou, Tao; Albin, Clément; Renaud, Gilles; Bardotti, Laurent; Tournus, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional hexagonal arrays of Pt nanoparticles (1.5 nm diameter) have been obtained by deposition of preformed and size selected Pt nanoparticles on graphene. This original self-organization is induced, at room temperature, by the 2D periodic undulation (the moiré pattern) of graphene epitaxially grown on the Ir(111) surface. By means of complementary techniques (scanning tunneling microscopy, grazing incidence X ray scattering), the Pt clusters shapes and organization are characterized and the structural evolution during annealing is investigated. The soft-landed clusters remain quasi-spherical and a large proportion appears to be pinned on specific moiré sites. The quantitative determination of the proportion of organized clusters reveals that the obtained hexagonal array of the almost spherical nanoparticles is stable up to 650 K, which is an indication of a strong cluster-surface interaction. PMID:26278787

  16. Synergistic teratogenic effects induced by retinoids in mice by coadministration of a RARalpha- or RARgamma-selective agonist with a RXR-selective agonist.

    PubMed

    Elmazar, M M; Rühl, R; Nau, H

    2001-01-01

    To study the interaction of retinoid-induced limb defects and cleft palate on day 11 of gestation, a RXR-selective agonist (AGN191701, an arylpropenyl-thiophene-carboxylic acid derivative, 20 mg/kg orally) was coadministered with a RARalpha-agonist (Am580, an arylcarboxamidobenzoic acid derivative, 5 mg/kg orally) to NMRI mice. AGN191701 was neither fetotoxic nor teratogenic at the dose used but potentiated Am580-induced limb defects and cleft palate and prevented Am580-induced fetal weight retardation. These results suggest that Am580-induced limb defects and probably cleft palate on day 11 of gestation may be mediated via RARalpha-RXR heterodimerization, particularly in the absence of toxicokinetic interactions. AGN191701 was also coadministered with a RARgamma-agonist (CD437, an adamantyl-hydroxyphenyl naphthoic acid derivative, 15 mg/kg orally) on days 8 and 11 of gestation to investigate which CD437-induced defects are mediated via RARgamma-RXR heterodimerization. On day 8 of gestation, AGN191701 potentiated CD437-induced embryolethality, exencephaly, spina bifida aperta, cleft palate, and tail defects, as well as visceral and skeletal defects, but not micrognathia. On day 11 of gestation, the incidence of CD437-induced cleft palate and limb defects was also potentiated when coadministered with the RXR agonist. These results suggest that synergistic teratogenic effects can be induced by coadministration of two receptor-selective retinoids, indicating the importance of RARalpha-RXR and RARgamma-RXR heterodimers in producing structural defects during organogenesis.

  17. Shape selection in Landsat time series: a tool for monitoring forest dynamics.

    PubMed

    Moisen, Gretchen G; Meyer, Mary C; Schroeder, Todd A; Liao, Xiyue; Schleeweis, Karen G; Freeman, Elizabeth A; Toney, Chris

    2016-10-01

    We present a new methodology for fitting nonparametric shape-restricted regression splines to time series of Landsat imagery for the purpose of modeling, mapping, and monitoring annual forest disturbance dynamics over nearly three decades. For each pixel and spectral band or index of choice in temporal Landsat data, our method delivers a smoothed rendition of the trajectory constrained to behave in an ecologically sensible manner, reflecting one of seven possible 'shapes'. It also provides parameters summarizing the patterns of each change including year of onset, duration, magnitude, and pre- and postchange rates of growth or recovery. Through a case study featuring fire, harvest, and bark beetle outbreak, we illustrate how resultant fitted values and parameters can be fed into empirical models to map disturbance causal agent and tree canopy cover changes coincident with disturbance events through time. We provide our code in the r package ShapeSelectForest on the Comprehensive R Archival Network and describe our computational approaches for running the method over large geographic areas. We also discuss how this methodology is currently being used for forest disturbance and attribute mapping across the conterminous United States.

  18. Knowledge fusion: An approach to time series model selection followed by pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Bleasdale, S.A.; Burr, T.L.; Scovel, J.C.; Strittmatter, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes work done during FY 95 that was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, Knowledge Fusion Project. The project team selected satellite sensor data to use as the one main example for the application of its analysis algorithms. The specific sensor-fusion problem has many generic features, which make it a worthwhile problem to attempt to solve in a general way. The generic problem is to recognize events of interest from multiple time series that define a possibly noisy background. By implementing a suite of time series modeling and forecasting methods and using well-chosen alarm criteria, we reduce the number of false alarms. We then further reduce the number of false alarms by analyzing all suspicious sections of data, as judged by the alarm criteria, with pattern recognition methods. An accompanying report (Ref 1) describes the implementation and application of this 2-step process for separating events from unusual background and applies a suite of forecasting methods followed by a suite of pattern recognition methods. This report goes into more detail about one of the forecasting methods and one of the pattern recognition methods and is applied to the same kind of satellite-sensor data that is described in Ref. 1.

  19. Automatic QSO Selection Algorithm Using Time Series Analysis and Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Won; Protopapas, P.; Alcock, C.; Byun, Y.; Khardon, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new QSO selection algorithm using time series analysis and supervised machine learning. To characterize the lightcurves, we extracted multiple times series features such as period, amplitude, color and autocorrelation value. We then used Support Vector Machine (SVM), a supervised machine learning algorithm, to separate QSOs from other types of variable stars, microlensing events and non-variable stars. In order to train the QSO SVM model, we used 58 known QSOs, 1,629 variable stars and 4,288 non-variable stars from the MAssive Compact Halo Objects (MACHO) database. Cross-validation test shows that the model identifies 80% of known QSOs and have 25% false positive rate. Most of the false positives during the cross-validation are Be stars, known to show similar variability characteristic with QSOs. We applied the trained QSO SVM model to the MACHO Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) dataset, which consists of 40million lightcurves, and found 1,097 QSO candidates. We crossmatched the candidates with several astronomical catalogs including the Spizter SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) LMC catalog and various X-ray catalogs. The results suggest that the most of the candidates are likely true QSOs.

  20. THE GALEX TIME DOMAIN SURVEY. I. SELECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF OVER A THOUSAND ULTRAVIOLET VARIABLE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Gezari, S.; Martin, D. C.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.; Morrissey, P.; Wyder, T. K.; Huber, M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Heckman, T.; Bianchi, L.; Neff, S. G.; Seibert, M.; Schiminovich, D.; Price, P. A.

    2013-03-20

    We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in {approx}40 deg{sup 2} of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of {approx}3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5{sigma} level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). We detect a large-amplitude tail in the UV variability distribution for M-dwarf flare stars and RR Lyrae, reaching up to |{Delta}m| = 4.6 mag and 2.9 mag, respectively. The mean amplitude of the structure function for quasars on year timescales is five times larger than observed at optical wavelengths. The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV < 23 mag and |{Delta}m| > 0.2 mag of {approx}8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg{sup -2} for quasars, active galactic nuclei, and RR Lyrae stars, respectively. We also calculate a surface density rate in the

  1. The Galex Time Domain Survey. I. Selection And Classification of Over a Thousand Ultraviolet Variable Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, S.; Martin, D. C.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.; Huber, M.; Heckman, T.; Bianchi, L.; Morrissey, P.; Neff, S. G.; Seibert, M.; Schiminovich, D.; Wyder, T. K.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Price, P. A.; Tonry, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in approximately 40 deg(exp 2) of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of approximately 3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5 sigma level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). We detect a large-amplitude tail in the UV variability distribution for M-dwarf flare stars and RR Lyrae, reaching up to absolute value(?m) = 4.6 mag and 2.9 mag, respectively. The mean amplitude of the structure function for quasars on year timescales is five times larger than observed at optical wavelengths. The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV less than 23 mag and absolute value(?m) greater than 0.2 mag of approximately 8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg(exp -2) for quasars, active galactic nuclei, and RR Lyrae stars

  2. Selective methioninase-induced trap of cancer cells in S/G2 phase visualized by FUCCI imaging confers chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Shuya; Li, Shukuan; Han, Qinghong; Tan, Yuying; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A major impediment to the response of tumors to chemotherapy is that the large majority of cancer cells within a tumor are quiescent in G0/G1, where cancer cells are resistant to chemotherapy. To attempt to solve this problem of quiescent cells in a tumor, cancer cells were treated with recombinant methioninase (rMETase), which selectively traps cancer cells in S/G2. The cell cycle phase of the cancer cells was visualized with the fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). At the time of rMETase-induced S/G2-phase blockage, identified by the cancer cells' green fluorescence by FUCCI imaging, the cancer cells were administered S/G2-dependent chemotherapy drugs, which interact with DNA or block DNA synthesis such as doxorubicin, cisplatin, or 5-fluorouracil. Treatment of cancer cells with drugs only, without rMETase-induced S/G2 phase blockage, led to the majority of the cancer-cell population being blocked in G0/G1 phase, identified by the cancer cells becoming red fluorescent in the FUCCI system. The G0/G1 blocked cells were resistant to the chemotherapy. In contrast, trapping of cancer cells in S/G2 phase by rMETase treatment followed by FUCCI-imaging-guided chemotherapy was highly effective in killing the cancer cells. PMID:25238266

  3. An inexpensive technique for the time resolved laser induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Ahmed, Nasar; Iqbal, J.; Baig, M. Aslam

    2016-08-01

    We present an efficient and inexpensive method for calculating the time resolved emission spectrum from the time integrated spectrum by monitoring the time evolution of neutral and singly ionized species in the laser produced plasma. To validate our assertion of extracting time resolved information from the time integrated spectrum, the time evolution data of the Cu II line at 481.29 nm and the molecular bands of AlO in the wavelength region (450-550 nm) have been studied. The plasma parameters were also estimated from the time resolved and time integrated spectra. A comparison of the results clearly reveals that the time resolved information about the plasma parameters can be extracted from the spectra registered with a time integrated spectrograph. Our proposed method will make the laser induced plasma spectroscopy robust and a low cost technique which is attractive for industry and environmental monitoring.

  4. Effects of Selection and Training on Unit-Level Performance over Time: A Latent Growth Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H.; Ferris, Gerald R.; Perrewe, Pamela L.; Perryman, Alexa A.; Blass, Fred R.; Heetderks, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly few data exist concerning whether and how utilization of job-related selection and training procedures affects different aspects of unit or organizational performance over time. The authors used longitudinal data from a large fast-food organization (N = 861 units) to examine how change in use of selection and training relates to…

  5. Selecting antagonistic antibodies that control differentiation through inducible expression in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Melidoni, Anna N.; Dyson, Michael R.; Wormald, Sam; McCafferty, John

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies that modulate receptor function have great untapped potential in the control of stem cell differentiation. In contrast to many natural ligands, antibodies are stable, exquisitely specific, and are unaffected by the regulatory mechanisms that act on natural ligands. Here we describe an innovative system for identifying such antibodies by introducing and expressing antibody gene populations in ES cells. Following induced antibody expression and secretion, changes in differentiation outcomes of individual antibody-expressing ES clones are monitored using lineage-specific gene expression to identify clones that encode and express signal-modifying antibodies. This in-cell expression and reporting system was exemplified by generating blocking antibodies to FGF4 and its receptor FGFR1β, identified through delayed onset of ES cell differentiation. Functionality of the selected antibodies was confirmed by addition of exogenous antibodies to three different ES reporter cell lines, where retained expression of pluripotency markers Oct4, Nanog, and Rex1 was observed. This work demonstrates the potential for discovery and utility of functional antibodies in stem cell differentiation. This work is also unique in constituting an example of ES cells carrying an inducible antibody that causes a functional protein “knock-down” and allows temporal control of stable signaling components at the protein level. PMID:24082130

  6. Hydrophobicity-induced selective covering of carbon nanotubes with sol gel sheaths achieved by ultrasound assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ki Chul; Mahiko, Tomoaki; Morimoto, Shingo; Takeuchi, Kenji; Endo, Morinobu

    2008-09-01

    A simple construction of sol-gel sheaths onto the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been carried out in water by a hydrophobicity-induced covering with the assistance of ultrasound. The ultrasound assistance prevents in water an unregulated agglomeration induced by the hydrophobicity of MWCNTs and phenyl-containing sols, leading to a selective construction of sol-gel sheaths on the nanotube surface. The phenyl groups of the resulting sol-gel sheaths were successfully removed by air-oxidation to provide the MWCNTs covered with amorphous SiO 2 sheaths. The effect of the SiO 2 sheaths on the electrical and thermal properties of the SiO 2-MWCNT nanocomposites was evaluated from the electrical resistivities of the nanocomposites with two different SiO 2 concentrations and the thermal conductivities of their phenol-resin composites. The results indicate that the small increase of the SiO 2 concentration remarkably increases the electrical resistivity of the SiO 2-MWCNT nanocomposites. Furthermore, the SiO 2 sheaths have more directly influenced the thermal property of the polymer composites than the inside nanotubes.

  7. Effect of domperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia on selected immune parameters in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Buc, M; Lojda, Z; Ruzicková, M; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Mistina, T; Vigas, M; Lackovic, V

    1995-01-01

    Domperidone, anti-emetic drug, given to healthy female volunteers, induced an elevation of plasma prolactin (PRL) concentration with the peak in 1-4 h. The release of prolactin had a transient stimulating effect on theophylline sensitive T lymphocytes and on concanavalin A induced mitogenic activity, suggesting an enhanced activity of T suppressor lymphocytes. The relative number of CD4+ lymphocytes decreased markedly one hour after domperidone administration and returned to normal values within 2 h (that means 3 h after taking the drug). The number of lymphocytes positive for dipeptidyl peptidase IV exhibited similar transient increase and normalization of activity. No change was observed in the number of CD8+ lymphocytes. The production of interferon by leukocytes treated with Newcastle disease virus was found to be significantly increased 2 h after domperidone administration. The results suggest that prolactin can selectively stimulate some functions of cellular immunity as well as the release of cytokines (IFN). The present study may contribute to the understanding of the role of the immune system in endogenous hyperprolactinemia. PMID:8744700

  8. Site selection and investigation for subsurface disposal of radioactive wastes in hydraulically induced fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Injection into a thick shale formation of intermediate-level radioactive wastes (specific activity of less than 6 x 10/sup 3/ ..mu..Ci/ml consisting mainly of radionuclides such as strontium and cesium with half-lives of less than 50 years) mixed with cement is a promising and feasible disposal method. Hydraulic fracturing provides openings in the shale to accommodate the wastes. Ion exchange and radionuclide adsorption materials can be added to the grout during mixing to further increase the radionuclide retaining capacity of the grout. After solidification of the grout, the injected wastes become an integral part of the shale formation and thus the wastes will remain at depth and in place as long as the injection zone is not subjected to erosion or dissolution. Problems concerning safety of the disposal method are: (1) potential of inducing vertical fractures; (2) phase separation during and after injections; (3) reliability of methods for determining orientation of induced fractures; (4) possibility of triggering earthquakes; and (5) radionuclides leaching and transporting by ground water. Waste injections are made in multiple-layer injection stages in an injection well. After the first series of injections are made at the greatest depth, the well is plugged by cement at the injection depth. The depth of the second series of injections is located at a suitable distance above the first injection depth. The repeated use of the injection well distributes the cost of construction of injection and monitoring wells over many injections, thereby making hydraulic fracturing and grout injection economically attractive as a method for disposal of radioactive wastes. Theoretical considerations of inducing nearly horizontal bedding-plane fractures in shale and field procedures for site selection, safety, monitoring and operation of radioactive waste disposal are discussed. Case histories are used as examples to demonstrate the theoretical applications and field operations.

  9. A novel inducible protein production system and neomycin resistance as selection marker for Methanosarcina mazei.

    PubMed

    Mondorf, Sebastian; Deppenmeier, Uwe; Welte, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    Methanosarcina mazei is one of the model organisms for the methanogenic order Methanosarcinales whose metabolism has been studied in detail. However, the genetic toolbox is still limited. This study was aimed at widening the scope of utilizable methods in this group of organisms. (i) Proteins specific to methanogens are oftentimes difficult to produce in E. coli. However, a protein production system is not available for methanogens. Here we present an inducible system to produce Strep-tagged proteins in Ms. mazei. The promoter p1687, which directs the transcription of methyl transferases that demethylate methylamines, was cloned into plasmid pWM321 and its activity was determined by monitoring β-glucuronidase production. The promoter was inactive during growth on methanol but was rapidly activated when trimethylamine was added to the medium. The gene encoding the β-glucuronidase from E. coli was fused to a Strep-tag and was cloned downstream of the p1687 promoter. The protein was overproduced in Ms. mazei and was purified in an active form by affinity chromatography. (ii) Puromycin is currently the only antibiotic used as a selectable marker in Ms. mazei and its relatives. We established neomycin resistance as a second selectable marker by designing a plasmid that confers neomycin resistance in Ms. mazei.

  10. Tuning a strain-induced orbital selective Mott transition in epitaxial VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shantanu; Quackenbush, N. F.; Paik, H.; Schlueter, C.; Lee, T.-L.; Schlom, D. G.; Piper, L. F. J.; Lee, Wei-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We present evidence of strain-induced modulation of electron correlation effects and increased orbital anisotropy in the rutile phase of epitaxial VO2/TiO2 films from hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and soft V L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy, respectively. By using the U(1) slave spin formalism, we further argue that the observed anisotropic correlation effects can be understood by a model of orbital selective Mott transition at a filling that is noninteger but close to the half filling. Because the overlaps of wave functions between d orbitals are modified by the strain, orbital-dependent renormalizations of the bandwidths and the onsite energy occur. These renormalizations generally result in different occupation numbers in different orbitals. We find that if the system has a noninteger filling number near the half filling such as for VO2, certain orbitals could reach an occupation number closer to half filling under the strain, resulting in a strong reduction in the quasiparticle weight Zα of that orbital. Our work demonstrates that such an orbital selective Mott transition, defined as the case with Zα=0 in some but not all orbitals, could be accessed by epitaxial-strain engineering of correlated electron systems.

  11. Pyrvinium selectively induces apoptosis of lymphoma cells through impairing mitochondrial functions and JAK2/STAT5.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meifang; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Yizheng; Rajoria, Pasupati; Wang, Changfu

    2016-01-15

    Targeting mitochondrial respiration has emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy in blood cancer due to their unique metabolic dependencies. In this study, we show that pyrvinium, a FDA-approved anthelmintic drug, selectively targets lymphoma T-cells though inhibition of mitochondrial functions and JAK2/STAT5. Pyrvinium induces apoptosis of malignant T-cell line Jurkat and primary T-cells from lymphoma patients while sparing T-cells from healthy donors. Increased level of active caspase-3 and decreased levels of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 were also observed in Jurkat and lymphoma T-cells but not normal T-cells treated with pyrvinium. In addition, pyrvinium impairs mitochondrial functions by inhibit mitochondrial respiration, suppressing mitochondrial respiratory complex I activity, increasing ROS and decreasing ATP levels. However, the effects of pyrvinium were abolished in mitochondrial respiration-deficient Jurkat ρ(0) cells, confirming that pyrvinium acts on lymphoma T-cells via targeting mitochondrial respiration. We further show that lymphoma T-cells derived from patients depend more on mitochondrial respiration than normal T-cells, and this explains the selective toxicity of pyrvinium in lymphoma versus normal T-cells. Finally, we demonstrate that pyrvinium also suppresses JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway in Jurkat cells. Our study suggests that pyrvinium is a useful addition to T-cell lymphoma treatment, and emphasizes the potential therapeutic value of the differences in the mitochondrial characteristics between malignant and normal T-cells in blood cancer.

  12. Time gating for energy selection and scatter rejection: High-energy pulsed neutron imaging at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Alicia; Schirato, Richard; McKigney, Edward; Hunter, James; Temple, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a linear accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico that accelerates a proton beam to 800 MeV, which then produces spallation neutron beams. Flight path FP15R uses a tungsten target to generate neutrons of energy ranging from several hundred keV to ~600 MeV. The beam structure has micropulses of sub-ns width and period of 1.784 ns, and macropulses of 625 μs width and frequency of either 50 Hz or 100 Hz. This corresponds to 347 micropulses per macropulse, or 1.74 x 104 micropulses per second when operating at 50 Hz. Using a very fast, cooled ICCD camera (Princeton Instruments PI-Max 4), gated images of various objects were obtained on FP15R in January 2015. Objects imaged included blocks of lead and borated polyethylene; a tungsten sphere; and a tungsten, polyethylene, and steel cylinder. Images were obtained in 36 min or less, with some in as little as 6 min. This is novel because the gate widths (some as narrow as 10 ns) were selected to reject scatter and other signal not of interest (e.g. the gamma flash that precedes the neutron pulse), which has not been demonstrated at energies above 14 MeV. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that time gating is possible above 14MeV and is useful for selecting neutron energy and reducing scatter, thus forming clearer images. Future work (simulation and experimental) is being undertaken to improve camera shielding and system design and to precisely determine optical properties of the imaging system.

  13. Selectivity of stimulus induced responses in cultured hippocampal networks on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Pimashkin, Alexey; Gladkov, Arseniy; Agrba, Ekaterina; Mukhina, Irina; Kazantsev, Victor

    2016-08-01

    Sensory information can be encoded using the average firing rate and spike occurrence times in neuronal network responses to external stimuli. Decoding or retrieving stimulus characteristics from the response pattern generally implies that the corresponding neural network has a selective response to various input signals. The role of various spiking activity characteristics (e.g., spike rate and precise spike timing) for basic information processing was widely investigated on the level of neural populations but gave inconsistent evidence for particular mechanisms. Multisite electrophysiology of cultured neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays is a recently developed tool and currently an active research area. In this study, we analyzed the stimulus responses represented by network-wide bursts evoked from various spatial locations (electrodes). We found that the response characteristics, such as the burst initiation time and the spike rate, can be used to retrieve information about the stimulus location. The best selectivity in the response spiking pattern could be found for a small subpopulation of neurones (electrodes) at relatively short post-stimulus intervals. Such intervals were unique for each culture due to the non-uniform organization of the functional connectivity in the network during spontaneous development. PMID:27468317

  14. Selectivity of stimulus induced responses in cultured hippocampal networks on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Pimashkin, Alexey; Gladkov, Arseniy; Agrba, Ekaterina; Mukhina, Irina; Kazantsev, Victor

    2016-08-01

    Sensory information can be encoded using the average firing rate and spike occurrence times in neuronal network responses to external stimuli. Decoding or retrieving stimulus characteristics from the response pattern generally implies that the corresponding neural network has a selective response to various input signals. The role of various spiking activity characteristics (e.g., spike rate and precise spike timing) for basic information processing was widely investigated on the level of neural populations but gave inconsistent evidence for particular mechanisms. Multisite electrophysiology of cultured neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays is a recently developed tool and currently an active research area. In this study, we analyzed the stimulus responses represented by network-wide bursts evoked from various spatial locations (electrodes). We found that the response characteristics, such as the burst initiation time and the spike rate, can be used to retrieve information about the stimulus location. The best selectivity in the response spiking pattern could be found for a small subpopulation of neurones (electrodes) at relatively short post-stimulus intervals. Such intervals were unique for each culture due to the non-uniform organization of the functional connectivity in the network during spontaneous development.

  15. Digitized pressure-time records, selected nuclear events. Technical report, 1 September 1982-1 April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    McMullan, F.W.; Bryant, E.J.

    1986-04-30

    Pressure-time records are presented for selected atmospheric nuclear events. The records were extracted from published test reports, digitized, and given uniform pressure-time scales for a given event and a given range to permit easier comparison. Data include p-t, q-t, p(tot)-t, Mach No-t, and Impulse-t as appropriate. Selected data were scaled to 1 kT.

  16. [A method for time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement].

    PubMed

    Pan, Cong-Yuan; Han, Zhen-Yu; Li, Chao-Yang; Yu, Yun-Si; Wang, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Qiu-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is strongly time related. Time-resolved LIBS measurement is an important technique for the research on laser induced plasma evolution and self-absorption of the emission lines. Concerning the temporal characteristics of LIBS spectrum, a method is proposed in the present paper which can achieve micros-scale time-resolved LIBS measurement by using general ms-scale detector. By setting different integration delay time of the ms-scale spectrum detector, a series of spectrum are recorded. And the integration delay time interval should be longer than the worst temporal precision. After baseline correction and spectrum fitting, the intensity of the character line was obtained. Calculating this intensity with differential method at a certain time interval and then the difference value is the time-resolved line intensity. Setting the plasma duration time as X-axis and the time-resolved line intensity as Y-axis, the evolution curve of the character line intensity can be plotted. Character line with overlap-free and smooth background should be a priority to be chosen for analysis. Using spectrometer with ms-scale integration time and a control system with temporal accuracy is 0.021 micros, experiments carried out. The results validate that this method can be used to characterize the evolution of LIBS characteristic lines and can reduce the cost of the time-resolved LIBS measurement system. This method makes high time-resolved LIBS spectrum measurement possible with cheaper system.

  17. The optimal timing of stimulation to induce long-lasting positive effects on episodic memory in physiological aging.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Rosa; Sandrini, Marco; Brambilla, Michela; Cotelli, Maria

    2016-09-15

    Episodic memory displays the largest degree of age-related decline. A noninvasive brain stimulation technique that can be used to modulate memory in physiological aging is transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). However, an aspect that has not been adequately investigated in previous studies is the optimal timing of stimulation to induce long-lasting positive effects on episodic memory function. Our previous studies showed episodic memory enhancement in older adults when anodal tDCS was applied over the left lateral prefrontal cortex during encoding or after memory consolidation with or without a contextual reminder. Here we directly compared the two studies to explore which of the tDCS protocols would induce longer-lasting positive effects on episodic memory function in older adults. In addition, we aimed to determine whether subjective memory complaints would be related to the changes in memory performance (forgetting) induced by tDCS, a relevant issue in aging research since individuals with subjective memory complaints seem to be at higher risk of later memory decline. The results showed that anodal tDCS applied after consolidation with a contextual reminder induced longer-lasting positive effects on episodic memory, conceivably through reconsolidation, than anodal tDCS during encoding. Furthermore, we reported, providing new data, a moderate negative correlation between subjective memory complaints and forgetting when anodal tDCS was applied after consolidation with a contextual reminder. This study sheds light on the best-suited timing of stimulation to induce long-lasting positive effects on memory function and might help the clinicians to select the most effective tDCS protocol to prevent memory decline. PMID:27185737

  18. There is a time and a place for everything: bidirectional modulations of latent inhibition by time-induced context differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lubow, R E; De la Casa, L G

    2005-10-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) is defined as poorer evidence of learning with a stimulus that previously was presented without consequence, as compared with a novel or previously attended stimulus. The present article reviews the evidence, mostly from three-stage conditioned taste aversion studies (preexposure, conditioning, and test), that LI can be either attenuated or enhanced depending on the length of the retention interval between conditioning and test and where that interval was spent. Time-induced reduction in LI is observed when the interval context is the same as that of the preexposure, conditioning, and test stages. Super-LI is obtained when a long retention interval is spent in a context that is different from that of the other stages. The differential modulations of LI appear to be the result of the strengthening of primacy effects (i.e., first training disproportionately stronger than subsequent training) by long-interval different contexts, thereby producing super-LI, and the reversal of this effect by long-interval same contexts, thereby producing attenuated LI. The bidirectional effects of time/ context modulations on LI, unaccounted for by current learning theories, are explained, in part, by a time-induced context differentiation process. Implications for theories of LI, learning, and, memory are discussed.

  19. Generalized focusing of time-lapse changes with applications to direct current and time-domain induced polarization inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Doetsch, Joseph; Vignoli, Giulio; Auken, Esben

    2015-11-01

    Often in geophysical monitoring experiments time-lapse inversion models vary too smoothly with time, owing to the strong imprint of regularization. Several methods have been proposed for focusing the spatiotemporal changes of the model parameters. In this study, we present two generalizations of the minimum support norm, which favour compact time-lapse changes and can be adapted to the specific problem requirements. Inversion results from synthetic direct current resistivity models that mimic developing plumes show that the focusing scheme significantly improves size, shape and magnitude estimates of the time-lapse changes. Inversions of the synthetic data also illustrate that the focused inversion gives robust results and that the focusing settings are easily chosen. Inversions of full-decay time-domain induced polarization (IP) field data from a CO2 monitoring injection experiment show that the focusing scheme performs well for field data and inversions for all four Cole-Cole polarization parameters. Our tests show that the generalized minimum support norms react in an intuitive and predictable way to the norm settings, implying that they can be used in time-lapse experiments for obtaining reliable and robust results.

  20. TRIASSIC: the Time-Resolved Industrial Alpha-Source Scanning Induced Current microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Arthur

    Time-resolved ion beam induced current (TRIBIC) microscopy yields useful information such as carrier mobility and lifetimes in semiconductors and defect locations in devices; however, traditional TRIBIC uses large, expensive particle accelerators that require specialized training to operate and maintain. The time-resolved industrial alpha-source scanning induced current (TRIASSIC) microscope transforms TRIBIC by replacing the particle accelerator facility with an affordable, tabletop instrument suitable for use in research and education at smaller colleges and universities. I will discuss the development of, successes with, setbacks to and future directions for TRIASSIC.

  1. Time transients in the quantum corrected Newtonian potential induced by a massless nonminimally coupled scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Marunovic, Anja; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2011-05-15

    We calculate the one-loop graviton vacuum polarization induced by a massless, nonminimally coupled scalar field on Minkowski background. We make use of the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism, which allows us to study time dependent phenomena. As an application we compute the leading quantum correction to the Newtonian potential of a point particle. The novel aspect of the calculation is the use of the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism, within which we calculate the time transients induced by switching on the graviton-scalar coupling.

  2. METHAMPHETAMINE-INDUCED CELL DEATH: SELECTIVE VULNERABILITY IN NEURONAL SUBPOPULATIONS OF THE STRIATUM IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, J. P. Q.; XU, W.; ANGULO, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an illicit and potent psychostimulant, which acts as an indirect dopamine agonist. In the striatum, METH has been shown to cause long lasting neurotoxic damage to dopaminergic nerve terminals and recently, the degeneration and death of striatal cells. The present study was undertaken to identify the type of striatal neurons that undergo apoptosis after METH. Male mice received a single high dose of METH (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and were killed 24 h later. To demonstrate that METH induces apoptosis in neurons, we combined terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining with immunohistofluorescence for the neuronal marker neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN). Staining for TUNEL and NeuN was colocalized throughout the striatum. METH induces apoptosis in approximately 25% of striatal neurons. Cell counts of TUNEL-positive neurons in the dorsomedial, ventromedial, dorsolateral and ventrolateral quadrants of the striatum did not reveal anatomical preference. The type of striatal neuron undergoing cell death was determined by combining TUNEL with immunohistofluorescence for selective markers of striatal neurons: dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, of apparent Mr 32,000, parvalbumin, choline acetyltransferase and somatostatin (SST). METH induces apoptosis in approximately 21% of dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, of apparent Mr 32,000-positive neurons (projection neurons), 45% of GABA-parvalbumin-positive neurons in the dorsal striatum, and 29% of cholinergic neurons in the dorsal–medial striatum. In contrast, the SST-positive interneurons were refractory to METH-induced apoptosis. Finally, the amount of cell loss determined with Nissl staining correlated with the amount of TUNEL staining in the striatum of METH-treated animals. In conclusion, some of the striatal projection neurons and the GABA-parvalbumin and cholinergic interneurons were removed by apoptosis in the aftermath of METH. This

  3. Sensitivity- and effort-gain analysis: multilead ECG electrode array selection for activation time imaging.

    PubMed

    Hintermüller, Christoph; Seger, Michael; Pfeifer, Bernhard; Fischer, Gerald; Modre, Robert; Tilg, Bernhard

    2006-10-01

    Methods for noninvasive imaging of electric function of the heart might become clinical standard procedure the next years. Thus, the overall procedure has to meet clinical requirements as an easy and fast application. In this paper, we propose a new electrode array which improves the resolution of methods for activation time imaging considering clinical constraints such as easy to apply and compatibility with routine leads. For identifying the body-surface regions where the body surface potential (BSP) is most sensitive to changes in transmembrane potential (TMP), a virtual array method was used to compute local linear dependency (LLD) maps. The virtual array method computes a measure for the LLD in every point on the body surface. The most suitable number and position of the electrodes within the sensitive body surface regions was selected by constructing effort gain (EG) plots. Such a plot depicts the relative attainable rank of the leadfield matrix in relation to the increase in number of electrodes required to build the electrode array. The attainable rank itself was computed by a detector criterion. Such a criterion estimates the maximum number of source space eigenvectors not covered by noise when being mapped to the electrode space by the leadfield matrix and recorded by a detector. From the sensitivity maps, we found that the BSP is most sensitive to changes in TMP on the upper left frontal and dorsal body surface. These sensitive regions are covered best by an electrode array consisting of two L-shaped parts of approximately 30 cm x 30 cm and approximately 20 cm x 20 cm. The EG analysis revealed that the array meeting clinical requirements best and improving the resolution of activation time imaging consists of 125 electrodes with a regular horizontal and vertical spacing of 2-3 cm.

  4. Novel space-time trellis codes for free-space optical communications using transmit laser selection.

    PubMed

    García-Zambrana, Antonio; Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, the deployment of novel space-time trellis codes (STTCs) with transmit laser selection (TLS) for free-space optical (FSO) communication systems using intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD) over atmospheric turbulence and misalignment fading channels is presented. Combining TLS and STTC with rate 1 bit/(s · Hz), a new code design criterion based on the use of the largest order statistics is here proposed for multiple-input/single-output (MISO) FSO systems in order to improve the diversity order gain by properly chosing the transmit lasers out of the available L lasers. Based on a pairwise error probability (PEP) analysis, closed-form asymptotic bit error-rate (BER) expressions in the range from low to high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are derived when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to moderate-to-strong turbulence conditions, following a gamma-gamma (GG) distribution, and pointing error effects, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. Obtained results show diversity orders of 2L and 3L when simple two-state and four-state STTCs are considered, respectively. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the analytical results.

  5. Monitoring of CO2-induced geochemical changes in a shallow aquifer by time domain spectral induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders V.; Cahill, Aaron G.; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2014-05-01

    Contamination of potable groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment, we investigate if surface monitoring of electrical resistivity and induced polarization can detect geochemical changes induced by CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5 and 10 m and monitored its migration using 320 electrodes on a 126 m × 25 m surface grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected direct current (DC) resistivity and full-decay induced polarization (IP) data and uploaded it into an online database. CO2 was injected for a period of 72 days and DC/IP monitoring started 20 days before and continued until 120 days after the beginning of the injection. The DC/IP data were supplemented by chemical analysis of water samples collected in 29 wells at time intervals of approximately 10 days. DC/IP data are inverted using a 2-D algorithm (AarhusInv) that incorporates the full voltage decay of the IP response to resolve DC resistivity, intrinsic chargeability and spectral IP content parameterized using the Cole-Cole model. Borehole information and a baseline inversion reveals the geology at the site consisting of aeolian sands near the surface, glacial sands between 5 and 10 m depth and marine sands below 10 m depth. Following the injection, we use a time-lapse inversion where differences in the DC/IP data are inverted for changes to the Cole-Cole parameters. Two different geochemical signatures that occur due to the injected CO2 are evident both in the geophysical inversions and the water samples. The first and clearest subsurface signal is a decrease in DC resistivity that moves advectively with the groundwater. The area of resistivity decrease expands with time in the direction of the groundwater flow and there is good correlation between geophysical and geochemical results. A chargeability decrease after the injection has been also observed, but in contrast to the

  6. Unilateral deactivation of macaque dorsolateral prefrontal cortex induces biases in stimulus selection.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Kevin; Lomber, Stephen G; Everling, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Following unilateral brain injury, patients are often unable to detect a stimulus presented in the contralesional field when another is presented simultaneously ipsilesionally. This phenomenon has been referred to as extinction and has been conceptualized as a deficit in selective attention. Although most commonly observed following damage to posterior parietal areas, extinction has been observed following lesions of prefrontal cortex (PFC) in both humans and nonhuman primates. To date, most studies in nonhuman primates have examined lesions of multiple PFC subregions, including the frontal eye fields (FEF). Theoretical accounts of attentional disturbances from human patients, however, also implicate other PFC areas, including the middle frontal gyrus. Here, we investigated the effects of deactivating PFC areas anterior to the FEF on stimulus selection using a free-choice task. Macaque monkeys were presented with two peripheral stimuli appearing either simultaneously, or at varying stimulus onset asynchronies, and their performance was evaluated during unilateral cryogenic deactivation of part of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or the cortex lining the caudal principal sulcus, the likely homologue of the human middle frontal gyrus. A decreased proportion of saccades was made to stimuli presented in the hemifield contralateral to the deactivated PFC. We also observed increases in reaction times to contralateral stimuli and decreases for stimuli presented in the hemifield ipsilateral to the deactivated hemisphere. In both cases, these results were greatest when both PFC subregions were deactivated. These findings demonstrate that selection biases result from PFC deactivation and support a role of dorsolateral prefrontal subregions anterior to FEF in stimulus selection. PMID:26792881

  7. Time delay induced different synchronization patterns in repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenggui; Yi, Ming; Shuai, Jianwei

    2013-09-01

    Time delayed coupling plays a crucial role in determining the system's dynamics. We here report that the time delay induces transition from the asynchronous state to the complete synchronization (CS) state in the repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, by changing the coupling strength or time delay, various types of synchronous patterns, including CS, antiphase CS, antiphase synchronization (ANS), and phase synchronization, can be generated. In the transition regions between different synchronous patterns, bistable synchronous oscillators can be observed. Furthermore, we show that the time-delay-induced phase flip bifurcation is of key importance for the emergence of CS. All these findings may light on our understanding of neuronal synchronization and information processing in the brain.

  8. Time delay induced different synchronization patterns in repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenggui; Yi, Ming; Shuai, Jianwei

    2013-09-01

    Time delayed coupling plays a crucial role in determining the system's dynamics. We here report that the time delay induces transition from the asynchronous state to the complete synchronization (CS) state in the repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, by changing the coupling strength or time delay, various types of synchronous patterns, including CS, antiphase CS, antiphase synchronization (ANS), and phase synchronization, can be generated. In the transition regions between different synchronous patterns, bistable synchronous oscillators can be observed. Furthermore, we show that the time-delay-induced phase flip bifurcation is of key importance for the emergence of CS. All these findings may light on our understanding of neuronal synchronization and information processing in the brain.

  9. Different Effects of Three Selected Lactobacillus Strains in Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Wei, Hongyun; Lu, Fanggen; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Deliang; Gu, Li; Ouyang, Chunhui

    2016-01-01

    Aim To analyze the changes of different Lactobacillus species in ulcerative colitis patients and to further assess the therapeutic effects of selected Lactobacillus strains on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis in BALB/c mice. Methods Forty-five active ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and 45 population-based healthy controls were enrolled. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and real-time PCR were performed for qualitative and quantitative analyses, respectively, of the Lactobacillus species in UC patients. Three Lactobacillus strains from three species were selected to assess the therapeutic effects on experimental colitis. Sixty 8-week-old BALB/c mice were divided into six groups. The five groups that had received DSS were administered normal saline, mesalazine, L. fermentum CCTCC M206110 strain, L. crispatus CCTCC M206119 strain, or L. plantarum NCIMB8826 strain. We assessed the severity of colitis based on disease activity index (DAI), body weight loss, colon length, and histologic damage. Results The detection rate of four of the 11 Lactobacillus species decreased significantly (P < 0.05), and the detection rate of two of the 11 Lactobacillus species increased significantly (P < 0.05) in UC patients. Relative quantitative analysis revealed that eight Lactobacillus species declined significantly in UC patients (P < 0.05), while three Lactobacillus species increased significantly (P < 0.05). The CCTCC M206110 treatment group had less weight loss and colon length shortening, lower DAI scores, and lower histologic scores (P < 0.05), while the CCTCC M206119 treatment group had greater weight loss and colon length shortening, higher histologic scores, and more severe inflammatory infiltration (P < 0.05). NCIMB8826 improved weight loss and colon length shortening (P < 0.05) with no significant influence on DAI and histologic damage in the colitis model. Conclusions Administration of an L. crispatus CCTCC M206119 supplement aggravated

  10. Emergence of network structure due to spike-timing-dependent plasticity in recurrent neuronal networks. I. Input selectivity--strengthening correlated input pathways.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Matthieu; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B; Thomas, Doreen A; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2009-08-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) determines the evolution of the synaptic weights according to their pre- and post-synaptic activity, which in turn changes the neuronal activity. In this paper, we extend previous studies of input selectivity induced by (STDP) for single neurons to the biologically interesting case of a neuronal network with fixed recurrent connections and plastic connections from external pools of input neurons. We use a theoretical framework based on the Poisson neuron model to analytically describe the network dynamics (firing rates and spike-time correlations) and thus the evolution of the synaptic weights. This framework incorporates the time course of the post-synaptic potentials and synaptic delays. Our analysis focuses on the asymptotic states of a network stimulated by two homogeneous pools of "steady" inputs, namely Poisson spike trains which have fixed firing rates and spike-time correlations. The (STDP) model extends rate-based learning in that it can implement, at the same time, both a stabilization of the individual neuron firing rates and a slower weight specialization depending on the input spike-time correlations. When one input pathway has stronger within-pool correlations, the resulting synaptic dynamics induced by (STDP) are shown to be similar to those arising in the case of a purely feed-forward network: the weights from the more correlated inputs are potentiated at the expense of the remaining input connections. PMID:19536560

  11. Jagged1-selective notch signaling induces smooth muscle differentiation via a RBP-Jkappa-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroshi; Iso, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Miki; Matsui, Hiroki; Tanaka, Toru; Manabe, Ichiro; Arai, Masashi; Nagai, Ryozo; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2006-09-29

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a crucial role in specifying cellular fates by interaction between cellular neighbors; however, the molecular mechanism underlying smooth muscle cell (SMC) differentiation by Notch signaling has not been well characterized. Here we demonstrate that Jagged1-Notch signaling promotes SMC differentiation from mesenchymal cells. Overexpression of the Notch intracellular domain, an activated form of Notch, up-regulates the expression of multiple SMC marker genes including SMC-myosin heavy chain (Sm-mhc) in mesenchymal 10T1/2 cells, but not in non-mesenchymal cells. Physiological Notch stimulation by its ligand Jagged1, but not Dll4, directly induces Sm-mhc expression in 10T1/2 cells without de novo protein synthesis, indicative of a ligand-selective effect. Jagged1-induced expression of SM-MHC was blocked bygamma-secretase inhibitor, N-(N-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-l-alanyl)-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester, which impedes Notch signaling. Using Rbp-jkappa-deficient cells and site-specific mutagenesis of the SM-MHC gene, we show that such an induction is independent of the myocardin-serum response factor-CArG complex, but absolutely dependent on RBP-Jkappa, a major mediator of Notch signaling, and its cognate binding sequence. Of importance, Notch signaling and myocardin synergistically activate SM-MHC gene expression. Taken together, these data suggest that the Jagged1-Notch pathway constitutes an instructive signal for SMC differentiation through an RBP-Jkappa-dependent mechanism and augments gene expression mediated by the myocardin-SRF-CArG complex. Given that Notch pathway components are expressed in vascular SMC during normal development and disease, Notch signaling is likely to play a pivotal role in such situations to modulate the vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype. PMID:16867989

  12. A Selective Orexin-1 Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Stress-Induced Hyperarousal without Hypnotic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sujin; Johnson, Philip L.; Shekhar, Anantha; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Shireman, Brock T.; Lebold, Terry P.; Nepomuceno, Diane; Lord, Brian; Wennerholm, Michelle; Shelton, Jonathan; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Orexins (OXs) are peptides produced by perifornical (PeF) and lateral hypothalamic neurons that exert a prominent role in arousal-related processes, including stress. A critical role for the orexin-1 receptor (OX1R) in complex emotional behavior is emerging, such as overactivation of the OX1R pathway being associated with panic or anxiety states. Here we characterize a brain-penetrant, selective, and high-affinity OX1R antagonist, compound 56 [N-({3-[(3-ethoxy-6-methylpyridin-2-yl)carbonyl]-3-azabicyclo[4.1.0]hept-4-yl}methyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2-amine]. Ex vivo receptor binding studies demonstrated that, after subcutaneous administration, compound 56 crossed the blood-brain barrier and occupied OX1Rs in the rat brain at lower doses than standard OX1R antagonists GSK-1059865 [5-bromo-N-({1-[(3-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)carbonyl]-5-methylpiperidin-2-yl}methyl)pyridin-2-amine], SB-334867 [1-(2-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-6-yl)-3-(1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl)urea], and SB-408124 [1-(6,8-difluoro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]urea]. Although compound 56 did not alter spontaneous sleep in rats and in wild-type mice, its administration in orexin-2 receptor knockout mice selectively promoted rapid eye movement sleep, demonstrating target engagement and specific OX1R blockade. In a rat model of psychological stress induced by cage exchange, the OX1R antagonist prevented the prolongation of sleep onset without affecting sleep duration. In a rat model of panic vulnerability (involving disinhibition of the PeF OX region) to threatening internal state changes (i.e., intravenous sodium lactate infusion), compound 56 attenuated sodium lactate–induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses without altering baseline locomotor or autonomic activity. In conclusion, OX1R antagonism represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with stress or hyperarousal states. PMID:25583879

  13. Time-resolved digital holographic microscopy of laser-induced forward transfer process

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H.; Venugopalan, V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a method for time-resolved digital holographic microscopy to obtain time-resolved 3-D deformation measurements of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) processes. We demonstrate nanometer axial resolution and nanosecond temporal resolution of our method which is suitable for measuring dynamic morphological changes in LIFT target materials. Such measurements provide insight into the early dynamics of the LIFT process and a means to examine the effect of laser and material parameters on LIFT process dynamics. PMID:24748724

  14. Photothermolysis by laser-induced microbubbles generated around gold nanorod clusters selectively formed in leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina; Zhdanok, Sergei; Rostro, Betty; Simonette, Rebecca; Hafner, Jason; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; Conjusteau, Andre; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    In an effort of developing clinical LANTCET (laser-activated nano-thermolysis as cell elimination technology) we achieved selective destruction of individual tumor cells through laser generation of vapor microbubbles around clusters of light absorbing gold nanorods (GNR) selectively formed in target tumor cells. Among all gold nanoparticles, nanorods offer the highest optical absorption in the near-infrared. We applied covalent conjugates of gold nanorods with targeting vectors such as monoclonal antibodies CD33 (specific for Acute Myeloid Leukemia), while GNR conjugates with polyethylene-glycol (PEG) were used as nonspecific targeting control. GNR clusters were formed inside the tumor cells at 37 °C due to endocytosis of large concentration of nanorods accumulated on the surface of tumor cells targeted at 4 °C. Formation of GNR clusters significantly reduces the threshold of tumor cell damage making LANTCET safe for normal cells. Appearance of GNR clusters was verified directly with optical resonance scattering microscopy. LANTCET was performed in vitro with living cells of (1) model myeloid K562 cells (CD33 positive), (2) primary human bone marrow CD33-positive blast cells from patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Laser-induced microbubbles were generated and detected with a photothermal microscope equipped with a tunable Ti-Sa pulsed laser. GNT cluster formation caused a 100-fold decrease in the threshold optical fluence for laser microbubble generation in tumor cells compared with that in normal cells under the same targeting and irradiation conditions. Combining imaging based on resonance optical scattering with photothermal imaging of microbubbles, we developed a method for detection, image-guided treatment and monitoring of LANTCET. Pilot experiments were performed in flow mode bringing LANTCET closer to reality of clinical procedure of purging tumor cells from bone marrow grafts.

  15. Effects of Spring Temperatures on the Strength of Selection on Timing of Reproduction in a Long-Distance Migratory Bird

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Marcel E.; Gienapp, Phillip; Husby, Arild; Morrisey, Michael; de la Hera, Iván; Pulido, Francisco; Both, Christiaan

    2015-01-01

    Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction intensified in the first two decades (1980–2000) but weakened during the last decade (2001–2010). Against expectation, this pattern could not be explained by the temporal variation in the phenological mismatch with food abundance. We therefore explored an alternative hypothesis that selection on timing was affected by conditions individuals experience when arriving in spring at the breeding grounds: arriving early in cold conditions may reduce survival. First, we show that in female recruits, spring arrival date in the first breeding year correlates positively with hatch date; hence, early-hatched individuals experience colder conditions at arrival than late-hatched individuals. Second, we show that when temperatures at arrival in the recruitment year were high, early-hatched young had a higher recruitment probability than when temperatures were low. We interpret this as a potential cost of arriving early in colder years, and climate warming may have reduced this cost. We thus show that higher temperatures in the arrival year of recruits were associated with stronger selection for early reproduction in the years these birds were born. As arrival temperatures in the beginning of the study increased, but recently declined again, directional selection on timing of reproduction showed a nonlinear change. We demonstrate that environmental conditions with a lag of up to two years can alter selection on phenological traits in natural populations, something that has important

  16. Effects of spring temperatures on the strength of selection on timing of reproduction in a long-distance migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Visser, Marcel E; Gienapp, Phillip; Husby, Arild; Morrisey, Michael; de la Hera, Iván; Pulido, Francisco; Both, Christiaan

    2015-04-01

    Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction intensified in the first two decades (1980-2000) but weakened during the last decade (2001-2010). Against expectation, this pattern could not be explained by the temporal variation in the phenological mismatch with food abundance. We therefore explored an alternative hypothesis that selection on timing was affected by conditions individuals experience when arriving in spring at the breeding grounds: arriving early in cold conditions may reduce survival. First, we show that in female recruits, spring arrival date in the first breeding year correlates positively with hatch date; hence, early-hatched individuals experience colder conditions at arrival than late-hatched individuals. Second, we show that when temperatures at arrival in the recruitment year were high, early-hatched young had a higher recruitment probability than when temperatures were low. We interpret this as a potential cost of arriving early in colder years, and climate warming may have reduced this cost. We thus show that higher temperatures in the arrival year of recruits were associated with stronger selection for early reproduction in the years these birds were born. As arrival temperatures in the beginning of the study increased, but recently declined again, directional selection on timing of reproduction showed a nonlinear change. We demonstrate that environmental conditions with a lag of up to two years can alter selection on phenological traits in natural populations, something that has important

  17. Effects of spring temperatures on the strength of selection on timing of reproduction in a long-distance migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Visser, Marcel E; Gienapp, Phillip; Husby, Arild; Morrisey, Michael; de la Hera, Iván; Pulido, Francisco; Both, Christiaan

    2015-04-01

    Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction intensified in the first two decades (1980-2000) but weakened during the last decade (2001-2010). Against expectation, this pattern could not be explained by the temporal variation in the phenological mismatch with food abundance. We therefore explored an alternative hypothesis that selection on timing was affected by conditions individuals experience when arriving in spring at the breeding grounds: arriving early in cold conditions may reduce survival. First, we show that in female recruits, spring arrival date in the first breeding year correlates positively with hatch date; hence, early-hatched individuals experience colder conditions at arrival than late-hatched individuals. Second, we show that when temperatures at arrival in the recruitment year were high, early-hatched young had a higher recruitment probability than when temperatures were low. We interpret this as a potential cost of arriving early in colder years, and climate warming may have reduced this cost. We thus show that higher temperatures in the arrival year of recruits were associated with stronger selection for early reproduction in the years these birds were born. As arrival temperatures in the beginning of the study increased, but recently declined again, directional selection on timing of reproduction showed a nonlinear change. We demonstrate that environmental conditions with a lag of up to two years can alter selection on phenological traits in natural populations, something that has important

  18. LATE-TIME RADIO EMISSION FROM X-RAY-SELECTED TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Metzger, Brian D.

    2013-02-15

    We present new observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of seven X-ray-selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The radio observations were carried out between 9 and 22 years after the initial X-ray discovery, and thus probe the late-time formation of relativistic jets and jet interactions with the interstellar medium in these systems. We detect a compact radio source in the nucleus of the galaxy IC 3599 and a compact radio source that is a possible counterpart to RX J1420.4+5334. We find no radio counterparts for five other sources with flux density upper limits between 51 and 200 {mu}Jy (3{sigma}). If the detections truly represent late radio emission associated with a TDE, then our results suggest that a fraction, {approx}> 10%, of X-ray-detected TDEs are accompanied by relativistic jets. We explore several models for producing late radio emission, including interaction of the jet with gas in the circumnuclear environment (blast wave model), and emission from the core of the jet itself. Upper limits on the radio flux density from archival observations suggest that the jet formation may have been delayed for years after the TDE, possibly triggered by the accretion rate dropping below a critical threshold of {approx}10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} M-dot {sub Edd}. The non-detections are also consistent with this scenario; deeper radio observations can determine whether relativistic jets are present in these systems. The emission from RX J1420.4+5334 is also consistent with the predictions of the blast wave model; however, the radio emission from IC 3599 is substantially underluminous, and its spectral slope is too flat, relative to the blast wave model expectations. Future radio monitoring of IC 3599 and RX J1420.4+5334 will help to better constrain the nature of the jets in these systems.

  19. Blood culture series benefit may be limited to selected clinical conditions: time to reassess.

    PubMed

    Khatib, R; Simeunovic, G; Sharma, M; Fakih, M G; Johnson, L B; Briski, L; Lebar, W

    2015-04-01

    Blood cultures are often submitted as series (two to three sets per 24 hours) to maximize sample recovery. We assessed the actual benefit of additional sets. Blood cultures submitted from adults (≥ 18 years old) over 1 year (1 February 2012 to 31 January 2013) were examined. The medical records of patients with positive cultures were reviewed. Cultures with commensal organisms were considered contamination in the absence of a source and clinical findings. The impact of additional sets on antibiotic therapy was estimated. We evaluated 15,394 blood cultures. They were submitted as two to five sets per 24 hours in 12,236 (79.5%) instances. Pathogens were detected in 1227 sets, representing 741 bacteremias, of which 618 (83.4%) were detected in the first set and 123 (16.6%) in the additional sets. Pathogens missed in the first set were recovered from patients receiving antibiotics (n = 72; 58.5%) and after undergoing a procedure (n = 54; 43.9%). The additional sets' results could have influenced antibiotic therapy in 76/6235 (1.2%) instances, including 40 (0.6%) antibiotic switches and 36 (0.6%) possible extensions of therapy. The potential impact of the detection of missed pathogens on antibiotic therapy was not apparent in patients who had an endovascular infection (26/27, 96.3%) and those who lacked an obvious source of pathogens (10/10, 100%). These findings suggest that one blood culture is probably adequate in patients with an obvious source of pathogens. Blood culture series are beneficial in patients without an obvious source of pathogens and in those with endovascular infections. It is time to reassess the benefit of blood culture series, perhaps limiting them to selected conditions.

  20. A novel manganese complex selectively induces malignant glioma cell death by targeting mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ji; Li, Jing; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Kaidi; Chen, Qiuyun; Guo, Wenjie; Gao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in treatment, malignant glioma commonly exhibits recurrence, subsequently leading to a poor prognosis. As manganese (Mn) compounds can be transported by the transferrin-transferrin receptor system, the present study synthesized and examined the potential use of Adpa-Mn as a novel antitumor agent. Adpa-Mn time and dose-dependently inhibited U251 and C6 cell proliferation; however, it had little effect on normal astrocytes. Apoptosis was significantly elevated following treatment with Adpa-Mn, as detected by chromatin condensation, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, and the activation of caspases-9, -7 and -3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, Adpa-Mn enhanced fluorescence intensity of monodansylcadaverine and elevated the expression levels of the autophagy-related protein microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine enhanced Adpa-Mn-induced cell inhibition, thus indicating that autophagy has an essential role in this process. Furthermore, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction was detected in the Adpa-Mn-treated group, including disrupted membrane potential, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted adenosine triphosphate. Conversely, treatment with the mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporin A reversed Adpa-Mn-induced ROS production, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis, thus suggesting that Adpa-Mn may target the mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggested that Adpa-Mn may be considered for use as a novel anti-glioma therapeutic option. PMID:27432745

  1. External magnetic field-induced selective biodistribution of magnetoliposomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at the effect of an external magnet on the biodistribution of magnetoliposomes intravenously administrated in mice (8 mg iron/kg) with and without induced acute inflammation. Our results showed that due to enhanced vascular permeability, magnetoliposomes accumulated at the site of inflammation in the absence of an external magnetic field, but the amount of iron present increased under the effect of a magnet located at the inflammation zone. This increase was dependent on the time (20 or 60 min) of exposure of the external magnetic field. It was also observed that the presence of the magnet was associated with lower amounts of iron in the liver, spleen, and plasma than was found in mice in which a magnet had not been applied. The results of this study confirm that it is possible to target drugs encapsulated in magnetic particles by means of an external magnet. PMID:22883385

  2. Spatially-Selective Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Cell-Solution Electrode Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Hokari, Yutaro; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Gene transfection, which is the process of deliberately introducing nucleic acids into cells, is expected to play an important role in medical treatment because the process is necessary for gene therapy and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional transfection methods have some problems, so we focus attention on promising transfection methods by atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). We have previously reported that the cell membrane permeability, which is closely related with gene transfection, is improved using a cell-solution electrode for generating He-APP. He-APP is irradiated to the solution containing the adherent cells and delivery materials such as fluorescent dyes (YOYO-1) and plasmid DNA (GFP). In case of YOYO-1 delivery, more than 80% of cells can be transferred only in the plasma-irradiated area and the spatially-selective membrane permeabilization is realized by the plasma irradiation. In addition, it is confirmed that plasmid DNA is transfected and the GFP genes are expressed using same APP irradiation system with no obvious cellular damage.

  3. Utility of extinction-induced response variability for the selection of mands.

    PubMed

    Grow, Laura L; Kelley, Michael E; Roane, Henry S; Shillingsburg, M Alice

    2008-01-01

    Functional communication training (FCT; Carr & Durand, 1985) is a commonly used differential reinforcement procedure for replacing problem behavior with socially acceptable alternative responses. Most studies in the FCT literature consist of demonstrations of the maintenance of responding when various treatment components (e.g., extinction, punishment) are present and absent (e.g., Fisher et al., 1993; Wacker et al., 1990). Relatively little research on FCT has (a) evaluated the conditions under which alternative responses are acquired or (b) described procedures with technological precision. Thus, additional research on a cogent technology for response acquisition appears to be warranted. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of exposing problem behavior to extinction for inducing response variability as a tool for selecting an alternative response during FCT. Once participants engaged in appropriate alternative responses, the reinforcer identified in the functional analysis as maintaining problem behavior was delivered contingent on the alternative behavior. Results showed that exposing problem behavior to extinction was a useful method for producing alternative behaviors during FCT. PMID:18468276

  4. Neisseria lactamica selectively induces mitogenic proliferation of the naive B cell pool via cell surface Ig.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Brackenbury, Louise S; Massari, Paola; Davenport, Victoria; Gorringe, Andrew; Heyderman, Robert S; Williams, Neil A

    2010-09-15

    Neisseria lactamica is a commensal bacteria that colonizes the human upper respiratory tract mucosa during early childhood. In contrast to the closely related opportunistic pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, there is an absence of adaptive cell-mediated immunity to N. lactamica during the peak age of carriage. Instead, outer membrane vesicles derived from N. lactamica mediate a B cell-dependent proliferative response in mucosal mononuclear cells that is associated with the production of polyclonal IgM. We demonstrate in this study that this is a mitogenic human B cell response that occurs independently of T cell help and any other accessory cell population. The ability to drive B cell proliferation is a highly conserved property and is present in N. lactamica strains derived from diverse clonal complexes. CFSE staining of purified human tonsillar B cells demonstrated that naive IgD(+) and CD27(-) B cells are selectively induced to proliferate by outer membrane vesicles, including the innate CD5(+) subset. Neither purified lipooligosaccharide nor PorB from N. lactamica is likely to be responsible for this activity. Prior treatment of B cells with pronase to remove cell-surface Ig or treatment with BCR-specific Abs abrogated the proliferative response to N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles, suggesting that this mitogenic response is dependent upon the BCR.

  5. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  6. Hypoxia-induced gene expression results from selective mRNA partitioning to the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Jonas J.; Naarmann-de Vries, Isabel S.; Ujvari, Stefanie J.; Klinger, Bertram; Kasim, Mumtaz; Benko, Edgar; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H.; Bondke Persson, Anja; Lorenzen, Stephan; Meier, Jochen C.; Blüthgen, Nils; Persson, Pontus B.; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Mrowka, Ralf; Fähling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a primary energy-consuming process in the cell. Therefore, under hypoxic conditions, rapid inhibition of global mRNA translation represents a major protective strategy to maintain energy metabolism. How some mRNAs, especially those that encode crucial survival factors, continue to be efficiently translated in hypoxia is not completely understood. By comparing specific transcript levels in ribonucleoprotein complexes, cytoplasmic polysomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound ribosomes, we show that the synthesis of proteins encoded by hypoxia marker genes is favoured at the ER in hypoxia. Gene expression profiling revealed that transcripts particularly increased by the HIF-1 transcription factor network show hypoxia-induced enrichment at the ER. We found that mRNAs favourably translated at the ER have higher conservation scores for both the 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) and contain less upstream initiation codons (uAUGs), indicating the significance of these sequence elements for sustained mRNA translation under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, we found enrichment of specific cis-elements in mRNA 5′- as well as 3′-UTRs that mediate transcript localization to the ER in hypoxia. We conclude that transcriptome partitioning between the cytoplasm and the ER permits selective mRNA translation under conditions of energy shortage. PMID:25753659

  7. Serum factor induces selective increase in Na-channel expression in cultured skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, C.; Sampson, S.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have examined effects of horse serum (HS) and various fractions (1 million-1M, 300K, 100K, and 30K nominal molecular weight limit) obtained by ultrafiltration on expression of TTX-sensitive Na-channels and on activities of the Na-K pump and glucose transport systems in cultured myotubes obtained from 1-2-day-old neonatal rat pups. Five-day-old cells were transferred to serum-free medium with no hormone or growth factor supplements (DMEM) for 24 hr and then treated with the various serum fractions for 48 hr. Measurements were made of specific (3H)-saxitoxin (STX) binding, action potential properties, 86Rb-uptake and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake. HS significantly increased all parameters compared to DMEM (increases in STX-binding, 69%; Rb-uptake, 65%; 2-DG uptake, 93%). Results of treatment with the separate fractions showed that the 300K fraction caused a significantly greater increase in STX-binding than either HS or the other fractions. In contrast, the increases in Rb and 2-DG uptakes induced by the different fractions were not different from that obtained with HS. They conclude that serum contains a factor that selectively increases expression of TTX-sensitive Na-channels in skeletal muscle.

  8. Shock-induced deformation of nanocrystalline Al: Characterization with orientation mapping and selected area electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; E, J. C.; Cai, Y.; Zhao, F.; Fan, D.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate shock-induced deformation of columnar nanocrystalline Al with large-scale molecular dynamics simulations and implement orientation mapping (OM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) for microstructural analysis. Deformation mechanisms include stacking fault formation, pronounced twinning, dislocation slip, grain boundary (GB) sliding and migration, and lattice or partial grain rotation. GBs and GB triple junctions serve as the nucleation sites for crystal plasticity including twinning and dislocations, due to GB weakening, and stress concentrations. Grains with different orientations exhibit different densities of twins or stacking faults nucleated from GBs. GB migration occurs as a result of differential deformation between two grains across the GB. High strain rates, appropriate grain orientation and GBs contribute to deformation twinning. Upon shock compression, intra-grain dislocation and twinning nucleated from GBs lead to partial grain rotation and the formation of subgrains, while whole grain rotation is not observed. During tension, stress gradients associated with the tensile pulse give rise to intra-grain plasticity and then partial grain rotation. The simulated OM and SAED are useful to describe lattice/grain rotation, the formation of subgrains, GB migration and other microstructures.

  9. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants potentiate methylphenidate (Ritalin)-induced gene regulation in the adolescent striatum.

    PubMed

    Van Waes, Vincent; Beverley, Joel; Marinelli, Michela; Steiner, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (Ritalin) is used in conjunction with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of medical conditions such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder with anxiety/depression comorbidity and major depression. Co-exposure also occurs in patients on SSRIs who use psychostimulant 'cognitive enhancers'. Methylphenidate is a dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that produces altered gene expression in the forebrain; these effects partly mimic gene regulation by cocaine (dopamine/norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor). We investigated whether the addition of SSRIs (fluoxetine or citalopram; 5 mg/kg) modified gene regulation by methylphenidate (2-5 mg/kg) in the striatum and cortex of adolescent rats. Our results show that SSRIs potentiate methylphenidate-induced expression of the transcription factor genes zif268 and c-fos in the striatum, rendering these molecular changes more cocaine-like. Present throughout most of the striatum, this potentiation was most robust in its sensorimotor parts. The methylphenidate + SSRI combination also enhanced behavioral stereotypies, consistent with dysfunction in sensorimotor striatal circuits. In so far as such gene regulation is implicated in psychostimulant addiction, our findings suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction potential of methylphenidate.

  10. Utility of extinction-induced response variability for the selection of mands.

    PubMed

    Grow, Laura L; Kelley, Michael E; Roane, Henry S; Shillingsburg, M Alice

    2008-01-01

    Functional communication training (FCT; Carr & Durand, 1985) is a commonly used differential reinforcement procedure for replacing problem behavior with socially acceptable alternative responses. Most studies in the FCT literature consist of demonstrations of the maintenance of responding when various treatment components (e.g., extinction, punishment) are present and absent (e.g., Fisher et al., 1993; Wacker et al., 1990). Relatively little research on FCT has (a) evaluated the conditions under which alternative responses are acquired or (b) described procedures with technological precision. Thus, additional research on a cogent technology for response acquisition appears to be warranted. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of exposing problem behavior to extinction for inducing response variability as a tool for selecting an alternative response during FCT. Once participants engaged in appropriate alternative responses, the reinforcer identified in the functional analysis as maintaining problem behavior was delivered contingent on the alternative behavior. Results showed that exposing problem behavior to extinction was a useful method for producing alternative behaviors during FCT.

  11. Modulation of stress-induced and stimulated hyperprolactinemia with the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor selective agonist, LY379268.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M P; Chamberlain, M

    2002-10-01

    It is well recognized that glutamate is an integral excitatory neurotransmitter in the neuroendocrine control of several hormonal factors. While the ability of pharmacological agents acting at ionotropic glutamate receptors to modulate the levels of serum prolactin levels has been investigated, there have been few reports of the effects mediated by the G-protein coupled, metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. The present work was undertaken to investigate the role of the Group II mGlu receptors, mGlu2 and mGlu3 in the regulation of serum polactin levels. LY379268, a Group II selective agonist, did not alter basal levels of circulating prolactin in young (36-40 day old) male rats. However, when an immobilization stress-induced hyperprolactinemia was examined, 10 mg/kg s.c. of LY379268 significantly lowered serum prolactin levels. Similarly, pretreatment with LY379268 was able to reverse the hyperprolactinemia induced with the catecholamine synthesis inhibitor, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (aMPT). This inhibition of hyperprolactinemia could be prevented by pretreatment with LY341495, a Group II mGlu receptor antagonist. The Group II antagonist alone had no effect on either basal nor stimulated prolactin levels. The agonist LY379268 was able to prevent the transient hyperprolactinemia associated with stimulation of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors by 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), but did not alter the high levels of circulating prolactin induced with the D2 antagonist, haloperidol. When treatment with LY379268 was delayed until 1 h after aMPT, a time demonstrated to show a full effect of aMPT on serum prolactin levels, the Group II agonist was similarly able to reverse hyperprolactinemia, suggesting LY379268 did not act by preventing the partial catecholamine depletion by aMPT. Similarly, high doses of amphetamine, a dopamine (DA) releaser, were able to reverse the aMPT-induced hyperprolactinemia, consistent with sufficient levels of dopamine remaining after a

  12. Detection of selected intestinal helminths and protozoa at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia using multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Basuni, M; Mohamed, Z; Ahmad, M; Zakaria, N Z; Noordin, R

    2012-09-01

    Intestinal parasites are the causative agents of a number of important human infections in developing countries. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of selected helminths and protozoan infections among patients admitted with gastrointestinal disorders at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia using multiplex real-time PCR. In addition microscopic examination was also performed following direct smear, zinc sulphate concentration and Kato-Katz thick smear techniques; and the presence of protozoan parasites was confirmed using trichrome and acid-fast stains. Of the 225 faecal samples analysed, 26.2% were positive for intestinal parasites by the multiplex real-time PCR, while 5.3% were positive by microscopy. As compared to microscopy, the multiplex real-time PCR detected 5.8 and 4.5 times more positives for the selected helminth and protozoan infections respectively. Among the selected helminths detected in this study, hookworm was the most prevalent by real-time PCR, while Ascaris lumbricoides was detected the most by microscopy. Meanwhile, among the selected protozoa detected in this study, Entamoeba histolytica was the most prevalent by real-time PCR, however microscopy detected equal number of cases with E. histolytica and Giardia lamblia. This study showed that real-time PCR can be used to obtain a more accurate prevalence data on intestinal helminths and protozoa.

  13. Effect of selective and non-selective serotonin receptor activation on L-DOPA-induced therapeutic efficacy and dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Tronci, E; Fidalgo, C; Stancampiano, R; Carta, M

    2015-10-01

    Selective activation of 5-HT1 receptors has been shown to produce near to full suppression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however, a reduction of the therapeutic effect of L-DOPA has been reported in several studies. Conversely, we recently found that increasing the serotonergic tone with chronic administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can reduce LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, without affecting L-DOPA efficacy. To directly compare the effects of selective versus non-selective serotonin receptor activation, here we first tested different acute doses of the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine and 5-HTP on LID in order to identify doses of the individual compounds showing similar anti-dyskinetic efficacy in L-DOPA-primed dyskinetic rats. About 50% reduction of LID was observed with 0.1 mg/kg and 24 mg/kg of eltoprazine and 5-HTP, respectively; we then compared the effect of the two drugs, individually and in combination, on L-DOPA-induced stepping test in L-DOPA-naïve parkinsonian animals and LID over three weeks of L-DOPA treatment. Results showed that eltoprazine induced significant worsening of L-DOPA-mediated performance in the stepping test, while 5-HTP did not. Interestingly, combination of 5-HTP with eltoprazine prevented the reduction in the forelimb use induced by eltoprazine. Moreover, 5-HTP and eltoprazine given individually showed similar efficacy also upon chronic treatment, and had additive effect in dampening the appearance of LID when given in combination. Finally, chronic administration of eltoprazine and/or 5-HTP did not affect striatal serotonin innervation, compared to l-DOPA alone, as measured by serotonin transporter expression.

  14. Effect of selective and non-selective serotonin receptor activation on L-DOPA-induced therapeutic efficacy and dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Tronci, E; Fidalgo, C; Stancampiano, R; Carta, M

    2015-10-01

    Selective activation of 5-HT1 receptors has been shown to produce near to full suppression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however, a reduction of the therapeutic effect of L-DOPA has been reported in several studies. Conversely, we recently found that increasing the serotonergic tone with chronic administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can reduce LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, without affecting L-DOPA efficacy. To directly compare the effects of selective versus non-selective serotonin receptor activation, here we first tested different acute doses of the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine and 5-HTP on LID in order to identify doses of the individual compounds showing similar anti-dyskinetic efficacy in L-DOPA-primed dyskinetic rats. About 50% reduction of LID was observed with 0.1 mg/kg and 24 mg/kg of eltoprazine and 5-HTP, respectively; we then compared the effect of the two drugs, individually and in combination, on L-DOPA-induced stepping test in L-DOPA-naïve parkinsonian animals and LID over three weeks of L-DOPA treatment. Results showed that eltoprazine induced significant worsening of L-DOPA-mediated performance in the stepping test, while 5-HTP did not. Interestingly, combination of 5-HTP with eltoprazine prevented the reduction in the forelimb use induced by eltoprazine. Moreover, 5-HTP and eltoprazine given individually showed similar efficacy also upon chronic treatment, and had additive effect in dampening the appearance of LID when given in combination. Finally, chronic administration of eltoprazine and/or 5-HTP did not affect striatal serotonin innervation, compared to l-DOPA alone, as measured by serotonin transporter expression. PMID:26119238

  15. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock. II. Boost-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide 240Pu as an example. Methods: Following upon the work presented in Goddard et al. [Phys. Rev. C 92, 054610 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.054610, quadrupole-constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickly absorbed by the nucleus. In instantaneous boosts, this leads to fast shape rearrangements and violent dynamics that can ultimately lead to fission. This is a qualitatively different process than the deformation-induced fission. Boosts induced within a finite time window excite the system in a relatively gentler way and do induce fission but with a smaller energy deposition. Conclusions: The fission products obtained using boost-induced fission in time-dependent Hartree-Fock are more asymmetric than the fragments obtained in deformation-induced fission or the corresponding adiabatic approaches.

  16. Acute Footshock Stress Induces Time-Dependent Modifications of AMPA/NMDA Protein Expression and AMPA Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Daniela; Mora, Cristina; Tornese, Paolo; Sala, Nathalie; Filippini, Alice; La Via, Luca; Milanese, Marco; Calza, Stefano; Bonanno, Gianbattista; Racagni, Giorgio; Gennarelli, Massimo; Popoli, Maurizio; Musazzi, Laura; Barbon, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on patients with stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders reported functional and morphological changes in brain areas where glutamatergic transmission is predominant, including frontal and prefrontal areas. In line with this evidence, several preclinical works suggest that glutamate receptors are targets of both rapid and long-lasting effects of stress. Here we found that acute footshock- (FS-) stress, although inducing no transcriptional and RNA editing alterations of ionotropic AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor subunits, rapidly and transiently modulates their protein expression, phosphorylation, and localization at postsynaptic spines in prefrontal and frontal cortex. In total extract, FS-stress increased the phosphorylation levels of GluA1 AMPA subunit at Ser845 immediately after stress and of GluA2 Ser880 2 h after start of stress. At postsynaptic spines, stress induced a rapid decrease of GluA2 expression, together with an increase of its phosphorylation at Ser880, suggesting internalization of GluA2 AMPA containing receptors. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA receptor subunits were found markedly upregulated in postsynaptic spines, 2 h after start of stress. These results suggest selected time-dependent changes in glutamatergic receptor subunits induced by acute stress, which may suggest early and transient enhancement of AMPA-mediated currents, followed by a transient activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:26966584

  17. Enhanced analyte detection using in-source fragmentation of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-selected ions in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lauren J; Smith, Robert W; Toutoungi, Danielle E; Reynolds, James C; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew; Sage, Ashley; Wilson, Ian D; Weston, Daniel J; Boyle, Billy; Creaser, Colin S

    2012-05-01

    Miniaturized ultra high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is used for the selective transmission of differential mobility-selected ions prior to in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) analysis. The FAIMS-in-source collision induced dissociation-TOFMS (FISCID-MS) method requires only minor modification of the ion source region of the mass spectrometer and is shown to significantly enhance analyte detection in complex mixtures. Improved mass measurement accuracy and simplified product ion mass spectra were observed following FAIMS preselection and subsequent in-source CID of ions derived from pharmaceutical excipients, sufficiently close in m/z (17.7 ppm mass difference) that they could not be resolved by TOFMS alone. The FISCID-MS approach is also demonstrated for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of peptides with FAIMS used to filter out unrelated precursor ions thereby simplifying the resulting product ion mass spectra. Liquid chromatography combined with FISCID-MS was applied to the analysis of coeluting model peptides and tryptic peptides derived from human plasma proteins, allowing precursor ion selection and CID to yield product ion data suitable for peptide identification via database searching. The potential of FISCID-MS for the quantitative determination of a model peptide spiked into human plasma in the range of 0.45-9.0 μg/mL is demonstrated, showing good reproducibility (%RSD < 14.6%) and linearity (R(2) > 0.99).

  18. Effect of nicotinic acid on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Basilio, C.; Toro, A.; Yojay, L.

    1986-05-01

    The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration (50 mg/kg) of nicotinic acid (NA), markedly decreased the sleep time of rats pretreated (10 min before), post-treated (10 min after) or simultaneously treated with ethanol (4 g/Kg i.p.). A similar effect was observed on the sleep time induced by pentobarbital (37 mg/Kg i.p.). Blood alcohol levels (BAL) were the same or slightly higher in the animals pretreated with NA than in the control animals pre-injected with saline. Nicotinamide and NAD had no effect. A total of three doses of ethanol, each one administered weekly or biweekly, induced tolerance, which persisted for approximately six weeks. After this period, a hypersensitivity to ethanol appeared to develop. This phenomenon was not observed when NA was pre-injected 10 min before each dose of ethanol. The sleep time of the latter animals did not change neither during the treatment period nor after six weeks without any treatment. BAL were slightly higher in NA treated than in control animals. The authors concluded that the effect of NA on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol is not due to an increased rate of its metabolism and/or elimination but to a long-lasting effect that decreases the sensitivity of the nervous cells to ethanol. The mechanisms involved in the shortening of the sleep time as well as those responsible for the loss of the capacity to develop tolerance are under current investigation.

  19. Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence on an oscillatory xenon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-11-15

    A novel approach to time-synchronizing laser-induced fluorescence measurements to an oscillating current in a 60 Hz xenon discharge lamp using a continuous wave laser is presented. A sample-hold circuit is implemented to separate out signals at different phases along a current cycle, and is followed by a lock-in amplifier to pull out the resulting time-synchronized fluorescence trace from the large background signal. The time evolution of lower state population is derived from the changes in intensity of the fluorescence excitation line shape resulting from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 6s{sup Prime }[1/2]{sub 1}{sup 0}-6p{sup Prime }[3/2]{sub 2} xenon atomic transition at {lambda}= 834.68 nm. Results show that the lower state population oscillates at twice the frequency of the discharge current, 120 Hz.

  20. Dissociation dynamics of CH3I in electric spark induced breakdown revealed by time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; Duo, Li-ping; Liu, Yu-qiang; Yang, Yan-qiang

    2015-02-01

    The electric discharge spark dissociation of gas CH3I is found to be similar to its femtosecond laser photodissociation. The almost identical spectra of the two processes show that their initial ionization conditions are very similar. The initial ionization followed by molecular fragmentation is proposed as the dissociation mechanism, in which the characteristic emissions of I+, CH3, CH2, CH, H, and I2 are identified as the dissociation products. The emission band of 505 nm I2 is clearly observed in the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The dynamic curve indicates that I2∗ molecules are formed after the delay time of ∼4.7 ns. The formation of I2∗ molecule results from the bimolecular collision of the highly excited iodine atom I∗(4P) and CH3I molecule. This dynamical information can help understand the process of electric discharge spark dissociation of CH3I.

  1. Time and dose-response effects of honokiol on UVB-induced skin cancer development.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Ruth F; Chilampalli, Chandeshwari; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zeman, David; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2012-06-01

    Honokiol has shown chemopreventive effects in chemically-induced and UVB-induced skin cancer in mice. In this investigation, we assessed the time-effects of a topical low dose of honokiol (30 μg), and then the effects of different honokiol doses (30, 45, and 60 μg) on a UVB-induced skin cancer model to find an optimal dose and time for desirable chemopreventive effects. UVB radiation (30 mJ/cm(2), 5 days/week for 25 or 27 weeks) was used to induce skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. For the time-response experiment 30 μg honokiol in acetone was applied topically to the animals before the UVB exposure (30 min, 1 h, and 2 h) and after the UVB exposure (immediately, 30 min, and 1 h). Control groups were treated with acetone. For the dose-response study, animals were treated topically with acetone or honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) one hour before the UVB exposure. In the time-response experiment, honokiol inhibited skin tumor multiplicity by 49-58% while reducing tumor volumes by 70-89%. In the dose-response study, honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) significantly decreased skin tumor multiplicity by 36-78% in a dose-dependent manner, while tumor area was reduced by 76-94%. Honokiol (60 μg) significantly reduced tumor incidence by 40% as compared to control group. Honokiol applied in very low doses (30 μg) either before or after UVB radiation shows chemopreventive effects. Honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) prevents UVB-induced skin cancer in a dose-dependent manner. Honokiol can be an effective chemopreventive agent against skin cancer.

  2. Intense Habitat-Specific Fisheries-Induced Selection at the Molecular Pan I Locus Predicts Imminent Collapse of a Major Cod Fishery

    PubMed Central

    Árnason, Einar; Hernandez, Ubaldo Benitez; Kristinsson, Kristján

    2009-01-01

    Predation is a powerful agent in the ecology and evolution of predator and prey. Prey may select multiple habitats whereby different genotypes prefer different habitats. If the predator is also habitat-specific the prey may evolve different habitat occupancy. Drastic changes can occur in the relation of the predator to the evolved prey. Fisheries exert powerful predation and can be a potent evolutionary force. Fisheries-induced selection can lead to phenotypic changes that influence the collapse and recovery of the fishery. However, heritability of the phenotypic traits involved and selection intensities are low suggesting that fisheries-induced evolution occurs at moderate rates at decadal time scales. The Pantophysin I (Pan I) locus in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), representing an ancient balanced polymorphism predating the split of cod and its sister species, is under an unusual mix of balancing and directional selection including current selective sweeps. Here we show that Pan I alleles are highly correlated with depth with a gradient of 0.44% allele frequency change per meter. AA fish are shallow-water and BB deep-water adapted in accordance with behavioral studies using data storage tags showing habitat selection by Pan I genotype. AB fish are somewhat intermediate although closer to AA. Furthermore, using a sampling design covering space and time we detect intense habitat-specific fisheries-induced selection against the shallow-water adapted fish with an average 8% allele frequency change per year within year class. Genotypic fitness estimates (0.08, 0.27, 1.00 of AA, AB, and BB respectively) predict rapid disappearance of shallow-water adapted fish. Ecological and evolutionary time scales, therefore, are congruent. We hypothesize a potential collapse of the fishery. We find that probabilistic maturation reaction norms for Atlantic cod at Iceland show declining length and age at maturing comparable to changes that preceded the collapse of northern cod at

  3. Measuring time-domain spectral induced polarization in the on-time: decreasing acquisition time and increasing signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Per-Ivar; Dahlin, Torleif; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben

    2015-12-01

    Combined resistivity and time-domain direct current induced polarization (DCIP) measurements are traditionally carried out with a 50% duty cycle current waveform, taking the resistivity measurements during the on-time and the IP measurements during the off-time. One drawback with this method is that only half of the acquisition time is available for resistivity and IP measurements, respectively. In this paper, this limitation is solved by using a current injection with 100% duty cycle and also taking the IP measurements in the on-time. With numerical modelling of current waveforms with 50% and 100% duty cycles we show that the waveforms have comparable sensitivity for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters and that signal level is increased up to a factor of 2 if the 100% duty cycle waveform is used. The inversion of field data acquired with both waveforms confirms the modelling results and shows that it is possible to retrieve similar inversion models with either of the waveforms when inverting for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters with the waveform of the injected current included in the forward computations. Consequently, our results show that on-time measurements of IP can reduce the acquisition time by up to 50% and increase the signal-to-noise ratio by up to 100% almost without information loss. Our findings can contribute and have a large impact for DCIP surveys in general and especially for surveys where time and reliable data quality are important factors. Specifically, the findings are of value for DCIP surveys conducted in urban areas where anthropogenic noise is an issue and the heterogeneous subsurface demands time-consuming 3D acquisitions.

  4. Natural soil microbes alter flowering phenology and the intensity of selection on flowering time in a wild Arabidopsis relative.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Maggie R; Lundberg, Derek S; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Tringe, Susannah G; Dangl, Jeffery L; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Plant phenology is known to depend on many different environmental variables, but soil microbial communities have rarely been acknowledged as possible drivers of flowering time. Here, we tested separately the effects of four naturally occurring soil microbiomes and their constituent soil chemistries on flowering phenology and reproductive fitness of Boechera stricta, a wild relative of Arabidopsis. Flowering time was sensitive to both microbes and the abiotic properties of different soils; varying soil microbiota also altered patterns of selection on flowering time. Thus, soil microbes potentially contribute to phenotypic plasticity of flowering time and to differential selection observed between habitats. We also describe a method to dissect the microbiome into single axes of variation that can help identify candidate organisms whose abundance in soil correlates with flowering time. This approach is broadly applicable to search for microbial community members that alter biological characteristics of interest.

  5. Riding the Lexical Speedway: A Critical Review on the Time Course of Lexical Selection in Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Strijkers, Kristof; Costa, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Speech requires time. How much time often depends on the amount of labor the brain has to perform in order to retrieve the linguistic information related to the ideas we want to express. Although most psycholinguistic research in the field of language production has focused on the net result of time required to utter words in various experimental conditions, over the last years more and more researchers pursued the objective to flesh out the time course of particular stages implicated in language production. Here we critically review these studies, with particular interest for the time course of lexical selection. First, we evaluate the data underlying the estimates of an influential temporal meta-analysis on language production (Indefrey and Levelt, 2004). We conclude that those data alone are not sufficient to provide a reliable time frame of lexical selection. Next, we discuss recent neurophysiological evidence which we argue to offer more explicit insights into the time course of lexical selection. Based on this evidence we suggest that, despite the absence of a clear time frame of how long lexical selection takes, there is sufficient direct evidence to conclude that the brain initiates lexical access within 200 ms after stimulus presentation, hereby confirming Indefrey and Levelt’s estimate. In a final section, we briefly review the proposed mechanisms which could lead to this rapid onset of lexical access, namely automatic spreading activation versus specific concept selection, and discuss novel data which support the notion of spreading activation, but indicate that the speed with which this principle takes effect is driven by a top-down signal in function of the intention to engage in a speech act. PMID:22144973

  6. Selective detection of viable Helicobacter pylori using ethidium monoazide or propidium monoazide in combination with real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sehee; Kwon, Soonbok; Kim, Min-jeong; Chae, Jong-Chan; Jae Maeng, Pil; Park, Jong-Geun; Lee, Gyu-Cheol

    2011-12-01

    Because Helicobacter pylori has a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer, chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, detection of its viable form is very important. The objective of this study was to optimize a PCR method using ethidium monoazide (EMA) or propidium monoazide (PMA) for selective detection of viable H. pylori cells in mixed samples of viable and dead bacteria. Before conducting the real-time PCR using SodB primers of H. pylori, EMA or PMA was added to suspensions of viable and/or dead H. pylori cells at concentrations between 1 and 100 μM. PMA at a concentration of 50 μM induced the highest DNA loss in dead cells with little loss of genomic DNA in viable cells. In addition, selective detection of viable cells in the mixtures of viable and dead cells at various ratios was possible with the combined use of PMA and real-time PCR. In contrast, EMA penetrated the membranes of both viable and dead cells and induced degradation of their genomic DNA. The findings of this study suggest that PMA, but not EMA, can be used effectively to differentiate viable H. pylori from its dead form.

  7. Role of estrogen receptor β selective agonist in ameliorating portal hypertension in rats with CCl4-induced liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Zhang, Bin; Deng, Wen-Sheng; Duan, Ming; Chen, Wei; Wu, Zhi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of diarylpropionitrile (DPN), a selective agonist of estrogen receptor β (ERβ), in liver cirrhosis with portal hypertension (PHT) and isolated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). METHODS: Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized (OVX), and liver cirrhosis with PHT was induced by CCl4 injection. DPN and PHTPP, the selective ERβ agonist and antagonist, were used as drug interventions. Liver fibrosis was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and Masson’s trichrome staining and by analyzing smooth muscle actin expression. Hemodynamic parameters were determined in vivo using colored microspheres technique. Protein expression and phosphorylation were determined by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis. Messenger RNA levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Collagen gel contraction assay was performed using gel lattices containing HSCs treated with DPN, PHTPP, or Y-27632 prior to ET-1 addition. RESULTS: Treatment with DPN in vivo greatly lowered portal pressure and improved hemodynamic parameters without affecting mean arterial pressure, which was associated with the attenuation of liver fibrosis and intrahepatic vascular resistance (IHVR). In CCl4-treated rat livers, DPN significantly decreased the expression of RhoA and ROCK II, and even suppressed ROCK II activity. Moreover, DPN remarkedly increased the levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS, and promoted the activities of protein kinase G (PKG), which is an NO effector in the liver. Furthermore, DPN reduced the contractility of activated HSCs in the 3-dimensional stress-relaxed collagen lattices, and decreased the ROCK II activity in activated HSCs. Finally, in vivo/in vitro experiments demonstrated that MLC activity was inhibited by DPN. CONCLUSION: For OVX rats with liver cirrhosis, DPN suppressed liver RhoA/ROCK signal, facilitated NO/PKG pathways, and decreased IHVR, giving rise to

  8. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  9. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  10. Control and target gene selection for studies on UV-induced genotoxicity in whales

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite international success in reducing ozone-depleting emissions, ultraviolet radiation (UV) is not expected to decrease for several decades. Thus, it is pressing to implement tools that allow investigating the capacity of wildlife to respond to excessive UV, particularly species like cetaceans that lack anatomical or physiological protection. One approach is to examine epidermal expression of key genes involved in genotoxic stress response pathways. However, quantitation of mRNA transcripts requires previous standardization, with accurate selection of control and target genes. The latter is particularly important when working with environmental stressors such as UV that can activate numerous genes. Results Using 20 epidermal biopsies from blue, fin and sperm whale, we found that the genes encoding the ribosomal proteins L4 and S18 (RPL4 and RPS18) were the most suitable to use as controls, followed by the genes encoding phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) and succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA). A careful analysis of the transcription pathways known to be activated by UV-exposure in humans and mice led us to select as target genes those encoding for i) heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) an indicator of general cell stress, ii) tumour suppressor protein P53 (P53), a transcription factor activated by UV and other cell stressors, and iii) KIN17 (KIN), a cell cycle protein known to be up-regulated following UV exposure. These genes were successfully amplified in the three species and quantitation of their mRNA transcripts was standardised using RPL4 and RPS18. Using a larger sample set of 60 whale skin biopsies, we found that the target gene with highest expression was HSP70 and that its levels of transcription were correlated with those of KIN and P53. Expression of HSP70 and P53 were both related to microscopic sunburn lesions recorded in the whales’ skin. Conclusion This article presents groundwork data essential for future qPCR-based studies

  11. Selection of reference genes for qRT-PCR in high fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis mice model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingyan; Ma, Xinran; Cui, Bin; Li, Xiaoying; Ning, Guang; Wang, Shu

    2011-07-01

    With the epidemic proportions of obesity worldwide and the concurrent prevalence of hepatic steatosis, there is an urgent need for better understanding the intrinsic mechanism of hepatic steatosis, especially the changes of gene expression underlying the development of hepatic steatosis and its associated abnormal liver function. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a sensitive and highly reproducible technique of gene expression analysis. However, for accurate and reliable gene expression results, it is vital to have an internal control gene expressed at constant levels under all the experimental conditions being analyzed for. In this study, the authors validated candidate reference genes suitable for qRT-PCR profiling experiments using livers from control mice and high fat diet-induced obese mice. Cross-validation of expression stability of ten selected reference genes using three popular algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper found HPRT1 and GAPDH as most stable reference genes. Thus, HPRT1 and GAPDH are recommended as stable reference genes most suitable for gene expression studies in the development of hepatic steatosis.

  12. Highly efficient and selective pressure-assisted photon-induced polymerization of styrene.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jiwen; Song, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The polymerization process of condensed styrene to produce polystyrene as an industrially important polymeric material was investigated using a novel approach by combining external compression with ultraviolet radiation. The reaction evolution was monitored as a function of time and the reaction products were characterized by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. By optimizing the loading pressures, we observed highly efficient and selective production of polystyrene of different tacticities. Specifically, at relatively low loading pressures, infrared spectra suggest that styrene monomers transform to amorphous atactic polystyrene (APS) with minor crystalline isotactic polystyrene. In contrast, APS was found to be the sole product when polymerization occurs at relatively higher loading pressures. The time-dependent reaction profiles allow the examination of the polymerization kinetics by analyzing the rate constant and activation volume as a function of pressure. As a result, an optimized pressure condition, which allows a barrierless reaction to proceed, was identified and attributed to the very desirable reaction yield and kinetics. Finally, the photoinitiated reaction mechanism and the growth geometry of the polymer chains were investigated from the energy diagram of styrene and by the topology analysis of the crystal styrene. This study shows strong promise to produce functional polymeric materials in a highly efficient and controlled manner. PMID:27276967

  13. Highly efficient and selective pressure-assisted photon-induced polymerization of styrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jiwen; Song, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The polymerization process of condensed styrene to produce polystyrene as an industrially important polymeric material was investigated using a novel approach by combining external compression with ultraviolet radiation. The reaction evolution was monitored as a function of time and the reaction products were characterized by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. By optimizing the loading pressures, we observed highly efficient and selective production of polystyrene of different tacticities. Specifically, at relatively low loading pressures, infrared spectra suggest that styrene monomers transform to amorphous atactic polystyrene (APS) with minor crystalline isotactic polystyrene. In contrast, APS was found to be the sole product when polymerization occurs at relatively higher loading pressures. The time-dependent reaction profiles allow the examination of the polymerization kinetics by analyzing the rate constant and activation volume as a function of pressure. As a result, an optimized pressure condition, which allows a barrierless reaction to proceed, was identified and attributed to the very desirable reaction yield and kinetics. Finally, the photoinitiated reaction mechanism and the growth geometry of the polymer chains were investigated from the energy diagram of styrene and by the topology analysis of the crystal styrene. This study shows strong promise to produce functional polymeric materials in a highly efficient and controlled manner.

  14. TCR engagement of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes in vitro induces early aspects of positive selection, but not apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Groves, T; Parsons, M; Miyamoto, N G; Guidos, C J

    1997-01-01

    Immature CD4/CD8 double-positive (DP) thymocytes expressing self MHC-restricted TCR are positively selected in response to TCR signals to survive and differentiate into functionally competent CD4 or CD8 single positive (SP) T cells. In contrast, DP precursors expressing autoreactive TCR are clonally deleted in response to TCR signals. We show here that in vitro TCR engagement of TCR(low) DP thymocytes rapidly triggers a variety of events considered to be hallmarks of positive selection in vivo. These include increased expression of CD5 and Bcl-2, termination of RAG-1 and pre-T(alpha) gene expression, and a switch in lck promoter usage. We also demonstrate that CD4- or CD28-mediated signals synergize with TCR signals to induce these outcomes. Finally, we show that the response of DP thymocytes to TCR engagement is selective in that clonal deletion, CD4/CD8 lineage commitment, and other events associated with maturation, such as changes in expression of Thy-1, HSA, MHC class I, and CD45-RB, were not induced. Thus, only subsets of maturational processes associated with positive selection in vivo were shown to be directly coupled to TCR signaling pathways at the DP stage. These observations support conclusions from in vivo systems suggesting that multiple, temporally separated TCR engagements are required to effect the entire spectrum of developmental changes associated with positive selection, and provide a conceptual and experimental framework for unraveling the complexity of positive selection.

  15. Initiation time of near-infrared laser-induced slip on the surface of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungho; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2014-06-23

    We have determined the initiation time of laser-induced slip on a silicon wafer surface subjected to a near-infrared continuous-wave laser by numerical simulations and experiments. First, numerical analysis was performed based on the heat transfer and thermoelasticity model to calculate the resolved shear stress and the temperature-dependent yield stress. Slip initiation time was predicted by finding the time at which the resolved shear stress reached the yield stress. Experimentally, the slip initiation time was measured by using a laser scattering technique that collects scattered light from the silicon wafer surface and detects strong scattering when the surface slip is initiated. The surface morphology of the silicon wafer surface after laser irradiation was also observed using an optical microscope to confirm the occurrence of slip. The measured slip initiation times agreed well with the numerical predictions.

  16. Transient Induced Molecular Electronic Spectroscopy (TIMES) for study of protein-ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiantian; Ku, Ti-Hsuan; Han, Yuanyuan; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Niaz, Iftikhar Ahmad; Luo, Hua; Chang, Derrick; Huang, Jian-Jang; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    We present a method, Transient Induced Molecular Electronic Spectroscopy (TIMES), to detect protein-ligand interactions without any protein engineering or chemical modification. We developed a physics model for the TIMES signal and mathematically formulated the problem to attain physical insight of protein-ligand interactions without any disturbances by molecular probes, fluorescent labels, or immobilization of molecules. To demonstrate the functionality of this method, we have used the TIMES signals to find the dissociation constants for the affinity of reactions, the shear-stress dependent adsorption time of molecules on surface, and other interesting features of protein-ligand interaction in native conditions. As a unique tool, TIMES offers a simple and effective method to investigate fundamental protein chemistry and drug discoveries. PMID:27759045

  17. Diversity and time delays induce resonance in a modular neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. B.; Yang, X. L.; Kurths, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper focuses on the resonance dynamics of a modular neuronal network consisting of several small-world subnetworks. The considered network is composed of delay-coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neurons, whose characteristic parameters present diversity in the form of quenched noise. Our numerical results indicate that when such a network is subjected to an external subthreshold periodic signal, its collective response is optimized for an intermediate level of diversity, namely, a resonant behavior can be induced by an appropriate level of diversity. How the probabilities of intramodule and intermodule connections, as well as the number of subnetworks influence the diversity-induced resonance are also discussed. Further, conclusive evidences demonstrate the nontrivial role of time-delayed coupling on the diversity-induced resonance properties. Especially, multiple resonance is obviously detected when time delays are located at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the signal. Moreover, the phenomenon of fine-tuned delays in inducing multiple resonance remains when diversity is within an intermediate range. Our findings have implications that neural systems may profit from their generic diversity and delayed coupling to optimize the response to external stimulus.

  18. Time-resolved characterization of laser-induced plasma from fresh potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wenqi; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Boueri, Myriam; Ma, Qianli; Zhang, Dacheng; Zheng, Lijuan; Zeng, Heping; Yu, Jin

    2009-09-01

    Optical emission of laser-induced plasma on the surface of fresh vegetables provides sensitive analysis of trace elements for in situ or online detection of these materials. This emergent technique promises applications with expected outcomes in food security or nutrition quality, as well as environment pollution detection. Characterization of the plasma induced on such soft and humid materials represents the first step towards quantitative measurement using this technique. In this paper, we present the experimental setup and protocol that optimize the plasma generation on fresh vegetables, potatoes for instance. The temporal evolution of the plasma properties are investigated using time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In particular, the electron density and the temperatures of the plasma are reported as functions of its decay time. The temperatures are evaluated from the well known Boltzmann and Saha-Boltzmann plot methods. These temperatures are further compared to that of the typical molecular species, CN, for laser-induced plasma from plant materials. This comparison validates the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the specific case of fresh vegetables ablated in the typical LIBS conditions. A study of the temporal evolution of the signal to noise ratio also provides practical indications for an optimized detection of trace elements. We demonstrate finally that, under certain conditions, the calibration-free LIBS procedure can be applied to determine the concentrations of trace elements in fresh vegetables.

  19. mda-7 (IL-24) mediates selective apoptosis in human melanoma cells by inducing the coordinated overexpression of the GADD family of genes by means of p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Devanand; Su, Zao-Zhong; Lebedeva, Irina V.; Sauane, Moira; Gopalkrishnan, Rahul V.; Valerie, Kristoffer; Dent, Paul; Fisher, Paul B.

    2002-01-01

    Subtraction hybridization identified melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (mda-7) as a gene induced during terminal differentiation in human melanoma cells. On the basis of structure, chromosomal localization and cytokine-like properties, mda-7 is classified as IL-24. Administration of mda-7/IL-24 by means of a replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad.mda-7) induces apoptosis selectively in diverse human cancer cells without inducing harmful effects in normal fibroblast or epithelial cells. The present studies investigated the mechanism underlying this differential apoptotic effect. Infection of melanoma cells, but not normal immortal melanocytes, with Ad.mda-7 induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in expression, mRNA and protein, of a family of growth arrest and DNA damage (GADD)-inducible genes, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. Among the members of the GADD family of genes, GADD153, GADD45α, and GADD34 displayed marked, and GADD45γ showed minimal induction. Treatment of melanoma cells with SB203580, a selective inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, effectively inhibited Ad.mda-7-induced apoptosis. Additional support for an involvement of the p38 MAPK pathway in Ad.mda-7-mediated apoptosis was documented by using an adenovirus expressing a dominant negative mutant of p38 MAPK. Infection with Ad.mda-7 increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and heat shock protein 27 in melanoma cells but not in normal immortal melanocytes. In addition, SB203580 effectively inhibited Ad.mda-7-mediated induction of the GADD family of genes in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and it effectively blocked Ad.mda-7-mediated down-regulation of the antiapoptotic protein BCL-2. Inhibition of GADD genes by an antisense approach either alone or in combination also effectively blocked Ad.mda-7-induced apoptosis in melanoma cells. These results support the hypothesis that Ad.mda-7 mediates induction of the GADD family of genes by means

  20. Low-temperature laser-induced selective area growth of compound semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppili, Sudarsan

    Laser induced epitaxial growth of gallium phosphide was investigated as a low temperature, spatially selective process using both pyrolytic and photolytic reaction. A focussed beam from an argon ion laser operating at 514.5 nm was used to direct-write epitaxial microstructures of homoepitaxial GaP using a pyrolytic process. The precursors were trimethyl gallium (TMG) and tertiary butylphosphine (TBP). Dependence of the epitaxial growth on several deposition parameters was examined. An ArF excimer laser was also used to achieve homoepitaxy and heteroepitaxy of gallium phosphide on gallium arsenide at 500 C using TMG and TBP as the precusor gases. Dependence of homoepitaxial growth of GaP on several parameters is examined. The crystalline properties of the film were determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electrical properties of p-n diodes fabricated via Zn doping were also examined. Defect structures in excimer laser-assisted epitaxial GaP on (100) GaP and (100) GaAs were examined using TEM. Periodic structures were obtained using nominally unpolarized excimer laser radiation, during heteroepitaxial growth of GaP on GaAs. Both crystalline properties and chemical composition of these structures were examined. Microanalysis showed modulation in composition in the ripple structure resulting from the thermal variation caused by the optical interference during growth. Electrical conductivity measurements of GaP during pulsed lasers irradiation indicated that in the absence of gases, there was appreciable heating of the semiconductor. However, a very small quantity of hydrogen or helium cooled the substrate appreciably. This suggested that the average temperature rise of the substrate was not an important factor in the temperature calculations used in the present investigation.

  1. Feasibility of time-lapse AVO and AVOA analysis to monitor compaction-induced seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.-X.; Angus, D. A.; Yuan, S. Y.; Xu, Y. G.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbon reservoir production generally results in observable time-lapse physical property changes, such as velocity increases within a compacting reservoir. However, the physical property changes that lead to velocity changes can be difficult to isolate uniquely. Thus, integrated hydro-mechanical simulation, stress-sensitive rock physics models and time-lapse seismic modelling workflows can be employed to study the influence of velocity changes and induced seismic anisotropy due to reservoir compaction. We study the influence of reservoir compaction and compartmentalization on time-lapse seismic signatures for reflection amplitude variation with offset (AVO) and azimuth (AVOA). Specifically, the time-lapse AVO and AVOA responses are predicted for two models: a laterally homogeneous four-layer dipping model and a laterally heterogeneous graben structure reservoir model. Seismic reflection coefficients for different offsets and azimuths are calculated for compressional (P-P) and converted shear (P-S) waves using an anisotropic ray tracer as well as using approximate equations for AVO and AVOA. The simulations help assess the feasibility of using time-lapse AVO and AVOA signatures to monitor reservoir compartmentalization as well as evaluate induced stress anisotropy due to changes in the effective stress field. The results of this study indicate that time-lapse AVO and AVOA analysis can be applied as a potential means for qualitatively and semi-quantitatively linking azimuthal anisotropy changes caused by reservoir production to pressure/stress changes.

  2. Effects of Morphine on Temporal Discrimination and Color Matching: General Disruption of Stimulus Control or Selective Effects on Timing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Ryan D.; Odum, Amy L.

    2005-01-01

    Discrepant effects of drugs on behavior maintained by temporal-discrimination procedures make conclusive statements about the neuropharmacological bases of timing difficult. The current experiment examined the possible contribution of a general, drug-induced disruption of stimulus control. Four pigeons responded on a three-component multiple…

  3. The Effects of Population Size Histories on Estimates of Selection Coefficients from Time-Series Genetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Ethan M.; Steinrücken, Matthias; Song, Yun S.

    2016-01-01

    Many approaches have been developed for inferring selection coefficients from time series data while accounting for genetic drift. These approaches have been motivated by the intuition that properly accounting for the population size history can significantly improve estimates of selective strengths. However, the improvement in inference accuracy that can be attained by modeling drift has not been characterized. Here, by comparing maximum likelihood estimates of selection coefficients that account for the true population size history with estimates that ignore drift by assuming allele frequencies evolve deterministically in a population of infinite size, we address the following questions: how much can modeling the population size history improve estimates of selection coefficients? How much can mis-inferred population sizes hurt inferences of selection coefficients? We conduct our analysis under the discrete Wright–Fisher model by deriving the exact probability of an allele frequency trajectory in a population of time-varying size and we replicate our results under the diffusion model. For both models, we find that ignoring drift leads to estimates of selection coefficients that are nearly as accurate as estimates that account for the true population history, even when population sizes are small and drift is high. This result is of interest because inference methods that ignore drift are widely used in evolutionary studies and can be many orders of magnitude faster than methods that account for population sizes. PMID:27550904

  4. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing. PMID:27003445

  5. A practical MGA-ARIMA model for forecasting real-time dynamic rain-induced attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shuhong; Gao, Yifeng; Shi, Houbao; Zhao, Ge

    2013-05-01

    novel and practical modified genetic algorithm (MGA)-autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model for forecasting real-time dynamic rain-induced attenuation has been established by combining genetic algorithm ideas with the ARIMA model. It is proved that due to the introduction of MGA into the ARIMA(1,1,7) model, the MGA-ARIMA model has the potential to be conveniently applied in every country or area by creating a parameter database used by the ARIMA(1,1,7) model. The parameter database is given in this paper based on attenuation data measured in Xi'an, China. The methods to create the parameter databases in other countries or areas are offered, too. Based on the experimental results, the MGA-ARIMA model has been proved practical for forecasting dynamic rain-induced attenuation in real time. The novel model given in this paper is significant for developing adaptive fade mitigation technologies at millimeter wave bands.

  6. Real-time monitoring of nitric oxide in ischemic myocardium using an NO-selective electrode calibrated by electron spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shun-suke; Omori, Yoichi; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Shoji, Hirofumi; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-il; Todoki, Kazuo; Kamibayashi, Masato; Murakami, Eiichi

    2003-11-21

    Using a Langendorff-perfused rat heart preparation and selective electrodes, we determined nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen levels in cardiac tissue. An NO-selective electrode that was calibrated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was inserted into the middle of the myocardium in the left ventricle. Simultaneously, we used an O2-selective electrode to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the perfusate, Krebs-Henseleit (K-H) solution, that was ejected from the heart. After 30 min of aerobic control perfusion, hearts were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 30 min of reperfusion. Under ischemic conditions, with a gradually decreasing pO2, NO detected by an NO-sensitive electrode within the myocardium was gradually increased. The maximum concentration increases in NO and decreases in pO2 during global ischemia were +10.200 +/- 1.223 microM and -58.608 +/- 4.123 mmHg, respectively. NO and pO2 levels both recovered to pre-ischemia baseline values when perfusion was restarted after global ischemia (reperfusion). The presence of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 mM), a NOS inhibitor, prevented ischemia/reperfusion-induced changes in NO. This study shows that an NO-selective electrode that is calibrated by ESR can provide accurate, real-time monitoring of cardiac NO in normal and ischemic myocardium.

  7. Neutron-induced fission measurements at the time-of-flight facility nELBE

    DOE PAGES

    Kögler, T.; Beyer, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2015-05-18

    Neutron-induced fission of ²⁴²Pu is studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The relative fast neutron fission cross section was determined using actinide fission chambers in a time-of-flight experiment. A good agreement of present nuclear data with evalua- tions has been achieved in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV.

  8. Selective Hyper-responsiveness of the Interferon System in Major Depressive Disorders and Depression Induced by Interferon Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoyo-Becerra, Carolina; Erim, Yesim; Kis, Bernhard; Wang, Bo; Scherbaum, Norbert; Gerken, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Background Though an important percentage of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) undergoing interferon (IFN) therapy develop depressive symptoms, the role of the IFN system in the pathogenesis of depressive disorders is not well understood. Methods 50 patients with HCV infection were treated with standard combination therapy (pegylated IFN-α2a/ribavirin). IFN-induced gene expression was analyzed to identify genes which are differentially regulated in patients with or without IFN-induced depression. For validation, PBMC from 22 psychiatric patients with a severe depressive episode (SDE) and 11 controls were cultivated in vitro with pegylated IFN-α2a and gene expression was analyzed. Results IFN-induced depression in HCV patients was associated with selective upregulation of 15 genes, including 6 genes that were previously described to be relevant for major depressive disorders or neuronal development. In addition, increased endogenous IFN-production and selective hyper-responsiveness of these genes to IFN stimulation were observed in SDE patients. Conclusions Our data suggest that selective hyper-responsiveness to exogenous (IFN therapy) or endogenous (depressive disorders) type I IFNs may lead to the development of depressive symptoms. These data could lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to treat IFN-induced and major depressive disorders. PMID:22701688

  9. Real-Time, Selective Detection of Copper(II) Using Ionophore-Grafted Carbon-Fiber Microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Ibrahim, Ahmad A; Hashemi, Parastoo; Stockdill, Jennifer L

    2016-07-19

    Rapid, selective detection of metals in complex samples remains an elusive goal that could provide critical analytical information for biological and environmental sciences and industrial waste management. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMs) is an emerging technique for metal analysis with broad potential applicability because of its rapid response to changes in analyte concentration and minimal disturbance to the analysis medium. In this communication, we report the first effective application of covalently modified CFMs to achieve highly selective, subsecond Cu(II) measurements using FSCV. A two-part strategy is employed for maximum selectivity: Cu(II) binding is augmented by a covalently grafted ionophore, while binding of other metals is prevented by chemical blocking of nonselective surface adsorption sites. The resulting electrodes selectively detect Cu(II) in a complex medium comprising several interfering metals. Overall, this strategy represents a transformative innovation in real-time electrochemical detection of metal analytes. PMID:27079730

  10. Delay selection by spike-timing-dependent plasticity in recurrent networks of spiking neurons receiving oscillatory inputs.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robert R; Burkitt, Anthony N; Thomas, Doreen A; Gilson, Matthieu; Grayden, David B

    2013-01-01

    Learning rules, such as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), change the structure of networks of neurons based on the firing activity. A network level understanding of these mechanisms can help infer how the brain learns patterns and processes information. Previous studies have shown that STDP selectively potentiates feed-forward connections that have specific axonal delays, and that this underlies behavioral functions such as sound localization in the auditory brainstem of the barn owl. In this study, we investigate how STDP leads to the selective potentiation of recurrent connections with different axonal and dendritic delays during oscillatory activity. We develop analytical models of learning with additive STDP in recurrent networks driven by oscillatory inputs, and support the results using simulations with leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. Our results show selective potentiation of connections with specific axonal delays, which depended on the input frequency. In addition, we demonstrate how this can lead to a network becoming selective in the amplitude of its oscillatory response to this frequency. We extend this model of axonal delay selection within a single recurrent network in two ways. First, we show the selective potentiation of connections with a range of both axonal and dendritic delays. Second, we show axonal delay selection between multiple groups receiving out-of-phase, oscillatory inputs. We discuss the application of these models to the formation and activation of neuronal ensembles or cell assemblies in the cortex, and also to missing fundamental pitch perception in the auditory brainstem. PMID:23408878

  11. Effects of selection and training on unit-level performance over time: a latent growth modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Ferris, Gerald R; Perrewé, Pamela L; Blass, Fred R; Heetderks, Thomas D; Perryman, Alexa A

    2009-07-01

    Surprisingly few data exist concerning whether and how utilization of job-related selection and training procedures affects different aspects of unit or organizational performance over time. The authors used longitudinal data from a large fast-food organization (N = 861 units) to examine how change in use of selection and training relates to change in unit performance. Latent growth modeling analyses revealed significant variation in both the use and the change in use of selection and training across units. Change in selection and training was related to change in 2 proximal unit outcomes: customer service performance and retention. Change in service performance, in turn, was related to change in the more distal outcome of unit financial performance (i.e., profits). Selection and training also affected financial performance, both directly and indirectly (e.g., through service performance). Finally, results of a cross-lagged panel analysis suggested the existence of a reciprocal causal relationship between the utilization of the human resources practices and unit performance. However, there was some evidence to suggest that selection and training may be associated with different causal sequences, such that use of the training procedure appeared to lead to unit performance, whereas unit performance appeared to lead to use of the selection procedure. PMID:19594228

  12. Effects of selection and training on unit-level performance over time: a latent growth modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Ferris, Gerald R; Perrewé, Pamela L; Blass, Fred R; Heetderks, Thomas D; Perryman, Alexa A

    2009-07-01

    Surprisingly few data exist concerning whether and how utilization of job-related selection and training procedures affects different aspects of unit or organizational performance over time. The authors used longitudinal data from a large fast-food organization (N = 861 units) to examine how change in use of selection and training relates to change in unit performance. Latent growth modeling analyses revealed significant variation in both the use and the change in use of selection and training across units. Change in selection and training was related to change in 2 proximal unit outcomes: customer service performance and retention. Change in service performance, in turn, was related to change in the more distal outcome of unit financial performance (i.e., profits). Selection and training also affected financial performance, both directly and indirectly (e.g., through service performance). Finally, results of a cross-lagged panel analysis suggested the existence of a reciprocal causal relationship between the utilization of the human resources practices and unit performance. However, there was some evidence to suggest that selection and training may be associated with different causal sequences, such that use of the training procedure appeared to lead to unit performance, whereas unit performance appeared to lead to use of the selection procedure.

  13. Selective Influence of Circadian Modulation and Task Characteristics on Motor Imagery Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debarnot, Ursula; Sahraoui, Djafar; Champely, Stephane; Collet, Christian; Guillot, Aymeric

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of circadian modulation on motor imagery (MI) time while also considering the effects of task complexity and duration. The ability to imagine in real time was influenced by circadian modulation in a simple walking condition, with longer MI times in the morning and evening sessions. By contrast, there was no…

  14. Bilberry extract (Antho 50) selectively induces redox-sensitive caspase 3-related apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by targeting the Bcl-2/Bad pathway

    PubMed Central

    Alhosin, Mahmoud; León-González, Antonio J.; Dandache, Israa; Lelay, Agnès; Rashid, Sherzad K.; Kevers, Claire; Pincemail, Joël; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu; Mauvieux, Laurent; Herbrecht, Raoul; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B.

    2015-01-01

    Defect in apoptosis has been implicated as a major cause of resistance to chemotherapy observed in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B CLL). This study evaluated the pro-apoptotic effect of an anthocyanin-rich dietary bilberry extract (Antho 50) on B CLL cells from 30 patients and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy subjects, and determined the underlying mechanism. Antho 50 induced concentration- and time-dependent pro-apoptotic effects in B CLL cells but little or no effect in PBMCs. Among the main phenolic compounds of the bilberry extract, delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and delphinidin-3-O-rutinoside induced a pro-apoptotic effect. Antho 50-induced apoptosis is associated with activation of caspase 3, down-regulation of UHRF1, a rapid dephosphorylation of Akt and Bad, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Antho 50 significantly induced PEG-catalase-sensitive formation of reactive oxygen species in B CLL cells. PEG-catalase prevented the Antho 50-induced induction of apoptosis and related signaling. The present findings indicate that Antho 50 exhibits strong pro-apoptotic activity through redox-sensitive caspase 3 activation-related mechanism in B CLL cells involving dysregulation of the Bad/Bcl-2 pathway. This activity of Antho 50 involves the glucoside and rutinoside derivatives of delphinidin. They further suggest that Antho 50 has chemotherapeutic potential by targeting selectively B CLL cells. PMID:25757575

  15. Incipient allochronic speciation due to non-selective assortative mating by flowering time, mutation and genetic drift

    PubMed Central

    Devaux, Céline; Lande, Russell

    2008-01-01

    We model the evolution of flowering time using a multilocus quantitative genetic model with non-selective assortative mating and mutation to investigate incipient allochronic speciation in a finite population. For quantitative characters with evolutionary parameters satisfying empirical observations and two approximate inequalities that we derived, disjunct clusters in the population flowering phenology originated within a few thousand generations in the absence of disruptive natural or sexual selection. Our simulations and the conditions we derived showed that cluster formation was promoted by limited population size, high mutational variance of flowering time, short individual flowering phenology and a long flowering season. By contrast, cluster formation was hindered by inbreeding depression, stabilizing selection and pollinator limitation. Our results suggest that incipient allochronic speciation in populations of limited size (satisfying two inequalities) could be a common phenomenon. PMID:18700202

  16. Mental Aptitude and Comprehension of Time-Compressed and Compressed-Expanded Listening Selections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticht, Thomas G.

    The comprehensibility of materials compressed and then expanded by means of an electromechanical process was tested with 280 Army inductees divided into groups of high and low mental aptitude. Three short listening selections relating to military activities were subjected to compression and compression-expansion to produce seven versions. Data…

  17. The good, the bad, and the timely: how temporal order and moral judgment influence causal selection

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kevin; Kirfel, Lara; van Riel, Raphael; Barlassina, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Causal selection is the cognitive process through which one or more elements in a complex causal structure are singled out as actual causes of a certain effect. In this paper, we report on an experiment in which we investigated the role of moral and temporal factors in causal selection. Our results are as follows. First, when presented with a temporal chain in which two human agents perform the same action one after the other, subjects tend to judge the later agent to be the actual cause. Second, the impact of temporal location on causal selection is almost canceled out if the later agent did not violate a norm while the former did. We argue that this is due to the impact that judgments of norm violation have on causal selection—even if the violated norm has nothing to do with the obtaining effect. Third, moral judgments about the effect influence causal selection even in the case in which agents could not have foreseen the effect and did not intend to bring it about. We discuss our findings in connection to recent theories of the role of moral judgment in causal reasoning, on the one hand, and to probabilistic models of temporal location, on the other. PMID:25477851

  18. Stimulus Similarity and Encoding Time Influence Incidental Recognition Memory in Adult Monkeys with Selective Hippocampal Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeamer, Alyson; Meunier, Martine; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Recognition memory impairment after selective hippocampal lesions in monkeys is more profound when measured with visual paired-comparison (VPC) than with delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS). To clarify this issue, we assessed the impact of stimuli similarity and encoding duration on the VPC performance in monkeys with hippocampal lesions and…

  19. Full-Time Faculty Recruitment and Selection Strategies Practiced by Learning-Centered Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler-Hill, Sandra A.

    This report presents the results of a study of faculty recruitment and selection strategies used by self-reported learning-centered community colleges during the 1998-1999 academic year. The study examined six key principles of a learning college: (1) creates substantive change in learners; (2) engages students as partners in learning; (3) offers…

  20. Effects of Location, Frequency Region, and Time Course of Selective Attention on Auditory Scene Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusack, Rhodri; Decks, John; Aikman, Genevieve; Carlyon, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    Often, the sound arriving at the ears is a mixture from many different sources, but only 1 is of interest. To assist with selection, the auditory system structures the incoming input into streams, each of which ideally corresponds to a single source. Some authors have argued that this process of streaming is automatic and invariant, but recent…

  1. Picosecond time scale modification of forward scattered light induced by absorption inside particles.

    PubMed

    Kervella, Myriam; d'Abzac, Françoix-Xavier; Hache, François; Hespel, Laurent; Dartigalongue, Thibault

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of absorption processes on the Time Of Flight (TOF) of the light scattered out of a thick medium in the forward direction. We use a Monte-Carlo simulation with temporal phase function and Debye modes. The main result of our study is that absorption inside the particle induces a decrease of the TOF on a picosecond time scale, measurable with a femtosecond laser apparatus. This decrease, which exhibits a neat sensitivity to the absorption coefficient of particles, could provide an efficient way to measure this absorption.

  2. Inducing changes in the bond length of diatomic molecules by time-symmetric chirped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Bo Y.; Shin, Seokmin; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2010-12-15

    We show numerically that it is possible to change the structure of a simple molecule, that is, a diatomic molecule, where the bond length is modified at a precise timing with symmetrically chirped laser pulses. In the adiabatic regime, the process is fully time reversible, making it possible to design slow vibrations with large bond elongations. The scheme relies on the preparation of a separable state of both nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom with predominant amplitude on the dissociative (antibonding) electronic wave function. Shorter laser pulses can be used to dynamically induce larger bond elongations, preparing a highly excited vibrational wave packet in the ground potential as the laser is switched off.

  3. A Novel Solution for the Time-Dependent Probability of Gene Fixation or Loss Under Natural Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Rannala, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Kimura (1955b) proposed a solution for the time-dependent probability of fixation, or loss, of a gene under selection. Example calculations suggest the formulas are prone to numerical inaccuracies. An alternative solution is proposed; the correctness of the solution is confirmed by numerically solving the Kolmogorov backward equation and by simulation. PMID:15514078

  4. Acquisition of Some Selected Prepositions of Time by English Major Undergraduates at Balqa Applied University in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Qudah, Ayat Khalid

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the acquisition of some selected prepositions of time by English major undergraduates at Balqa Applied University in Jordan and to reveal any significant differences among their acquisition attributed to the academic level (1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year levels) and to studying "English Basic Grammar" course. A…

  5. Caterpillars selected for large body size and short development time are more susceptible to oxygen-related stress.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jon F; Cease, Arianne J; Vandenbrooks, John M; Albert, Todd; Davidowitz, Goggy

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that higher growth rates may be associated with reduced capacities for stress tolerance and increased accumulated damage due to reactive oxygen species. We tested the response of Manduca sexta (Sphingidae) lines selected for large or small body size and short development time to hypoxia (10 kPa) and hyperoxia (25, 33, and 40 kPa); both hypoxia and hyperoxia reduce reproduction and oxygen levels over 33 kPa have been shown to increase oxidative damage in insects. Under normoxic (21 kPa) conditions, individuals from the large-selected (big-fast) line were larger and had faster growth rates, slightly longer developmental times, and reduced survival rates compared to individuals from a line selected for small size (small-fast) or an unselected control line. Individuals from the big-fast line exhibited greater negative responses to hyperoxia with greater reductions in juvenile and adult mass, growth rate, and survival than the other two lines. Hypoxia generally negatively affected survival and growth/size, but the lines responded similarly. These results are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that simultaneous acquisition of large body sizes and short development times leads to reduced capacities for coping with stressful conditions including oxidative damage. This result is of particular importance in that natural selection tends to decrease development time and increase body size.

  6. Caterpillars selected for large body size and short development time are more susceptible to oxygen-related stress

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jon F; Cease, Arianne J; VandenBrooks, John M; Albert, Todd; Davidowitz, Goggy

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that higher growth rates may be associated with reduced capacities for stress tolerance and increased accumulated damage due to reactive oxygen species. We tested the response of Manduca sexta (Sphingidae) lines selected for large or small body size and short development time to hypoxia (10 kPa) and hyperoxia (25, 33, and 40 kPa); both hypoxia and hyperoxia reduce reproduction and oxygen levels over 33 kPa have been shown to increase oxidative damage in insects. Under normoxic (21 kPa) conditions, individuals from the large-selected (big-fast) line were larger and had faster growth rates, slightly longer developmental times, and reduced survival rates compared to individuals from a line selected for small size (small-fast) or an unselected control line. Individuals from the big-fast line exhibited greater negative responses to hyperoxia with greater reductions in juvenile and adult mass, growth rate, and survival than the other two lines. Hypoxia generally negatively affected survival and growth/size, but the lines responded similarly. These results are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that simultaneous acquisition of large body sizes and short development times leads to reduced capacities for coping with stressful conditions including oxidative damage. This result is of particular importance in that natural selection tends to decrease development time and increase body size. PMID:23762517

  7. Revisiting the Impact of Part-Time Work on Adolescent Adjustment: Distinguishing between Selection and Socialization Using Propensity Score Matching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Kathryn C.; Lee, Joanna M.; Steinberg, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    The impact of part-time employment on adolescent functioning remains unclear because most studies fail to adequately control for differential selection into the workplace. The present study reanalyzes data from L. Steinberg, S. Fegley, and S. M. Dornbusch (1993) using multiple imputation, which minimizes bias in effect size estimation, and 2 types…

  8. Effect of a novel NK1 receptor selective antagonist (NKP608) on citric acid induced cough and airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    El-Hashim, A Z; Wyss, D; Lewis, C

    2004-01-01

    The effects of an orally administered novel and selective NK1 antagonist, NKP608, on cough and airway obstruction, induced by citric acid in guinea pigs, were investigated. Guinea pigs were pre-treated with 0.03, 0.3 and 1 mg kg(-1) of NKP608, the NK2 antagonist, SR48968 or both 2 h prior to challenge with citric acid (0.6 M) for a 10 min period. Guinea pigs pre-treated with 0.03, 0.3 and 1mgkg(-1) of NKP608 exhibited a significant reduction of 77, 74 and 79%, respectively, in the numbers of cough compared to vehicle pre-treated animals (P<0.05). SR48968, 10 mg kg(-1), alone did not significantly affect the citric acid-induced cough but when co-administered with 1 mg kg(-1) of NKP608, there was a significant 90% reduction in cough. NKP608 did not significantly reduce the citric acid-induced increase in Penh at any of the doses used. SR48968 significantly reduced the citric acid induced airway obstruction by about 50%. However, when SR48968 was co-administered with NKP608, there was a greater (73%) decrease in the airway obstruction compared with SR48968 alone. These data show that NKP608, a selective NK1 receptor antagonist, is a potent inhibitor of citric acid induced cough in guinea pigs and may therefore have value in the therapy of clinical cough.

  9. An Integral Method for Determining Induced Voltage in Time-Varying Wire Inductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D; Rockway, J

    2005-05-27

    This report documents the creation of software tools to model time-varying wire inductors. The class of inductors studied consists of arbitrary wire shapes in nonmagnetic material. When the wire structures are deformed, the inductance changes, and a voltage is induced. This voltage is of interest, for instance when the inductor is used to measure or sense a shockwave. An integral technique, which only requires integrating over the wire segments, is used to find the inductance at each time step, with backwards-difference approximations being used on successive time steps to determine the voltage. This method allows for arbitrary time-varying wire structures. It was tested for several canonical problems and used to model a double helix solenoid compressed by a shockwave.

  10. Shortened blood coagulation times in genetically obese rats and diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Noriyuki; Nagakubo, Dai; Hashida, Shin-Ichi; Takahashi, Saya; Kuratani, Motoi; Hirai, Norihiko; Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Asai, Fumitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate blood coagulation times in genetically obese rats and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice in order to clarify the relationship between visceral obesity and blood coagulation. WBN/Kob-Lepr(fa) (fa/fa) rats, a genetically obese model, exhibited a significantly shorter activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) than age-matched Wistar rats. C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet (60%), a DIO model, exhibited significantly shorter aPTT, PT and thrombin time than lean mice fed a standard diet. Higher body weight, visceral fat weight and insulin resistance were also shared by fa/fa rats and DIO mice. These results suggest that visceral obesity is related to accelerated blood coagulation in addition to disrupted metabolism of glucose and lipids.

  11. Selective detection of NADPH among four pyridine-nucleotide cofactors by a fluorescent probe based on aggregation-induced emission.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takao; Dawn, Arnab; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Tsuchiya, Youichi; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Shinkai, Seiji

    2013-05-14

    A fluorescent sensor based on guanidinium-tethered tetraphenylethene (TPE) has been investigated toward the differentiation of pyridine nucleotide cofactors (NAD(+) , NADH, NADP(+) , and NADPH). TPE selectively recognizes NADPH possessing the higher tetra-anionic net-charge, resulting in the steep "turn-on" fluorescence increase. The comparative aggregation behaviors and fluorescence response studies of TPE on the four cofactors reveal that the critical aggregate concentration of TPE against NADPH correlates directly with the concentration threshold for the fluorescence response. These results establish that TPE can selectively differentiate NADPH over the other three cofactors by the steep aggregation-induced fluorescence response accompanied by the high signal-to-background contrast.

  12. Compound 331 selectively induces glioma cell death by upregulating miR-494 and downregulating CDC20.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Niu, Tianhui; Huang, Yafei; Zhu, Haichuan; Zhong, Wu; Lin, Jian; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant tumors in the central nervous system (CNS). Up to date, the prognosis of glioma is still very poor, effective therapy with less side-effect is very necessary. Herein, we identify a compound named as "331" selectively induced cell death in glioma cells but not in astrocytes. Compound 331 upregulated miR-494 and downregulated CDC20 in glioma cells but not in astrocytes. These results suggest that compound 331 could be a potential drug selectively targeting glioma cells through upregulating miR-494 and downregulating CDC20. PMID:26153143

  13. Compound 331 selectively induces glioma cell death by upregulating miR-494 and downregulating CDC20

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Niu, Tianhui; Huang, Yafei; Zhu, Haichuan; Zhong, Wu; Lin, Jian; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant tumors in the central nervous system (CNS). Up to date, the prognosis of glioma is still very poor, effective therapy with less side-effect is very necessary. Herein, we identify a compound named as “331” selectively induced cell death in glioma cells but not in astrocytes. Compound 331 upregulated miR-494 and downregulated CDC20 in glioma cells but not in astrocytes. These results suggest that compound 331 could be a potential drug selectively targeting glioma cells through upregulating miR-494 and downregulating CDC20. PMID:26153143

  14. Antithrombotic activity of NSP-513, a novel selective phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor, on femoral arterial thrombosis induced by physical stenosis and electrical current: comparison of antithrombotic and hemodynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Hirose, H; Mashiko, S; Kimura, T; Ishida, F; Mochizuki, N; Nishibe, T; Nishikibe, M

    2000-04-01

    NSP-513, a novel potent and selective phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE 3) inhibitor, and cilostazol, a previously developed PDE 3 inhibitor, were compared with respect to antiplatelet, antithrombotic, and hemodynamic effects. In the in vitro antiplatelet aggregation studies, NSP-513 and cilostazol inhibited collagen-induced canine platelet aggregation with median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.093 and 3.1 miccroM, respectively, and inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced canine platelet aggregation with IC50 values of 0.15 and 12 microM, respectively. For ADP-induced platelet aggregation, the presence of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1; 3 and 10 nM) further decreased the IC50 values for NSP-513 to 0.11 and 0.032 microM, respectively. In ex vivo antiplatelet aggregation studies, orally administered NSP-513 (0.03-1 mg/kg) and cilostazol (50 mg/kg) inhibited collagen-induced canine platelet aggregation. In an in vivo canine femoral arterial thrombosis model, intraduodenally administered NSP-513 (0.01-0.03 mg/ kg) dose-dependently prevented thrombus formation without any changes in blood pressure, heart rate, or bleeding time. In conscious dogs, NSP-513 at oral doses of > or =0.3 mg/kg produced hemodynamic changes such as decreased blood pressure and increased heart rate and LVdP/dt(max). Thus the minimal hemodynamically effective dose of NSP-513 was 0.3 mg/kg, and the hemodynamic effects of this dose were comparable to those of 50 mg/kg of cilostazol. In conclusion, these data suggest that NSP-513 has in vivo selectivity for antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities over hemodynamic activity, and that the selectivity of NSP-513 is higher than that of cilostazol in dogs.

  15. Choline-induced selective fluorescence quenching of acetylcholinesterase conjugated Au@BSA clusters.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Meegle S; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T; Joseph, Kuruvilla

    2016-07-15

    We have developed a highly selective sensitive fluorescent detection of acetylcholine (ACh) using bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected atomically precise clusters of gold. The gold quantum clusters (AuQC@BSA) synthesized using bovine serum albumin and conjugated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme specific for acetylcholine, resulting in AuQC@BSA-AChE. The enzyme, AChE hydrolyzes acetylcholine (ACh) to choline (Ch) which in turn interacts with AuQC@BSA-AChE and quenches its fluorescence, enabling sensing. We have carried out the real time monitoring of the hydrolysis of ACh using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) to find out the mechanism of fluorescent quenching. The validity of present method for determination of concentration of acetylcholine in real system such as blood was demonstrated. Further, the sensor, AuQC@BSA-AChE can be easily coated on paper and an efficient and cheap sensor can be developed and detection limit for ACh is found to be 10nM. The fluorescent intensity of AuQC@BSA-AChE is sensitive towards acetylcholine in range of 10nM to 6.4µM. This suggests that AuQC@BSA-AChE has an excellent potential to be used for diagnosis of various neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  16. Giant spin splitting, strong valley selective circular dichroism and valley-spin coupling induced in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jinfeng; Peng, Xiangyang; Xiao, Di; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Silicene is a potential candidate for valleytronics. However, in comparison with the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), silicene has a tiny energy gap and zero spin splitting at its Dirac valleys, being unfavorable for valleytronic applications. Based on first principles calculations, we find that by proximity with Bi(111) bilayer, the Dirac valleys of silicene acquire a sizable energy gap and giant spin splittings, which are even larger than the splittings of Mo S2 . Our calculations show that the silicene over Bi layer exhibits a strong valley-contrasting circular dichroism, enabling selective optical pumping of valley carriers. Due to the time reversal symmetry and the breaking of inversion symmetry, the Berry curvatures and the spin splittings are opposite at the K and K' valleys of silicene, and hence the valley and spin are locked and can be simultaneously polarized. In this way, silicene and likely other similar Dirac materials can be comparable to TMDs in valleytronics, which not only adds a new dimension to the properties of silicene but also expands the members of the valleytronic family.

  17. Excess selenium increases Ca sup ++ -induced clotting times in chicks and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Herz, W.C.; Combs, G.F. Jr. )

    1991-03-11

    Calcium (Ca{sup ++})-induced clotting times (i.e., prothrombin times, PT times) in young White Leghorn chickens and male weanling Sprague Dawley rats were shown to be elevated in animals fed diets for 20-30 days containing excess Se. Clotting times of chicks were prolonged from those of controls in animals fed either deficient or excess Se, although all dietary treatment groups showed comparable concentrations of total plasma protein. Rats showed significantly prolonged PT times when fed Se at either 5 ppm or 10 ppm. The plasma activities of certain enzymes of hepatic origin (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase) in rats fed excess Se were comparable to those of controls, despite the increase in the PT times. Body weights and liver weights were significantly depressed in those animals only at the 10 ppm Se level. These results demonstrate increased PT times in both chicks and rats. In each species, this effect is independent of feed intake and body weight, and is apparent at levels of Se intake that do not affect other indicators of hepatic damage. Therefore, prolonged PT time may be an early indicator of sub-acute selenosis.

  18. Method and system for selecting data sampling phase for self timed interface logic

    DOEpatents

    Hoke, Joseph Michael; Ferraiolo, Frank D.; Lo, Tin-Chee; Yarolin, John Michael

    2005-01-04

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention is a method for transmitting data among processors over a plurality of parallel data lines and a clock signal line. A receiver processor receives both data and a clock signal from a sender processor. At the receiver processor a bit of the data is phased aligned with the transmitted clock signal. The phase aligning includes selecting a data phase from a plurality of data phases in a delay chain and then adjusting the selected data phase to compensate for a round-off error. Additional embodiments include a system and storage medium for transmitting data among processors over a plurality of parallel data lines and a clock signal line.

  19. A quantitative method for evaluating numerical simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation with its applications to selecting appropriate element size and time step.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Tse, Peter W; Tan, Haihui

    2016-01-01

    Lamb wave technique has been widely used in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). However, due to the multi-mode characteristics and dispersive nature, Lamb wave propagation behavior is much more complex than that of bulk waves. Numerous numerical simulations on Lamb wave propagation have been conducted to study its physical principles. However, few quantitative studies on evaluating the accuracy of these numerical simulations were reported. In this paper, a method based on cross correlation analysis for quantitatively evaluating the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb waves propagation is proposed. Two kinds of error, affecting the position and shape accuracies are firstly identified. Consequently, two quantitative indices, i.e., the GVE (group velocity error) and MACCC (maximum absolute value of cross correlation coefficient) derived from cross correlation analysis between a simulated signal and a reference waveform, are proposed to assess the position and shape errors of the simulated signal. In this way, the simulation accuracy on the position and shape is quantitatively evaluated. In order to apply this proposed method to select appropriate element size and time step, a specialized 2D-FEM program combined with the proposed method is developed. Then, the proper element size considering different element types and time step considering different time integration schemes are selected. These results proved that the proposed method is feasible and effective, and can be used as an efficient tool for quantitatively evaluating and verifying the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation. PMID:26315506

  20. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, I.; Luchinsky, D. G.; Tindjong, R.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Qf at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Qf=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Qf for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Qf leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Qf(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca2+/Na+ valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls.

  1. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, I; Luchinsky, D G; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Q(f) at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Q(f)=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Q(f) for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q(f) leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Q(f)(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca(2+)/Na(+) valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls. PMID:24329301

  2. Survivin selective inhibitor YM155 induce apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 Wilms tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Survivin, a member of the family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, functions as a key regulator of mitosis and programmed cell death. YM155, a novel molecular targeted agent, suppresses survivin, which is overexpressed in many tumor types. The aim of this study was to determine the antitumor activity of YM155 in SK-NEP-1 cells. Methods SK-NEP-1 cell growth in vitro and in vivo was assessed by MTT and nude mice experiments. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometric analysis was used to detect apoptosis in cell culture. Then gene expression profile of tumor cells treated with YM155 was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. We then analyzed the expression data with MEV (Multi Experiment View) cluster software. Datasets representing genes with altered expression profile derived from cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. Results YM155 treatment resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1cells in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V assay, cell cycle, and activation of caspase-3 demonstrates that YM155 induced apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 cells. YM155 significantly inhibited growth of SK-NEP-1 xenografts (YM155 5 mg/kg: 1.45 ± 0.77 cm3; YM155 10 mg/kg: 0.95 ± 0.55 cm3) compared to DMSO group (DMSO: 3.70 ± 2.4 cm3) or PBS group cells (PBS: 3.78 ± 2.20 cm3, ANOVA P < 0.01). YM155 treatment decreased weight of tumors (YM155 5 mg/kg: 1.05 ± 0.24 g; YM155 10 mg/kg: 0.72 ± 0.17 g) compared to DMSO group (DMSO: 2.06 ± 0.38 g) or PBS group cells (PBS: 2.36 ± 0.43 g, ANOVA P < 0.01). Real-time PCR array analysis showed between Test group and control group there are 32 genes significantly up-regulated and 54 genes were significantly down-regulated after YM155 treatment. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) showed cell death was the highest rated network with 65 focus molecules and the significance score of 44. The IPA analysis also groups the differentially expressed genes into biological mechanisms that

  3. Selection and design of the secondary electron channel of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkova, T. Ya.; Basalaev, A. A.; Kuz'michev, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Computer simulation is carried out for selecting a compact electron-optical system of the channel for detecting secondary electrons formed during the interaction of xenon atoms or ions with energy of 1-30 keV with Xe atoms. The solid angle of passage of secondary electron beams in a wide range of their initial energies is calculated. The energy spectrum of secondary electrons with various energies is determined by constructing their deceleration curve.

  4. [Selection of suitable polypropylene tubes for DNA testing using real-time PCR].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Eri; Futo, Satoshi; Masubuchi, Tomoko; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Kasahara, Masaki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Hino, Akihiro; Mano, Jyunichi; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2010-01-01

    Polypropylene microtubes (tubes) are generally used for bio-material tests in addition to PCR tests such as genetically modified organism (GMO) testings. However, the choice of suitable tubes is quite important, because it might influence the results: DNA binding and/or elution of chemical substances sometimes occurs. In this study, we established methods to select tubes with the most suitable characteristics for DNA testing. PMID:20208409

  5. [Selection of suitable polypropylene tubes for DNA testing using real-time PCR].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Eri; Futo, Satoshi; Masubuchi, Tomoko; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Kasahara, Masaki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Hino, Akihiro; Mano, Jyunichi; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2010-01-01

    Polypropylene microtubes (tubes) are generally used for bio-material tests in addition to PCR tests such as genetically modified organism (GMO) testings. However, the choice of suitable tubes is quite important, because it might influence the results: DNA binding and/or elution of chemical substances sometimes occurs. In this study, we established methods to select tubes with the most suitable characteristics for DNA testing.

  6. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Ivan I; Vinding, Mads S; Tse, Desmond H Y; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Shah, N Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  7. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, Ivan I.; Vinding, Mads S.; Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Shah, N. Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  8. Time course of spatial and feature selective attention for partly-occluded objects.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Tetsuko; Takeya, Ryuji

    2012-07-01

    Attention selects objects/groups as the most fundamental units, and this may be achieved by an attention-spreading mechanism. Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have found that attention-spreading is reflected by a decrease in the N1 spatial attention effect. The present study tested whether the electrophysiological attention effect is associated with the perception of object unity or amodal completion through the use of partly-occluded objects. ERPs were recorded in 14 participants who were required to pay attention to their left or right visual field and to press a button for a target shape in the attended field. Bilateral stimuli were presented rapidly, and were separated, connected, or connected behind an occluder. Behavioral performance in the connected and occluded conditions was worse than that in the separated condition, indicating that attention spread over perceptual object representations after amodal completion. Consistently, the late N1 spatial attention effect (180-220 ms post-stimulus) and the early phase (230-280 ms) of feature selection effects (target N2) at contralateral sites decreased, equally for the occluded and connected conditions, while the attention effect in the early N1 latency (140-180 ms) shifted most positively for the occluded condition. These results suggest that perceptual organization processes for object recognition transiently modulate spatial and feature selection processes in the visual cortex. PMID:22683447

  9. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Ivan I; Vinding, Mads S; Tse, Desmond H Y; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Shah, N Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community. PMID:25863895

  10. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy for clients with chronic stroke: interrupted time series (ITS) design.

    PubMed

    Park, JuHyung; Lee, NaYun; Cho, YongHo; Yang, YeongAe

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact that modified constraint-induced movement therapy has on upper extremity function and the daily life of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Modified constraint-induced movement therapy was conduct for 2 stroke patients with hemiplegia. It was performed 5 days a week for 2 weeks, and the participants performed their daily living activities wearing mittens for 6 hours a day, including the 2 hours of the therapy program. The assessment was conducted 5 times in 3 weeks before and after intervention. The upper extremity function was measured using the box and block test and a dynamometer, and performance daily of living activities was assessed using the modified Barthel index. The results were analyzed using a scatterplot and linear regression. [Results] All the upper extremity functions of the participants all improved after the modified constraint-induced movement therapy. Performance of daily living activities by participant 1 showed no change, but the results of participant 2 had improved after the intervention. [Conclusion] Through the results of this research, it was identified that modified constraint-induced movement therapy is effective at improving the upper extremity functions and the performance of daily living activities of chronic stroke patients.

  11. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy for clients with chronic stroke: interrupted time series (ITS) design

    PubMed Central

    Park, JuHyung; Lee, NaYun; Cho, YongHo; Yang, YeongAe

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact that modified constraint-induced movement therapy has on upper extremity function and the daily life of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Modified constraint-induced movement therapy was conduct for 2 stroke patients with hemiplegia. It was performed 5 days a week for 2 weeks, and the participants performed their daily living activities wearing mittens for 6 hours a day, including the 2 hours of the therapy program. The assessment was conducted 5 times in 3 weeks before and after intervention. The upper extremity function was measured using the box and block test and a dynamometer, and performance daily of living activities was assessed using the modified Barthel index. The results were analyzed using a scatterplot and linear regression. [Results] All the upper extremity functions of the participants all improved after the modified constraint-induced movement therapy. Performance of daily living activities by participant 1 showed no change, but the results of participant 2 had improved after the intervention. [Conclusion] Through the results of this research, it was identified that modified constraint-induced movement therapy is effective at improving the upper extremity functions and the performance of daily living activities of chronic stroke patients. PMID:25931770

  12. Modeling and inversion of stress-induced multicomponent seismic time shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven Shawn

    Subsurface pressure and temperature variations can alter rock properties both near and relatively far from the disturbance, causing detectable changes in seismic traveltimes. In this thesis, I first use traveltime variations to study velocity changes around a heated prototype nuclear waste storage tunnel. Then I model and invert compaction-induced multicomponent time shifts from depressurizing petroleum reservoirs. Heaters inside the tunnel replicate the thermal output of decaying radioactive waste, heating the tunnel over two years and maintaining a constant temperature for another two years. Time-lapse velocity models were constructed using temperature-dependent velocity data for granite and thermal profiles from boreholes in the tunnel wall. Matching check-shot and modeled waveforms indicate that the tunnel temperature can be monitored using seismic data. Further, the smooth, unperturbed velocity field lacks spatial perturbations, suggesting that no fluid or steam was present around the tunnel near the receiver array during the experiment. However, the combination of changing velocities and non-elastic, stress-induced acoustic emissions near the tunnel crown suggest that damage to the rock may occur. To study time shifts around a compacting reservoir, I employ geomechanical modeling of the compaction-induced stress/strain fields. Strain-dependent stiffness perturbations are obtained from the nonlinear theory of elasticity. Then full-waveform multicomponent seismic data are generated by finite-differences and used to estimate the time shifts of P-, S-, and PS-waves. P-wave time shifts are strongly influenced by compaction-induced velocity anisotropy around the reservoir. S-wave anisotropy is almost negligible, but S-wave shifts are 2-3 times larger than those of P-waves. PS-wave time-shift behavior significantly varies with the reflection point. Spatial time-shift distributions are exploited to study the sensitivity of each wave type to reservoir pressure ( Delta

  13. SU-E-I-60: The Correct Selection of Pitch and Rotation Time for Optimal CT Scanning : The Big Misconception

    SciTech Connect

    Ranallo, F; Szczykutowicz, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide correct guidance in the proper selection of pitch and rotation time for optimal CT imaging with multi-slice scanners. Methods: There exists a widespread misconception concerning the role of pitch in patient dose with modern multi-slice scanners, particularly with the use of mA modulation techniques. We investigated the relationship of pitch and rotation time to image quality, dose, and scan duration, with CT scanners from different manufacturers in a way that clarifies this misconception. This source of this misconception may concern the role of pitch in single slice CT scanners. Results: We found that the image noise and dose are generally independent of the selected effective mAs (mA*time/ pitch) with manual mA technique settings and are generally independent of the selected pitch and /or rotation time with automatic mA modulation techniques. However we did find that on certain scanners the use of a pitch just above 0.5 provided images of equal image noise at a lower dose compared to the use of a pitch just below 1.0. Conclusion: The misconception that the use of a lower pitch over-irradiates patients by wasting dose is clearly false. The use of a lower pitch provides images of equal or better image quality at the same patient dose, whether using manual mA or automatic mA modulation techniques. By decreasing the pitch and the rotation times by equal amounts, both helical and patient motion artifacts can be reduced without affecting the exam time. The use of lower helical pitch also allows better scanning of larger patients by allowing a greater scan effective mAs, if the exam time can be extended. The one caution with the use of low pitch is not related to patient dose, but to the length of the scan time if the rotation time is not set short enough. Partial Research funding from GE HealthCare.

  14. Water availability as an agent of selection in introduced populations of Arabidopsis thaliana: impacts on flowering time evolution

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Amanda J.; McGoey, Brechann V.

    2015-01-01

    Flowering is one of the most influential events in the life history of a plant and one of the main determinants of reproductive investment and lifetime fitness. It is also a highly complex trait controlled by dozens of genes. Understanding the selective pressures influencing time to flowering, and being able to reliably predict how it will evolve in novel environments, are unsolved challenges for plant evolutionary geneticists. Using the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, we examined the impact of simulated high and low winter precipitation levels on the flowering time of naturalized lines from across the eastern portion of the introduced North American range, and the fitness consequences of early versus late flowering. Flowering time order was significantly correlated across two environments—in a previous common garden experiment and in environmental chambers set to mimic mid-range photoperiod and temperature conditions. Plants in low water flowered earlier, had fewer basal branches and produced fewer fruits. Selection in both treatments favored earlier flowering and more basal branches. Our analyses revealed an interaction between flowering time and water treatment for fitness, where flowering later was more deleterious for fitness in the low water treatment. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that differences in winter precipitation levels are one of the selective agents underlying a flowering time cline in introduced A. thaliana populations. PMID:25909038

  15. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa.

  16. Reduction of primary freeze-drying time by electric field induced ice nucleus formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Ansgar; Rau, Guenter; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2006-08-01

    The potential of a high electric field was utilized to induce ice nucleus formation in aqueous solutions. Using this technique it was possible to reduce the primary drying time during lyophilization. Samples of 10% (w/v) hydroxyethylstarch (HES) solution were frozen at a constant rate of -1 K/min, while nucleation was initiated at temperatures of -1.5, -4.5 and -8.5°C. In contrast, spontaneous nucleation was observed in a range between -11.5 and -17.1°C. Electrically induced nucleus formation has proved to be a reliable method to start crystallization at a desired temperature. Continuous measurement of the weight allowed to determine the drying rate and to detect at which time primary drying was completed. The drying time and the drying rate were found to be strongly dependent on the nucleation temperature during freezing. A relation between the nucleation temperature, the structure of the frozen samples and the drying times could be established.

  17. Relaxation Time Distribution (RTD) of Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) data from environmental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Ustra, A.; Slater, L. D.; Zhang, C.; Mendonça, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present an alternative formulation of the Debye Decomposition (DD) of complex conductivity spectra, with a new set of parameters that are directly related to the continuous Debye relaxation model. The procedure determines the relaxation time distribution (RTD) and two frequency-independent parameters that modulate the induced polarization spectra. The distribution of relaxation times quantifies the contribution of each distinct relaxation process, which can in turn be associated with specific polarization processes and characterized in terms of electrochemical and interfacial parameters as derived from mechanistic models. Synthetic tests show that the procedure can successfully fit spectral induced polarization (SIP) data and accurately recover the RTD. The procedure was applied to different data sets, focusing on environmental applications. We focus on data of sand-clay mixtures artificially contaminated with toluene, and crude oil-contaminated sands experiencing biodegradation. The results identify characteristic relaxation times that can be associated with distinct polarization processes resulting from either the contaminant itself or transformations associated with biodegradation. The inversion results provide information regarding the relative strength and dominant relaxation time of these polarization processes.

  18. Selected Characteristics of Full-Time Professional Staff, Community Colleges, Fall 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

    Data on faculty and staff at Hawaii's community colleges focuses upon full-time appointees, with additional information on part-time appointees, lecturers, and professional staff on leave. Data are summarized by the program categories of institutional support, academic support, student services, instruction (general and vocational education), and…

  19. Selected Characteristics of Full-Time Professional Staff: Community Colleges, Fall 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

    This report provides data on the faculty and staff of the Hawaii community college system as of fall 1975. It focuses on full-time appointees, but also provides information on lecturers, part-time appointees, and professional staff on leave. Data are summarized by five program categories: instructional support, academic support, student services,…

  20. Selected Characteristics of Full-Time Professional Staff. University of Hawaii, Community Colleges, Fall 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    To gather data for reviewing personnel practices and responding to inquiries from various agencies, a study was conducted of the characteristics of the professional personnel in six of Hawaii's community colleges. The study focused on full-time Board of Regents (BOR) appointees, but also provided minimal information on lecturers, part-time BOR…

  1. Pursuing Benefit or Avoiding Detriment: Term-Time Job Selection of Sports Major Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Huan-Hung; Chen, Shan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Higher education expansion accompanied with the tuition rising has resulted in the increasing number of term-time employed students in many countries. Taiwan is no exception to this trend. Thus, there were a few studies to explore the impact of term-time employment on undergraduates. However, very few researchers focus on how undergraduates make…

  2. Heading date 1 (Hd1), an ortholog of Arabidopsis CONSTANS, is a possible target of human selection during domestication to diversify flowering times of cultivated rice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Shimamoto, Ko

    2011-01-01

    During the domestication of rice (Oryza sativa L.), diversification of flowering time was important in expanding the areas of cultivation. Rice is a facultative short day (SD) plant and requires certain periods of dark to induce flowering. Heading date 1 (Hd1), a regulator of the florigen gene Hd3a, is one of the main factors used to generate diversity in flowering. Loss-of-function alleles of Hd1 are common in cultivated rice and cause the diversity of flowering time. However, it is unclear how these functional nucleotide polymorphisms of Hd1 accumulated in the course of evolution. Nucleotide polymorphisms within Hd1 and Hd3a were analyzed in 38 accessions of ancestral wild rice Oryza rufipogon and compared with those of cultivated rice. In contrast to cultivated rice, no nucleotide changes affecting Hd1 function were found in 38 accessions of wild rice ancestors. No functional changes were found in Hd3a in either cultivated or ancestral rice. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that evolution of the Hd1 alleles may have occurred independently in cultivars descended from various accessions of ancestral rice. The non-functional Hd1 alleles found in cultivated rice may be selected during domestication, because they were not found or very rare in wild ancestral rice. In contrast with Hd3a, which has been highly conserved, Hd1 may have undergone human selection to diversify the flowering times of rice during domestication or the early stage of the cultivation period.

  3. Ex-plant retinal laser induced threshold studies in the millisecond time regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmeister, Karl; Husinsky, Johannes; Seiser, Bernhard; Edthofer, Florian; Tuschl, Helga; Lund, David J.

    2006-02-01

    Excised bovine retinas were used as model for threshold determination of laser induced thermal damage in the pulse regime of 1 ms to 655 ms for a range of laser spot size diameters. The thresholds as determined by fluorescence viability staining compare very well with the prediction of thermal damage models. Both models compare well with published and new Rhesus monkey threshold data. A distinctive dependence of the threshold on laser spot size diameter for different pulse duration was found which indicates that current (ICNIRP, ANSI and IEC) laser exposure limits for large spots can be increased in this pulse duration regime. A time dependent α max is proposed which only for the case of long exposure durations has the current value of 100 mrad, but decreases to smaller angles for short exposure durations, effectively increasing the permissible exposure level. An explanation based on intra-retinal scattering is offered for the unexpected spot size dependence for spot diameters less than about 80 µm. The time dependence and nature of damage is discussed for pulse durations shorter than 1 ms where bubble induced damage seems to lead to a threshold a factor of 10 lower than the thermally induced threshold, resulting in the need to lower the MPE values for this condition. Possible changes of the MPE values are offered and discussed.

  4. Levofloxacin‐Induced QTc Prolongation Depends on the Time of Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Kervezee, L; Gotta, V; Stevens, J; Birkhoff, W; Kamerling, IMC; Danhof, M; Meijer, JH

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors influencing a drug's potential to prolong the QTc interval on an electrocardiogram is essential for the correct evaluation of its safety profile. To explore the effect of dosing time on drug‐induced QTc prolongation, a randomized, crossover, clinical trial was conducted in which 12 healthy male subjects received levofloxacin at 02:00, 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Using a pharmacokinetic‐pharmacodynamic (PK‐PD) modeling approach to account for variations in PKs, heart rate, and daily variation in baseline QT, we find that the concentration‐QT relationship shows a 24‐hour sinusoidal rhythm. Simulations show that the extent of levofloxacin‐induced QT prolongation depends on dosing time, with the largest effect at 14:00 (1.73 (95% prediction interval: 1.56–1.90) ms per mg/L) and the smallest effect at 06:00 (−0.04 (−0.19 to 0.12) ms per mg/L). These results suggest that a 24‐hour variation in the concentration‐QT relationship could be a potentially confounding factor in the assessment of drug‐induced QTc prolongation. PMID:27479699

  5. Tumor progression in murine leukemia virus-induced T-cell lymphomas: monitoring clonal selections with viral and cellular probes.

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, H T; Selten, G C; Zijlstra, M; de Goede, R E; Melief, C J; Berns, A J

    1986-01-01

    Clonal selections occurring during the progression of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-induced T-cell lymphomas in mice were examined in primary and transplanted tumors by monitoring various molecular markers: proviral integration patterns, MuLV insertions near c-myc and pim-1, and rearrangements of the immunoglobulin heavy chain and beta-chain T-cell receptor genes. The results were as follows. Moloney MuLV frequently induced oligoclonal tumors with proviral insertions near c-myc or pim-1 in the independent clones. Moloney MuLV acted as a highly efficient insertional mutagen, able to activate different (putative) oncogenes in one cell lineage. Clonal selections during tumor progression were frequently marked by the acquisition of new proviral integrations. Independent tumor cell clones exhibited a homing preference upon transplantation in syngeneic hosts and were differently affected by the route of transplantation. Images PMID:3091854

  6. Senktide-induced gerbil foot tapping behaviour is blocked by selective tachykinin NK1 and NK3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Monika; Kristensson, Elin; Adolfsson, Rebecka; Leffler, Agnes; Ahlstedt, Ingela; Engberg, Susanna; Drmota, Tomas; Sigfridsson, Kalle; Jussila, Rainer; de Verdier, Jennie; Novén, Anna; Johansson, Anders; Påhlman, Ingrid; von Mentzer, Bengt; Lindström, Erik

    2007-12-22

    Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of tachykinin NK(1) receptor agonists induces tapping of the hind legs in gerbils, so-called gerbil foot tapping, which is thought to reflect a fear-related response. The aim of the present study was to examine how ligands selective for NK(1), NK(2) and NK(3) receptors affect the gerbil foot tap response. Agonists selective for NK receptor subtypes were administered i.c.v. and the gerbil foot tap response was monitored. The effect of systemically administered antagonists was also studied. The interaction of ligands with gerbil NK(1) receptors was evaluated using autoradiography on gerbil brain slices with [(3)H]-Sar,Met(O(2))-substance P or [(3)H]GR205171 as radioligand. The effects of ligands on NK(1) and NK(3) receptor-mediated increases in intracellular calcium in vitro were studied in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the cloned gerbil receptors. The selective NK(1) receptor agonist ASMSP and the selective NK(3) receptor agonist senktide induced dose-dependent increases in gerbil foot tapping with similar potency. The maximal effect of senktide was approximately 40% of the maximal response evoked by ASMSP. The effects of ASMSP and senktide were blocked by administration of the selective NK(1) receptor antagonist CP99,994 (10 micromol/kg s.c.). The effects of senktide, but not ASMSP, were blocked by administration of the selective NK(3) receptor antagonist SB223412 (50 micromol/kg i.p.). Senktide did not displace NK(1) receptor radioligand binding and was >1000-fold less potent than ASMSP at activating gerbil NK(1) receptors. The selective NK(3) receptor agonist senktide evokes fear-related gerbil foot tapping, an effect which probably involves indirect enhancement of NK(1) receptor signalling.

  7. Differentiating induced and natural seismicity using space-time-magnitude statistics applied to the Coso Geothermal field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenball, Martin; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable characteristic of earthquakes is their clustering in time and space, displaying their self-similarity. It remains to be tested if natural and induced earthquakes share the same behavior. We study natural and induced earthquakes comparatively in the same tectonic setting at the Coso Geothermal Field. Covering the preproduction and coproduction periods from 1981 to 2013, we analyze interevent times, spatial dimension, and frequency-size distributions for natural and induced earthquakes. Individually, these distributions are statistically indistinguishable. Determining the distribution of nearest neighbor distances in a combined space-time-magnitude metric, lets us identify clear differences between both kinds of seismicity. Compared to natural earthquakes, induced earthquakes feature a larger population of background seismicity and nearest neighbors at large magnitude rescaled times and small magnitude rescaled distances. Local stress perturbations induced by field operations appear to be strong enough to drive local faults through several seismic cycles and reactivate them after time periods on the order of a year.

  8. Fragmentation energetics for angiotensin II and its analogs from time- and energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Julia; Bailey, Thomas H.; Futrell, Jean H.

    2004-05-01

    Surface-induced dissociation (SID) of four model peptides: DRVYIHPF, RVYIHPF, RVYIHAF, and RVYIHDF was studied using a novel Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially configured for SID experiments. The energetics and dynamics of peptide fragmentation were deduced by modeling the time- and energy-resolved survival curves for each precursor ion using an RRKM based approach developed in our laboratory. Accurate dissociation parameters can be obtained from these experiments because collision-energy-resolved SID data are very sensitive to both the energetics and dynamics of dissociation. We found that transition from selective to non-selective fragmentation as ion kinetic energy is increased is associated with a substantial (ca. 0.5 eV) increase in the dissociation energy and a 3-4 orders of magnitude increase in the pre-exponential factor. Dissociation thresholds for angiotensin analogs derived from the experimental data are as follows: 1.62 eV for RVYIHAF and RVYIHPF, 1.14 eV for RVYIHDF and 1.13 eV for DRVYIHPF. Pre-exponential factors of 8.2×1011, 7.2×1012, 3.1×108, and 5.0×107 s-1 were obtained for RVYIHPF, RVYIHAF, RVYIHDF, and DRVYIHPF, respectively. Contribution from shattering to the total decomposition of the precursor ion increases for kinetically hindered fragmentation. The largest contribution is observed for a peptide ion that has the largest negative reaction entropy--DRVYIHPF.

  9. Time-of-day effects in implicit racial in-group preferences are likely selection effects, not circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    Time-of-day effects in human psychological functioning have been known of since the 1800s. However, outside of research specifically focused on the quantification of circadian rhythms, their study has largely been neglected. Moves toward online data collection now mean that psychological investigations take place around the clock, which affords researchers the ability to easily study time-of-day effects. Recent analyses have shown, for instance, that implicit attitudes have time-of-day effects. The plausibility that these effects indicate circadian rhythms rather than selection effects is considered in the current study. There was little evidence that the time-of-day effects in implicit attitudes shifted appropriately with factors known to influence the time of circadian rhythms. Moreover, even variables that cannot logically show circadian rhythms demonstrated stronger time-of-day effects than did implicit attitudes. Taken together, these results suggest that time-of-day effects in implicit attitudes are more likely to represent processes of selection rather than circadian rhythms, but do not rule out the latter possibility. PMID:27114886

  10. Time-of-day effects in implicit racial in-group preferences are likely selection effects, not circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Time-of-day effects in human psychological functioning have been known of since the 1800s. However, outside of research specifically focused on the quantification of circadian rhythms, their study has largely been neglected. Moves toward online data collection now mean that psychological investigations take place around the clock, which affords researchers the ability to easily study time-of-day effects. Recent analyses have shown, for instance, that implicit attitudes have time-of-day effects. The plausibility that these effects indicate circadian rhythms rather than selection effects is considered in the current study. There was little evidence that the time-of-day effects in implicit attitudes shifted appropriately with factors known to influence the time of circadian rhythms. Moreover, even variables that cannot logically show circadian rhythms demonstrated stronger time-of-day effects than did implicit attitudes. Taken together, these results suggest that time-of-day effects in implicit attitudes are more likely to represent processes of selection rather than circadian rhythms, but do not rule out the latter possibility. PMID:27114886

  11. Real-time observations of mechanical stimulus-induced enhancements of mechanical properties in osteoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Liu, Xiaoli; Sun, Jialun; He, Shuojie; Lee, Imshik; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2008-09-01

    Osteoblast, playing a key role in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis, is one of the mechanical stress sensitive cells. The effects of mechanical load-induced changes of mechanical properties in osteoblast cells were studied at real-time. Osteoblasts obtained from young Wistar rats were exposed to mechanical loads in different frequencies and resting intervals generated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip and simultaneously measured the changes of the mechanical properties by AFM. The enhancement of the mechanical properties was observed and quantified by the increment of the apparent Young's modulus, E*. The observed mechanical property depended on the frequency of applied tapping loads. For the resting interval is 50s, the mechanical load-induced enhancement of E*-values disappears. It seems that the enhanced mechanical property was recover able under no additional mechanical stimulus.

  12. Time-Resolved AMR measurements of current induced magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittienne, Ph.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Kelly, D.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    2001-03-01

    Time-resolved detection of the magnetization switching in static magnetic fields was achieved by pulsing current densities of about 107 A/cm2 in single isolated Nickel nanowires (80nm in diameter, 6000 nm in length, electrodeposited in porous membranes), using a Weathstone bridge of a 1GHz bandwidth. This irreversible transition is found to occur in a time of about 10 ns. The time of switching within the pulse, tsw, is measured as a function of applied field and current. The temperature rise due to Joule heating is deduced from the change in resistance. The entire set of data tsw(H,T) are fitted with a simple activation law, with the energy barrier height as the unique fitting parameter. The results show a strong departure from pure thermal activation indicating a current-induced magnetization reversal.

  13. Real-time studies of evaporation-induced colloidal self-assembly by optical microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Zhang, Yiduo; Luo, Jianheng; Luo, Yanhong; Gao, Kuiyi; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo

    2011-09-01

    Real-time monitoring of the whole growth process of evaporation-induced colloidal self-assembly has been conducted using an optical microspectroscopy setup. Our observations suggest that the assembly process can be divided into three different growth stages as evidenced by the variations detected in the reflectance spectra. The thickness variation of the growing colloidal crystal was monitored by examining the Fabry-Perot fringes in the reflectance spectra. Furthermore, the scalar wave approximation was utilized to analyze the evolution of optical properties with growth. More detailed information, including the time dependence of number of layers and volume fraction of water, has been revealed by comparing the experimental and calculated reflectance spectra. The present work demonstrates that in situ real-time microspectroscopy is a promising technique for monitoring and investigating the dynamic process of colloidal self-assembly.

  14. Desorption induced by electronic transitions studied with a time-dependent quantum mechanical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johan Setterlind, Carl

    1992-05-01

    We have used the split time operator FFT method to describe a DIET (desorption induced by electronic transitions) process of the Menzel-Gomer-Redhead type. H+ desorbing from a tungsten surface is described, in a one-dimensional picture, with the time dependent Schrödinger equation and a complex potential. The imaginary potential part corresponds to decay processes. We have also compared results of the split time operator method with results of an analytical semiclassical method described by Schuck et al. [Z. Phys. B 46 (1982) 137]. These results seem to indicate that the split operator method, at least in the case concerning decay rates, is a better tool for studying DIET models than a semiclassical method.

  15. Intense two-cycle laser pulses induce time-dependent bond hardening in a polyatomic molecule.

    PubMed

    Dota, K; Garg, M; Tiwari, A K; Dharmadhikari, J A; Dharmadhikari, A K; Mathur, D

    2012-02-17

    A time-dependent bond-hardening process is discovered in a polyatomic molecule (tetramethyl silane, TMS) using few-cycle pulses of intense 800 nm light. In conventional mass spectrometry, symmetrical molecules such as TMS do not exhibit a prominent molecular ion (TMS(+)) as unimolecular dissociation into [Si(CH(3))(3)](+) proceeds very fast. Under a strong field and few-cycle conditions, this dissociation channel is defeated by time-dependent bond hardening: a field-induced potential well is created in the TMS(+) potential energy curve that effectively traps a wave packet. The time dependence of this bond-hardening process is verified using longer-duration (≥100 fs) pulses; the relatively slower falloff of optical field in such pulses allows the initially trapped wave packet to leak out, thereby rendering TMS(+) unstable once again.

  16. Magnetic state selection in atomic frequency and time standards. [hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic standards such as those based upon cesium and hydrogen rely upon magnetic state selection to obtain population inversion in the hyperfine transition levels. Use of new design approaches and improved magnetic materials has made it possible to fabricate improved state selectors of small size, and thus the efficiency of utilization of beam flux is greatly improved and the size and weight of the standard is reduced. The sensitivity to magnetic perturbations is also decreased, so that the accuracy and stability of the standard is improved. Several new state selector designs are illustrated and the application to standards utilizing different atomic species is analyzed.

  17. Exploring the phase space of time of flight mass selected Pt(x)Y nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Masini, Federico; Hernández-Fernández, Patricia; Deiana, Davide; Strebel, Christian Ejersbo; McCarthy, David Norman; Bodin, Anders; Malacrida, Paolo; Stephens, Ifan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2014-12-28

    Mass-selected nanoparticles can be conveniently produced using magnetron sputtering and aggregation techniques. However, numerous pitfalls can compromise the quality of the samples, e.g. double or triple mass production, dendritic structure formation or unpredicted particle composition. We stress the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) for verifying the morphology, size distribution and chemical composition of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, we correlate the morphology and the composition of the PtxY nanoparticles with their catalytic properties for the oxygen reduction reaction. Finally, we propose a completely general diagnostic method, which allows us to minimize the occurrence of undesired masses.

  18. Limitations Placed on the Time Coverage, Isoplanatic Patch Size and Exposure Time for Solar Observations Using Image Selection Procedures in the Presence of Telescope Aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J. M.; Rimmele, T. R.

    1996-12-01

    Image selection, adaptive optics and post-facto image restoration methods are all techniques being used for diffraction limited imaging with ground-based solar and stellar telescopes. Often these techniques are used in a hybrid form like e.g. the application of adaptive optics and/or post-facto image restoration in combination with already good images obtained by image selection in periods of good seeing. Fried (JOSA 56, 1372, 1966), Hecquet and Coupinot (J. Optics/Paris 16, 21, 1985) and Beckers ("Solar and Stellar Granulation", Kluwer, Rutten & Severino Eds, 55, 1988) already discussed the usefulness of image selection, or the "Lucky Observer" mode, for high resolution imaging. All assumed perfect telescope optics. In case of moderate telescope aberrations image selection can still lead to diffraction limited imaging but only when the atmospheric wavefront aberration happens to compensate that of the telescope. In this "Very Lucky Observer" mode the probability of obtaining a good image is reduced over the un-aberrated case, as are the size of the isoplanatic patch and the exposure time. We describe an analysis of these effects for varying telescope aberrations. These result in a strong case for the removal of telescope aberrations either by initial implementation or by the use of slow active optics.

  19. A chromatochemometric approach for evaluating and selecting the perfume maceration time.

    PubMed

    López-Nogueroles, Marina; Chisvert, Alberto; Salvador, Amparo

    2010-04-30

    A chemometric treatment of the data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detector (FID) has been proposed to study the maceration time involved in perfumes manufacture with the final purpose of reducing this time but preserving the organoleptic characteristics of the perfume that is being elaborated. In this sense, GC-FID chromatograms were used as a fingerprint of perfume samples subjected to different maceration times, and data were treated by linear discriminant analysis (LDA), by comparing to a set of samples known to be macerated or not, which were used as calibration objects. The GC-FID methodology combined with the treatment of data by LDA has been applied successfully to seven different perfumes. The constructed LDA models exhibited excellent Wilks' lambdas (0.013-0.118, depending on the perfume), and up to a reduction of 57% has been achieved with respect to the maceration time initially established.

  20. Selective influence of circadian modulation and task characteristics on motor imagery time.

    PubMed

    Debarnot, Ursula; Sahraoui, Djafar; Champely, Stéphane; Collet, Christian; Guillot, Aymeric

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of circadian modulation on motor imagery (MI) time while also considering the effects of task complexity and duration. The ability to imagine in real time was influenced by circadian modulation in a simple walking condition, with longer MI times in the morning and evening sessions. By contrast, there was no effect of circadian rhythm in the complex, short or long walking conditions. We concluded that motor imagery time is modulated during the course of the day, but the effect of task difficulty is stronger than circadian modulation in altering the temporal congruence between physical practice and MI performance. Practical applications in motor learning and rehabilitation are discussed.

  1. Effects of Type and Strength of Force Feedback on Movement Time in a Target Selection Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorie, Robert Conrad; Vu, Kim-Phuong L.; Marayong, Panadda; Robles, Jose; Strybel, Thomas Z.; Battiste, Vernol

    2013-01-01

    Future cockpits will likely include new onboard technologies, such as cockpit displays of traffic information, to help support future flight deck roles and responsibilities. These new technologies may benefit from multimodal feedback to aid pilot information processing. The current study investigated the effects of multiple levels of force feedback on operator performance in an aviation task. Participants were presented with two different types of force feedback (gravitational and spring force feedback) for a discrete targeting task, with multiple levels of gain examined for each force feedback type. Approach time and time in target were recorded. Results suggested that the two highest levels of gravitational force significantly reduced approach times relative to the lowest level of gravitational force. Spring force level only affected time in target. Implications of these findings for the design of future cockpit displays will be discussed.

  2. Quantum Stephani exact cosmological solutions and the selection of time variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedram, P.; Jalalzadeh, S.; Gousheh, S. S.

    2007-11-01

    We study a perfect fluid Stephani quantum cosmological model. In the present work, the Schutz's variational formalism which recovers the notion of time is applied. This gives rise to a Wheeler DeWitt equation for the scale factor. We use the eigenfunctions in order to construct wave packets for each case. We study the time-dependent behavior of the expectation value of the scale factor, using many-worlds and de Broglie Bohm interpretations of quantum mechanics.

  3. Antagonistic selection factors induce a continuous population divergence in a polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Nagata, N; Kawata, M

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the relative importance of selection and stochastic factors in population divergence of adaptive traits is a classical topic in evolutionary biology. However, it is difficult to separate these factors and detect the effects of selection when two or more contrasting selective factors are simultaneously acting on a single locus. In the damselfly Ischnura senegalensis, females exhibit color dimorphism and morph frequencies change geographically. We here evaluated the role of selection and stochastic factors in population divergence of morph frequencies by comparing the divergences in color locus and neutral loci. Comparisons between population pairwise FST for neutral loci and for the color locus did not detect any stochastic factors affecting color locus. Although comparison between population divergence in color and neutral loci using all populations detected only divergent selection, we detected two antagonistic selective factors acting on the color locus, that is, balancing and divergent selection, when considering geographical distance between populations. Our results suggest that a combination of two antagonistic selective factors, rather than stochastic factors, establishes the geographic cline in morph frequency in this system. PMID:24281546

  4. Velocity Selective Neural Signal Recording Using a Space-Time Electrode Array.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Fatemeh; Seydnejad, Saeid R

    2015-09-01

    Extracting the activity of a particular neural fiber from the extracellular recording of a peripheral nerve is quite important from different clinical perspectives. While traditional neural recording methods are unable to provide such granularity, new signal recording and processing techniques have offered promising solutions recently. A multi-electrode cuff in conjunction with a delay and sum beamforming structure has been used to detect the activity of different fibers in a nerve based on the propagation velocity of action potentials. However, as it is shown in this paper, simple delay and sum beamforming method encounters severe selectivity problem and signal distortion especially at higher velocities. In addition to scrutinizing the performance of the delay and sum beamformer and its inherent problems, here we propose a new beamforming method, based on broadband sensor array signal processing techniques, which exhibits much better selectivity with uniform frequency-velocity response. Our simulation results show how the new method can faithfully extract individual neural fiber activities and explore potential applications which could emerge from using such technique.

  5. Phenology and Phenotypic Natural Selection on the Flowering Time of a Deceit-pollinated Tropical Orchid, Myrmecophila christinae

    PubMed Central

    PARRA-TABLA, VÍCTOR; VARGAS, CARLOS F.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and aims. Flowering phenology is described and the effect of flowering time on pollination success is evaluated in the deceit-pollinated tropical orchid, Myrmecophila christinae. It was expected that, due to this species' deceit pollination strategy and low observed pollinator visit rate, there would be a higher probability of natural selection events favouring individuals flowering away from the population flowering peak. • Methods. The study covers two consecutive years and four populations of M. christinae located along the north coast of the Yucatán Peninsula. For phenological and pollination success data, a total of 110 individuals were monitored weekly in 1998, and 83 individuals in 1999, during all the flowering and fruiting season. • Key results. The results showed significant differences in the probability of donating and receiving pollen throughout the flowering season. The probability of receiving or donating pollen increased the further an individual flowering was from the flowering peak. Regression analysis showed directional and disruptive phenotypic natural selection gradients, suggesting the presence of selection events unfavourable to flowering during flowering peak, for both male success (pollen removal) and female success (fruit production). However, the intensity and significance of the natural selection events varied between populations from year to year. The variation between seasons and populations was apparently due to variations in the density of reproductive individuals in each population and each season. • Conclusions. As in other deceit-pollinated orchids, natural selection in M. christinae favours individuals flowering early or late in relation to population peak flowering. However, results also suggested a fluctuating regime of selective events act on flowering time of M. christinae. PMID:15205176

  6. Modeling Time Dependent Earthquake Magnitude Distributions Associated with Injection-Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, J.; Segall, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and predicting earthquake magnitudes from injection-induced seismicity is critically important for estimating hazard due to injection operations. A particular problem has been that the largest event often occurs post shut-in. A rigorous analysis would require modeling all stages of earthquake nucleation, propagation, and arrest, and not just initiation. We present a simple conceptual model for predicting the distribution of earthquake magnitudes during and following injection, building on the analysis of Segall & Lu (2015). The analysis requires several assumptions: (1) the distribution of source dimensions follows a Gutenberg-Richter distribution; (2) in environments where the background ratio of shear to effective normal stress is low, the size of induced events is limited by the volume perturbed by injection (e.g., Shapiro et al., 2013; McGarr, 2014), and (3) the perturbed volume can be approximated by diffusion in a homogeneous medium. Evidence for the second assumption comes from numerical studies that indicate the background ratio of shear to normal stress controls how far an earthquake rupture, once initiated, can grow (Dunham et al., 2011; Schmitt et al., submitted). We derive analytical expressions that give the rate of events of a given magnitude as the product of three terms: the time-dependent rate of nucleations, the probability of nucleating on a source of given size (from the Gutenberg-Richter distribution), and a time-dependent geometrical factor. We verify our results using simulations and demonstrate characteristics observed in real induced sequences, such as time-dependent b-values and the occurrence of the largest event post injection. We compare results to Segall & Lu (2015) as well as example datasets. Future work includes using 2D numerical simulations to test our results and assumptions; in particular, investigating how background shear stress and fault roughness control rupture extent.

  7. Respiratory-Induced Prostate Motion Using Wavelet Decomposition of the Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuting; Liu, Tian; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuenan; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to characterize and quantify the impact of respiratory-induced prostate motion. Methods and Materials: Real-time intrafraction motion is observed with the Calypso 4-dimensional nonradioactive electromagnetic tracking system (Calypso Medical Technologies, Inc. Seattle, Washington). We report the results from a total of 1024 fractions from 31 prostate cancer patients. Wavelet transform was used to decompose the signal to extract and isolate the respiratory-induced prostate motion from the total prostate displacement. Results: Our results show that the average respiratory motion larger than 0.5 mm can be observed in 68% of the fractions. Fewer than 1% of the patients showed average respiratory motion of less than 0.2 mm, whereas 99% of the patients showed average respiratory-induced motion ranging between 0.2 and 2 mm. The maximum respiratory range of motion of 3 mm or greater was seen in only 25% of the fractions. In addition, about 2% patients showed anxiety, indicated by a breathing frequency above 24 times per minute. Conclusions: Prostate motion is influenced by respiration in most fractions. Real-time intrafraction data are sensitive enough to measure the impact of respiration by use of wavelet decomposition methods. Although the average respiratory amplitude observed in this study is small, this technique provides a tool that can be useful if one moves to smaller treatment margins (≤5 mm). This also opens ups the possibility of being able to develop patient specific margins, knowing that prostate motion is not unpredictable.

  8. Nuclear receptor-induced transcription is driven by spatially and timely restricted waves of ROS

    PubMed Central

    Perillo, Bruno; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Ombra, Maria Neve; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is governed by chromatin mainly through posttranslational modifications at the N-terminal tails of nucleosomal histone proteins. According to the histone code theory, peculiar sets of such modifications (marks) give rise to reproducible final effects on transcription and, very recently, a further level of complexity has been highlighted in binary switches between specific marks at adjacent residues. In particular, disappearance of dimethyl-lysine 9 in histone H3 is faced by phosphorylation of the following serine during activation of gene expression. Demethylation of lysine 9 by the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is a pre-requisite for addition of the phosphoryl mark to serine 10 and an essential step in the transcriptional control by estrogens. It generates a local burst of oxygen reactive species (ROS) that induce oxidation of nearby nucleotides and recruitment of repair enzymes with a consequent formation of single or double stranded nicks on DNA that modify chromatin flexibility in order to allow correct assembly of the transcriptional machinery.   We describe here the molecular mechanism by which members of the family of nuclear receptors prevent the potential damage to DNA during transcription of target genes elicited by the use of ROS to shape chromatin. The mechanism is based on the presence of phosphorylated serine 10 in histone H3 to prevent unbalanced DNA oxidation waves. We also discuss the opportunities raised by the use of voluntary derangement of this servo system to induce selective death in hormone-responsive transformed cells. PMID:25482200

  9. Role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth basketball.

    PubMed

    te Wierike, Sanne Cornelia Maria; Elferink-Gemser, Marije Titia; Tromp, Eveline Jenny Yvonne; Vaeyens, Roel; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth male basketball. Forty-three talented Dutch players (14.66 ± 1.09 years) participated in this study. Maturity timing (age at peak height velocity), anthropometric, physiological, and technical characteristics were measured. Maturity timing and height of the basketball players were compared with a matched Dutch population. One-sample t-tests showed that basketball players were taller and experienced their peak height velocity at an earlier age compared to their peers, which indicates the relation between maturity timing and selection procedures. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that guards experienced their peak height velocity at a later age compared to forwards and centres (P < .01). In addition, positional differences were found for height, sitting height, leg length, body mass, lean body mass, sprint, lower body explosive strength, and dribble (P < .05). Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) (age and age at peak height velocity as covariate) showed only a significant difference regarding the technical characteristic dribbling (P < .05). Coaches and trainers should be aware of the inter-individual differences between boys related to their maturity timing. Since technical characteristics appeared to be least influenced by maturity timing, it is recommended to focus more on technical characteristics rather than anthropometric and physiological characteristics.

  10. Time of travel and dispersion in a selected reach of Roberts Creek, Clayton County, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Kalkhoff, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    Time of travel was determined by dye tracing, using rhodamine WT as the tracer. One dyeinjection site and three sampling sites were used to measure time of travel. Two dye-tracing tests were conducted at discharges having flow-duration values of 48 and 80 percent. The discharges at the time of the two dye-tracing tests approximated medium- and low-flow conditions. The average stream velocity in the study area was 0.23 foot per second during medium-flow conditions, March 20 to 22,1990, and 0.07 foot per second during low-flow conditions, April 30 to May 12, 1990. The injected dye dispersed in a plume that lasted about 18 hours during medium flow and about 64 hours during low flow at the downstream site.

  11. On the selection and evaluation of visual display symbology Factors influencing search and identification times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger; Williams, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    Three single-target visual search tasks were used to evaluate a set of cathode-ray tube (CRT) symbols for a helicopter situation display. The search tasks were representative of the information extraction required in practice, and reaction time was used to measure the efficiency with which symbols could be located and identified. Familiar numeric symbols were responded to more quickly than graphic symbols. The addition of modifier symbols, such as a nearby flashing dot or surrounding square, had a greater disruptive effect on the graphic symbols than did the numeric characters. The results suggest that a symbol set is, in some respects, like a list that must be learned. Factors that affect the time to identify items in a memory task, such as familiarity and visual discriminability, also affect the time to identify symbols. This analogy has broad implications for the design of symbol sets. An attempt was made to model information access with this class of display.

  12. Time-resolved lattice measurements of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milathianaki, Despina

    The response of materials under extreme temperature and pressure conditions is a topic of great significance because of its relevance in astrophysics, geophysics, and inertial confinement fusion. In recent years, environments exceeding several hundred gigapascals in pressure have been produced in the laboratory via laser-based dynamic loading techniques. Shock-loading is of particular interest as the shock provides a fiducial for measuring time-dependent processes in the lattice such as phase transitions. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction is the only technique that offers an insight into these shock-induced processes at the relevant spatial (atomic) and temporal scales. In this study, nanosecond resolution x-ray diffraction techniques were developed and implemented towards the study of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials. More specifically, the capability of a focusing x-ray diffraction geometry in high-resolution in situ lattice measurements was demonstrated by probing shock-compressed Cu and amorphous metallic glass samples. In addition, simultaneous lattice and free surface velocity measurements of shock-compressed Mg in the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) and shock-induced body centered cubic (bcc) phases between 12 and 45 GPa were performed. These measurements revealed x-ray diffraction signals consistent with a compressed bcc lattice above a shock pressure of 26.2+/-1.3 GPa, thus capturing for the first time direct lattice evidence of a shock-induced hcp to bcc phase transition in Mg. Our measurement of the hcp-bcc phase boundary in Mg was found to be consistent with the calculated boundary from generalized pseudopotential theory in the pressure and temperature region intersected by the principal shock Hugoniot. Furthermore, the subnanosecond timescale of the phase transition implied by the shock-loading conditions was in agreement with the kinetics of a martensitic transformation. In conclusion, we report on the progress and

  13. Genotypic and sex differences in anxiety-like behavior and alcohol-induced anxiolysis in High Drinking in the Dark selected mice.

    PubMed

    Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M; Crabbe, John C

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol use disorders and anxiety disorders are highly comorbid in humans. In rodent lines selected for alcohol drinking, differences in anxiety-like behavior are also seen. The High Drinking in the Dark (HDID) lines of mice are selectively bred for drinking to intoxication during limited access to alcohol, and these mice represent a genetic model of risk for binge-like drinking. The present studies investigated whether these selected lines differ from control (HS) mice in basal anxiety behavior or in anxiolytic response to alcohol. We also assessed the genetic correlation between alcohol drinking in the dark (DID) and basal anxiety-like behavior using existing inbred strain data. Mice of both sexes and HDID replicates (HDID-1 and HDID-2) were tested on an elevated zero maze immediately following a DID test. In general, HDID mice showed more time spent in the open arms after drinking alcohol than HS mice, and open-arm time was significantly correlated with blood alcohol concentration. HDID-1 male mice also showed less anxiety-like behavior at baseline (water-drinking controls). In a separate experiment, HDID-1 and HS mice were tested for anxiolytic dose-response to acute alcohol injections. Both genotypes showed increasing time spent in the open arms with increasing alcohol doses, and HDID-1 and female mice had greater open-arm time across all doses. HDID-1 control males showed lower anxiety-like behavior than the HS control males. Inbred strain data analysis also showed no significant genetic relationship between alcohol DID and anxiety. These findings suggest that HDID selection has not produced systematic changes in anxiety-like behavior or sensitivity to alcohol-induced anxiolysis, though there is a tendency in the male mice of the first replicate toward reduced basal anxiety-like behavior. Therefore, anxiety state and sensitivity to alcohol's anxiolytic effects do not appear to contribute significantly to the high drinking behavior of the HDID mice.

  14. Real-time background-free selective imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Ryuji; Yoshinari, Yohsuke; Yokota, Hiroaki; Sugi, Takuma; Sugihara, Fuminori; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Shigenori; Mori, Ikue; Tochio, Hidehito; Harada, Yoshie; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2012-11-14

    Recent developments of imaging techniques have enabled fluorescence microscopy to investigate the localization and dynamics of intracellular substances of interest even at the single-molecule level. However, such sensitive detection is often hampered by autofluorescence arising from endogenous molecules. Those unwanted signals are generally reduced by utilizing differences in either wavelength or fluorescence lifetime; nevertheless, extraction of the signal of interest is often insufficient, particularly for in vivo imaging. Here, we describe a potential method for the selective imaging of nitrogen-vacancy centers (NVCs) in nanodiamonds. This method is based on the property of NVCs that the fluorescence intensity sensitively depends on the ground state spin configuration which can be regulated by electron spin magnetic resonance. Because the NVC fluorescence exhibits neither photobleaching nor photoblinking, this protocol allowed us to conduct long-term tracking of a single nanodiamond in both Caenorhabditis elegans and mice, with excellent imaging contrast even in the presence of strong background autofluorescence.

  15. How choosy should I be? The relative searching time predicts evolution of choosiness under direct sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Loïc; Rousset, François; Godelle, Bernard; Courtiol, Alexandre

    2014-06-22

    Most theoretical research in sexual selection has focused on indirect selection. However, empirical studies have not strongly supported indirect selection. A well-established finding is that direct benefits and costs exert a strong influence on the evolution of mate choice. We present an analytical model in which unilateral mate choice evolves solely by direct sexual selection on choosiness. We show this is sufficient to generate the evolution of all possible levels of choosiness, because of the fundamental trade-off between mating rate and mating benefits. We further identify the relative searching time (RST, i.e. the proportion of lifetime devoted to searching for mates) as a predictor of the effect of any variable affecting the mating rate on the evolution of choosiness. We show that the RST: (i) allows one to make predictions about the evolution of choosiness across a wide variety of mating systems; (ii) encompasses all alternative variables proposed thus far to explain the evolution of choosiness by direct sexual selection; and (iii) can be empirically used to infer qualitative differences in choosiness.

  16. Numerical analysis of curved frequency selective surface by finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin-yi; Wang, Jian-bo; Chen, Gui-bo; Sun, Guan-cheng; Lu, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Frequency selective surface is a monolayer or multilayer 2D periodic structure which is composed of multiple resonance units scattering by a two-dimensional periodic array on dielectric layer. FSS can't absorb radio frequency energy, but can filter the frequency which is therefore applied in microwave technique or stealth technology. The relative research on curved FSS is relatively scarce since the curved FSS structure can be obtained only when FSS is attached on the materials surfaces of curved structures in engineering application. However, curved FSS is widely applied in practical engineering; therefore, the research on curved FSS structure has important significance. In this paper, a curved FSS structure model of Y-pore unit is established and numerical simulated by means of FDTD. The influence of curvature on FSS transmission characteristics is studied according to the analysis on the changing of radar cross section (RCS). The results show: the center frequency point of the plane band pass FSS structure drifts after the curve surface deformation of the structure; the center frequency point of the curved band pass FSS structure drifts with the changing of the curvature radius, i. e. with the decreasing of curvature radius, the frequency point drifts towards high points and the transmittance decreases. The design of FSS radome demands of accurate and stable center resonance frequency; therefore, the actual situation of curved surface should be considered in practical engineering application when band pass FSS is made into frequency selection filtering radome. The curvature radius should be long enough to avoid center frequency drifting and transmittance deceasing.

  17. Revisiting the time domain induced polarization technique, from linearization to inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Oldenburg, D.

    2015-12-01

    The induced polarization (IP) technique has been successful in mineral exploration, particularly for finding disseminated sulphide or porphyry deposits, but also in helping solve geotechnical and environmental problems. Electrical induced polarization (EIP) surveys use grounded electrodes and take measurements of the electric field while the current is both "on" and "off". Currently, 2D and 3D inversions of EIP data are generally carried out by first finding a background conductivity from the asymptotic "on-time" measurements. The DC resistivity problem is then linearized about that conductivity to obtain a linear relationship between the off-time data and the "pseudo-chargeability". The distribution of pseudo-chargeability in the earth is then interpreted within the context of the initial geoscience problem pursued. Despite its success, the current EIP implementation does have challenges. A fundamental assumption, that there is no electromagnetic induction (EM) effect, breaks down when the background is conductive. This is especially problematic in regions having conductive overburden. EM induction complicates, and sometimes overwhelms, the IP signal. To ameliorate this effect, we estimate the inductive signal, subtract it from the "off-time" data and invert the resultant IP data using the linearized formulation. We carefully examine the conditions under which this works. We also investigate the potential alterations to the linearized sensitivity function that are needed to allow a linearized inversion to be carried out. Inversions of EIP data recover a "chargeability" but this is not a uniquely defined quantity. There are multiple definitions of this property because there are a diverse number of ways in which an IP datum is defined. In time domain IP surveys, the data might be mV/V or a time-integrated voltage with units of ms. In reality however, data from an EIP survey have many time channels and each one can be inverted separately to produce a chargeability

  18. Calculation of surface diffusivity and residence time by molecular dynamics with application to nanoscale selective-area growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, S.; Ochoa, E.; Chavez, J. J.; Zhou, X. W.; Zubia, D.

    2015-08-01

    The surface diffusivity and residence time were calculated by molecular dynamics simulations in order to solve the surface diffusion equations for selective-area growth. The calculations for CdTe/CdS material system were performed in substrates with Cd termination and S termination. The surface diffusivity and residence time were obtained at different temperatures (600 K, 800 K, 1000 K, 1200 K, and 1400 K). The thermal activation energies were extracted from Arrhenius equation for each substrate termination. Thereafter, values obtained by molecular dynamics were used in a surface diffusion model to calculate the surface concentration profile of adatoms. Alternating the surface termination has the potential to achieve nanoscale selective-area growth without the need of a dielectric film as a mask.

  19. Time Management Abilities of School Principals According to Gender: A Case Study in Selected Gauteng Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botha, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    According to the literature on school effectiveness and school improvement and the role of the school principal in this regard, the lack of time management skills and abilities among school principals can be regarded as one of the main factors that lead to principal inefficiency and ineffectiveness in the school context. But, how do male and…

  20. Cultural Orientations of First-Time High School Principals during Selection and Entry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jo

    The power of effective schools lies not in their specific characteristics, but in their individual culture formation; a shared understanding of what ought to be symbolized by the behavior of all people involved in the school is part of that culture. The school cultural orientations of seven male and five female first-time principals (10 white and…

  1. Time-Resolved Fluorescence in Lipid Bilayers: Selected Applications and Advantages over Steady State

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Mariana; Šachl, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Coutinho, Ana; Prieto, Manuel; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence methods are versatile tools for obtaining dynamic and topological information about biomembranes because the molecular interactions taking place in lipid membranes frequently occur on the same timescale as fluorescence emission. The fluorescence intensity decay, in particular, is a powerful reporter of the molecular environment of a fluorophore. The fluorescence lifetime can be sensitive to the local polarity, hydration, viscosity, and/or presence of fluorescence quenchers/energy acceptors within several nanometers of the vicinity of a fluorophore. Illustrative examples of how time-resolved fluorescence measurements can provide more valuable and detailed information about a system than the time-integrated (steady-state) approach will be presented in this review: 1), determination of membrane polarity and mobility using time-dependent spectral shifts; 2), identification of submicroscopic domains by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy; 3), elucidation of membrane leakage mechanisms from dye self-quenching assays; and 4), evaluation of nanodomain sizes by time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25517142

  2. Time course of "escape" from calcitonin-induced inhibition of motility and resorption of disaggregated osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kanehisa, J

    1989-01-01

    The reversible calcitonin (CT)-induced inhibition of osteoclastic activity has been studied to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the so-called "escape phenomenon." Osteoclasts disaggregated from neonatal rabbits were cultured on glass coverslips or thin bovine bone slices. Resorption activity was evaluated by using time-lapse recording and scanning electron microscopy. Addition of CT to the cultures caused most osteoclasts on glass surfaces to be immotile and contracted. From 1.5 h onward, in cultures with CT, osteoclasts started to escape from CT-induced quiescence independently of other cells. CT also prevented osteoclasts on bone slices from excavating bone while concomitant cell immobility occurred. Inhibited osteoclasts were able to regain apparent bone-resorbing potency only after resumption of cytoplasmic immobility. The resumption of bone resorption could begin as early as 9.7 h after CT addition. The observations indicate that CT-induced inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption is associated with inhibition of cytoplasmic motility and that the "escape" phenomenon reflects resumption of activity of osteoclasts that were previously inhibited by CT action rather than the resportive activity of newly formed osteoclasts. PMID:2765310

  3. Selected time-lapse movies of the east rift zone eruption of KĪlauea Volcano, 2004–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has used mass-market digital time-lapse cameras and network-enabled Webcams for visual monitoring and research. The 26 time-lapse movies in this report were selected from the vast collection of images acquired by these camera systems during 2004–2008. Chosen for their content and broad aesthetic appeal, these image sequences document a variety of flow-field and vent processes from Kīlauea's east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983 and is still (as of 2011) ongoing.

  4. Time-Resolved Study of Nanoparticle Induced Apoptosis Using Microfabricated Single Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Röttgermann, Peter J. F.; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate decisions like apoptosis are heterogeneously implemented within a cell population and, consequently, the population response is recognized as sum of many individual dynamic events. Here, we report on the use of micro-patterned single-cell arrays for real-time tracking of nanoparticle-induced (NP) cell death in sets of thousands of cells in parallel. Annexin (pSIVA) and propidium iodide (PI), two fluorescent indicators of apoptosis, are simultaneously monitored after exposure to functionalized polystyrene (PS−NH2) nanobeads as a model system. We find that the distribution of Annexin onset times shifts to later times and broadens as a function of decreasing NP dose. We discuss the mean time-to-death as a function of dose, and show how the EC50 value depends both on dose and time of measurement. In addition, the correlations between the early and late apoptotic markers indicate a systematic shift from apoptotic towards necrotic cell death during the course of the experiment. Thus, our work demonstrates the potential of array-based single cell cytometry for kinetic analysis of signaling cascades in a high-throughput format. PMID:27600074

  5. Influence of injection timing on severity of cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Katsumi; Yanagiba, Yukie; Ashimori, Atsushige; Takeuchi, Asuka; Takada, Naoko; Togawa, Masako; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Masayuki; Miura, Nobuhiko

    2013-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the endocrine disrupter and is a well-known testicular toxicant. Recently, we reported that Cd-induced mortality was markedly different by injection timing. In this report, we investigated whether severity of testicular toxicity was affected by injection timing of Cd. C57BL/6J mice (male, 7 w) were received single intraperitoneal injection of CdCl(2) (4.5 mg/kg) at zeitgeber time 6 (ZT6) or ZT18; these injection timings showed highest (ZT6) or lowest (ZT18) mortality in our previous study (Miura, 2012). After one week of the injection, several parameters for testicular toxicity such as epididymal sperm motility and numbers of sperm head both in cauda epididymidis and testis were measured. At ZT6 injection group, all parameters examined were significantly reduced compared to the control group. However, very interestingly, no significant changes were observed at ZT18 injection group. We obtained similar results by another experiment in which mice were received single subcutaneous injection of CdCl(2) (4 or 6 mg/kg) followed by measuring the parameters ten days after the injection. This diurnal variation was not contradictory to the result of the lethal toxicity which we showed earlier. Therefore, our results indicate that the testicular toxicity of Cd is also influenced by the injection timing. PMID:23358149

  6. Time-Resolved Study of Nanoparticle Induced Apoptosis Using Microfabricated Single Cell Arrays.

    PubMed

    Röttgermann, Peter J F; Dawson, Kenneth A; Rädler, Joachim O

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate decisions like apoptosis are heterogeneously implemented within a cell population and, consequently, the population response is recognized as sum of many individual dynamic events. Here, we report on the use of micro-patterned single-cell arrays for real-time tracking of nanoparticle-induced (NP) cell death in sets of thousands of cells in parallel. Annexin (pSIVA) and propidium iodide (PI), two fluorescent indicators of apoptosis, are simultaneously monitored after exposure to functionalized polystyrene (PS - NH 2) nanobeads as a model system. We find that the distribution of Annexin onset times shifts to later times and broadens as a function of decreasing NP dose. We discuss the mean time-to-death as a function of dose, and show how the EC 50 value depends both on dose and time of measurement. In addition, the correlations between the early and late apoptotic markers indicate a systematic shift from apoptotic towards necrotic cell death during the course of the experiment. Thus, our work demonstrates the potential of array-based single cell cytometry for kinetic analysis of signaling cascades in a high-throughput format. PMID:27600074

  7. Time causal operational estimation of electric fields induced in the Earth's lithosphere during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Swidinsky, Andrei

    2014-04-01

    In support of projects for monitoring geomagnetic hazards for electric power grids, we develop a simple mathematical formalism, consistent with the time causality of deterministic physics, for estimating electric fields that are induced in the Earth's lithosphere during magnetic storms. For an idealized model of the lithosphere, an infinite half-space having uniform electrical conductivity properties described by a galvanic tensor, we work in the Laplace-transformed frequency domain to obtain a transfer function which, when convolved with measured magnetic field time series, gives an estimated electric field time series. Using data collected at the Kakioka, Japan observatory, we optimize lithospheric conduc