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Sample records for induces strong anti-sense

  1. Upregulation of long non-coding RNA HIF 1α-anti-sense 1 induced by transforming growth factor-β-mediated targeting of sirtuin 1 promotes osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    XU, YAO; WANG, SHILONG; TANG, CHAOLIANG; CHEN, WENJUN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanism of long non-coding RNA hypoxia-inducible factor 1α-anti-sense 1 (lncRNA HIF1α-AS1) in osteoblast differentiation as well as its targeting by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), which may be inhibited by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), western blot analysis, lncRNA PCR arrays and chromatin immunoprecipitation were performed in order to examine the interference of SIRT1 expression by TGF-β, the effects of SIRT1 overexpression on lncRNA HIF1α-AS1 and the regulation of the expression of homeobox (HOX)D10, which promotes BMSC differentiation, by lncRNA HIF1α-AS1. The results showed that TGF-β interfered with SIRT1 expression. Furthermore, lncRNA HIF1α-AS1 was significantly downregulated following overexpression of SIRT1. In addition, low expression of HIF1α-AS1 was sufficient to block the expression of HOXD10. The present study further demonstrated that downregulation of HOXD10 by HIF1α-AS1 interfered with acetylation, and subsequently resulted in the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggested that HIF1α-AS1 is an essential mediator of osteoblast differentiation, and may thus represent a gene-therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bone diseases. PMID:26460121

  2. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins strongly induce negative curvature.

    PubMed

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W; Rananavare, Shankar B; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-07-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C greatly accelerate the adsorption of vesicles containing the surfactant lipids to form a film that lowers the surface tension of the air/water interface in the lungs. Pulmonary surfactant enters the interface by a process analogous to the fusion of two vesicles. As with fusion, several factors affect adsorption according to how they alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, suggesting that adsorption proceeds via a rate-limiting structure with negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the phospholipid leaflets is concave. In the studies reported here, we tested whether the surfactant proteins might promote adsorption by inducing lipids to adopt a more negative curvature, closer to the configuration of the hypothetical intermediate. Our experiments used x-ray diffraction to determine how the proteins in their physiological ratio affect the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the negatively curved, inverse hexagonal phase. With binary mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), the proteins produced a dose-related effect on curvature that depended on the phospholipid composition. With DOPE alone, the proteins produced no change. With an increasing mol fraction of DOPC, the response to the proteins increased, reaching a maximum 50% reduction in cylindrical radius at 5% (w/w) protein. This change represented a doubling of curvature at the outer cylindrical surface. The change in spontaneous curvature, defined at approximately the level of the glycerol group, would be greater. Analysis of the results in terms of a Langmuir model for binding to a surface suggests that the effect of the lipids is consistent with a change in the maximum binding capacity. Our findings show that surfactant proteins can promote negative curvature, and support the possibility that they facilitate adsorption by that mechanism. PMID:26153706

  3. Hydrophobic Surfactant Proteins Strongly Induce Negative Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W.; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C greatly accelerate the adsorption of vesicles containing the surfactant lipids to form a film that lowers the surface tension of the air/water interface in the lungs. Pulmonary surfactant enters the interface by a process analogous to the fusion of two vesicles. As with fusion, several factors affect adsorption according to how they alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, suggesting that adsorption proceeds via a rate-limiting structure with negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the phospholipid leaflets is concave. In the studies reported here, we tested whether the surfactant proteins might promote adsorption by inducing lipids to adopt a more negative curvature, closer to the configuration of the hypothetical intermediate. Our experiments used x-ray diffraction to determine how the proteins in their physiological ratio affect the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the negatively curved, inverse hexagonal phase. With binary mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), the proteins produced a dose-related effect on curvature that depended on the phospholipid composition. With DOPE alone, the proteins produced no change. With an increasing mol fraction of DOPC, the response to the proteins increased, reaching a maximum 50% reduction in cylindrical radius at 5% (w/w) protein. This change represented a doubling of curvature at the outer cylindrical surface. The change in spontaneous curvature, defined at approximately the level of the glycerol group, would be greater. Analysis of the results in terms of a Langmuir model for binding to a surface suggests that the effect of the lipids is consistent with a change in the maximum binding capacity. Our findings show that surfactant proteins can promote negative curvature, and support the possibility that they facilitate adsorption by that mechanism. PMID:26153706

  4. [Music-induced chills as a strong emotional experience].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuma; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    While enjoying music and other works of art, people sometimes experience "chills," a strong emotional response characterized by a sensation of goose bumps or shivers. Such experiences differ from having goose bumps as a defense response or from shivering in reaction to cold temperatures. The current paper presents the phenomenon of music-induced chills and reviews the chill-related emotional response, autonomic nervous system activity, and brain activity. It also reviews the musico-acoustic features, listening contexts, and individual differences that cause chills. Based on the review, we propose a hypothetical model regarding the evocation of music-induced chills. Furthermore, we investigate the strong emotional response associated with chills by exploring the relationship between music-related chills and non-music-related chills, and discuss future research directions. PMID:25639033

  5. [Music-induced chills as a strong emotional experience].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuma; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    While enjoying music and other works of art, people sometimes experience "chills," a strong emotional response characterized by a sensation of goose bumps or shivers. Such experiences differ from having goose bumps as a defense response or from shivering in reaction to cold temperatures. The current paper presents the phenomenon of music-induced chills and reviews the chill-related emotional response, autonomic nervous system activity, and brain activity. It also reviews the musico-acoustic features, listening contexts, and individual differences that cause chills. Based on the review, we propose a hypothetical model regarding the evocation of music-induced chills. Furthermore, we investigate the strong emotional response associated with chills by exploring the relationship between music-related chills and non-music-related chills, and discuss future research directions.

  6. Anomaly-Induced Dynamical Refringence in Strong-Field QED.

    PubMed

    Mueller, N; Hebenstreit, F; Berges, J

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the impact of the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly on the nonequilibrium evolution of strong-field quantum electrodynamics (QED) using real-time lattice gauge theory techniques. For field strengths exceeding the Schwinger limit for pair production, we encounter a highly absorptive medium with anomaly induced dynamical refractive properties. In contrast to earlier expectations based on equilibrium properties, where net anomalous effects vanish because of the trivial vacuum structure, we find that out-of-equilibrium conditions can have dramatic consequences for the presence of quantum currents with distinctive macroscopic signatures. We observe an intriguing tracking behavior, where the system spends longest times near collinear field configurations with maximum anomalous current. Apart from the potential relevance of our findings for future laser experiments, similar phenomena related to the chiral magnetic effect are expected to play an important role for strong QED fields during initial stages of heavy-ion collision experiments. PMID:27541456

  7. Anomaly-Induced Dynamical Refringence in Strong-Field QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, N.; Hebenstreit, F.; Berges, J.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the impact of the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly on the nonequilibrium evolution of strong-field quantum electrodynamics (QED) using real-time lattice gauge theory techniques. For field strengths exceeding the Schwinger limit for pair production, we encounter a highly absorptive medium with anomaly induced dynamical refractive properties. In contrast to earlier expectations based on equilibrium properties, where net anomalous effects vanish because of the trivial vacuum structure, we find that out-of-equilibrium conditions can have dramatic consequences for the presence of quantum currents with distinctive macroscopic signatures. We observe an intriguing tracking behavior, where the system spends longest times near collinear field configurations with maximum anomalous current. Apart from the potential relevance of our findings for future laser experiments, similar phenomena related to the chiral magnetic effect are expected to play an important role for strong QED fields during initial stages of heavy-ion collision experiments.

  8. Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi

    PubMed Central

    Krannich, S.; Sidis, Y.; Lamago, D.; Heid, R.; Mignot, J.-M.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Ivanov, A.; Steffens, P.; Keller, T.; Wang, L.; Goering, E.; Weber, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of electronic, spin and lattice degrees of freedom in solids result in complex phase diagrams, new emergent phenomena and technical applications. While electron–phonon coupling is well understood, and interactions between spin and electronic excitations are intensely investigated, only little is known about the dynamic interactions between spin and lattice excitations. Noncentrosymmetric FeSi is known to undergo with increasing temperature a crossover from insulating to metallic behaviour with concomitant magnetic fluctuations, and exhibits strongly temperature-dependent phonon energies. Here we show by detailed inelastic neutron-scattering measurements and ab initio calculations that the phonon renormalization in FeSi is linked to its unconventional magnetic properties. Electronic states mediating conventional electron–phonon coupling are only activated in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, phonons entailing strongly varying Fe–Fe distances are damped via dynamic coupling to the temperature-induced magnetic moments, highlighting FeSi as a material with direct spin–phonon coupling and multiple interaction paths. PMID:26611619

  9. Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi.

    PubMed

    Krannich, S; Sidis, Y; Lamago, D; Heid, R; Mignot, J-M; Löhneysen, H v; Ivanov, A; Steffens, P; Keller, T; Wang, L; Goering, E; Weber, F

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of electronic, spin and lattice degrees of freedom in solids result in complex phase diagrams, new emergent phenomena and technical applications. While electron-phonon coupling is well understood, and interactions between spin and electronic excitations are intensely investigated, only little is known about the dynamic interactions between spin and lattice excitations. Noncentrosymmetric FeSi is known to undergo with increasing temperature a crossover from insulating to metallic behaviour with concomitant magnetic fluctuations, and exhibits strongly temperature-dependent phonon energies. Here we show by detailed inelastic neutron-scattering measurements and ab initio calculations that the phonon renormalization in FeSi is linked to its unconventional magnetic properties. Electronic states mediating conventional electron-phonon coupling are only activated in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, phonons entailing strongly varying Fe-Fe distances are damped via dynamic coupling to the temperature-induced magnetic moments, highlighting FeSi as a material with direct spin-phonon coupling and multiple interaction paths. PMID:26611619

  10. Laser-Induced Shocks in Strongly Coupled Aluminum Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, T.; Benage, J.; Evans, S.; Glocer, A.; Kyrala, G.; Montoya, R.; Munson, C.; Roberts, J.; Skidmore, B.; Taylor, A.; Wood, B.; Workman, J.; Wysocki, F.

    2001-10-01

    Inverse bremsstrahlung is a dominant absorption mechanism at high densities and low temperatures, such as in strongly coupled plasmas. We electrically produce a 0.1 g/cm^3, 1 eV SCP target which is struck by a 2-3 J, 0.8 ns frequency-doubled Nd:Yag laser pulse. Under these conditions, the laser pulse couples into the plasma where the electron plasma frequency equals the laser frequency. For a wavelength of 532 nm, this happens at a critical density of ne = 4x10^21 cm-3. The rapid deposition of energy heats and compresses the plasma to shock conditions. The surface temperature of the plasma is measured using four filtered PMTs with the assumption of blackbody emission with constant emissivity. Pre-shocked and shocked density measurements are simultaneously made using a laser-produced Ti K-shell (4.75 keV) x-ray shadowgraph. We present the experiment design and results of a laser-induced shock in a strongly coupled plasma.

  11. Nanosized graphene crystallite induced strong magnetism in pure carbon films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xi; Diao, Dongfeng

    2015-03-14

    We report strong magnetism in pure carbon films grown by electron irradiation assisted physical vapor deposition in electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The development of graphene nanocrystallites in the amorphous film matrix, and the dependence of the magnetic behavior on amorphous, nanocrystallite and graphite-like structures were investigated. Results were that the amorphous structure shows weak paramagnetism, graphene nanocrystallites lead to strong magnetization, and graphite-like structures corresponded with a lower magnetization. At a room temperature of 300 K, the highest saturation magnetization of 0.37 emu g(-1) was found in the nanosized graphene nanocrystallite structure. The origin of strong magnetism in nanocrystallites was ascribed to the spin magnetic moment at the graphene layer edges.

  12. Higgs-induced spectroscopic shifts near strong gravity sources

    SciTech Connect

    Onofrio, Roberto

    2010-09-15

    We explore the consequences of the mass generation due to the Higgs field in strong gravity astrophysical environments. The vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field is predicted to depend on the curvature of spacetime, potentially giving rise to peculiar spectroscopic shifts, named hereafter 'Higgs shifts'. Higgs shifts could be searched through dedicated multiwavelength and multispecies surveys with high spatial and spectral resolution near strong gravity sources such as Sagittarius A* or broad searches for signals due to primordial black holes. The possible absence of Higgs shifts in these surveys should provide limits to the coupling between the Higgs particle and the curvature of spacetime, a topic of interest for a recently proposed Higgs-driven inflationary model. We discuss some conceptual issues regarding the coexistence between the Higgs mechanism and gravity, especially for their different handling of fundamental and composite particles.

  13. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  14. Moderately strong pump-induced ultrafast dynamics in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. F.; Zhang, Yizhu; Yan, T.-M.; Wang, Z. Y.; Jiang, Y. H.

    2016-09-01

    The transient transmittance spectra of laser dye IR144 in methanol were investigated experimentally in the moderately strong pump-probe field. Observed emission spectra in the red edge of the incident-field bandwidth, created by resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (RISRS), display significant nonlinear intensity dependence as the pulse intensity increases. Dynamic perspectives of RISRS spectra can be understood well in a wavepacket picture. The excitation of high vibrational levels in the ground electronic state leading to the redshift of emissions presents high dependence of the pump-pulse intensity and ultrafast dynamical features, mapping the spatial overlap and separation of ground and excited wave functions and resolving the ultrafast vibrational relaxation in the femtosecond regime.

  15. Strong electron and ion emissions induced by a pyroelectric crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockley, M.; Huang, Z.

    2013-01-01

    A novel method of high voltage pulse generation was developed, based on charging a capacitor by changing the temperature of a pyroelectric crystal. A high voltage pulse is formed when a miniature spark gap device in connection with the charging capacitor is suddenly switched on. This high voltage pulse is then used to trigger strong electron and ion emissions from a ferroelectric cathode. The developments of voltage and emission with time were compared with those when the voltage pulse was produced by an external power source, and the differences were explained as due to different electric boundary conditions, based on the surface plasma assisted emission mechanisms. Factors affecting the ferroelectric cathode emissions, such as the capacitance of the charging capacitor, the polarity of the voltage pulses being applied to the front or rear electrode of the cathode, and the shape of the front grid electrode, have been investigated. Significantly higher current and total emitted electrons were observed in the case of a negative voltage applied to the front electrode. Other emission features such as the energy of the emitted particles and density distribution were also characterised.

  16. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease.

  17. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease. PMID:12929156

  18. Strong-wind and heavy-rainfall extents induced by tropical cyclones over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dasol; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Park, Doo-Sun R.

    2016-04-01

    Strong-wind and heavy-rainfall accompanied with tropical cyclone (TC) landfall can make enormous socio-economic losses. This study investigated the areal extents of strong-wind and heavy-rainfall induced by TC for its landfall period over South Korea. Utilizing a high-resolution reanalysis data, the strong-wind and heavy-rainfall extents are defined as the number of grids in which wind speed and rainfall exceed their threshold values (11.2 m s-1 and 1.38 mm hr-1, respectively). Note that the threshold values of wind and rainfall are derived from the top 99th percentiles of weather-station record. In this study, 126 TCs are examined for the period of 1979-2014. Both the strong-wind and heavy-rainfall extents increase with TC intensity, which means intense TC has large size. However, areal fractions of strong-wind and heavy-rainfall extent to total-influence extent, which is union of strong-wind and heavy-rainfall extents, present significant negative-correlation (r=-0.87) between them. Based on this negative relation, rainfall-dominant TCs which possess large heavy-rainfall fraction but small high-wind fraction are defined, and vice versa for wind-dominant TCs. Thus, the rainfall-dominant TCs generally present heavier rainfall but weaker winds than wind-dominant TCs since the rainfall-dominant TC has much stronger divergence in upper-level and asymmetric convection than wind-dominant TC. An anomalous upper tropospheric trough located over the west of South Korea is found to be a possible reason for the different structure of the both TC types by causing following three effects: (1) rising motion associated with enhanced upper-level divergence ahead of TC propagation, (2) enhancement of secondary circulation induced by strong vertical wind shear, and (3) asymmetric convection related with faster TC movements. All of these factors are favorable to the rainfall-dominant TCs, but unfavorable to the wind-dominant TCs. The present study highlights importance of

  19. Strong-field ionization inducing multi-electron-hole coherence probed by attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in attosecond spectroscopy has enabled resolving electron-hole dynamics in real time. The correlated electron-hole dynamics and the resulted coherence are directly related to how fast the ionization is completed. How the laser-induced electron-hole coherence evolves and whether it can be utilized to probe the core dynamics are among the key questions in attosecond physics or even attosecond chemistry. In this work, we propose a new scenario to apply IR-pump-XUV-probe schemes to resolving strong field ionization induced and attosecond pulse driven electron-hole dynamics and coherence in real time. The coherent driving of both the infrared laser and the attosecond pulse correlates the dynamics of the core-hole and the valence-hole which leads to the otherwise forbidden absorption and emission of XUV photon. An analytical model is developed based on the strong-field approximation by taking into account of the essential multielectron configurations. The emission spectra from the core-valence transition and the core-hole recombination are found modulating strongly as functions of the time delay between the two pulses, which provides a unique insight into the instantaneous ionization and the interplay of the multi-electron-hole coherence.

  20. Electric-field-induced strong enhancement of electroluminescence in multilayer molybdenum disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dehui; Cheng, Rui; Zhou, Hailong; Wang, Chen; Yin, Anxiang; Chen, Yu; Weiss, Nathan O.; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted considerable interest for their unique electronic and optical properties. While the monolayer MoS2 exhibits a direct bandgap, the multilayer MoS2 is an indirect bandgap semiconductor and generally optically inactive. Here we report electric-field-induced strong electroluminescence in multilayer MoS2. We show that GaN–Al2O3–MoS2 and GaN–Al2O3–MoS2–Al2O3-graphene vertical heterojunctions can be created with excellent rectification behaviour. Electroluminescence studies demonstrate prominent direct bandgap excitonic emission in multilayer MoS2 over the entire vertical junction area. Importantly, the electroluminescence efficiency observed in multilayer MoS2 is comparable to or higher than that in monolayers. This strong electroluminescence can be attributed to electric-field-induced carrier redistribution from the lowest energy points (indirect bandgap) to higher energy points (direct bandgap) in k-space. The electric-field-induced electroluminescence is general for other layered materials including WSe2 and can open up a new pathway towards transition metal dichalcogenide-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:26130491

  1. Strong nonlinearity of mesoscopic vibrational modes induced by electron-phonon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovtsev, Kirill; Dykman, M. I.

    We show that the electron-phonon coupling can lead to a strong nonlinearity of vibrational modes in semiconductor nano- and micro-resonators. For typical mode frequencies, the electron distribution adiabatically follows lattice strain. Therefore strain leads to redistribution of the electron density over the valleys of the conduction band. It also leads to the onset of a spatial charge. The parameter that controls the distribution is the ratio of the deformation potential to the electron chemical potential or temperature. It is ~102 for many semiconductors of interest even when they are heavily doped. Therefore the change of the electron distribution is strongly nonlinear in the strain. As a consequence, the stress induced by the electron-phonon coupling is also strongly nonlinear. We have found the vibration nonlinearity parameters for n-doped Si and calculated the amplitude dependence of the frequencies of several low-lying Si resonator modes with account taken of their spatial structure. The results are compared with the recent experimental data that shows strong effect of doping on the vibration nonlinearity.

  2. Optically induced strong intermodal coupling in mechanical resonators at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, R.; Okamoto, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hey, R.; Friedland, K. J.

    2015-08-31

    Strong parametric mode coupling in mechanical resonators is demonstrated at room temperature by using the photothermal effect in thin membrane structures. Thanks to the large stress modulation by laser irradiation, the coupling rate of the mechanical modes, defined as half of the mode splitting, reaches 2.94 kHz, which is an order of magnitude larger than electrically induced mode coupling. This large coupling rate exceeds the damping rates of the mechanical resonators and results in the strong coupling regime, which is a signature of coherent mode interaction. Room-temperature coherent mode coupling will enable us to manipulate mechanical motion at practical operation temperatures and provides a wide variety of applications of integrated mechanical systems.

  3. Dressed-state strong-field approximation for laser-induced molecular ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, W.; Chen, J.; Chen, S. G.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2007-09-15

    In the customary formulation of the strong-field approximation (SFA) for laser-induced ionization, the initial bound state is taken as field-free. In the formulation of a length-gauge SFA for ionization of a molecule described by a two-center binding potential with sufficiently large internuclear separation, we argue that the initial state has to be dressed in order to account for the different scalar potentials at the various centers. We propose a 'dressed-state' SFA to this end.

  4. Paramagnetic molecule induced strong antiferromagnetic exchange coupling on a magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics device.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pawan; Baker, Collin; D'Angelo, Christopher

    2015-07-31

    This paper reports our Monte Carlo (MC) studies aiming to explain the experimentally observed paramagnetic molecule induced antiferromagnetic coupling between ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Recently developed magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics devices (MTJMSDs) were prepared by chemically bonding the paramagnetic molecules between the FM electrodes along the tunnel junction's perimeter. These MTJMSDs exhibited molecule-induced strong antiferromagnetic coupling. We simulated the 3D atomic model analogous to the MTJMSD and studied the effect of molecule's magnetic couplings with the two FM electrodes. Simulations show that when a molecule established ferromagnetic coupling with one electrode and antiferromagnetic coupling with the other electrode, then theoretical results effectively explained the experimental findings. Our studies suggest that in order to align MTJMSDs' electrodes antiparallel to each other, the exchange coupling strength between a molecule and FM electrodes should be ∼50% of the interatomic exchange coupling for the FM electrodes.

  5. Role of trap-induced scales in non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting trapped bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Anirban; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Sengupta, K.

    2016-08-01

    We use a time-dependent hopping expansion technique to study the non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting bosons in an optical lattice in the presence of a harmonic trap characterized by a force constant K. We show that after a sudden quench of the hopping amplitude J across the superfluid (SF)-Mott insulator (MI) transition, the SF order parameter |{{Δ }\\mathbf{r}}(t)| and the local density fluctuation δ {{n}\\mathbf{r}}(t) exhibit sudden decoherence beyond a trap-induced time scale {{T}0}∼ {{K}-1/2} . We also show that after a slow linear ramp down of J, |{{Δ }\\mathbf{r}}| and the boson defect density {{P}\\mathbf{r}} display a novel non-monotonic spatial profile. Both these phenomena can be explained as consequences of trap-induced time and length scales affecting the dynamics and can be tested by concrete experiments.

  6. Strong nonlinear terahertz response induced by Dirac surface states in Bi2Se3 topological insulator

    PubMed Central

    Giorgianni, Flavio; Chiadroni, Enrica; Rovere, Andrea; Cestelli-Guidi, Mariangela; Perucchi, Andrea; Bellaveglia, Marco; Castellano, Michele; Di Giovenale, Domenico; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Pompili, Riccardo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Villa, Fabio; Cianchi, Alessandro; Mostacci, Andrea; Petrarca, Massimo; Brahlek, Matthew; Koirala, Nikesh; Oh, Seongshik; Lupi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Electrons with a linear energy/momentum dispersion are called massless Dirac electrons and represent the low-energy excitations in exotic materials such as graphene and topological insulators. Dirac electrons are characterized by notable properties such as a high mobility, a tunable density and, in topological insulators, a protection against backscattering through the spin–momentum locking mechanism. All those properties make graphene and topological insulators appealing for plasmonics applications. However, Dirac electrons are expected to present also a strong nonlinear optical behaviour. This should mirror in phenomena such as electromagnetic-induced transparency and harmonic generation. Here we demonstrate that in Bi2Se3 topological insulator, an electromagnetic-induced transparency is achieved under the application of a strong terahertz electric field. This effect, concomitantly determined by harmonic generation and charge-mobility reduction, is exclusively related to the presence of Dirac electron at the surface of Bi2Se3, and opens the road towards tunable terahertz nonlinear optical devices based on topological insulator materials. PMID:27113395

  7. Nuclear-spin-induced cotton-mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-Juan; Vaara, Juha

    2014-08-01

    Novel, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic methods can provide site-specific nuclear information by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic properties. We present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of the recently proposed nuclear-spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field (NSCM-B). In NSCM-B, ellipticity is induced in a linearly polarized light beam, which can be attributed to both the dependence of the symmetric dynamic polarizability on the external magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moment, as well as the temperature-dependent partial alignment of the molecules due to the magnetic fields. Quantum-chemical calculations of NSCM-B were conducted for a series of molecular liquids. The overall order of magnitude of the induced ellipticities is predicted to be 10(-11) -10(-6) rad T(-1)  M(-1)  cm(-1) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. In particular, liquid-state heavy-atom systems should be promising for experiments in the Voigt setup.

  8. Spectroscopy of Strongly-Coupled Spins Using Spin-Lock Induced Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen; Walsworth, Ronald; Rosen, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    We present a novel pulse sequence called Spin-Lock Induced Crossing (SLIC) for the manipulation of strongly-coupled spins, based on the splitting and shifting of dressed-state energy levels in response to spin-locking. We demonstrate how SLIC can be used to acquire spectra from groups of spins with unresolvable resonance lines. Performing NMR with SLIC at 6.5 mT, we measured a J-coupling spectrum for both hydrated and dehydrated ethanol, without the addition of a heteronucleus, thereby making chemical identification possible despite the lack of resolvable chemical shifts. We also demonstrated how SLIC can perform spin operations between dressed states. Performing NMR at 4.7 T, we used SLIC to create long-lived nuclear spin singlet states in two nearly-equivalent proton pairs. We discuss how SLIC might be applied to novel spin measurements and quantum memories in the solid state.

  9. Strong coupling among semiconductor quantum dots induced by a metal nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), we investigate the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in a metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in an SQD-MNP coupled system. We propose a quantum transformation method to strongly reveal the exciton energy shift and the modified decay rate of SQD as well as the coupling among SQDs. To obtain these parameters, a simple system composed of an SQD, an MNP, and a weak signal light is designed. Furthermore, we consider a model to demonstrate the coupling of two SQDs mediated by SPP field under two cases. It is shown that two SQDs can be entangled in the presence of MNP. A high concurrence can be achieved, which is the best evidence that the coupling among SQDs induced by SPP field in MNP. This scheme may have the potential applications in all-optical plasmon-enhanced nanoscale devices. PMID:22297024

  10. Plasmon-induced strong interaction between chiral molecules and orbital angular momentum of light

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Rongyao; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not chiral interaction exists between the optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) and a chiral molecule remains unanswered. So far, such an interaction has not been observed experimentally. Here we present a T-matrix method to study the interaction between optical OAM and the chiral molecule in a cluster of nanoparticles. We find that strong interaction between the chiral molecule and OAM can be induced by the excitation of plasmon resonances. An experimental scheme to observe such an interaction has been proposed. Furthermore, we have found that the signal of the OAM dichroism can be either positive or negative, depending on the spatial positions of nanocomposites in the cross-sections of OAM beams. The cancellation between positive and negative signals in the spatial average can explain why the interaction has not been observed in former experiments. PMID:26656892

  11. Electromagnetically superconducting phase of QCD vacuum induced by strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2011-05-23

    In this talk we discuss our recent suggestion that the QCD vacuum in a sufficiently strong magnetic field (stronger than 10{sup 16} Tesla) may undergo a spontaneous transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The possible superconducting state is anisotropic (the vacuum exhibits superconductivity only along the axis of the uniform magnetic field) and inhomogeneous (in the transverse directions the vacuum structure shares similarity with the Abrikosov lattice of an ordinary type-II superconductor). The electromagnetic superconductivity of the QCD vacuum is suggested to occur due to emergence of specific quark-antiquark condensates which carry quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. A Lorentz-covariant generalization of the London transport equations for the magnetic-field-induced superconductivity is given.

  12. Developmental abnormality induced by strong static magnetic field in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Du, Hua; Guo, Xiaoying; Wang, Xinan; Wang, Meimei; Wang, Yichen; Wang, Min; Chen, Shaopeng; Wu, Lijun; Xu, An

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the effects of strong static magnetic fields (SMFs) on living organisms is significant in health risk assessment, but underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In the present study, we determined developmental abnormalities induced by 8.5Tesla (T) SMFs in a well-established in vivo model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Exposure of C. elegans eggs to 8.5 T SMF resulted in a time-dependent lifespan decrease, whereas only slight changes were observed upon exposure to 5 T SMF. Although SMF exposure did not alter brood size, development rate and stages were significantly modified by 8.5 T SMF. Germ cell apoptosis dramatically increased upon exposure to 8.5 T SMF in adult worms, as confirmed by ced-3 and ced-4 mutants, and could be prevented by concurrent treatment with a free radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide. Compared to wild-type worms, shorter lifespan and greater numbers of apoptotic cells were observed in abnormal methyl viologen sensitivity-1 (mev-1(kn1)) nematodes with increased sensitivity to oxidative damage. Furthermore, exposure to 8.5 T SMF increased expression of superoxide dismutase-3 (sod-3), which is thought to protect against oxidative stress. However, 8.5 T SMF had minimal effects on lifespans of daf-2 and daf-16 mutants, which have compromised insulin/IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factors-1) mediated signaling pathways; this finding was consistent with the expression of these genes in wild-type worms. Our results indicate that developmental toxicity induced by strong SMF in C. elegans is mediated by oxidative stress and may be regulated by the insulin-like receptor pathway.

  13. Strong interface-induced spin–orbit interaction in graphene on WS2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Ki, Dong–Keun; Chen, Hua; Berger, Helmuth; MacDonald, Allan H.; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial interactions allow the electronic properties of graphene to be modified, as recently demonstrated by the appearance of satellite Dirac cones in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride substrates. Ongoing research strives to explore interfacial interactions with other materials to engineer targeted electronic properties. Here we show that with a tungsten disulfide (WS2) substrate, the strength of the spin–orbit interaction (SOI) in graphene is very strongly enhanced. The induced SOI leads to a pronounced low-temperature weak anti-localization effect and to a spin-relaxation time two to three orders of magnitude smaller than in graphene on conventional substrates. To interpret our findings we have performed first-principle electronic structure calculations, which confirm that carriers in graphene on WS2 experience a strong SOI and allow us to extract a spin-dependent low-energy effective Hamiltonian. Our analysis shows that the use of WS2 substrates opens a possible new route to access topological states of matter in graphene-based systems. PMID:26391068

  14. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Schölch, Sebastian; Rauber, Conrad; Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A; Lipson, Kenneth E; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E

    2015-03-10

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy.

  15. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N.; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy. PMID:25609199

  16. Strong-mixing induced deep ocean heat uptake events in the North Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somavilla Cabrillo, Raquel; Gonzalez-Pola, Cesar; Schauer, Ursula; Budeus, Gedeon

    2015-04-01

    The deceleration of the upper ocean heat storage during the last decade has resulted in an active search for the 'missing heat' in the deep ocean. Modeling work has provided new insights into the role of the central Pacific Ocean on the present hiatus in global warming and the efficient transfer of heat to the deep ocean, but recent studies have highlighted also the large contribution of the North Atlantic basin to these processes, mainly based on ocean observations. The deep ocean heat uptake (below 300 m) in the North Atlantic is not confined to the subpolar gyre region but extends to mid-latitudes of the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), requiring an additional process for its explanation other than deep convection considered until now. Here, using oceanographic in-situ data, we describe a mechanism of heat and salt injection to the deep ocean after years of warming and saltening at the surface occurred both in regions of mode (43°-48°N) and deep water (74°-76°N) formation in the ENA. The mechanism, although punctual meditated by strong winter mixing events, is between 2 and 6 times higher than the 2000-2010 ocean heat uptake at depths of mode (300-700m) and deep water (>2000m) formation, contributing significantly to the observed deep ocean heat uptake in the North Atlantic. Nutrient, hydrographic and reanalysis data indicate that the strong mixing-induced deep ocean heat uptake events at areas of mode and deep water formation in the North Atlantic are connected through the northward propagation of salty ENA mode waters triggered by the contraction of the subpolar gyre reinforced by the occurrences of blocking anomalies in the ENA. Such connection is not unique of the last decade but observed also during the 1960s. Natural climate variability seems the ultimate driver of the strong mixing-induced deep ocean heat uptake events, although the anthropogenic global warming and its forcing on the Arctic sea-ice retreat and frequency of extreme weather events could

  17. [Conformational changes of actin induced by strong or weak myosin subfragment-1 binding].

    PubMed

    Dedova, I V; Avrova, S V; Vikhoreva, N N; Vikhorev, R G; Hazlett, T L; Van der Meer, W; Dos Remedios, C G; Borovikov, Iu S

    2004-01-01

    Movements of different areas of polypeptide chains within F-actin monomers induced by S1 or pPDM-S1 binding were studied by polarized fluorimetry. Thin filaments of ghost muscle were reconstructed by adding G-actin labeled with fluorescent probes attached alternatively to different sites of actin molecule. These sites were: Cys-374 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, TMRIA or 5-IAF; Lys-373 labeled with NBD-Cl; Lys-113 labeled with Alexa-488; Lys-61 labeled with FITC; Gln-41 labeled with DED and Cys-10 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, 5-IAF or fluorescein-maleimid. In addition, we used TRITC-, FITC-falloidin and e-ADP that were located, respectively, in filament groove and interdomain cleft. The data were analysed by model-dependent and model-independent methods (see appendixes). The orientation and mobility of fluorescent probes were significantly changed when actin and myosin interacted, depending on fluorophore location and binding site of actomyosin. Strong binding of S with actin leads to 1) a decrease in the orientation of oscillators of derivatives of falloidin (TRITC-falloidin, FITC-falloidin) and actin-bound nucleotide (e-ADP); 2) an increase in the orientation of dye oscillators located in the "front' surface of the small domain (where actin is viewed in the standard orientation with subdomains 1/2 and 3/4 oriented to the right and to the left, respectively); 3) a decrease in the angles of dye oscillators located on the "back" surface of subdomain-1. In contrast, a weak binding of S1 to actin induces the opposite effects in orientation of these probes. These data suggest that during the ATP hydrolysis cycle myosin heads induce a change in actin monomer (a tilt and twisting of its small domain). Presumably, these alterations in F-actin conformation play an important role in muscle contraction.

  18. PPE Antigen Rv2430c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induces a Strong B-Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Rakesh Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita; Chakhaiyar, Prachee; Sharma, Naresh; Murthy, K. J. R.; Katoch, V. M.; Hasnain, Seyed E.

    2003-01-01

    The variation in sequence and length in the C-terminal region among members of the unique PE (Pro-Glu) and PPE (Pro-Pro-Glu) protein families of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a likely source of antigenic variation, giving rise to the speculation that these protein families could be immunologically important. Based on in silico analysis, we selected a hypothetical open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein belonging to the PPE family and having epitopes with predictably higher antigenic indexes. Reverse transcriptase PCR using total RNA extracted from in vitro-cultured M. tuberculosis H37Rv generated an mRNA product corresponding to this gene, indicating the expression of this ORF (Rv2430c) at the mRNA level. Recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was used to screen the sera of M. tuberculosis-infected patients, as well as those of clinically healthy controls (n = 10), by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The panel of patient sera comprised sera from fresh infection cases (category 1; n = 32), patients with relapsed tuberculosis (category 2; n = 30), and extrapulmonary cases (category 3; n = 30). Category 2 and 3 sera had strong antibody responses to the PPE antigen, equal to or higher than those to other well-known antigens, such as Hsp10 or purified protein derivative (PPD). However, a higher percentage of patients belonging to category 1, as opposed to clinically healthy controls, showed stronger antibody response against the PPE protein when probed with anti-immunoglobulin M (IgM) (71 versus 37.5%) or anti-IgG (62.5 versus 28.12%). Our results reveal that this PPE ORF induces a strong B-cell response compared to that generated by M. tuberculosis Hsp10 or PPD, pointing to the immunodominant nature of the protein. PMID:14573653

  19. Delivering HIV Gagp24 to DCIR Induces Strong Antibody Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Flamar, Anne-Laure; Contreras, Vanessa; Zurawski, Sandra; Montes, Monica; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathatlie; Martinon, Frédéric; Banchereau, Jacques; Le Grand, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Targeting dendritic cell-specific endocytic receptors using monoclonal antibodies fused to desired antigens is an approach widely used in vaccine development to enhance the poor immunogenicity of protein-based vaccines and to induce immune responses. Here, we engineered an anti-human DCIR recombinant antibody, which cross-reacts with the homologous cynomolgous macaque receptor and was fused via the heavy chain C-terminus to HIV Gagp24 protein (αDCIR.Gagp24). In vitro, αDCIR.Gagp24 expanded multifunctional antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells recognizing multiple Gagp24 peptides from HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In non human primates, priming with αDCIR.Gagp24 without adjuvant elicited a strong anti-Gagp24 antibody response after the second immunization, while in the non-targeted HIV Gagp24 protein control groups the titers were weak. The presence of the double-stranded RNA poly(I:C) adjuvant significantly enhanced the anti-Gagp24 antibody response in all the groups and reduced the discrimination between the different vaccine groups. The avidity of the anti-Gagp24 antibody responses was similar with either αDCIR.Gagp24 or Gagp24 immunization, but increased from medium to high avidity in both groups when poly(I:C) was co-administered. This data provides a comparative analysis of DC-targeted and non-targeted proteins for their capacity to induce antigen-specific antibody responses in vivo. This study supports the further development of DCIR-based DC-targeting vaccines for protective durable antibody induction, especially in the absence of adjuvant. PMID:26407317

  20. Phase transitions in ensembles of solitons induced by an optical pumping or a strong electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, P.; Brazovskii, S.

    2016-09-01

    The latest trend in studies of modern electronically and/or optically active materials is to provoke phase transformations induced by high electric fields or by short (femtosecond) powerful optical pulses. The systems of choice are cooperative electronic states whose broken symmetries give rise to topological defects. For typical quasi-one-dimensional architectures, those are the microscopic solitons taking from electrons the major roles as carriers of charge or spin. Because of the long-range ordering, the solitons experience unusual super-long-range forces leading to a sequence of phase transitions in their ensembles: the higher-temperature transition of the confinement and the lower one of aggregation into macroscopic walls. Here we present results of an extensive numerical modeling for ensembles of both neutral and charged solitons in both two- and three-dimensional systems. We suggest a specific Monte Carlo algorithm preserving the number of solitons, which substantially facilitates the calculations, allows to extend them to the three-dimensional case and to include the important long-range Coulomb interactions. The results confirm the first confinement transition, except for a very strong Coulomb repulsion, and demonstrate a pattern formation at the second transition of aggregation.

  1. Interferon-β gene transfer induces a strong cytotoxic bystander effect on melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Úrsula A; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Villaverde, Marcela S; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-05-01

    A local gene therapy scheme for the delivery of type I interferons could be an alternative for the treatment of melanoma. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of interferon-β (IFNβ) gene lipofection on tumor cell lines derived from three human cutaneous and four canine mucosal melanomas. The cytotoxicity of human IFNβ gene lipofection resulted higher or equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) to human cells. IFNβ gene lipofection was not cytotoxic for only one canine melanoma cell line. When cultured as monolayers, three human and three canine IFNβ-lipofected melanoma cell lines displayed a remarkable bystander effect. As spheroids, the same six cell lines were sensitive to IFNβ gene transfer, two displaying a significant multicell resistance phenotype. The effects of conditioned IFNβ-lipofected canine melanoma cell culture media suggested the release of at least one soluble thermolabile cytotoxic factor that could not be detected in human melanoma cells. By using a secretion signal-free truncated human IFNβ, we showed that its intracellular expression was enough to induce cytotoxicity in two human melanoma cell lines. The lower cytoplasmatic levels of reactive oxygen species detected after intracellular IFNβ expression could be related to the resistance displayed by one human melanoma cell line. As IFNβ gene transfer was effective against most of the assayed melanomas in a way not limited by relatively low lipofection efficiencies, the clinical potential of this approach is strongly supported.

  2. Mucosal vaccination with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces strong central memory responses and protects against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Deepak; Foreman, Taylor W.; Gautam, Uma S.; Alvarez, Xavier; Adekambi, Toidi; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Golden, Nadia A.; Johnson, Ann-Marie F.; Phillips, Bonnie L.; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Doyle, Lara A.; Roy, Chad J.; Didier, Peter J.; Blanchard, James L.; Rengarajan, Jyothi; Lackner, Andrew A.; Khader, Shabaana A.; Mehra, Smriti

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global pandaemic, partially due to the failure of vaccination approaches. Novel anti-TB vaccines are therefore urgently required. Here we show that aerosol immunization of macaques with the Mtb mutant in SigH (MtbΔsigH) results in significant recruitment of inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing activation and proliferation markers to the lungs. Further, the findings indicate that pulmonary vaccination with MtbΔsigH elicited strong central memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in the lung. Vaccination with MtbΔsigH results in significant protection against a lethal TB challenge, as evidenced by an approximately three log reduction in bacterial burdens, significantly diminished clinical manifestations and granulomatous pathology and characterized by the presence of profound iBALT. This highly protective response is virtually absent in unvaccinated and BCG-vaccinated animals after challenge. These results suggest that future TB vaccine candidates can be developed on the basis of MtbΔsigH. PMID:26460802

  3. Effect of initial perturbation amplitude on Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Dell, Z.; Abarzhi, S. I. E-mail: sabarji@andrew.cmu.edu; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2015-09-15

    We systematically study the effect of the initial perturbation on Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks in fluids with contrasting densities. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations are employed. A broad range of shock strengths and density ratios is considered. The amplitude of the initial single mode sinusoidal perturbation of the interface varies from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. The simulations results are compared, wherever possible, with four rigorous theories, and with other experiments and simulations, achieving good quantitative and qualitative agreement. Our study is focused on early time dynamics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). We analyze the initial growth-rate of RMI immediately after the shock passage, when the perturbation amplitude increases linearly with time. For the first time, to the authors' knowledge, we find that the initial growth-rate of RMI is a non-monotone function of the initial perturbation amplitude, thus restraining the amount of energy that can be deposited by the shock at the interface. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate depends on the shock strength and the density ratio, whereas the corresponding value of the initial perturbation amplitude depends only slightly on the shock strength and density ratio.

  4. Giant Faraday rotation induced by the Berry phase in bilayer graphene under strong terahertz fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Xu, Xiaodong; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-04-01

    High-order terahertz (THz) sideband generation in semiconductors is a phenomenon with physics similar to that of high-order harmonic generation but in a regime of much lower frequency. Our previous paper [1] found that the electron-hole pair excited by a weak optical laser can accumulate a Berry phase along a cyclic trajectory under the driving of a strong elliptically polarized THz field. Furthermore, the Berry phase appears as the Faraday rotation angle of the emission signal under short-pulse excitation in monolayer MoS_{2}. In this paper, the theory of the Berry phase in THz extreme nonlinear optics is applied to biased bilayer graphene with Bernal stacking, which has similar Bloch band features and optical properties to monolayer MoS_{2}, such as the time-reversal related valleys and the valley contrasting optical selection rule. However, the biased bilayer graphene has much larger Berry curvature than monolayer MoS_{2}, which leads to a large Berry phase of the quantum trajectory and in turn a giant Faraday rotation of the optical emission (˜1 rad for a THz field with frequency 1 THz and strength 8 kV cm-1). This surprisingly big angle shows that the Faraday rotation can be induced more efficiently by the Berry curvature in momentum space than by the magnetic field in real space. It provides opportunities to use bilayer graphene and THz lasers for ultrafast electro-optical devices.

  5. Vv-AMP1, a ripening induced peptide from Vitis vinifera shows strong antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Abré; Vivier, Melané A

    2008-01-01

    Background Latest research shows that small antimicrobial peptides play a role in the innate defense system of plants. These peptides typically contribute to preformed defense by developing protective barriers around germinating seeds or between different tissue layers within plant organs. The encoding genes could also be upregulated by abiotic and biotic stimuli during active defense processes. The peptides display a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. Their potent anti-pathogenic characteristics have ensured that they are promising targets in the medical and agricultural biotechnology sectors. Results A berry specific cDNA sequence designated Vv-AMP1, Vitis vinifera antimicrobial peptide 1, was isolated from Vitis vinifera. Vv-AMP1 encodes for a 77 amino acid peptide that shows sequence homology to the family of plant defensins. Vv-AMP1 is expressed in a tissue specific, developmentally regulated manner, being only expressed in berry tissue at the onset of berry ripening and onwards. Treatment of leaf and berry tissue with biotic or abiotic factors did not lead to increased expression of Vv-AMP1 under the conditions tested. The predicted signal peptide of Vv-AMP1, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP), showed that the signal peptide allowed accumulation of its product in the apoplast. Vv-AMP1 peptide, produced in Escherichia coli, had a molecular mass of 5.495 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry. Recombinant Vv-AMP1 was extremely heat-stable and showed strong antifungal activity against a broad spectrum of plant pathogenic fungi, with very high levels of activity against the wilting disease causing pathogens Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae. The Vv-AMP1 peptide did not induce morphological changes on the treated fungal hyphae, but instead strongly inhibited hyphal elongation. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of Vv-AMP1 might be associated with altering the membrane permeability of the fungal

  6. Interfaces between strongly correlated oxides: controlling charge transfer and induced magnetism by hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibes, Manuel

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from correlations between transition metal and oxygen ions. Strong correlations thus offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. In this talk we will show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we have probed charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3 using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We show that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate (observed by XMCD), exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. Work supported by ERC CoG MINT #615759.

  7. Advanced In vivo Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Anti-sense DNA Inhibition for Gene Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandon J.; Azam, Amber B.; Gillon, Colleen J.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Zovkic, Iva B.

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain–behavior relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene editing technology now allows neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene editing in the adult nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knockout genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the toolbox is widely accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knockdown genes in the brain. The main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their simplicity, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories. PMID:26793235

  8. Strong Pitch-Angle Diffusion of the Ring Current Ions Induced by Electromagnetic ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-12-01

    Deep and intense circulation of the magnetospheric plasma during geomagnetic storm is building up an energy content of the terrestrial ring current (RC) to an unusually high level, and the RC intensity strongly influence the storm-time space weather. The recovery of Dst index takes place hours or days after Dst minimum, and is caused by the decay of magnetopause and magnetotail current systems, and removal of the RC ions due to charge exchange, convection through the dayside magnetopause, Coulomb scattering, RC interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and scattering by field-line curvature. During the early recovery phase, the RC loss rate is about one hour or less, and it is more rapid than charge exchange can support. Ion scattering into the loss cone by EMIC waves is believed to be responsible for such fast RC decay during this storm stage. However, most RC-EMIC wave interaction models do not predict the strong pitch-angle diffusion that is theoretically discussed and observed in the Earth magnetosphere (particularly by SEPS detectors on board of the POLAR satellite). In present work, we employ our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model in order to study systematically the occurrence of the RC strong pitch-angle diffusion caused by interaction with waves during the May 1998 storm. Most of cases of the strong diffusion and of the intense EMIC waves are located in the afternoon-premidnight MLT sector at 3 < L < 6, and exhibit significant linear correlation. During the early recovery phase (at about 08 UT on May 4), the entire RC energy range (less than 450 keV) is subject to strong pitch-angle diffusion. Although the flux transitions between trapped zone and loss cone are steeper for higher energy RC protons than for main body of the distribution function, the pitch-angle distributions are highly isotropic for all energies both inside and outside of the loss cone.

  9. Strong-field-induced attosecond dynamics in SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultze, M.; Bothschafter, E. M.; Sommer, A.; Holzner, S.; Fiess, M.; Hofstetter, M.; Kienberger, R.; Apalkov, V.; Yakovlev, V. S.; Stockman, M. I.; Krausz, F.

    2013-03-01

    Striking field-induced changes in the absorption near the Si L-edge of SiO2 exposed to a near-infrared laser field of several V/Å delivered by a few-cycle pulse are observed with sub-100 attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses by means of attosecond transient absorption.

  10. Magnetic Field Induced Shear Flow in a Strongly Coupled Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Konopka, U.; Jiang, K.; Morfill, G.

    2011-11-01

    We address an experimental observation of shear flow of micron sized dust particles in a strongly coupled complex plasma in presence of a homogeneous magnetic field. Two concentric Aluminum rings of different size are placed on the lower electrode of a radio frequency (rf) parallel plate discharge. The modified local sheath electric field is pointing outward/inward close to the inner/outher ring, respectively. The microparticles, confined by the rings and subject to an ion wind that driven by the local sheath electric field and deflected by an externally applied magnetic field, start flowing in azimuthal direction. Depending upon the rf amplitudes on the electrodes, the dust layers show rotation in opposite direction at the edges of the ring-shaped cloud resulting a strong shear in its center. MD simulations shows a good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. New mechanism of kinetic exchange interaction induced by strong magnetic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the kinetic exchange interaction between single-occupied magnetic orbitals (s-s) is always antiferromagnetic, while between single- and double-occupied orbitals (s-d) is always ferromagnetic and much weaker. Here we show that the exchange interaction between strongly anisotropic doublets of lanthanides, actinides and transition metal ions with unquenched orbital momentum contains a new s-d kinetic contribution equal in strength with the s-s one. In non-collinear magnetic systems, this s-d kinetic mechanism can cause an overall ferromagnetic exchange interaction which can become very strong for transition metal ions. These findings are fully confirmed by DFT based analysis of exchange interaction in several Ln3+ complexes. PMID:27098292

  12. Sulfur Doping Induces Strong Ferromagnetic Ordering in Graphene: Effect of Concentration and Substitution Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Błoński, Piotr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Šimek, Petr; Petr, Martin; Pumera, Martin; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-01

    Imprinting ferromagnetism to a graphene structure by substitution of carbon atoms with sulfur is reported. S-doped graphene (4.2 at%) shows strong ferromagnetic properties with saturation magnetization exceeding 5.5 emu g(-1) at 2 K, which is among the highest values reported for any sp-based system. The remarkable magnetic response is attributed to delocalization of electrons from sulfur injected into the graphene conduction band. PMID:27135692

  13. Fate of disorder-induced inhomogeneities in strongly correlated d-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debmalya; Ghosal, Amit

    2014-10-01

    We analyze the complex interplay of the strong correlations and impurities in a high temperature superconductor and show that both the nature and degree of the inhomogeneities at zero temperature in the local-order parameters change drastically from those obtained in a simple Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Although both the strong electronic repulsions and disorder contribute to the nanoscale inhomogeneity in the population of charge-carriers, we find they compete with each other, leading to a relatively smooth variation of the local density. Our self-consistent calculations modify the spatial fluctuations in the pairing amplitude by suppressing all the double occupancy within a Gutzwiller formalism and prohibit the formation of distinct superconducting ‘islands’. In contrast, presence of such ‘islands’ controls the outcome if strong correlations are neglected. The reorganization of the spatial structures in the Gutzwiller method makes these superconductors surprisingly insensitive to the impurities. This is illustrated by a very weak decay of superfluid stiffness, off-diagonal long-range order and local density of states up to a large disorder strength. Exploring the origin of such a robustness, we conclude that the underlying one-particle normal states reshape in a rich manner, such that the superconductor formed by pairing these states experiences a weaker but spatially correlated effective disorder. Such a route to superconductivity is evocative of Anderson's theorem. Our results capture the key experimental trends in the cuprates.

  14. Strong angular magneto-induced anisotropy of Voigt effect in metal-dielectric metamaterials with periodic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelniker, Yakov M.; Bergman, David J.

    2014-03-01

    When an applied magnetic field has an arbitrary direction with respect to the lattice axes of a periodically microstructured or nanostructured metamaterial, the effective permittivity tensor of the metamaterial sample becomes anisotropic and all its components can be nonzero. This is true even if the microstructure has a high symmetry, e.g., cubic or triangular. It is found that the strong magneto-induced anisotropy which appears in the macroscopic response leads to an unusually strong anisotropic behavior of the Voigt effect and other magneto-optical effects. That is, these phenomena become strongly dependent on the direction of the applied static magnetic field, as well as on the direction of the time-dependent electromagnetic field, with respect to the symmetry axes of the periodic microstructure.

  15. Strong polarization-induced reduction of addition energies in single-molecule nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Flensberg, Karsten

    2008-11-01

    We address polarization-induced renormalization of molecular levels in solid-state based single-molecule transistors and focus on an organic conjugate molecule where a surprisingly large reduction of the addition energy has been observed. We have developed a scheme that combines a self-consistent solution of a quantum chemical calculation with a realistic description of the screening environment. Our results indeed show a large reduction, and we explain this to be a consequence of both (a) a reduction of the electrostatic molecular charging energy and (b) polarization induced level shifts of the HOMO and LUMO levels. Finally, we calculate the charge stability diagram and explain at a qualitative level general features observed experimentally.

  16. Cisgenesis strongly improves introgression breeding and induced translocation breeding of plants.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Evert; Schouten, Henk J

    2007-05-01

    There are two ways for genetic improvement in classical plant breeding: crossing and mutation. Plant varieties can also be improved through genetic modification; however, the present GMO regulations are based on risk assessments with the transgenes coming from non-crossable species. Nowadays, DNA sequence information of crop plants facilitates the isolation of cisgenes, which are genes from crop plants themselves or from crossable species. The increasing number of these isolated genes, and the development of transformation protocols that do not leave marker genes behind, provide an opportunity to improve plant breeding while remaining within the gene pool of the classical breeder. Compared with induced translocation and introgression breeding, cisgenesis is an improvement for gene transfer from crossable plants: it is a one-step gene transfer without linkage drag of other genes, whereas induced translocation and introgression breeding are multiple step gene transfer methods with linkage drag. The similarity of the genes used in cisgenesis compared with classical breeding is a compelling argument to treat cisgenic plants as classically bred plants. In the case of the classical breeding method induced translocation breeding, the insertion site of the genes is a priori unknown, as it is in cisgenesis. This provides another argument to treat cisgenic plants as classically bred plants, by exempting cisgenesis of plants from the GMO legislations.

  17. Strong field-induced frequency conversion of laser radiation in plasma plumes: recent achievements.

    PubMed

    Ganeev, R A

    2013-01-01

    New findings in plasma harmonics studies using strong laser fields are reviewed. We discuss recent achievements in the growth of the efficiency of coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation sources based on frequency conversion of the ultrashort pulses in the laser-produced plasmas, which allowed for the spectral and structural studies of matter through the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy. These studies showed that plasma HHG can open new opportunities in many unexpected areas of laser-matter interaction. Besides being considered as an alternative method for generation of coherent XUV radiation, it can be used as a powerful tool for various spectroscopic and analytical applications.

  18. Strong Field-Induced Frequency Conversion of Laser Radiation in Plasma Plumes: Recent Achievements

    PubMed Central

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    New findings in plasma harmonics studies using strong laser fields are reviewed. We discuss recent achievements in the growth of the efficiency of coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation sources based on frequency conversion of the ultrashort pulses in the laser-produced plasmas, which allowed for the spectral and structural studies of matter through the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy. These studies showed that plasma HHG can open new opportunities in many unexpected areas of laser-matter interaction. Besides being considered as an alternative method for generation of coherent XUV radiation, it can be used as a powerful tool for various spectroscopic and analytical applications. PMID:23864818

  19. Strong localization induced by one clamped point in thin plate vibrations.

    PubMed

    Filoche, Marcel; Mayboroda, Svitlana

    2009-12-18

    We discover a strong localization of flexural (bi-Laplacian) waves in rigid thin plates. We show that clamping just one point inside such a plate not only perturbs its spectral properties, but essentially divides the plate into two independently vibrating regions. This effect progressively appears when increasing the plate eccentricity. Such a localization is qualitatively and quantitatively different from the results known for the Laplacian waves in domains of irregular boundary. It would allow us to control the confinement of mechanical vibrations in rigid plates and of eddies in the slow Stokes flow. PMID:20366256

  20. Strong cooperative coupling of pressure-induced magnetic order and nematicity in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothapalli, K.; Böhmer, A. E.; Jayasekara, W. T.; Ueland, B. G.; Das, P.; Sapkota, A.; Taufour, V.; Xiao, Y.; Alp, E.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    A hallmark of the iron-based superconductors is the strong coupling between magnetic, structural and electronic degrees of freedom. However, a universal picture of the normal state properties of these compounds has been confounded by recent investigations of FeSe where the nematic (structural) and magnetic transitions appear to be decoupled. Here, using synchrotron-based high-energy x-ray diffraction and time-domain Mössbauer spectroscopy, we show that nematicity and magnetism in FeSe under applied pressure are indeed strongly coupled. Distinct structural and magnetic transitions are observed for pressures between 1.0 and 1.7 GPa and merge into a single first-order transition for pressures >~1.7 GPa, reminiscent of what has been found for the evolution of these transitions in the prototypical system Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2. Our results are consistent with a spin-driven mechanism for nematic order in FeSe and provide an important step towards a universal description of the normal state properties of the iron-based superconductors.

  1. Strong cooperative coupling of pressure-induced magnetic order and nematicity in FeSe.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, K; Böhmer, A E; Jayasekara, W T; Ueland, B G; Das, P; Sapkota, A; Taufour, V; Xiao, Y; Alp, E; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C; Kreyssig, A; Goldman, A I

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of the iron-based superconductors is the strong coupling between magnetic, structural and electronic degrees of freedom. However, a universal picture of the normal state properties of these compounds has been confounded by recent investigations of FeSe where the nematic (structural) and magnetic transitions appear to be decoupled. Here, using synchrotron-based high-energy x-ray diffraction and time-domain Mössbauer spectroscopy, we show that nematicity and magnetism in FeSe under applied pressure are indeed strongly coupled. Distinct structural and magnetic transitions are observed for pressures between 1.0 and 1.7 GPa and merge into a single first-order transition for pressures ≳1.7 GPa, reminiscent of what has been found for the evolution of these transitions in the prototypical system Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2. Our results are consistent with a spin-driven mechanism for nematic order in FeSe and provide an important step towards a universal description of the normal state properties of the iron-based superconductors. PMID:27582003

  2. Fermi surface nesting induced strong pairing in iron-based superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Terashima, K.; Sekiba, Y.; Bowen, J. H.; Nakayama, K.; Kawahara, T.; Sato, T.; Richard, P.; Xu, Y.-M.; Li, L. J.; Cao, G. H.; Xu, Z.-A.; Ding, H.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides raised the possibility of an unconventional superconducting mechanism in multiband materials. The observation of Fermi-surface (FS)-dependent nodeless superconducting gaps suggested that inter-FS interactions may play a crucial role in superconducting pairing. In the optimally hole-doped Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2, the pairing strength is enhanced simultaneously (2Δ/Tc≈7) on the nearly nested FS pockets, i.e., the inner hole-like (α) FS and the 2 hybridized electron-like FSs, whereas the pairing remains weak (2Δ/Tc≈3.6) in the poorly nested outer hole-like (β) FS. Here, we report that in the electron-doped BaFe1.85Co0.15As2, the FS nesting condition switches from the α to the β FS due to the opposite size changes for hole- and electron-like FSs upon electron doping. The strong pairing strength (2Δ/Tc≈6) is also found to switch to the nested β FS, indicating an intimate connection between FS nesting and superconducting pairing, and strongly supporting the inter-FS pairing mechanism in the iron-based superconductors. PMID:19359490

  3. Defect-induced strong localization of uranium dicarbide on the graphene surface.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Dai, Xing; Gao, Yang; Meng, Yan; Wang, Zhigang

    2014-11-01

    Defects such as the most stable hexavacancy (V6) distribute widely on neutron-irradiated graphite surfaces, which play a dominant role in immobilizing radioactive products released from nuclear fuels. By performing DFT calculations, we explore the interaction of gaseous uranium dicarbide (UC2) molecules on a graphene nanosheet with a V6 defect, in order to investigate the behavior of the representative vapor species of uranium carbide fuels in reactor cores. Results suggest that UC2 can be trapped in the V6 defect with considerable binding energy of >10 eV, with all the six dangling bonds of the V6 defect being saturated by UC2. Bonding nature analyses also reveal that the U-C interaction lies in the synergistic interplay between electrostatic and covalent interaction with extensive participation of U valence electrons from 5f to 7p orbitals, which further stimulate polarization of semi-core 6p orbitals and their subsequent contributions to the bonding. This strong interaction leads to a favorable binding of UC2 to the defective graphite surface, which reduces the capability of nuclear graphite to retain harmful fission products by the vacancies being filled with UC2. These findings highlight substantial chemical reactivity and strong localization of UC2 on the widespread V6 defects in nuclear graphite, and may provide an important reference in establishing modern nuclear reactor safety at the atomic level.

  4. Strong cooperative coupling of pressure-induced magnetic order and nematicity in FeSe

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, K.; Böhmer, A. E.; Jayasekara, W. T.; Ueland, B. G.; Das, P.; Sapkota, A.; Taufour, V.; Xiao, Y.; Alp, E.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of the iron-based superconductors is the strong coupling between magnetic, structural and electronic degrees of freedom. However, a universal picture of the normal state properties of these compounds has been confounded by recent investigations of FeSe where the nematic (structural) and magnetic transitions appear to be decoupled. Here, using synchrotron-based high-energy x-ray diffraction and time-domain Mössbauer spectroscopy, we show that nematicity and magnetism in FeSe under applied pressure are indeed strongly coupled. Distinct structural and magnetic transitions are observed for pressures between 1.0 and 1.7 GPa and merge into a single first-order transition for pressures ≳1.7 GPa, reminiscent of what has been found for the evolution of these transitions in the prototypical system Ba(Fe1−xCox)2As2. Our results are consistent with a spin-driven mechanism for nematic order in FeSe and provide an important step towards a universal description of the normal state properties of the iron-based superconductors. PMID:27582003

  5. MAGNETIC FIELD-DECAY-INDUCED ELECTRON CAPTURES: A STRONG HEAT SOURCE IN MAGNETAR CRUSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Randall L.; Kaplan, David L. E-mail: dkaplan@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2010-01-10

    We propose a new heating mechanism in magnetar crusts. Magnetars' crustal magnetic fields are much stronger than their surface fields; therefore, magnetic pressure partially supports the crust against gravity. The crust loses magnetic pressure support as the field decays and must compensate by increasing the electron degeneracy pressure; the accompanying increase in the electron Fermi energy induces nonequilibrium, exothermic electron captures. The total heat released via field-decay electron captures is comparable to the total magnetic energy in the crust. Thus, field-decay electron captures are an important, if not the primary, mechanism powering magnetars' soft X-ray emission.

  6. Amorphous tracks induced by energetic ions in strongly anisotropic solids with layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szenes, G.

    2006-07-01

    Common features of ion-induced tracks in layered structures are analysed in YBaCuO, BiSrCaCuO and in semiconducting GeS and MoS2 . In all crystals, the conduction is poor along the normal layer. The anisotropic electron properties lead to the formation of an ion-induced broad and a narrow thermal spike in these solids. The contribution of the two spikes to the formation of tracks can be separated in GeS. When the gap energy is low or zero (YBaCuO, BiSrCaCuO, MoS2), only the narrow spike controls the track formation, and the localization of the energy deposition is the same as in insulators. However, the fraction of the deposited energy transferred to the narrow spike is only about one-third of that in insulators. The anisotropic features of tracks show the effect of the energy bands. Good quantitative agreement is found between the experimental data and the predictions of the authors thermal spike model.

  7. Phase-transition oscillations induced by a strongly focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devailly, Clémence; Crauste-Thibierge, Caroline; Petrosyan, Artyom; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    We report the observation of a surprising phenomenon consisting in a oscillating phase transition which appears in a binary mixture when this is enlightened by a strongly focused infrared laser beam. The mixture is poly-methyl-meth-acrylate (PMMA)-3-octanone, which has an upper critical solution temperature at Tc=306.6 K and volume fraction ϕc=12.8 % [Crauste et al., arXiv:1310.6720, 2013]. We describe the dynamical properties of the oscillations, which are produced by a competition between various effects: the local accumulation of PMMA produced by the laser beam, thermophoresis, and nonlinear diffusion. We show that the main properties of this kind of oscillations can be reproduced in the Landau theory for a binary mixture in which a local driving mechanism, simulating the laser beam, is introduced.

  8. Defect passivation induced strong photoluminescence enhancement of rhombic monolayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Su, Weitao; Jin, Long; Qu, Xiaodan; Huo, Dexuan; Yang, Li

    2016-05-18

    Growing high quality monolayer MoS2 with strong photoluminescence (PL) is essential to produce light-emitting devices on the atomic scale. In this study we show that rhombic monolayer MoS2 with PL intensity 8 times stronger than those of chemical vapour deposition (CVD)-grown triangular and mechanically exfoliated (ME) monolayer MoS2 can be prepared by using CVD. Both Raman and PL measurements indicate low density of defects in rhombic monolayer MoS2 with enhanced PL intensity. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that passivation of defects in MoS2 removes trapping gap states, which may finally result in PL enhancement.

  9. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  10. Anisotropy induced crossover from weakly to strongly first order melting of two dimensional solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Santra, Mantu; Bagchi, Biman

    2013-05-01

    Melting and freezing transitions in two dimensional (2D) systems are known to show highly unusual characteristics. Most of the earlier studies considered atomic systems: the melting of 2D molecular solids is still largely unexplored. In order to understand the role of anisotropy as well as multiple energy and length scales present in molecular systems, here we report computer simulation studies of melting of 2D molecular systems. We computed a limited portion of the solid-liquid phase diagram. We find that the interplay between the strength of isotropic and anisotropic interactions can give rise to rich phase diagram consisting of isotropic liquid and two crystalline phases—honeycomb and oblique. The nature of the transition depends on the relative strength of the anisotropic interaction and a strongly first order melting turns into a weakly first order transition on increasing the strength of the isotropic interaction. This crossover can be attributed to an increase in stiffness of the solid phase free energy minimum on increasing the strength of the anisotropic interaction. The defects involved in melting of molecular systems are quite different from those known for the atomic systems.

  11. Secondary emission and acoustic-phonon scattering induced by strong magnetic fields in multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapega, V. F.; Belitsky, V. I.; Ruf, T.; Fuchs, H. D.; Cardona, M.; Ploog, K.

    1992-12-01

    A strong increase of low-frequency Raman scattering has been observed in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple quantum wells in magnetic fields up to 14 T. The spectra, consisting of background scattering, folded acoustic phonons, and additional features, show resonant behavior with respect to the laser frequency and the strength of the magnetic field. The broad background, usually related to geminate recombination, has its origin in a continuum of Raman processes with the emission of longitudinal-acoustic phonons where crystal momentum is not conserved. Such processes can become dominant when interface fluctuations allow for resonant scattering in individual quantum wells only. Thus phonons with all possible energies contribute to the background scattering efficiency. The observed folded longitudinal-acoustic phonons are in good agreement with calculated frequencies. Additional features, detected in all samples measured, are attributed to local vibrational modes tied to the gaps at the folded Brillouin-zone center and edge. Other peculiarities observed correspond to modes localized at crossings of the folded longitudinal- and transverse-acoustic branches inside the Brillouin zone. The appearance of these local modes is attributed to fluctuations in the well and barrier thicknesses of the quantum wells.

  12. Giant spin splitting, strong valley selective circular dichroism and valley-spin coupling induced in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jinfeng; Peng, Xiangyang; Xiao, Di; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Silicene is a potential candidate for valleytronics. However, in comparison with the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), silicene has a tiny energy gap and zero spin splitting at its Dirac valleys, being unfavorable for valleytronic applications. Based on first principles calculations, we find that by proximity with Bi(111) bilayer, the Dirac valleys of silicene acquire a sizable energy gap and giant spin splittings, which are even larger than the splittings of Mo S2 . Our calculations show that the silicene over Bi layer exhibits a strong valley-contrasting circular dichroism, enabling selective optical pumping of valley carriers. Due to the time reversal symmetry and the breaking of inversion symmetry, the Berry curvatures and the spin splittings are opposite at the K and K' valleys of silicene, and hence the valley and spin are locked and can be simultaneously polarized. In this way, silicene and likely other similar Dirac materials can be comparable to TMDs in valleytronics, which not only adds a new dimension to the properties of silicene but also expands the members of the valleytronic family.

  13. Characteristics of sea-cliff erosion induced by a strong winter storm in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Oded; Mushkin, Amit

    2013-07-01

    Changes in sea-cliff morphologies along the 30-km-long Sharon Escarpment segment of Israel's weakly cemented Mediterranean eolianite cliff line were analyzed to gain quantitative insights into erosion characteristics associated with a high-energy winter storm (10-20 year return interval). Ground-based repeat LiDAR measurements at five sites along the cliff line captured perturbations of cliff stability by basal wave scouring during the storm, subsequent post-storm gravity-driven slope failures in the cliff face above, and return of the system to transient stability within several months. Post-storm erosion, which amounted to 70% of the total volume of cliff erosion documented, resulted in dramatic local effects of up to 8 m of cliff-top retreat. And yet, at the larger scale of the 30-km cliff line examined, erosion during the storm and the year that followed affected less than 4% of the cliff length and does not appear to be above the average cliff-length annual erosion implied by previously published decadal-scale retreat rates along this sea cliff. Our results do not support a direct association between strong storm events and elevated erosion and retreat at the cliff-line scale.

  14. BMP4 and FGF strongly induce differentiation of mouse ES cells into oral ectoderm.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Hiroshi; Suga, Hidetaka; Yamada, Tomiko; Sakakibara, Mayu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Ozone, Chikafumi; Ogawa, Koichiro; Goto, Motomitsu; Banno, Ryoichi; Tsunekawa, Shin; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arima, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, oral ectoderm differentiates into the adenohypophysis, dental epithelia, salivary glands, and nasal pit. Few reports exist concerning the induction of oral ectoderm from embryonic stem (ES) cells. Generally, any lot differences in fetal bovine serum (FBS) and serum replacer may affect the induction of ES cell-differentiation. Using a previously established culture strategy for differentiation, the proportion of cell aggregates containing Pitx1+ oral ectoderm varied widely between 9-36% when several different lots of FBS or serum replacer were used. We therefore tried to enhance the differentiation method. We found that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) treatments improved oral ectoderm induction. Such treatment also improved the differentiation of oral ectoderm into the adenohypophysis. Furthermore, increased BMP4 treatment induced dental epithelium and mesenchyme. Such differentiation suggests that the Pitx1+ layer displays similar properties to oral ectoderm, as found in vivo. Differentiation of ES cells into oral ectoderm using different lots of FBS and serum replacer increased 78-90% after treatment with BMP4 and FGF. In summary, we have established a robust strategy for the induction of oral ectoderm differentiation from mouse ES cells. PMID:26209816

  15. Coupled barrier island-resort model: 1. Emergent instabilities induced by strong human-landscape interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2008-03-01

    As humans increasingly occupy and modify marginal landscapes, previously unobserved long timescale, emergent behaviors related to interactions between natural processes and human agency are possible. Barrier islands, which are low-lying strips of sand separated from a coast by lagoons, cut by inlets and topped by sand dunes, have been significantly modified through the development of tourist resorts. Resorts and barrier islands are dynamically coupled through storm damage and beach erosion, and measures taken to prevent or mitigate them. In response to rising sea level, a natural barrier island migrates steadily up the continental shelf. In contrast, we show that in a novel numerical model-coupling barrier island processes with resort development, storm damage, and hazard mitigation, policy decisions driven by market dynamics destabilize barrier island response to rising sea level, giving rise to emergent, episodic boom and bust cycles, which alternate in phase alongshore, and less frequent, regionally extensive resort destruction events. Developed barrier islands are precariously maintained at lower elevations and further offshore than their natural counterparts, a situation exacerbated by insurance, which can lead to island inundation. Our results suggest that coastal areas that have recently instituted protection measures eventually will experience a widespread upsurge in damage if these practices are sustained, even in the absence of climate-change-induced increased storminess.

  16. Tail biting induces a strong acute phase response and tail-end inflammation in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Mari; Orro, Toomas; Kokkonen, Teija; Munsterhjelm, Camilla; Peltoniemi, Olli; Valros, Anna

    2010-06-01

    The extent of inflammation associated with tail biting in finishing pigs was evaluated. Tail histopathology, carcass condemnation and the concentration of three acute phase proteins (APPs), C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid-A (SAA) and haptoglobin (Hp), were examined in 12 tail-bitten and 13 control pigs. The median concentrations of APPs were higher (P<0.01) in bitten (CRP 617.5mg/L, range 80.5-969.9; SAA 128.0mg/L, 6.2-774.4; Hp 2.8g/L, 1.6-3.5) than in control pigs (CRP 65.7mg/L, 28.4-180.4; SAA 6.2mg/L, 6.2-21.4; Hp 1.2g/L, 0.9-1.5). There was a tendency for APP concentrations to rise with the histopathological score but the differences were only statistically significant between some of the scores. Five (42%) bitten cases and one (8%) control pig had partial carcass condemnations owing to abscesses (P=0.07). The results show that tail biting induces an inflammatory response in the tail end leading to an acute phase response and formation of carcass abscesses. PMID:19398209

  17. Live, attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vehicles are strong inducers of immunity toward influenza B virus

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Victor C.; Kleimeyer, Loren H.; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-01

    Historically, vaccines developed toward influenza viruses of the B type using methodologies developed for influenza A viruses as a blueprint have not been equally efficacious or effective. Because most influenza research and public attention concerns influenza A viruses, these shortcomings have not been adequately addressed. In this manuscript, we utilized different influenza vaccine vehicles to compare immunogenicity and protection in mice and ferrets after vaccination against an influenza B virus. We report that plasmid DNA vaccines demonstrate low immunogenicity profiles and poor protection compared to either whole, inactivated influenza virus (IIV) or, live, attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines. When mixed prime:boost regimens using LAIV and IIV were studied, we observed a boosting effect in mice after priming with LAIV that was not seen when IIV was used as the prime. In ferrets LAIV induced high antibody titers after a single dose and provided a boost in IIV-primed animals. Regimens including LAIV as a prime demonstrated enhanced protection, and adjuvantation was required for efficacy using the IIV preparation. Our results differ from generally accepted influenza A virus vaccine models, and argue that strategies for control of influenza B virus should be considered separately from those for influenza A virus. PMID:18708106

  18. BMP4 and FGF strongly induce differentiation of mouse ES cells into oral ectoderm.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Hiroshi; Suga, Hidetaka; Yamada, Tomiko; Sakakibara, Mayu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Ozone, Chikafumi; Ogawa, Koichiro; Goto, Motomitsu; Banno, Ryoichi; Tsunekawa, Shin; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arima, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, oral ectoderm differentiates into the adenohypophysis, dental epithelia, salivary glands, and nasal pit. Few reports exist concerning the induction of oral ectoderm from embryonic stem (ES) cells. Generally, any lot differences in fetal bovine serum (FBS) and serum replacer may affect the induction of ES cell-differentiation. Using a previously established culture strategy for differentiation, the proportion of cell aggregates containing Pitx1+ oral ectoderm varied widely between 9-36% when several different lots of FBS or serum replacer were used. We therefore tried to enhance the differentiation method. We found that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) treatments improved oral ectoderm induction. Such treatment also improved the differentiation of oral ectoderm into the adenohypophysis. Furthermore, increased BMP4 treatment induced dental epithelium and mesenchyme. Such differentiation suggests that the Pitx1+ layer displays similar properties to oral ectoderm, as found in vivo. Differentiation of ES cells into oral ectoderm using different lots of FBS and serum replacer increased 78-90% after treatment with BMP4 and FGF. In summary, we have established a robust strategy for the induction of oral ectoderm differentiation from mouse ES cells.

  19. Shear Induced Reaction Localizations and Mechanisms of Energy Dissipation in PBX Subjected to Strong Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Igor

    2007-06-01

    Paper addresses two emerging topics: how reaction initiation arises when PBX is subjected to shock and how detonation wave becomes oscillating. We apply the 96-channel optical analyzer for simultaneous measurements of radiation from the reaction spots surface and stress field caused by shock or detonation reaction zone in multi-layer optical monitor. This metrology allows meso-scale probing of the 3-D structure of shock- or detonation- reaction-zone as well as revealing mechanisms of its formation at different initiation scenarios. The dominant role of the shear driven plastic deformation in initiation scenario is disclosed in all tested PBX-s (including simulants of PBXN-110, PBAN-128, PBXN-109, 111, 121 and B-2208), in wide range of PBX sample sizes: from 1 mm^3 (single crystal within the binder) up to few cm^3. This research is complementing a separate, longer running, theoretical effort by Dr. Steve Coffey that examines the solid state--quantum physics responsible for initiation of explosive crystals subjected to shock or impact. Finally, this represents a novel research effort to relate plastic deformation, energy dissipation and localization in crystals to shear and shear deformation. The accompanying experimental results strongly support Coffey's theoretical prediction that initiation is due to shear driven plastic deformation and is not due solely to uniform shock pressure. Finally, we will present and discuss the recently revealed phenomenon of the thermal precursor origination caused by the reaction front radiation. The role of this earlier unknown energy localization mechanism, at Shock-to-Detonation transition in PBX, will be shown as a function of HMX particle sizes and the PBX porosity.

  20. Aerosol-Induced Changes of Convective Cloud Anvils Produce Strong Climate Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koren, I.; Remer, L. A.; Altaratz, O.; Martins, J. V.; Davidi, A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of aerosol on clouds poses one of the largest uncertainties in estimating the anthropogenic contribution to climate change. Small human-induced perturbations to cloud characteristics via aerosol pathways can create a change in the top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing of hundreds of Wm(exp-2) . Here we focus on links between aerosol and deep convective clouds of the Atlantic and Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zones, noting that the aerosol environment in each region is entirely different. The tops of these vertically developed clouds consisting of mostly ice can reach high levels of the atmosphere, overshooting the lower stratosphere and reaching altitudes greater than 16 km. We show a link between aerosol, clouds and the free atmosphere wind profile that can change the magnitude and sign of the overall climate radiative forcing. We find that increased aerosol loading is associated with taller cloud towers and anvils. The taller clouds reach levels of enhanced wind speeds that act to spread and thin the anvi1 clouds, increasing areal coverage and decreasing cloud optical depth. The radiative effect of this transition is to create a positive radiative forcing (warming) at top-of-atmosphere. Furthermore we introduce the cloud optical depth (r), cloud height (Z) forcing space and show that underestimation of radiative forcing is likely to occur in cases of non homogenous clouds. Specifically, the mean radiative forcing of towers and anvils in the same scene can be several times greater than simply calculating the forcing from the mean cloud optical depth in the scene. Limitations of the method are discussed, alternative sources of aerosol loading are tested and meteorological variance is restricted, but the trend of taller clouds; increased and thinner anvils associated with increased aerosol loading remains robust through all the different tests and perturbations.

  1. Strong anisotropy of momentum-relaxation time induced by intermolecular vibrations of single-crystal organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the relationships between intermolecular vibrations and anisotropic transport properties of pentacene and rubrene single-crystal organic semiconductors. Using our wave-packet approach based on the Kubo formula beyond the effective-mass approximation with the assumption of an isotropic momentum-relaxation time, we find that the intermolecular vibrations induce a strong anisotropic momentum-relaxation time but moderate the anisotropy of carrier mobility much more than that of the effective mass. This clarifies the mechanism behind the deviation of the anisotropic ratio of mobility from that of effective mass observed in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy experiments.

  2. Size/morphology induced tunable luminescence in upconversion crystals: ultra-strong single-band emission and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaofeng; Zeng, Songshan; Yu, Jingfang; Ji, Xiaoming; Zeng, Huidan; Xin, Shuangyu; Wang, Yuhua; Sun, Luyi

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we present a two-step method to controllably synthesize novel and highly efficient upconversion materials, Lu5O4F7:Er(3+),Yb(3+) nano/micro-crystals, and investigate their size/morphology induced tunable upconversion properties. In addition to the common phenomenon aroused by a surface quenching effect, direct experimental evidence for the regulation of phonon modes is obtained in nanoparticles. The findings in this work advance the existing mechanisms for the general explanation of size/morphology induced upconversion features. Because of the adjustment of phonon energy and density as well as the surface quenching effect, the biocompatible Lu5O4F7:Er(3+),Yb(3+) nanoparticles exhibit an ultra-strong single-band red upconversion, rendering them promising for biomedical applications.

  3. Strong-field induced dissociation dynamics in 1,2-dibromoethane traced by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterley, A. S.; Lackner, F.; Neumark, D. M.; Leone, S. R.; Gessner, O.

    2016-05-01

    Strong field induced dissociation dynamics of the small haloalkane 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) have been explored using femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy. Dynamics are initiated by a near IR pump pulse with intensities between 75 and 220 TW cm-2, and are probed by the atomic site specific XUV absorption of the Br 3d levels. Immediately upon ionization, the spectral signatures of molecular ions appear. These molecular peaks decay in tandem with the appearance of atomic Br peaks in charge states of 0, + 1 and + 2, which are all monitored simultaneously. Neutral Br atoms are eliminated in 300 fs, presumably from statistical dissociation of vibrationally hot DBE+ ions, Br+ ions are eliminated in 70 fs from a more energetic dissociative ionization pathway, and Br++ ions are eliminated within the duration of the 35 fs pump pulse. The simultaneous recording of multiple parent molecule and fragment ion traces enables new insight into predominant dissociation pathways induced by strong field ionization of organic molecules.

  4. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Poggianella, Monica; Slon Campos, José L; Chan, Kuan Rong; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Bestagno, Marco; Ooi, Eng Eong; Burrone, Oscar R

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII) of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE) in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well.

  5. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kuan Rong; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Bestagno, Marco; Ooi, Eng Eong; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII) of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE) in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well. PMID:26218926

  6. Strong resilience of soil respiration components to drought-induced die-off resulting in forest secondary succession.

    PubMed

    Barba, Josep; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Poyatos, Rafael; Janssens, Ivan A; Lloret, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    How forests cope with drought-induced perturbations and how the dependence of soil respiration on environmental and biological drivers is affected in a warming and drying context are becoming key questions. The aims of this study were to determine whether drought-induced die-off and forest succession were reflected in soil respiration and its components and to determine the influence of climate on the soil respiration components. We used the mesh exclusion method to study seasonal variations in soil respiration (R S) and its components: heterotrophic (R H) and autotrophic (R A) [further split into fine root (R R) and mycorrhizal respiration (R M)] in a mixed Mediterranean forest where Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is undergoing a drought-induced die-off and is being replaced by holm oak (Quercus ilex L.). Drought-induced pine die-off was not reflected in R S nor in its components, which denotes a high functional resilience of the plant and soil system to pine die-off. However, the succession from Scots pine to holm oak resulted in a reduction of R H and thus in an important decrease of total respiration (R S was 36 % lower in holm oaks than in non-defoliated pines). Furthermore, R S and all its components were strongly regulated by soil water content-and-temperature interaction. Since Scots pine die-off and Quercus species colonization seems to be widely occurring at the driest limit of the Scots pine distribution, the functional resilience of the soil system over die-off and the decrease of R S from Scots pine to holm oak could have direct consequences for the C balance of these ecosystems. PMID:26879544

  7. Strong resilience of soil respiration components to drought-induced die-off resulting in forest secondary succession.

    PubMed

    Barba, Josep; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Poyatos, Rafael; Janssens, Ivan A; Lloret, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    How forests cope with drought-induced perturbations and how the dependence of soil respiration on environmental and biological drivers is affected in a warming and drying context are becoming key questions. The aims of this study were to determine whether drought-induced die-off and forest succession were reflected in soil respiration and its components and to determine the influence of climate on the soil respiration components. We used the mesh exclusion method to study seasonal variations in soil respiration (R S) and its components: heterotrophic (R H) and autotrophic (R A) [further split into fine root (R R) and mycorrhizal respiration (R M)] in a mixed Mediterranean forest where Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is undergoing a drought-induced die-off and is being replaced by holm oak (Quercus ilex L.). Drought-induced pine die-off was not reflected in R S nor in its components, which denotes a high functional resilience of the plant and soil system to pine die-off. However, the succession from Scots pine to holm oak resulted in a reduction of R H and thus in an important decrease of total respiration (R S was 36 % lower in holm oaks than in non-defoliated pines). Furthermore, R S and all its components were strongly regulated by soil water content-and-temperature interaction. Since Scots pine die-off and Quercus species colonization seems to be widely occurring at the driest limit of the Scots pine distribution, the functional resilience of the soil system over die-off and the decrease of R S from Scots pine to holm oak could have direct consequences for the C balance of these ecosystems.

  8. Measurement of gas density and temperature distributions in strongly rotating UF/sub 6/ using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, R.A.; Caldwell, S.E.; White, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique for using Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) signals to measure the distribution of gas density and temperature in strongly rotating UF/sub 6/ gas is presented. An external pulsed laser is used to excite the rotating UF/sub 6/ gas, producing an exponentially decaying fluorescence signal. A multi-channel fiber optics system simultaneously collects the fluorescence signals emanating from a number of points in the gas. The signals from each optical channel are digitized and processed to determine the fluorescence signal intensity and decay lifetime at each of the points of observation by means of a least squares fitting process. Gas densities and temperatures are then determined from the intensity and lifetime data. A recently constructed LIF probe system is described and an analysis of the unfolding techniques necessary to process the signal data is presented. Preliminary data, obtained in tests of the probe system in a laboratory rotor, are presented.

  9. Strong ionization asymmetry in a geometrically symmetric radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma induced by sawtooth voltage waveforms.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, Bastien; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Greb, Arthur; Johnson, Erik V; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-27

    The ionization dynamics in geometrically symmetric parallel plate capacitively coupled plasmas driven by radio frequency tailored voltage waveforms is investigated using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Temporally asymmetric waveforms induce spatial asymmetries and offer control of the spatiotemporal dynamics of electron heating and associated ionization structures. Sawtooth waveforms with different rise and fall rates are employed using truncated Fourier series approximations of an ideal sawtooth. Experimental PROES results obtained in argon plasmas are compared with PIC simulations, showing excellent agreement. With waveforms comprising a fast voltage drop followed by a slower rise, the faster sheath expansion in front of the powered electrode causes strongly enhanced ionization in this region. The complementary waveform causes an analogous effect in front of the grounded electrode. PMID:25860749

  10. An injectable, low-toxicity phospholipid-based phase separation gel that induces strong and persistent immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Xue, Jiao; Wang, Luyao; Peng, Ke; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2016-10-01

    Sustained antigen delivery using incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) can induce strong, long-term immune response, but it can also cause severe side effects. Here we describe an injectable, phospholipid-based phase separation gel (PPSG) that readily transforms in situ into a drug depot. PPSG loaded with the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) supported sustained OVA release in mice that lasted nearly one month. Immunizing mice with a single injection of PPSG/OVA elicited a strong and persistent increase in titers of OVA-specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a. Co-administering CpG-ODN further increased antibody titers. Such co-administration recruited dendritic cells to injection sites and activated dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes. Moreover, immunization with PPSG/OVA/CpG resulted in potent memory antibody responses and high frequency of memory T cells. Remarkably, PPSG/OVA/CpG was associated with much lower toxicity at injection sites than IFA/OVA/CpG, and it showed no systemic toxicity such as to lymph nodes or spleen. These findings illustrate the potential of injectable PPSG for sustained, minimally toxic delivery of antigens and adjuvants. PMID:27522253

  11. Seismic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in rocks with strong permeability fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Germán Rubino, J; Monachesi, Leonardo B; Müller, Tobias M; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Oscillatory fluid movements in heterogeneous porous rocks induced by seismic waves cause dissipation of wave field energy. The resulting seismic signature depends not only on the rock compressibility distribution, but also on a statistically averaged permeability. This so-called equivalent seismic permeability does not, however, coincide with the respective equivalent flow permeability. While this issue has been analyzed for one-dimensional (1D) media, the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cases remain unexplored. In this work, this topic is analyzed for 2D random medium realizations having strong permeability fluctuations. With this objective, oscillatory compressibility simulations based on the quasi-static poroelasticity equations are performed. Numerical analysis shows that strong permeability fluctuations diminish the magnitude of attenuation and velocity dispersion due to fluid flow, while the frequency range where these effects are significant gets broader. By comparing the acoustic responses obtained using different permeability averages, it is also shown that at very low frequencies the equivalent seismic permeability is similar to the equivalent flow permeability, while for very high frequencies this parameter approaches the arithmetic average of the permeability field. These seemingly generic findings have potentially important implications with regard to the estimation of equivalent flow permeability from seismic data. PMID:25669286

  12. Seismic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in rocks with strong permeability fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Germán Rubino, J; Monachesi, Leonardo B; Müller, Tobias M; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Oscillatory fluid movements in heterogeneous porous rocks induced by seismic waves cause dissipation of wave field energy. The resulting seismic signature depends not only on the rock compressibility distribution, but also on a statistically averaged permeability. This so-called equivalent seismic permeability does not, however, coincide with the respective equivalent flow permeability. While this issue has been analyzed for one-dimensional (1D) media, the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cases remain unexplored. In this work, this topic is analyzed for 2D random medium realizations having strong permeability fluctuations. With this objective, oscillatory compressibility simulations based on the quasi-static poroelasticity equations are performed. Numerical analysis shows that strong permeability fluctuations diminish the magnitude of attenuation and velocity dispersion due to fluid flow, while the frequency range where these effects are significant gets broader. By comparing the acoustic responses obtained using different permeability averages, it is also shown that at very low frequencies the equivalent seismic permeability is similar to the equivalent flow permeability, while for very high frequencies this parameter approaches the arithmetic average of the permeability field. These seemingly generic findings have potentially important implications with regard to the estimation of equivalent flow permeability from seismic data.

  13. A new 5-lipoxygenase selective inhibitor derived from Artocarpus communis strongly inhibits arachidonic acid-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Koshihara, Y; Fujimoto, Y; Inoue, H

    1988-06-01

    Natural compounds isolated from the Indonesian plant, Artocarpus communis, inhibit 5-lipoxygenase of cultured mastocytoma cells. One of five compounds, AC-5-1, strongly inhibits 5-lipoxygenase with a half-inhibition dose of 5 +/- 0.12 X 10(-8) M. However, prostaglandin synthesizing activity is not inhibited until 10(-5) M. AC-5-1 is a highly selective inhibitor for 5-lipoxygenase. The AC-5-1 at 10(-5) M inhibits 96% of leukotriene C4 synthesis of mouse peritoneal cells facilitated by calcium-ionophore. Arachidonic acid-induced ear edema of mice, an in vivo inflammatory model, involving leukotriene induction, is strongly inhibited by AC-5-1 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition is the strongest of any inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase reported previously. Since the natural compound AC-5-1 can selectively inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and affect in vivo inflammation, it will be interesting to investigate the role of leukotrienes on inflammation and other physiological processes.

  14. Thymoquinone strongly inhibits fMLF-induced neutrophil functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boudiaf, Kaouthar; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Belambri, Sahra Amel; Marie, Jean-Claude; Derradji, Yacine; Benboubetra, Mustapha; El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2016-03-15

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are key players in host defense against pathogens through the robust production of superoxide anion by the NADPH oxidase and the release of antibacterial proteins from granules. However, inappropriate release of these agents in the extracellular environment induces severe tissue injury, thereby contributing to the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. Many studies have been carried out to identify molecules capable of inhibiting phagocyte functions, in particular superoxide anion production, for therapeutic purposes. In the present study, we show that thymoquinone (TQ), the major component of the volatile oil from Nigella sativa (black cumin) seeds strongly inhibits fMLF-induced superoxide production and granules exocytosis in neutrophils. The inhibition of superoxide anion was not due to a scavenger effect, as TQ did not inhibit superoxide anion produced by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. Interestingly, TQ impaired the phosphorylation on Ser-304 and Ser-328 of p47(PHOX), a cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase. TQ also attenuated specific and azurophilic granule exocytosis in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of gp91(PHOX) and CD11b, and release of myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, both the PKC and MAPK pathways, which are involved in p47(PHOX) phosphorylation and granules exocytosis, respectively, were inhibited by TQ in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils. Finally, in a model of pleurisy induced by λ-carrageenan in rats, TQ reduced neutrophil accumulation in the pleural space, showing that it not only inhibits PMN functions in vitro, but also exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. Thus, TQ possesses promising anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential. PMID:26774451

  15. Chloroquine or Chloroquine-PI3K/Akt Pathway Inhibitor Combinations Strongly Promote γ-Irradiation-Induced Cell Death in Primary Stem-Like Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Firat, Elke; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Gaedicke, Simone; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    We asked whether inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, which is highly active in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and upregulated in response to genotoxic treatments, promote γ-irradiationγIR)-induced cell death in highly radioresistant, patient-derived stem-like glioma cells (SLGCs). Surprisingly, in most cases the inhibitors did not promote γIR-induced cell death. In contrast, the strongly cytostatic Ly294002 and PI-103 even tended to reduce it. Since autophagy was induced we examined whether addition of the clinically applicable autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) would trigger cell death in SLGCs. Triple therapy with CQ at doses as low as 5 to 10 µM indeed caused strong apoptosis. At slightly higher doses, CQ alone strongly promoted γIR-induced apoptosis in all SLGC lines examined. The strong apoptosis in combinations with CQ was invariably associated with strong accumulation of the autophagosomal marker LC3-II, indicating inhibition of late autophagy. Thus, autophagy-promoting effects of PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitors apparently hinder cell death induction in γ-irradiated SLGCs. However, as we show here for the first time, the late autophagy inhibitor CQ strongly promotes γIR-induced cell death in highly radioresistant CSCs, and triple combinations of CQ, γIR and a PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor permit reduction of the CQ dose required to trigger cell death. PMID:23091617

  16. Strong nuclear ring currents and magnetic fields in pseudorotating OsH4 molecules induced by circularly polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Barth, Ingo; Bressler, Christian; Koseki, Shiro; Manz, Jörn

    2012-06-01

    We design a circularly polarized laser pulse in the infrared frequency and femtosecond time domains, for excitation of the OsH(4) molecule in its first excited pseudorotational state of the triply-degenerate bend. The OsH(4) molecule need not be pre-oriented. After excitation, the central nucleus Os carries out pseudorotation about the axis parallel to the direction of propagation of the laser pulse. This pseudorotation causes a strong electric ring current with a value I=1.53 e fs(-1). The mean value of the radius of the ring current is very small, R=0.0031 a(0), where a(0) is the Bohr radius. According to the Biot-Savart law (|B(R=0)| ~I/R)), this nuclear ring current induces the strongest magnetic field predicted so far in molecules, with a central peak absolute value |B(R=0)| =623 T. To monitor the effect, we propose an IR-pump-X-ray-probe versus an X-ray-probe-only experiment, at the K- and L-edges of X-ray ionization. The results are based on the general quantum theory of excitations of pseudorotations in tetrahedral molecules AB(4), driven by a circularly polarized laser pulse. PMID:22389250

  17. Naegleria fowleri lysate induces strong cytopathic effects and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in rat microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang-Jin; Park, Chang-Eun; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Jung, Suk-Yul; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2011-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a ubiquitous free-living ameba, causes fatal primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. N. fowleri trophozoites are known to induce cytopathic changes upon contact with microglial cells, including necrotic and apoptotic cell death and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In this study, we treated rat microglial cells with amebic lysate to probe contact-independent mechanisms for cytotoxicity, determining through a combination of light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy whether N. fowleri lysate could effect on both necrosis and apoptosis on microglia in a time- as well as dose-dependent fashion. A (51)Cr release assay demonstrated pronounced lysate induction of cytotoxicity (71.5%) toward microglial cells by 24 hr after its addition to cultures. In an assay of pro-inflammatory cytokine release, microglial cells treated with N. fowleri lysate produced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, though generation of the former 2 cytokines was reduced with time, and that of the last increased throughout the experimental period. In summary, N. fowleri lysate exerted strong cytopathic effects on microglial cells, and elicited pro-inflammatory cytokine release as a primary immune response. PMID:22072830

  18. Naegleria fowleri lysate induces strong cytopathic effects and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in rat microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang-Jin; Park, Chang-Eun; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Jung, Suk-Yul; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2011-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a ubiquitous free-living ameba, causes fatal primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. N. fowleri trophozoites are known to induce cytopathic changes upon contact with microglial cells, including necrotic and apoptotic cell death and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In this study, we treated rat microglial cells with amebic lysate to probe contact-independent mechanisms for cytotoxicity, determining through a combination of light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy whether N. fowleri lysate could effect on both necrosis and apoptosis on microglia in a time- as well as dose-dependent fashion. A (51)Cr release assay demonstrated pronounced lysate induction of cytotoxicity (71.5%) toward microglial cells by 24 hr after its addition to cultures. In an assay of pro-inflammatory cytokine release, microglial cells treated with N. fowleri lysate produced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, though generation of the former 2 cytokines was reduced with time, and that of the last increased throughout the experimental period. In summary, N. fowleri lysate exerted strong cytopathic effects on microglial cells, and elicited pro-inflammatory cytokine release as a primary immune response.

  19. Naegleria fowleri Lysate Induces Strong Cytopathic Effects and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Release in Rat Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang-Jin; Park, Chang-Eun; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Jung, Suk-Yul

    2011-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a ubiquitous free-living ameba, causes fatal primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. N. fowleri trophozoites are known to induce cytopathic changes upon contact with microglial cells, including necrotic and apoptotic cell death and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In this study, we treated rat microglial cells with amebic lysate to probe contact-independent mechanisms for cytotoxicity, determining through a combination of light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy whether N. fowleri lysate could effect on both necrosis and apoptosis on microglia in a time- as well as dose-dependent fashion. A 51Cr release assay demonstrated pronounced lysate induction of cytotoxicity (71.5%) toward microglial cells by 24 hr after its addition to cultures. In an assay of pro-inflammatory cytokine release, microglial cells treated with N. fowleri lysate produced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, though generation of the former 2 cytokines was reduced with time, and that of the last increased throughout the experimental period. In summary, N. fowleri lysate exerted strong cytopathic effects on microglial cells, and elicited pro-inflammatory cytokine release as a primary immune response. PMID:22072830

  20. Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence reveals strong representation of photosynthesis at ecosystem level in rice paddy field in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nasahara, K. N.; Akitsu, T.; Ono, K.; Miyata, A.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence emission from ecosystem induced by sunlight (Sun-Induced Fluorescence: SIF) is now a key factor to accurately estimate the ecosystem-level photosynthesis activity as suggested by satellite studies, and has been recently detected by satellites [Frankenberg et al., 2011; Guanter et al., 2012; Joiner et al., 2013] and measured at field stations [Daumard et al., 2010; Porcar-Castell, 2011]. However, the few example of field-based assessment on the representation ability reduces its value for the availability to better understand the dynamics in CO2uptake by land ecosystem. To elucidate the potential of SIF to estimate ecosystem GPP in typical Asian crop type, the canopy-top SIF was calculated from the spectrum data in Japanese rice paddy field in Mase in central Japan (36°03'N, 140°01'E, 11 m a.s.l.), and compared with eddy-tower measured GPP on half-hourly and daily bases during seven years from 2006 to 2012. The rice (Oriza sativa L.; cultivar Koshihikari) was transplanted in May and harvested in September normally. The SIF was estimated from the spectrums of downward Sun irradiance and upward canopy-reflected radiance measured at the height of 3m above ground by HemiSpherical Spectro-Radiometer (HSSR), consisting of the spectroradiometer (MS-700, Eko inc., Tokyo, Japan) with the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of 10 nm and wavelength interval of 3.3 nm. The SIF around 760nm (O2-A band: Fs760) was calculated according to the Fraunhofer Line Depth principle [Maier et al., 2003] with several additional arrangements. The GPP increased almost linearly as both Fs760 and APAR (Absorbed Photosyntethically Active Radiation) increased based on monthly-averaged diurnal courses during the growing season in 2006. The slopes of their regression lines differed much among the months in APAR, but in Fs760. These nearly constant relationships among the months between GPP and Fs760 were kept for all the observation years. Daily averaged GPP and Fs760

  1. Phenotypic plasticity in growth and fecundity induced by strong population fluctuations affects reproductive traits of female fish.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, Juha; Urpanen, Olli; Keskinen, Tapio; Huuskonen, Hannu; Sarvala, Jouko; Valkeajärvi, Pentti; Marjomäki, Timo J

    2016-02-01

    Fish are known for their high phenotypic plasticity in life-history traits in relation to environmental variability, and this is particularly pronounced among salmonids in the Northern Hemisphere. Resource limitation leads to trade-offs in phenotypic plasticity between life-history traits related to the reproduction, growth, and survival of individual fish, which have consequences for the age and size distributions of populations, as well as their dynamics and productivity. We studied the effect of plasticity in growth and fecundity of vendace females on their reproductive traits using a series of long-term incubation experiments. The wild parental fish originated from four separate populations with markedly different densities, and hence naturally induced differences in their growth and fecundity. The energy allocation to somatic tissues and eggs prior to spawning served as a proxy for total resource availability to individual females, and its effects on offspring survival and growth were analyzed. Vendace females allocated a rather constant proportion of available energy to eggs (per body mass) despite different growth patterns depending on the total resources in the different lakes; investment into eggs thus dictated the share remaining for growth. The energy allocation to eggs per mass was higher in young than in old spawners and the egg size and the relative fecundity differed between them: Young females produced more and smaller eggs and larvae than old spawners. In contrast to earlier observations of salmonids, a shortage of maternal food resources did not increase offspring size and survival. Vendace females in sparse populations with ample resources and high growth produced larger eggs and larvae. Vendace accommodate strong population fluctuations by their high plasticity in growth and fecundity, which affect their offspring size and consequently their recruitment and productivity, and account for their persistence and resilience in the face of high

  2. Tendon progenitor cells in injured tendons have strong chondrogenic potential: the CD105-negative subpopulation induces chondrogenic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-12-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers, and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous bone morphogenetic proteins or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a coreceptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair.

  3. Strong synergistic induction of CYP1A1 expression by andrographolide plus typical CYP1A inducers in mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaruchotikamol, Atika; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan Sirisangtrakul, Wanna; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Kawasaki, Yuki; Nemoto, Nobuo

    2007-10-15

    The effects of andrographolide, the major diterpenoid constituent of Andrographis paniculata, on the expression of cytochrome P450 superfamily 1 members, including CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1, as well as on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes were investigated in comparison with the effects of typical CYP1A inducers, including benz[a]anthracene, {beta}-naphthoflavone, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. Andrographolide significantly induced the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs in a concentration-dependent manner, as did the typical CYP1A inducers, but did not induce that of CYP1B1 or AhR. Interestingly, andrographolide plus the typical CYP1A inducers synergistically induced CYP1A1 expression, and the synergism was blocked by an AhR antagonist, resveratrol. The CYP1A1 enzyme activity showed a similar pattern of induction. This is the first report that shows that andrographolide has a potency to induce CYP1A1 enzyme and indicates that andrographolide could be a very useful compound for investigating the regulatory mechanism of the CYP1A1 induction pathway. In addition, our findings suggest preparing advice for rational administration of A. paniculata, according to its ability to induce CYP1A1 expression.

  4. Strong-field induced XUV transmission and multiplet splitting in 4d(-1)6p core-excited Xe studied by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Pfeiffer, Adrian N; Neumark, Daniel M; Leone, Stephen R; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-12-28

    Light-induced coupling of core-excited states of Xe atoms is investigated by femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy with photon energies ranging from 50 eV to 72 eV. Coupling of the 4d(-1)((2)D(5/2))6p((2)P(3/2)) (65.1 eV) and 4d(-1)((2)D(3/2))6p((2)P(1/2)) (67.0 eV) core-excited states to nearby states by a strong infrared laser field leads to a threefold enhancement of XUV transmission. The transmission at 65.1 eV (67.0 eV) changes from 3.2 ± 0.4% (5.9 ± 0.5%) without the coupling laser to 9 ± 2% (22 ± 5%) at the maximum of the laser field. A strong-field induced broad XUV absorption feature between 60 eV and 65 eV is ascribed to splitting of the field-free absorption lines into multiple branches when the Rabi frequencies of the coupling transitions exceed the infrared laser frequency. This picture is supported by a comparison of the strong-field induced absorption spectrum with a numerical integration of the von Neumann equation for a few-level quantum system. The valence hole-alignment of strong-field ionized Xe is revisited, confirming the previously observed reduced alignment compared to theoretical predictions.

  5. Strong hyperfine-induced modulation of an optically driven hole spin in an InAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S. G.; Economou, Sophia E.; Greilich, A.; Barnes, Edwin; Sweeney, T.; Bracker, A. S.; Gammon, D.

    2014-02-01

    Compared to electrons, holes in InAs quantum dots have a significantly weaker hyperfine interaction that leads to less dephasing from nuclear spins. Thus many recent studies have suggested that nuclear spins are unimportant for hole-spin dynamics compared to electric-field fluctuations. We show that the hole hyperfine interaction can have a strong effect on hole-spin coherence measurements through a nuclear feedback effect. The nuclear polarization is generated through a unique process that is dependent on the anisotropy of the hole hyperfine interaction and the coherent precession of nuclear spins, giving rise to strong modulation at the nuclear precession frequency.

  6. Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karsch, F.; Vogelsang, V.

    2009-09-29

    We will give here an overview of our theory of the strong interactions, Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and its properties. We will also briefly review the history of the study of the strong interactions, and the discoveries that ultimately led to the formulation of QCD. The strong force is one of the four known fundamental forces in nature, the others being the electromagnetic, the weak and the gravitational force. The strong force, usually referred to by scientists as the 'strong interaction', is relevant at the subatomic level, where it is responsible for the binding of protons and neutrons to atomic nuclei. To do this, it must overcome the electric repulsion between the protons in an atomic nucleus and be the most powerful force over distances of a few fm (1fm=1 femtometer=1 fermi=10{sup -15}m), the typical size of a nucleus. This property gave the strong force its name.

  7. Strong covalency-induced recombination centers in perovskite solar cell material CH3NH3PbI3.

    PubMed

    Agiorgousis, Michael L; Sun, Yi-Yang; Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Shengbai

    2014-10-15

    Inorganic-organic hybrid perovskites are a new family of solar cell materials, which have recently been used to make solar cells with efficiency approaching 20%. Here, we report the unique defect chemistry of the prototype material, CH3NH3PbI3, based on first-principles calculation. We found that both the Pb cations and I anions in this material exhibit strong covalency as characterized by the formation of Pb dimers and I trimers with strong covalent bonds at some of the intrinsic defects. The Pb dimers and I trimers are only stabilized in a particular charge state with significantly lowered energy, which leads to deep charge-state transition levels within the band gap, in contradiction to a recent proposal that this system has only shallow intrinsic defects. Our results show that, in order to prevent the deep-level defects from being effective recombination centers, the equilibrium carrier concentrations should be controlled so that the Fermi energy is about 0.3 eV away from the band edges. Beyond this range, according to a Shockley-Read-Hall analysis, the non-equilibrium carrier lifetime will be strongly affected by the concentration of I vacancies and the anti-site defects with I occupying a CH3NH3 site.

  8. Ferromagnetism: Sulfur Doping Induces Strong Ferromagnetic Ordering in Graphene: Effect of Concentration and Substitution Mechanism (Adv. Mater. 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Błoński, Piotr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Šimek, Petr; Petr, Martin; Pumera, Martin; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-01

    R. Zbořil and co-workers show that doping a graphene lattice with sulfur induces magnetic centers which display ferromagnetic order below ≈62 K. As described on page 5045, sulfur doping promotes magnetically active configurations resembling the gamma-thiothiapyrone motif. Enhanced magnetic properties of sulfur-doped graphene are attributed to two unpaired electrons from each sulfur atom injected into the graphene conducting band where they are delocalized between the S and C atoms. PMID:27372723

  9. Control of strong ground motion of mining-induced earthquakes by the strength of the seismogenic rock mass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.

    2002-01-01

    The shear stress ?? that can be sustained by the rock mass in the environs of a mining-induced earthquake controls the near-fault peak ground velocity v of that event according to v???0.25(??/G) ??, where ?? is the shear wave speed and G is the modulus of rigidity. To estimate ?? at mining depths, I review the results of four studies involving Witwatersrand tremors that relate to the bulk shear strength. The first and most general analysis uses the common assumptions that the seismogenic crust is pervasively faulted, has hydrostatic pore pressure before mining, and an extensional stress state that is close to failure. Mining operations reduce the pore pressure to zero within the mine and redistribute the stresses such that, in localized regions, the state of stress is again at the point of failure. Laboratory friction experiments can be used to estimate ?? in the zero-pore-pressure regime. Second, model calculations of states of stress in the vicinity of milling at about 3 km depth indicated the shear stress available to cause faulting near the centre of a distribution of induced earthquakes. Third, laboratory experiments combined with microscopic analyses of fault gouge from the rupture zone of a mining-induced event provided an estimate of the average shear stress acting on the fault to cause this earthquake at a depth of 2 km. Fourth, moment tensors determined for mining- induced earthquakes usually show substantial implosive components, from which it is straightforward to estimate ??. These four different analyses yield estimates of ?? that fall in the range 30 to 61 MPa which implies that near-fault particle velocities could he as high as about 1.5 m/s. To the extent that the causative fault ruptures previously intact rock, both ?? and v, in localized regions, could be several times higher than 61 MPa and 1.5 m/s.

  10. SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds induce RISC-mediated antisense strand selection and strong gene-silencing activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Takanori; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Takei, Yoshifumi; Mihara, Keichiro; Sato, Yuichiro; Seyama, Toshio

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds (Ar-siRNAs) at 5 Prime -sense strand were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs increased resistance against nuclease degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs were thermodynamically stable compared with the unmodified siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High levels of cellular uptake and cytoplasmic localization were found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong gene-silencing efficacy was exhibited in the Ar-siRNAs. -- Abstract: Short interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells. In this study, we focused on the development of siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds in order to improve the potency of RNAi and thus to overcome several problems with siRNAs, such as cellular delivery and nuclease stability. The siRNAs conjugated with phenyl, hydroxyphenyl, naphthyl, and pyrenyl derivatives showed strong resistance to nuclease degradation, and were thermodynamically stable compared with unmodified siRNA. A high level of membrane permeability in HeLa cells was also observed. Moreover, these siRNAs exhibited enhanced RNAi efficacy, which exceeded that of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified siRNAs, against exogenous Renilla luciferase in HeLa cells. In particular, abundant cytoplasmic localization and strong gene-silencing efficacy were found in the siRNAs conjugated with phenyl and hydroxyphenyl derivatives. The novel siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds are promising candidates for a new generation of modified siRNAs that can solve many of the problems associated with RNAi technology.

  11. Envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV purified with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin induce strong immune responses.

    PubMed

    Gilljam, G

    1993-05-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography was used to purify in a single step the envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV. Envelope glycoproteins carry the major determinants essential for protection by the humoral immune response. The purification of these proteins has previously been a laborious procedure. The glycoproteins were purified by a one-step procedure to a high level of purity by using Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA). The purified glycoprotein had CD4-binding and antigenic reactivities. Strong immune responses to envelope proteins and peptides were seen in mice and primates after immunization with these preparations.

  12. Tunability over three frequency bands induced by mode transition in relativistic backward wave oscillator with strong end reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Fan, Juping; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Sun, Jun

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents an efficient approach to realizing the frequency tunability of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) over three frequency bands by mode transition without changing the slow wave structure (SWS). It is figured out that the transition of the operation mode in the RBWO can be efficiently achieved by using the strong end reflection of the SWS. This mode transition results in the tunability of the RBWO over three frequency bands at high power and high efficiency without changing the SWS. In numerical simulation, the output frequency of the RBWO can jump over 7.9 GHz in C-band, 9.9 GHz in X-band, and 12.4 GHz in Ku-band with output power exceeding 3.0 GW and conversion efficiency higher than 35% by just reasonably transforming the structures of the front and post resonant reflectors which provide the strong end reflection for the SWS.

  13. An mTOR anti-sense oligonucleotide decreases polycystic kidney disease in mice with a targeted mutation in Pkd2.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Zafar, Iram; He, Zhibin; Doctor, R Brian; Moldovan, Radu; Mullick, Adam E; Edelstein, Charles L

    2014-09-15

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common life-threatening hereditary disease in the USA. In human ADPKD studies, sirolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor, had little therapeutic effect. While sirolimus robustly inhibits mTORC1, it has a minimal effect on mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). Polycystic kidneys of Pkd2WS25/- mice, an orthologous model of human ADPKD caused by a mutation in the Pkd2 gene, had an early increase in pS6 (marker of mTORC1) and pAktSer(473) (marker of mTORC2). To investigate the effect of combined mTORC1 and 2 inhibition, Pkd2WS25/- mice were treated with an mTOR anti-sense oligonucleotide (ASO) that blocks mTOR expression thus inhibiting both mTORC1 and 2. The mTOR ASO resulted in a significant decrease in mTOR protein, pS6 and pAktSer(473). Pkd2WS25/- mice treated with the ASO had a normalization of kidney weights and kidney function and a marked decrease in cyst volume. The mTOR ASO resulted in a significant decrease in proliferation and apoptosis of tubular epithelial cells. To demonstrate the role of mTORC2 on cyst growth, Rictor, the functional component of mTORC2, was silenced in Madin-Darby canine kidney cell cysts grown in 3D cultures. Silencing Rictor significantly decreased cyst volume and expression of pAktSer(473). The decreased cyst size in the Rictor silenced cells was reversed by introduction of a constitutively active Akt1. In vitro, combined mTORC1 and 2 inhibition reduced cyst growth more than inhibition of mTORC1 or 2 alone. In conclusion, combined mTORC1 and 2 inhibition has therapeutic potential in ADPKD. PMID:24847003

  14. Synthesis of PLGA nanoparticles of tea polyphenols and their strong in vivo protective effect against chemically induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Singh, Madhulika; Mishra, Sanjay; Kumar, Pradeep; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2013-01-01

    In spite of proficient results of several phytochemicals in preclinical settings, the conversion rate from bench to bedside is not very encouraging. Many reasons are attributed to this limited success, including inefficient systemic delivery and bioavailability under in vivo conditions. To achieve improved efficacy, polyphenolic constituents of black (theaflavin [TF]) and green (epigallocatechin-3-gallate [EGCG]) tea in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA-NPs) were entrapped with entrapment efficacy of ~18% and 26%, respectively. Further, their preventive potential against 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced DNA damage in mouse skin using DNA alkaline unwinding assay was evaluated. Pretreatment (topically) of mouse skin with either TF or EGCG (100 μg/mouse) doses exhibits protection of 45.34% and 28.32%, respectively, against DMBA-induced DNA damage. However, pretreatment with TF-loaded PLGA-NPs protects against DNA damage 64.41% by 1/20th dose of bulk, 71.79% by 1/10th dose of bulk, and 72.46% by 1/5th dose of bulk. Similarly, 51.28% (1/20th of bulk), 57.63% (1/10th of bulk), and 63.14% (1/5th of bulk) prevention was noted using EGCG-loaded PLGA-NP doses. These results showed that tea polyphenol-loaded PLGA-NPs have ~30-fold dose-advantage than bulk TF or EGCG doses. Additionally, TF- or EGCG-loaded PLGA-NPs showed significant potential for induction of DNA repair genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, and ERCC3) and suppression of DNA damage responsive genes (p53, p21, MDM2, GADD45α, and COX-2) as compared with respective bulk TF or EGCG doses. Taken together, TF- or EGCG-loaded PLGA-NPs showed a superior ability to prevent DMBA-induced DNA damage at much lower concentrations, thus opening a new dimension in chemoprevention research. PMID:23717041

  15. Strong nonlocalization induced by small scale parameter on terahertz flexural wave dispersion characteristics of a monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendar, S.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the strong nonlocal scale effect on the flexural wave propagation in a monolayer graphene sheet. The graphene is modeled as an isotropic plate of one atom thick. Nonlocal governing equation of motion is derived and wave propagation analysis is performed using spectral analysis. The present analysis shows that the flexural wave dispersion in graphene obtained by local and nonlocal elasticity theories is quite different. The nonlocal elasticity calculation shows that the wavenumber escapes to infinite at certain frequency and the corresponding wave velocity tends to zero at that frequency indicating localization and stationary behavior. This behavior is captured in the spectrum and dispersion curves. The cut-off frequency of flexural wave not only depend on the axial wavenumber but also on the nonlocal scaling parameter. The effect of axial wavenumber on the wave behavior in graphene is also discussed in the present manuscript.

  16. Strong Facet-Induced and Light-Controlled Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Semiconducting β-FeSi2 Nanocubes.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiqiang; Xiong, Shijie; Wu, Shuyi; Zhu, Xiaobin; Meng, Ming; Wu, Xinglong

    2015-09-01

    Crystalline β-FeSi2 nanocubes with two {100} facets and four {011} lateral facets synthesized by spontaneous one-step chemical vapor deposition exhibit strong room-temperature ferromagnetism with saturation magnetization of 15 emu/g. The room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed from the β-FeSi2 nanocubes larger than 150 nm with both the {100} and {011} facets. The ferromagnetism is tentatively explained with a simplified model including both the itinerant electrons in surface states and the local moments on Fe atoms near the surfaces. The work demonstrates the transformation from a nonmagnetic semiconductor to a magnetic one by exposing specific facets and the room-temperature ferromagnetism can be manipulated under light irradiation. The semiconducting β-FeSi2 nanocubes may have large potential in silicon-based spintronic applications. PMID:26302086

  17. Strong Bilayer Coupling Induced by the Symmetry Breaking in the Monoclinic Phase of BiS2-Based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Masayuki; Akashi, Ryosuke; Kuroki, Kazuhiko

    2016-09-01

    We perform first-principles band structure calculations for the tetragonal and monoclinic structures of LaO0.5F0.5BiS2. We find that the Bi 6px,y bands on two BiS2 layers exhibit a sizable splitting at the X = (π ,0,0) and several other k-points for the monoclinic structure. We show that this feature originates from the inter-BiS2 layer coupling strongly enhanced by the symmetry breaking of the crystal structure. The Fermi surface also shows a large splitting and becomes anisotropic with respect to the kx- and ky-directions in the monoclinic structure, whereas it remains almost flat with respect to the kz-direction.

  18. DMSO is a strong inducer of DNA hydroxymethylation in pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Roman; Spitzer, Silvia; Karlic, Heidrun; Klaushofer, Klaus; Varga, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Artificial induction of active DNA demethylation appears to be a possible and useful strategy in molecular biology research and therapy development. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was shown to cause phenotypic changes in embryonic stem cells altering the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles. Here we report that DMSO increases global and gene-specific DNA hydroxymethylation levels in pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. After 1 day, DMSO increased the expression of genes involved in DNA hydroxymethylation (TET) and nucleotide excision repair (GADD45) and decreased the expression of genes related to DNA methylation (Dnmt1, Dnmt3b, Hells). Already 12 hours after seeding, before first replication, DMSO increased the expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Fas and of the early osteoblastic factor Dlx5, which proved to be Tet1 dependent. At this time an increase of 5-methyl-cytosine hydroxylation (5-hmC) with a concomitant loss of methyl-cytosines on Fas and Dlx5 promoters as well as an increase in global 5-hmC and loss in global DNA methylation was observed. Time course-staining of nuclei suggested euchromatic localization of DMSO induced 5-hmC. As consequence of induced Fas expression, caspase 3/7 and 8 activities were increased indicating apoptosis. After 5 days, the effect of DMSO on promoter- and global methylation as well as on gene expression of Fas and Dlx5 and on caspases activities was reduced or reversed indicating down-regulation of apoptosis. At this time, up regulation of genes important for matrix synthesis suggests that DMSO via hydroxymethylation of the Fas promoter initially stimulates apoptosis in a subpopulation of the heterogeneous MC3T3-E1 cell line, leaving a cell population of extra-cellular matrix producing osteoblasts.  PMID:22507896

  19. The Role of Mental Imagery in Depression: Negative Mental Imagery Induces Strong Implicit and Explicit Affect in Depression.

    PubMed

    Görgen, Stefanie Maria; Joormann, Jutta; Hiller, Wolfgang; Witthöft, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mental imagery, seeing with the mind's eyes, can induce stronger positive as well as negative affect compared to verbal processing. Given this emotion-amplifying effect, it appears likely that mental images play an important role in affective disorders. According to the subcomponents model of depression, depressed mood is maintained by both negative imagery (which amplifies negative mood) and less efficient positive imagery processes. Empirical research on the link between mental imagery and affect in clinical depression, however, is still sparse. This study aimed at testing the role of mental imagery in depression, using a modified version of the affect misattribution procedure (AMP) and the self-assessment manikin (SAM) to assess implicit (AMP) and explicit (SAM) affect elicited by mental images, pictures, and verbal processing in clinically depressed participants (n = 32) compared to healthy controls (n = 32). In individuals with a depressive disorder, compared to healthy controls, negative mental images induced stronger negative affect in the explicit as well as implicit measure. Negative mental imagery did not, however, elicit greater increases in explicitly and implicitly assessed negative affect compared to other processing modalities (verbal processing, pictures) in the depressed group. Additionally, a positive imagery deficit in depression was observed in the explicit measure. Interestingly, the two groups did not differ in implicitly assessed affect after positive imagery, indicating that depressed individuals might benefit from positive imagery on an implicit or automatic level. Overall, our findings suggest that mental imagery also plays an important role in depression and confirm the potential of novel treatment approaches for depression, such as the promotion of positive imagery. PMID:26217240

  20. The Role of Mental Imagery in Depression: Negative Mental Imagery Induces Strong Implicit and Explicit Affect in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Görgen, Stefanie Maria; Joormann, Jutta; Hiller, Wolfgang; Witthöft, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mental imagery, seeing with the mind’s eyes, can induce stronger positive as well as negative affect compared to verbal processing. Given this emotion-amplifying effect, it appears likely that mental images play an important role in affective disorders. According to the subcomponents model of depression, depressed mood is maintained by both negative imagery (which amplifies negative mood) and less efficient positive imagery processes. Empirical research on the link between mental imagery and affect in clinical depression, however, is still sparse. This study aimed at testing the role of mental imagery in depression, using a modified version of the affect misattribution procedure (AMP) and the self-assessment manikin (SAM) to assess implicit (AMP) and explicit (SAM) affect elicited by mental images, pictures, and verbal processing in clinically depressed participants (n = 32) compared to healthy controls (n = 32). In individuals with a depressive disorder, compared to healthy controls, negative mental images induced stronger negative affect in the explicit as well as implicit measure. Negative mental imagery did not, however, elicit greater increases in explicitly and implicitly assessed negative affect compared to other processing modalities (verbal processing, pictures) in the depressed group. Additionally, a positive imagery deficit in depression was observed in the explicit measure. Interestingly, the two groups did not differ in implicitly assessed affect after positive imagery, indicating that depressed individuals might benefit from positive imagery on an implicit or automatic level. Overall, our findings suggest that mental imagery also plays an important role in depression and confirm the potential of novel treatment approaches for depression, such as the promotion of positive imagery. PMID:26217240

  1. Seismically induced rock slope failures resulting from topographic amplification of strong ground motions: The case of Pacoima Canyon, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, S.A.; Murphy, W.; Jibson, R.W.; Petley, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge earthquake (Mw = 6.7) triggered extensive rock slope failures in Pacoima Canyon, immediately north of Los Angeles, California. Pacoima Canyon is a narrow and steep canyon incised in gneissic and granitic rocks. Peak accelerations of nearly 1.6 g were recorded at a ridge that forms the left abutment of Pacoima Dam; peak accelerations at the bottom of the canyon were less than 0.5 g, suggesting the occurrence of topographic amplification. Topographic effects have been previously suggested to explain similarly high ground motions at the site during the 1971 (Mw = 6.7) San Fernando earthquake. Furthermore, high landslide concentrations observed in the area have been attributed to unusually strong ground motions rather than higher susceptibility to sliding compared with nearby zones. We conducted field investigations and slope stability back-analyses to confirm the impact of topographic amplification on the triggering of landslides during the 1994 earthquake. Our results suggest that the observed extensive rock sliding and falling would have not been possible under unamplified seismic conditions, which would have generated a significantly lower number of areas affected by landslides. In contrast, modelling slope stability using amplified ground shaking predicts slope failure distributions matching what occurred in 1994. This observation confirms a significant role for topographic amplification on the triggering of landslides at the site, and emphasises the need to select carefully the inputs for seismic slope stability analyses. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Control of dynamical self-assembly of strongly Brownian nanoparticles through convective forces induced by ultrafast laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilday, Serim; Akguc, Gursoy B.; Tokel, Onur; Makey, Ghaith; Yavuz, Ozgun; Yavuz, Koray; Pavlov, Ihor; Ilday, F. Omer; Gulseren, Oguz

    We report a new dynamical self-assembly mechanism, where judicious use of convective and strong Brownian forces enables effective patterning of colloidal nanoparticles that are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than the laser beam. Optical trapping or tweezing effects are not involved, but the laser is used to create steep thermal gradients through multi-photon absorption, and thereby guide the colloids through convective forces. Convective forces can be thought as a positive feedback mechanism that helps to form and reinforce pattern, while Brownian motion act as a competing negative feedback mechanism to limit the growth of the pattern, as well as to increase the possibilities of bifurcation into different patterns, analogous to the competition observed in reaction-diffusion systems. By steering stochastic processes through these forces, we are able to gain control over the emergent pattern such as to form-deform-reform of a pattern, to change its shape and transport it spatially within seconds. This enables us to dynamically initiate and control large patterns comprised of hundreds of colloids. Further, by not relying on any specific chemical, optical or magnetic interaction, this new method is, in principle, completely independent of the material type being assembled.

  3. Laser induced periodic surface structure formation in germanium by strong field mid IR laser solid interaction at oblique incidence.

    PubMed

    Austin, Drake R; Kafka, Kyle R P; Trendafilov, Simeon; Shvets, Gennady; Li, Hui; Yi, Allen Y; Szafruga, Urszula B; Wang, Zhou; Lai, Yu Hang; Blaga, Cosmin I; DiMauro, Louis F; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2015-07-27

    Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS or ripples) were generated on single crystal germanium after irradiation with multiple 3 µm femtosecond laser pulses at a 45° angle of incidence. High and low spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL and LSFL, respectively) were observed for both s- and p-polarized light. The measured LSFL period for p-polarized light was consistent with the currently established LIPSS origination model of coupling between surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and the incident laser pulses. A vector model of SPP coupling is introduced to explain the formation of s-polarized LSFL away from the center of the damage spot. Additionally, a new method is proposed to determine the SPP propagation length from the decay in ripple depth. This is used along with the measured LSFL period to estimate the average electron density and Drude collision time of the laser-excited surface. Finally, full-wave electromagnetic simulations are used to corroborate these results while simultaneously offering insight into the nature of LSFL formation.

  4. Neuroblastoma cells expressing mature IL-18, but not proIL-18, induce a strong and immediate antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Heuer, J G; Tucker-McClung, C; Hock, R A

    1999-07-01

    Retroviral constructs were designed to express the novel cytokine interleukin 18 (IL-18), also known as interferon-gamma-inducing factor, in a murine neuroblastoma cell line [neuro-2a (N-2a)] to examine the effects of IL-18 expression on tumorigenicity. N-2a cells expressing proIL-18 (N-2a/IL-18p) were as tumorigenic as parental N-2a cells, whereas N-2a cells engineered to secrete mature IL-18 (N-2a/IL-18m) were nontumorigenic. Inoculation of mice with N-2a/IL-18m generated immediate immunity to parental N-2a. N-2a/IL-18m formed tumors in mice depleted of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, suggesting that the antitumor immune response was T cell mediated. The resulting T-helper (Th) immune response was also characterized in vitro and had a large Th1 component based on in vitro production of the cytokines IFN-gamma and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in response to tumor cells and IL-18.

  5. Chemical properties of lipids strongly affect the kinetics of the membrane-induced aggregation of α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James W. P.; Ouberai, Myriam M.; Flagmeier, Patrick; Vendruscolo, Michele; Buell, Alexander K.; Sparr, Emma; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular α-synuclein deposits, known as Lewy bodies, have been linked to a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease. α-Synuclein binds to synthetic and biological lipids, and this interaction has been shown to play a crucial role for both α-synuclein’s native function, including synaptic plasticity, and the initiation of its aggregation. Here, we describe the interplay between the lipid properties and the lipid binding and aggregation propensity of α-synuclein. In particular, we have observed that the binding of α-synuclein to model membranes is much stronger when the latter is in the fluid rather than the gel phase, and that this binding induces a segregation of the lipids into protein-poor and protein-rich populations. In addition, α-synuclein was found to aggregate at detectable rates only when interacting with membranes composed of the most soluble lipids investigated here. Overall, our results show that the chemical properties of lipids determine whether or not the lipids can trigger the aggregation of α-synuclein, thus affecting the balance between functional and aberrant behavior of the protein. PMID:27298346

  6. Intramuscular Priming and Intranasal Boosting Induce Strong Genital Immunity Through Secretory IgA in Minipigs Infected with Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Emma; Follmann, Frank; Bøje, Sarah; Erneholm, Karin; Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Jungersen, Gregers; Andersen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    International efforts in developing a vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis have highlighted the need for novel immunization strategies for the induction of genital immunity. In this study, we evaluated an intramuscular (IM) prime/intranasal boost vaccination strategy in a Göttingen Minipig model with a reproductive system very similar to humans. The vaccine was composed of C. trachomatis subunit antigens formulated in the Th1/Th17 promoting CAF01 adjuvant. IM priming immunizations with CAF01 induced a significant cell-mediated interferon gamma and interleukin 17A response and a significant systemic high-titered neutralizing IgG response. Following genital challenge, intranasally boosted groups mounted an accelerated, highly significant genital IgA response that correlated with enhanced bacterial clearance on day 3 post infection. By detecting antigen-specific secretory component (SC), we showed that the genital IgA was locally produced in the genital mucosa. The highly significant inverse correlation between the vaginal IgA SC response and the chlamydial load suggests that IgA in the minipig model is involved in protection against C. trachomatis. This is important both for our understanding of protective immunity and future vaccination strategies against C. trachomatis and genital pathogens in general. PMID:26734002

  7. Cytomegalovirus induces strong antileukemic effect in acute myeloid leukemia patients following sibling HSCT without ATG-containing regimen

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiebing; Zhu, Qian; Xue, Shengli; Hu, Xiaohui; Ma, Xiao; Chen, Feng; Chen, Suning; Sun, Aining; Wu, Depei; Yu, Jianhua; Wu, Xiaojin; Qiu, Huiying

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of studies have demonstrated that cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT) could enforce graft-versus leukemia (GVL) effect in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. However, the use of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) as part of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis may dampen this beneficial effect of CMV replication. In this context, we retrospectively analyzed the effect of CMV reactivation on relapse, survival and prognosis in a total of 227 AML patients who received a myeloablative (MA) conditioning regimen at a single research center between January 2010 and April 2013. Of these 227 patients, 110 cases received non-ATG-containing regimens and 117 cases received ATG-containing regimens. CMV reactivation occurred in 45 patients (41%) among non-ATG regimen group and 73 patients (62%) among ATG regimen group (P = 0.001). At a median time to follow-up of 27.5 months, a lower risk of cumulative relapse incidence associated with CMV reactivation was observed in non-ATG group in multivariate analyses (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.10-0.79; P = 0.016). However, CMV reactivation after transplantation did not significantly decrease the cumulative incidence of relapse in our ATG group (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.10-0.79; P = 0.016). Collectively, our results demonstrate that in AML patients following sibling HSCT, the CMV-induced beneficial effect on relapse occurs only in the MA regimens containing no ATG, although ATG promotes CMV reactivation. PMID:27158357

  8. Field-induced Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid phase of a two-leg spin-1/2 ladder with strong leg interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. H.; Hotta, C.; Takano, Y.; Tremelling, G.; Turnbull, M. M.; Landee, C.; Kang, H.-J.; Christensen, N. B.; Lefmann, K.; Schmidt, K. P.; Uhrig, G. S.; Broholm, C.

    2010-01-01

    We study the magnetic-field-induced quantum phase transition from a gapped quantum phase that has no magnetic long-range order into a gapless phase in the spin-1/2 ladder compound bis(2,3-dimethylpyridinium) tetrabromocuprate (DIMPY). At temperatures below about 1 K, the specific heat in the gapless phase attains an asymptotic linear temperature dependence, characteristic of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. Inelastic neutron scattering and the specific heat measurements in both phases are in good agreement with theoretical calculations, demonstrating that DIMPY is the first model material for an S=1/2 two-leg spin ladder in the strong-leg regime.

  9. Combined treatment with cotylenin A and phenethyl isothiocyanate induces strong antitumor activity mainly through the induction of ferroptotic cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kasukabe, Takashi; Honma, Yoshio; Okabe-Kado, Junko; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kato, Nobuo; Kumakura, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal tract malignancies, with current chemotherapeutic drugs has had limited success due to its chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Therefore, the development of new drugs or effective combination therapies is urgently needed. Cotylenin A (CN-A) (a plant growth regulator) is a potent inducer of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells and exhibits potent antitumor activities in several cancer cell lines. In the present study, we demonstrated that CN-A and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), an inducer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a dietary anticarcinogenic compound, synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MIAPaCa-2, PANC-1 and gemcitabine-resistant PANC-1 cells. A combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC also effectively inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of these cancer cells. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC strongly induced cell death within 1 day at concentrations at which CN-A or PEITC alone did not affect cell viability. A combined treatment with synthetic CN-A derivatives (ISIR-005 and ISIR-042) or fusicoccin J (CN-A-related natural product) and PEITC did not have synergistic effects on cell death. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC synergistically induced the generation of ROS. Antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine and trolox), ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin), and the lysosomal iron chelator deferoxamine canceled the synergistic cell death. Apoptosis inhibitors (Z-VAD-FMK and Q-VD-OPH) and the necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1s did not inhibit synergistic cell death. Autophagy inhibitors (3-metyladenine and chloroquine) partially prevented cell death. These results show that synergistic cell death induced by the combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC is mainly due to the induction of ferroptosis. Therefore, the combination of CN-A and PEITC has potential as a novel therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer.

  10. Combined treatment with cotylenin A and phenethyl isothiocyanate induces strong antitumor activity mainly through the induction of ferroptotic cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kasukabe, Takashi; Honma, Yoshio; Okabe-Kado, Junko; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kato, Nobuo; Kumakura, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal tract malignancies, with current chemotherapeutic drugs has had limited success due to its chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Therefore, the development of new drugs or effective combination therapies is urgently needed. Cotylenin A (CN-A) (a plant growth regulator) is a potent inducer of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells and exhibits potent antitumor activities in several cancer cell lines. In the present study, we demonstrated that CN-A and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), an inducer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a dietary anticarcinogenic compound, synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MIAPaCa-2, PANC-1 and gemcitabine-resistant PANC-1 cells. A combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC also effectively inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of these cancer cells. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC strongly induced cell death within 1 day at concentrations at which CN-A or PEITC alone did not affect cell viability. A combined treatment with synthetic CN-A derivatives (ISIR-005 and ISIR-042) or fusicoccin J (CN-A-related natural product) and PEITC did not have synergistic effects on cell death. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC synergistically induced the generation of ROS. Antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine and trolox), ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin), and the lysosomal iron chelator deferoxamine canceled the synergistic cell death. Apoptosis inhibitors (Z-VAD-FMK and Q-VD-OPH) and the necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1s did not inhibit synergistic cell death. Autophagy inhibitors (3-metyladenine and chloroquine) partially prevented cell death. These results show that synergistic cell death induced by the combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC is mainly due to the induction of ferroptosis. Therefore, the combination of CN-A and PEITC has potential as a novel therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer. PMID:27375275

  11. Targeting cryptic epitope with modified antigen coupled to the surface of liposomes induces strong antitumor CD8 T-cell immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Yutaka; Takagi, Akira; Uchida, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2015-12-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy, such as cancer vaccine, is based on the fundamental knowledge that tumor‑associated antigens (TAAs) are presented on MHC molecules for recognition by specific T cells. However, most TAAs are self-antigens and are also expressed on normal tissues, including the thymus. This fact raises the issue of the tolerance of the TAA‑specific T‑cell repertoire and consequently the inability to trigger a strong and efficient antitumor immune response. In the present study, we used antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes to target telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), a widely expressed self/tumor antigen. Taking advantage of the high homology between mouse and human TERT, we investigated immunogenicity and antitumor efficiency of the liposomal TERT peptides in HLA-A*0201 transgenic HHD mice. Using the heteroclitical peptide-modifying approach with antigen‑coupled liposomes, we identified a novel cryptic epitope with low affinity for HLA*0201 molecules derived from TERT. The heteroclitical variant derived from this novel low affinity peptide exhibited strong affinity for HLA*0201 molecules. However, it induced only weak CD8 T‑cell immune responses in HHD mice when emulsified in IFA. By contrast, when coupled to the surface of the liposomes, it induced powerful CD8 T‑cell immune responses which cross-reacted against the original cryptic epitope. The induced CD8 T cells also recognized endogenously TERT‑expressing tumor cells and inhibited their growth in HHD mice. These data suggest that heteroclitical antigen derived from low affinity epitope of tumor antigens coupled to the surface of liposome may have a role as an effective cancer vaccine candidate.

  12. Strong induced polarity between Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) and α-SiC and its influence on dielectric permittivity and loss of their composites

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yefeng; Gong, Honghong; Xie, Yunchuan; Zhang, Zhicheng; Wei, Xiaoyong; Yang, Lanjun

    2015-03-07

    Interface polarization and interface zone have been widely utilized to account for the abnormally improved dielectric properties of composites although their formation is rather vague and their influence has never been directly measured. In this work, micro α-SiC was designed as the filler particles incorporated into poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) with internal double bonds (P(VDF-CTFE-DB)) to construct polymer micro composites through solution casting method. The dielectric constant of the composites is found to be increasing linearly as SiC content increases at lower content and the highest value is obtained as 83 at 100 Hz, which is unusually higher than both pristine polymer (13@100 Hz) and SiC filler (17@100 Hz). By studying the dielectric properties of a bilayer model composite, the real dielectric permittivity of SiC sheet and P(VDF-CTFE-DB) layer has been directly measured to be significantly enhanced than their original value. The induced polarity between high polar PVDF units in polymer matrix and the electron-hole dipoles in α-SiC is responsible for the elevated dielectric properties of both components, which could address the failure of binary series and parallel models in predicting the dielectric permittivity of 0-3 composites as well. The strong dependence of induced polarity on the volume content, thickness, and polar nature of both components strongly suggests establishing promising high induced polarity between polymer matrix and fillers may provide an alternative strategy for fabricating high-k composites.

  13. A multi-subunit Chlamydia vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies and strong IFN-γ+ CMI responses protects against a genital infection in minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Bøje, Sarah; Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Erneholm, Karin; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Jungersen, Gregers; Andersen, Peter; Follmann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia is the most widespread sexually transmitted bacterial disease and a prophylactic vaccine is highly needed. Ideally, this vaccine is required to induce a combined response of Th1 cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in concert with neutralizing antibodies. Using a novel Göttingen minipig animal model, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a multi-subunit vaccine formulated in the strong Th1-inducing adjuvant CAF01. We evaluated a mixture of two fusion proteins (Hirep1 and CTH93) designed to promote either neutralizing antibodies or cell-mediated immunity, respectively. Hirep1 is a novel immunogen based on the variant domain (VD) 4 region from major outer membrane protein (MOMP) serovar (Sv) D, SvE and SvF, and CTH93 is a fusion molecule of three antigens (CT043, CT414 and MOMP). Pigs were immunized twice intramuscularly with either Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01, UV-inactivated Chlamydia trachomatis SvD bacteria (UV-SvD/CAF01) or CAF01. The Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine induced a strong CMI response against the vaccine antigens and high titers of antibodies, particularly against the VD4 region of MOMP. Sera from Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 immunized pigs neutralized C. trachomatis SvD and SvF infectivity in vitro. Both Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 and UV-SvD/CAF01 vaccination protected pigs against a vaginal C. trachomatis SvD infection. In conclusion, the Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine proved highly immunogenic and equally protective as UV-SvD/CAF01 showing promise for the development of a subunit vaccine against Chlamydia. PMID:26268662

  14. Targeting cryptic epitope with modified antigen coupled to the surface of liposomes induces strong antitumor CD8 T-cell immune responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    HORIUCHI, YUTAKA; TAKAGI, AKIRA; UCHIDA, TETSUYA; AKATSUKA, TOSHITAKA

    2015-01-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy, such as cancer vaccine, is based on the fundamental knowledge that tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are presented on MHC molecules for recognition by specific T cells. However, most TAAs are self-antigens and are also expressed on normal tissues, including the thymus. This fact raises the issue of the tolerance of the TAA-specific T-cell repertoire and consequently the inability to trigger a strong and efficient antitumor immune response. In the present study, we used antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes to target telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), a widely expressed self/tumor antigen. Taking advantage of the high homology between mouse and human TERT, we investigated immunogenicity and antitumor efficiency of the liposomal TERT peptides in HLA-A*0201 transgenic HHD mice. Using the heteroclitical peptide-modifying approach with antigen-coupled liposomes, we identified a novel cryptic epitope with low affinity for HLA*0201 molecules derived from TERT. The heteroclitical variant derived from this novel low affinity peptide exhibited strong affinity for HLA*0201 molecules. However, it induced only weak CD8 T-cell immune responses in HHD mice when emulsified in IFA. By contrast, when coupled to the surface of the liposomes, it induced powerful CD8 T-cell immune responses which cross-reacted against the original cryptic epitope. The induced CD8 T cells also recognized endogenously TERT-expressing tumor cells and inhibited their growth in HHD mice. These data suggest that heteroclitical antigen derived from low affinity epitope of tumor antigens coupled to the surface of liposome may have a role as an effective cancer vaccine candidate. PMID:26398429

  15. Vaccine adjuvant systems containing monophosphoryl lipid A and QS21 induce strong and persistent humoral and T cell responses against hepatitis B surface antigen in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vandepapelière, Pierre; Horsmans, Yves; Moris, Philippe; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Janssens, Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Van Belle, Pascale; Clement, Frédéric; Hanon, Emmanuel; Wettendorff, Martine; Garçon, Nathalie; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2008-03-01

    A randomised, double-blind study assessing the potential of four adjuvants in combination with recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen has been conducted to evaluate humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in healthy adults after three vaccine doses at months 0, 1 and 10. Three Adjuvant Systems (AS) contained 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and QS21, formulated either with an oil-in-water emulsion (AS02B and AS02V) or with liposomes (AS01B). The fourth adjuvant was CpG oligonucleotide. High levels of antibodies were induced by all adjuvants, whereas cell-mediated immune responses, including cytolytic T cells and strong and persistent CD4(+) T cell response were mainly observed with the three MPL/QS21-containing Adjuvant Systems. The CD4(+) T cell response was characterised in vitro by vigorous lymphoproliferation, high IFN-gamma and moderate IL-5 production. Antigen-specific T cell immune response was further confirmed ex vivo by detection of IL-2- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) T cells, and in vivo by measuring increased levels of IFN-gamma in the serum and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. The CpG adjuvanted vaccine induced consistently lower immune responses for all parameters. All vaccine adjuvants were shown to be safe with acceptable reactogenicity profiles. The majority of subjects reported local reactions at the injection site after vaccination while general reactions were recorded less frequently. No vaccine-related serious adverse event was reported. Importantly, no increase in markers of auto-immunity and allergy was detected over the whole study course. In conclusion, the Adjuvant Systems containing MPL/QS21, in combination with hepatitis B surface antigen, induced very strong humoral and cellular immune responses in healthy adults. The AS01B-adjuvanted vaccine induced the strongest and most durable specific cellular immune responses after two doses. These Adjuvant Systems, when added to recombinant protein antigens, can be

  16. Strong localization induced anomalous temperature dependence exciton emission above 300 K from SnO{sub 2} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, S. S. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn; Li, F. D.; Liu, Q. W.; Xu, S. C.; Luo, Y. Y.; Li, G. H. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn

    2015-05-07

    SnO{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) are potential materials for deep ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting devices. In this study, we report the temperature and excitation power-dependent exciton luminescence from SnO{sub 2} QDs. The exciton emission exhibits anomalous blue shift, accompanied with band width reduction with increasing temperature and excitation power above 300 K. The anomalous temperature dependences of the peak energy and band width are well interpreted by the strongly localized carrier thermal hopping process and Gaussian shape of band tails states, respectively. The localized wells and band tails at conduction minimum are considered to be induced by the surface oxygen defects and local potential fluctuation in SnO{sub 2} QDs.

  17. The characterization of six auxin-induced tomato GH3 genes uncovers a member, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dehua; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Aiqun; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Jianjian; Liu, Junli; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the GH3 gene family is widely considered to be involved in a broad range of plant physiological processes, through modulation of hormonal homeostasis. Multiple GH3 genes have been functionally characterized in several plant species; however, to date, limited works to study the GH3 genes in tomato have been reported. Here, we characterize the expression and regulatory profiles of six tomato GH3 genes, SlGH3.2, SlGH3.3, SlGH3.4, SlGH3.7, SlGH3.9 and SlGH3.15, in response to different phytohormone applications and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization. All six GH3 genes showed inducible responses to external IAA, and three members were significantly up-regulated in response to AM symbiosis. In particular, SlGH3.4, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal growth conditions, was strongly activated in the IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots. A comparison of the SlGH3.4 expression in wild-type plants and M161, a mutant with a defect in AM symbiosis, confirmed that SlGH3.4 expression is highly correlated to mycorrhizal colonization. Histochemical staining demonstrated that a 2,258 bp SlGH3.4 promoter fragment could drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression strongly in root tips, steles and cortical cells of IAA-treated roots, but predominantly in the fungal-colonized cells of mycorrhizal roots. A truncated 654 bp promoter failed to direct GUS expression in IAA-treated roots, but maintained the symbiosis-induced activity in mycorrhizal roots. In summary, our results suggest that a mycorrhizal signaling pathway that is at least partially independent of the auxin signaling pathway has evolved for the co-regulation of the auxin- and mycorrhiza-activated GH3 genes in plants.

  18. The characterization of six auxin-induced tomato GH3 genes uncovers a member, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dehua; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Aiqun; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Jianjian; Liu, Junli; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the GH3 gene family is widely considered to be involved in a broad range of plant physiological processes, through modulation of hormonal homeostasis. Multiple GH3 genes have been functionally characterized in several plant species; however, to date, limited works to study the GH3 genes in tomato have been reported. Here, we characterize the expression and regulatory profiles of six tomato GH3 genes, SlGH3.2, SlGH3.3, SlGH3.4, SlGH3.7, SlGH3.9 and SlGH3.15, in response to different phytohormone applications and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization. All six GH3 genes showed inducible responses to external IAA, and three members were significantly up-regulated in response to AM symbiosis. In particular, SlGH3.4, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal growth conditions, was strongly activated in the IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots. A comparison of the SlGH3.4 expression in wild-type plants and M161, a mutant with a defect in AM symbiosis, confirmed that SlGH3.4 expression is highly correlated to mycorrhizal colonization. Histochemical staining demonstrated that a 2,258 bp SlGH3.4 promoter fragment could drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression strongly in root tips, steles and cortical cells of IAA-treated roots, but predominantly in the fungal-colonized cells of mycorrhizal roots. A truncated 654 bp promoter failed to direct GUS expression in IAA-treated roots, but maintained the symbiosis-induced activity in mycorrhizal roots. In summary, our results suggest that a mycorrhizal signaling pathway that is at least partially independent of the auxin signaling pathway has evolved for the co-regulation of the auxin- and mycorrhiza-activated GH3 genes in plants. PMID:25535196

  19. Strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information of visual stimuli: an approach using large-size Navon letters.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yasuki; Tomoike, Kouta

    2016-01-12

    Recent studies argue that strongly-motivated positive emotions (e.g. desire) narrow a scope of attention. This argument is mainly based on an observation that, while humans normally respond faster to global than local information of a visual stimulus (global advantage), positive affects eliminated the global advantage by selectively speeding responses to local (but not global) information. In other words, narrowing of attentional scope was indirectly evidenced by the elimination of global advantage (the same speed of processing between global and local information). No study has directly shown that strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information while excluding a bias for global information (global advantage) in a baseline (emotionally-neutral) condition. In the present study, we addressed this issue by eliminating the global advantage in a baseline (neutral) state. Induction of positive affects under this state resulted in faster responses to local than global information. Our results provided direct evidence that positive affects in high motivational intensity narrow a scope of attention.

  20. Antibiotics, arsenate and H2O2 induce the promoter of Staphylococcus aureus cspC gene more strongly than cold.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Palas Kumar; Mondal, Rajkrishna; Sau, Keya; Sau, Subrata

    2009-04-01

    Proteins expressed by the bacterial cold shock genes are highly conserved at sequence level and perform various biological functions in both the cold-stressed and normal cells. To study the effects of various agents on the cold shock genes of Staphylococcus aureus, we have cloned the upstream region of cspC from S. aureus Newman and found that the above region possesses appreciable promoter (P(c)) activity even at 37 degrees C. A reporter S. aureus strain CHANDA2, constructed by inserting the P(c)-lacZ transcriptional fusion into S. aureus RN4220 genome, was found to express very low level of beta-galactosidase after cold shock, indicating that low temperature induces P(c) very weakly. Interestingly, transcription from P(c ) was induced very strongly by several antibiotics, hydrogen peroxide and arsenate salt. Cold shock proteins expressed by S. aureus are highly identical at sequence level and bear single-strand nucleic acid binding motifs. A 16 nt downstream box and a 13 nt upstream box were identified at the downstream of initiation codon and at the upstream of ribosome binding site of csp transcripts. Their roles in S. aureus cold shock gene expression have been discussed elaborately.

  1. Dendritic cells retrovirally overexpressing IL-12 induce strong Th1 responses to inhaled antigen in the lung but fail to revert established Th2 sensitization.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Harmjan; Heirman, Carlo; Hijdra, Daniëlle; Muskens, Femke; Willart, Monique; van Meirvenne, Sonja; Thielemans, Kris; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2004-11-01

    It has been postulated that low-level interleukin (IL)-12 production of antigen-presenting cells is associated with the risk of developing atopic asthma. To study the relationship between IL-12 production capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) and development of T helper type 2 (Th2) responses in the lung, we genetically engineered DCs to constutively overexpress bioactive IL-12. Retrovirally mediated overexpression of IL-12 in DCs strongly polarized naive ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CD4+ T cells toward Th1 effector cells in vitro. After intratracheal injection, OVA-pulsed IL-12-overexpressing DCs failed to induce Th2 responses in vivo and no longer primed mice for Th2-dependent eosinophilic airway inflammation upon OVA aerosol challenge, readily observed in mice immunized with sham-transfected, OVA-pulsed DCs. Analysis of a panel of cytokines and chemokines in the lung demonstrated that the lack of Th2 sensitization was accompanied by increased production of the Th1 cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), chemokines induced by IFN-gamma, and the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10. When Th2 priming was induced using OVA/alum prior to intratracheal DC administration, DCs constitutively expressing IL-12 were no longer capable of preventing eosinophilic airway inflammation and even enhanced it. These data show directly that high-level expression of IL-12 in DCs prevents the development of Th2 sensitization. Enhancing IL-12 production in DCs should be seen as a primary prevention strategy for atopic disorders. Enhancing IL-12 production in DCs is less likely to be of benefit in already Th2-sensitized individuals. PMID:15316032

  2. Mercuric chloride induces a strong immune activation, but does not accelerate the development of dermal fibrosis in tight skin 1 mice.

    PubMed

    Hansson, M; Abedi-Valugerdi, M

    2004-05-01

    In susceptible mice, mercuric chloride induces a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by increased serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 and IgE, production of anti-nucleolar autoantibodies (ANolA) and formation of renal IgG deposits. We have previously hypothesized that mercury confers more adverse immunological effects on those mouse strains, which are genetically prone to develop spontaneous autoimmune diseases than on normal strains. In this study, we tested our hypothesis in tight skin 1 (Tsk1/+) mice, a murine model for human scleroderma. As a support for our hypothesis, we observed that in Tsk1/+ mice, B cells were spontaneously hyperactive and that treatment with mercury induced a strong immune/autoimmune response in these mice, but not in their non-Tsk (+/+) littermates. This response was characterized by the formation of high numbers of splenic IgG1, IgG2b and IgG3 antibody-secreting cells, increased serum levels of IgE, production of IgG1 antibodies against single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), trinitrophenol (TNP) as well as thyroglobulin and the development of renal IgG1 deposits. Neither Tsk1/+ mice nor F1 hybrid crosses between this strain, and mercury susceptible B10.S (H-2(s)) were able to produce IgG1-ANolA in response to mercury. Moreover, mercury-induced immune activation in Tsk1/+ was not able to potentiate the progression of skin fibrosis in this strain. Thus, exposure to mercury accelerates the immune dysregulation, but not the development of skin fibrosis in Tsk1/+ mice.

  3. Strong ground motion generated by controlled blasting experiments and mining induced seismic events recorded underground at deep level mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, A.; Selllers, E.; Skorpen, L.; Scheepers, L.; Murphy, S.; Spottiswoode, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground at deep level gold mines in South Africa in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to strong ground motion. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The simulated rockbursts involved the design of the seismic source, seismic observations in the near and far field, high-speed video filming, a study of rock mass conditions such as fractures, joints, rock strength etc. Knowledge of the site conditions before and after the simulated rockbursts was also gained. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of peak particle velocities, was found to be proportional to R^-1.7. Special investigations were carried out to evaluate the mechanism and the magnitude of damage, as well as the support behaviour under excessive dynamic loading. The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied, as part of this work, not only to characterize the rock mass response, but also to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instrument especially designed for recording strong ground motions was used to create a large database of peak particle velocities measured on stope hangingwalls. A total number of 58 sites located in stopes where the Carbon Leader Reef, Ventersdorp Contact Reef, Vaal Reef and Basal Reef are mined, were monitored. The peak particle velocities were measured at the surface of the excavations to identify the effect of the free surface and the fractures surrounding the underground mining. Based on these measurements the generally accepted velocity criterion of 3 m

  4. Strong Expression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α) Is Associated with Axl Expression and Features of Aggressive Tumors in African Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nalwoga, Hawa; Ahmed, Lavina; Arnes, Jarle B.; Wabinga, Henry; Akslen, Lars A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is being evaluated for targeted therapy in solid tumors. Both HIF-1α and Axl influence tumor growth and metastatic potential, and they have been linked to treatment failure in many cancers. However, there is a lack of reports on HIF-1α expression in African breast cancer, which has a poor prognosis, and novel treatment targets must therefore be established. Here, we aimed to evaluate HIF-1α in relation to Axl expression, angiogenesis markers, and other tumor characteristics in a series of African breast cancer. Methods Using immunohistochemistry, we examined 261 invasive breast cancers on tissue microarrays for HIF-1α and Axl as well as several other markers, and a subset of 185 cases had information on VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression, microvessel density (MVD), proliferating microvessel density (pMVD) and vascular proliferation index (VPI) for important comparisons. Results Strong HIF-1α expression was associated with increased Axl (p = 0.007), VEGF (p<0.0005), and p53 (p = 0.032) expression, as well as high tumor cell proliferation by Ki-67 (p = 0.006), and high tumor grade (p = 0.003). Tumors with strong HIF-1α expression had significantly higher MVD (p = 0.019) and higher pMVD (p = 0.027) than tumors with weak expression. Conclusions High HIF-1α expression is significantly associated with Axl and VEGF expression, and with markers of poor prognosis in this series of breast cancer, suggesting HIF-1α and Axl as potential therapeutic targets in African breast cancer. PMID:26760782

  5. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep.

  6. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  7. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  8. Interleukin-22 binding protein (IL-22BP) is constitutively expressed by a subset of conventional dendritic cells and is strongly induced by retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Martin, JCJ; Bériou, G; Heslan, M; Chauvin, C; Utriainen, L; Aumeunier, A; Scott, CL; Mowat, A; Cerovic, V; Houston, SA; Leboeuf, M; Hubert, FX; Hémont, C; Merad, M; Milling, S; Josien, R

    2014-01-01

    IL-22 is mainly produced at barrier surfaces by T cells and innate lymphoid cells and is crucial to maintain epithelial integrity. However, dysregulated IL-22 action leads to deleterious inflammation and is involved in diseases such as psoriasis, intestinal inflammation and cancer. IL-22BP is a soluble inhibitory IL-22 receptor and may represent a crucial regulator of IL-22. We show both in rats and mice that, in the steady state, the main source of IL-22BP is constituted by a subset of conventional dendritic cells (DC) in lymphoid and non lymphoid tissues. In mouse intestine, IL-22BP was specifically expressed in lamina propria CD103+CD11b+ DC. In humans, IL-22BP was expressed in immature monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) and strongly induced by retinoic acid (RA) but dramatically reduced upon maturation. Our data suggest that a subset of immature DC may actively participate in the regulation of IL-22 activity in the gut by producing high levels of IL-22BP. PMID:23653115

  9. Bimetallic Au2 Cu6 Nanoclusters: Strong Luminescence Induced by the Aggregation of Copper(I) Complexes with Gold(0) Species.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xi; Wang, Shuxin; Song, Yongbo; Jin, Shan; Sun, Guodong; Yu, Haizhu; Zhu, Manzhou

    2016-03-01

    The concept of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) has been exploited to render non-luminescent Cu(I) SR complexes strongly luminescent. The Cu(I) SR complexes underwent controlled aggregation with Au(0) . Unlike previous AIE methods, our strategy does not require insoluble solutions or cations. X-ray crystallography validated the structure of this highly fluorescent nanocluster: Six thiolated Cu atoms are aggregated by two Au atoms (Au2 Cu6 nanoclusters). The quantum yield of this nanocluster is 11.7 %. DFT calculations imply that the fluorescence originates from ligand (aryl groups on the phosphine) to metal (Cu(I) ) charge transfer (LMCT). Furthermore, the aggregation is affected by the restriction of intramolecular rotation (RIR), and the high rigidity of the outer ligands enhances the fluorescence of the Au2 Cu6 nanoclusters. This study thus presents a novel strategy for enhancing the luminescence of metal nanoclusters (by the aggregation of active metal complexes with inert metal atoms), and also provides fundamental insights into the controllable synthesis of highly luminescent metal nanoclusters. PMID:26890334

  10. Bimetallic Au2 Cu6 Nanoclusters: Strong Luminescence Induced by the Aggregation of Copper(I) Complexes with Gold(0) Species.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xi; Wang, Shuxin; Song, Yongbo; Jin, Shan; Sun, Guodong; Yu, Haizhu; Zhu, Manzhou

    2016-03-01

    The concept of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) has been exploited to render non-luminescent Cu(I) SR complexes strongly luminescent. The Cu(I) SR complexes underwent controlled aggregation with Au(0) . Unlike previous AIE methods, our strategy does not require insoluble solutions or cations. X-ray crystallography validated the structure of this highly fluorescent nanocluster: Six thiolated Cu atoms are aggregated by two Au atoms (Au2 Cu6 nanoclusters). The quantum yield of this nanocluster is 11.7 %. DFT calculations imply that the fluorescence originates from ligand (aryl groups on the phosphine) to metal (Cu(I) ) charge transfer (LMCT). Furthermore, the aggregation is affected by the restriction of intramolecular rotation (RIR), and the high rigidity of the outer ligands enhances the fluorescence of the Au2 Cu6 nanoclusters. This study thus presents a novel strategy for enhancing the luminescence of metal nanoclusters (by the aggregation of active metal complexes with inert metal atoms), and also provides fundamental insights into the controllable synthesis of highly luminescent metal nanoclusters.

  11. Induced quadrupole effects near a crossover in a tetragonal TbLiF{sub 4} sheelite in a strong magnetic field up to 50 T

    SciTech Connect

    Kazei, Z. A. Snegirev, V. V.; Broto, J.-M.; Abdulsabirov, R. Yu.; Korableva, S. L.

    2012-12-15

    The anomalies of magnetic properties of TbLiF{sub 4} caused by the interaction of the energy levels of a rare-earth ion in a strong magnetic field up to 50 T directed along the [100] and [110] axes are studied experimentally and theoretically. The jumps in magnetization M(H) and the maxima of the differential magnetic susceptibility dM(H)/dH are found in critical fields H{sub c} = 28 and 31 T, where the lower component of the excited doublet approaches the ground-state singlet of a Tb{sup 3+} ion. Based on the crystal-field model with known interaction parameters, we calculated the Zeeman effect and the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility curves for the TbLiF{sub 4} crystal, which adequately describe magnetic anomalies and critical parameters of a crossover. It is shown that the jumpwise change in the {alpha}- and {gamma}-symmetry quadrupole interactions in TbLiF{sub 4} caused by changes in the corresponding quadrupole moments during the crossing of energy levels leads, in accordance with experiments, to a decrease in the critical field H{sub c} by approximately 4 T and an increase in the maximum of the differential susceptibility dM(H)/dH near the crossover more than twofold. This behavior can be considered as an analog of the induced quadrupole transition caused by a change of the ground state of the rare-earth ion during crossover.

  12. Strong metal-support interaction in novel core-shell Au-CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihua; Fu, Huifen; Tian, Ziwei; Han, Dongmei; Gu, Fubo

    2016-03-21

    Yolk-shell Au/CeO2 (Y-Au/CeO2) and encapsulated Au/CeO2 (E-Au/CeO2) nanocatalysts were prepared by using silica templates. A strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in the Au/CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation were studied. E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 had the best performance, followed by Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2, Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2, and E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2. The reasons for the different activities were discussed. There were two kinds of strong metal-support interactions (SMSI) between Au and CeO2 termed as R-SMSI (pretreated in reductive atmosphere) and O-SMSI (pretreated in oxidation atmosphere). Because of the smaller size of the Au and the larger contact area, both the R-SMSI and O-SMSI of E-Au/CeO2 were larger than those of Y-Au/CeO2. The O-SMSI was accompanied by the formation of cationic Au species that were beneficial to the enhancing of activity. As expected, the activity of E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 with a Au size less than 5 nm was higher than that of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 with 25 nm Au. However, it is surprisingly found that the activity of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 with 25 nm Au was higher than that of E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 with a Au size less than 5 nm. R-SMSI resulted in the formation of a AuCe alloy that had a negative effect on the activity. Compared with E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2, Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 exhibited a smaller relative content of the AuCe alloy, leading to a better activity of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2.

  13. A vaccine based on a mutant transferrin binding protein B of Haemophilus parasuis induces a strong T-helper 2 response and bacterial clearance after experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Sonia; Frandoloso, Rafael; Rodríguez-Ferri, Elías-Fernando; García-Iglesias, María-José; Pérez-Martínez, Claudia; Álvarez-Estrada, Álvaro; Gutiérrez-Martín, César-Bernardo

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to characterize the type of immune response induced by an experimental vaccine based on a mutant Haemophilus parasuis transferrin binding protein (Tbp) B (Y167A) defective in its ability to bind porcine transferrin. Clinical and pathological signs, bacterial clearance, antibody response and the cytokine profile in alveolar macrophages and spleen after the vaccination and challenge of twenty-two colostrum-deprived pigs with 10(8) CFU of H. parasuis were analysed. Pigs vaccinated with Y167A were compared to those vaccinated with native TbpB (nTbpB), those treated with a commercial bacterin (CB) against Glässer's disease, those unvaccinated challenged (CH) and those unvaccinated unchallenged (UNCH) pigs. The rectal temperatures of Y167A pigs resembled those of UNCH pigs and were significantly lower than those of the nTbpB, CB and CH animals. A major reduction in pathological changes of the challenged pigs was observed in the Y167A group. H. parasuis was cleared from 88.9% of the samples from Y167A pigs versus 60.0% and 55.6% from those of the CB and nTbpB groups, respectively. The antibody response elicited by Y167A by ELISA was notably higher than that observed for nTbpB and CB pigs and was capable of preventing the expression and secretion of IL-8. The expression of IL-4 and IL-5, which were associated with the specific antibody levels, suggests that the main mechanism of protection conferred by Y167A vaccine is based on a strong T-helper 2 response. PMID:27590421

  14. Strong Manual Acupuncture Stimulation of “Huantiao” (GB 30) Reduces Pain-Induced Anxiety and p-ERK in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiao-mei; Shen, Zui; Sun, Jing; Fang, Fang; Fang, Jun-fan; Wu, Yuan-yuan; Fang, Jian-qiao

    2015-01-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain is associated with anxiety. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays an important role in pain-induced anxiety. Acupuncture is widely used for pain and anxiety. However, little is known about which acupuncture technique is optimal on pain-induced anxiety and the relationship between acupuncture effect and p-ERK. The rat model was induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Male adult SD rats were randomly divided into control, SNL, strong manual acupuncture (sMA), mild manual acupuncture (mMA), and electroacupuncture (EA) group. Bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30) were stimulated by sMA, mMA, and EA, respectively. The pain withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) and anxiety behavior were measured, and p-ERK protein expression and immunoreactivity cells in ACC were detected. PWTs increased significantly in both sMA and EA groups. Meanwhile, anxiety-like behavior was improved significantly in the sMA and mMA groups. Furthermore, the overexpression of p-ERK induced by SNL was downregulated by strong and mild manual acupuncture. Therefore, strong manual acupuncture on bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30) could be a proper therapy relieving both pain and pain-induced anxiety. The effect of different acupuncture techniques on pain-induced anxiety may arise from the regulation of p-ERK in ACC. PMID:26770252

  15. How Strong Is the Evidence for Sodium Bicarbonate to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Coronary Angiography and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuhao; Zhang, Bin; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hydration with sodium bicarbonate is one of the strategies to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). The purpose of this study was to determine how strong is the evidence for sodium bicarbonate to prevent CI-AKI after coronary angiography (CAG) and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We conducted PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases to search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate with sodium chloride to prevent CI-AKI after CAG and/or PCI. Relative risk (RR), standardized mean difference (SMD), or weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was calculated. Heterogeneity, publication bias, and study quality were evaluated, sensitivity analyses, cumulative analyses, and subgroup analyses were performed. The risk of random errors was assessed by trial sequential analysis (TSA). Sixteen RCTs (3537 patients) met the eligibility criteria. Hydration with sodium bicarbonate showed significant beneficial effects in preventing CI-AKI (RR 0.67; 95% CI: 0.47–0.96, P = 0.029), decreasing the change in serum creatinine (SCr) (SMD −0.31 95% CI: −0.55 to −0.07, P = 0.011) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (SMD −0.17 95% CI: −0.30 to −0.04, P = 0.013). But no significant differences were observed in the requirement for dialysis (RR 1.11; 95% CI: 0.60–2.07, P = 0.729), mortality (RR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.41–1.21, P = 0.204) and reducing the length of hospital stay (LHS) (WMD −1.47; 95% CI: −4.14 to 1.20, P = 0.279). The result of TSA on incidence of CI-AKI showed the required information size (RIS = 6614) was not reached and cumulative z curve did not cross TSA boundary. The result of TSA on the requirement for dialysis and mortality demonstrated the required information sizes (RIS = 170,510 and 19,516, respectively) were not reached, and the cumulative z-curve did not cross any boundaries. The evidence that sodium

  16. How Strong Is the Evidence for Sodium Bicarbonate to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Coronary Angiography and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention?

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuhao; Zhang, Bin; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-02-01

    Hydration with sodium bicarbonate is one of the strategies to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). The purpose of this study was to determine how strong is the evidence for sodium bicarbonate to prevent CI-AKI after coronary angiography (CAG) and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).We conducted PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases to search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate with sodium chloride to prevent CI-AKI after CAG and/or PCI. Relative risk (RR), standardized mean difference (SMD), or weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was calculated. Heterogeneity, publication bias, and study quality were evaluated, sensitivity analyses, cumulative analyses, and subgroup analyses were performed. The risk of random errors was assessed by trial sequential analysis (TSA).Sixteen RCTs (3537 patients) met the eligibility criteria. Hydration with sodium bicarbonate showed significant beneficial effects in preventing CI-AKI (RR 0.67; 95% CI: 0.47-0.96, P = 0.029), decreasing the change in serum creatinine (SCr) (SMD -0.31 95% CI: -0.55 to -0.07, P = 0.011) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (SMD -0.17 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.04, P = 0.013). But no significant differences were observed in the requirement for dialysis (RR 1.11; 95% CI: 0.60-2.07, P = 0.729), mortality (RR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.41-1.21, P = 0.204) and reducing the length of hospital stay (LHS) (WMD -1.47; 95% CI: -4.14 to 1.20, P = 0.279). The result of TSA on incidence of CI-AKI showed the required information size (RIS = 6614) was not reached and cumulative z curve did not cross TSA boundary. The result of TSA on the requirement for dialysis and mortality demonstrated the required information sizes (RIS = 170,510 and 19,516, respectively) were not reached, and the cumulative z-curve did not cross any boundaries.The evidence that sodium bicarbonate reduces the incidence of

  17. How Strong Is the Evidence for Sodium Bicarbonate to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Coronary Angiography and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention?

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuhao; Zhang, Bin; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-02-01

    Hydration with sodium bicarbonate is one of the strategies to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). The purpose of this study was to determine how strong is the evidence for sodium bicarbonate to prevent CI-AKI after coronary angiography (CAG) and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).We conducted PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases to search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate with sodium chloride to prevent CI-AKI after CAG and/or PCI. Relative risk (RR), standardized mean difference (SMD), or weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was calculated. Heterogeneity, publication bias, and study quality were evaluated, sensitivity analyses, cumulative analyses, and subgroup analyses were performed. The risk of random errors was assessed by trial sequential analysis (TSA).Sixteen RCTs (3537 patients) met the eligibility criteria. Hydration with sodium bicarbonate showed significant beneficial effects in preventing CI-AKI (RR 0.67; 95% CI: 0.47-0.96, P = 0.029), decreasing the change in serum creatinine (SCr) (SMD -0.31 95% CI: -0.55 to -0.07, P = 0.011) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (SMD -0.17 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.04, P = 0.013). But no significant differences were observed in the requirement for dialysis (RR 1.11; 95% CI: 0.60-2.07, P = 0.729), mortality (RR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.41-1.21, P = 0.204) and reducing the length of hospital stay (LHS) (WMD -1.47; 95% CI: -4.14 to 1.20, P = 0.279). The result of TSA on incidence of CI-AKI showed the required information size (RIS = 6614) was not reached and cumulative z curve did not cross TSA boundary. The result of TSA on the requirement for dialysis and mortality demonstrated the required information sizes (RIS = 170,510 and 19,516, respectively) were not reached, and the cumulative z-curve did not cross any boundaries.The evidence that sodium bicarbonate reduces the incidence of

  18. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity in human adipocytes is strongly correlated with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and is a target of insulin-induced oxidative inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangdong; Hardy, V Elise; Joseph, Jeffrey I; Jabbour, Serge; Mahadev, Kalyankar; Zhu, Li; Goldstein, Barry J

    2003-06-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), in particular PTP1B, have been shown to modulate insulin signal transduction in liver and skeletal muscle in animal models; however, their role in human adipose tissue remains unclear. The uptake of (14)C-D-glucose in response to 10 or 100 nmol/L insulin was measured in isolated subcutaneous adipocytes from subjects with a mean age of 44 years (range, 26 to 58) and mean body mass index (BMI) of 35.6 (range, 29.7 to 45.5). The endogenous activity of total PTPases and specifically of PTP1B in immunoprecipitates was measured in cell lysates under an inert atmosphere with and without added reducing agents. Using nonlinear regression analysis, higher BMI was significantly correlated with lower adipocyte glucose uptake (r = 0.73, P =.01) and with increased endogenous total PTPase activity (r = 0.64, P =.04). Correlation with waist circumference gave similar results. The endogenous total PTPase activity also strongly correlated with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (R =.89, P <.0001); however, the activity of PTP1B was unrelated to the level of glucose uptake. Consistent with the insulin-stimulated oxidative inhibition of thiol-dependent PTPases reported for 3T3-L1 adipocytes and hepatoma cells, treatment of human adipocytes with 100 nmol/L insulin for 5 minutes lowered endogenous PTPase activity to 37% of control (P <.001), which was increased 25% by subsequent treatment with dithiothreitol in vitro. Cellular treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor that blocks the cellular generation of H(2)O(2) and reduces the insulin-induced reduction of cellular PTPase activity, also diminished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by 82% (P =.001). These data suggest that total cellular PTPase activity, but not the activity of PTP1B, is higher in more obese subjects and is negatively associated with insulin-stimulated glucose transport. The insulin-stimulated oxidative inhibition of PTPases may also have an important

  19. Assessment of the effects of ISIS 2302, an anti-sense inhibitor of human ICAM-1, on cellular and humoral immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Henry, Scott P; Levin, Arthur A; White, Kimber; Mennear, John H

    2006-12-01

    ISIS 2302 is a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide designed to inhibit human ICAM-1 and is intended for treatment of inflammatory diseases. Molecules of this class are known to elicit pro-inflammatory effects, and immunotoxicity studies were performed in mice to elucidate the nature of effects of ISIS 2302 on mammalian immune function. ISIS 2302 (1, 5, 20, or 50 mg/kg/dose) was administered intravenously every other day for 27 days. The pro-inflammatory properties of the drug were observed at doses > or = 20 mg/kg. A dose-dependent increase in spleen weight was associated with increased absolute splenocyte and B-lymphocyte counts after the 50 mg/kg/dose regimen. The mitogenic response of B-lymphocytes to bacterial lipopolysaccharide was increased after the 20 and 50 mg/kg/doses but antibody-forming cell activities remained unchanged. Total serum IgG concentration was decreased after the 20 and 50 mg/kg/dose regimens but IgM titers were unchanged. Increases in IL-6, IL-12, and MCP-1 as well as NK cell activity were observed after administration of 20 and 50 mg/kg/dose. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity was decreased by the 50 mg/kg/dose regimen. Other changes in immune function were not observed in ISIS 2302-dosed mice. ISIS 3082, a murine active ICAM-1 inhibitor, was used to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of ICAM-1 inhibition in the 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced contact sensitization model. Intravenous administration of 1 mg/kg of ISIS 3082 every other day for 27 days was unequivocally anti-inflammatory in the contact sensitization test. The results of these experiments support the conclusion that the prophlogistic effects of ISIS 2302 in mice are observed only at suprapharmacologic doses.

  20. IL-15 induces strong but short-lived tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cell responses through the regulation of Tim-3 in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Heon, Elise K.; Wulan, Hasi; Macdonald, Loch P.; Malek, Adel O.; Braunstein, Glenn H.; Eaves, Connie G.; Schattner, Mark D.; Allen, Peter M.; Alexander, Michael O.; Hawkins, Cynthia A.; McGovern, Dermot W.; Freeman, Richard L.; Amir, Eitan P.; Huse, Jason D.; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S.; Kauff, Noah P.; Meyers, Paul G.; Gleason, Michelle H.; Overholtzer, Michael G.; Wiseman, Sam S.; and others

    2015-08-14

    IL-15 has pivotal roles in the control of CD8{sup +} memory T cells and has been investigated as a therapeutic option in cancer therapy. Although IL-15 and IL-2 share many functions together, including the stimulation of CD8 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, the different in vivo roles of IL-15 and IL-2 have been increasingly recognized. Here, we explored the different effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells from resected breast tumors. We found that neither IL-2 nor IL-15 induced intratumoral CD8 T cell proliferation by itself, but after CD3/CD28-stimulation, IL-15 induced significantly higher proliferation than IL-2 during early time points, at day 2, day 3 and day 6. However, the IL-15-induced proliferation leveled off at day 9 and day 12, whereas IL-2 induced lower but progressive proliferation at each time point. Furthermore, IL-15 caused an early and robust increase of IFN-γ in the supernatant of TI cell cultures, which diminished at later time points, while the IL-2-induced IFN-γ production remained constant over time. In addition, the IL-15-costimulated CD8 T cells presented higher frequencies of apoptotic cells. The diminishing IL-15-induced response was possibly due to regulatory and/or exhaustion mechanisms. We did not observe increased IL-10 or PD-1 upregulation, but we have found an increase of Tim-3 upregulation on IL-15-, but not IL-2-stimulated cells. Blocking Tim-3 function using anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in increased IL-15-induced proliferation and IFN-γ production for a prolonged period of time, whereas adding Tim-3 ligand galectin 9 led to reduced proliferation and IFN-γ production. Our results suggest that IL-15 in combination of Tim-3 blocking antibodies could potentially act as an IL-2 alternative in tumor CD8 T cell expansion in vitro, a crucial step in adoptive T cell therapy. - Highlights: • We explored the effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells of breast cancer. • IL-15

  1. Formation of a ZnO overlayer in industrial Cu/ZnO/Al2 O3 catalysts induced by strong metal-support interactions.

    PubMed

    Lunkenbein, Thomas; Schumann, Julia; Behrens, Malte; Schlögl, Robert; Willinger, Marc G

    2015-04-01

    In industrially relevant Cu/ZnO/Al2 O3 catalysts for methanol synthesis, the strong metal support interaction between Cu and ZnO is known to play a key role. Here we report a detailed chemical transmission electron microscopy study on the nanostructural consequences of the strong metal support interaction in an activated high-performance catalyst. For the first time, clear evidence for the formation of metastable "graphite-like" ZnO layers during reductive activation is provided. The description of this metastable layer might contribute to the understanding of synergistic effects between the components of the Cu/ZnO/Al2 O3 catalysts. PMID:25683230

  2. IL-15 induces strong but short-lived tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cell responses through the regulation of Tim-3 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Heon, Elise K; Wulan, Hasi; Macdonald, Loch P; Malek, Adel O; Braunstein, Glenn H; Eaves, Connie G; Schattner, Mark D; Allen, Peter M; Alexander, Michael O; Hawkins, Cynthia A; McGovern, Dermot W; Freeman, Richard L; Amir, Eitan P; Huse, Jason D; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S; Kauff, Noah P; Meyers, Paul G; Gleason, Michelle H; Overholtzer, Michael G; Wiseman, Sam S; Streutker, Catherine D; Asa, Sylvia W; McAlindon, Timothy P; Newcomb, Polly O; Sorensen, Poul M; Press, Oliver A

    2015-08-14

    IL-15 has pivotal roles in the control of CD8(+) memory T cells and has been investigated as a therapeutic option in cancer therapy. Although IL-15 and IL-2 share many functions together, including the stimulation of CD8 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, the different in vivo roles of IL-15 and IL-2 have been increasingly recognized. Here, we explored the different effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells from resected breast tumors. We found that neither IL-2 nor IL-15 induced intratumoral CD8 T cell proliferation by itself, but after CD3/CD28-stimulation, IL-15 induced significantly higher proliferation than IL-2 during early time points, at day 2, day 3 and day 6. However, the IL-15-induced proliferation leveled off at day 9 and day 12, whereas IL-2 induced lower but progressive proliferation at each time point. Furthermore, IL-15 caused an early and robust increase of IFN-γ in the supernatant of TI cell cultures, which diminished at later time points, while the IL-2-induced IFN-γ production remained constant over time. In addition, the IL-15-costimulated CD8 T cells presented higher frequencies of apoptotic cells. The diminishing IL-15-induced response was possibly due to regulatory and/or exhaustion mechanisms. We did not observe increased IL-10 or PD-1 upregulation, but we have found an increase of Tim-3 upregulation on IL-15-, but not IL-2-stimulated cells. Blocking Tim-3 function using anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in increased IL-15-induced proliferation and IFN-γ production for a prolonged period of time, whereas adding Tim-3 ligand galectin 9 led to reduced proliferation and IFN-γ production. Our results suggest that IL-15 in combination of Tim-3 blocking antibodies could potentially act as an IL-2 alternative in tumor CD8 T cell expansion in vitro, a crucial step in adoptive T cell therapy.

  3. Source mechanism analysis of strong mining induced seismic event and its influence on ground deformation observed by InSAR technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Lukasz; Mirek, Katarzyna; Mirek, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    On April 17th, 2015 a strong shallow seismic event M4.0 struck a mining panel in the Wujek-Slask coal mine, southern Poland. The event was widely felt, followed with rockburst and caused a strong damages inside mining corridors. Unfortunately two miners are trapped by tunnels collapse. Full Moment Tensor (MT) estimated with regional broad-band signals shows that the event was characterized with very high isotropic (implosive) part. Mining inspections verified the occurrence of a rockfall and floor uplift. Very shallow foci depth (less than 1000m) and collapse - like MT solution suggest that event could be responsible for surface deformation in the vicinity of epicenter. To verified this issue we used the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique (InSAR). The InSAR relies on measuring phase differences between two SAR images (radarograms). The measured differences may be computed into a single interferometric image. i.e. an interferogram. Interferogram computed from two radarograms of the same terrain taken at different time allows detecting changes in elevation of the terrain. Two SAR scenes acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite (European Space Agency) were processed to obtain the interferogram covered study area (12.04.2015 and 24.04.2015). 12 days interval differential interferogram shows distinctive concentric feature which indicate subsidence trough. Subsidence pattern shows 1 cycle of deformation corresponding with about 2.5 cm subsidence. The InSAR solution support the reliability of very strong implosive MT part.

  4. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    SciTech Connect

    Volkas, R. R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G. C.

    1989-07-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3)/sub 1//direct product/SU(3)/sub 2//direct product/SU(3)/sub 3/ gauge theory, where quarks of the /ital i/th generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub /ital i// and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements.

  5. Strong stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate emulsion by ovalbumin: gaining insight into the mechanism of 'polymer-induced liquid precursor' processes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephan E; Leiterer, Jork; Pipich, Vitaliy; Barrea, Raul; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-08-17

    The impact of the ovo proteins ovalbumin and lysozyme--present in the first stage of egg shell formation--on the homogeneous formation of the liquid amorphous calcium carbonate (LACC) precursor, was studied by a combination of complementing methods: in situ WAXS, SANS, XANES, TEM, and immunogold labeling. Lysozyme (pI = 9.3) destabilizes the LACC emulsion whereas the glycoprotein ovalbumin (pI = 4.7) extends the lifespan of the emulsified state remarkably. In the light of the presented data: (a) Ovalbumin is shown to behave commensurable to the 'polymer-induced liquid precursor' (PILP) process proposed by Gower et al. Ovalbumin can be assumed to take a key role during eggshell formation where it serves as an effective stabilization agent for transient precursors and prevents undirected mineralization of the eggshell. (b) It is further shown that the emulsified LACC carries a negative surface charge and is electrostatically stabilized. (c) We propose that the liquid amorphous calcium carbonate is affected by polymers by depletion stabilization and de-emulsification rather than 'induced' by acidic proteins and polymers during a so-called polymer-induced liquid-precursor process. The original PILP coating effect, first reported by Gower et al., appears to be a result of a de-emulsification process of a stabilized LACC phase. The behavior of the liquid amorphous carbonate phase and the polymer-induced liquid-precursor phase itself can be well described by colloid chemical terms: electrostatic and depletion stabilization and de-emulsification by depletion destabilization.

  6. Adjuvant-carrying synthetic vaccine particles augment the immune response to encapsulated antigen and exhibit strong local immune activation without inducing systemic cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Ilyinskii, Petr O; Roy, Christopher J; O'Neil, Conlin P; Browning, Erica A; Pittet, Lynnelle A; Altreuter, David H; Alexis, Frank; Tonti, Elena; Shi, Jinjun; Basto, Pamela A; Iannacone, Matteo; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Langer, Robert S; Farokhzad, Omid C; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Johnston, Lloyd P M; Kishimoto, Takashi Kei

    2014-05-19

    Augmentation of immunogenicity can be achieved by particulate delivery of an antigen and by its co-administration with an adjuvant. However, many adjuvants initiate strong systemic inflammatory reactions in vivo, leading to potential adverse events and safety concerns. We have developed a synthetic vaccine particle (SVP) technology that enables co-encapsulation of antigen with potent adjuvants. We demonstrate that co-delivery of an antigen with a TLR7/8 or TLR9 agonist in synthetic polymer nanoparticles results in a strong augmentation of humoral and cellular immune responses with minimal systemic production of inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, antigen encapsulated into nanoparticles and admixed with free TLR7/8 agonist leads to lower immunogenicity and rapid induction of high levels of inflammatory cytokines in the serum (e.g., TNF-a and IL-6 levels are 50- to 200-fold higher upon injection of free resiquimod (R848) than of nanoparticle-encapsulated R848). Conversely, local immune stimulation as evidenced by cellular infiltration of draining lymph nodes and by intranodal cytokine production was more pronounced and persisted longer when SVP-encapsulated TLR agonists were used. The strong local immune activation achieved using a modular self-assembling nanoparticle platform markedly enhanced immunogenicity and was equally effective whether antigen and adjuvant were co-encapsulated in a single nanoparticle formulation or co-delivered in two separate nanoparticles. Moreover, particle encapsulation enabled the utilization of CpG oligonucleotides with the natural phosphodiester backbone, which are otherwise rapidly hydrolyzed by nucleases in vivo. The use of SVP may enable clinical use of potent TLR agonists as vaccine adjuvants for indications where cellular immunity or robust humoral responses are required.

  7. Adjuvant-carrying synthetic vaccine particles augment the immune response to encapsulated antigen and exhibit strong local immune activation without inducing systemic cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Ilyinskii, Petr O; Roy, Christopher J; O'Neil, Conlin P; Browning, Erica A; Pittet, Lynnelle A; Altreuter, David H; Alexis, Frank; Tonti, Elena; Shi, Jinjun; Basto, Pamela A; Iannacone, Matteo; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Langer, Robert S; Farokhzad, Omid C; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Johnston, Lloyd P M; Kishimoto, Takashi Kei

    2014-05-19

    Augmentation of immunogenicity can be achieved by particulate delivery of an antigen and by its co-administration with an adjuvant. However, many adjuvants initiate strong systemic inflammatory reactions in vivo, leading to potential adverse events and safety concerns. We have developed a synthetic vaccine particle (SVP) technology that enables co-encapsulation of antigen with potent adjuvants. We demonstrate that co-delivery of an antigen with a TLR7/8 or TLR9 agonist in synthetic polymer nanoparticles results in a strong augmentation of humoral and cellular immune responses with minimal systemic production of inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, antigen encapsulated into nanoparticles and admixed with free TLR7/8 agonist leads to lower immunogenicity and rapid induction of high levels of inflammatory cytokines in the serum (e.g., TNF-a and IL-6 levels are 50- to 200-fold higher upon injection of free resiquimod (R848) than of nanoparticle-encapsulated R848). Conversely, local immune stimulation as evidenced by cellular infiltration of draining lymph nodes and by intranodal cytokine production was more pronounced and persisted longer when SVP-encapsulated TLR agonists were used. The strong local immune activation achieved using a modular self-assembling nanoparticle platform markedly enhanced immunogenicity and was equally effective whether antigen and adjuvant were co-encapsulated in a single nanoparticle formulation or co-delivered in two separate nanoparticles. Moreover, particle encapsulation enabled the utilization of CpG oligonucleotides with the natural phosphodiester backbone, which are otherwise rapidly hydrolyzed by nucleases in vivo. The use of SVP may enable clinical use of potent TLR agonists as vaccine adjuvants for indications where cellular immunity or robust humoral responses are required. PMID:24593999

  8. Anion-Exchange Induced Strong π-π Interactions in Single Crystalline Naphthalene Diimide for Nitroexplosive Sensing: An Electronic Prototype for Visual on-Site Detection.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Anamika; Hussain, Sameer; Malik, Akhtar Hussain; Barman, Ujjwol; Goswami, Namami; Iyer, Parameswar Krishnan

    2016-09-28

    A new derivative of naphthalene diimide (NDMI) was synthesized that displayed optical, electrical, and visual changes exclusively for the most widespread nitroexplosive and highly water-soluble toxicant picric acid (PA) due to strong π-π interactions, dipole-charge interaction, and a favorable ground state electron transfer process facilitated by Coulombic attraction. The sensing mechanism and interaction between NDMI with PA is demonstrated via X-ray diffraction analysis, (1)H NMR studies, cyclic voltammetry, UV-visible/fluorescence spectroscopy, and lifetime measurements. Single crystal X-ray structure of NDMI revealed the formation of self-assembled crystalline network assisted by noncovalent C-H···I interactions that get disrupted upon introducing PA as a result of anion exchange and strong π-π stacking between NDMI and PA. Morphological studies of NDMI displayed large numbers of single crystalline microrods along with some three-dimensional (3D) daisy-like structures which were fabricated on Al-coated glass substrate to construct a low-cost two terminal sensor device for realizing vapor mode detection of PA at room temperature and under ambient conditions. Furthermore, an economical and portable electronic prototype was developed for visual and on-site detection of PA vapors under exceptionally realistic conditions.

  9. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema. PMID:26863147

  10. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Angelika; Kunze, Reiner; Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko; Marti, Hugo H

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema. PMID:26863147

  11. Strong stabilization of liquid amorphous calcium carbonate by ovalbumin: gaining insight into the mechanism of ‘polymer-induced liquid precursor’ processes

    PubMed Central

    Leiterer, Jork; Pipich, Vitaliy; Barrea, Raul; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The impact of the ovo-proteins ovalbumin and lysozyme—present in the first stage of egg shell formation—on the homogeneous formation of the liquid-amorphous calcium carbonate (LACC) precursor, was studied by a combination of complementing methods: in situ WAXS, SANS, XANES, TEM, and immunogold labeling. Lysozyme (pI = 9.3) destabilizes the LACC emulsion whereas the glycoprotein ovalbumin (pI = 4.7) extends the lifespan of the emulsified state remarkably. In the light of the presented data: (a) Ovalbumin is shown to behave commensurable to the ‘polymer-induced liquid precursor’ (PILP) process proposed by Gower et al. Ovalbumin can be assumed to take a key role during eggshell formation where it serves as an effective stabilization agent for transient precursors and prevents undirected mineralization of the eggshell. (b) It is further shown that the emulsified LACC carries a negative surface charge and is electrostatically stabilized. (c) We propose that the liquid amorphous calcium carbonate is affected by polymers by depletion stabilization and de-emulsification rather than ‘induced’ by acidic proteins and polymers during a polymer-induced liquid-precursor process. The original PILP coating effect, first reported by Gower et al., appears to be a result of a de-emulsification process of a stabilized LACC phase. The behavior of the liquid amorphous carbonate phase and the polymer-induced liquid-precursor phase itself can be well described by colloid chemical terms: electrostatic and depletion stabilization and de-emulsification by depletion destabilization. PMID:21736300

  12. Compensation of phonon-induced renormalization of vacuum Rabi splitting in large quantum dots: Towards temperature-stable strong coupling in the solid state with quantum dot-micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopfmann, C.; Musiał, A.; Strauß, M.; Barth, A. M.; Glässl, M.; Vagov, A.; Strauß, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Axt, V. M.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-12-01

    We study experimentally the influence of temperature on the emission characteristics of quantum dot-micropillars in the strong coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED). In particular, we investigate its impact on the vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) and we address the important question of the temperature stability of the coherent coupling regime in a semiconductor system, which is relevant in view of both fundamental study and future applications. To study the temperature dependence we investigate an unprecedentedly large number of strong coupling cases (89) in a wide temperature range from 10 up to 50 K, which constitutes a good basis for statistical analysis. The experiment indicates a statistically significant increase of the VRS with temperature in contrast to an expected decrease of the VRS due to the dephasing induced by acoustic phonons. From the theoretical point of view, the phonon-induced renormalization of the VRS is calculated using a real-time path-integral approach for strongly confined quantum dots (QDs), which allows for a numerical exact treatment of the coupling between the QD and a continuum of longitudinal acoustic phonons. The absence of the expected decrease of the VRS with temperature in our experimental data can be attributed to a unique optical property of laterally extended I n0.4G a0.6As QDs used in this study. Their electronic structure facilitates an effective temperature-driven increase of the oscillator strength of the excitonic state by up to 40% in the given temperature range. This leads to enhanced light-matter interaction and overcompensates the phonon-related decrease of the VRS. The observed persistence of strong coupling in the presence of phonon-induced decoherence demonstrates the appealing possibility to counteract detrimental phonon effects in the cQED regime via engineering the electronic structure of QDs.

  13. Influenza Virus–induced Dendritic Cell Maturation Is Associated with the Induction of Strong T Cell Immunity to a Coadministered, Normally Nonimmunogenic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brimnes, Marie K.; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M.; Moran, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the proposal that during microbial infection, dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation and present a mixture of peptides derived from the microbe as well as harmless environmental antigens. Mice were exposed to an aerosol of endotoxin free ovalbumin (OVA) in the absence or presence of influenza virus. In its absence, OVA failed to induce B and T cell responses and even tolerized, but with influenza, OVA-specific antibodies and CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes developed. With or without infection, OVA was presented selectively in the draining mediastinal lymph nodes, as assessed by the comparable proliferation of infused, CD8+ and CD4+, TCR transgenic T cells. In the absence of influenza, these OVA-specific T cells produced little IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ, but with infection, both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells made high levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ. The OVA plus influenza-treated mice also showed accelerated recovery to a challenge with recombinant vaccinia OVA virus. CD11c+ DCs from the mediastinal lymph nodes of infected mice selectively stimulated both OVA- and influenza-specific T cells and underwent maturation, with higher levels of MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 molecules. The relatively slow (2–3 d) kinetics of maturation correlated closely to the time at which OVA inhalation elicited specific antibodies. Therefore respiratory infection can induce DC maturation and simultaneously B and T cell immunity to an innocuous antigen inhaled concurrently. PMID:12847140

  14. Host-induced gene silencing of cytochrome P450 lanosterol C14α-demethylase–encoding genes confers strong resistance to Fusarium species

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Aline; Kumar, Neelendra; Weber, Lennart; Keller, Harald; Imani, Jafargholi; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Head blight, which is caused by mycotoxin-producing fungi of the genus Fusarium, is an economically important crop disease. We assessed the potential of host-induced gene silencing targeting the fungal cytochrome P450 lanosterol C-14α-demethylase (CYP51) genes, which are essential for ergosterol biosynthesis, to restrict fungal infection. In axenic cultures of Fusarium graminearum, in vitro feeding of CYP3RNA, a 791-nt double-stranded (ds)RNA complementary to CYP51A, CYP51B, and CYP51C, resulted in growth inhibition [half-maximum growth inhibition (IC50) = 1.2 nM] as well as altered fungal morphology, similar to that observed after treatment with the azole fungicide tebuconazole, for which the CYP51 enzyme is a target. Expression of the same dsRNA in Arabidopsis and barley rendered susceptible plants highly resistant to fungal infection. Microscopic analysis revealed that mycelium formation on CYP3RNA-expressing leaves was restricted to the inoculation sites, and that inoculated barley caryopses were virtually free of fungal hyphae. This inhibition of fungal growth correlated with in planta production of siRNAs corresponding to the targeted CYP51 sequences, as well as highly efficient silencing of the fungal CYP51 genes. The high efficiency of fungal inhibition suggests that host-induced gene-silencing targeting of the CYP51 genes is an alternative to chemical treatments for the control of devastating fungal diseases. PMID:24218613

  15. Gene conversion is strongly induced in human cells by double-strand breaks and is modulated by the expression of BCL-x(L)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Pierce, Andrew J.; Gauny, Stacey S.; Jasin, Maria; Kronenberg, Amy; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability in rodent cells, and it has been assumed that HDR is of similar importance in DSB repair in human cells. However, some outcomes of homologous recombination can be deleterious, suggesting that factors exist to regulate HDR. We demonstrated previously that overexpression of BCL-2 or BCL-x(L) enhanced the frequency of X-ray-induced TK1 mutations, including loss of heterozygosity events presumed to arise by mitotic recombination. The present study was designed to test whether HDR is a prominent DSB repair pathway in human cells and to determine whether ectopic expression of BCL-x(L) affects HDR. Using TK6-neo cells, we find that a single DSB in an integrated HDR reporter stimulates gene conversion 40-50-fold, demonstrating efficient DSB repair by gene conversion in human cells. Significantly, DSB-induced gene conversion events are 3-4-fold more frequent in TK6 cells that stably overexpress the antiapoptotic protein BCL-X(L). Thus, HDR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity in human cells, and ectopic expression of BCL-x(L) enhances HDR of DSBs. This is the first study to highlight a function for BCL-x(L) in modulating DSB repair in human cells.

  16. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  17. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  18. Relaxation of the normal electrical resistivity induced by high-pressure in strongly underdoped YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Nazyrov, Z. F.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the relaxation of the normal electrical resistivity, induced by high-pressure in YBa2Cu3O6.45 single crystals. It is determined that the pressure affects to the phase composition of the sample. Under pressure phases with different (but similar) critical temperatures form. It is determined that the application-removal pressure process is completely reversible. Above Tc the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the layers' plane at different hydrostatic pressures can be approximated with high accuracy with the scattering of electrons by phonons model. With increasing pressure, the residual resistance is reduced and the contribution of intraband s-s scattering increases. Additionally, the role of the interband s-d scattering and the Debye temperature is enhanced.

  19. Gene conversion is strongly induced in human cells by double-strand breaks and is modulated by the expression of BCL-XL

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Pierce, Andrew J.; Gauny, Stacey S.; Jasin, Maria; Kronenberg, Amy

    2001-09-25

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a well-established mechanism that contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability in rodent cells, and it has been assumed that HDR is of similar importance in the repair of DSBs in human cells. However, in addition to promoting genomic stability, some outcomes of homologous recombination can be deleterious, suggesting that factors exist to regulate HDR. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of BCL-2 or BCL-xL enhanced the frequency of x-ray-induced mutations involving the TK1 locus, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events presumed to arise by mitotic recombination. The present study was designed to test whether HDR is a prominent DSB repair pathway in human cells, and to directly determine whether ectopic expression of BCL-xL affects HDR. We used the B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6, which expresses wild-type TP53 and resembles normal lymphocytes in undergoing apoptosis following! genotoxic stress. U sing isogenic derivatives of TK6 cells (TK6-neo, TK6-bcl-xL), we find that a DSB in an integrated HDR reporter stimulates gene conversion 40-50-fold in TK6-neo cells, demonstrating that a DSB can be efficiently repaired by gene conversion in human cells. Significantly, DSB-induced gene conversion events are 3- to 4-fold more frequent in BCL-xL overexpressing cells. The results demonstrate that HDR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity in human cells and that ectopic expression of BCL-xL enhances HDR of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight a function for BCL-xL in modulating DSB repair in human cells.

  20. The bovine viral diarrhea virus E2 protein formulated with a novel adjuvant induces strong, balanced immune responses and provides protection from viral challenge in cattle.

    PubMed

    Snider, Marlene; Garg, Ravendra; Brownlie, Robert; van den Hurk, Jan V; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2014-11-28

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is still one of the most serious pathogens in cattle, meriting the development of improved vaccines. Recently, we developed a new adjuvant consisting of poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)]-phosphazene (PCEP), either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), and an immune defense regulator (IDR) peptide. As this adjuvant has been shown to mediate the induction of robust, balanced immune responses, it was evaluated in an E2 subunit vaccine against BVDV in lambs and calves. The BVDV type 2 E2 protein was produced at high levels in a mammalian expression system and purified. When formulated with either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), together with IDR and PCEP, the E2 protein elicited high antibody titers and production of IFN-γ secreting cells in lambs. As the immune responses were stronger when poly(I:C) was used, the E2 protein with poly(I:C), IDR and PCEP was subsequently tested in cattle. Robust virus neutralizing antibodies as well as cell-mediated immune responses, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses, were induced. The fact that CTL responses were demonstrated in calves vaccinated with an E2 protein subunit vaccine indicates that this adjuvant formulation promotes cross-presentation. Furthermore, upon challenge with a high dose of virulent BVDV-2, the vaccinated calves showed almost no temperature response, weight loss, leukopenia or virus replication, in contrast to the control animals, which had severe clinical disease. These data suggest that this E2 subunit formulation induces significant protection from BVDV-2 challenge, and thus is a promising BVDV vaccine candidate; in addition, the adjuvant platform has applications in bovine vaccines in general.

  1. Intranasal Delivery of Influenza rNP Adjuvanted with c-di-AMP Induces Strong Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses and Provides Protection against Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Maria Victoria; Ebensen, Thomas; Schulze, Kai; Cargnelutti, Diego; Blazejewska, Paulina; Scodeller, Eduardo A.; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    There is a critical need for new influenza vaccines able to protect against constantly emerging divergent virus strains. This will be sustained by the induction of vigorous cellular responses and humoral immunity capable of acting at the portal of entry of this pathogen. In this study we evaluate the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination with recombinant influenza nucleoprotein (rNP) co-administrated with bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) as adjuvant. Immunization of BALB/c mice with two doses of the formulation stimulates high titers of NP-specific IgG in serum and secretory IgA at mucosal sites. This formulation also promotes a strong Th1 response characterized by high secretion of INF-γ and IL-2. The immune response elicited promotes efficient protection against virus challenge. These results suggest that c-di-AMP is a potent mucosal adjuvant which may significantly contribute towards the development of innovative mucosal vaccines against influenza. PMID:25140692

  2. Low iron availability in continuous in vitro colonic fermentations induces strong dysbiosis of the child gut microbial consortium and a decrease of main metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Dostal, Alexandra; Fehlbaum, Sophie; Chassard, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; Lacroix, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects an estimated 2 billion people worldwide and Fe supplements are a common corrective strategy. The impact of Fe deficiency and Fe supplementation on the complex microbial community of the child gut was studied using in vitro colonic fermentation models inoculated with immobilized fecal microbiota. Chyme media (all Fe chelated by 2,2’-dipyridyl to 26.5 mg Fe L-1) mimicking Fe deficiency and supplementation were continuously fermented. Fermentation effluent samples were analyzed daily on the microbial composition and metabolites by qPCR, 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing and HPLC. Low Fe conditions (1.56 mg Fe L-1) significantly decreased acetate concentrations and subsequent Fe supplementation (26.5 mg Fe L-1) restored acetate production. High Fe following normal Fe conditions had no impact on the gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity. During very low Fe conditions (0 . 9 m g F e L-1 or Fe chelated b y 2,2’-dipyridyl), a decrease of Roseburia spp./Eubacterium rectale, Clostridium Cluster IV members and Bacteroides spp. was observed while Lactobacillus spp. and Enterobacteriaceae increased consistent with a decrease of butyrate (-84%) and propionate (-55%). The strong dysbiosis of the gut microbiota together with decrease of main gut microbiota metabolites observed with very low iron conditions could weaken the barrier effect of the microbiota and negatively impact gut health. PMID:22845175

  3. Vaccination with Pasteurella multocida recombinant OmpA induces strong but non-protective and deleterious Th2-type immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Dabo, S Mady; Confer, Anthony; Montelongo, Marie; York, Petrina; Wyckoff, John H

    2008-08-12

    Pasteurella multocida OmpA (PmOmpA) belongs to the major and multifunctional Escherichia coli OmpA family of proteins. We have previously reported that the protein is conserved, immunogenic and an adhesin that binds host cells and host cell extracellular matrix molecules [Dabo SM, Confer AW, Quijano-Blas RA. Molecular and immunological characterization of Pasteurella multocida serotype A:3 OmpA: evidence of its role in P. multocida interaction with extracellular matrix molecules. Microb Pathog 2003;35(4):147-157]. In this study, we found that immunization of mice with the recombinant PmOmpA elicited strong Th2-type immune response, characterized by high immunoglobulin G(1) (IgG(1)) antibodies production. Subsequent intraperitoneal homologous challenge of the immunized mice resulted in lack of protection associated with the high IgG(1) titers in anti-rPmOmpA sera. Furthermore, the protection afforded by vaccination with P. multocida OMPs alone was adversely affected by the addition of the rPmOmpA to the vaccine preparations. The results demonstrate that PmOmpA has a detrimental effect on the efficacy of vaccination with OMPs in mice. Targeted inactivation of pmOmpA gene in P. multocida 232 represents a potential mean towards the development of an effective vaccine candidate.

  4. Intranasal immunization of mice with CpG DNA induces strong systemic and mucosal responses that are influenced by other mucosal adjuvants and antigen distribution.

    PubMed Central

    McCluskie, M. J.; Weeratna, R. D.; Davis, H. L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory cytosine-guanine phosphate-linked dinucleotide (CpG) motifs are potent systemic and mucosal adjuvants in mice that have synergistic action with numerous other adjuvants, including alum and cholera toxin (CT). Herein, we evaluate CpG ODN with intranasal (IN) delivery of purified hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), relative to and in combination with CT, Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin (LT), the B subunit of CT (CTB), and a nontoxic derivative of LT (LTK63). MATERIALS AND METHODS: BALB/c mice were immunized by IN administration of HBsAg, alone or combined with CT, LT, CTB, or LTK63, and/or CpG ODN, or non-CpG control ODN. In addition, the effect of low-or high-volume administration was assessed, in order to target upper respiratory or entire respiratory tract, respectively. HBsAg-specific systemic (immunoglobulins: IgG, IgG1, IgG2a in plasma) and mucosal (IgA in fecal, lung, vaginal, saliva, and gut samples) humoral responses, as well as cell-mediated immune responses including T-cell proliferation and cytokines (interleukins: IL-4, IL-5; interferon: IFN-gamma) were evaluated. RESULTS: CpG ODN, CT, and LT augmented anti-HBs titers equally, and more so than did CTB or LTK63. CpG ODN acted synergistically with CT and LT, but not CTB or LTK63 to enhance anti-HBs titers. Nevertheless, CpG ODN induced a more Th1-like response for all combinations, compared with the same formulation without CpG. Strength of induced systemic and mucosal immune responses was better with IN delivery of a large volume. A small volume required multiple administrations and higher doses of antigen and adjuvant for equal results. This suggests that delivery of antigen to the lung and/or diges-tive system is superior to delivery to the nasal cavity. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the synergy between CpG ODN and native toxins (CT, LT) may depend on their enzymatic activity and that the lack of synergy

  5. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  6. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-08-26

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway.

  7. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  8. ZnO nanoparticles impose a panmetabolic toxic effect along with strong necrosis, inducing activation of the envelope stress response in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Vidovic, Sinisa; Elder, Jeff; Medihala, Prabhakara; Lawrence, John R; Predicala, Bernardo; Zhang, Haixia; Korber, Darren R

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested the antimicrobial activity of three metal nanoparticles (NPs), ZnO, MgO, and CaO NPs, against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in liquid medium and on solid surfaces. Out of the three tested metal NPs, ZnO NPs exhibited the most significant antimicrobial effect both in liquid medium and when embedded on solid surfaces. Therefore, we focused on revealing the mechanisms of surface-associated ZnO biocidal activity. Using the global proteome approach, we report that a great majority (79%) of the altered proteins in biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis were downregulated, whereas a much smaller fraction (21%) of proteins were upregulated. Intriguingly, all downregulated proteins were enzymes involved in a wide range of the central metabolic pathways, including translation; amino acid biosynthetic pathways; nucleobase, nucleoside, and nucleotide biosynthetic processes; ATP synthesis-coupled proton transport; the pentose phosphate shunt; and carboxylic acid metabolic processes, indicating that ZnO NPs exert a panmetabolic toxic effect on this prokaryotic organism. In addition to their panmetabolic toxicity, ZnO NPs induced profound changes in cell envelope morphology, imposing additional necrotic effects and triggering the envelope stress response of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis. The envelope stress response effect activated periplasmic chaperones and proteases, transenvelope complexes, and regulators, thereby facilitating protection of this prokaryotic organism against ZnO NPs. PMID:25801570

  9. Excited Oxidized-Carbon Nanodots Induced by Ozone from Low-Temperature Plasma to Initiate Strong Chemiluminescence for Fast Discrimination of Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Long, Zi; Fang, De-Cai; Ren, Hong; Ouyang, Jin; He, Lixin; Na, Na

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanodots (C-dots) are recently well examined due to the emissions with color-tuning and nonblinking properties, while more studies are still needed for the appropriate understanding and application of distinct emissions. In this work, we found the emission of chemiluminescence (CL) by introducing low-temperature plasma (LTP) into C-dots solutions without any reagent added, whose intensity was affected by the presence of different metal ions. Based on both experimental data and theoretical calculations, we found with the ozonation by ozone from LTP, excited oxidized-C-dots would be generated with the addition of ozone onto the conjugated double bonds of C-dots, and these excited species could directly initiate strong CL combining with the deactivation of excited species to the ground state. Significantly, the cross-reactive CL signals were obtained from different kinds of C-dots with the presence of different metal ions. Therefore, a new sensor array (electronic tongue) composed of five different C-dots was designed for fast discrimination of metal ions, which achieved the accurate discrimination of 13 kinds of metal ions in pure water and real samples. It exhibited good reproducibility and sensitivity, which can be used for the quantitative analysis of metal ions such as showing a linear range from 4 × 10(-7) to 6 × 10(-5) mol·L(-1) (R(2) > 0.99) for Fe(3+) with a detection limit of 2.5 × 10(-7) mol·L(-1). This work not only provides a novel finding of CL from C-dots revealing explicit relationship between structures and CL properties, but also realizes the fast discrimination of metal ions, showing potentials in environmental monitoring and quality identifications. PMID:27376407

  10. Strong Navajo marriages.

    PubMed

    Skogrand, Linda; Mueller, Mary Lou; Arrington, Rachel; LeBlanc, Heidi; Spotted Elk, Davina; Dayzie, Irene; Rosenband, Reva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, conducted in two Navajo Nation chapters, was to learn what makes Navajo marriages strong because no research has been done on this topic. Twenty-one Navajo couples (42 individuals) who felt they had strong marriages volunteered to participate in the study. Couples identified the following marital strengths: (1) maintain communication, (2) nurture your relationship, (3) learn about marriage, (4) be prepared for marriage, and (5) have a strong foundation.

  11. Strong Navajo marriages.

    PubMed

    Skogrand, Linda; Mueller, Mary Lou; Arrington, Rachel; LeBlanc, Heidi; Spotted Elk, Davina; Dayzie, Irene; Rosenband, Reva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, conducted in two Navajo Nation chapters, was to learn what makes Navajo marriages strong because no research has been done on this topic. Twenty-one Navajo couples (42 individuals) who felt they had strong marriages volunteered to participate in the study. Couples identified the following marital strengths: (1) maintain communication, (2) nurture your relationship, (3) learn about marriage, (4) be prepared for marriage, and (5) have a strong foundation. PMID:19085828

  12. Intranasal vaccination of recombinant H5N1 HA1 proteins fused with foldon and Fc induces strong mucosal immune responses with neutralizing activity: Implication for developing novel mucosal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Li, Ye; Guo, Yan; Wang, Lili; Yang, Jie; Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Yusen; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus remains a threat to public health because of its continued spread in poultry in some countries and its ability to infect humans with high mortality rate, calling for the development of effective and safe vaccines against H5N1 infection. Here, we constructed 4 candidate vaccines by fusing H5N1 hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) with foldon (HA1-Fd), human IgG Fc (HA1-Fc), foldon and Fc (HA1-FdFc) or His-tag (HA1-His). We then compared their ability to induce mucosal immune responses and neutralizing antibodies in the presence or absence of Poly(I:C) and CpG adjuvants via the intranasal route. Without an adjuvant, HA1-FdFc could elicit appreciable humoral immune responses and local mucosal IgA antibodies in immunized mice, while other vaccine candidates only induced background immune responses. In the presence of Poly(I:C) and CpG, both HA1-Fd and HA1-Fc elicited much higher levels of serum IgG and local mucosal IgA antibodies than HA1-His. Poly(I:C) and CpG could also augment the neutralizing antibody responses induced by these 4 vaccine candidates in the order of HA1-FdFc > HA1-Fc > HA1-Fd > HA1-His. These results suggest that both Fd and Fc potentiate the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1 protein and that Poly(I:C) and CpG serve as efficient mucosal adjuvants in promoting efficacy of these vaccine candidates to induce strong systemic and local antibody responses and potent neutralizing antibodies, providing a useful strategy to develop effective and safe mucosal H5N1 vaccines. PMID:26260706

  13. Intranasal vaccination of recombinant H5N1 HA1 proteins fused with foldon and Fc induces strong mucosal immune responses with neutralizing activity: Implication for developing novel mucosal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Li, Ye; Guo, Yan; Wang, Lili; Yang, Jie; Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Yusen; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus remains a threat to public health because of its continued spread in poultry in some countries and its ability to infect humans with high mortality rate, calling for the development of effective and safe vaccines against H5N1 infection. Here, we constructed 4 candidate vaccines by fusing H5N1 hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) with foldon (HA1-Fd), human IgG Fc (HA1-Fc), foldon and Fc (HA1-FdFc) or His-tag (HA1-His). We then compared their ability to induce mucosal immune responses and neutralizing antibodies in the presence or absence of Poly(I:C) and CpG adjuvants via the intranasal route. Without an adjuvant, HA1-FdFc could elicit appreciable humoral immune responses and local mucosal IgA antibodies in immunized mice, while other vaccine candidates only induced background immune responses. In the presence of Poly(I:C) and CpG, both HA1-Fd and HA1-Fc elicited much higher levels of serum IgG and local mucosal IgA antibodies than HA1-His. Poly(I:C) and CpG could also augment the neutralizing antibody responses induced by these 4 vaccine candidates in the order of HA1-FdFc > HA1-Fc > HA1-Fd > HA1-His. These results suggest that both Fd and Fc potentiate the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1 protein and that Poly(I:C) and CpG serve as efficient mucosal adjuvants in promoting efficacy of these vaccine candidates to induce strong systemic and local antibody responses and potent neutralizing antibodies, providing a useful strategy to develop effective and safe mucosal H5N1 vaccines.

  14. Strong Navajo Marriages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogrand, Linda; Mueller, Mary Lou; Arrington, Rachel; LeBlanc, Heidi; Spotted Elk, Davina; Dayzie, Irene; Rosenbrand, Reva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, conducted in two Navajo Nation chapters, was to learn what makes Navajo marriages strong because no research has been done on this topic. Twenty-one Navajo couples (42 individuals) who felt they had strong marriages volunteered to participate in the study. Couples identified the following marital strengths:…

  15. What Is Strong Correlation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Marcin

    2009-01-01

    Interpretation of correlation is often based on rules of thumb in which some boundary values are given to help decide whether correlation is non-important, weak, strong or very strong. This article shows that such rules of thumb may do more harm than good, and instead of supporting interpretation of correlation--which is their aim--they teach a…

  16. Living Bones, Strong Bones

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this classroom activity, engineering, nutrition, and physical activity collide when students design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increas...

  17. Downregulation of miR-210 expression inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and enhances radiosensitivity in hypoxic human hepatoma cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Ting; Cao, Jianping; Liu, Fenju; Tian, Ye; Zhu, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and an important contributor to tumor radioresistance. miR-210 is the most consistently and robustly induced microRNA under hypoxia in different types of tumor cells and normal cells. In the present study, to explore the feasibility of miR-210 as an effective therapeutic target, lentiviral-mediated anti-sense miR-210 gene transfer technique was employed to downregulate miR-210 expression in hypoxic human hepatoma SMMC-7721, HepG2 and HuH7 cells, and phenotypic changes of which were analyzed. Hypoxia led to an increased hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and miR-210 expression and cell arrest in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase in all cell lines. miR-210 downregulation significantly suppressed cell viability, induced cell arrest in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase, increased apoptotic rate and enhanced radiosensitivity in hypoxic human hepatoma cells. Moreover, apoptosis-inducing factor, mitochondrion-associated, 3 (AIFM3) was identified as a direct target gene of miR-210. AIFM3 downregulation by siRNA attenuated radiation induced apoptosis in miR-210 downregulated hypoxic human hepatoma cells. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-210 might be a potential therapeutic target and specific inhibition of miR-210 expression in combination with radiotherapy might be expected to exert strong anti-tumor effect on hypoxic human hepatoma cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-210 downregulation radiosensitized hypoxic hepatoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIFM3 was identified as a direct target gene of miR-210. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-210 might be a therapeutic target to hypoxic hepatoma.

  18. On Strong Anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, N.; Turvey, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    We examine Dubois's (2003) distinction between weak anticipation and strong anticipation. Anticipation is weak if it arises from a model of the system via internal simulations. Anticipation is strong if it arises from the system itself via lawful regularities embedded in the system's ordinary mode of functioning. The assumption of weak anticipation dominates cognitive science and neuroscience and in particular the study of perception and action. The assumption of strong anticipation, however, seems to be required by anticipation's ubiquity. It is, for example, characteristic of homeostatic processes at the level of the organism, organs, and cells. We develop the formal distinction between strong and weak anticipation by elaboration of anticipating synchronization, a phenomenon arising from time delays in appropriately coupled dynamical systems. The elaboration is conducted in respect to (a) strictly physical systems, (b) the defining features of circadian rhythms, often viewed as paradigmatic of biological behavior based in internal models, (c) Pavlovian learning, and (d) forward models in motor control. We identify the common thread of strongly anticipatory systems and argue for its significance in furthering understanding of notions such as “internal”, “model” and “prediction”. PMID:20191086

  19. Pellet feed adsorbed with the recombinant Lactococcus lactis BFE920 expressing SiMA antigen induced strong recall vaccine effects against Streptococcus iniae infection in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel; Beck, Bo Ram; Lee, Sun Min; Jeon, Jongsu; Lee, Dong Wook; Lee, Jae Il; Song, Seong Kyu

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a fish feed vaccine that provides effective disease prevention and convenient application. A lactic acid bacterium (LAB), Lactococcus lactis BFE920, was modified to express the SiMA antigen, a membrane protein of Streptococcus iniae. The antigen was engineered to be expressed under the nisin promoter, which is induced by nisin produced naturally by the host LAB. Various sizes (40 ± 3.5 g, 80 ± 2.1 g, and 221 ± 2.4 g) of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) were vaccinated by feeding the extruded pellet feed, onto which the SiMA-expressing L. lactis BFE920 (1.0 × 10(7) CFU/g) was adsorbed. Vaccine-treated feed was administered twice a day for 1 week, and priming and boosting were performed with a 1-week interval in between. The vaccinated fish had significantly elevated levels of antigen-specific serum antibodies and T cell marker mRNAs: CD4-1, CD4-2, and CD8a. In addition, the feed vaccine significantly induced T cell effector functions, such as the production of IFN-γ and activation of the transcription factor that induces its expression, T-bet. When the flounder were challenged by intraperitoneal infection and bath immersion with S. iniae, the vaccinated fish showed 84% and 82% relative percent survival (RPS), respectively. Furthermore, similar protective effects were confirmed even 3 months after vaccination in a field study (n = 4800), indicating that this feed vaccine elicited prolonged duration of immunopotency. In addition, the vaccinated flounder gained 21% more weight and required 16% less feed to gain a unit of body weight compared to the control group. The data clearly demonstrate that the L. lactis BFE920-SiMA feed vaccine has strong protective effects, induces prolonged vaccine efficacy, and has probiotic effects. In addition, this LAB-based fish feed vaccine can be easily used to target many different pathogens of diverse fish species. PMID:27302864

  20. Strongly correlated Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2016-10-01

    The strongly interacting Bose gas is one of the most fundamental paradigms of quantum many-body physics and the subject of many experimental and theoretical investigations. We review recent progress on strongly correlated Bose gases, starting with a description of beyond mean-field corrections. We show that the Efimov effect leads to non universal phenomena and to a metastability of the low temperature Bose gas through three-body recombination to deeply bound molecular states. We outline differences and similarities with ultracold Fermi gases, discuss recent experiments on the unitary Bose gas, and finally present a few perspectives for future research.

  1. Adult thymus transplantation with allogeneic intra-bone marrow–bone marrow transplantation from same donor induces high thymopoiesis, mild graft-versus-host reaction and strong graft-versus-tumour effects

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Takashi; Hosaka, Naoki; Cui, Wenhao; Nishida, Teruhisa; Takaki, Takashi; Inaba, Muneo; Kamiyama, Yasuo; Ikehara, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    Although allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) plus donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is performed for solid tumours to enhance graft-versus-tumour (GVT) effects, a graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) is also elicited. We carried out intra-bone marrow–bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) plus adult thymus transplantation (ATT) from the same donor to supply alloreactive T cells continually. Normal mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT survived for a long time with high donor-derived thymopoiesis and mild GVHR. The percentage of CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the spleen of the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT was lower than in normal B6 mice or mice treated with IBM-BMT alone, but higher than in mice treated with IBM-BMT + DLI; the mice treated with IBM-BMT + DLI showed severe GVHR. In tumour-bearing mice, tumour growth was more strongly inhibited by IBM-BMT + ATT than by IBM-BMT alone. Mice treated with IBM-BMT + a high dose of DLI also showed tumour regression comparable to that of mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT but died early of GVHD. By contrast, mice treated with IBM-BMT + a low dose of DLI showed longer survival but less tumour regression than the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT. Histologically, significant numbers of CD8+ T cells were found to have infiltrated the tumour in the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT. The number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labelling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic tumour cells also significantly increased in the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT. Allogeneic IBM-BMT + ATT thus can induce high thymopoiesis, preserving strong GVT effects without severe GVHR. PMID:18778285

  2. Strong Little Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moloney, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Did you know that some strong little cylindrical magnets available in local hardware stores can have an effective circumferential current of 2500 A? This intriguing information can be obtained by hanging a pair of magnets at the center of a coil, as shown in Fig. 1, and measuring the oscillation frequency as a function of coil current.

  3. Noise in Strong Lensing Cosmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Neal; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Bode, Paul

    2005-03-01

    Giant arcs in strong lensing galaxy clusters can provide a purely geometric determination of cosmological parameters, such as the dark energy density and equation of state. We investigate sources of noise in cosmography with giant arcs, focusing in particular on errors induced by density fluctuations along the line of sight and errors caused by modeling uncertainties. We estimate parameter errors in two independent ways, first by developing a Fisher matrix formalism for strong lensing parameters and next by directly ray-tracing through N-body simulations using a multiplane lensing code. We show that for reasonable power spectra, density fluctuations from large-scale structures produce >100% errors in cosmological parameters derived from any single sight line, precluding the use of individual clusters or ``golden lenses'' to derive accurate cosmological constraints. Modeling uncertainties can similarly lead to large errors, and we show that the use of parameterized mass models in fitting strong lensing clusters can significantly bias the inferred cosmological parameters. We lastly speculate on the means by which these errors may be corrected.

  4. Abrupt transitions of the top-down controlled Black Sea pelagic ecosystem during 1960 2000: Evidence for regime-shifts under strong fishery exploitation and nutrient enrichment modulated by climate-induced variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz, Temel; Gilbert, Denis

    2007-02-01

    -shifts appear to be sporadic events forced by strong transient decadal perturbations, and therefore differ from the multi-decadal scale cyclical events observed in pelagic ocean ecosystems under low-frequency climatic forcing. The Black Sea observations illustrate that eutrophication and extreme fishery exploitation can indeed induce hysteresis in large marine ecosystems, when they can exert sufficiently strong forcing onto the system. They further illustrate the link between the disruption of the top predators, proliferation of new predator stocks, and regime-shift events. Examples of these features have been reported for some aquatic ecosystems, but are extremely limited for large marine ecosystems.

  5. Strong stellar winds.

    PubMed

    Conti, P S; McCray, R

    1980-04-01

    The hottest and most luminous stars lose a substantial fraction of their mass in strong stellar winds. These winds not only affect the evolution of the star, they also carve huge expanding cavities in the surrounding interstellar medium, possibly affecting star formation. The winds are probably driven by radiation pressure, but uncertainties persist in their theoretical description. Strong x-ray sources associated with a few of these hot stars may be used to probe the stellar winds. The nature of the weak x-ray sources recently observed to be associated with many of these stars is uncertain. It is suggested that roughly 10 percent of the luminous hot stars may have as companions neutron stars or black holes orbiting within the stellar winds.

  6. Open Flavor Strong Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Bijker, R.; Ferretti, J.; Galatà, G.; Santopinto, E.

    2016-10-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the results of a QM calculation of the open-flavor strong decays of **** light nucleon resonances. These are the results of a recent calculation, where we used a modified ^3P_0 model for the amplitudes and the U(7) algebraic model and the hypercentral quark model to predict the baryon spectrum. The decay amplitudes are compared with the existing experimental data.

  7. Tilts in strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.

    2006-01-01

    Most instruments used in seismological practice to record ground motion are pendulum seismographs, velocigraphs, or accelerographs. In most cases it is assumed that seismic instruments are only sensitive to the translational motion of the instrument's base. In this study the full equation of pendulum motion, including the inputs of rotations and tilts, is considered. It is shown that tilting the accelerograph's base can severely impact its response to the ground motion. The method of tilt evaluation using uncorrected strong-motion accelerograms was first suggested by Graizer (1989), and later tested in several laboratory experiments with different strong-motion instruments. The method is based on the difference in the tilt sensitivity of the horizontal and vertical pendulums. The method was applied to many of the strongest records of the Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake of 1994. Examples are shown when relatively large tilts of up to a few degrees occurred during strong earthquake ground motion. Residual tilt extracted from the strong-motion record at the Pacoima Dam-Upper Left Abutment reached 3.1?? in N45??E direction, and was a result of local earthquake-induced tilting due to high-amplitude shaking. This value is in agreement with the residual tilt measured by using electronic level a few days after the earthquake. The method was applied to the building records from the Northridge earthquake. According to the estimates, residual tilt reached 2.6?? on the ground floor of the 12-story Hotel in Ventura. Processing of most of the strongest records of the Northridge earthquake shows that tilts, if happened, were within the error of the method, or less than about 0.5??.

  8. Strongly intensive quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, M. I.; Gazdzicki, M.

    2011-07-15

    Analysis of fluctuations of hadron production properties in collisions of relativistic particles profits from use of measurable intensive quantities which are independent of system size variations. The first family of such quantities was proposed in 1992; another is introduced in this paper. Furthermore we present a proof of independence of volume fluctuations for quantities from both families within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. These quantities are referred to as strongly intensive ones. Influence of conservation laws and resonance decays is also discussed.

  9. Breathers in strongly anharmonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Rosenau, Philip; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2014-02-01

    We present and study a family of finite amplitude breathers on a genuinely anharmonic Klein-Gordon lattice embedded in a nonlinear site potential. The direct numerical simulations are supported by a quasilinear Schrodinger equation (QLS) derived by averaging out the fast oscillations assuming small, albeit finite, amplitude vibrations. The genuinely anharmonic interlattice forces induce breathers which are strongly localized with tails evanescing at a doubly exponential rate and are either close to a continuum, with discrete effects being suppressed, or close to an anticontinuum state, with discrete effects being enhanced. Whereas the D-QLS breathers appear to be always stable, in general there is a stability threshold which improves with spareness of the lattice.

  10. Novel influenza virus vectors expressing Brucella L7/L12 or Omp16 proteins in cattle induced a strong T-cell immune response, as well as high protectiveness against B. abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Yespembetov, Bolat; Zinina, Nadezhda; Assanzhanova, Nurika; Kozhamkulov, Yerken; Inkarbekov, Dulat; Gotskina, Tatyana; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2014-04-11

    This paper presents the results of a study of the immunogenicity and protectiveness of new candidate vector vaccine against Brucella abortus - a bivalent vaccine formulation consisting of a mixture of recombinant influenza A subtype H5N1 or H1N1 (viral constructs vaccine formulation) viruses expressing Brucella ribosomal protein L7/L12 and Omp16, in cattle. To increase the effectiveness of the candidate vaccine, adjuvants such as Montanide Gel01 or chitosan were included in its composition. Immunization of cattle (heifers aged 1-1.5 years, 5 animals per group) with the viral constructs vaccine formulation only, or its combination with adjuvants Montanide Gel01 or chitosan, was conducted via the conjunctival method using cross prime (influenza virus subtype H5N1) and booster (influenza virus subtype H1N1) vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. Vaccine candidates were evaluated in comparison with the positive (B. abortus S19) and negative (PBS) controls. The viral constructs vaccine formulations, particularly in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant promoted formation of IgG antibodies (with a predominance of antibodies of isotype IgG2a) against Brucella L7/L12 and Omp16 proteins in ELISA. Moreover, these vaccines in cattle induced a strong antigen-specific T-cell immune response, as indicated by a high number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, as well as the concentration of IFN-γ, and most importantly provided a high level of protectiveness comparable to the commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine and superior to the B. abortus S19 vaccine in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant. Based on these findings, we recommended the bivalent vaccine formulation containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 for practical use in cattle.

  11. Novel influenza virus vectors expressing Brucella L7/L12 or Omp16 proteins in cattle induced a strong T-cell immune response, as well as high protectiveness against B. abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Yespembetov, Bolat; Zinina, Nadezhda; Assanzhanova, Nurika; Kozhamkulov, Yerken; Inkarbekov, Dulat; Gotskina, Tatyana; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2014-04-11

    This paper presents the results of a study of the immunogenicity and protectiveness of new candidate vector vaccine against Brucella abortus - a bivalent vaccine formulation consisting of a mixture of recombinant influenza A subtype H5N1 or H1N1 (viral constructs vaccine formulation) viruses expressing Brucella ribosomal protein L7/L12 and Omp16, in cattle. To increase the effectiveness of the candidate vaccine, adjuvants such as Montanide Gel01 or chitosan were included in its composition. Immunization of cattle (heifers aged 1-1.5 years, 5 animals per group) with the viral constructs vaccine formulation only, or its combination with adjuvants Montanide Gel01 or chitosan, was conducted via the conjunctival method using cross prime (influenza virus subtype H5N1) and booster (influenza virus subtype H1N1) vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. Vaccine candidates were evaluated in comparison with the positive (B. abortus S19) and negative (PBS) controls. The viral constructs vaccine formulations, particularly in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant promoted formation of IgG antibodies (with a predominance of antibodies of isotype IgG2a) against Brucella L7/L12 and Omp16 proteins in ELISA. Moreover, these vaccines in cattle induced a strong antigen-specific T-cell immune response, as indicated by a high number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, as well as the concentration of IFN-γ, and most importantly provided a high level of protectiveness comparable to the commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine and superior to the B. abortus S19 vaccine in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant. Based on these findings, we recommended the bivalent vaccine formulation containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 for practical use in cattle. PMID:24598723

  12. Strong, Lightweight, Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, James C.; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Ilhan, Ulvi

    2007-01-01

    A new class of strong, lightweight, porous materials has been invented as an outgrowth of an effort to develop reinforced silica aerogels. The new material, called X-Aerogel is less hygroscopic, but no less porous and of similar density to the corresponding unmodified aerogels. However, the property that sets X-Aerogels apart is their mechanical strength, which can be as much as two and a half orders of magnitude stronger that the unmodified aerogels. X-Aerogels are envisioned to be useful for making extremely lightweight, thermally insulating, structural components, but they may also have applications as electrical insulators, components of laminates, catalyst supports, templates for electrode materials, fuel-cell components, and filter membranes.

  13. Strongly anisotropic polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Stephan; Zippelius, Annette; Benetatos, Panayotis

    2011-03-01

    We investigate a network of worm-like chains, which are strongly oriented along a preferred direction due to an external field, boundary conditions, or a nematic environment. We discuss the effects of random permanent cross-links, whose density may follow an arbitrary distribution along the alignment direction. We show that the tilt modulus is unaffected by cross-links. As the cross-link density is increased beyond the gel point, the network develops a stiffness to in-plane shear deformations. Results for the shear elasticity and fluctuations of the polymer chains are presented. The case of cross-linking the chains on one end only is highlighted, it constitutes a simple model for polymer brushes. Moreover force-extension curves are presented for a toy model that consists of two cross-linked chains.

  14. Finding Strong Bridges and Strong Articulation Points in Linear Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italiano, Giuseppe F.; Laura, Luigi; Santaroni, Federico

    Given a directed graph G, an edge is a strong bridge if its removal increases the number of strongly connected components of G. Similarly, we say that a vertex is a strong articulation point if its removal increases the number of strongly connected components of G. In this paper, we present linear-time algorithms for computing all the strong bridges and all the strong articulation points of directed graphs, solving an open problem posed in [2].

  15. Disordered strongly correlated electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Mard, Hossein

    Disorder can have a vast variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this dissertation we study the effects of quenched disorder on electronic systmens at zero temperature. First, we perform variational studies of the interaction-localization problem to describe the interaction-induced renormalizations of the effective (screened) random potential seen by quasiparticles. Here we present results of careful finite-size scaling studies for the conductance of disordered Hubbard chains at half-filling and zero temperature. While our results indicate that quasiparticle wave functions remain exponentially localized even in the presence of moderate to strong repulsive interactions, we show that interactions produce a strong decrease of the characteristic conductance scale g* signaling the crossover to strong localization. This effect, which cannot be captured by a simple renormalization of the disorder strength, instead reflects a peculiar non-Gaussian form of the spatial correlations of the screened disordered potential, a hitherto neglected mechanism to dramatically reduce the impact of Anderson localization (interference) effects. Second, we formulate a strong-disorder renormalization-group (SDRG) approach to study the beta function of the tight-binding model in one dimension with both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder for states at the band center. We show that the SDRG method, when used to compute transport properties, yields exact results since it is identical to the transfer matrix method. The beta function is shown to be universal when only off-diagonal disorder is present even though single-parameter scaling is known to be violated. A different single-parameter scaling theory is formulated for this particular (particle-hole symmetric) case. Upon breaking particle-hole symmetry (by adding diagonal disorder), the beta function is shown to

  16. Strongly correlated surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Victor A.

    Everything has an edge. However trivial, this phrase has dominated theoretical condensed matter in the past half a decade. Prior to that, questions involving the edge considered to be more of an engineering problem rather than a one of fundamental science: it seemed self-evident that every edge is different. However, recent advances proved that many surface properties enjoy a certain universality, and moreover, are 'topologically' protected. In this thesis I discuss a selected range of problems that bring together topological properties of surface states and strong interactions. Strong interactions alone can lead to a wide spectrum of emergent phenomena: from high temperature superconductivity to unconventional magnetic ordering; interactions can change the properties of particles, from heavy electrons to fractional charges. It is a unique challenge to bring these two topics together. The thesis begins by describing a family of methods and models with interactions so high that electrons effectively disappear as particles and new bound states arise. By invoking the AdS/CFT correspondence we can mimic the physical systems of interest as living on the surface of a higher dimensional universe with a black hole. In a specific example we investigate the properties of the surface states and find helical spin structure of emerged particles. The thesis proceeds from helical particles on the surface of black hole to a surface of samarium hexaboride: an f-electron material with localized magnetic moments at every site. Interactions between electrons in the bulk lead to insulating behavior, but the surfaces found to be conducting. This observation motivated an extensive research: weather the origin of conduction is of a topological nature. Among our main results, we confirm theoretically the topological properties of SmB6; introduce a new framework to address similar questions for this type of insulators, called Kondo insulators. Most notably we introduce the idea of Kondo

  17. Foreshocks of strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, A. V.; Sobisevich, L. E.; Sobisevich, A. L.; Lavrov, I. P.

    2014-07-01

    The specific enhancement of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) electromagnetic oscillations a few hours prior to the strong earthquakes, which was previously mentioned in the literature, motivated us to search for the distinctive features of the mechanical (foreshock) activity of the Earth's crust in the epicentral zones of the future earthquakes. Activation of the foreshocks three hours before the main shock is revealed, which is roughly similar to the enhancement of the specific electromagnetic ULF emission. It is hypothesized that the round-the-world seismic echo signals from the earthquakes, which form the peak of energy release 2 h 50 min before the main events, act as the triggers of the main shocks due to the cumulative action of the surface waves converging to the epicenter. It is established that the frequency of the fluctuations in the foreshock activity decreases at the final stages of the preparation of the main shocks, which probably testifies to the so-called mode softening at the approach of the failure point according to the catastrophe theory.

  18. Kinematics of Strong Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, K.; Nguyen, G.; Sulsky, D.

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides a detailed view of the Arctic ice cover. When processed with the RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS), it provides estimates of sea ice motion and deformation over large regions of the Arctic for extended periods of time. The deformation is dominated by the appearance of linear kinematic features that have been associated with the presence of leads. The RGPS deformation products are based on the assumption that the displacement and velocity are smooth functions of the spatial coordinates. However, if the dominant deformation of multiyear ice results from the opening, closing and shearing of leads, then the displacement and velocity can be discontinuous. This presentation discusses the kinematics associated with strong discontinuities that describe possible jumps in displacement or velocity. Ice motion from SAR data are analyzed using this framework. It is assumed that RGPS cells deform due to the presence of a lead. The lead orientation is calculated to optimally account for the observed deformation. It is shown that almost all observed deformation can be represented by lead opening and shearing. The procedure used to reprocess motion data to account for leads will be described and applied to regions of the Beaufort Sea. The procedure not only provides a new view of ice deformation, it can be used to obtain information about the presence of leads for initialization and/or validation of numerical simulations.

  19. Landslides induced by heavy rainfall in July 2012 in Northern Kyushu District, Japan and the influence of long term rainfall increase comparing with the slope destabilization due to strong seismic shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Aditian, Aril

    2013-04-01

    1. Objective We had a deluge in July 2012 in the northern Kyushu district with intense rainfall of 800mm and 108mm/hr. This intensity yielded countless traces of debris flow and landslides, slope failures that induced tremendous damage and causalities in the area. Hence, several field investigations and reconnaissance tasks were conducted to delve into this sediment-related disaster. The various results and the information obtained through this investigation were reported, mentioning the damage, the meteorological condition, geologic-geomorphologic features and hydraulic characteristics of the debris flows, vegetation effects, and the influence of the climate change. Increase in rainfall that may be induced by the global climate change is obvious in Kyushu district, Japan, according to the analysis of rain data observed in various locations including mountainside points that are not influenced by local warming due to urbanization. On this point of view, we are intrigued to elucidate the response of landslide to this increase in rainfall. Hence, its long term impact on this landslide disaster is also analyzed comparing with the slope destabilization due to strong seismic shaking. 2. Method and target areas Field investigation on landslides slopes, slope failures and torrents where debris flows occurred are conducted to obtain the geologic data, geo-structure, vegetation feature, soil samples and topographic data i.e. cross sections, then soil shear tests and soil permeability tests are also conducted. The rainfall data at the nearest rain observatory were obtained from the database of Japan meteorological agency. The long term impact on the slope stability at some slopes in the area is analyzed by the finite element method (FEM) combined with rain infiltration and seepage analysis with the long term rainfall fluctuation data, obtaining factor of safety ( Fs) on real landslide slopes. The results are compared with the destabilized influence on the slopes due to the

  20. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  1. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  2. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations. PMID:27279218

  3. Detection of nucleotide- and F-actin-induced movements in the switch II helix of the skeletal myosin using its differential oxidative cleavage mediated by an iron-EDTA complex disulfide-linked to the strong actin binding site.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, R; Capony, J P; Derancourt, J; Kassab, R

    1999-09-14

    We have synthesized the mixed disulfide, S-(2-nitro-5-thiobenzoic acid) cysteaminyl-EDTA, using a rapid procedure and water-soluble chemistry. Its disulfide-thiol exchange reaction with rabbit myosin subfragment-1 (S-1), analyzed by spectrophotometry, ATPase assays, and peptide mapping, led to the incorporation of the cysteaminyl-EDTA group into only Cys 540 on the heavy chain and into the unique cysteine on the alkali light chains. The former thiol, residing in the strong actin binding site, reacted at a much faster rate with a concomitant 3-fold decrease in the V(max) for acto-S-1 ATPase but without change in the essential enzymatic functions of S-1. Upon chelation of Fe(3+) ions to the Cys 540-bound EDTA and incubation of the S-1 derivative-Fe complex with ascorbic acid at pH 7.5, the 95 kDa heavy chain underwent a conformation-dependent, single-cut oxidative fragmentation within 5-15 A of Cys 540. Three pairs of fragments were formed which, after specific fluorescent labeling and SDS-PAGE, could be positioned along the heavy chain sequence as 68 kDa-26 kDa, 62 kDa-32 kDa, and 54 kDa-40 kDa. Densitometric measurements revealed that the yield of the 54 kDa-40 kDa pair of bands, but not that for the two other pairs, was very sensitive to S-1 binding to nucleotides or phosphate analogues as well as to F-actin. In binary complexes, all the former ligands specifically lowered the yield to 40% of S-1 alone, roughly in the following order: ADP = AMP-PNP > ATP = ADP.AlF(4) > ADP.BeF(x)() > PP(i). By contrast, rigor binding to F-actin increased the yield to 130%. In the ternary acto-S-1-ADP complex, the yield was again reduced to 80%, and it fell to 25% in acto-S-1-ADP.AlF(4), the putative transition state analogue complex of the acto-S-1 ATPase. These different quantitative changes reflect distinct ligand-induced conformations of the secondary structure element whose scission generates the 54 kDa-40 kDa species. According to the S-1 crystal structure, this element could

  4. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  5. Strong-Field Resonant Dynamics in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismer, Michael S.; Kruchinin, Stanislav Yu.; Ciappina, Marcelo; Stockman, Mark I.; Yakovlev, Vladislav S.

    2016-05-01

    We predict that a direct band gap semiconductor (GaAs) resonantly excited by a strong ultrashort laser pulse exhibits a novel regime: kicked anharmonic Rabi oscillations. In this regime, Rabi oscillations are strongly coupled to intraband motion, and interband transitions mainly take place when electrons pass near the Brillouin zone center where electron populations undergo very rapid changes. The asymmetry of the residual population distribution induces an electric current controlled by the carrier-envelope phase of the driving pulse. The predicted effects are experimentally observable using photoemission and terahertz spectroscopies.

  6. Relativistically modulational instability by strong Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Liu, S. Q.; Li, X. Q.

    2012-09-15

    Based on the set of nonlinear coupling equations, which has considered the relativistic effects of electrons, modulational instability by strong Langmuir waves has been investigated in this paper. Both the characteristic scale and maximum growth rate of the Langmuir field will enhance with the increase in the electron relativistic effect. The numerical results indicate that longitudinal perturbations induce greater instability than transverse perturbations do, which will lead to collapse and formation of the pancake-like structure.

  7. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Study of SmFeAs(O1−xFy) Single Crystals: Evidence for Strong Momentum-Dependent Doping-Induced Renormalizations of Optical Phonons

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Le Tacon, M.; Forrest, T.R.; Ruegg, Ch.; Bosak, A.; Walters, A.C.; Mittal, R.; Rønnow, H.M.; Zhigadlo, N.D.; Katrych, S.; Karpinski, J.; Krisch, M.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2009-12-01

    We report inelastic x-ray scattering experiments on the lattice dynamics in SmFeAsO and superconducting SmFeAsO{sub 0.60}F{sub 0.35} single crystals. Particular attention was paid to the dispersions along the [100] direction of three optical modes close to 23 meV, polarized out of the FeAs planes. Remarkably, two of these modes are strongly renormalized upon fluorine doping. These results provide significant insight into the energy and momentum dependence of the coupling of the lattice to the electron system and underline the importance of spin-phonon coupling in the superconducting iron pnictides.

  8. Strong-back safety latch

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-03-06

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch.

  9. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  10. SU-8-Induced Strong Bonding of Polymer Ligands to Flexible Substrates via in Situ Cross-Linked Reaction for Improved Surface Metallization and Fast Fabrication of High-Quality Flexible Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingjun; Guo, Qiuquan; Zhang, Tengyuan; Zhou, Shaolin; Yang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    On account of in situ cross-linked reaction of epoxy SU-8 with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) and its strong reactive bonding ability with different pretreated substrates, we developed a simple universal one-step solution-based coating method for fast surface modification of various objects. Through this method, a layer of P4VP molecules with controllable thickness can be tethered tightly onto substrates with the assistance of SU-8. P4VP molecules possess a lot of pyridine ligands to immobilize transitional metal ions that can behave as the catalyst of electroless copper plating for surface metallization while functioning as the adhesion-promoting layer between the substrate and deposited metal. Attributed to interpenetrated entanglement of P4VP molecules and as-deposited metal, ultrathick (>7 μm) strongly adhesive high-quality copper layer can be formed on flexible substrates without any delamination. Then through laser printer to print toner mask, a variety of designed circuits can be easily fabricated on modified flexible PET substrate.

  11. SU-8-Induced Strong Bonding of Polymer Ligands to Flexible Substrates via in Situ Cross-Linked Reaction for Improved Surface Metallization and Fast Fabrication of High-Quality Flexible Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingjun; Guo, Qiuquan; Zhang, Tengyuan; Zhou, Shaolin; Yang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    On account of in situ cross-linked reaction of epoxy SU-8 with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) and its strong reactive bonding ability with different pretreated substrates, we developed a simple universal one-step solution-based coating method for fast surface modification of various objects. Through this method, a layer of P4VP molecules with controllable thickness can be tethered tightly onto substrates with the assistance of SU-8. P4VP molecules possess a lot of pyridine ligands to immobilize transitional metal ions that can behave as the catalyst of electroless copper plating for surface metallization while functioning as the adhesion-promoting layer between the substrate and deposited metal. Attributed to interpenetrated entanglement of P4VP molecules and as-deposited metal, ultrathick (>7 μm) strongly adhesive high-quality copper layer can be formed on flexible substrates without any delamination. Then through laser printer to print toner mask, a variety of designed circuits can be easily fabricated on modified flexible PET substrate. PMID:26844943

  12. The immunodominant T helper 2 (Th2) response elicited in BALB/c mice by the Leishmania LiP2a and LiP2b acidic ribosomal proteins cannot be reverted by strong Th1 inducers

    PubMed Central

    Iborra, S; Abánades, D R; Parody, N; Carrión, J; Risueño, R M; Pineda, M A; Bonay, P; Alonso, C; Soto, M

    2007-01-01

    The search for disease-associated T helper 2 (Th2) Leishmania antigens and the induction of a Th1 immune response to them using defined vaccination protocols is a potential strategy to induce protection against Leishmania infection. Leishmania infantum LiP2a and LiP2b acidic ribosomal protein (P proteins) have been described as prominent antigens during human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. In this study we demonstrate that BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major develop a Th2-like humoral response against Leishmania LiP2a and LiP2b proteins and that the same response is induced in BALB/c mice when the parasite P proteins are immunized as recombinant molecules without adjuvant. The genetic immunization of BALB/c mice with eukaryotic expression plasmids coding for these proteins was unable to redirect the Th2-like response induced by these antigens, and only the co-administration of the recombinant P proteins with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) promoted a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response. According to the preponderance of a Th2 or mixed Th1/Th2 responses elicited by the different regimens of immunization tested, no evidence of protection was observed in mice after challenge with L. major. Although alterations of the clinical outcome were not detected in mice presensitized with the P proteins, the enhanced IgG1 and interleukin (IL)-4 response against total Leishmania antigens in these mice may indicate an exacerbation of the disease. PMID:17900304

  13. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  14. Creating and Nurturing Strong Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kaye M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses ways to create and sustain strong teaching teams, including matching curriculum goals, complementary professional strengths, and exercise of autonomy. Elaborates the administrator's role in nurturing and supporting teamwork. (JPB)

  15. Simulating strongly correlated electrons with a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John E.

    2013-05-28

    The quantum many-body physics of strongly-correlated fermions is studied in a degenerate, strongly- interacting atomic Fermi gas, first realized by our group with DOE support in 2002. This system, which exhibits strong spin pairing, is now widely studied and provides an important paradigm for testing predictions based on state-of-the-art many-body theory in fields ranging from nuclear matter to high temperature superfluidity and superconductivity. As the system is strongly interacting, both the superfluid and the normal fluid are nontrivial and of great interest. A central part of our program on Fermi gases is the connection between the study of thermodynamics, supported by DOE and the study of hydrodynamic transport, supported by NSF. This connection is especially interesting in view of a recent conjecture from the string theory community on the concept of nearly perfect normal fluids, which exhibit a minimum ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in strongly-interacting, scale-invariant systems.

  16. Enhanced Surface-and-Interface Coupling in Pd-Nanoparticle-coated LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Heterostructures: Strong Gas- and Photo-Induced Conductance Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haeri; Chan, Ngai Yui; Dai, Ji-yan; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Pd nanoparticle (NP) coated LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterointerface exhibits more notable conductance (G) change while varying the ambient gas (N2, H2/N2, and O2) and illuminating with UV light (wavelength: 365 nm) than a sample without the NPs. Simultaneous Kelvin probe force microscopy and transport measurements reveal close relationships between the surface work function (W) and G of the samples. Quantitative analyses suggest that a surface adsorption/desorption-mediated reaction and redox, resulting in a band-alignment modification and charge-transfer, could explain the gas- and photo-induced conductance modulation at the LAO/STO interface. Such surface-and-interface coupling enhanced by catalytic Pd NPs is a unique feature, quite distinct from conventional semiconductor hetero-junctions, which enables the significant conductance tunability at ultrathin oxide heterointerfaces by external stimuli. PMID:25704566

  17. Enhanced Surface-and-Interface Coupling in Pd-Nanoparticle-coated LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Heterostructures: Strong Gas- and Photo-Induced Conductance Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Haeri; Chan, Ngai Yui; Dai, Ji-Yan; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-02-01

    Pd nanoparticle (NP) coated LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterointerface exhibits more notable conductance (G) change while varying the ambient gas (N2, H2/N2, and O2) and illuminating with UV light (wavelength: 365 nm) than a sample without the NPs. Simultaneous Kelvin probe force microscopy and transport measurements reveal close relationships between the surface work function (W) and G of the samples. Quantitative analyses suggest that a surface adsorption/desorption-mediated reaction and redox, resulting in a band-alignment modification and charge-transfer, could explain the gas- and photo-induced conductance modulation at the LAO/STO interface. Such surface-and-interface coupling enhanced by catalytic Pd NPs is a unique feature, quite distinct from conventional semiconductor hetero-junctions, which enables the significant conductance tunability at ultrathin oxide heterointerfaces by external stimuli.

  18. Gravitational leptogenesis, C, CP and strong equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2015-02-01

    The origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the most important outstanding problems at the interface of particle physics and cosmology. Gravitational leptogenesis (baryogenesis) provides a possible mechanism through explicit couplings of spacetime curvature to appropriate lepton (or baryon) currents. In this paper, the idea that these strong equivalence principle violating interactions could be generated automatically through quantum loop effects in curved spacetime is explored, focusing on the realisation of the discrete symmetries C, CP and CPT which must be broken to induce matter-antimatter asymmetry. The related issue of quantum corrections to the dispersion relation for neutrino propagation in curved spacetime is considered within a fully covariant framework.

  19. Strong CP violation in external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Millo, R.; Faccioli, P.

    2008-03-15

    We study the response of the QCD vacuum to an external magnetic field, in the presence of strong CP violation. Using chiral perturbation theory and large N{sub c} expansion, we show that the external field would polarize quantum fluctuations and induce an electric dipole moment of the vacuum along the direction of the magnetic field. We estimate the magnitude of this effect in different physical scenarios. In particular, we find that the polarization induced by the magnetic field of a magnetar could accelerate electric charges up to energies of the order {approx}{theta}10{sup 3} TeV. We also suggest a connection with the possible existence of ''hot-spots'' on the surface of neutron stars.

  20. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  1. The SNAP Strong Lens Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, P.

    2005-01-03

    Basic considerations of lens detection and identification indicate that a wide field survey of the types planned for weak lensing and Type Ia SNe with SNAP are close to optimal for the optical detection of strong lenses. Such a ''piggy-back'' survey might be expected even pessimistically to provide a catalogue of a few thousand new strong lenses, with the numbers dominated by systems of faint blue galaxies lensed by foreground ellipticals. After sketching out our strategy for detecting and measuring these galaxy lenses using the SNAP images, we discuss some of the scientific applications of such a large sample of gravitational lenses: in particular we comment on the partition of information between lens structure, the source population properties and cosmology. Understanding this partitioning is key to assessing strong lens cosmography's value as a cosmological probe.

  2. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole–dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  3. Simulation of the strong interaction.

    PubMed

    Kenway, Richard

    2002-06-15

    In the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, quarks are permanently confined by the strong interaction into bound states called hadrons. The values of some parameters, such as the quark masses and the strengths of the decays of one quark flavour into another, cannot be measured directly and must be deduced from experiments on hadrons. This requires calculations of the strong-interaction effects within the bound states, which are only possible using numerical simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field theory of the strong interaction. In conjunction with experimental data from B factories over the next few years, QCD simulations may provide clues to physics beyond the SM. The simulations are computationally intensive and, for the past 20 years, have exploited leading-edge computing technology. This continues today, with a project to develop a 10 Tflops computer for QCD costing less than 1 US dollar per Mflops.

  4. Super-strong magneto-rheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.

    2001-03-01

    A typical MR fluid is a suspension of magnetic particles of micrometer size in a liquid. Upon application of a strong magnetic field, the fluid turns into a solid. This process is reversible and the response time is of milliseconds. MR fluids presently have a yield shear stress around 80 kPa, which is adequate for applications in shock absorbers and vibration dampers, but is inadequate for automobile clutch etc. Efforts in searching for new materials in the past decades came with limited results. Thus we have developed a new approach to change the microstructure of MR fluids and make them super-strong. It is well known that under a strong magnetic field, the ideal structure of MR fluids is a body-centered tetragonal (bct) lattice. The mechanical strength of MR fluids strongly depends on the microstructure. A bct-lattice based thick column has a much higher yield stress than a single-chain structure. When a magnetic field is applied to a MR fluid, the particles first form chains. With time, the chains may aggregate into columns. However, the unassisted aggregation is not very useful, as it is slow and produces columns with a limited thickness. Our method is based on assisted aggregations. Immediately after a magnetic field is applied, we compress the MR fluid in the field direction before a shear force is applied. The compression pushes the induced chains together to form thick columns. This microstructure change greatly enhances the yield stress. The experiment on an iron-based MR fluid finds 800 kPa for the yield stress, ten times stronger than that without the compression. When the magnetic field is removed, the MR fluid still returns to the liquid state quickly. The upper limit of this structure-enhanced yield stress seems well above 800 kPa. The super-strong MR fluids are suitable for many industrial applications. *Supported by NSF Grant 0196022

  5. Strong Photoassociation in Ultracold Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Jamison, Alan; Rvachov, Timur; Ebadi, Sepher; Son, Hyungmok; Jiang, Yijun; Zwierlein, Martin; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Despite many studies there are still open questions about strong photoassociation in ultracold gases. Photoassociation occurs only at short range and thus can be used as a tool to probe and control the two-body correlation function in an interacting many-body system and to engineer Hamiltonians using dissipation. We propose the possibility to slow down decoherence by photoassociation through the quantum Zeno effect. This can realized by shining strong photoassociation light on the superposition of the lowest two hyperfine states of Lithium 6. NSF, ARO-MURI, Samsung, NSERC.

  6. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, David; Senatore, Gaetano

    2009-05-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS), held from 29 July-2 August 2008 at the University of Camerino. Camerino is an ancient hill-top town located in the Apennine mountains of Italy, 200 kilometres northeast of Rome, with a university dating back to 1336. The Camerino conference was the 11th in a series which started in 1977: 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (hosted by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (hosted by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, New York, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) 2005: Moscow, Russia (hosted by Vladimir E Fortov and Vladimir Vorob'ev). The name of the series was changed in 1996 from Strongly Coupled Plasmas to Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems to reflect a wider range of topics. 'Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems' encompasses diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. The purpose of the conferences is to provide a regular international forum for the presentation and discussion of research achievements and ideas relating to a variety of plasma, liquid and condensed matter systems that are dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphases that have followed new discoveries and new techniques. The field has continued to see new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions, most recently in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas

  7. A strongly coupled anyon material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brattan, Daniel K.

    2015-11-01

    We use alternative quantisation of the D3-D5 system to explore properties of a strongly coupled anyon material at finite density and temperature. We study the transport properties of the material and find both diffusion and massive holographic zero sound modes. By studying the anyon number conductivity we also find evidence for the anyonic analogue of the metal-insulator transition.

  8. Strong covalent hydration of terephthalaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Baymak, Melek S; Vercoe, Kellie L; Zuman, Petr

    2005-11-24

    Spectrophotometric and electroanalytical studies indicate that one of the formyl groups of terephthalaldehyde in aqueous solution is present in about 23% as a geminal diol. Stronger covalent hydration of CHO in terephthalaldehyde than in p-nitrobenzaldehyde is attributed to a strong resonance interaction between the two formyl groups.

  9. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  10. Dynamics of Strongly Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towery, Colin; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Strongly compressible turbulence, wherein the turbulent velocity fluctuations directly generate compression effects, plays a critical role in many important scientific and engineering problems of interest today, for instance in the processes of stellar formation and also hypersonic vehicle design. This turbulence is very unusual in comparison to ``normal,'' weakly compressible and incompressible turbulence, which is relatively well understood. Strongly compressible turbulence is characterized by large variations in the thermodynamic state of the fluid in space and time, including excited acoustic modes, strong, localized shock and rarefaction structures, and rapid heating due to viscous dissipation. The exact nature of these thermo-fluid dynamics has yet to be discerned, which greatly limits the ability of current computational engineering models to successfully treat these problems. New direct numerical simulation (DNS) results of strongly compressible isotropic turbulence will be presented along with a framework for characterizing and evaluating compressible turbulence dynamics and a connection will be made between the present diagnostic analysis and the validation of engineering turbulence models.

  11. Strongly Coupled Nanotube Electromechanical Resonators.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guang-Wei; Zhu, Dong; Wang, Xin-He; Zou, Chang-Ling; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Liu, Di; Li, Yan; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Kai-Li; Dai, Xing-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2016-09-14

    Coupling an electromechanical resonator with carbon-nanotube quantum dots is a significant method to control both the electronic charge and the spin quantum states. By exploiting a novel microtransfer technique, we fabricate two separate strongly coupled and electrically tunable mechanical resonators for the first time. The frequency of the two resonators can be individually tuned by the bottom gates, and in each resonator, the electron transport through the quantum dot can be strongly affected by the phonon mode and vice versa. Furthermore, the conductance of either resonator can be nonlocally modulated by the other resonator through phonon-phonon interaction between the two resonators. Strong coupling is observed between the phonon modes of the two resonators, where the coupling strength larger than 200 kHz can be reached. This strongly coupled nanotube electromechanical resonator array provides an experimental platform for future studies of the coherent electron-phonon interaction, the phonon-mediated long-distance electron interaction, and entanglement state generation.

  12. Strong cosmic censorship and the strong curvature singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Kro-dotlak, A.

    1987-11-01

    Conditions are given under which any asymptotically simple and empty space-time that has a partial Cauchy surface with an asymptotically simple past is globally hyperbolic. It is shown that this result suggests that the Cauchy horizons of the type occurring in Reissner--Nordstroem and Kerr space-times are unstable. This in turn gives support for the validity of the strong cosmic censorship hypothesis.

  13. Quality control by <strong>HyperS>pectral <strong>I>maging (HSI) in solid waste recycling: logics, algorithms and procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    In secondary raw materials and recycling sectors, the products quality represents, more and more, the key issue to pursuit in order to be competitive in a more and more demanding market, where quality standards and products certification play a preheminent role. These goals assume particular importance when recycling actions are applied. Recovered products, resulting from waste materials, and/or dismissed products processing, are, in fact, always seen with a certain suspect. An adequate response of the industry to the market can only be given through the utilization of equipment and procedures ensuring pure, high-quality production, and efficient work and cost. All these goals can be reached adopting not only more efficient equipment and layouts, but also introducing new processing logics able to realize a full control of the handled material flow streams fulfilling, at the same time, i) an easy management of the procedures, ii) an efficient use of the energy, iii) the definition and set up of reliable and robust procedures, iv) the possibility to implement network connectivity capabilities finalized to a remote monitoring and control of the processes and v) a full data storage, analysis and retrieving. Furthermore the ongoing legislation and regulation require the implementation of recycling infrastructure characterised by high resources efficiency and low environmental impacts, both aspects being strongly linked to the waste materials and/or dismissed products original characteristics. For these reasons an optimal recycling infrastructure design primarily requires a full knowledge of the characteristics of the input waste. What previously outlined requires the introduction of a new important concept to apply in solid waste recycling, the recycling-oriented characterization, that is the set of actions addressed to strategically determine selected attributes, in order to get goaloriented data on waste for the development, implementation or improvement of recycling

  14. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  15. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  16. Strong Gravitational Lensing with SNAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R. D.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2001-12-01

    As currently configured, SNAP should cover an area of sky to sufficient depth to observe tens of thousands of strong (ie multiple-imaging) gravitational lenses. This could provide an unprecedented database for performing cosmography, studies of large scale structure and galactic structure.and should complement the weak lensing program which will concentrate on larger scales. The challenge will be to recognize multiple imaging efficiently in an unbiased way and to organize effective follow up so as to obtain spectroscopic redshifts and monitor variable sources, when appropriate. Experience with the CLASS radio survey and the CASTLES program will be invaluable as we transition from the detailed study of a few tens of strong lenses through the ACS ultra-deep, deep and wide surveys (which should yield hundreds of examples of multiple imaging) to the larger samples envisaged from SNAP. New approaches to data analysis will be needed and coordinated planning with other proposed large survey instruments, like SKA, will be essential.

  17. Comparing strengths of directional selection: how strong is strong?

    PubMed

    Hereford, Joe; Hansen, Thomas F; Houle, David

    2004-10-01

    The fundamental equation in evolutionary quantitative genetics, the Lande equation, describes the response to directional selection as a product of the additive genetic variance and the selection gradient of trait value on relative fitness. Comparisons of both genetic variances and selection gradients across traits or populations require standardization, as both are scale dependent. The Lande equation can be standardized in two ways. Standardizing by the variance of the selected trait yields the response in units of standard deviation as the product of the heritability and the variance-standardized selection gradient. This standardization conflates selection and variation because the phenotypic variance is a function of the genetic variance. Alternatively, one can standardize the Lande equation using the trait mean, yielding the proportional response to selection as the product of the squared coefficient of additive genetic variance and the mean-standardized selection gradient. Mean-standardized selection gradients are particularly useful for summarizing the strength of selection because the mean-standardized gradient for fitness itself is one, a convenient benchmark for strong selection. We review published estimates of directional selection in natural populations using mean-standardized selection gradients. Only 38 published studies provided all the necessary information for calculation of mean-standardized gradients. The median absolute value of multivariate mean-standardized gradients shows that selection is on average 54% as strong as selection on fitness. Correcting for the upward bias introduced by taking absolute values lowers the median to 31%, still very strong selection. Such large estimates clearly cannot be representative of selection on all traits. Some possible sources of overestimation of the strength of selection include confounding environmental and genotypic effects on fitness, the use of fitness components as proxies for fitness, and biases in

  18. Strongly interacting parton matter equilibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ozvenchuk, V.; Linnyk, O.; Bratkovskaya, E.; Gorenstein, M.; Cassing, W.

    2012-07-15

    We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different energy densities. Particle abundances, kinetic energy distributions, and the detailed balance of the off-shell quarks and gluons in the strongly-interacting quarkgluon plasma are addressed and discussed.

  19. Strongly magnetized classical plasma models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Peyraud, J.; Dewitt, C.

    1974-01-01

    Discrete particle processes in the presence of a strong external magnetic field were investigated. These processes include equations of state and other equilibrium thermodynamic relations, thermal relaxation phenomena, transport properties, and microscopic statistical fluctuations in such quantities as the electric field and the charge density. Results from the equilibrium statistical mechanics of two-dimensional plasmas are discussed, along with nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of the electrostatic guiding-center plasma (a two-dimensional plasma model).

  20. Strong CP and SUZ2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaid, Abdelhamid; Dine, Michael; Draper, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Solutions to the strong CP problem typically introduce new scales associated with the spontaneous breaking of symmetries. Absent any anthropic argument for small overline{θ} , these scales require stabilization against ultraviolet corrections. Supersymmetry offers a tempting stabilization mechanism, since it can solve the "big" electroweak hierarchy problem at the same time. One family of solutions to strong CP, including generalized parity models, heavy axion models, and heavy η' models, introduces {Z}_2 copies of (part of) the Standard Model and an associated scale of {Z}_2 -breaking. We review why, without additional structure such as supersymmetry, the {Z}_2 -breaking scale is unacceptably tuned. We then study "SUZ2" models, supersymmetric theories with {Z}_2 copies of the MSSM. We find that the addition of SUSY typically destroys the {Z}_2 protection of overline{θ}=0 , even at tree level, once SUSY and {Z}_2 are broken. In theories like supersymmetric completions of the twin Higgs, where {Z}_2 addresses the little hierarchy problem but not strong CP, two axions can be used to relax overline{θ}.

  1. Tilts in strong-ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graizer, V.

    2006-12-01

    Most instruments used in seismological practice to record ground motion are pendulum seismographs, velocigraphs or accelerographs. In most cases it is assumed that seismic instruments are only sensitive to the translational motion of the instrument's base. In this study the full equation of pendulum motion including the inputs of rotations and tilts is considered. It is shown that tilting the accelerograph's base can severely impact its response to the ground motion. The method of tilt evaluation using uncorrected strong-motion accelerograms was first suggested by Graizer (1989), and later tested in a number of laboratory experiments with different strong-motion instruments. The method is based on the difference in the tilt sensitivity of the horizontal and vertical pendulums. The method was applied to a number of strongest records of the Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake of 1994. Examples are shown when relatively large tilts of up to a few degrees occurred during strong earthquake ground motion. Residual tilt extracted from the strong-motion record at the Pacoima Dam Upper Left Abutment reached 3.1 degrees in N45E direction, and was a result of local earthquake induced tilting due to high amplitude shaking. This value is in agreement with the residual tilt measured using electronic level a few days after the earthquake. The method was applied to the building records from the Northridge earthquake. According to the estimates, residual tilt reached 2.6 degrees on the ground floor of the 12-story Hotel in Ventura. Processing of most of the strongest records of the Northridge earthquake shows that tilts, if happened, were within the error of the method, or less than about 0.5 degree.

  2. Strong interactive massive particles from a strong coupled theory

    SciTech Connect

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.; Kouvaris, Chris

    2008-03-15

    Minimal walking technicolor models can provide a nontrivial solution for cosmological dark matter, if the lightest technibaryon is doubly charged. Technibaryon asymmetry generated in the early Universe is related to baryon asymmetry, and it is possible to create an excess of techniparticles with charge (-2). These excessive techniparticles are all captured by {sup 4}He, creating techni-O-helium tOHe atoms, as soon as {sup 4}He is formed in big bang nucleosynthesis. The interaction of techni-O-helium with nuclei opens new paths to the creation of heavy nuclei in big bang nucleosynthesis. Because of the large mass of technibaryons, the tOHe ''atomic'' gas decouples from the baryonic matter and plays the role of dark matter in large scale structure formation, while structures in small scales are suppressed. Nuclear interactions with matter slow down cosmic techni-O-helium in the Earth below the threshold of underground dark matter detectors, thus escaping severe cryogenic dark matter search constraints. On the other hand, these nuclear interactions are not sufficiently strong to exclude this form of strongly interactive massive particles by constraints from the XQC experiment. Experimental tests of this hypothesis are possible in the search for tOHe in balloon-borne experiments (or on the ground) and for its charged techniparticle constituents in cosmic rays and accelerators. The tOHe atoms can cause cold nuclear transformations in matter and might form anomalous isotopes, offering possible ways to exclude (or prove?) their existence.

  3. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  4. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E.; Golden, Kenneth I.; Norman, Genri E.

    2006-04-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) which was held during the week of 20 24 June 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The Moscow conference was the tenth in a series of conferences. The previous conferences were organized as follows. 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (organized by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (organized by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, NY, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) After 1995 the name of the series was changed from `Strongly Coupled Plasmas' to the present name in order to extend the topics of the conferences. The planned frequency for the future is once every three years. The purpose of these conferences is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of research accomplishments and ideas relating to a variety of plasma liquid and condensed matter systems, dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Strongly coupled Coulomb systems encompass diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphasis as new discoveries and new methods appear. This year, sessions were organized for invited presentations and posters on dense plasmas and warm matter, astrophysics and dense hydrogen, non-neutral and ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, condensed matter 2D and layered charged-particle systems, Coulomb liquids, and statistical theory of SCCS. Within

  5. Topics in strongly correlated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, Ilya

    The thesis is a collection of three topics connected together by the common themes of strong interactions, magnetism and quantum phases, such as the Aharonov-Bohm or Berry phase. The first part of the present dissertation discusses the possibility of examining microscopic origins of magnetism in strongly interacting systems by exploiting the setting of ultra-cold atomic gases in optical lattices. We discuss signatures of correlation in the trap, and propose an experiment to measure the phase diagram of itinerant magnetism directly. The second part focuses on the exotic phase of matter exhibiting the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect, which emerges when interacting particles are placed in a very strong magnetic field. We propose a trial ground state wave-function and prove that it is the unique highest density ground state of a well-motivated pseudo-potential Hamiltonian. The exchange statistics of quasiparticles are shown to be exotic, and overlaps with results of exact diagonalization are also discussed. The final part of the thesis studies frustrated magnetic systems, in which competing forces cannot not be satisfied simultaneously, doped with electrons. The interplay of frustration and itinerant behavior generates Berry phases associated with charge transport. We study the effects of these phases on electronic behavior, as well as the effect electrons have on the underlying magnetic textures. In the quasi-classical limit, we conjecture a field-driven metal-insulator transition, and discuss persistent currents arising in ground states selected by the presence of charge. In the quantum regime we derive the full Hamiltonian and discuss small fluctuations about the classical results.

  6. Dynamics of strongly correlated and strongly inhomogeneous plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kählert, Hanno; Kalman, Gabor J; Bonitz, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Kinetic and fluid equations are derived for the dynamics of classical inhomogeneous trapped plasmas in the strong coupling regime. The starting point is an extended Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjölander (STLS) ansatz for the dynamic correlation function, which is allowed to depend on time and both particle coordinates separately. The time evolution of the correlation function is determined from the second equation of the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy. We study the equations in the linear limit and derive a nonlocal equation for the fluid displacement field. Comparisons to first-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal an excellent quality of our approach thereby overcoming the limitations of the broadly used STLS scheme.

  7. Strong dynamics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ittisamai, Pawin

    The limitations of the Standard Model of particle physics, despite its being a well-established theory, have prompted various proposals for new physics capable of addressing its shortcomings. The particular issue to be explored here is the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, the probing of which lies within the TeV-scale physics accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This thesis focuses on the phenomenology of a class of models featuring a dynamical breaking of the electroweak symmetry via strong dynamics. Consequences of recent experiments and aspects of near-future experiments are presented. We study the implications of the LHC Higgs searches available at the time the related journal article was written for technicolor models that feature colored technifermions. Then we discuss the properties of a technicolor model featuring strong-top dynamics that is viable for explaining the recently discovered boson of mass 126 GeV. We introduce a novel method of characterizing the color structure of a new massive vector boson, often predicted in various new physics models, using information that will be promptly available if it is discovered in the near-future experiments at the LHC. We generalize the idea for more realistic models where a vector boson has flavor non-universal couplings to quarks. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of probing the chiral structure of a new color-octet vector boson.

  8. Circuit electromechanics with single photon strong coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan Yang, Li-Na; Zhou, Jian

    2015-07-13

    In circuit electromechanics, the coupling strength is usually very small. Here, replacing the capacitor in circuit electromechanics by a superconducting flux qubit, we show that the coupling among the qubit and the two resonators can induce effective electromechanical coupling which can attain the strong coupling regime at the single photon level with feasible experimental parameters. We use dispersive couplings among two resonators and the qubit while the qubit is also driven by an external classical field. These couplings form a three-wave mixing configuration among the three elements where the qubit degree of freedom can be adiabatically eliminated, and thus results in the enhanced coupling between the two resonators. Therefore, our work constitutes the first step towards studying quantum nonlinear effect in circuit electromechanics.

  9. Strong Localization of Positive Charge in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uskov, Dmitry; Burin, Alex

    2008-05-01

    The positive charge transfer in a DNA molecule is determined by two main factors: the structure and composition of specific DNA strand, and interaction of a positive charge with the DNA environment. In this letter we present results of microscopic linear response theory for balance of charge transfer reaction in synthetic strands GAGG and GAGGG, where experimental data on the rates of electron hole migration has been reported by Lewis et al Nature, 406, 51-53 (2000). Our theoretical predictions, based on experimental data for the ratio of reaction rates G^+A(G)n<->GA(G)n^+ , n=2,3, suggest that charge in DNA is strongly localized within the single base pair because of the self-induced reorganization of classical environment. The onset of localization has a threshold behavior characteristic to quantum bistability. We also demonstrate that our conclusion does not depend on details of the model.

  10. Strong interaction between plants induces circular barren patches: fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Oto, C; Tlidi, M; Escaff, D; Clerc, M G

    2014-10-28

    Fairy circles consist of isolated or randomly distributed circular areas devoid of any vegetation. They are observed in vast territories in southern Angola, Namibia and South Africa. We report on the formation of fairy circles, and we interpret them as localized structures with a varying plateau size as a function of the aridity. Their stabilization mechanism is attributed to a combined influence of the bistability between the bare state and the uniformly vegetation state, and Lorentzian-like non-local coupling that models the competition between plants. We show how a circular shape is formed, and how the aridity level influences the size of fairy circles. Finally, we show that the proposed mechanism is model-independent.

  11. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W; Brennan, J M; Cameron, P; Connolly, R; Montag, C; Peggs, S; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D; Van Zeijts, J

    2003-05-12

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far.

  12. Strong Langmuir turbulence at Jupiter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Langmuir wave packets with short scale lengths less than an approximately equal to 100 lambda e have been observed in Jupiter's foreshock. Theoretical constraints on the electric fields and scale sizes of collapsing wave packets are summarized, extended and placed in a form suitable for easy comparison with Voyager and Ulysses data. The published data are reviewed and possible instrumental underestimation of fields discussed. New upper limits for the fields of the published wave packets are estimated. Wave packets formed at the nucleation scale from the observed large-scale fields cannot collapse because they are disrupted before collapse occurs. The published wave packets are quantitatively inconsistent with strong turbulence collapse. Strict constraints exist for more intense wave packets to be able to collapse: E greater than or approximately equals to 1-8 mV/m for scales less than or approximately equal to 100 lambda e. Means for testing these conclusions using Voyager and Ulysses data are suggested.

  13. Properties of strong coupled superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Dolgov, O. V.; Ptitsyn, M. O.

    1987-07-01

    By use of Eliashberg equations the system of electrons and phonons with the Einstein spectrum alpha (sub 2) (omega) F(omega) = lambda x omega/2 delta (omega - OMEGA) is studied. The orbital and paramagnetic upper critical magnetic fields are obtained in the case of strong electron-phonon coupling lambda including lambda is much greater than 1. For lambda much greater than 1 superconducting parameters at very low temperatures differ remarkably from that near T(sub c), the crossover takes place at a temperature corresponding to the phonon frequency omega. For lambda is greater than or approximately 4 at temperatures below about omega/3 the superconducting correlation length decreases giving the positive curvature in the temperature dependence of upper critical field. The obtained results favor the ratio delta(O)/T (sub c) to be proportional to the square root of lambda at lambda is greater than or approximately 4/6. The coefficients of GL functional are calculated. The absolute value of specific heat jump grows with lambda while its relative value drops. At lambda is greater than or approximately 4 the resistivity above T(sub c) increases linearly with temperature.

  14. Strong majorization entropic uncertainty relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnicki, Łukasz; Puchała, Zbigniew; Życzkowski, Karol

    2014-05-01

    We analyze entropic uncertainty relations in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space and derive several strong bounds for the sum of two entropies obtained in projective measurements with respect to any two orthogonal bases. We improve the recent bounds by Coles and Piani [P. Coles and M. Piani, Phys. Rev. A 89, 022112 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.022112], which are known to be stronger than the well-known result of Maassen and Uffink [H. Maassen and J. B. M. Uffink, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 1103 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.60.1103]. Furthermore, we find a bound based on majorization techniques, which also happens to be stronger than the recent results involving the largest singular values of submatrices of the unitary matrix connecting both bases. The first set of bounds gives better results for unitary matrices close to the Fourier matrix, while the second one provides a significant improvement in the opposite sectors. Some results derived admit generalization to arbitrary mixed states, so that corresponding bounds are increased by the von Neumann entropy of the measured state. The majorization approach is finally extended to the case of several measurements.

  15. Promoting Strong Written Communication Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reason that an improvement in the quality of technical writing is still needed in the classroom is due to the fact that universities are facing challenging problems not only on the technological front but also on the socio-economic front. The universities are actively responding to the changes that are taking place in the global consumer marketplace. Obviously, there are numerous benefits of promoting strong written communication skills. They can be summarized into the following six categories. First, and perhaps the most important: The University achieves learner satisfaction. The learner has documented verbally, that the necessary knowledge has been successfully acquired. This results in learner loyalty that in turn will attract more qualified learners.Second, quality communication lowers the cost per pupil, consequently resulting in increased productivity backed by a stronger economic structure and forecast. Third, quality communications help to improve the cash flow and cash reserves of the university. Fourth, having high quality communication enables the university to justify the need for high costs of tuition and fees. Fifth, better quality in written communication skills result in attracting top-quality learners. This will lead to happier and satisfied learners, not to mention greater prosperity for the university as a whole. Sixth, quality written communication skills result in reduced complaints, thus meaning fewer hours spent on answering or correcting the situation. The University faculty and staff are thus able to devote more time on scholarly activities, meaningful research and productive community service. References Boyer, Ernest L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the Professorate.Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Hawkins, P., & Winter, J. (1997). Mastering change: Learning the lessons of the enterprise.London: Department for Education and Employment. Buzzel, Robert D., and Bradley T. Gale. (1987

  16. Superconductivity of QCD vacuum in strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2010-10-15

    We show that in a sufficiently strong magnetic field the QCD vacuum may undergo a transition to a new phase where charged {rho}{sup {+-}}mesons are condensed. In this phase the vacuum behaves as an anisotropic inhomogeneous superconductor which supports superconductivity along the axis of the magnetic field. In the directions transverse to the magnetic field the superconductivity is absent. The magnetic-field-induced anisotropic superconductivity - which is realized in the cold vacuum, i.e. at zero temperature and density - is a consequence of a nonminimal coupling of the {rho} mesons to the electromagnetic field. The onset of the superconductivity of the charged {rho}{sup {+-}}mesons should also induce an inhomogeneous superfluidity of the neutral {rho}{sup 0} mesons. We also argue that due to simple kinematical reasons a strong enough magnetic field makes the lifetime of the {rho} mesons longer by closing the main channels of the strong decays of the {rho} mesons into charged pions.

  17. Tunneling in strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Marianna

    Tunneling studies of strongly correlated materials provide information about the nature of electronic correlations, which is vital for investigation of emergent materials at the microscopic level. In particular, scanning tunneling spectroscopy/microscopy (STS/STM) studies have made major contributions to understanding cuprate superconductors (66), yet there is a sense that huge STM data arrays contain much more precious information to be extracted and analyzed. One of the most pressing questions in the field is how to improve the data analysis, so as to extract more information from STM data. A dominant trend in STM data analysis has been to interpret the data within a particular microscopic model, while using only basic data analysis tools. To decrease the reliance of the STM data interpretation on particular microscopic models, further advances in data analysis methods are necessary. In Chapter 2 of this Thesis, we discuss how one can extract information about the phase of the order parameter from STM data. We show that symmetrized and anti-symmetrized correlators of local density of states give rise to observable coherence factor effects. In Chapter 3, we apply this framework to analyze the recent scanning tunneling experiments on an underdoped cuprate superconductor Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2 by T. Hanaguri et al. (60). In Chapter 4, we propose a model for nodal quasiparticle scattering in a disordered vortex lattice. Recently, scanning tunneling studies of a Kondo lattice material URu2Si2 became possible (117). If it proves possible to apply scanning tunneling spectroscopy to Kondo lattice materials, then remarkable new opportunities in the ongoing investigation may emerge. In Chapter 5, we examine the effect of co-tunneling to develop a theory of tunneling into a Kondo lattice. We find that the interference between the direct tunneling and the co-tunneling channels leads to a novel asymmetric lineshape, which has two peaks and a gap. The presence of the peaks suggests

  18. Strong negative differential conductance in strained graphene devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung Nguyen, M.; Hung Nguyen, V.; Nguyen, Huy-Viet; Dollfus, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the transport properties of devices made of graphene strained heterochannels. Due to the effects of local strain on the band structure, the Klein tunneling is strongly suppressed and transport gaps can appear in the unstrained/strained graphene junctions. The gap regions can be modulated in k-space and in energy by strain and doping engineering, respectively. We show that these effects can be exploited to achieve a strong negative differential conductance (NDC) in single gate-induced barrier structures and in p-n junctions. When the local strain is suitably applied, the peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) of the current-voltage characteristics can be as high as a few hundred. The dependence of NDC effect on structure parameters is investigated systematically. In particular, a strong NDC is obtained in single barrier structures with large strained region, while the PVR is not strongly sensitive to the transition length in p-n junctions.

  19. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon.

    PubMed

    Brown, C R D; Gericke, D O; Cammarata, M; Cho, B I; Döppner, T; Engelhorn, K; Förster, E; Fortmann, C; Fritz, D; Galtier, E; Glenzer, S H; Harmand, M; Heimann, P; Kugland, N L; Lamb, D Q; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Lemke, H; Makita, M; Moinard, A; Murphy, C D; Nagler, B; Neumayer, P; Plagemann, K-U; Redmer, R; Riley, D; Rosmej, F B; Sperling, P; Toleikis, S; Vinko, S M; Vorberger, J; White, S; White, T G; Wünsch, K; Zastrau, U; Zhu, D; Tschentscher, T; Gregori, G

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen close to their original positions in the fluid.

  20. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Vezzani, A.

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of {sup 41}K induces a significant loss of coherence in {sup 87}Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices.

  1. Realization of an excited, strongly correlated quantum gas phase.

    PubMed

    Haller, Elmar; Gustavsson, Mattias; Mark, Manfred J; Danzl, Johann G; Hart, Russell; Pupillo, Guido; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph

    2009-09-01

    Ultracold atomic physics offers myriad possibilities to study strongly correlated many-body systems in lower dimensions. Typically, only ground-state phases are accessible. Using a tunable quantum gas of bosonic cesium atoms, we realized and controlled in one-dimensional geometry a highly excited quantum phase that is stabilized in the presence of attractive interactions by maintaining and strengthening quantum correlations across a confinement-induced resonance. We diagnosed the crossover from repulsive to attractive interactions in terms of the stiffness and energy of the system. Our results open up the experimental study of metastable, excited, many-body phases with strong correlations and their dynamical properties. PMID:19729651

  2. Observation of a strongly interacting degenerate Fermi gas of atoms.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, K M; Hemmer, S L; Gehm, M E; Granade, S R; Thomas, J E

    2002-12-13

    We report on the observation of a highly degenerate, strongly interacting Fermi gas of atoms. Fermionic lithium-6 atoms in an optical trap are evaporatively cooled to degeneracy using a magnetic field to induce strong, resonant interactions. Upon abruptly releasing the cloud from the trap, the gas is observed to expand rapidly in the transverse direction while remaining nearly stationary in the axial direction. We interpret the expansion dynamics in terms of collisionless superfluid and collisional hydrodynamics. For the data taken at the longest evaporation times, we find that collisional hydrodynamics does not provide a satisfactory explanation, whereas superfluidity is plausible.

  3. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C. R. D.; Gericke, D. O.; Cammarata, M.; Cho, B. I.; Gwangju Inst. of Science and Technology, Gwangju; Inst. for Basic Science, Gwangju ; Döppner, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Förster, E.; Fortmann, C.; Fritz, D.; Galtier, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Harmand, M.; Heimann, P.; Kugland, N. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, R. W.; Lemke, H.; Makita, M.; Moinard, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Plagemann, K. -U.; Redmer, R.; Riley, D.; Rosmej, F. B.; Sperling, P.; Toleikis, S.; Vinko, S. M.; Vorberger, J.; White, S.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Tschentscher, T.; Gregori, G.

    2014-06-09

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen close to their original positions in the fluid.

  4. Mixtures of strongly interacting bosons in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Buonsante, P; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Penna, V; Vezzani, A

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of 41K induces a significant loss of coherence in 87Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices. PMID:18643555

  5. Strong curvature singularities and causal simplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Krolak, A. )

    1992-02-01

    Techniques of differential topology in Lorentzian manifolds developed by Geroch, Hawking, and Penrose are used to rule out a class of locally naked strong curvature singularities in strongly causal space-times. This result yields some support to the validity of Penrose's strong cosmic censorship hypothesis.

  6. Consistent description of quantum Brownian motors operating at strong friction.

    PubMed

    Machura, L; Kostur, M; Hänggi, P; Talkner, P; Luczka, J

    2004-09-01

    A quantum Smoluchowski equation is put forward that consistently describes thermal quantum states. In particular, it notably does not induce a violation of the second law of thermodynamics. This so modified kinetic equation is applied to study analytically directed quantum transport at strong friction in arbitrarily shaped ratchet potentials that are driven by nonthermal two-state noise. Depending on the mutual interplay of quantum tunneling and quantum reflection these quantum corrections can induce both, a sizable enhancement or a suppression of transport. Moreover, the threshold for current reversals becomes markedly shifted due to such quantum fluctuations.

  7. Energy Exchange in Driven Open Quantum Systems at Strong Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrega, Matteo; Solinas, Paolo; Sassetti, Maura; Weiss, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    The time-dependent energy transfer in a driven quantum system strongly coupled to a heat bath is studied within an influence functional approach. Exact formal expressions for the statistics of energy dissipation into the different channels are derived. The general method is applied to the driven dissipative two-state system. It is shown that the energy flows obey a balance relation, and that, for strong coupling, the interaction may constitute the major dissipative channel. Results in analytic form are presented for the particular value K =1/2 of strong Ohmic dissipation. The energy flows show interesting behaviors including driving-induced coherences and quantum stochastic resonances. It is found that the general characteristics persists for K near 1/2 .

  8. Generalized eikonal approximation for strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajiao Vélez, F.; Krajewska, K.; Kamiński, J. Z.

    2015-05-01

    We develop the eikonal perturbation theory to describe the strong-field ionization by finite laser pulses. This approach in the first order with respect to the binding potential (the so-called generalized eikonal approximation) avoids a singularity at the potential center. Thus, in contrast to the ordinary eikonal approximation, it allows one to treat rescattering phenomena in terms of quantum trajectories. We demonstrate how the first Born approximation and its domain of validity follow from eikonal perturbation theory. Using this approach, we study the coherent interference patterns in photoelectron energy spectra and their modifications induced by the interaction of photoelectrons with the atomic potential. Along with these first results, we discuss the prospects of using the generalized eikonal approximation to study strong-field ionization from multicentered atomic systems and to study other strong-field phenomena.

  9. Effect of dilute strongly pinning impurities on charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Jun-ichi; Millis, Andrew J.

    2015-05-01

    We study theoretically the effects of strong pinning centers on a charge density wave in the limit that the charge density wave coherence length is shorter than the average interimpurity distance. An analysis based on a Ginzburg-Landau model shows that long-range forces arising from the elastic response of the charge density wave induce a kind of collective pinning which suppresses impurity-induced phase fluctuations, leading to a long-range ordered ground state. The correlations induced by impurities are characterized by a length scale parametrically longer than the average interimpurity distance. Long-wavelength fluctuations are found to be gapped, implying the stability of the ground state. We also present Monte Carlo simulations that confirm the basic features of the analytical results.

  10. Expressional alterations in functional ultra-conserved non-coding rnas in response to all-trans retinoic acid - induced differentiation in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ultra-conserved regions (UCRs) are segments of the genome (≥ 200 bp) that exhibit 100% DNA sequence conservation between human, mouse and rat. Transcribed UCRs (T-UCRs) have been shown to be differentially expressed in cancers versus normal tissue, indicating a possible role in carcinogenesis. All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) causes some neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines to undergo differentiation and leads to a significant decrease in the oncogenic transcription factor MYCN. Here, we examine the impact of ATRA treatment on T-UCR expression and investigate the biological significance of these changes. Methods We designed a custom tiling microarray to profile the expression of 481 T-UCRs in sense and anti-sense orientation (962 potential transcripts) in untreated and ATRA-treated neuroblastoma cell lines (SH-SY5Y, SK-N-BE, LAN-5). Following identification of significantly differentially expressed T-UCRs, we carried out siRNA knockdown and gene expression microarray analysis to investigate putative functional roles for selected T-UCRs. Results Following ATRA-induced differentiation, 32 T-UCRs were differentially expressed (16 up-regulated, 16 down-regulated) across all three cell lines. Further insight into the possible role of T-UC.300A, an independent transcript whose expression is down-regulated following ATRA was achieved by siRNA knockdown, resulting in the decreased viability and invasiveness of ATRA-responsive cell lines. Gene expression microarray analysis following knockdown of T-UC.300A revealed a number of genes whose expression was altered by changing T-UC.300A levels and that might play a role in the increased proliferation and invasion of NB cells prior to ATRA-treatment. Conclusions Our results indicate that significant numbers of T-UCRs have altered expression levels in response to ATRA. While the precise roles that T-UCRs might play in cancer or in normal development are largely unknown and an important area for future study, our findings

  11. Keeping Marriages Strong in Challenging Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ober, Marci Wolff

    2009-01-01

    What makes a strong marriage anyway...? There are definite qualities that exist in healthy marriages, that is, a marriage that is defined by both partners to be "mostly" or "usually" very satisfying. This article explores these qualities and looks at what really works to make and keep marriages strong, healthy, and satisfying for a lifetime. It…

  12. On the Strong Direct Summand Conjecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Jason

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, our aim is the study the Vanishing of Maps of Tor Conjecture of Hochster and Huneke. We mainly focus on an equivalent characterization called the Strong Direct Summand Conjecture, due to N. Ranganathan. Our results are separated into three chapters. In Chapter 3, we prove special cases of the Strong Direct Summand Conjecture in…

  13. LHC Phenomenology and Lattice Strong Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G. T.

    2013-03-01

    While the LHC experimentalists work to find evidence of physics beyond the standard model, lattice gauge theorists are working as well to characterize the range of possible phenomena in strongly-coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking. I will summarize the current progress of the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on the flavor dependence of SU(3) gauge theories.

  14. Strongly correlated quantum spin liquid in herbertsmithite

    SciTech Connect

    Shaginyan, V. R.; Popov, K. G.; Khodel, V. A.

    2013-05-15

    Strongly correlated Fermi systems are among the most intriguing and fundamental systems in physics. We show that the herbertsmithite ZnCu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2} can be regarded as a new type of strongly correlated electrical insulator that possesses properties of heavy-fermion metals with one exception: it resists the flow of electric charge. We demonstrate that herbertsmithite's low-temperature properties are defined by a strongly correlated quantum spin liquid made with hypothetic particles such as fermionic spinons that carry spin 1/2 and no charge. Our calculations of its thermodynamic and relaxation properties are in good agreement with recent experimental facts and allow us to reveal their scaling behavior, which strongly resembles that observed in heavy-fermion metals. Analysis of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility of strongly correlated Fermi systems suggests that there exist at least two types of its scaling.

  15. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOEpatents

    Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

    1995-05-30

    A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

  16. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOEpatents

    Harben, Philip E.; Rodgers, Peter W.; Ewert, Daniel W.

    1995-01-01

    A seismic switching device that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period.

  17. Radio-Frequency Spectroscopy of a Strongly Interacting Two-Dimensional Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Froehlich, Bernd; Feld, Michael; Vogt, Enrico; Koschorreck, Marco; Koehl, Michael; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2011-03-11

    We realize and study a strongly interacting two-component atomic Fermi gas confined to two dimensions in an optical lattice. Using radio-frequency spectroscopy we measure the interaction energy of the strongly interacting gas. We observe the confinement-induced Feshbach resonance on the attractive side of the 3D Feshbach resonance and find the existence of confinement-induced molecules in very good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  18. Ozone Photolysis: Strong Isotopologue/isotopomer Selectivity in the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Fabien; Ndengue, Steve; Jost, Remy; Halasz, Gabor; Vibok, Agnes

    2013-06-01

    Using the visible-UV absorption cross section (Abs. XS) of five ozone isotopologues and an averaged actinic flux, we have calculated the contribution of the atmospheric ozone photolysis to the oxygen isotope and ozone isotopologue/isotopomer enrichment. Five ozone isotopologues/isotopomers are considered among which three are symmetric, O^{16}3 (noted 666), O^{16}O^{17}O^{16} (676) and O^{16}O^{18}O^{16} (686), and two are asymmetric, O^{17}O^{16}_2 (667) and O^{18}O^{16}_2 (668). The photolysis rates of the five ozone isotopologues have been calculated as a function of altitude. The Multi Configuration Time Dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method and the potential energy surfaces calculates by R. Schinke and coworkers have been used. We have used experimental actinic fluxes, averaged for latitude and season, for altitudes varying by step of 4km up to 80km. Below 35km, the contribution of the Hartley band to the photolysis rates is restricted to its low energy range, named the Huggins band, which has strong isotopologue/isotopomer selectivity and then induces strong enrichment. Consequently, the isotopologue enrichment's due to ozone photolysis are strongly dependent of the altitude, with pronounced enrichment peaks around 35 km, the altitude corresponding to the maximum relative contribution of the Huggins band. We will also present some new simulations for the simulation of laser-induced quantum dynamics of the electronic and nuclear motion in the ozone molecule on the attosecond time scale.

  19. Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Martínez-Cruzado, J. A.; Martínez-Pagan, J.; Santana-Torres, E. X.; Torres-O, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network is currently in charge of the operation of: (i) free-field (ff) strong motion stations, (ii) instrumented structures (STR) (Dams, Bridges, Buildings), and (iii) the data acquisition/monitoring and analysis of earthquakes considered strong from the point of view of their intensity and magnitude. All these instruments are deployed in the Puerto Rico Island (PRI), US-, and British-Virgin Islands (BVI), and Dominican Republic (DR). The Puerto Rico Island and the Caribbean region have high potential to be affected by earthquakes that could be catastrophic for the area. The Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network (actually Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program, PRSMP) has grown since 1970's from 7 ff strong motion stations and one instrumented building with analog accelerographs to 111 ff strong motion stations and 16 instrumented buildings with digital accelerographs: PRI: 88 ff, 16 STR., DR: 13 ff, BVI: 5 ff, 2 STR collecting data via IP (internet), DU (telephone), and stand alone stations The current stage of the PRSMP seismic network, the analysis of moderate earthquakes that were recorded and/or occurred on the island, results of the intensity distribution of selected earthquakes, as well as results of dynamic parameter identification of some of the instrumented structures are here presented.

  20. Strong correlation in Kohn-Sham DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet Giralt, Francesc; Mirtschink, André; Cremon, Jonas; Mendl, Christian; Giesbertz, Klaas; Reimann, Stephanie; Gori-Giorgi, Paola; Mathematical Physics, Lund University Collaboration; Mathematics Department, Technische Universität München Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The knowledge on the strong-interacting limit of density functional theory can be used to construct exchange- correlation functionals able to address strongly-correlated systems without introducing any symmetry breaking. We report calculations on semiconductor nanostructures and one-dimensional models for chemical systems, showing that this approach yields quantitatively good results in both the weakly- and the strongly-correlated regimes, with a numerical cost much lower than the traditional wavefunction methods. This work has been supported by a VIDI grant of the NWO and a Marie Curie grant within the FP7 programme.

  1. Dual field theory of strong interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.

    1987-07-01

    A dual field theory of strong interactions is derived from a Lagrangian of the Yang-Mills and Higgs fields. The existence of a magnetic monopole of mass 2397 MeV and Dirac charge g = (137/2)e is incorporated into the theory. Unification of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces is shown to converge at the mass of the intermediate vector boson W/sup +/-/. The coupling constants of the strong and weak interactions are derived in terms of the fine-structure constant ..cap alpha.. = 1/137.

  2. Physics in Very Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides an introduction to a number of astrophysics problems related to strong magnetic fields. The first part deals with issues related to atoms, condensed matter and high-energy processes in very strong magnetic fields, and how these issues influence various aspects of neutron star astrophysics. The second part deals with classical astrophysical effects of magnetic fields: Even relatively "weak" fields can play a strong role in various astrophysical problems, ranging from stars, accretion disks and outflows, to the formation and merger of compact objects.

  3. Strong photoassociation in a degenerate fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rvachov, Timur; Jamison, Alan; Jing, Li; Son, Hyungmok; Ebadi, Sepehr; Jiang, Yijun; Zwierlein, Martin; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Despite many studies there remain open questions about strong photoassociation in ultracold gases. We study the effects of strong photoassociation in ultracold fermions. Photoassociation occurs only at short range and thus can be used as a tool to probe and control the two-body correlation function in an interacting many-body system. We study the effects of strong photoassociation in 6 Li, the onset of saturation, and its effects on spin polarized and interacting spin-mixtures. This work was funded by the NSF, ARO-MURI, SAMSUNG, and NSERC.

  4. XUV Transient Absorption of Strong-Field Ionized Ferrocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterley, Adam S.; Lackner, Florian; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption experiments are underway to study the dynamics of ferrocene following strong field ionization. Ferrocene is a textbook organometallic compound, composed of an iron atom sandwiched between two aromatic organic rings. An intense infrared (IR, 790 nm) pump pulse is used to ionize the ferrocene molecules. Femtosecond XUV pulses, created by high harmonic generation (HHG) are used to probe the induced dynamics. Iron 3p inner-shell to valence transitions (M edge, 50 eV strong-field induced molecular dynamics from the perspective of the metal center. We will induce dissociation dynamics at high field intensities and use lower IR intensities to study dynamics of electronically and/or vibrationally excited ferrocene cations. Preliminary results will be presented, demonstrating current progress of XUV transient absorption experiments on moderately large molecular systems.

  5. Strongly Anisotropic Bianchi i Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hans-Jürgen

    2002-12-01

    We report on the period-doubling bifurcation recently detected for strongly anisotropic Bianchi I quantum cosmology by M. Bachmann and H.-J. Schmidt and present further arguments related to the quantum boundary.

  6. Green jobs and a strong middle class.

    PubMed

    Podesta, John D

    2009-01-01

    Green jobs are critical to building a strong middle class, and millions of green jobs can be created through energy efficiency. The models already exist for this work, but we need sustained investment to bring them to scale.

  7. 78 FR 15710 - Strong Sensitizer Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Strong Sensitizer Guidance AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC or Commission) is announcing...

  8. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  9. Strong color fields and heavy flavor production

    SciTech Connect

    Bautista, I.; Pajares, C.

    2010-09-15

    The clustering of color sources provides a natural framework for soft partonic interactions producing strong color fields. We study the consequences of these color fields in the production of heavy flavor and the behavior of the nuclear modification factor.

  10. Trident Pair Production in Strong Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ilderton, Anton

    2011-01-14

    We calculate the trident pair production amplitude in a strong laser background. We allow for finite pulse durations, while still treating the laser fields nonperturbatively in strong-field QED. Our approach reveals explicitly the individual contributions of the one-step and two-step processes. We also expose the role gauge invariance plays in the amplitudes and discuss the relation between our results and the optical theorem.

  11. Study of strong turbulence effects for optical wireless links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Heba; Meric, Hasim; Kunter, Fulya

    2012-10-01

    Strong turbulence measurements that are taken using real time optical wireless experimental setups are valuable when studying the effects of turbulence regimes on a propagating optical beam. In any kind of FSO system, for us to know the strength of the turbulence thus the refractive index structure constant, is beneficial for having an optimum bandwidth of communication. Even if the FSO Link is placed very well-high-above the ground just to have weak enough turbulence effects, there can be severe atmospheric conditions that can change the turbulence regime. Having a successful theory that will cover all regimes will give us the chance of directly processing the image in existing or using an additional hardware thus deciding on the optimum bandwidth of the communication line at firsthand. For this purpose, Strong Turbulence data has been collected using an outdoor optical wireless setup placed about 85 centimeters above the ground with an acceptable declination and a path length of about 250 meters inducing strong turbulence to the propagating beam. Variations of turbulence strength estimation methods as well as frame image analysis techniques are then been applied to the experimental data in order to study the effects of different parameters on the result. Such strong turbulence data is compared with existing weak and intermediate turbulence data. Aperture Averaging Factor for different turbulence regimes is also investigated.

  12. Fragmentation of long-lived hydrocarbons after strong field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimian, Seyedreza; Erattupuzha, Sonia; Lötstedt, Erik; Szidarovszky, Tamás; Maurer, Raffael; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus; Xie, Xinhua

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the deprotonation process on nanosecond to microsecond timescales in ethylene and acetylene molecules following their double ionization by a strong femtosecond laser field. In our experiments we utilized coincidence detection with the reaction microscope technique. We found that both the lifetime of the long-lived ethylene dication leading to the delayed deprotonation and the relative channel strength of the delayed deprotonation compared to the prompt one have no evident dependence on the laser pulse duration and the laser peak intensity. Quantum chemical simulations suggest that the observed delayed fragmentation process originates from the tunneling from near-dissociation-threshold C-H stretch vibrational states on a dicationic electronic state. These vibrational states can be populated through strong field double-ionization-induced vibrational excitation on an electronically excited state in the case of ethylene, and through a spin-flip transition from electronically excited singlet states to the triplet ground state in the case of acetylene.

  13. Robust mesoscopic superposition of strongly correlated ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hallwood, David W.; Ernst, Thomas; Brand, Joachim

    2010-12-15

    We propose a scheme to create coherent superpositions of annular flow of strongly interacting bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional ring trap. The nonrotating ground state is coupled to a vortex state with mesoscopic angular momentum by means of a narrow potential barrier and an applied phase that originates from either rotation or a synthetic magnetic field. We show that superposition states in the Tonks-Girardeau regime are robust against single-particle loss due to the effects of strong correlations. The coupling between the mesoscopically distinct states scales much more favorably with particle number than in schemes relying on weak interactions, thus making particle numbers of hundreds or thousands feasible. Coherent oscillations induced by time variation of parameters may serve as a 'smoking gun' signature for detecting superposition states.

  14. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, C. R. D.; Gericke, D. O.; Cammarata, M.; Cho, B. I.; Döppner, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Förster, E.; Fortmann, C.; Fritz, D.; Galtier, E.; et al

    2014-06-09

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen closemore » to their original positions in the fluid.« less

  15. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C. R. D.; Gericke, D. O.; Cammarata, M.; Cho, B. I.; Döppner, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Förster, E.; Fortmann, C.; Fritz, D.; Galtier, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Harmand, M.; Heimann, P.; Kugland, N. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, R. W.; Lemke, H.; Makita, M.; Moinard, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Plagemann, K.-U.; Redmer, R.; Riley, D.; Rosmej, F. B.; Sperling, P.; Toleikis, S.; Vinko, S. M.; Vorberger, J.; White, S.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Tschentscher, T.; Gregori, G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen close to their original positions in the fluid. PMID:24909903

  16. Atom-Pair Kinetics with Strong Electric-Dipole Interactions.

    PubMed

    Thaicharoen, N; Gonçalves, L F; Raithel, G

    2016-05-27

    Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly to a strongly interacting regime via adiabatic transformation of the atoms from an approximately nonpolar into a highly dipolar quantum state. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces are probed using a device akin to a field ion microscope. Ion imaging and pair-correlation analysis reveal the kinetics of the interacting atoms. Dumbbell-shaped pair-correlation images demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipolar C_{3} coefficient, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The results indicate many-body dynamics akin to disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems. PMID:27284655

  17. Atom-Pair Kinetics with Strong Electric-Dipole Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaicharoen, N.; Gonçalves, L. F.; Raithel, G.

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly to a strongly interacting regime via adiabatic transformation of the atoms from an approximately nonpolar into a highly dipolar quantum state. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces are probed using a device akin to a field ion microscope. Ion imaging and pair-correlation analysis reveal the kinetics of the interacting atoms. Dumbbell-shaped pair-correlation images demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipolar C3 coefficient, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The results indicate many-body dynamics akin to disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems.

  18. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon.

    PubMed

    Brown, C R D; Gericke, D O; Cammarata, M; Cho, B I; Döppner, T; Engelhorn, K; Förster, E; Fortmann, C; Fritz, D; Galtier, E; Glenzer, S H; Harmand, M; Heimann, P; Kugland, N L; Lamb, D Q; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Lemke, H; Makita, M; Moinard, A; Murphy, C D; Nagler, B; Neumayer, P; Plagemann, K-U; Redmer, R; Riley, D; Rosmej, F B; Sperling, P; Toleikis, S; Vinko, S M; Vorberger, J; White, S; White, T G; Wünsch, K; Zastrau, U; Zhu, D; Tschentscher, T; Gregori, G

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen close to their original positions in the fluid. PMID:24909903

  19. Bcl-xL Silencing Induces Alterations in hsa-miR-608 Expression and Subsequent Cell Death in A549 and SK-LU1 Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Norahayu; In, Lionel L. A.; Harikrishna, Jennifer A.; Hasima, Noor

    2013-01-01

    Bcl-xL is an anti-apoptotic protein that is frequently found to be overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer leading to an inhibition of apoptosis and poor prognosis. Recently, the role of miRNAs in regulating apoptosis and cell survival during tumorigenesis has become evident, with cancer cells showing perturbed expression of various miRNAs. In this study, we utilized miRNA microarrays to determine if miRNA dysregulation in bcl-xL silenced lung adenocarcinoma cells could be involved in regulating cell death. Short interfering RNA-based transfection of A549 and SK-LU1 lung adenocarcinoma cells was successful in inducing a reduction in bcl-xL expression levels, resulting in a decrease in cell viability. A total of 10 miRNAs were found to be significantly differentially expressed when compared between siRNA-transfected and non-transfected cells including hsa-miR-181a, hsa-miR-769-5p, hsa-miR-361-5p, hsa-miR-1304 and hsa-miR-608. When overexpression studies on hsa-miR-608 was performed via transfection of miRNA mimics, cell death was found to be induced in A549 and SK-LU1 cells in comparison to untreated cells. This effect was reversed when knockdown studies involving anti-sense inhibitors were introduced. Combination of siRNA based silencing of bcl-xL (siBcl-xL) followed by anti-sense inhibitor transfection led to a decrease in the apoptotic population of A549 and SK-LU1 cells in comparison to cells only treated with siBcl-xL, illustrating the connection between bcl-xL, hsa-miR-608 and cell death. Gene target prediction analysis implicated the PI3K/AKT, WNT, TGF-β, and ERK signaling pathways as targets of bcl-xL induced miRNA alterations. We have demonstrated that bcl-xL silencing in A549 and SK-LU1 cells leads to the occurrence of cell death through the dysregulation of specific miRNAs. This study also provides a platform for anti-sense gene therapy whereby miRNA expression can be exploited to increase the apoptotic properties in lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID

  20. Mechanisms underlying strong-field double ionization of argon dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Manschwetus, B.; Rottke, H.; Steinmeyer, G.; Sandner, W.; Foucar, L.; Czasch, A.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate double ionization of argon dimers in high-intensity ultrashort Ti:sapphire laser pulses. We are able to identify several strong-field excitation pathways of the dimer that terminate in atomic ion pairs from a Coulomb explosion. The explosion starts from two-site double-ionized dimers and from one-site double-ionized ones after radiative charge transfer at small internuclear separation. One-site double ionization is accomplished by laser-induced charge transfer in the high-intensity laser pulse following two-site double ionization. The highest energy ion pairs we observed can be attributed to ''frustrated triple ionization'' of the argon dimer.

  1. Strong Motion Recording in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archuleta, R. J.; Fletcher, J. B.; Shakal, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The United States strong motion program began in 1932 when the Coast and Geodetic Survey (C&GS) installed eight strong motion accelerographs in California. During the March 1933 Long Beach earthquake, three of these produced the first strong motion records. With this success the C&GS expanded the number of accelerographs to 71 by 1964. With development of less expensive, mass-produced accelerographs the number of strong motion accelerographs expanded to ~575 by 1972. Responsibilities for operating the network and disseminating data were transferred to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 1970 and then to the U.S. Geological Survey in 1973. In 1972 the California Legislature established the California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP). CSMIP operates accelerographs at 812 ground stations, with multi-channel accelerographs in 228 buildings, 125 lifelines and 37 geotechnical arrays, in California. The USGS and the ANSS effort operate accelerographs at 1584 ground stations, 96 buildings, 14 bridges, 70 dams, and 15 multi-channel geotechnical arrays. The USC Los Angeles array has 78 ground stations; UCSB operates 5 geotechnical arrays; other government and private institutions also operate accelerographs. Almost all accelerographs are now digital with a sampling rate of 200 Hz. Most of the strong motion data can be downloaded from the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data (http://strongmotioncenter.org). As accelerographs have become more sophisticated, the concept of what constitutes strong motion has blurred because small earthquakes (M ~3) are well recorded on accelerometers as well as seismometers. However, when accelerations are over ~10%g and velocities over ~1 cm/s, the accelerometers remain on scale, providing the unclipped data necessary to analyze the ground motion and its consequences. Strong motion data are essential to the development of ground motion prediction equations, understanding structural response, performance

  2. The Italian Strong Motion Network (RAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Giovanni; Ammirati, Alfredo; de Nardis, Rita; Filippi, Luisa; Gallo, Antonella; Lavecchia, Giusy; Sirignano, Sebastiano; Zambonelli, Elisa; Nicoletti, Mario

    2014-05-01

    A network for the strong motion monitoring of the territory allows recording data that provide an excellent opportunity to study the source, path, and site effects on the ground motions, specifically in near source area, for updating seismic hazard map and consequently construction codes and earthquake resistant design. Strong motion data also help to increase the effective preparation and response to seismic emergencies and the ability of a community to quickly recover from the damages of an earthquake contributes to lower the seismic risk usually measured in term of casualties and economic losses. The Italian network for monitoring the strong movement of the national territory (RAN) is the result of a fruitful cooperation over the last 16 years between the Italian government, the regions and local authorities and now counts more than 500 stations. Over the years, as a priority the DPC has focused mainly on the expansion of the network in terms of the number of measurement points and technological improvement of instrumentation as well as the data transmission system. A data acquisition centre was implemented in which the Antelope software collects, processes and archives, automatically, the data of the RAN and of the external strong motion networks that contribute to the database of the RAN. Recently the DPC has dedicated specific resources to improve the response of the network, in particular, in case of emergency. The efficiency of the network on a daily basis is not less than 95% and temporary networks were installed in the epicentral area within 24 hours after the earthquake and connected to the data acquisition centre in Rome. A fast seismic data analysis is essential to provide useful information to Authorities which make decisions immediately after a strong earthquake occurrence. During a strong earthquake, the modern accelerometers are the only instruments which can provide near source high-quality data that are important both for scientific and for civil

  3. Visible periodicity of strong nucleosome DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bilal; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Lowary and Widom assembled nucleosomes on synthetic random sequence DNA molecules, selected the strongest nucleosomes and discovered that the TA dinucleotides in these strong nucleosome sequences often appear at 10-11 bases from one another or at distances which are multiples of this period. We repeated this experiment computationally, on large ensembles of natural genomic sequences, by selecting the strongest nucleosomes--i.e. those with such distances between like-named dinucleotides, multiples of 10.4 bases, the structural and sequence period of nucleosome DNA. The analysis confirmed the periodicity of TA dinucleotides in the strong nucleosomes, and revealed as well other periodic sequence elements, notably classical AA and TT dinucleotides. The matrices of DNA bendability and their simple linear forms--nucleosome positioning motifs--are calculated from the strong nucleosome DNA sequences. The motifs are in full accord with nucleosome positioning sequences derived earlier, thus confirming that the new technique, indeed, detects strong nucleosomes. Species- and isochore-specific variations of the matrices and of the positioning motifs are demonstrated. The strong nucleosome DNA sequences manifest the highest hitherto nucleosome positioning sequence signals, showing the dinucleotide periodicities in directly observable rather than in hidden form.

  4. Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios

    2010-12-15

    Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

  5. Harvesting excitons through plasmonic strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ballestero, Carlos; Feist, Johannes; Moreno, Esteban; Garcia-Vidal, Francisco J.

    2015-09-01

    Exciton harvesting is demonstrated in an ensemble of quantum emitters coupled to localized surface plasmons. When the interaction between emitters and the dipole mode of a metallic nanosphere reaches the strong-coupling regime, the exciton conductance is greatly increased. The spatial map of the conductance matches the plasmon field intensity profile, which indicates that transport properties can be tuned by adequately tailoring the field of the plasmonic resonance. Under strong coupling, we find that pure dephasing can have detrimental or beneficial effects on the conductance, depending on the effective number of participating emitters. Finally, we show that the exciton transport in the strong-coupling regime occurs on an ultrafast time scale given by the inverse Rabi splitting (˜10 fs), which is orders of magnitude faster than transport through direct hopping between the emitters.

  6. Strongly Nonlinear Stress Waves in Dissipative Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yichao; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2015-06-01

    We present the measurements, numerical simulations, and theoretical analysis of stress wave propagation in a one-dimensional strongly nonlinear dissipative metamaterial composed of steel disks and Nitrile O-rings. A stress wave of bell shape is generated by impactor with different masses. A strongly nonlinear double power-law is used to describe the nonlinear viscoelastic force interaction between the disks due to the compression of rubber O-rings. Numerical modeling including a nonlinear dissipative term is developed to predict the wave shape and propagation speed. The shape of generated stress wave can be dramatically changed by the viscous dissipation, which may prevent the pulse from splitting into trains of solitary waves. This strongly nonlinear dissipative metamaterial has a potential for attenuation of dynamic loading and allows an enhanced tunability of signal speed.

  7. Strong diquark correlations inside the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics is thought to be the relativistic quantum field theory that describes the strong interaction of the Standard Model. This interaction produces mesons but it is also able to generate quark-quark (diquark) correlations inside baryons. In this work, we employ a continuum approach to QCD based on Dyson-Schwinger equations to calculate the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and analyze in a deeper way the consequences of having strong diquark correlations. Comparison with the experimental data reveals that the presence of strong diquark correlations within the proton is sufficient to understand empirical extractions of the flavour-separated form factors. The explained reduction of the ratios F1d/F1u and F2d/F2u at high Q2 in the quark-diquark picture are responsible of the precocious scaling of the F2p/F1p observed experimentally.

  8. Strongly interacting bubbles under an ultrasonic horn.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Iida, Yasuo; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Towata, Atsuya

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulations of bubble pulsations have been performed for a system of two bubble clouds in order to study the experimentally observed bubble motion under an ultrasonic horn by high-speed video camera. The comparison between the calculated results and the experimental observation of the bubble pulsation has indicated that the bubble pulsation is strongly influenced by the interaction with surrounding bubbles. The expansion of a bubble during the rarefaction phase of ultrasound is strongly reduced by the bubble-bubble interaction. Some bubbles move toward the horn tip due to the secondary Bjerknes force acting from the bubbles near the horn tip. It has also been shown that the acoustic amplitude in the liquid is strongly reduced by cavitation due to the decrease in acoustic radiation resistance.

  9. Vacuum birefringence in strong inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, Felix; Gies, Holger; Reuter, Maria; Zepf, Matt

    2015-10-01

    Birefringence is one of the fascinating properties of the vacuum of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in strong electromagnetic fields. The scattering of linearly polarized incident probe photons into a perpendicularly polarized mode provides a distinct signature of the optical activity of the quantum vacuum and thus offers an excellent opportunity for a precision test of nonlinear QED. Precision tests require accurate predictions and thus a theoretical framework that is capable of taking the detailed experimental geometry into account. We derive analytical solutions for vacuum birefringence which include the spatio-temporal field structure of a strong optical pump laser field and an x-ray probe. We show that the angular distribution of the scattered photons depends strongly on the interaction geometry and find that scattering of the perpendicularly polarized scattered photons out of the cone of the incident probe x-ray beam is the key to making the phenomenon experimentally accessible with the current generation of FEL/high-field laser facilities.

  10. Simple supersymmetric strongly coupled preon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajfer, S.; Tadić, D.

    1988-08-01

    This supersymmetric-SU(5) composite model is a natural generalization of the usual strong-coupling models. Preon superfields are in representations 5* and 10. The product representations 5*×10, 5×10, 5×5, and 5*×5 contain only those strongly hypercolor bound states which are needed in the standard electroweak theory. There are no superfluous quarklike states. The neutrino is massless. Only one strongly hypercolor bound singlet (10×10*) can exist as a free particle. At higher energies one should expect to see a plethora of new particles. Grand unification happens at the scale M~1014 GeV. Cabibbo mixing can be incorporated by using a transposed Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix.

  11. Strong-Field Tunneling without Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Nubbemeyer, T.; Gorling, K.; Saenz, A.; Eichmann, U.; Sandner, W.

    2008-12-05

    In the tunneling regime of strong laser field ionization we measure a substantial fraction of neutral atoms surviving the laser pulse in excited states. The measured excited neutral atom yield extends over several orders of magnitude as a function of laser intensity. Our findings are compatible with the strong-field tunneling-plus-rescattering model, confirming the existence of a widely unexplored neutral exit channel (frustrated tunneling ionization). Strong experimental support for this mechanism as origin of excited neutral atoms stems from the dependence of the excited neutral yield on the laser ellipticity, which is as expected for a rescattering process. Theoretical support for the proposed mechanism comes from the agreement of the neutral excited state distribution centered at n=6-10 obtained from both, a full quantum mechanical and a semiclassical calculation, in agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-09-01

    Scintillation index of spherical wave in strongly turbulent oceanic medium is evaluated. In the evaluation, modified Rytov solution and our recent formulation that expresses the oceanic turbulence parameters by the atmospheric turbulence structure constant, are employed. Variations of the scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence are examined versus the oceanic turbulence parameters such as the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, viscosity, wavelength, the link length, and the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum.

  13. The Determination of the Strong Coupling Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissertori, Günther

    2016-10-01

    The strong coupling constant is one of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Theory of particle physics. In this review I will briefly summarise the theoretical framework, within which the strong coupling constant is defined and how it is connected to measurable observables. Then I will give an historical overview of its experimental determinations and discuss the current status and world average value. Among the many different techniques used to determine this coupling constant in the context of quantum chromodynamics, I will focus in particular on a number of measurements carried out at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  14. Experimental investigation of strong field trident production

    SciTech Connect

    Esberg, J.; Kirsebom, K.; Knudsen, H.; Thomsen, H. D.; Uggerhoej, E.; Uggerhoej, U. I.; Sona, P.; Mangiarotti, A.; Ketel, T. J.; Dizdar, A.; Dalton, M. M.; Ballestrero, S.; Connell, S. H.

    2010-10-01

    We show by experiment that an electron impinging on an electric field that is of critical magnitude in its rest frame, may produce an electron-positron pair. Our measurements address higher-order QED, using the strong electric fields obtainable along particular crystallographic directions in single crystals. For the amorphous material our data are in good agreement with theory, whereas a discrepancy with theory on the magnitude of the trident enhancement is found in the precisely aligned case where the strong electric field acts.

  15. Strongly coupled stress waves in heterogeneous plates.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. S. D.; Chou, P. C.; Rose, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of coupled stress waves generated by an impulsive load applied at one end of a semiinfinite plate. For the field equations governing the one-dimensional coupled waves a hyperbolic system of equations is obtained in which a strong coupling in the second derivatives exists. The method of characteristics described by Chou and Mortimer (1967) is extended to cover the case of strong coupling, and a study is made of the transient stress waves in a semiinfinite plate subjected to an initial step input. Coupled discontinuity fronts are found to propagate at different velocities. The normal plate stress and the bending moment at different time regimes are illustrated by graphs.

  16. Weak side of strong topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbierski, Björn; Schneider, Martin; Brouwer, Piet W.

    2016-04-01

    Strong topological insulators may have nonzero weak indices. The nonzero weak indices allow for the existence of topologically protected helical states along line defects of the lattice. If the lattice admits line defects that connect opposite surfaces of a slab of such a "weak-and-strong" topological insulator, these states effectively connect the surface states at opposite surfaces. Depending on the phases accumulated along the dislocation lines, this connection results in a suppression of in-plane transport and the opening of a spectral gap or in an enhanced density of states and an increased conductivity.

  17. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    DOE PAGES

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum -Kyu; Kim, Ju -Jin; Stockman, Mark I.; Kim, D.

    2016-02-18

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drivemore » this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Lastly, our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics.« less

  18. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Jin; Stockman, Mark I.; Kim, D.

    2016-01-01

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drive this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics. PMID:26888147

  19. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Jin; Stockman, Mark I.; Kim, D.

    2016-02-01

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drive this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics.

  20. Three Strands Form Strong School Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saphier, Jon; King, Matt; D'Auria, John

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors illustrate the three fundamental elements of school leadership: academic focus, shared beliefs and values, and productive professional relationships. These three elements purportedly produce strong organizational cultures, more teaching expertise, and better student achievement and more thoughtful and caring citizens.…

  1. Dynamo Activity in Strongly Magnetized Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-01-01

    Strongly magnetized accretion disks around black holes have many attractive features that may explain the enigmatic behavior observed from X-ray binaries. The physics and structure of these disks are governed by a dynamo-like mechanism, which channels the accretion power liberated by the magnetorotational instability into an ordered toroidal magnetic field. To study dynamo activity, we performed three-dimensional, stratified, isothermal, ideal magnetohydrodynamic shearing box simulations. In our simulations, the strength of this self-sustained toroidal magnetic field depends on the net vertical magnetic flux we impose, which allows us to study weak-to-strong magnetization regimes. We find that the entire disk develops into a magnetic pressure-dominated state for a sufficiently strong net vertical magnetic flux. Over the two orders of magnitude in net vertical magnetic flux that we consider, the effective α-viscosity parameter scales as a power-law. We quantify dynamo properties of toroidal magnetic flux production and its buoyant escape as a function of disk magnetization. Finally, we compare our simulations to an analytic model for the vertical structure of strongly magnetized disks applicable to the high/soft state of X-ray binaries.

  2. Charm production in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C. S.; Navarra, F. S.; Noronha, J.; Oliveira, E. G. de; Strickland, M.

    2014-11-11

    We discuss the effects of a strong magnetic field on B and D mesons, focusing on the changes of the energy levels and the masses of the bound states. Using the Color Evaporation Model we discuss the possible changes in the production of J/ψ and Υ. We briefly comment the recent experimental data.

  3. MRS photodiode in strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Rykalin, V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Zutshi, v.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2004-12-01

    The experimental results on the performance of the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiode in the strong magnetic field of 4.4T, and the possible impact of the quench of the magnet at 4.5T on sensor's operation are reported.

  4. Strong Female Characters in Recent Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heine, Pat; Inkster, Christine; Kazemek, Frank; Williams, Sandra; Raschke, Sylvia; Stevens, Della

    1999-01-01

    Shares the authors' criteria for evaluating female characters as positive role models in children's literature. Explores the criteria by examining "The Ballad of Lucy Wipple" (Karen Cushman). Discusses other recently published picture books and novels which feature strong females in history, in contemporary times, and in fantasy. (SR)

  5. CSMIP (California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program) strong-motion records from the Santa Cruz Mountains (Loma Prieta), California earthquake of 17 October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Shakal, A.; Reichle, M.; Ventura, C.; Cao, T.; Sherburne, R.; Savage, M.; Darragh, R.; Petersen, C.

    1990-01-01

    Strong-motion records were recovered from 93 stations of the California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP) after the earthquake. CSMIP provides information on the force of ground motion and the deformation induced in structures and in rock and soil by earthquake-generated ground motion. This information is recorded by strong-motion sensors placed in engineered structures and at free field (ground) sites, and is used by earthquake engineers and earth scientists to improve the design of earthquake-resistant structures. The strong-motion instrumentation program was established after the San Fernando earthquake in 1971. A total of 125 records were recovered from the 93 CSMIP stations which recorded the Loma Prieta event. These 125 records contain data from a total of 690 strong-motion sensors. These data are important because of the unique structures and sites at which records were obtained during this event. Some highlights of particular interest are included in this paper.

  6. Diphoton resonance from a new strong force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgi, Howard; Nakai, Yuichiro

    2016-10-01

    We explore a "partial unification" model that a new strong gauge group is combined with the ordinary color and hypercharge gauge groups. The VEV responsible for the combination is of the order of the S U (2 )×U (1 ) breaking scale, but the coupling of the new physics to standard model particles is suppressed by the strong interaction of the new gauge group. This simple extension of the standard model has a rich phenomenology, including composite particles of the new confining gauge interaction, a coloron and a Z' which are rather weakly coupled to standard model particles, and massive vector bosons charged under both the ordinary color and hypercharge gauge groups and the new strong gauge group. The new scalar glueball could be produced by gluon fusion and decay into two photons, both through loops of the new massive vector bosons. The simplest version of the model has some issues: the massive vector bosons are stable and the coloron and the Z' are strongly constrained by search data. An extension of the model to include additional fermions with the new gauge coupling, though not as simple and elegant, can address both issues and more. It allows the massive vector boson to decay into a colorless, neutral state that could be a candidate of the dark matter. And the coloron and Z' can decay dominantly into the new fermions, completely changing the search bounds. If the massive vector bosons are still long lived, they could form new bound states, "vector bosoniums" with additional interesting phenomenology. The model is an explicit example of how new physics at small scales could be hidden by strong interactions.

  7. Strong-Field Control of Laser Filamentation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levis, Robert; Romanov, Dmitri; Filin, Aleskey; Compton, Ryan

    2008-05-01

    The propagation of short strong-file laser pulses in gas and solution phases often result in formation of filaments. This phenomenon involves many nonlinear processes including Kerr lensing, group velocity dispersion, multi-photon ionization, plasma defocusing, intensity clamping, and self-steepening. Of these, formation and dynamics of pencil-shape plasma areas plays a crucial role. The fundamental understanding of these laser-induced plasmas requires additional effort, because the process is highly nonlinear and complex. We studied the ultrafast laser-generated plasma dynamics both experimentally and theoretically. Ultrafast plasma dynamics was probed using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering. The measurements were made in a room temperature gas maintained at 1 atm in a flowing cell. The time dependent scattering was measured by delaying the CARS probe with respect to the intense laser excitation pulse. A general trend is observed between the spacing of the ground state and the first allowed excited state with the rise time for the noble gas series and the molecular gases. This trend is consistent with our theoretical model, which considers the ultrafast dynamics of the strong field generated plasma as a three-step process; (i) strong-field ionization followed by the electron gaining considerable kinetic energy during the pulse; (ii) immediate post-pulse dynamics: fast thermalization, impact-ionization-driven electron multiplication and cooling; (iii) ensuing relaxation: evolution to electron-ion equilibrium and eventual recombination.

  8. Beta decay and other processes in strong electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.

    2011-09-15

    We consider effects of the fields of strong electromagnetic waves on various characteristics of quantum processes. After a qualitative discussion of the effects of external fields on the energy spectra and angular distributions of the final-state particles as well as on the total probabilities of the processes (such as decay rates and total cross sections), we present a simple method of calculating the total probabilities of processes with production of nonrelativistic charged particles. Using nuclear {beta} decay as an example, we study the weak- and strong-field limits, as well as the field-induced {beta} decay of nuclei stable in the absence of the external fields, both in the tunneling and multiphoton regimes. We also consider the possibility of accelerating forbidden nuclear {beta} decays by lifting the forbiddeness due to the interaction of the parent or daughter nuclei with the field of a strong electromagnetic wave. It is shown that for currently attainable electromagnetic fields all effects on total {beta}-decay rates are unobservably small.

  9. Using strong electromagnetic fields to control x-ray processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Buth, C.; Dunford, R. W.; Ho, P.; Kanter, E. P.; Kraessig, B.; Peterson, E. R.; Rohringer, N.; Santra, R.; Southworth, S. H.

    2010-06-01

    Exploration of a new ultrafast-ultrasmall frontier in atomic and molecular physics has begun. Not only is is possible to control outer-shell electron dynamics with intense ultrafast optical lasers, but now control of inner-shell processes has become possible by combining intense infrared/optical lasers with tunable sources of X-ray radiation. This marriage of strong-field laser and X-ray physics has led to the discovery of methods to control reversibly resonant X-ray absorption in atoms and molecules on ultrafast timescales. Using a strong optical dressing field, resonant X-ray absorption in atoms can be markedly suppressed, yielding an example of electromagnetically induced transparency for x rays. Resonant X-ray absorption can also be controlled in molecules using strong non-resonant, polarized laser fields to align the framework of a molecule, and therefore its unoccupied molecular orbitals to which resonant absorption occurs. At higher laser intensities, ultrafast field ionization produces an irreversible change in X-ray absorption. Finally, the advent of X-ray free electron lasers enables first exploration of non-linear X-ray processes.

  10. Basic properties of strongly code disjoint checkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaidis, M.

    1990-09-01

    In order to ensure total self checking, checkers have been introduced by Carter and defined by Anderson to be totally self checking: that is they are code disjoint, self testing, and fault secure. Checkers which are only code disjoint and self testing are also discussed. Strongly code disjoint checkers are not fault secure. Some researchers feel that the fault secure property is indeed necessary. This lack of agreement about the basic concepts of checkers is an important drawback in further research on self checking checkers. The various arguments used in the debate are presented. Aspects of the problem over which there is the most disagreement are highlighted. Some important points concerning strongly code disjoint checkers are discussed.

  11. Strongly correlated quantum walks in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp M.; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M. Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Zupancic, Philip; Lahini, Yoav; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Full control over the dynamics of interacting, indistinguishable quantum particles is an important prerequisite for the experimental study of strongly correlated quantum matter and the implementation of high-fidelity quantum information processing. We demonstrate such control over the quantum walk—the quantum mechanical analog of the classical random walk—in the regime where dynamics are dominated by interparticle interactions. Using interacting bosonic atoms in an optical lattice, we directly observed fundamental effects such as the emergence of correlations in two-particle quantum walks, as well as strongly correlated Bloch oscillations in tilted optical lattices. Our approach can be scaled to larger systems, greatly extending the class of problems accessible via quantum walks.

  12. Waves in strong centrifugal fields: dissipationless gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-04-01

    Linear waves are investigated in a rotating gas under the condition of strong centrifugal acceleration of the order 106 g realized in gas centrifuges for separation of uranium isotopes. Sound waves split into three families of the waves under these conditions. Dispersion equations are obtained. The characteristics of the waves strongly differ from the conventional sound waves on polarization, velocity of propagation and distribution of energy of the waves in space for two families having frequencies above and below the frequency of the conventional sound waves. The energy of these waves is localized in rarefied region of the gas. The waves of the third family were not specified before. They propagate exactly along the rotational axis with the conventional sound velocity. These waves are polarized only along the rotational axis. Radial and azimuthal motions are not excited. Energy of the waves is concentrated near the wall of the rotor where the density of the gas is largest.

  13. Strong ground motion prediction using virtual earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Denolle, M A; Dunham, E M; Prieto, G A; Beroza, G C

    2014-01-24

    Sedimentary basins increase the damaging effects of earthquakes by trapping and amplifying seismic waves. Simulations of seismic wave propagation in sedimentary basins capture this effect; however, there exists no method to validate these results for earthquakes that have not yet occurred. We present a new approach for ground motion prediction that uses the ambient seismic field. We apply our method to a suite of magnitude 7 scenario earthquakes on the southern San Andreas fault and compare our ground motion predictions with simulations. Both methods find strong amplification and coupling of source and structure effects, but they predict substantially different shaking patterns across the Los Angeles Basin. The virtual earthquake approach provides a new approach for predicting long-period strong ground motion. PMID:24458636

  14. Temperature equilibration in strongly coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L. E.; Chang, C. H.; Snell, C. M.; Daughton, W. S.; Csanak, G. Y.

    2002-01-01

    A laser-driven experiment investigating electron-ion equilibration in strongly coupled plasma was performed in 1995. At that time, standard estimates for the electron-ion equilibration time were two-to-three orders of magnitude faster than observed experimentally. As a result, the electron-ion equilibration time was taken as a fitting parameter to understand the experimental results. Based upon guidance from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics mixture calculations 121 and comparison with strongly coupled resistivity experiments, we have developed a consistent binary collision model to understand the electron-ion equilibration experiment. The model has been implemented in a newly developed multi-species, multi-temperature physics code, which was used for simulation of the experiment. The resulting electron-ion exchange rate is close to the experiment, which is about three orders-of-magnitude slower than given by standard estimates, most of which is the result of a modified coulomb logarithm.

  15. Spectral properties of strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monien, H.

    1998-01-01

    The pseudogap and the suppression of coherent transport in the direction perpendicular to the CuO planes of the high-temperature superconductors are clearly related to strong correlations. We study the suppression of coherent transport modelling the layered structure of the high-temperature superconductors by a pair of strongly correlated planes which are connected by a hopping transfer integral t⊥ in the limit of large in-plane coordination number. The suppression of low-energy density of states (pseudogap) by low-energy fluctuation close to a phase transition can be studied in one dimension using techniques introduced by Abrikosova and Ryzhkin. We present results which are exact in the limit of large correlation lengths which differ significantly from results obtained earlier. Our results may be relevant to the “pseudogap” phenomenon occurring in underdoped high- Tc superconductors and quasi-one-dimensional organic conductors and to the theory of liquid metals.

  16. Hydrogen Strongly Coupled Plasma at Megabar Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    New experimental results on thermodynamics and electrical conductivity of shock and isoentropically compressed hydrogen and deuterium are presented. Strongly coupled plasmas in which pressures achieved 18 Mbar, Coulomb coupling parameter exceeded 450, electron degeneracy parameter came up to 290 were obtained with semi-spherical explosive-driven generators. Theoretical models for description of thermodynamics of warm dense hydrogen, the experiment and theory comparison for hydrogen strongly non-ideal plasmas under high energy density are presented. Experimental and theoretical problems in studying of warm dense hydrogen are discussed. Work done in collaboration with R.I. Il'kayev, M.A. Mochalov, M.V. Zhernokletov, A.L. Mikhailov, V.B. Mintsev, I.L. Iosilevskiy, and V.Ya. Ternovoi.

  17. New strong interactions above the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.

    1994-08-09

    Theoretical arguments for a new higher-color quark sector, based on Pomeron physics in QCD, are briefly described. The electroweak symmetry-breaking, Strong CP conservation, and electroweak scale CP violation, that is naturally produced by this sector is also outlined. A further consequence is that above the electroweak scale there will be a radical change in the strong interaction. Electroweak states, in particular multiple W`s and Z`s, and new, semi-stable, very massive, baryons, will be commonly produced. The possible correlation of expected phenomena with a wide range of observed Cosmic Ray effects at and above the primary spectrum knee is described. Related phenomena that might be seen in the highest energy hard scattering events at the Fermilab Tevatron, some of which could be confused with top production, are also briefly discussed.

  18. Strongly correlated thermoelectric transport beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Prasenjit; Le Hur, Karyn

    2013-12-01

    We investigate nonlinear thermoelectric transport through quantum impurity systems with strong on-site interactions. We show that the steady-state transport through interacting quantum impurities in contact with electron reservoirs at significantly different temperatures can be captured by an effective-equilibrium density matrix, expressed compactly in terms of the Lippmann-Schwinger operators of the system. In addition, the reservoirs can be maintained at arbitrary chemical potentials. The interplay between the temperature gradient and bias voltage gives rise to a nontrivial breaking of particle-hole symmetry in the strongly correlated regime, manifest in the Abrikosov-Suhl localized electron resonance. This purely many-body effect, which is in agreement with experimental results, is beyond the purview of mean-field arguments.

  19. Decay of Resonaces in Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We suggest that decay properties (branching ratios) of hadronic resonances may become modified in strong external magnetic field. The behavior of K±*, K0* vector mesons as well as Λ* (1520) and Ξ0* baryonic states is considered in static fields 1013-1015 T. In particular, n = 0 Landau level energy increase of charged particles in the external magnetic field, and the interaction of hadron magnetic moments with the field is taken into account. We suggest that enhanced yield of dileptons and photons from ρ0(770) mesons may occur if strong decay channel ρ0 → π+π- is significantly suppressed. CP - violating π+π- decays of pseudoscalar ηc and η(547) mesons in the magnetic field are discussed, and superpositions of quarkonium states ηc,b and χc,b(nP) with Ψ(nS), ϒ(nS) mesons in the external field are considered.

  20. Strong regularizing effect of integrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin

    1997-11-01

    Many time evolution problems have the so-called strong regularization effect, that is, with any irregular initial data, as soon as becomes greater than 0, the solution becomes C{sup {infinity}} for both spacial and temporal variables. This paper studies 1 x 1 dimension integrable systems for such regularizing effect. In the work by Sachs, Kappler [S][K], (see also earlier works [KFJ] and [Ka]), strong regularizing effect is proved for KdV with rapidly decaying irregular initial data, using the inverse scattering method. There are two equivalent Gel`fand-Levitan-Marchenko (GLM) equations associated to an inverse scattering problem, one is normalized at x = {infinity} and another at x = {infinity}. The method of [S][K] relies on the fact that the KdV waves propagate only in one direction and therefore one of the two GLM equations remains normalized and can be differentiated infinitely many times. 15 refs.

  1. Nonperturbative enhancement of superloop at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We address the near-collinear expansion of NMHV six-particle scattering amplitudes at strong value of the 't Hooft coupling in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. We complement recent studies of this observable within the context of the Pentagon Operator Product Expansion, via the dual superWilson loop description, by studying effects of multiple scalar exchanges that accompany (or not) massive flux-tube excitations. Due to the fact that holes have a very small, nonperturbatively generated mass mh which is exponentially suppressed in the 't Hooft coupling, their exchanges must be resummed in the ultraviolet limit, τ ≪ 1 /mh. This procedure yields a contribution to the expectation value of the superloop which enters on equal footing with the classical area - a phenomenon which was earlier observed for MHV amplitudes. In all components, the near-massless scalar exchanges factorize from the ones of massive particles, at leading order in strong coupling.

  2. Solvable model of a strongly driven micromaser

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, P.; Walther, H.; Casagrande, F.; Lulli, A.; Englert, B.-G.; Solano, E.

    2004-02-01

    We study the dynamics of a micromaser where the pumping atoms are strongly driven by a resonant classical field during their transit through the cavity mode. We derive a master equation for this strongly driven micromaser, involving the contributions of the unitary atom-field interactions and the dissipative effects of a thermal bath. We find analytical solutions for the temporal evolution and the steady state of this system by means of phase-space techniques, providing an unusual solvable model of an open quantum system, including pumping and decoherence. We derive closed expressions for all relevant expectation values, describing the statistics of the cavity field and the detected atomic levels. The transient regime shows the buildup of mixtures of mesoscopic fields evolving towards a super-Poissonian steady-state field that, nevertheless, yields atomic correlations that exhibit stronger nonclassical features than the conventional micromaser.

  3. Photon scattering from strongly driven atomic ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Luling; Evers, Joerg; Macovei, Mihai

    2011-10-15

    The second-order correlation function for light emitted from a strongly and near-resonantly driven dilute cloud of atoms is discussed. Because of the strong driving, the fluorescence spectrum separates into distinct peaks, for which the spectral properties can be defined individually. It is shown that the second-order correlations for various combinations of photons from different spectral lines exhibit bunching together with super-Poissonian or sub-Poissonian photon statistics, tunable by the choice of the detector positions. Additionally, a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality is violated for photons emitted from particular spectral bands. The emitted light intensity is proportional to the square of the number of particles, and thus can potentially be intense. Three different averaging procedures to model ensemble disorder are compared.

  4. Strong ground motion prediction using virtual earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Denolle, M A; Dunham, E M; Prieto, G A; Beroza, G C

    2014-01-24

    Sedimentary basins increase the damaging effects of earthquakes by trapping and amplifying seismic waves. Simulations of seismic wave propagation in sedimentary basins capture this effect; however, there exists no method to validate these results for earthquakes that have not yet occurred. We present a new approach for ground motion prediction that uses the ambient seismic field. We apply our method to a suite of magnitude 7 scenario earthquakes on the southern San Andreas fault and compare our ground motion predictions with simulations. Both methods find strong amplification and coupling of source and structure effects, but they predict substantially different shaking patterns across the Los Angeles Basin. The virtual earthquake approach provides a new approach for predicting long-period strong ground motion.

  5. Photoneutrino energy losses in strong magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Fassio-Canuto, L.

    1973-01-01

    Previously computed rates of energy losses (Petrosian et al., 1967) ignored the presence of strong magnetic fields, hence the change brought in when such a field (about 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 13th power G) is included is studied. The results indicate that for T about 10 to the 8th power K and densities rho of about 10,000 g/cu cm, the presence of a strong H field decreases the energy losses by at the most a factor between 10 and 100 in the region up to rho = 1,000,000 g/cu cm. At higher densities the neutrino emissivities are almost identical.

  6. Bose polarons in the strongly interacting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, Dhruv; Hu, Ming-Guang; van de Graaff, Michael; Corson, John; Cornell, Eric; Jin, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    Impurities immersed in and interacting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are predicted to form quasiparticle excitations called Bose polarons. I will present experimental evidence of Bose polarons in cold atoms obtained using radio-frequency spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of fermionic K-40 impurities interacting with a BEC of Rb-87 atoms. We use an interspecies Feshbach resonance to tune the interactions between the impurities and the bosons, and we take data in the strongly interacting regime.

  7. Strong coupling QED with two fermionic flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.C.

    1990-11-01

    We report the recent results of our simulation of strong coupling QED, with non-compact action, on lattices 10{sup 4} and 16{sup 4}. Since we are dealing with two staggered fermionic flavors, we use hybrid algorithm to do the simulation. In addition to the measurement of the chiral order parameter {l angle}{bar {psi}}{psi}{r angle}, we also measure magnetic monopole susceptibility, {chi}, throughout the region of chiral transition. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Concepts in strong Langmuir turbulence theory

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, D.F.; Rose, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the basic concepts of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) theory are reviewed. In SLT system, a major fraction of the turbulent energy is carried by local, time-dependent, nonlinear excitations called cavitons. Modulational instability, localization of Langmuir fields by density fluctuations, caviton nucleation, collapse, and burnout and caviton correlations are reviewed. Recent experimental evidence will be presented for SLT phenomena in the interaction of powerful HF waves with the ionosphere and in laser-plasma interaction experiments. 38 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Kinetic Characterization of Strongly Coupled Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Knapek, C. A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Klumov, B. A.; Morfill, G. E.; Samsonov, D.

    2007-01-05

    We propose a simple method to determine the local coupling strength {gamma} experimentally, by linking the individual particle dynamics with the local density and crystal structure of a 2D plasma crystal. By measuring particle trajectories with high spatial and temporal resolution we obtain the first maps of {gamma} and temperature at individual particle resolution. We employ numerical simulations to test this new method, and discuss the implications to characterize strongly coupled systems.

  10. Strongly scale-dependent non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Riotto, Antonio; Sloth, Martin S.

    2011-02-15

    We discuss models of primordial density perturbations where the non-Gaussianity is strongly scale dependent. In particular, the non-Gaussianity may have a sharp cutoff and be very suppressed on large cosmological scales, but sizable on small scales. This may have an impact on probes of non-Gaussianity in the large-scale structure and in the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropies.

  11. Strong, Ductile Rotor For Cryogenic Flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royals, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    Improved magnetic flowmeter rotor resists cracking at cryogenic temperatures, yet provides adequate signal to magnetic pickup outside flowmeter housing. Consists mostly of stainless-steel alloy 347, which is ductile and strong at low temperatures. Small bead of stainless-steel alloy 410 welded in groove around circumference of round bar of stainless-steel alloy 347; then rotor machined from bar. Tips of rotor blades contain small amounts of magnetic alloy, and passage of tips detected.

  12. Kummer solitons in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj

    2009-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent strongly nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NNSE) in spherical coordinates, with the help of Kummer's functions. We obtain analytical solitary solutions, which we term the Kummer solitons. We compare analytical solutions with the numerical solutions of NNSE. We discuss higher-order Kummer spatial solitons, which can exist in various forms, such as the 3D vortex solitons and the multipole solitons.

  13. Quantum states with strong positive partial transpose

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Jurkowski, Jacek; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2008-02-15

    We construct a large class of bipartite M x N quantum states which defines a proper subset of states with positive partial transposes (PPTs). Any state from this class has PPT but the positivity of its partial transposition is recognized with respect to canonical factorization of the original density operator. We propose to call elements from this class states with strong positive partial transposes (SPPTs). We conjecture that all SPPT states are separable.

  14. Dynamics of strongly-coupled spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Bressloff, P C; Coombes, S

    2000-01-01

    We present a dynamical theory of integrate-and-fire neurons with strong synaptic coupling. We show how phase-locked states that are stable in the weak coupling regime can destabilize as the coupling is increased, leading to states characterized by spatiotemporal variations in the interspike intervals (ISIs). The dynamics is compared with that of a corresponding network of analog neurons in which the outputs of the neurons are taken to be mean firing rates. A fundamental result is that for slow interactions, there is good agreement between the two models (on an appropriately defined timescale). Various examples of desynchronization in the strong coupling regime are presented. First, a globally coupled network of identical neurons with strong inhibitory coupling is shown to exhibit oscillator death in which some of the neurons suppress the activity of others. However, the stability of the synchronous state persists for very large networks and fast synapses. Second, an asymmetric network with a mixture of excitation and inhibition is shown to exhibit periodic bursting patterns. Finally, a one-dimensional network of neurons with long-range interactions is shown to desynchronize to a state with a spatially periodic pattern of mean firing rates across the network. This is modulated by deterministic fluctuations of the instantaneous firing rate whose size is an increasing function of the speed of synaptic response. PMID:10636934

  15. Systematic errors in strong lens modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Traci Lin; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew B.

    2015-08-01

    The lensing community has made great strides in quantifying the statistical errors associated with strong lens modeling. However, we are just now beginning to understand the systematic errors. Quantifying these errors is pertinent to Frontier Fields science, as number counts and luminosity functions are highly sensitive to the value of the magnifications of background sources across the entire field of view. We are aware that models can be very different when modelers change their assumptions about the parameterization of the lensing potential (i.e., parametric vs. non-parametric models). However, models built while utilizing a single methodology can lead to inconsistent outcomes for different quantities, distributions, and qualities of redshift information regarding the multiple images used as constraints in the lens model. We investigate how varying the number of multiple image constraints and available redshift information of those constraints (ex., spectroscopic vs. photometric vs. no redshift) can influence the outputs of our parametric strong lens models, specifically, the mass distribution and magnifications of background sources. We make use of the simulated clusters by M. Meneghetti et al. and the first two Frontier Fields clusters, which have a high number of multiply imaged galaxies with spectroscopically-measured redshifts (or input redshifts, in the case of simulated clusters). This work will not only inform upon Frontier Field science, but also for work on the growing collection of strong lensing galaxy clusters, most of which are less massive and are capable of lensing a handful of galaxies, and are more prone to these systematic errors.

  16. Strong convergence for reduced free products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisier, Gilles

    2016-06-01

    Using an inequality due to Ricard and Xu, we give a different proof of Paul Skoufranis’s recent result showing that the strong convergence of possibly non-commutative random variables X(k) → X is stable under reduced free product with a fixed non-commutative random variable Y. In fact we obtain a more general fact: assuming that the families X(k) = {X i(k)} and Y(k) = {Y j(k)} are ∗-free as well as their limits (in moments) X = {Xi} and Y = {Yj}, the strong convergences X(k) → X and Y(k) → Y imply that of {X(k),Y(k)} to {X,Y }. Phrased in more striking language: the reduced free product is “continuous” with respect to strong convergence. The analogue for weak convergence (i.e. convergence of all moments) is obvious. Our approach extends to the amalgamated free product, left open by Skoufranis.

  17. Forecasting area of strong aftershock occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Sergey; Shebalin, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting an area of strong aftershock was never, at our knowledge, considered in terms of operational forecasting. Different declustering models exist to separate post-factum the aftershocks from "independent" events. Large number of studies discussed in previous years the form of the distribution of the aftershocks distances from the mainshock fault. Here we present results of our attempts to assimilate the above researches into a model that can be used in operational aftershock forecasting. Our study was based on data provided by ANSS catalog for 1980-2015. We tried more than 20 well known and suggested by ourselves models of aftershock areas to retrospective forecasting of strong aftershock areas. We tried the models based on data for 12 hours after a mainshock and estimated their forecast quality using special modification of L-test to achieve an optimal model. As a result of our study is a model that can be used in operational forecasting area of strong aftershocks. The research was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project 16-05-00263A).

  18. Doubling strong lensing as a cosmological probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Eric V.

    2016-10-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides a geometric probe of cosmology in a unique manner through distance ratios involving the source and lens. This is well-known for the time delay distance derived from measured delays between lightcurves of the images of variable sources such as quasars. Recently, double source plane lens systems involving two constant sources lensed by the same foreground lens have been proposed as another probe, involving a different ratio of distances measured from the image positions and fairly insensitive to the lens modeling. Here we demonstrate that these two different sets of strong lensing distance ratios have strong complementarity in cosmological leverage. Unlike other probes, the double source distance ratio is actually more sensitive to the dark energy equation of state parameters w0 and wa than to the matter density Ωm, for low redshift lenses. Adding double source distance ratio measurements can improve the dark energy figure of merit by 40% for a sample of fewer than 100 low redshift systems, or even better for the optimal redshift distribution we derive.

  19. Inflationary magnetogenesis without the strong coupling problem

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Ricardo J.Z.; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sloth, Martin S. E-mail: jain@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2013-10-01

    The simplest gauge invariant models of inflationary magnetogenesis are known to suffer from the problems of either large backreaction or strong coupling, which make it difficult to self-consistently achieve cosmic magnetic fields from inflation with a field strength larger than 10{sup −32}G today on the Mpc scale. Such a strength is insufficient to act as seed for the galactic dynamo effect, which requires a magnetic field larger than 10{sup −20}G. In this paper we analyze simple extensions of the minimal model, which avoid both the strong coupling and back reaction problems, in order to generate sufficiently large magnetic fields on the Mpc scale today. First we study the possibility that the coupling function which breaks the conformal invariance of electromagnetism is non-monotonic with sharp features. Subsequently, we consider the effect of lowering the energy scale of inflation jointly with a scenario of prolonged reheating where the universe is dominated by a stiff fluid for a short period after inflation. In the latter case, a systematic study shows upper bounds for the magnetic field strength today on the Mpc scale of 10{sup −13}G for low scale inflation and 10{sup −25}G for high scale inflation, thus improving on the previous result by 7-19 orders of magnitude. These results are consistent with the strong coupling and backreaction constraints.

  20. Diphotons, new vacuum angles, and strong CP

    DOE PAGES

    Draper, Patrick; McKeen, David

    2016-04-20

    The Standard Model contains a well-understood, natural, spin-0 diphoton resonance: the π0. Numerous studies have pointed out that the hint of a new diphoton resonance at 750 GeV could be a pion analog, identified with the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of a chiral symmetry spontaneously broken by new strong dynamics at the TeV scale. These “hypercolor” models are generically expected to violate parity through a topological angle θ~. We discuss the physics of θ~ and its impact on the phenomenology of the new sector. We also describe some of the theoretical implications of a nonzero θ~. In particular, θ~ can generate anmore » O(1) threshold correction to the QCD vacuum angle θ near the TeV scale, sharply constraining ultraviolet solutions to the strong CP problem. Furthermore, finding that θ~ is small may be interpreted as evidence in favor of UV solutions to strong CP, particularly those based on spontaneously broken P or CP symmetries.« less

  1. Strong CP, Flavor, and Twisted Split Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Perez, Gilad; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Shirman, Yuri

    2004-11-10

    We present a natural solution to the strong CP problem in the context of split fermions. By assuming CP is spontaneously broken in the bulk, a weak CKM phase is created in the standard model due to a twisting in flavor space of the bulk fermion wavefunctions. But the strong CP phase remains zero, being essentially protected by parity in the bulk and CP on the branes. As always in models of spontaneous CP breaking, radiative corrections to theta bar from the standard model are tiny, but even higher dimension operators are not that dangerous. The twisting phenomenon was recently shown to be generic, and not to interfere with the way that split fermions naturally weaves small numbers into the standard model. It follows that out approach to strong CP is compatible with flavor, and we sketch a comprehensive model. We also look at deconstructed version of this setup which provides a viable 4D model of spontaneous CP breaking which is not in the Nelson-Barr class.

  2. Cosmological test using strong gravitational lensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. C.; Wang, F. Y.

    2015-09-01

    As one of the probes of universe, strong gravitational lensing systems allow us to compare different cosmological models and constrain vital cosmological parameters. This purpose can be reached from the dynamic and geometry properties of strong gravitational lensing systems, for instance, time-delay Δτ of images, the velocity dispersion σ of the lensing galaxies and the combination of these two effects, Δτ/σ2. In this paper, in order to carry out one-on-one comparisons between ΛCDM universe and Rh = ct universe, we use a sample containing 36 strong lensing systems with the measurement of velocity dispersion from the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS) and Lens Structure and Dynamic survey (LSD) survey. Concerning the time-delay effect, 12 two-image lensing systems with Δτ are also used. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations are used to compare the efficiency of the three methods as mentioned above. From simulations, we estimate the number of lenses required to rule out one model at the 99.7 per cent confidence level. Comparing with constraints from Δτ and the velocity dispersion σ, we find that using Δτ/σ2 can improve the discrimination between cosmological models. Despite the independence tests of these methods reveal a correlation between Δτ/σ2 and σ, Δτ/σ2 could be considered as an improved method of σ if more data samples are available.

  3. Phase transition transistors based on strongly-correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    The field-effect transistor (FET) provides electrical switching functions through linear control of the number of charges at a channel surface by external voltage. Controlling electronic phases of condensed matters in a FET geometry has long been a central issue of physical science. In particular, FET based on a strongly correlated material, namely ``Mott transistor,'' has attracted considerable interest, because it potentially provides gigantic and diverse electronic responses due to a strong interplay between charge, spin, orbital and lattice. We have investigated electric-field effects on such materials aiming at novel physical phenomena and electronic functions originating from strong correlation effects. Here we demonstrate electrical switching of bulk state of matter over the first-order metal-insulator transition. We fabricated FETs based on VO2 with use of a recently developed electric-double-layer transistor technique, and found that the electrostatically induced carriers at a channel surface drive all preexisting localized carriers of 1022 cm-3 even inside a bulk to motion, leading to bulk carrier delocalization beyond the electrostatic screening length. This non-local switching of bulk phases is achieved with just around 1 V, and moreover, a novel non-volatile memory like character emerges in a voltage-sweep measurement. These observations are apparently distinct from those of conventional FETs based on band insulators, capturing the essential feature of collective interactions in strongly correlated materials. This work was done in collaboration with K. Shibuya, D. Okuyama, T. Hatano, S. Ono, M. Kawasaki, Y. Iwasa, and Y. Tokura. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSAP) through its ``Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program).''

  4. Is strong reciprocity really strong in the lab, let alone in the real world?

    PubMed

    Güney, Şule; Newell, Ben R

    2012-02-01

    We argue that standard experiments supporting the existence of "strong reciprocity" do not represent many cooperative situations outside the laboratory. More representative experiments that incorporate "earned" rather than "windfall" wealth also do not provide evidence for the impact of strong reciprocity on cooperation in contemporary real-life situations or in evolutionary history, supporting the main conclusions of the target article.

  5. 77 FR 53212 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request Strong Cities Strong Communities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Communities National Resource Network AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and... Proposal: Strong Cities Strong Communities National Resource Network. OMB Control Number, if applicable... National Resource Network. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Act,...

  6. Prevention of strong earthquakes: Goal or utopia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamediev, Sh. A.

    2010-11-01

    In the present paper, we consider ideas suggesting various kinds of industrial impact on the close-to-failure block of the Earth’s crust in order to break a pending strong earthquake (PSE) into a number of smaller quakes or aseismic slips. Among the published proposals on the prevention of a forthcoming strong earthquake, methods based on water injection and vibro influence merit greater attention as they are based on field observations and the results of laboratory tests. In spite of this, the cited proofs are, for various reasons, insufficient to acknowledge the proposed techniques as highly substantiated; in addition, the physical essence of these methods has still not been fully understood. First, the key concept of the methods, namely, the release of the accumulated stresses (or excessive elastic energy) in the source region of a forthcoming strong earthquake, is open to objection. If we treat an earthquake as a phenomenon of a loss in stability, then, the heterogeneities of the physicomechanical properties and stresses along the existing fault or its future trajectory, rather than the absolute values of stresses, play the most important role. In the present paper, this statement is illustrated by the classical examples of stable and unstable fractures and by the examples of the calculated stress fields, which were realized in the source regions of the tsunamigenic earthquakes of December 26, 2004 near the Sumatra Island and of September 29, 2009 near the Samoa Island. Here, just before the earthquakes, there were no excessive stresses in the source regions. Quite the opposite, the maximum shear stresses τmax were close to their minimum value, compared to τmax in the adjacent territory. In the present paper, we provide quantitative examples that falsify the theory of the prevention of PSE in its current form. It is shown that the measures for the prevention of PSE, even when successful for an already existing fault, can trigger or accelerate a catastrophic

  7. An IPTG Inducible Conditional Expression System for Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, Sudha; Ambady, Anisha; Ramu, Haripriya; Mudugal, Naina Vinay; Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Anbarasu, Anand; Sharma, Umender K.; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression strains serve as a valuable tool to study the essentiality and to establish the vulnerability of a target under investigation in a drug discovery program. While essentiality implies an absolute requirement of a target function, vulnerability provides valuable information on the extent to which a target function needs to be depleted to achieve bacterial growth inhibition followed by cell death. The critical feature of an ideal conditional expression system is its ability to tightly regulate gene expression to achieve the full spectrum spanning from a high level of expression in order to support growth and near zero level of expression to mimic conditions of gene knockout. A number of bacterial conditional expression systems have been reported for use in mycobacteria. The utility of an isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG) inducible system in mycobacteria has been reported for protein overexpression and anti-sense gene expression from a replicating multi-copy plasmid. Herein, we report the development of a versatile set of non-replicating IPTG inducible vectors for mycobacteria which can be used for generation of conditional expression strains through homologous recombination. The role of a single lac operator versus a double lac operator to regulate gene expression was evaluated by monitoring the expression levels of β-galactosidase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. These studies indicated a significant level of leaky expression from the vector with a single lac operator but none from the vector with double lac operator. The significance of the double lac operator vector for target validation was established by monitoring the growth kinetics of an inhA, a rpoB and a ftsZ conditional expression strain grown in the presence of different concentrations of IPTG. The utility of this inducible system in identifying target specific inhibitors was established by screening a focussed library of small molecules using an inhA and a rpoB conditional expression

  8. (1+2)-dimensional strongly nonlocal solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang Shigen; Guo Qi

    2007-11-15

    Approximate solutions of (1+2)-dimensional strongly nonlocal solitons (SNSs) are presented. It is shown that the power of a SNS in a nematic liquid crystal is in direct proportion to the second power of the degree of nonlocality, the power of a SNS in a nonlocal medium with a logarithmic nonlocal response is in inverse proportion to the second power of its beamwidth, and the power of a SNS in a nonlocal medium with an sth-power decay nonlocal response is in direct proportion to the (s+2)th power of the degree of nonlocality.

  9. Bose Polarons in the Strongly Interacting Regime.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Van de Graaff, Michael J; Kedar, Dhruv; Corson, John P; Cornell, Eric A; Jin, Deborah S

    2016-07-29

    When an impurity is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, impurity-boson interactions are expected to dress the impurity into a quasiparticle, the Bose polaron. We superimpose an ultracold atomic gas of ^{87}Rb with a much lower density gas of fermionic ^{40}K impurities. Through the use of a Feshbach resonance and radio-frequency spectroscopy, we characterize the energy, spectral width, and lifetime of the resultant polaron on both the attractive and the repulsive branches in the strongly interacting regime. The width of the polaron in the attractive branch is narrow compared to its binding energy, even as the two-body scattering length diverges. PMID:27517776

  10. Obama Indicates Strong Support for Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-05-01

    In remarks delivered at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) annual meeting on 27 April, U.S. President Barack Obama indicated his administration's strong support for science and for pursuing a clean energy economy. He also announced a goal that the United States “will devote more than 3% of our [gross domestic product] to research and development.” “This represents the largest commitment to scientific research and innovation in American history,” Obama said, noting that the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act already is providing the nation with its largest single boost to investment in basic research.

  11. Strongly nonlinear magnetosonic waves and ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, B.; Tajima, T.

    1997-11-01

    The electromagnetic fields associated with a nonlinear compressional Alfven wave propagating perpendicular to an external magnetic field of arbitrary strength are derived. For the strongly magnetized and high phase velocity case relevant for ion acceleration to high energies, we show that the electric field increases proportionally only to the external magnetic field O (B{sub ext}[in T] MV/cm) and the electrostatic potential increases with the square root of the ion-to-electron mass ratio {radical}M{sub i}/m{sub e}.

  12. Dynamical simulations of strongly correlated electron materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Joel; Barros, Kipton; Batista, Cristian; Chern, Gia-Wei; Kotliar, Gabriel

    We present a formulation of quantum molecular dynamics that includes electron correlation effects via the Gutzwiller method. Our new scheme enables the study of the dynamical behavior of atoms and molecules with strong electron interactions. The Gutzwiller approach goes beyond the conventional mean-field treatment of the intra-atomic electron repulsion and captures crucial correlation effects such as band narrowing and electron localization. We use Gutzwiller quantum molecular dynamics to investigate the Mott transition in the liquid phase of a single-band metal and uncover intriguing structural and transport properties of the atoms.

  13. Nondipole effects in strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Dubau, J.; Kim, Kyung Taec

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of the relativistic nondipole effects in strong-field tunneling ionization process driven by a linearly polarized laser pulse. We consider the role of these effects in breaking the symmetry with respect to the inversion of the momentum component perpendicular to the laser-field polarization direction, which the dipole differential ionization probabilities possess. The study is based on the solution of a three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation taking into account the leading-order relativistic corrections.

  14. Towards NMHV amplitudes at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Pentagon Operator Product Expansion provides a non-perturbative framework for analysis of scattering amplitudes in planar maximally supersymmetric gauge theory building up on their duality to null polygonal superWilson loop and integrability. In this paper, we construct a systematic expansion for the main ingredients of the formalism, i.e., pentagons, at large 't Hooft coupling as a power series in its inverse value. The calculations are tested against relations provided by the so-called Descent Equation which mixes transitions at different perturbative orders. We use leading order results to have a first glimpse into the structure of scattering amplitude at NMHV level at strong coupling.

  15. Strong Interactions in Strange Exotic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareš, J.

    2003-08-01

    Strong interaction level shifts and widths in - and K- atoms have been analyzed. The phenomenological density dependent approach as well as the relativistic mean field (RMF) model yield nucleus optical potentials with a repulsive real part in the nuclear interior. This has important consequences for the spectroscopy of hypernuclei. The study of K- atoms cannot resolve the depth of the K- nucleus potential. The fits to the kaonic atom data are satisfactory for both the relatively shallow potentials derived from chiral models and for the deep potentials based on the phenomenological and RMF analyses.

  16. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, S E; Marston, J B

    2011-02-14

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  17. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, S. E.; Marston, J. B.

    2011-02-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  18. Fundamental Structure of Matter and Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-11-01

    More than 99% of the visible matter in the universe are the protons and neutrons. Their internal structure is mostly governed by the strong interaction. Understanding their internal structure in terms of fundamental degrees-of-freedom is one of the most important subjects in modern physics. Worldwide efforts in the last few decades have lead to numerous surprises and discoveries, but major challenges still remain. An overview of the progress will be presented with a focus on the recent studies of the proton and neutron's electromagnetic and spin structure. Future perspectives will be discussed.

  19. Bose Polarons in the Strongly Interacting Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Van de Graaff, Michael J.; Kedar, Dhruv; Corson, John P.; Cornell, Eric A.; Jin, Deborah S.

    2016-07-01

    When an impurity is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, impurity-boson interactions are expected to dress the impurity into a quasiparticle, the Bose polaron. We superimpose an ultracold atomic gas of 87Rb with a much lower density gas of fermionic 40 impurities. Through the use of a Feshbach resonance and radio-frequency spectroscopy, we characterize the energy, spectral width, and lifetime of the resultant polaron on both the attractive and the repulsive branches in the strongly interacting regime. The width of the polaron in the attractive branch is narrow compared to its binding energy, even as the two-body scattering length diverges.

  20. Empirical prediction of strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Joyner, William B.

    1993-01-01

    In 1982, we published equations for the prediction of various measures of ground motion as a function of earthquake magnitude, distance from the earthquake rupture, and site geology. Many more strong-motion recordings have been obtained since we published our equations. The predictions of the ground motions from our published equations are in reasonable agreement with the peak accelerations from the new data. The increased number of data, however, allow us to refine our predictions for some regions of magnitude and distance space, and perhaps for other variables.

  1. Radiation reaction in strong field QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilderton, Anton; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2013-10-01

    We derive radiation reaction from QED in a strong background field. We identify, in general, the diagrams and processes contributing to recoil effects in the average momentum of a scattered electron, using perturbation theory in the Furry picture: we work to lowest nontrivial order in α. For the explicit example of scattering in a plane wave background, we compare QED with classical electrodynamics in the limit ℏ → 0, finding agreement with the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac and Landau-Lifshitz equations, and with Larmor's formula. The first quantum corrections are also presented.

  2. Development of a strong electromagnet wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, M.J.; Deis, G.A.; Holmes, R.H.; Van Maren, R.D.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    The Strong Electromagnet (SEM) wiggler is a permanent magnet-assisted electromagnet under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Induction Linac Free-Electron-Laser (IFEL) program. This concept uses permanent magnets within the wiggler to provide a reverse bias flux in the iron and thus delay the onset of magnetic saturation. The electromagnet coils determine the wiggler field and operate at low current densities by virtue of their placement away from the midplane. We describe here the design approach used and test data from a 7-period wiggler prototype that includes curved pole tips to provide wiggle-plane focusing. 7 refs.

  3. Efimov correlations in strongly interacting Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Barth, Marcus

    A series of recent hallmark experiments have demonstrated that Bose gases can be created in the strongly interacting unitary limit in the non-degenerate high-temperature regime. These systems display the three-body Efimov effect, which poses a theoretical challenge to compute observables including these relevant three-body correlations. In this talk, I shall present our results for the virial coefficients, the contact parameters, and the momentum distribution of a strongly interacting three-dimensional Bose gas obtained by means of a virial expansion up to third order in the fugacity, which takes into account three-body correlations exactly. Our results characterize the non-degenerate regime of the interacting Bose gas, where the thermal wavelength is smaller than the interparticle spacing but the scattering length may be arbitrarily large. In addition, we provide a calculation of the momentum distribution at unitarity, which displays a universal high-momentum tail with a log-periodic momentum dependence - a direct signature of Efimov physics. In particular, we provide a quantitative description of the momentum distribution at high momentum as measured by the JILA group [Makotyn et al., Nat. Phys. 10, 116 (2014)]. Our results allow the spectroscopy of Efimov states at unitarity.

  4. Relativistically strong electromagnetic radiation in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Kondo, K.

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes in a plasma under the action of relativistically strong electromagnetic waves generated by high-power lasers have been briefly reviewed. These processes are of interest in view of the development of new methods for acceleration of charged particles, creation of sources of bright hard electromagnetic radiation, and investigation of macroscopic quantum-electrodynamical processes. Attention is focused on nonlinear waves in a laser plasma for the creation of compact electron accelerators. The acceleration of plasma bunches by the radiation pressure of light is the most efficient regime of ion acceleration. Coherent hard electromagnetic radiation in the relativistic plasma is generated in the form of higher harmonics and/or electromagnetic pulses, which are compressed and intensified after reflection from relativistic mirrors created by nonlinear waves. In the limit of extremely strong electromagnetic waves, radiation friction, which accompanies the conversion of radiation from the optical range to the gamma range, fundamentally changes the behavior of the plasma. This process is accompanied by the production of electron-positron pairs, which is described within quantum electrodynamics theory.

  5. Multimode Strong Coupling in Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Neereja; Liu, Yanbing; Sadri, Darius; Szocs, Laszlo; Underwood, Devin; Malekakhlagh, Moein; Tureci, Hakan; Houck, Andrew

    We present experimental and theoretical studies in the multimode strong coupling (MMSC) regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). In MMSC, a single atom is simultaneously coupled to a large, but discrete, number of cavity harmonics, with atom-mode coupling strengths comparable to the free spectral range (FSR). This regime is readily accessible in circuit QED, by strongly coupling a transmon qubit to a low fundamental frequency microwave cavity. We present some key results from our original experiment (PRX 5, 021035, 2015), in which a transmon qubit, resonant with the 75th harmonic of a 90 MHz cavity, reached qubit-mode coupling strengths exceeding 30MHz. When this system is coherently driven, we observed complex multimode fluorescence, with the notable formation of ultra-narrow linewidths. To better understand these unique features of multimode resonance fluorescence we developed a quantum formalism, which attributes the spectral linewidth narrowing to the correlated spontaneous emission of doubly dressed states. Finally we will share preliminary experimental results from our continuing study of MMSC, this time from a system where qubit-mode coupling strengths approach and even exceed the FSR.

  6. An Engineered Strong Promoter for Streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weishan; Li, Xiao; Wang, Juan; Xiang, Sihai; Feng, Xiaozhou

    2013-01-01

    Well-characterized promoters are essential tools for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. In Streptomyces coelicolor, the native kasOp is a temporally expressed promoter strictly controlled by two regulators, ScbR and ScbR2. In this work, first, kasOp was engineered to remove a common binding site of ScbR and ScbR2 upstream of its core region, thus generating a stronger promoter, kasOp3. Second, another ScbR binding site internal to the kasOp3 core promoter region was abolished by random mutation and screening of the mutant library to obtain the strongest promoter, kasOp* (where the asterisk is used to distinguish the engineered promoter from the native promoter). The activities of kasOp* were compared with those of two known strong promoters, ermEp* and SF14p, in three Streptomyces species. kasOp* showed the highest activity at the transcription and protein levels in all three hosts. Furthermore, relative to ermEp* and SF14p, kasOp* was shown to confer the highest actinorhodin production level when used to drive the expression of actII-ORF4 in S. coelicolor. Therefore, kasOp* is a simple and well-defined strong promoter useful for gene overexpression in streptomycetes. PMID:23686264

  7. Heat treatment modelling using strongly continuous semigroups.

    PubMed

    Malek, Alaeddin; Abbasi, Ghasem

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, mathematical simulation of bioheat transfer phenomenon within the living tissue is studied using the thermal wave model. Three different sources that have therapeutic applications in laser surgery, cornea laser heating and cancer hyperthermia are used. Spatial and transient heating source, on the skin surface and inside biological body, are considered by using step heating, sinusoidal and constant heating. Mathematical simulations describe a non-Fourier process. Exact solution for the corresponding non-Fourier bioheat transfer model that has time lag in its heat flux is proposed using strongly continuous semigroup theory in conjunction with variational methods. The abstract differential equation, infinitesimal generator and corresponding strongly continuous semigroup are proposed. It is proved that related semigroup is a contraction semigroup and is exponentially stable. Mathematical simulations are done for skin burning and thermal therapy in 10 different models and the related solutions are depicted. Unlike numerical solutions, which suffer from uncertain physical results, proposed analytical solutions do not have unwanted numerical oscillations.

  8. Spherical Strong-Shock Inferences on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nora, R.; Lafon, M.; Betti, R.; Theobald, W.; Seka, W.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    A milestone for shock ignition is to experimentally verify the generation of several hundred Mbar shocks at shock-ignition-relevant laser intensities. This paper presents the first experimental evidence of strong shocks generated in a spherical geometry. Using the temporal delay between the launch of the strong shock at the outer surface of the spherical target and the time when the shock converges at the center, the shock properties can be inferred using radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Peak ablation pressures exceeding 200 Mbar are inferred at laser intensities of ~ 3 ×1015 W/cm2. The shock strength is significantly enhanced by the coupling of copius amounts of hot electrons, up to 2 kJ with Thot ~ 50 to 100 keV. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Number DE-FG02-04ER54786.

  9. Bose condensates with strong anisotropic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeenkov, Alexander; Bohn, John L.; Bortolotti, Daniele C. E.

    2004-05-01

    We theoretically investigate trapped Bose condensates with strong dipolar interactions, in the presence of an external electrostatic field. As a prototype we consider polar OH molecules. Previously such systems have been studied in the case of a very strong external field that aligns all the dipoles along the field axis[1,2]. Here we relax this assumption and investigate the influence of finite external field, also taking into account the internal fine structure of the molecules. As a first approximation we treat the intermolecular coordinates as adiabatic and construct an effective potential by diagonalizing Stark and dipole-dipole hamiltonians. The anisotropy of these adiabatic surfaces is a function of an external field, and does not always resemble the interaction between polarized dipoles. We discuss the implications of finite electric field on the stability and geometry of the condensate. [1] K.Goral, K.Rzazewski, and T.Pfau, Phys.Rev.A 61, 051601/1(2000) [2] L.Santos, G.V.Shlyapnikov, P.Zoller and M.Lewenstein, Phys.Rev.Lett.85,1791(2000)

  10. Emergent quasicrystals in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, Eran; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-07-01

    Commensurability is of paramount importance in numerous strongly interacting electronic systems. In the fractional quantum Hall effect, a rich cascade of increasingly narrow plateaux appear at larger denominator filling fractions. Rich commensurate structures also emerge, at certain filling fractions, in high temperature superconductors and other electronic systems. A natural question concerns the character of these and other electronic systems at irrational filling fractions. Here we demonstrate that quasicrystalline structures naturally emerge in these situations, and trigger behaviors not typically expected of periodic systems. We first show that irrationally filled quantum Hall systems cross over into quasiperiodically ordered configuration in the thin-torus limit. Using known properties of quasicrystals, we argue that these states are unstable against the effects of disorder, in agreement with the existence of quantum Hall plateaux. We then study analogous physical situations in a system of cold Rydberg atoms placed on an optical lattice. Such an experimental setup is generally disorder free, and can therefore be used to detect the emergent quasicrystals we predict. We discuss similar situations in the Falicov-Kimball model, where known exact results can be used to establish quasicrystalline structures in one and two dimensions. We briefly speculate on possible relations between our theoretical findings and the existence of glassy dynamics and other features of strongly correlated electronic systems.

  11. Thermally driven motion of strongly heated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboer, P. C. T.

    1983-02-01

    Approximate equations which are derived for the thermally driven motion of strongly heated, shallow fluids were examined. The equations follow from formal perturbation theory, using the nondimensionalized depth epsilon of the fluid as the smaller parameter. They govern the zeroth order temperature, pressure, and density. The method used is also applied to a weakly heated, deep fluid, using the nondimensionalized strength delta' of the heat source distribution as the small parameter. In the later case, the equations govern the first order perturbations in temperature, pressure, and density, while the unperturbed situation is the so called adiabatic state. The Boussinesq equations are recovered for a weakly heated, shallow fluid, independent of the relative magnitude of delta' and epsilon. For the case of a weakly heated, shallow ideal gas maintained at constant volume and heated throughout the volume, the equations account for the effect of perturbation pressure on perturbation density and on compression heating. A final case considered is that of a strongly heated, deep liquid with a small coefficient of thermal expansion. The energy equation for this case is found to be significantly different from that for a weakly heated, deep liquid. For two dimensional geometries, the various sets of equations derived are amendable to a common numerical method of solution.

  12. Ambipolar diffusion in strongly electronegative plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisovskiy, Valeriy; Yegorenkov, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents the treatment of the analytical model of ambipolar diffusion in quasi-neutral electronegative plasma consisting of electrons, a single species of negative ions and a single species of positive ions, which was proposed by Thompson J.B. [Proc. Phys. Soc., 73 (1959) 818]. We demonstrate that in plasma with the concentration of negative ions more than 10 times exceeding that of electrons one has to take into account the mobility of negative and positive ions. We established that in strongly electronegative plasma when both conditions α >> 1 (α = n-/ne) and μe << α.μ- hold, the ambipolar diffusion coefficients for positive and negative ions as well as electrons are close to the coefficients of their free diffusion. Consequently in strongly electronegative plasma the diffusion ceases to be ambipolar (even for large plasma concentration) and becomes to be free, i.e. charged particles of different species and sign cease to affect the diffusion motion of each other.

  13. Heat treatment modelling using strongly continuous semigroups.

    PubMed

    Malek, Alaeddin; Abbasi, Ghasem

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, mathematical simulation of bioheat transfer phenomenon within the living tissue is studied using the thermal wave model. Three different sources that have therapeutic applications in laser surgery, cornea laser heating and cancer hyperthermia are used. Spatial and transient heating source, on the skin surface and inside biological body, are considered by using step heating, sinusoidal and constant heating. Mathematical simulations describe a non-Fourier process. Exact solution for the corresponding non-Fourier bioheat transfer model that has time lag in its heat flux is proposed using strongly continuous semigroup theory in conjunction with variational methods. The abstract differential equation, infinitesimal generator and corresponding strongly continuous semigroup are proposed. It is proved that related semigroup is a contraction semigroup and is exponentially stable. Mathematical simulations are done for skin burning and thermal therapy in 10 different models and the related solutions are depicted. Unlike numerical solutions, which suffer from uncertain physical results, proposed analytical solutions do not have unwanted numerical oscillations. PMID:25912988

  14. Rotation and Strong Magnetism of White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We study the co-evolution of rotation and magnetism during the post-main sequence expansion of 1 and 5 M⊙ stars. The magnetic field is sourced by a dynamo operating near the core-envelope boundary, which is driven by the downward pumping of angular momentum though the envelope. In stars with strong and magnetized main-sequence winds, this angular momentum must be supplied by a binary planetary or stellar companion. Magnetic helicity is advected into the growing core as the magnetic field enforces solid-body rotation there, corresponding to a dipolar magnetic field ˜ 106-107 G in the white dwarf (WD) remnant. We estimate the residual spin that results from a shutoff of the dynamo, combined with decoupling of core and envelope, during the last stages of the AGB. Only a thin magnetized layer is left behind in a massive WD: the ohmic transport time is typically less than a Gyr, suggesting that the incidence of strong magnetism in massive WDs will be observed to decrease with age.

  15. Beam plasma interaction in strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Marlene; Kalman, Gabor J.; Kyrkos, Stamatios; Donko, Zoltan

    2006-04-01

    The well-known problem of beam-plasma instability acquires new aspects when one or both of the two components (the beam and the plasma) are strongly interacting. We have now theoretically considered the case when the plasma is in the solid phase and forms a lattice. In this situation, the inherent anisotropy of the lattice leads to a coupling between the longitudinal and transverse polarizations. One of the novel features of the beam-plasma instability in this scenario is the possible excitation of transverse modes, which should be an experimentally observable signature of the instability. We have initially concentrated on a 2D toy model with the beam lying in the lattice plane. At the same time, we have initiated a molecular dynamics simulation program for studying various aspects of the penetration of a beam into a plasma lattice. The beam parameters can be adjusted in order to see the effects of increasing coupling strength within the beam and to distinguish between collective phenomena and scattering on individual particles. When both components are strongly interacting, a number of remarkable phenomena—trapping of beam particles, creation of dislocations, local melting of the lattice—may be observed.

  16. Cardiac Strong Inward Rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Anumonwo, Justus MB; Lopatin, Anatoli N

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac IK1 and IKACh are the major potassium currents displaying classical strong inward rectification, a unique property that is critical for their roles in cardiac excitability. In the last fifteen years, research on IK1 and IKACh has been propelled by the cloning of the underlying inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels, the discovery of the molecular mechanism of strong rectification and the linking of a number of disorders of cardiac excitability to defects in genes encoding Kir channels. Disease-causing mutations in Kir genes have been shown experimentally to affect one or more of the following channel properties: structure, assembly, trafficking and regulation, with the ultimate effect of a gain-, or a loss-of-function of the channel. It is now established that IK1 and IKACh channels are heterotetramers of Kir2 and Kir3 subunits, respectively. Each homomeric Kir channel has distinct biophysical and regulatory properties, and individual Kir subunits often display different patterns of regional, cellular and membrane distribution. These differences are thought to underlie important variations in the physiological properties of IK1 and IKACh. It has become increasingly clear that the contribution of IK1 and IKACh channels to cardiac electrical activity goes beyond their long recognized role in the stabilization of resting membrane potential and shaping the late phase of action potential repolarization in individual myocytes, but extends to being critical elements determining the overall electrical stability of the heart. PMID:19703462

  17. Theory of the strongly disordered Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altland, Alexander; Bagrets, Dmitry

    2016-02-01

    In disordered Weyl semimetals, mechanisms of topological origin lead to novel mechanisms of transport, which manifest themselves in unconventional types of electromagnetic response. Prominent examples of transport phenomena particular to the Weyl context include the anomalous Hall effect, the chiral magnetic effect, and the formation of totally field-dominated regimes of transport in which the longitudinal conductance is proportional to an external magnetic field. In this paper, we discuss the manifestations of these phenomena at large length scales including the cases of strong disorder and/or magnetic field which are beyond the scope of diagrammatic perturbation theory. Our perhaps most striking finding is the identification of a regime of drift-diffusion transport where diffusion at short scales gives way to effectively ballistic dynamics at large scales before a reentrance to diffusion takes place at yet larger scales. We show that this regime plays a key role in understanding the interplay of the various types of magnetoresponse of the system. Our results are obtained by describing the strongly disordered system in terms of an effective field theory of Chern-Simons type. The paper contains a self-contained derivation of this theory and a discussion of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium (noise) transport phenomena following from it.

  18. Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification behind Strong Shock Waves in GRB and SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2012-09-01

    Using three-dimensional (special relativistic) magnetohydrodynamics simulations, the amplification of magnetic field behind strong shock wave is studied. In supernova remnants and gamma-ray bursts, strong shock waves propagate through an inhomogeneous density field. When the shock wave hit a density bump or density dent, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is induced that cause a deformation of the shock front. The deformed shock leaves vorticity behind the shock wave that amplifies the magnetic field due to the stretching of field lines.

  19. CdTe X-ray detectors under strong optical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cola, Adriano; Farella, Isabella

    2014-11-17

    The perturbation behaviour of Ohmic and Schottky CdTe detectors under strong optical pulses is investigated. To this scope, the electric field profiles and the induced charge transients are measured, thus simultaneously addressing fixed and free charges properties, interrelated by one-carrier trapping. The results elucidate the different roles of the contacts and deep levels, both under dark and strong irradiation conditions, and pave the way for the improvement of detector performance control under high X-ray fluxes.

  20. Dispersion in the Presence of Strong Transverse Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, Ralph; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    To minimize emittance growth in a long linac, it is necessary to control the wakefields by correcting the beam orbit excursions. In addition, the particle energy is made to vary along the length of the bunch to introduce a damping, known as the BNS damping, to the beam break-up effect. In this paper, we use a two-particle model to examine the relative magnitudes of the various orbit and dispersion functions involved. The results are applied to calculate the effect of a closed orbit bump and a misaligned structure. It is shown that wake-induced dispersion is an important contribution to the beam dynamics in long linacs with strong wakefields like SLC.

  1. Nonlinear parallel momentum transport in strong electrostatic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wen, Tiliang; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-05-01

    Most existing theoretical studies of momentum transport focus on calculating the Reynolds stress based on quasilinear theory, without considering the nonlinear momentum flux- ⟨ v ˜ r n ˜ u ˜ ∥ ⟩ . However, a recent experiment on TORPEX found that the nonlinear toroidal momentum flux induced by blobs makes a significant contribution as compared to the Reynolds stress [Labit et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032308 (2011)]. In this work, the nonlinear parallel momentum flux in strong electrostatic turbulence is calculated by using a three dimensional Hasegawa-Mima equation, which is relevant for tokamak edge turbulence. It is shown that the nonlinear diffusivity is smaller than the quasilinear diffusivity from Reynolds stress. However, the leading order nonlinear residual stress can be comparable to the quasilinear residual stress, and so may be important to intrinsic rotation in tokamak edge plasmas. A key difference from the quasilinear residual stress is that parallel fluctuation spectrum asymmetry is not required for nonlinear residual stress.

  2. Crustal failure on icy Moons from a strong tidal encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Giannella, David; Shaw, John G.; Ebinger, Cynthia

    2016-09-01

    Close tidal encounters among large planetesimals and Moons should have been more common than grazing or normal impacts. Using a mass spring model within an N-body simulation, we simulate the deformation of the surface of an elastic spherical body caused by a close parabolic tidal encounter with a body that has similar mass as that of the primary body. Such an encounter can induce sufficient stress on the surface to cause brittle failure of an icy crust and simulated fractures can extend a large fraction of the radius of body. Strong tidal encounters may be responsible for the formation of long graben complexes and chasmata in ancient terrain of icy Moons such as Dione, Tethys, Ariel and Charon.

  3. Spontaneous parity violation and SUSY strong gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ohki, Hiroshi

    2012-07-27

    We suggest simple models of spontaneous parity violation in supersymmetric strong gauge theory. We focus on left-right symmetric model and investigate vacuum with spontaneous parity violation. Non-perturbative effects are calculable in supersymmetric gauge theory, and we suggest new models. Our models show confinement, so that we try to understand them by using a dual description of the theory. The left-right symmetry breaking and electroweak symmetry breaking are simultaneously occurred with the suitable energy scale hierarchy. This structure has several advantages compared to the MSSM. The scale of the Higgs mass (left-right breaking scale) and that of VEVs are different, so the SUSY little hierarchy problems are absent. The second model also induces spontaneous supersymmetry breaking.

  4. Strong nonlinear current–voltage behaviour in iron oxyborate

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yuanjun; Xu, Yingying; Song, Yujun; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Rongming

    2014-11-15

    Strong nonlinear resistance has been found in the charge ordered ferroelectric iron oxyborate (Fe{sub 2}OBO{sub 3}) with a high dielectric constant and giant converse magnetoelectric effect. In low temperature range the I-V nonlinearity increases quickly with decreasing temperature. Transport measurements on polycrystalline and single crystal Fe{sub 2}OBO{sub 3} indicate that the nonlinearity is not induced by grain boundaries. The nonlinear I-V behavior is intrinsically correlated with the charge order phase melting in Fe{sub 2}OBO{sub 3} by detailed in-situ TEM investigations. These results provide an insight into structure-activity relationship of resistance switching effects at atomic and electric scales, which is essential for its potential application as varistors and storage media.

  5. Strong correlations in gravity and biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotov, Dmitry

    The unifying theme of this dissertation is the use of correlations. In the first part (chapter 2), we investigate correlations in quantum field theories in de Sitter space. In the second part (chapters 3,4,5), we use correlations to investigate a theoretical proposal that real (observed in nature) transcriptional networks of biological organisms are operating at a critical point in their phase diagram. In chapter 2 we study the infrared dependence of correlators in various external backgrounds. Using the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism we calculate loop corrections to the correlators in the case of the Poincare patch and the complete de Sitter space. In the case of the Poincare patch, the loop correction modifies the behavior of the correlator at large distances. In the case of the complete de Sitter space, the loop correction has a strong dependence on the infrared cutoff in the past. It grows linearly with time, suggesting that at some point the correlations become strong and break the symmetry of the classical background. In chapter 3 we derive the signatures of critical behavior in a model organism, the embryo of Drosophila melanogaster. They are: strong correlations in the fluctuations of different genes, a slowing of dynamics, long range correlations in space, and departures from a Gaussian distribution of these fluctuations. We argue that these signatures are observed experimentally. In chapter 4 we construct an effective theory for the zero mode in this system. This theory is different from the standard Landau-Ginsburg description. It contains gauge fields (the result of the broken translational symmetry inside the cell), which produce observable contributions to the two-point function of the order parameter. We show that the behavior of the two-point function for the network of N genes is described by the action of a relativistic particle moving on the surface of the N - 1 dimensional sphere. We derive a theoretical bound on the decay of the correlations and

  6. Strong CP Violation in Large Scale Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Faccioli, P.; Millo, R.

    2007-11-19

    We explore the possibility of improving on the present experimental bounds on Strong CP violation, by studying processes in which the smallness of {theta} is compensated by the presence of some other very large scale. In particular, we study the response of the {theta} vacuum to large-scale magnetic fields, whose correlation lengths can be as large as the size of galaxy clusters. We find that, if strong interactions break CP, an external magnetic field would induce an electric vacuum polarization along the same direction. As a consequence, u,d-bar and d,u-bar quarks would accumulate in the opposite regions of the space, giving raise to an electric dipole moment. We estimate the magnitude of this effect both at T = 0 and for 0

  7. Local dissipation scales in strongly inhomogeneous turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Khandakar; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2014-11-01

    We have previously shown that the distribution of dissipation scales, Q (η) , is dependent on the shear-dissipation Reynolds number Res ≡ < ɛ > / (S2 ν) along the streamwise homogeneous direction. This dependency is further explored through a generalized theoretical framework linking Q (η) , with the two-point correlation function, as well as the Reynolds stress tensor orientation relative to the mean axes of principal deformation. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements were performed in a stationary turbulent flow past a backward facing step at Reynolds numbers 13,600, 9,000, and 5,500 based on the maximum velocity and step size. Q (η) were measured in all directions at different points in the measurement region with varying mean shear magnitude. Results show anisotropic Q (η) distributions strongly reflecting the anisotropy in the two-point correlation function and the Reynolds stress tensor. Based on these results the previous Res dependency is generalized to inhomogeneous directions while discussing the physical role of strong mean shear in inducing local anisotropy.

  8. Strongly nonlinear dynamics of electrolytes in large ac voltages.

    PubMed

    Højgaard Olesen, Laurits; Bazant, Martin Z; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-07-01

    We study the response of a model microelectrochemical cell to a large ac voltage of frequency comparable to the inverse cell relaxation time. To bring out the basic physics, we consider the simplest possible model of a symmetric binary electrolyte confined between parallel-plate blocking electrodes, ignoring any transverse instability or fluid flow. We analyze the resulting one-dimensional problem by matched asymptotic expansions in the limit of thin double layers and extend previous work into the strongly nonlinear regime, which is characterized by two features--significant salt depletion in the electrolyte near the electrodes and, at very large voltage, the breakdown of the quasiequilibrium structure of the double layers. The former leads to the prediction of "ac capacitive desalination" since there is a time-averaged transfer of salt from the bulk to the double layers, via oscillating diffusion layers. The latter is associated with transient diffusion limitation, which drives the formation and collapse of space-charge layers, even in the absence of any net Faradaic current through the cell. We also predict that steric effects of finite ion sizes (going beyond dilute-solution theory) act to suppress the strongly nonlinear regime in the limit of concentrated electrolytes, ionic liquids, and molten salts. Beyond the model problem, our reduced equations for thin double layers, based on uniformly valid matched asymptotic expansions, provide a useful mathematical framework to describe additional nonlinear responses to large ac voltages, such as Faradaic reactions, electro-osmotic instabilities, and induced-charge electrokinetic phenomena.

  9. Dynamical core polarization in strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zengxiu; Zhang, Bin; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    Core polarization plays an important role in both ionization and high harmonic generation processes of molecules driven by strong laser fields. With our recently developed three-dimensional time-dependent Hartree-Fock method, we investigate the orientation-dependent ionization of CO molecules. It is found that the full ionization results are in good agreement with the recent experiment. The comparisons between the full method and the single-active-orbital method show that although the core electrons are generally more tightly bound and contribute little to the total ionization yields, their dynamics cannot be ignored, which effectively modifies the behavior of electrons in the HOMO. By incorporating it into the SAO method, we identify that the dynamic core polarization plays an important role in the tunneling ionization of CO molecules, which is helpful for the future development of the tunneling ionization theory beyond the single active electron approximation. In order to further verify the role of core polarization, exact calculations are performed for the ionization of two-electron model systems by strong laser fields. The limitations of HF and the SAE are quantified and the tunneling ionization rate is shown improved with the core-polarization induced correction.

  10. Strong and electromagnetic interactions of heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Delbourgo, R.; Liu, D.

    1996-06-01

    It is possible to express all the strong and electromagnetic interactions of ground state hadrons in terms of a single coupling constant and the constituent quark masses {ital m}{sub {ital ud}}{approx_equal}0.34 GeV, {ital m}{sub {ital s}}{approx_equal}0.43 GeV, and {ital m}{sub {ital c}}{approx_equal}1.5 GeV by using spin-flavor relativistic supermultiplet theory. We show that this produces results which are generally accurate to within 10{percent}. We thereby predict widths and couplings of recently and soon-to-be discovered heavy hadrons. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications.

  12. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  13. Strong gravity and structure of topological solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, Yu. P.

    The unification of Skyrme and Faddeev chiral models describing baryons and leptons respectively as topological solitons is suggested within the framework of 16-spinor field ψ = ψ1 ⊕ ψ2 nonlinear model containing two 8-semispinors ψ1 and ψ2. Using Brioschi identity for 8-spinors and special structure of the Higgs potential V implying the spontaneous symmetry breaking, it is possible to realize topological soliton-like excitations of two kinds due to the choice of S2- or S3- manifolds as phase spaces. The interactions with electromagnetic, Yang--Mills and gravitational fields are exhibited through the extention of derivatives via gauge invariance principle. Specific inclusion in the Higgs potential of the Kretschmann gravitational invariant K = RμνσλRμνσλ/48 permits one to obtain the strong gravity behavior at small distances and guarantee the correspondence with Quantum Mechanics at large distances.

  14. Scaling of chaos in strongly nonlinear lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mulansky, Mario

    2014-06-15

    Although it is now understood that chaos in complex classical systems is the foundation of thermodynamic behavior, the detailed relations between the microscopic properties of the chaotic dynamics and the macroscopic thermodynamic observations still remain mostly in the dark. In this work, we numerically analyze the probability of chaos in strongly nonlinear Hamiltonian systems and find different scaling properties depending on the nonlinear structure of the model. We argue that these different scaling laws of chaos have definite consequences for the macroscopic diffusive behavior, as chaos is the microscopic mechanism of diffusion. This is compared with previous results on chaotic diffusion [M. Mulansky and A. Pikovsky, New J. Phys. 15, 053015 (2013)], and a relation between microscopic chaos and macroscopic diffusion is established.

  15. Strong mobility in weakly disordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We study transport of interacting particles in weakly disordered media. Our one-dimensional system includes (i) disorder, the hopping rate governing the movement of a particle between two neighboring lattice sites is inhomogeneous, and (ii) hard core interaction, the maximum occupancy at each site is one particle. We find that over a substantial regime, the root-mean-square displacement of a particle s grows superdiffusively with time t, {sigma}{approx}({epsilon}t){sup 2/3}, where {epsilon} is the disorder strength. Without disorder the particle displacement is subdiffusive, {sigma} {approx}t{sup 1/4}, and therefore disorder strongly enhances particle mobility. We explain this effect using scaling arguments, and verify the theoretical predictions through numerical simulations. Also, the simulations show that regardless of disorder strength, disorder leads to stronger mobility over an intermediate time regime.

  16. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  17. Bound states in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C. S.; Navarra, F. S.; Noronha, J.; Oliveira, E. G.; Ferreira Filho, L. G.

    2013-03-25

    We expect a strong magnetic field to be produced in the perpendicular direction to the reaction plane, in a noncentral heavy-ion collision . The strength of the magnetic field is estimated to be eB{approx}m{sup 2}{sub {pi}}{approx} 0.02 GeV{sup 2} at the RHIC and eB{approx} 15m{sup 2}{sub {pi}}{approx} 0.3 GeV{sup 2} at the LHC. We investigate the effects of the magnetic field on B{sup 0} and D{sup 0} mesons, focusing on the changes of the energy levels and of the mass of the bound states.

  18. Asymmetric fishnet metamaterials with strong optical activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jin, Wei; Dong, Xian-Zi; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the optical properties of mono- and double-layer asymmetric fishnet metamaterials with orientated elliptical holes, which exhibit exotic spectral and polarization rotating characteristics in the visible spectral range. Our results show that nontrivial orientations of the holes with respect to the reciprocal lattice vectors of the periodic lattice in both systems produce strong polarization rotation as well as additional enhanced optical transmission peaks. Analysis of the electromagnetic field distribution shows the unusual effect is produced by the spinning localized surface plasmon resonances due to the asymmetric geometry. High sensitivity of the hybridized mode on the dielectric spacing, the aspect ratio of the holes and the embedding media in double-layer structure is also observed. The dependence of spectral and polarization response on the orientation of the holes and the embedding media is useful for design of chiral metamaterials at optical frequencies and tailoring the polarization behavior of the metallic nano-structures.

  19. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications. PMID:20090749

  20. Origin of strong dispersion in Hubbard insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Jia, C. J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Wu, K.; Chen, C. -C.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-08-10

    Using cluster perturbation theory, we explain the origin of the strongly dispersive feature found at high binding energy in the spectral function of the Hubbard model. By comparing the Hubbard and $t₋J₋3s$ model spectra, we show that this dispersion does not originate from either coupling to spin fluctuations ($∝ J$ ) or the free hopping ($∝ t$ ). Instead, it should be attributed to a long-range, correlated hopping $∝ t²/U$ which allows an effectively free motion of the hole within the same antiferromagnetic sublattice. This origin explains both the formation of the high-energy anomaly in the single-particle spectrum and themore » sensitivity of the high-binding-energy dispersion to the next-nearest-neighbor hopping $t'$ .« less

  1. Origin of strong dispersion in Hubbard insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Jia, C. J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Wu, K.; Chen, C. -C.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-08-10

    Using cluster perturbation theory, we explain the origin of the strongly dispersive feature found at high binding energy in the spectral function of the Hubbard model. By comparing the Hubbard and $t₋J₋3s$ model spectra, we show that this dispersion does not originate from either coupling to spin fluctuations ($∝ J$ ) or the free hopping ($∝ t$ ). Instead, it should be attributed to a long-range, correlated hopping $∝ t²/U$ which allows an effectively free motion of the hole within the same antiferromagnetic sublattice. This origin explains both the formation of the high-energy anomaly in the single-particle spectrum and the sensitivity of the high-binding-energy dispersion to the next-nearest-neighbor hopping $t'$ .

  2. Utilizing Nanofabrication to Construct Strong, Luminescent Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Gang; Lu, Hong B.; McCready, David E.; Joly, Alan G.; Bovin, Jan-Olov

    2006-05-28

    Luminescent materials have been utilized widely in applications from lighting to sensing. The new development of technologies based on luminescence properties requires the materials to have high luminescence efficiency and mechanical strength. In this article, we report the fabrication of luminescent materials possessing high mechanical strength by nanofabrication with polyvinyl alcohol used as a stabilizer or coupling agent. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission microscope observations reveal that the nanocomposite sample contains ZnS and ZnO nanoparticles as well as kozoite and sodium nitrate. The mechanical strength and hardness of these nanocomposite materials are higher than polycarbonate and some carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites. Strong luminescence is observed in the new nanocomposites and the luminescence intensity does not degrade following up to 30 minutes of X-ray irradiation. Our results indicate that nanofabrication may provide a good method to improve the mechanical strength of luminescent materials for some applications in which high strength luminescent materials are needed.

  3. Disordered weak and strong topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koji; Ohtsuki, Tomi; Imura, Ken-Ichiro

    2013-06-01

    A global phase diagram of disordered weak and strong topological insulators is established numerically. As expected, the location of the phase boundaries is renormalized by disorder, a feature recognized in the study of the so-called topological Anderson insulator. Here, we report unexpected quantization, i.e., robustness against disorder of the conductance peaks on these phase boundaries. Another highlight of the work is on the emergence of two subregions in the weak topological insulator phase under disorder. According to the size dependence of the conductance, the surface states are either robust or "defeated" in the two subregions. The nature of the two distinct types of behavior is further revealed by studying the Lyapunov exponents.

  4. Is It Possible to Predict Strong Earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, Y. S.; Ryabinin, G. V.; Solovyeva, A. B.; Timashev, S. F.

    2015-07-01

    The possibility of earthquake prediction is one of the key open questions in modern geophysics. We propose an approach based on the analysis of common short-term candidate precursors (2 weeks to 3 months prior to strong earthquake) with the subsequent processing of brain activity signals generated in specific types of rats (kept in laboratory settings) who reportedly sense an impending earthquake a few days prior to the event. We illustrate the identification of short-term precursors using the groundwater sodium-ion concentration data in the time frame from 2010 to 2014 (a major earthquake occurred on 28 February 2013) recorded at two different sites in the southeastern part of the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The candidate precursors are observed as synchronized peaks in the nonstationarity factors, introduced within the flicker-noise spectroscopy framework for signal processing, for the high-frequency component of both time series. These peaks correspond to the local reorganizations of the underlying geophysical system that are believed to precede strong earthquakes. The rodent brain activity signals are selected as potential "immediate" (up to 2 weeks) deterministic precursors because of the recent scientific reports confirming that rodents sense imminent earthquakes and the population-genetic model of K irshvink (Soc Am 90, 312-323, 2000) showing how a reliable genetic seismic escape response system may have developed over the period of several hundred million years in certain animals. The use of brain activity signals, such as electroencephalograms, in contrast to conventional abnormal animal behavior observations, enables one to apply the standard "input-sensor-response" approach to determine what input signals trigger specific seismic escape brain activity responses.

  5. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    SciTech Connect

    Willatzen, M.; Pors, A.; Gravesen, J.

    2012-08-15

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schroedinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important to understand the influence of curvature effects in waveguides. In this work, we demonstrate analytically strong curvature effects for the eigenvalue spectrum of the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions in cases where the waveguide cross section is a circular sector. It is found that the linear-in-curvature contribution originates from parity symmetry breaking of eigenstates in circular-sector tori and hence vanishes in a torus with a complete circular cross section. The same strong curvature effect is not present in waveguides subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions where curvature contributions contribute to second-order in the curvature only. We demonstrate this finding by considering wave propagation in a circular-sector torus corresponding to Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, respectively. Results for relative eigenfrequency shifts and modes are determined and compared with three-dimensional finite element method results. Good agreement is found between the present analytical method using a combination of differential geometry with perturbation theory and finite element results for a large range of curvature ratios.

  6. Bodrum Strong Motion Network, Mugla, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcik, H. A.; Tanircan, G.; Korkmaz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf of Gökova is located in southwestern Turkey near the Aegean Sea and surrounded by Datça Peninsula to the south, the island of Kos to the west and Bodrum Peninsula to the north. The Bodrum peninsula with a population of one million in summer season is one of the most populated touristic centers of Turkey. This region is also surrounded by numerous active seismic entities such as Ula-Ören Fault Zone, Gökova Graben etc.. and demonstrates high seismic hazard. In the past, many destructive earthquakes have occurred in southwestern Turkey. One of the destructive historical earthquakes is 1493 Kos event (Mw=6.9) caused heavy damage in Bodrum. In the instrumental period seismic activity in the Gökova region includes the Ms>6.0 earthquakes of 23 April 1933 (Ms=6.4), 23 May 1941 (Ms=6.0), 13 December 1941 (Ms=6.5) events. Intense earthquake activity (Mw5+) occurred in Gulf of Gökova in August 2004 and January 2005. Considering the high seismicity and population of this region, a strong ground motion monitoring system stationed in dense settlements in the Bodrum Peninsula: Bodrum, Turgutreis, Yalıkavak, Çiftlik and Ortakent was deployed on June 2015. The network consists of 5 strong motion recorders, has been set up with the aim of monitoring of regional earthquakes, collecting accurate and reliable data for engineering and scientific research purposes, in particular to provide input for future earthquake rapid reporting and early warning implementation projects on urban environments in the Bodrum peninsula and the surrounding areas. In this poster presentation, we briefly introduce the Bodrum Network and discuss our future plans for further developments.

  7. Building Strong Geoscience Departments: A Workshop Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, C. A.; MacDonald, R. H.; Richardson, R.; Feiss, P. G.

    2005-12-01

    The strength of Geoscience departments and their programs lies at the heart of developing a strong geoscience workforce capable of meeting the wide variety of challenges facing our society. In February 2005, 28 geoscience faculty, department chairs, and senior administrators from Ph.D. granting institutions, comprehensive and regional institutions, liberal arts colleges, and community colleges met to share information on strategies that had strengthened their own departments and to brainstorm ideas for collective action that would strengthen departments across the United States. Participants in the NSF funded workshop recognized that these are challenging times for geoscience departments and that a number of departments have been closed or are facing reorganization. However, they concluded that departments across the full spectrum of institutional types have more in common than was previously realized and that there are many best practices and successful innovations for meeting challenges that departments can learn from one another. As a step toward promoting this sharing, workshop participants created a document describing characteristics of thriving geoscience departments. This document, as well as: essays describing the variety of ways in which participants' departments have met challenges and opportunities; a bibliography of papers, reports and websites of use to departmental leaders; and resources for departmental leadership and planning, can be found at the 'Building Strong Geoscience Departments' website (serc.carleton.edu/departments). The workshop agenda, powerpoint slides and posters presented at the workshop, discussion summaries, and participant list can also be found at the website. Workshop participants have invited all departments engaged in teaching geoscience to participate in further discussion and sharing beginning with sessions at professional society meetings this fall. An advisory board has been formed to move forward in implementing the

  8. Cyclotron resonance cooling by strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Tagcuhi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioka

    1995-12-31

    Reduction of energy spread of electron beam is very important to increase a total output radiation power in free electron lasers. Although several cooling systems of particle beams such as a stochastic cooling are successfully operated in the accelerator physics, these cooling mechanisms are very slow and they are only applicable to high energy charged particle beams of ring accelerators. We propose here a new concept of laser cooling system by means of cyclotron resonance. Electrons being in cyclotron motion under a strong magnetic field can resonate with circular polarized electromagnetic field, and the resonance take place selectively depending on the velocity of the electrons. If cyclotron frequency of electrons is equal to the frequency of the electromagnetic field, they absorb the electromagnetic field energy strongly, but the other electrons remain unchanged. The absorbed energy will be converted to transverse kinetic energy, and the energy will be dumped into the radiation energy through bremastrahlung. To build a cooling system, we must use two laser beams, where one of them is counter-propagating and the other is co-propagating with electron beam. When the frequency of the counter-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of fast electrons and the co-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of slow electrons, the energy of two groups will approach and the cooling will be achieved. We solve relativistic motions of electrons with relativistic radiation dumping force, and estimate the cooling rate of this mechanism. We will report optimum parameters for the electron beam cooling system for free electron lasers.

  9. Induction of strong gravitation and the hierarchical picture of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, V. F.

    1983-09-01

    A nontraditional approach is taken to strong gravitation, i.e., from the point of view of gravitation induction. A 'cutoff factor' is calculated in the ase of which the Salam gravitational constant and the cosmological term of strong gravitation are induced due to zero oscillations of vacuum in curved space. Attention is given to the induction of the strong-gravitational constant due to quantum effects in curved space. The relation between gravitation induction and the hierarchical structure of the world is examined.

  10. A strong integrated strength and toughness artificial nacre based on dopamine cross-linked graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Li, Mingzhu; Liu, Jiyang; Wang, Ben; Zhang, Chuck; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Qunfeng

    2014-09-23

    Demands of the strong integrated materials have substantially increased across various industries. Inspired by the relationship of excellent integration of mechanical properties and hierarchical nano/microscale structure of the natural nacre, we have developed a strategy for fabricating the strong integrated artificial nacre based on graphene oxide (GO) sheets by dopamine cross-linking via evaporation-induced assembly process. The tensile strength and toughness simultaneously show 1.5 and 2 times higher than that of natural nacre. Meanwhile, the artificial nacre shows high electrical conductivity. This type of strong integrated artificial nacre has great potential applications in aerospace, flexible supercapacitor electrodes, artificial muscle, and tissue engineering. PMID:25106494

  11. Effects of Strong Static Magnetic Fields on Amphibian Development and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Satomi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Furuno, Nobuaki; Yamashita, Masamichi; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-07-01

    This investigation attempts to clarify the effects of strong vertical and static magnetic fields (SMFs) of 11-15 T on Xenopus laevis development and on Xotx2 (an important regulator of fore- and midbrain morphogenesis) and Xag1 (essential for cement gland formation) gene expression. Results showed that (1) a strong SMF significantly retarded normal development and induced microcephaly, two heads, abnormal cement glands and multiple malformations, indicating that SMF inhibits normal embryonic development, (2) a strong SMF suppressed Xotx2 and Xag1 expression.

  12. Non-equilibrium magnetic interactions in strongly correlated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Secchi, A.; Brener, S.; Lichtenstein, A.I.; Katsnelson, M.I.

    2013-06-15

    We formulate a low-energy theory for the magnetic interactions between electrons in the multi-band Hubbard model under non-equilibrium conditions determined by an external time-dependent electric field which simulates laser-induced spin dynamics. We derive expressions for dynamical exchange parameters in terms of non-equilibrium electronic Green functions and self-energies, which can be computed, e.g., with the methods of time-dependent dynamical mean-field theory. Moreover, we find that a correct description of the system requires, in addition to exchange, a new kind of magnetic interaction, that we name twist exchange, which formally resembles Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya coupling, but is not due to spin–orbit, and is actually due to an effective three-spin interaction. Our theory allows the evaluation of the related time-dependent parameters as well. -- Highlights: •We develop a theory for magnetism of strongly correlated systems out of equilibrium. •Our theory is suitable for laser-induced ultrafast magnetization dynamics. •We write time-dependent exchange parameters in terms of electronic Green functions. •We find a new magnetic interaction, a “twist exchange”. •We give general expressions for magnetic noise in itinerant-electron systems.

  13. Coupling of strongly localized graphene plasmons to molecular vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Damon; Li, Yilei; Yan, Hugen; Meng, Xiang; Zhu, Wenjuan; Osgood, Richard; Heinz, Tony; Avouris, Phaedon

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we first present a determination of the out-of-plane confinement of the plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. Using light with a free-space wavelength of ~ 6 μ m, we excite plasmons in graphene nanoribbons that are ~ 100 nm wide. A red-shift in the plasmon frequency is induced by a thin layer of Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) adsorbed onto the nanoribbons surface due to dielectric screening effect. With increasing thickness of the PMMA layer, we observe a saturation of the frequency shift, from which we deduce an out-of-plane field plasmon field decay length of ~ 10 nm. The strongly confined plasmons in graphene produce significant enhancement of the field intensity. We show that this enhancement strengthens the coupling of graphene plasmon to vibrations in the PMMA molecules. The enhanced interaction is manifested through induced transparency in the graphene plasmon optical response when the plasmon and the vibrational frequencies are matched. We also show that this coupling is of an electromagnetic nature by comparing the evolution of the line shape as a function of the detuning of the two frequencies to simulations using the finite-difference time-domain method.

  14. Finding communities in networks in the strong and almost-strong sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafieri, Sonia; Caporossi, Gilles; Hansen, Pierre; Perron, Sylvain; Costa, Alberto

    2012-04-01

    Finding communities, or clusters or modules, in networks can be done by optimizing an objective function defined globally and/or by specifying conditions which must be satisfied by all communities. Radicchi [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USAPNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.0400054101 101, 2658 (2004)] define a susbset of vertices of a network to be a community in the strong sense if each vertex of that subset has a larger inner degree than its outer degree. A partition in the strong sense has only strong communities. In this paper we first define an enumerative algorithm to list all partitions in the strong sense of a network of moderate size. The results of this algorithm are given for the Zachary karate club data set, which is solved by hand, as well as for several well-known real-world problems of the literature. Moreover, this algorithm is slightly modified in order to apply it to larger networks, keeping only partitions with the largest number of communities. It is shown that some of the partitions obtained are informative, although they often have only a few communities, while they fail to give any information in other cases having only one community. It appears that degree 2 vertices play a big role in forcing large inhomogeneous communities. Therefore, a weakening of the strong condition is proposed and explored: we define a partition in the almost-strong sense by substituting a nonstrict inequality to a strict one in the definition of strong community for all vertices of degree 2. Results, for the same set of problems as before, then give partitions with a larger number of communities and are more informative.

  15. Arabidopsis Mutant bik1 Exhibits Strong Resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Bi, Kai; He, Zhangchao; Gao, Zhixiao; Zhao, Ying; Fu, Yanping; Cheng, Jiasen; Xie, Jiatao; Jiang, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis-induced kinase1 (BIK1), a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, plays an important role in resistance against pathogens and insects in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unknown whether BIK1 functions against Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate biotrophic protist that attacks cruciferous plants and induces gall formation on roots. Here, we investigated the potential roles of receptors FLS2, BAK1, and BIK1 in the infection of P. brassicae cruciferous plants. Wild-type plants, fls2, and bak1 mutants showed typical symptom on roots, and the galls were filled with large quantities of resting spores, while bik1 mutant plants exhibited strong resistance to P. brassicae. Compared with that of the wild-type plants, the root hair and cortical infection rate of bik1 mutant were significantly reduced by about 40–50%. A considerable portion of bik1 roots failed to form typical galls. Even if some small galls were formed, they were filled with multinucleate secondary plasmodia. The bik1 plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS) at infected roots than other mutants and wild-type plants. Exogenous salicylic acid (SA) treatment alleviated the clubroot symptoms in wild-type plants, and the expression of the SA signaling marker gene PR1 was significantly increased in bik1. Both sid2 (salicylic acid induction-deficient 2) and npr1-1 [non-expresser of PR genes that regulate systemic acquired resistance (SAR)] mutants showed increased susceptibility to P. brassicae compared with wild-type plants. These results suggest that the resistance of bik1 to P. brassicae is possibly mediated by SA inducible mechanisms. PMID:27679580

  16. Arabidopsis Mutant bik1 Exhibits Strong Resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Bi, Kai; He, Zhangchao; Gao, Zhixiao; Zhao, Ying; Fu, Yanping; Cheng, Jiasen; Xie, Jiatao; Jiang, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis-induced kinase1 (BIK1), a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, plays an important role in resistance against pathogens and insects in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unknown whether BIK1 functions against Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate biotrophic protist that attacks cruciferous plants and induces gall formation on roots. Here, we investigated the potential roles of receptors FLS2, BAK1, and BIK1 in the infection of P. brassicae cruciferous plants. Wild-type plants, fls2, and bak1 mutants showed typical symptom on roots, and the galls were filled with large quantities of resting spores, while bik1 mutant plants exhibited strong resistance to P. brassicae. Compared with that of the wild-type plants, the root hair and cortical infection rate of bik1 mutant were significantly reduced by about 40–50%. A considerable portion of bik1 roots failed to form typical galls. Even if some small galls were formed, they were filled with multinucleate secondary plasmodia. The bik1 plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS) at infected roots than other mutants and wild-type plants. Exogenous salicylic acid (SA) treatment alleviated the clubroot symptoms in wild-type plants, and the expression of the SA signaling marker gene PR1 was significantly increased in bik1. Both sid2 (salicylic acid induction-deficient 2) and npr1-1 [non-expresser of PR genes that regulate systemic acquired resistance (SAR)] mutants showed increased susceptibility to P. brassicae compared with wild-type plants. These results suggest that the resistance of bik1 to P. brassicae is possibly mediated by SA inducible mechanisms.

  17. Coulomb Bound States of Strongly Interacting Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, M. F.; Gullans, M. J.; Bienias, P.; Choi, S.; Martin, I.; Firstenberg, O.; Lukin, M. D.; Büchler, H. P.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    We show that two photons coupled to Rydberg states via electromagnetically induced transparency can interact via an effective Coulomb potential. This interaction gives rise to a continuum of two-body bound states. Within the continuum, metastable bound states are distinguished in analogy with quasibound states tunneling through a potential barrier. We find multiple branches of metastable bound states whose energy spectrum is governed by the Coulomb potential, thus obtaining a photonic analogue of the hydrogen atom. Under certain conditions, the wave function resembles that of a diatomic molecule in which the two polaritons are separated by a finite "bond length." These states propagate with a negative group velocity in the medium, allowing for a simple preparation and detection scheme, before they slowly decay to pairs of bound Rydberg atoms.

  18. Momentum transport in strongly coupled anisotropic plasmas in the presence of strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finazzo, Stefano Ivo; Critelli, Renato; Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    We present a holographic perspective on momentum transport in strongly coupled, anisotropic non-Abelian plasmas in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We compute the anisotropic heavy quark drag forces and Langevin diffusion coefficients and also the anisotropic shear viscosities for two different holographic models, namely, a top-down deformation of strongly coupled N =4 super-Yang-Mills theory triggered by an external Abelian magnetic field, and a bottom-up Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton (EMD) model which is able to provide a quantitative description of lattice QCD thermodynamics with (2 +1 ) flavors at both zero and nonzero magnetic fields. We find that, in general, energy loss and momentum diffusion through strongly coupled anisotropic plasmas are enhanced by a magnetic field being larger in transverse directions than in the direction parallel to the magnetic field. Moreover, the anisotropic shear viscosity coefficient is smaller in the direction of the magnetic field than in the plane perpendicular to the field, which indicates that strongly coupled anisotropic plasmas become closer to the perfect fluid limit along the magnetic field. We also present, in the context of the EMD model, holographic predictions for the entropy density and the crossover critical temperature in a wider region of the (T , B ) phase diagram that has not yet been covered by lattice simulations. Our results for the transport coefficients in the phenomenologically realistic magnetic EMD model could be readily used as inputs in numerical codes for magnetohydrodynamics.

  19. Strong Motion Seismograph Based On MEMS Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Y.; Hu, X.

    2013-12-01

    The MEMS strong motion seismograph we developed used the modularization method to design its software and hardware.It can fit various needs in different application situation.The hardware of the instrument is composed of a MEMS accelerometer,a control processor system,a data-storage system,a wired real-time data transmission system by IP network,a wireless data transmission module by 3G broadband,a GPS calibration module and power supply system with a large-volumn lithium battery in it. Among it,the seismograph's sensor adopted a three-axis with 14-bit high resolution and digital output MEMS accelerometer.Its noise level just reach about 99μg/√Hz and ×2g to ×8g dynamically selectable full-scale.Its output data rates from 1.56Hz to 800Hz. Its maximum current consumption is merely 165μA,and the device is so small that it is available in a 3mm×3mm×1mm QFN package. Furthermore,there is access to both low pass filtered data as well as high pass filtered data,which minimizes the data analysis required for earthquake signal detection. So,the data post-processing can be simplified. Controlling process system adopts a 32-bit low power consumption embedded ARM9 processor-S3C2440 and is based on the Linux operation system.The processor's operating clock at 400MHz.The controlling system's main memory is a 64MB SDRAM with a 256MB flash-memory.Besides,an external high-capacity SD card data memory can be easily added.So the system can meet the requirements for data acquisition,data processing,data transmission,data storage,and so on. Both wired and wireless network can satisfy remote real-time monitoring, data transmission,system maintenance,status monitoring or updating software.Linux was embedded and multi-layer designed conception was used.The code, including sensor hardware driver,the data acquisition,earthquake setting out and so on,was written on medium layer.The hardware driver consist of IIC-Bus interface driver, IO driver and asynchronous notification driver. The

  20. Predictive Capability for Strongly Correlated Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cyrus Umrigar

    2012-05-09

    Diffusion Monte Carlo methods can give highly accurate results for correlated systems, provided that well optimized trial wave functions with accurate nodal surfaces are employed. The Cornell team developed powerful methods for optimizing all the parameters within a multi-determinant Slater-Jastrow form of the wave function. These include the Jastrow parameters within a flexible electron-electron-nucleus form of the Jastrow function, the parameters multiplying the configuration state functions, the orbital parameters and the basis exponents. The method optimizes a linear combination of the energy and the variance of the local energy. The optimal parameters are found iteratively by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix in the space spanned by the wave function and its first-order derivatives, making use of a strong zero-variance principle. It is highly robust, has become the method of choice for correlated wave function optimization and has been adopted by other QMC groups. This optimization method was used on the first-row atoms and homonuclear diatomic molecules, demonstrating that molecular well depths can be obtained with near chemical accuracy quite systematically at the diffusion Monte Carlo level for these systems. In addition the complete ground-state potential energy curve of the C{sub 2} molecule up to the dissociation limit was obtained, and, size consistency and broken spin-symmetry issues in quantum Monte Carlo calculations were studied. The method was used with a eight-electrons-in-eight-orbitals complete active space CAS(8,8) wave function to study the relative energies of the monocyclic and bicyclic forms of m-benzyne. The DMC calculations show that the monocyclic structure is lower in energy than the bicyclic structure by 1.92 kcal/ mole, which is in excellent agreement with the best coupled cluster results (CCSD(T)) and in disagreement with the CCSD results. QMC methods have for the most part been used only for ground states of a given symmetry. We

  1. Electronic properties of strongly correlated layered oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Cheng

    The two-dimensional electronic systems (2DESs) have kept surprising physicists for the last few decades. Examples include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, cuprate superconductivity, and graphene. This thesis is intended to develop suitable theoretical tools which can be generalized to study new types of 2DESs with strong correlation feature. The first part of this thesis describes the investigation of heterostructures made by Mott insulators. This work is mostly motivated by the significant improvement of techniques for layer-by-layer growth of transition metal oxides in the last few years. We construct a toy model based on generalized Hubbard model complemented with long-ranged Coulomb interaction, and we study it by Hartree-Fock theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and Thomas-Fermi theory. We argue that interesting 2D strongly correlated electronic systems can be created in such heterostructures under several conditions. Since these 2D systems are formed entirely due to the gap generated by electron-electron interaction, they are not addiabatically connected to a noninteracting electron states. This feature makes these 2D systems distinguish from the ones created in semiconductor heterostructures, and they may be potential systems having non-Fermi liquid behaviors. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the study of collective excitations in high-temperature superconductors. One important achievement in this work is to develop a time-dependent mean-field theory for t -- U -- J -- V model, an effective low energy model for cuprates. The time-dependent mean-field theory is proven to be identical to the generalized random-phase approximation (GRPA) which includes both the bubble and ladder diagrams. We propose that the famous 41 meV magnetic resonance mode observed in the inelastic neutron scattering measurements is a collective mode arising from a conjugation relation, which has been overlooked in previous work, between the antiferromagnetic

  2. Strong transverse coupling in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, G; Carson, J; Edwards, Don; Gelfand, N; Harding, D; Johnson, T; Johnstone, J; Martens, M; Sen, T; Syphers, Mike

    2003-03-01

    The Tevatron was designed with an extensive set of correction and adjustment magnets built into the spool pieces in recognition of the circumstance that a superconducting synchrotron was not as easy to modify as its conventional forebearers. Recently, concern has mounted at the high excitation of the skew quadrupole correctors. The purpose of this note is to account for this situation. When slow extraction was attempted from the Main Ring in the summer of 1970 horizontal-vertical coupling prevented adequate transverse oscillation growth for efficient slow spill. This situation was corrected by an 8 mrad roll of each of twelve equi-spaced quadrupoles [1]. In order to avoid a repetition of this problem in the Tevatron, an extremely strong skew quadrupole circuit was built in at the outset. When the Tevatron was commissioned only 4$ of the capability of this circuit was required. Now, 20 years later, the excitation of this skew quadrupole circuit is approximately 60%. Other skew quadrupole correctors were installed in the neighborhood of the long straight sections, and for a variety of reasons the number of elements in the strong circuit was reduced from 48 to 42. These are relatively minor changes in the present context. Recall that in the normal Tevatron tuning process the skew quad circuits are adjusted to minimize the difference between the horizontal and vertical tunes to the level of {Delta}{nu}{sub min} {approx} 0.003. Normally the horizontal-vertical coupling is not observed directly by orbit measurements during this procedure. it was recognized that the strength of the skew quadrupole settings would imply an uncorrected minimum tune difference of 0.2 units. Clearly, with the skew quad circuit turned off the coupling of the orbital motion should be easily observable. In the following sections, the authors describe the recent Tevatron studies that exhibit the transverse coupling and the analyses that link these observations to the long term development of a

  3. Developing Strong Geoscience Programs and Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Manduca, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Strong geoscience programs are essential for preparing future geoscientists and developing a broad public understanding of our science. Faculty working as a department team can create stronger programs than individual faculty working alone. Workshops sponsored by Project Kaleidoscope (www.pkal.org) on departmental planning in the geosciences have emphasized the importance of designing programs in the context of both departmental and student goals. Well-articulated goals form a foundation for designing curriculum, courses, and other departmental activities. Course/skill matrices have emerged as particularly valuable tools for analyzing how individual courses combine in a curriculum to meet learning goals. Integrated programs where students have opportunities to learn and use skills in multiple contexts have been developed at several institutions. Departments are leveraging synergies between courses to more effectively reach departmental goals and capitalize on opportunities in the larger campus environment. A full departmental program extends beyond courses and curriculum. Studies in physics (National Task Force on Undergraduate Physics, Hilborne, 2002) indicate the importance of activities such as recruiting able students, mentoring students, providing courses appropriate for pre-service K-12 teachers, assisting with professional development for a diversity of careers, providing opportunities for undergraduates to participate in research, and making connections with the local industries and businesses that employ graduates. PKAL workshop participants have articulated a wide variety of approaches to undergraduate research opportunities within and outside of class based on their departmental goals, faculty goals, and resources. Similarly, departments have a wide variety of strategies for developing productive synergies with campus-wide programs including those emphasizing writing skills, quantitative skills, and environmental studies. Mentoring and advising

  4. Interference Effects of Strongly Localized Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Ernesto Antonio

    We explore the possible role of quantum interference phenomena in conduction in the Variable Range Hopping, or deep insulating regime. The critical resistors in the Miller-Abrahams network are regarded as the phase coherent units. We consider a simple model of forward scattering paths (disregard backscattering) on a diagonal lattice. The hopping probability for non-resonant tunneling between two impurity sites, is computed numerically by evolving all directed Feynman paths in a disordered matrix of elastically scattering sites (intermediate impurities). The whole probability distribution for two dimensional samples is very broad, well fitted to a log-normal form. The average of the distribution increases linearly with the hopping length t, determining a global contribution to the localization length, coming from the interference part. The fluctuations grow with the hopping length as a non-trivial power law of t^{1over 3} . The system has a bound state which gives rise to the properties of the model. The exponents found are the same as those for directed polymers (DP) in a random media. Next we consider the effects of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the plane of the sample. The probability distribution for hopping is preserved in the field. We also find a positive magnetoconductance (MC) for small fields due to an increased localization length, in agreement with recent experiments. The features observed numerically are explained on the basis of the moment analysis, which suggests a single governing parameter for the interference effects. The effects of spin-orbit (SO) scattering are also studied (strong scattering limit). The interference contribution to the localization length is field independent in presence of SO. A small positive MC is found due to changes in the amplitude. Finally we investigate the problem of the universality of high moments in the strongly localized regime, by studying directed paths on a hierarchical lattice. We find non

  5. Thermal infrared anomalies of several strong earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting. PMID:24222728

  6. Strong Coulomb Coupling in the Todorov Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawin, M.; Cugnon, J.; Sazdjian, H.

    A positronium-like system with strong Coulomb coupling, considered in its pseudoscalar sector, is studied in the framework of relativistic quantum constraint dynamics with the Todorov choice for the potential. Case’s method of self-adjoint extension of singular potentials, which avoids explicit introduction of regularization cut-offs, is adopted. It is found that, as the coupling constant α increases, the bound state spectrum undergoes an abrupt change at the critical value α=αc=1/2. For α>αc, the mass spectrum displays, in addition to the existing states for α<αc, a new set of an infinite number of bound states concentrated in a narrow band starting at mass W=0; all the states have indefinitely oscillating wave functions near the origin. In the limit α→αc from above, the oscillations disappear and the narrow band of low-lying states shrinks to a single massless state with a mass gap with the rest of the spectrum. This state has the required properties to represent a Goldstone boson and to signal spontaneous breakdown of chiral symmetry.

  7. Emergent behavior in strongly correlated electron systems.

    PubMed

    Pines, David

    2016-09-01

    I describe early work on strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) from the perspective of a theoretical physicist who, while a participant in their reductionist top-down beginnings, is now part of the paradigm change to a bottom-up 'emergent' approach with its focus on using phenomenology to find the organizing principles responsible for their emergent behavior disclosed by experiment-and only then constructing microscopic models that incorporate these. After considering the organizing principles responsible for the emergence of plasmons, quasiparticles, and conventional superconductivity in SCES, I consider their application to three of SCES's sister systems, the helium liquids, nuclei, and the nuclear matter found in neutron stars. I note some recent applications of the random phase approximation and examine briefly the role that paradigm change is playing in two central problems in our field: understanding the emergence and subsequent behavior of heavy electrons in Kondo lattice materials; and finding the mechanism for the unconventional superconductivity found in heavy electron, organic, cuprate, and iron-based materials. PMID:27484183

  8. Binary Polymer Brushes of Strongly Immiscible Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chu, Elza; Babar, Tashnia; Bruist, Michael F; Sidorenko, Alexander

    2015-06-17

    The phenomenon of microphase separation is an example of self-assembly in soft matter and has been observed in block copolymers (BCPs) and similar materials (i.e., supramolecular assemblies (SMAs) and homo/block copolymer blends (HBCs)). In this study, we use microphase separation to construct responsive polymer brushes that collapse to generate periodic surfaces. This is achieved by a chemical reaction between the minor block (10%, poly(4-vinylpyridine)) of the block copolymer and a substrate. The major block of polystyrene (PS) forms mosaic-like arrays of grafted patches that are 10-20 nm in size. Depending on the nature of the assembly (SMA, HBC, or neat BCP) and annealing method (exposure to vapors of different solvents or heating above the glass transition temperature), a range of "mosaic" brushes with different parameters can be obtained. Successive grafting of a secondary polymer (polyacrylamide, PAAm) results in the fabrication of binary polymer brushes (BPBs). Upon being exposed to specific selective solvents, BPBs may adopt different conformations. The surface tension and adhesion of the binary brush are governed by the polymer occupying the top stratum. The "mosaic" brush approach allows for a combination of strongly immiscible polymers in one brush. This facilitates substantial contrast in the surface properties upon switching, previously only possible for substrates composed of predetermined nanostructures. We also demonstrate a possible application of such PS/PAAm brushes in a tunable bioadhesion-bioadhesive (PS on top) or nonbioadhesive (PAAm on top) surface as revealed by Escherichia coli bacterial seeding.

  9. Dispersion discontinuities of strong collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1970-01-01

    Linear fluid equations are used to estimate wave train properties of strong collisionless shocks. Fast shocks exhibit several dispersion changes with increasing Mach number. For perpendicular propagation into a finite-beta plasma, an ion cyclotron radius trailing wave train exists only for (M sub F)2 is smaller than 2. Oblique fast shocks have a leading ion inertia wave train if M sub A is smaller than root of M(+)/M(-) cos theta/2 and a trailing electron inertia train if M sub A is greater than root of M(+)/M(-) cos theta/2. If the downstream sound speed exceeds the flow speed, linear wave theory predicts a trailing ion acoustic structure which probably resides within the magnetic shock. For a turbulent shock model in which an effective electron-ion collision frequency exceeds the lower hybrid frequency, ions decouple from the magnetic field; the shock wave train now trails with electron inertia and electron gyroradius lengths. Comparisons of this turbulent model and observations on the earth's bow shock are made.

  10. Delineating parton distributions and the strong coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Reya, E.

    2014-04-29

    In this study, global fits for precision determinations of parton distributions, together with the highly correlated strong coupling αs, are presented up to next-to-next-to- leading order (NNLO) of QCD utilizing most world data (charm and jet production data are used where theoretically possible), except Tevatron gauge boson production data and LHC data which are left for genuine predictions. This is done within the 'dynamical' (valencelike input at Q02 = 0.8 GeV2 ) and 'standard' (input at Q02 = 2 GeV2) approach. The stability and reliability of the results are ensured by including nonperturbative higher-twist terms, nuclear corrections as well as target mass corrections, and by applying various (Q2, W2) cuts on available data. In addition, the Q02 dependence of the results is studied in detail. Predictions are given, in particular for LHC, on gauge and Higgs boson as well as for top-quark pair production. At NNLO the dynamical approach results in αs(MZ2) = 0.1136 ± 0.0004, whereas the somewhat less constrained standard fit gives αs(MZ2) = 0.1162 ± 0.0006.

  11. Emergent behavior in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pines, David

    2016-09-01

    I describe early work on strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) from the perspective of a theoretical physicist who, while a participant in their reductionist top-down beginnings, is now part of the paradigm change to a bottom-up ‘emergent’ approach with its focus on using phenomenology to find the organizing principles responsible for their emergent behavior disclosed by experiment—and only then constructing microscopic models that incorporate these. After considering the organizing principles responsible for the emergence of plasmons, quasiparticles, and conventional superconductivity in SCES, I consider their application to three of SCES’s sister systems, the helium liquids, nuclei, and the nuclear matter found in neutron stars. I note some recent applications of the random phase approximation and examine briefly the role that paradigm change is playing in two central problems in our field: understanding the emergence and subsequent behavior of heavy electrons in Kondo lattice materials; and finding the mechanism for the unconventional superconductivity found in heavy electron, organic, cuprate, and iron-based materials.

  12. Allocentric neglect strongly associated with egocentric neglect

    PubMed Central

    Rorden, Christopher; Hjaltason, Haukur; Fillmore, Paul; Fridriksson, Julius; Kjartansson, Olafur; Magnusdottir, Sigridur; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2012-01-01

    Following brain injury, many patients experience egocentric spatial neglect, where they fail to respond to stimuli on the contralesional side of their body. On the other hand, allocentric, object-based neglect refers to the symptom of ignoring the contralesional side of objects, regardless of the objects’ egocentric position. There is an established tradition for considering these two phenomena as both behaviorally and anatomically dissociable. However, several studies and some theoretical work have suggested that these rather reflect two aspects of a unitary underlying disorder. Furthermore, in a recent large study Yue et al. [Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 93 (2012) 156] reported that acute allocentric neglect is only observed in cases where substantial egocentric neglect is also present. In a new sample of right hemisphere stroke patients, we attempted to control for potential confounds by using a novel continuous measure for allocentric neglect (in addition to a recently developed continuous measure for egocentric neglect). Our findings suggest a strong association between egocentric and allocentric neglect. Consistent with the work of Yue et al. (2012), we found allocentric behavioral deficits only in conjunction with egocentric deficits as well as a large corresponding overlap for the anatomical regions associated with egocentric and with allocentric neglect. We discuss how different anatomical and behavioral findings can be explained in a unified physiologically plausible framework, whereby allocentric and egocentric effects interact. PMID:22608082

  13. The Multiply Imaged Strongly Lensed Supernova Refsdal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In 1964, Sjur Refsdal first considered the possibility that the light from a background supernova could traverse multiple paths around a strong gravitational lens towards us. He showed that the arrival times of the supernova's light would depend on the cosmic expansion rate, as well as the distribution of matter in the lens. I will discuss the discovery of the first such multiply imaged supernova, which exploded behind the MACS J1149.6+2223 galaxy cluster. We have obtained Hubble Space Telescope grism and ground-based spectra of the four images of the supernova, which form an Einstein Cross configuration around an elliptical cluster member. These spectra as well as rest-frame optical light curves have allowed us to learn about the properties of the peculiar core-collapse supernova explosion, and contain information about the lenses' matter distribution as well as their stellar populations. A delayed image of the supernova is expected close to the galaxy cluster center as early as Fall 2015, and will serve as an unprecedented probe of the potential of a massive galaxy cluster.

  14. Strong anticipation: complexity matching in interpersonal coordination.

    PubMed

    Marmelat, Vivien; Delignières, Didier

    2012-10-01

    A subtle coordination occurs within complex systems, between multiple nested sub-systems. This intra-system coordination can be detected by the presence of 1/f fluctuations produced by the system. But coordination can occur also between systems. Interpersonal coordination has been studied from a local point of view until now, focusing on macroscopic interactions. But the recent concept of strong anticipation introduced by Dubois (Lect Notes Comput Sci 2684:110-132, 2003) suggests that interactions could occur on multiple levels between complex systems. The hypothesis is that time series in interpersonal synchronization present a matching of the complexity index (fractal exponent). Moreover, it is argued that this matching is not a consequence of short-term adaptations but reveals a global coordination between participants. Eleven pairs of participants oscillated a hand-held pendulum in the in-phase pattern for 11 min, in three conditions where the coupling strength was manipulated by the perceptual feedbacks. The results show a high correlation between fractal exponents irrespective of the coupling strength, and a very low percentage of local cross-correlations between time series appear at lag 0 and lag 1. These results suggest that interpersonal coordination, and more globally synchronization of participants with natural environments, is based on non-local time scales. PMID:22865163

  15. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  16. Mars nightside electrons over strong crustal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, Alexander D.; Xu, Shaosui; Liemohn, Michael W.; Mitchell, David L.

    2016-04-01

    We investigated 7 years worth of data from the electron reflectometer and magnetometer aboard Mars Global Surveyor to quantify the deposition of photoelectron and solar wind electron populations on the nightside of Mars, over the strong crustal field region located in the southern hemisphere. Just under 600,000 observations, each including energy and pitch angle distributions, were examined. For solar zenith angles (SZA) less than 110°, photoelectrons have the highest occurrence rate; beyond that, plasma voids occur most often. In addition, for SZA >110°, energy deposition of electrons mainly occurs on vertical field lines with median pitch angle averaged energy flux values on the order of 107-108 eV cm-2 s-1. The fraction of downward flux that is deposited at a given location was typically low (16% or smaller), implying that the majority of precipitated electrons are magnetically reflected or scattered back out. The average energy of the deposited electrons is found to be 20-30 eV, comparable to typical energies of photoelectrons and unaccelerated solar wind electrons. Median electron flux values, from near-vertical magnetic field lines past solar zenith angle of 110°, calculated in this study produced a total electron content of 4.2 × 1014 m-2 and a corresponding peak density of 4.2 × 103 cm-3.

  17. Atmospheric dynamics on strongly irradiated Jovian planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langton, Jonathan

    In this dissertation, I examine the response of a Jovian atmosphere to time- dependent, spatially varying radiative forcing. Particular attention is give to those irradiation regimes appropriate to known extrasolar planets, with an emphasis on observationally verifiable predictions based upon known parameters, rather than exploration of a wide range of parameter space, of which only a small portion may be physically relevant. To this end, I have developed a two-dimensional radiative-hydrodynamic model appropriate to the simulation of the infrared photosphere of a strongly irradiated giant planet. The choice of a two-dimensional model is motivated by the fact that the infrared photosphere on these planets is expected to lie in the radiative zone, so that vertical flow is negligible. My model traces the evolution of atmospheric flow, temperature distribution, and emitted thermal radiation in response to the incident stellar radiation, and provides both the capability to produce photorealistic visualizations of extrasolar planets and the opportunity to compare predicted infrared emissions to those observed using space-based infrared telescopes. Despite the utility of a well-formed two-dimensional atmospheric model, a three-dimensional treatment is eventually necessary to obtain a full understanding of the behavior of exoplanetary atmospheres. While the full deployment of such a model is beyond the scope of this thesis, I partially develop the computational framework necessary for the treatment of irradiation in a three-dimensional atmosphere.

  18. Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Flonnie

    1993-01-01

    Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment.

  19. Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, F.

    1993-12-07

    Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter are described. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment. 27 figures.

  20. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications. PMID:27666663

  1. Strong local passivity in finite quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Frey, Michael; Funo, Ken; Hotta, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Passive states of quantum systems are states from which no system energy can be extracted by any cyclic (unitary) process. Gibbs states of all temperatures are passive. Strong local (SL) passive states are defined to allow any general quantum operation, but the operation is required to be local, being applied only to a specific subsystem. Any mixture of eigenstates in a system-dependent neighborhood of a nondegenerate entangled ground state is found to be SL passive. In particular, Gibbs states are SL passive with respect to a subsystem only at or below a critical system-dependent temperature. SL passivity is associated in many-body systems with the presence of ground state entanglement in a way suggestive of collective quantum phenomena such as quantum phase transitions, superconductivity, and the quantum Hall effect. The presence of SL passivity is detailed for some simple spin systems where it is found that SL passivity is neither confined to systems of only a few particles nor limited to the near vicinity of the ground state.

  2. Efimov correlations in strongly interacting Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Marcus; Hofmann, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    We compute the virial coefficients, the contact parameters, and the momentum distribution of a strongly interacting three-dimensional Bose gas by means of a virial expansion up to third order in the fugacity, which takes into account three-body correlations exactly. Our results characterize the nondegenerate regime of the interacting Bose gas, where the thermal wavelength is smaller than the interparticle spacing but the scattering length may be arbitrarily large. We observe a rapid variation of the third virial coefficient as the scattering length is tuned across the three-atom and the atom-dimer thresholds. The momentum distribution at unitarity displays a universal high-momentum tail with a log-periodic momentum dependence, which is a direct signature of Efimov physics. We provide a quantitative description of the momentum distribution at high momentum as measured by P. Makotyn et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 116 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2850], and our calculations indicate that the lowest trimer state might not be occupied in the experiment. Our results allow for a spectroscopy of Efimov states in the unitary limit.

  3. Strongly magnetized rotating dipole in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Electromagnetic waves arise in many areas of physics. Solutions are difficult to find in the general case. Aims: We numerically integrate Maxwell equations in a 3D spherical polar coordinate system. Methods: Straightforward finite difference methods would lead to a coordinate singularity along the polar axis. Spectral methods are better suited for such artificial singularities that are related to the choice of a coordinate system. When the radiating object rotates like a star, for example, special classes of solutions to Maxwell equations are worthwhile to study, such as quasi-stationary regimes. Moreover, in high-energy astrophysics, strong gravitational and magnetic fields are present especially around rotating neutron stars. Results: To study such systems, we designed an algorithm to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations in spherical polar coordinates including general relativity and quantum electrodynamical corrections to leading order. As a diagnostic, we computed the spin-down luminosity expected for these stars and compared it to the classical or non-relativistic and non-quantum mechanical results. Conclusions: Quantum electrodynamics leads to an irrelevant change in the spin-down luminosity even for a magnetic field of about the critical value of 4.4 × 109 T. Therefore the braking index remains close to its value for a point dipole in vacuum, namely n = 3. The same conclusion holds for a general-relativistic quantum electrodynamically corrected force-free magnetosphere.

  4. Developments in strong shock wave position tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Philip; Glover, Brain; Perry, Lee; WX-6; WX-7 Team

    2011-06-01

    This poster will highlight several modified techniques to allow the position vs. time to be tracked in strong shock situations (such as detonation). Each is a modification or improvement of existing ideas either making use of advances in specialist materials availability or recent advances in electronics.) Shorting embedded mini-coaxial cable with a standing microwave pattern. This technique is a modified version of an old LANL method of shock position tracking making use of a traveling short imposed in an embedded coaxial cable. A high frequency standing wave (3-8GHz) is present in the cable and the moving short position can be tracked by monitoring the output voltage envelope as a function of time. A diode detector is used to allow the envelope voltage to be monitored on a regular low frequency digitizer significantly reducing the cost. The small and cheap high frequency voltage generators now available allow much greater spatial resolution than possible previously. 2) Very thin shorting resistance track gauges. Parallel tracks of constantan resistance material are etched on a thin dielectric substrate. The gauges are less than 0.2 mm thick. The ionized gas present in a detonation front sweeps up the tracks lowering the measured resistance. A potential divider circuit allows the shock position vs. time to be monitored on a regular digitizer after easy calibration. The novel feature is the thin section of the gauge producing minimal perturbation in the detonation front.

  5. Observed strong currents under global tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chia; Tseng, Ruo-Shan; Chu, Peter C.; Chen, Jau-Ming; Centurioni, Luca R.

    2016-07-01

    Global data from drifters of the Surface Velocity Program (Niiler, 2001) and tropical cyclones (TCs) from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center and National Hurricane Center were analyzed to demonstrate strong ocean currents and their characteristics under various storm intensities in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). Mean TC's translation speed (Uh) is faster in the NH (~ 4.7 m s- 1) than in the SH (~ 4.0 m s- 1), owing to the fact that TCs are more intense in the NH than in the SH. The rightward (leftward) bias of ocean mixed-layer (OML) velocity occurs in the NH (SH). As a result of this slower Uh and thus a smaller Froude number in the SH, the flow patterns in the SH under the same intensity levels of TCs are more symmetric relative to the TC center and the OML velocities are stronger. This study provides the first characterization of the near-surface OML velocity response to all recorded TCs in the SH from direct velocity measurements.

  6. Thermal infrared anomalies of several strong earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting.

  7. Polymer ejection from strong spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piili, J.; Linna, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the ejection of an initially strongly confined flexible polymer from a spherical capsid through a nanoscale pore. We use molecular dynamics for unprecedentedly high initial monomer densities. We show that the time for an individual monomer to eject grows exponentially with the number of ejected monomers. By measurements of the force at the pore we show this dependence to be a consequence of the excess free energy of the polymer due to confinement growing exponentially with the number of monomers initially inside the capsid. This growth relates closely to the divergence of mixing energy in the Flory-Huggins theory at large concentration. We show that the pressure inside the capsid driving the ejection dominates the process that is characterized by the ejection time growing linearly with the lengths of different polymers. Waiting time profiles would indicate that the superlinear dependence obtained for polymers amenable to computer simulations results from a finite-size effect due to the final retraction of polymers' tails from capsids.

  8. Collective phases of strongly interacting cavity photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Ryan M.; Mahmud, Khan W.; Hu, Anzi; Gorshkov, Alexey V.; Hafezi, Mohammad; Foss-Feig, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We study a coupled array of coherently driven photonic cavities, which maps onto a driven-dissipative XY spin-1/2 model with ferromagnetic couplings in the limit of strong optical nonlinearities. Using a site-decoupled mean-field approximation, we identify steady-state phases with canted antiferromagnetic order, in addition to limit cycle phases, where oscillatory dynamics persist indefinitely. We also identify collective bistable phases, where the system supports two steady states among spatially uniform, antiferromagnetic, and limit cycle phases. We compare these mean-field results to exact quantum trajectory simulations for finite one-dimensional arrays. The exact results exhibit short-range antiferromagnetic order for parameters that have significant overlap with the mean-field phase diagram. In the mean-field bistable regime, the exact quantum dynamics exhibits real-time collective switching between macroscopically distinguishable states. We present a clear physical picture for this dynamics and establish a simple relationship between the switching times and properties of the quantum Liouvillian.

  9. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SUPERLUMINAL STRONG WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Teraki, Yuto; Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2015-06-01

    We calculate the electron acceleration in random superluminal strong waves (SLSWs) and radiation from them using numerical methods in the context of the termination shocks of pulsar wind nebulae. We pursue the orbit of electrons by solving the equation of motion in the analytically expressed electromagnetic turbulences. These consist of a primary SLS and isotropically distributed secondary electromagnetic waves. Under the dominance of the secondary waves, all electrons gain nearly equal energy. On the other hand, when the primary wave is dominant, selective acceleration occurs. The phase of the primary wave for electrons moving nearly along the wavevector changes very slowly compared with the oscillation of the wave, which is “phase-locked,” and such electrons are continuously accelerated. This acceleration by SLSWs may play a crucial role in pre-shock acceleration. In general, the radiation from the phase-locked population is different from the synchro-Compton radiation. However, when the amplitude of the secondary waves is not extremely weaker than that of the primary wave, the typical frequency can be estimated from synchro-Compton theory using the secondary waves. The primary wave does not contribute to the radiation because the SLSW accelerates electrons almost linearly. This radiation can be observed as a radio knot at the upstream of the termination shocks of the pulsar wind nebulae without counterparts in higher frequency ranges.

  10. Strong Gravitational Lensing: Relativity in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, Joachim

    2009-05-01

    Deflection of light by gravity was predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity and observationally confirmed in 1919. In the following decades, various aspects of the gravitational lens effect were explored theoretically, among them measuring the Hubble constant from multiple images of a background source, making use of the magnifying effect as a gravitational telescope, or the possibility of a "relativistic eclipse" as a perfect test of GR. Only in 1979, gravitational lensing became an observational science when the first doubly imaged quasar was discovered. Today lensing is a booming part of astrophysics and cosmology. A whole suite of strong lensing phenomena have been investigated since: multiple quasars, giant luminous arcs, Einstein rings, quasar microlensing, and galactic microlensing. The most recent lensing application is the detection of extrasolar planets. Lensing has contributed significant new results in areas as different as the cosmological distance scale, mass determination of galaxy clusters, physics of quasars, searches for dark matter in galaxy halos, structure of the Milky Way, stellar atmospheres and exoplanets. A guided tour through some of these applications -- with both photometric and astrometric signatures of lensing being discussed -- will illustrate how gravitational lensing has established itself as a very useful universal astrophysical tool.

  11. Strong gravitational lensing: relativity in action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Deflection of light by gravity was predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity and observationally confirmed in 1919. In the following decades, various aspects of the gravitational lens effect were explored theoretically, among them measuring the Hubble constant from multiple images of a background source, making use of the magnifying effect as a gravitational telescope, or the possibility of a “relativistic eclipse” as a perfect test of GR. Only in 1979, gravitational lensing became an observational science when the first doubly imaged quasar was discovered. Today lensing is a booming part of astrophysics and cosmology. A whole suite of strong lensing phenomena have been investigated: multiple quasars, giant luminous arcs, Einstein rings, quasar microlensing, and galactic microlensing. The most recent lensing application is the detection of extrasolar planets. Lensing has contributed significant new results in areas as different as the cosmological distance scale, mass determination of galaxy clusters, physics of quasars, searches for dark matter in galaxy halos, structure of the Milky Way, stellar atmospheres and exoplanets. A guided tour through some of these applications will illustrate how gravitational lensing has established itself as a very useful universal astrophysical tool.

  12. Parallel search of strongly ordered game trees

    SciTech Connect

    Marsland, T.A.; Campbell, M.

    1982-12-01

    The alpha-beta algorithm forms the basis of many programs that search game trees. A number of methods have been designed to improve the utility of the sequential version of this algorithm, especially for use in game-playing programs. These enhancements are based on the observation that alpha beta is most effective when the best move in each position is considered early in the search. Trees that have this so-called strong ordering property are not only of practical importance but possess characteristics that can be exploited in both sequential and parallel environments. This paper draws upon experiences gained during the development of programs which search chess game trees. Over the past decade major enhancements of the alpha beta algorithm have been developed by people building game-playing programs, and many of these methods will be surveyed and compared here. The balance of the paper contains a study of contemporary methods for searching chess game trees in parallel, using an arbitrary number of independent processors. To make efficient use of these processors, one must have a clear understanding of the basic properties of the trees actually traversed when alpha-beta cutoffs occur. This paper provides such insights and concludes with a brief description of a refinement to a standard parallel search algorithm for this problem. 33 references.

  13. Quark stars in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen; Wang, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Within the confined isospin- and density-dependent mass model, we study the properties of strange quark matter (SQM) and quark stars (QSs) in strong magnetic fields. The equation of state of SQM under a constant magnetic field is obtained self-consistently and the pressure perpendicular to the magnetic field is shown to be larger than that parallel to the magnetic field, implying that the properties of magnetized QSs generally depend on both the strength and the orientation of the magnetic fields distributed inside the stars. Using a density-dependent magnetic field profile which is introduced to mimic the magnetic field strength distribution in a star, we study the properties of static spherical QSs by assuming two extreme cases for the magnetic field orientation in the stars, i.e., the radial orientation in which the local magnetic fields are along the radial direction, and the transverse orientation in which the local magnetic fields are randomly oriented but perpendicular to the radial direction. Our results indicate that including the magnetic fields with radial (transverse) orientation can significantly decrease (increase) the maximum mass of QSs, demonstrating the importance of the magnetic field orientation inside the magnetized compact stars.

  14. Delineating parton distributions and the strong coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Reya, E.

    2014-04-29

    In this study, global fits for precision determinations of parton distributions, together with the highly correlated strong coupling αs, are presented up to next-to-next-to- leading order (NNLO) of QCD utilizing most world data (charm and jet production data are used where theoretically possible), except Tevatron gauge boson production data and LHC data which are left for genuine predictions. This is done within the 'dynamical' (valencelike input at Q02 = 0.8 GeV2 ) and 'standard' (input at Q02 = 2 GeV2) approach. The stability and reliability of the results are ensured by including nonperturbative higher-twist terms, nuclear corrections as well asmore » target mass corrections, and by applying various (Q2, W2) cuts on available data. In addition, the Q02 dependence of the results is studied in detail. Predictions are given, in particular for LHC, on gauge and Higgs boson as well as for top-quark pair production. At NNLO the dynamical approach results in αs(MZ2) = 0.1136 ± 0.0004, whereas the somewhat less constrained standard fit gives αs(MZ2) = 0.1162 ± 0.0006.« less

  15. DYNAMICS OF STRONGLY TWISTED RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Parfrey, Kyle; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hui, Lam

    2013-09-10

    Magnetar magnetospheres are believed to be strongly twisted due to shearing of the stellar crust by internal magnetic stresses. We present time-dependent axisymmetric simulations showing in detail the evolution of relativistic force-free magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. When the twist amplitude is small, the magnetosphere moves quasi-statically through a sequence of equilibria of increasing free energy. At some twist amplitude the magnetosphere becomes tearing-mode unstable to forming a resistive current sheet, initiating large-scale magnetic reconnection in which a significant fraction of the magnetic free energy can be dissipated. This ''critical'' twist angle is insensitive to the resistive length scale. Rapid shearing temporarily stabilizes the magnetosphere beyond the critical angle, allowing the magnetosphere of a rapidly differentially rotating star to store and dissipate more free energy. In addition to these effects, shearing the surface of a rotating star increases the spindown torque applied to the star. If shearing is much slower than rotation, the resulting spikes in spindown rate can occur on timescales anywhere from the long twisting timescale to the stellar spin period or shorter, depending both on the stellar shear distribution and the existing distribution of magnetospheric twists. A model in which energy is stored in the magnetosphere and released by a magnetospheric instability therefore predicts large changes in the measured spindown rate before soft gamma repeater giant flares.

  16. Charge instabilities in strongly correlated bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, G.

    2003-09-01

    We investigate the charge-instabilities of the Hubbard-Holstein model with two coupled layers. In this system the scattering processes naturally separate into contributions which are either symmetric or antisymmetric combinations with respect to exchange of the layers. It turns out that the short-range strong correlations suppress finite wave-vector nesting instabilities for both symmetries but favor the occurrence of phase separation in the symmetric channel. Inclusion of a sizeable long-range Coulomb (LRC) interaction frustrates the q=0 instabilities and supports the formation of incommensurate charge-density waves (CDW). Upon reducing doping from half-filling and for small electron-phonon coupling g the CDW instability first occurs in the antisymmetric channel but both instability lines merge with increasing g. While LRC forces always suppress the phase separation instability in the symmetric channel, the CDW period in the antisymmetric sector tends to infinity (q_cto 0) for sufficiently small Coulomb interaction. This feature allows for the possibility of singular scattering over the whole Fermi surface. We discuss possible implications of our results for the bilayer high- T c cuprates.

  17. Stochastic properties of strongly coupled plasmas.

    PubMed

    Morozov, I V; Norman, G E; Valuev, A A

    2001-03-01

    Stochastic properties of equilibrium strongly coupled plasmas are investigated by a molecular dynamics method. The Krylov-Kolmogorov entropy K and the dynamical memory time t(m) are calculated both for electrons and ions with mass ratios 10-10(5). Two values of K entropy for ions are discovered corresponding to electron and ion time scales. The dependence of the K entropy on the number of particles, the nonideality parameter, and the form of the interaction potential is investigated. The problem of the accuracy of molecular dynamics simulations is discussed. A universal relation between Kt(m) and the fluctuation of the total energy of the system is obtained. The relation does not depend on the numerical integration scheme, temperature, density, and the interparticle interaction potential, so that it may be applied to arbitrary dynamic systems. Transition from dynamic to stochastic correlation is treated for both electron and ion velocity autocorrelation functions, for Langmuir and ion-sound plasma wave dynamic structure factors. We point to quantum uncertainty as a physical reason which limits dynamic (Newton) correlation for times greater than t(m). PMID:11308773

  18. Dynamical consequences of strong CP breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Faccioli, Pietro

    2006-01-12

    In this talk we review some recent results of an on-going investigation of the dynamical consequences induced by the {theta}-term in the QCD Lagrangian. By using an instanton model to account for the topological fluctuations in the vacuum, we show that the {theta}-term generates an effective flavor-dependent repulsion between matter and anti-matter. Such a non-perturbative interaction triggers an asymmetry in the baryonic charge distribution in hadronic systems, along the direction of quantization of the spin. This represents the microscopic mechanism giving rise to the neutron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM), at the semi-classical level.We also present a numerical estimate the dependence of the neutron EDM on the value of the {theta} angle, based on Monte Carlo simulations in the Interacting Instanton Liquid Model. By comparing quenched and unquenched results we show that, for such an observable, the quenched approximation leads to an unphysical divergence in the chiral limit. This result poses the question of the reliability of the quenched lattice QCD calculations of the neutron EDM.

  19. Spin generation by strong inhomogeneous electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkler, Ilya; Engel, Hans-Andreas; Rashba, Emmanuel; Halperin, Bertrand

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by recent experiments [1], we propose a model with extrinsic spin-orbit interaction, where an inhomogeneous electric field E in the x-y plane can give rise, through nonlinear effects, to a spin polarization with non-zero sz, away from the sample boundaries. The field E induces a spin current js^z= z x(αjc+βE), where jc=σE is the charge current, and the two terms represent,respectively, the skew scattering and side-jump contributions. [2]. The coefficients α and β are assumed to be E- independent, but conductivity σ is field dependent. We find the spin density sz by solving the equation for spin diffusion and relaxation with a source term ∇.js^z. For sufficiently low fields, jc is linear in E, and the source term vanishes, implying that sz=0 away from the edges. However, for large fields, σ varies with E. Solving the diffusion equation in a T-shaped geometry, where the electric current propagates along the main channel, we find spin accumulation near the entrance of the side channel, similar to experimental findings [1]. Also, we present a toy model where spin accumulation away from the boundary results from a nonlinear and anisotropic conductivity. [1] V. Sih, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 096605 (2006). [2] H.-A. Engel, B.I. Halperin, E.I.Rashba, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 166605 (2005).

  20. Controlling strongly correlated dust clusters with lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Hauke; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar; Schella, André; Melzer, André

    2014-09-01

    Lasers have been used extensively to manipulate matter in a controlled way - from single atoms and molecules up to macroscopic materials. They are particularly valuable for the analysis and control of mesoscopic systems such as few-particle clusters. Here we report on recent work on finite size complex (dusty) plasma systems. These are unusual types of clusters with a very strong inter-particle interaction so that, at room temperature, they are practically in their ground state. Lasers are employed as a tool to achieve excited states and phase transitions. The most attractive feature of dusty plasmas is that they allow for a precise diagnostic with single-particle resolution. From such measurements, the structural properties of finite two-dimensional (2D) clusters and three-dimensional (3D) spherical crystals in nearly harmonic traps—so-called Yukawa balls—have been explored in great detail. Their structural features—the shell compositions and the order within the shells—have been investigated and good agreement to theoretical predictions was found. Open questions on the agenda are the excitation behaviour, the structural changes and phase transitions that occur at elevated temperature. Here we report on recent experimental results where laser heating methods were further improved and applied to finite 2D and 3D dust clusters. Comparing to simulations, we demonstrate that laser heating indeed allows to increase the temperature in a controlled manner. For the analysis of thermodynamic properties and phase transitions in these finite systems, we present theoretical and experimental results on the basis of the instantaneous normal modes, pair distribution function and the recently introduced centre-two-particle correlation function.