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Sample records for induces strong anti-sense

  1. Upregulation of long non-coding RNA HIF 1α-anti-sense 1 induced by transforming growth factor-β-mediated targeting of sirtuin 1 promotes osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    XU, YAO; WANG, SHILONG; TANG, CHAOLIANG; CHEN, WENJUN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanism of long non-coding RNA hypoxia-inducible factor 1α-anti-sense 1 (lncRNA HIF1α-AS1) in osteoblast differentiation as well as its targeting by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), which may be inhibited by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), western blot analysis, lncRNA PCR arrays and chromatin immunoprecipitation were performed in order to examine the interference of SIRT1 expression by TGF-β, the effects of SIRT1 overexpression on lncRNA HIF1α-AS1 and the regulation of the expression of homeobox (HOX)D10, which promotes BMSC differentiation, by lncRNA HIF1α-AS1. The results showed that TGF-β interfered with SIRT1 expression. Furthermore, lncRNA HIF1α-AS1 was significantly downregulated following overexpression of SIRT1. In addition, low expression of HIF1α-AS1 was sufficient to block the expression of HOXD10. The present study further demonstrated that downregulation of HOXD10 by HIF1α-AS1 interfered with acetylation, and subsequently resulted in the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggested that HIF1α-AS1 is an essential mediator of osteoblast differentiation, and may thus represent a gene-therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bone diseases. PMID:26460121

  2. Strong correlation induced charge localization in antiferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Qi, Yang; Tian, Chushun; Weng, Zheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The fate of a hole injected in an antiferromagnet is an outstanding issue of strongly correlated physics. It provides important insights into doped Mott insulators closely related to high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we report a systematic numerical study of t-J ladder systems based on the density matrix renormalization group. It reveals a surprising result for the single hole's motion in an otherwise well-understood undoped system. Specifically, we find that the common belief of quasiparticle picture is invalidated by the self-localization of the doped hole. In contrast to Anderson localization caused by disorders, the charge localization discovered here is an entirely new phenomenon purely of strong correlation origin. It results from destructive quantum interference of novel signs picked up by the hole, and since the same effect is of a generic feature of doped Mott physics, our findings unveil a new paradigm which may go beyond the single hole doped system. PMID:24002668

  3. Upstream Anti-sense Promoters are Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, Benjamin S.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W.; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C.; Adelman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression. PMID:26028540

  4. Noise-Induced Subdiffusion in Strongly Localized Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Islam, K. Ranjibul; Knap, Michael

    2017-07-01

    We consider the dynamics of strongly localized systems subject to dephasing noise with arbitrary correlation time. Although noise inevitably induces delocalization, transport in the noise-induced delocalized phase is subdiffusive in a parametrically large intermediate-time window. We argue for this intermediate-time subdiffusive regime both analytically and using numerical simulations on single-particle localized systems. Furthermore, we show that normal diffusion is restored in the long-time limit, through processes analogous to variable-range hopping. With numerical simulations based on Lanczos exact diagonalization, we demonstrate that our qualitative conclusions are also valid for interacting systems in the many-body localized phase.

  5. [Music-induced chills as a strong emotional experience].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuma; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    While enjoying music and other works of art, people sometimes experience "chills," a strong emotional response characterized by a sensation of goose bumps or shivers. Such experiences differ from having goose bumps as a defense response or from shivering in reaction to cold temperatures. The current paper presents the phenomenon of music-induced chills and reviews the chill-related emotional response, autonomic nervous system activity, and brain activity. It also reviews the musico-acoustic features, listening contexts, and individual differences that cause chills. Based on the review, we propose a hypothetical model regarding the evocation of music-induced chills. Furthermore, we investigate the strong emotional response associated with chills by exploring the relationship between music-related chills and non-music-related chills, and discuss future research directions.

  6. Anomaly-Induced Dynamical Refringence in Strong-Field QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, N.; Hebenstreit, F.; Berges, J.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the impact of the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly on the nonequilibrium evolution of strong-field quantum electrodynamics (QED) using real-time lattice gauge theory techniques. For field strengths exceeding the Schwinger limit for pair production, we encounter a highly absorptive medium with anomaly induced dynamical refractive properties. In contrast to earlier expectations based on equilibrium properties, where net anomalous effects vanish because of the trivial vacuum structure, we find that out-of-equilibrium conditions can have dramatic consequences for the presence of quantum currents with distinctive macroscopic signatures. We observe an intriguing tracking behavior, where the system spends longest times near collinear field configurations with maximum anomalous current. Apart from the potential relevance of our findings for future laser experiments, similar phenomena related to the chiral magnetic effect are expected to play an important role for strong QED fields during initial stages of heavy-ion collision experiments.

  7. Anomaly-Induced Dynamical Refringence in Strong-Field QED.

    PubMed

    Mueller, N; Hebenstreit, F; Berges, J

    2016-08-05

    We investigate the impact of the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly on the nonequilibrium evolution of strong-field quantum electrodynamics (QED) using real-time lattice gauge theory techniques. For field strengths exceeding the Schwinger limit for pair production, we encounter a highly absorptive medium with anomaly induced dynamical refractive properties. In contrast to earlier expectations based on equilibrium properties, where net anomalous effects vanish because of the trivial vacuum structure, we find that out-of-equilibrium conditions can have dramatic consequences for the presence of quantum currents with distinctive macroscopic signatures. We observe an intriguing tracking behavior, where the system spends longest times near collinear field configurations with maximum anomalous current. Apart from the potential relevance of our findings for future laser experiments, similar phenomena related to the chiral magnetic effect are expected to play an important role for strong QED fields during initial stages of heavy-ion collision experiments.

  8. Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi

    PubMed Central

    Krannich, S.; Sidis, Y.; Lamago, D.; Heid, R.; Mignot, J.-M.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Ivanov, A.; Steffens, P.; Keller, T.; Wang, L.; Goering, E.; Weber, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of electronic, spin and lattice degrees of freedom in solids result in complex phase diagrams, new emergent phenomena and technical applications. While electron–phonon coupling is well understood, and interactions between spin and electronic excitations are intensely investigated, only little is known about the dynamic interactions between spin and lattice excitations. Noncentrosymmetric FeSi is known to undergo with increasing temperature a crossover from insulating to metallic behaviour with concomitant magnetic fluctuations, and exhibits strongly temperature-dependent phonon energies. Here we show by detailed inelastic neutron-scattering measurements and ab initio calculations that the phonon renormalization in FeSi is linked to its unconventional magnetic properties. Electronic states mediating conventional electron–phonon coupling are only activated in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, phonons entailing strongly varying Fe–Fe distances are damped via dynamic coupling to the temperature-induced magnetic moments, highlighting FeSi as a material with direct spin–phonon coupling and multiple interaction paths. PMID:26611619

  9. Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi.

    PubMed

    Krannich, S; Sidis, Y; Lamago, D; Heid, R; Mignot, J-M; Löhneysen, H v; Ivanov, A; Steffens, P; Keller, T; Wang, L; Goering, E; Weber, F

    2015-11-27

    The interactions of electronic, spin and lattice degrees of freedom in solids result in complex phase diagrams, new emergent phenomena and technical applications. While electron-phonon coupling is well understood, and interactions between spin and electronic excitations are intensely investigated, only little is known about the dynamic interactions between spin and lattice excitations. Noncentrosymmetric FeSi is known to undergo with increasing temperature a crossover from insulating to metallic behaviour with concomitant magnetic fluctuations, and exhibits strongly temperature-dependent phonon energies. Here we show by detailed inelastic neutron-scattering measurements and ab initio calculations that the phonon renormalization in FeSi is linked to its unconventional magnetic properties. Electronic states mediating conventional electron-phonon coupling are only activated in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, phonons entailing strongly varying Fe-Fe distances are damped via dynamic coupling to the temperature-induced magnetic moments, highlighting FeSi as a material with direct spin-phonon coupling and multiple interaction paths.

  10. Quantum-criticality-induced strong Kerr nonlinearities in optomechanical systems

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Xin-You; Zhang, Wei-Min; Ashhab, Sahel; Wu, Ying; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a hybrid electro-optomechanical system that allows us to realize controllable strong Kerr nonlinearities even in the weak-coupling regime. We show that when the controllable electromechanical subsystem is close to its quantum critical point, strong photon-photon interactions can be generated by adjusting the intensity (or frequency) of the microwave driving field. Nonlinear optical phenomena, such as the appearance of the photon blockade and the generation of nonclassical states (e.g., Schrödinger cat states), are demonstrated in the weak-coupling regime, making the observation of strong Kerr nonlinearities feasible with currently available optomechanical technology. PMID:24126279

  11. Nanosized graphene crystallite induced strong magnetism in pure carbon films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xi; Diao, Dongfeng

    2015-03-14

    We report strong magnetism in pure carbon films grown by electron irradiation assisted physical vapor deposition in electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The development of graphene nanocrystallites in the amorphous film matrix, and the dependence of the magnetic behavior on amorphous, nanocrystallite and graphite-like structures were investigated. Results were that the amorphous structure shows weak paramagnetism, graphene nanocrystallites lead to strong magnetization, and graphite-like structures corresponded with a lower magnetization. At a room temperature of 300 K, the highest saturation magnetization of 0.37 emu g(-1) was found in the nanosized graphene nanocrystallite structure. The origin of strong magnetism in nanocrystallites was ascribed to the spin magnetic moment at the graphene layer edges.

  12. Higgs-induced spectroscopic shifts near strong gravity sources

    SciTech Connect

    Onofrio, Roberto

    2010-09-15

    We explore the consequences of the mass generation due to the Higgs field in strong gravity astrophysical environments. The vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field is predicted to depend on the curvature of spacetime, potentially giving rise to peculiar spectroscopic shifts, named hereafter 'Higgs shifts'. Higgs shifts could be searched through dedicated multiwavelength and multispecies surveys with high spatial and spectral resolution near strong gravity sources such as Sagittarius A* or broad searches for signals due to primordial black holes. The possible absence of Higgs shifts in these surveys should provide limits to the coupling between the Higgs particle and the curvature of spacetime, a topic of interest for a recently proposed Higgs-driven inflationary model. We discuss some conceptual issues regarding the coexistence between the Higgs mechanism and gravity, especially for their different handling of fundamental and composite particles.

  13. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  14. Interface-induced magnetism and strong correlation in oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at interfaces between two insulating oxides have attracted significant attention because they can exhibit unique properties, such as strong electron correlations, superconductivity and magnetism. In this presentation, we will discuss the emergent properties of 2DEGs in SrTiO3 quantum wells that are interfaced with Mott insulating rare earth titanates (RTiO3) . We show that the magnetic properties of the 2DEG can be tuned to be either (incipient) ferromagnetic or (incipient) antiferromagnetic, depending on the specific RTiO3 that interfaces it. The thickness of the quantum well is a critical tuning parameter and determines the onset of magnetism, the proximity to a quantum critical point, and the onset of non-Fermi liquid behavior for those quantum wells that are in proximity to an antiferromagnetic transition. We will also discuss the role of symmetry-lowering structural transitions in the quantum well.

  15. Moderately strong pump-induced ultrafast dynamics in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. F.; Zhang, Yizhu; Yan, T.-M.; Wang, Z. Y.; Jiang, Y. H.

    2016-09-01

    The transient transmittance spectra of laser dye IR144 in methanol were investigated experimentally in the moderately strong pump-probe field. Observed emission spectra in the red edge of the incident-field bandwidth, created by resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (RISRS), display significant nonlinear intensity dependence as the pulse intensity increases. Dynamic perspectives of RISRS spectra can be understood well in a wavepacket picture. The excitation of high vibrational levels in the ground electronic state leading to the redshift of emissions presents high dependence of the pump-pulse intensity and ultrafast dynamical features, mapping the spatial overlap and separation of ground and excited wave functions and resolving the ultrafast vibrational relaxation in the femtosecond regime.

  16. Fractal snapshot components in chaos induced by strong noise.

    PubMed

    Bódai, Tamás; Károlyi, György; Tél, Tamás

    2011-04-01

    In systems exhibiting transient chaos in coexistence with periodic attractors, the inclusion of weak noise might give rise to noise-induced chaotic attractors. When the noise amplitude exceeds a critical value, an extended attractor appears along the fractal unstable manifold of the underlying nonattracting chaotic set. A further increase of noise leads to a fuzzy nonfractal pattern. By means of the concept of snapshot attractors and random maps, we point out that the fuzzy pattern can be decomposed into well-defined fractal components, the snapshot attractors belonging to a given realization of the noise and generated by following an ensemble of noisy trajectories. The pattern of the snapshot attractor and its characteristic numbers, such as the finite time Lyapunov exponents and numerically evaluated fractal dimensions, change continuously in time. We find that this temporal fluctuation is a robust property of the system which hardly changes with increasing ensemble size. The validity of the Kaplan-Yorke formula is also investigated. A superposition of about 100 snapshot attractors provides a good approximant to the fuzzy noise-induced attractor at the same noise strength.

  17. Irradiation strongly reduces tumorigenesis of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Inui, Shoki; Minami, Kazumasa; Ito, Emiko; Imaizumi, Hiromasa; Mori, Seiji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Fukushima, Satsuki; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2017-03-03

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have demonstrated they can undergo self-renewal, attain pluripotency, and differentiate into various types of functional cells. In clinical transplantation of iPS cells, however, a major problem is the prevention of tumorigenesis. We speculated that tumor formation could be inhibited by means of irradiation. Since the main purpose of this study was to explore the prevention of tumor formation in human iPS (hiPS) cells, we tested the effects of irradiation on tumor-associated factors such as radiosensitivity, pluripotency and cell death in hiPS cells. The irradiated hiPS cells showed much higher radiosensitivity, because the survival fraction of hiPS cells irradiated with 2 Gy was < 10%, and there was no change of pluripotency. Irradiation with 2 and 4 Gy caused substantial cell death, which was mostly the result of apoptosis. Irradiation with 2 Gy was detrimental enough to cause loss of proliferation capability and trigger substantial cell death in vitro. The hiPS cells irradiated with 2 Gy were injected into NOG mice (NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2 Rγnull) for the analysis of tumor formation. The group of mice into which hiPS cells irradiated with 2 Gy was transplanted showed significant suppression of tumor formation in comparison with that of the group into which non-irradiated hiPS cells were transplanted. It can be presumed that this diminished rate of tumor formation was due to loss of proliferation and cell death caused by irradiation. Our findings suggest that tumor formation following cell therapy or organ transplantation induced by hiPS cells may be prevented by irradiation.

  18. Theory of strong hybridization-induced relaxation in uranium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, G.; Cooper, B.R.

    1988-11-15

    Commonly, for metallic uranium systems, sharp magnetic excitations are not observed in neutron inelastic scattering experiments, but rather there is a continuous spectrum of magnetic response. By extending our earlier theory for partially delocalized cerium systems, we can understand this behavior. The band-f hybridization is transformed to resonant scattering in our theory, where the exchange part of the scattering gives both a two-ion interaction (physically corresponding to cooperative hybridization, giving anisotropic magnetic ordering with unusual excitation dispersion for cerium systems) and a hybridization coupling of each ion to the band sea (giving relaxation and strong energy renormalization of the excitations for cerium systems). For uranium the f delocalization (and hence the hybridization) is much stronger than for cerium. The two-ion interaction (giving quasi-ionic energy level splitting) grows by an order of magnitude or more, as evidenced by greatly increased magnetic ordering temperatures. On the other hand, the single-site hybridization strength parameter J-script characterizing the f-to-band-bath coupling grows more moderately as the f levels move toward the Fermi energy, because of the renormalizing effect of the direct scattering which broadens the f levels. The increased energy scale of the quasi-ionic level splitting for uranium as compared to cerium or plutonium is the major contributor to the greatly increased width of magnetic scattering distributions, while the moderate increase in coupling of each uranium quasi-ion to the band sea gives a lesser contribution. We apply this theory to UP and UAs and compare our results with experiment.

  19. Theory of strong hybridization-induced relaxation in uranium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gong-Jia; Cooper, Bernard R.

    1988-11-01

    Commonly, for metallic uranium systems, sharp magnetic excitations are not observed in neutron inelastic scattering experiments, but rather there is a continuous spectrum of magnetic response. By extending our earlier theory for partially delocalized cerium systems, we can understand this behavior. The band-f hybridization is transformed to resonant scattering in our theory, where the exchange part of the scattering gives both a two-ion interaction (physically corresponding to cooperative hybridization, giving anisotropic magnetic ordering with unusual excitation dispersion for cerium systems) and a hybridization coupling of each ion to the band sea (giving relaxation and strong energy renormalization of the excitations for cerium systems). For uranium the f delocalization (and hence the hybridization) is much stronger than for cerium. The two-ion interaction (giving quasi-ionic energy level splitting) grows by an order of magnitude or more, as evidenced by greatly increased magnetic ordering temperatures. On the other hand, the single-site hybridization strength parameter J characterizing the f-to-band-bath coupling grows more moderately as the f levels move toward the Fermi energy, because of the renormalizing effect of the direct scattering which broadens the f levels. The increased energy scale of the quasi-ionic level splitting for uranium as compared to cerium or plutonium is the major contributor to the greatly increased width of magnetic scattering distributions, while the moderate increase in coupling of each uranium quasi-ion to the band sea gives a lesser contribution. We apply this theory to UP and UAs and compare our results with experiment.

  20. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Measurement-Induced Strong Kerr Nonlinearity for Weak Quantum States of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, Luca S.; Coelho, Antonio S.; Biagi, Nicola; Fiurášek, Jaromír; Bellini, Marco; Zavatta, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Strong nonlinearity at the single photon level represents a crucial enabling tool for optical quantum technologies. Here we report on experimental implementation of a strong Kerr nonlinearity by measurement-induced quantum operations on weak quantum states of light. Our scheme coherently combines two sequences of single photon addition and subtraction to induce a nonlinear phase shift at the single photon level. We probe the induced nonlinearity with weak coherent states and characterize the output non-Gaussian states with quantum state tomography. The strong nonlinearity is clearly witnessed as a change of sign of specific off-diagonal density matrix elements in the Fock basis.

  2. Syntheses of Anthracyclines and Fredericamycin A via Strong Base-Induced Cycloaddition Reaction of Homophthalic Anhydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Yasuyuki; Fujioka, Hiromichi

    Strong base-induced cycloaddition reactions of homophthalic anhydrides with quinone derivatives afford peri-hydroxyl aromatic compounds in a regioselective manner. The reactions have been applied to the syntheses of biologically important natural products. This review focuses on the following topics: (i) preparation of homophthalic anhydrides from homophthalic acids using (trimethylsilyl)ethoxyacetylene, (ii) strong base-induced cycloaddition of homophthalic anhydrides with the carbon-carbon double bond and the reaction mechanism, especially addressing the regiochemistry of the reaction, and (iii) application of the reaction to the efficient asymmetric syntheses of anthracyclines and fredericamycin A.

  3. Observation of subwavelength localization of cavity plasmons induced by ultra-strong exciton coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubrahmaniyam, M.; Kar, Durgesh; Sen, Prabal; Bisht, Prem B.; Kasiviswanathan, S.

    2017-04-01

    In condensed matter systems, there exists a class of exotic localized electronic states wherein the localization is induced, not by a disorder or a defect, but by extremely strong interactions, for example, Kondo-insulator and Mott-insulator. In this work, we investigate and experimentally implement the photonic analog of localization induced by ultra-strong interactions in a coupled three-mode system. We show that the localization of a propagating mode can be achieved without the aid of an underlying spatial disorder, a defect, or even periodicity. We demonstrate the same by realizing ultra-strong coupling between a highly dispersive cavity plasmon mode and dimer excitons of Rhodamine B. Using a photon tunneling arrangement, we map the dispersion of the hybrid modes and provide evidence for the existence of a quasi-dispersionless hybrid mode with the sub-wavelength localization length and cavity plasmon-like characteristics.

  4. Energy Transport Induced by an External Alternating Field in Strongly Disordered Media

    SciTech Connect

    Burin, Alexander L.; Kagan, Yuri; Polishchuk, Il'ya Ya.

    2001-06-11

    The delocalization of excitations in an ensemble of two-level systems with a strong disorder due to an external alternating acoustic or electric field is considered. The propagating modes are shown to appear if a ratio of the field amplitude to the frequency is large enough. Two complementary approaches, the static one similar to that of Anderson and the dynamic one related to Landau-Zener, are developed. It is shown that the field-induced relaxation mechanism can have a strong influence on the kinetics. The internal friction is argued to be vastly affected by the relaxation mechanism proposed.

  5. Strong Antibody Responses Induced by Protein Antigens Conjugated onto the Surface of Lecithin-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sloat, Brian R.; Sandoval, Michael A.; Hau, Andrew M.; He, Yongqun; Cui, Zhengrong

    2009-01-01

    An accumulation of research over the years has demonstrated the utility of nanoparticles as antigen carriers with adjuvant activity. Herein we defined the adjuvanticity of a novel lecithin-based nanoparticle engineered from emulsions. The nanoparticles were spheres of around 200 nm. Model protein antigens, bovine serum albumin (BSA) or Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) protein, were covalently conjugated onto the nanoparticles. Mice immunized with the BSA-conjugated nanoparticles developed strong anti-BSA antibody responses comparable to that induced by BSA adjuvanted with incomplete Freund's adjuvant and 6.5-fold stronger than that induced by BSA adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide. Immunization of mice with the PA-conjugated nanoparticles elicited a quick, strong, and durable anti-PA antibody response that afforded protection of the mice against a lethal dose of anthrax lethal toxin challenge. The potent adjuvanticity of the nanoparticles was likely due to their ability to move the antigens into local draining lymph nodes, to enhance the uptake of the antigens by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and to activate APCs. This novel nanoparticle system has the potential to serve as a universal protein-based vaccine carrier capable of inducing strong immune responses. PMID:19729045

  6. Superconductivity in HfTe5 across weak to strong topological insulator transition induced via pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Long, Y. J.; Zhao, L. X.; Nie, S. M.; Zhang, S. J.; Weng, Y. X.; Jin, M. L.; Li, W. M.; Liu, Q. Q.; Long, Y. W.; Yu, R. C.; Gu, C. Z.; Sun, F.; Yang, W. G.; Mao, H. K.; Feng, X. L.; Li, Q.; Zheng, W. T.; Weng, H. M.; Dai, X.; Fang, Z.; Chen, G. F.; Jin, C. Q.

    2017-03-01

    Recently, theoretical studies show that layered HfTe5 is at the boundary of weak & strong topological insulator (TI) and might crossover to a Dirac semimetal state by changing lattice parameters. The topological properties of 3D stacked HfTe5 are expected hence to be sensitive to pressures tuning. Here, we report pressure induced phase evolution in both electronic & crystal structures for HfTe5 with a culmination of pressure induced superconductivity. Our experiments indicated that the temperature for anomaly resistance peak (Tp) due to Lifshitz transition decreases first before climbs up to a maximum with pressure while the Tp minimum corresponds to the transition from a weak TI to strong TI. The HfTe5 crystal becomes superconductive above ~5.5 GPa where the Tp reaches maximum. The highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc) around 5 K was achieved at 20 GPa. Crystal structure studies indicate that HfTe5 transforms from a Cmcm phase across a monoclinic C2/m phase then to a P-1 phase with increasing pressure. Based on transport, structure studies a comprehensive phase diagram of HfTe5 is constructed as function of pressure. The work provides valuable experimental insights into the evolution on how to proceed from a weak TI precursor across a strong TI to superconductors.

  7. Superconductivity in HfTe5 across weak to strong topological insulator transition induced via pressures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Long, Y. J.; Zhao, L. X.; Nie, S. M.; Zhang, S. J.; Weng, Y. X.; Jin, M. L.; Li, W. M.; Liu, Q. Q.; Long, Y. W.; Yu, R. C.; Gu, C. Z.; Sun, F.; Yang, W. G.; Mao, H. K.; Feng, X. L.; Li, Q.; Zheng, W. T.; Weng, H. M.; Dai, X.; Fang, Z.; Chen, G. F.; Jin, C. Q.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, theoretical studies show that layered HfTe5 is at the boundary of weak & strong topological insulator (TI) and might crossover to a Dirac semimetal state by changing lattice parameters. The topological properties of 3D stacked HfTe5 are expected hence to be sensitive to pressures tuning. Here, we report pressure induced phase evolution in both electronic & crystal structures for HfTe5 with a culmination of pressure induced superconductivity. Our experiments indicated that the temperature for anomaly resistance peak (Tp) due to Lifshitz transition decreases first before climbs up to a maximum with pressure while the Tp minimum corresponds to the transition from a weak TI to strong TI. The HfTe5 crystal becomes superconductive above ~5.5 GPa where the Tp reaches maximum. The highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc) around 5 K was achieved at 20 GPa. Crystal structure studies indicate that HfTe5 transforms from a Cmcm phase across a monoclinic C2/m phase then to a P-1 phase with increasing pressure. Based on transport, structure studies a comprehensive phase diagram of HfTe5 is constructed as function of pressure. The work provides valuable experimental insights into the evolution on how to proceed from a weak TI precursor across a strong TI to superconductors. PMID:28300156

  8. Superconductivity in HfTe5 across weak to strong topological insulator transition induced via pressures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Long, Y J; Zhao, L X; Nie, S M; Zhang, S J; Weng, Y X; Jin, M L; Li, W M; Liu, Q Q; Long, Y W; Yu, R C; Gu, C Z; Sun, F; Yang, W G; Mao, H K; Feng, X L; Li, Q; Zheng, W T; Weng, H M; Dai, X; Fang, Z; Chen, G F; Jin, C Q

    2017-03-16

    Recently, theoretical studies show that layered HfTe5 is at the boundary of weak &strong topological insulator (TI) and might crossover to a Dirac semimetal state by changing lattice parameters. The topological properties of 3D stacked HfTe5 are expected hence to be sensitive to pressures tuning. Here, we report pressure induced phase evolution in both electronic &crystal structures for HfTe5 with a culmination of pressure induced superconductivity. Our experiments indicated that the temperature for anomaly resistance peak (Tp) due to Lifshitz transition decreases first before climbs up to a maximum with pressure while the Tp minimum corresponds to the transition from a weak TI to strong TI. The HfTe5 crystal becomes superconductive above ~5.5 GPa where the Tp reaches maximum. The highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc) around 5 K was achieved at 20 GPa. Crystal structure studies indicate that HfTe5 transforms from a Cmcm phase across a monoclinic C2/m phase then to a P-1 phase with increasing pressure. Based on transport, structure studies a comprehensive phase diagram of HfTe5 is constructed as function of pressure. The work provides valuable experimental insights into the evolution on how to proceed from a weak TI precursor across a strong TI to superconductors.

  9. Spin motive force induced by Rashba interaction in the strong sd coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatara, Gen; Nakabayashi, Noriyuki; Lee, Kyun-Jin

    2013-02-01

    Spin motive force induced by the Rashba interaction in the presence of strong sd interaction between conduction electron and localized spin is theoretically studied. The motive force is calculated by evaluating the time derivative of the current density on the basis of microscopic formalism. It is shown that there are two motive forces, one proportional to ER×ṅ, the other, perpendicular component proportional to ER×(n×ṅ), where ER and n are the Rashba electric field and localized spin direction, respectively. The second type arises in the strong sd coupling regime from the spin relaxation. The appearance of perpendicular component from the spin relaxation is understood from the analogy with the current-induced torques. In the case of domain wall motion, the two contributions to the spin motive force are the same order of magnitude, while the first term dominates in the case of precession of uniform magnetization. Our result explains the appearance of the perpendicular component in the weak sd coupling limit, recently discussed in the context of spin damping monopole. Detection of ac voltage induced by the precession of uniform magnetization serves as a experimental evidence of the Rashba interaction in films and wires.

  10. Electric-field-induced strong enhancement of electroluminescence in multilayer molybdenum disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dehui; Cheng, Rui; Zhou, Hailong; Wang, Chen; Yin, Anxiang; Chen, Yu; Weiss, Nathan O.; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted considerable interest for their unique electronic and optical properties. While the monolayer MoS2 exhibits a direct bandgap, the multilayer MoS2 is an indirect bandgap semiconductor and generally optically inactive. Here we report electric-field-induced strong electroluminescence in multilayer MoS2. We show that GaN–Al2O3–MoS2 and GaN–Al2O3–MoS2–Al2O3-graphene vertical heterojunctions can be created with excellent rectification behaviour. Electroluminescence studies demonstrate prominent direct bandgap excitonic emission in multilayer MoS2 over the entire vertical junction area. Importantly, the electroluminescence efficiency observed in multilayer MoS2 is comparable to or higher than that in monolayers. This strong electroluminescence can be attributed to electric-field-induced carrier redistribution from the lowest energy points (indirect bandgap) to higher energy points (direct bandgap) in k-space. The electric-field-induced electroluminescence is general for other layered materials including WSe2 and can open up a new pathway towards transition metal dichalcogenide-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:26130491

  11. Studies of HF-induced Strong Langmuir Turbulence at the HAARP Ionospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Gerres, J. M.; Keith, M. R.; Adham, N.; Wittbrodt, A.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Selcher, C. A.

    2009-11-01

    High power HF transmitters may induce a number of plasma instabilities in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. We report results from our recent experiments using over one gigawatt of HF power (ERP) to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and particle acceleration at the HAARP Observatory, Gakona, Alaska. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including the outshifted plasma line or free-mode, appearance of a short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effect, collapse, cascade and co-existing spectra, control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the plasma line spectra, and suprathermal electrons. Mapping the intensity of SLT versus pointing angle, we have discovered a number of regions of strong interaction displaced from the primary HF interaction region. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  12. Studies of HF-induced Strong Plasma Turbulence at the HAARP Ionospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Adham, N.; Watanabe, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Selcher, C. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2011-10-01

    High power HF transmitters may induce a number of plasma instabilities in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. We report results from our recent experiments using over one gigawatt of HF power (ERP) to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and particle acceleration at the HAARP Observatory, Gakona, Alaska. Among the effects observed and studied in UHF radar backscatter are: SLT spectra including the outshifted plasma line or free-mode, appearance of a short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effect, collapse, cascade and co-existing spectra, control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the plasma line spectra, and suprathermal electrons. Mapping the intensity of SLT versus pointing angle, we have discovered a number of regions of strong interaction displaced from the primary HF interaction region. Stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) measurements complement radar measurements. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  13. Studies of HF-induced Strong Plasma Turbulence at the HAARP Ionospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Adham, N.; Roe, R. G. E.; Keith, M. R.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Selcher, C. A.

    2010-11-01

    High power HF transmitters may induce a number of plasma instabilities in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. We report results from our recent experiments using over one gigawatt of HF power (ERP) to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and particle acceleration at the HAARP Observatory, Gakona, Alaska. Among the effects observed and studied in UHF radar backscatter are: SLT spectra including the outshifted plasma line or free-mode, appearance of a short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effect, collapse, cascade and co-existing spectra, control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the plasma line spectra, and suprathermal electrons. Mapping the intensity of SLT versus pointing angle, we have discovered a number of regions of strong interaction displaced from the primary HF interaction region. Stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) measurements complement radar measurements. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  14. Strong turbulent mixing induced by internal bores interacting with internal tide-driven vertically sheared flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, Eiji; Fringer, Oliver B.; Yamazaki, Hidekatsu; Amakasu, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We observed the formation of an internal bore interacting with the vertically sheared flow generated during the previous phase of the internal tide, which resulted in strong turbulent mixing. The rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation reached on the order of 10-5 W kg-1 during the event. Numerical simulations reproduced the observed interaction of internal bores with the sheared flow and verified the hypothesized breaking and mixing mechanism. The numerical results indicated that the Iribarren number, or the ratio of the topographic slope to the internal wave slope, plays a major role in the mixing intensity and types of internal bores. It was found that waves with low Iribarren numbers lead to bores that interact with vertically sheared flows induced by the previous phase of the internal tide and are more likely to produce strong wave breaking and mixing.

  15. Minicharged particles search by strong laser pulse-induced vacuum polarization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalba-Chávez, S.; Meuren, S.; Müller, C.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-based searches of the yet unobserved vacuum birefringence might be sensitive for very light hypothetical particles carrying a tiny fraction of the electron charge. We show that, with the help of contemporary techniques, polarimetric investigations driven by an optical laser pulse of moderate intensity might allow for excluding regions of the parameter space of these particle candidates which have not been discarded so far by laboratory measurement data. Particular attention is paid to the role of a Gaussian wave profile. It is argued that, at energy regimes in which the vacuum becomes dichroic due to these minicharges, the transmission probability of a probe beam through an analyzer set crossed to the initial polarization direction will depend on both the induced ellipticity as well as the rotation of the initial polarization plane. The weak and strong field regimes, relative to the attributes of these minicharged particles, and the relevance of the polarization of the strong field are investigated.

  16. Optically induced strong intermodal coupling in mechanical resonators at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, R.; Okamoto, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hey, R.; Friedland, K. J.

    2015-08-31

    Strong parametric mode coupling in mechanical resonators is demonstrated at room temperature by using the photothermal effect in thin membrane structures. Thanks to the large stress modulation by laser irradiation, the coupling rate of the mechanical modes, defined as half of the mode splitting, reaches 2.94 kHz, which is an order of magnitude larger than electrically induced mode coupling. This large coupling rate exceeds the damping rates of the mechanical resonators and results in the strong coupling regime, which is a signature of coherent mode interaction. Room-temperature coherent mode coupling will enable us to manipulate mechanical motion at practical operation temperatures and provides a wide variety of applications of integrated mechanical systems.

  17. Paramagnetic molecule induced strong antiferromagnetic exchange coupling on a magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics device.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pawan; Baker, Collin; D'Angelo, Christopher

    2015-07-31

    This paper reports our Monte Carlo (MC) studies aiming to explain the experimentally observed paramagnetic molecule induced antiferromagnetic coupling between ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Recently developed magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics devices (MTJMSDs) were prepared by chemically bonding the paramagnetic molecules between the FM electrodes along the tunnel junction's perimeter. These MTJMSDs exhibited molecule-induced strong antiferromagnetic coupling. We simulated the 3D atomic model analogous to the MTJMSD and studied the effect of molecule's magnetic couplings with the two FM electrodes. Simulations show that when a molecule established ferromagnetic coupling with one electrode and antiferromagnetic coupling with the other electrode, then theoretical results effectively explained the experimental findings. Our studies suggest that in order to align MTJMSDs' electrodes antiparallel to each other, the exchange coupling strength between a molecule and FM electrodes should be ∼50% of the interatomic exchange coupling for the FM electrodes.

  18. Possible Superconductivity Induced by Strong Spin-Orbit Coupling in Carrier Doped Iridium Oxides Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Kazutaka; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Arita, Ryotaro; Yunoki, Seiji

    2014-03-01

    5 d transition metal oxide Sr2IrO4 and its relevant Iridium oxides have attracted much interest because of exotic properties arising from highly entangled spin and orbital degrees of freedom due to strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Sr2IrO4 crystalizes in the layered perovskite structure, similar to cuprates. Five 5 d electrons in Ir occupy its t2 g orbitals which are split by strong SOC, locally inducing an effective total angular momentum Jeff = 1 / 2 , analogous to a S = 1 / 2 state in cuprates. Because of the similarities to cuprates, the possibility of superconductivity (SC) in Iridium oxides has been expected theoretically once mobile carriers are introduced into the Jeff = 1 / 2 antiferromagnetic insulator. To study theoretically possible SC in carrier doped Sr2IrO4, we investigate a three-orbital Hubbard model with SOC. By solving the Eliashberg equation in the random phase approximation, we find that Jeff = 1 / 2 antiferromagnetic fluctuations favor dx2 -y2-wave SC with a mixture of singlet and triplet Cooper pairings. We will also discuss the particle-hole asymmetry of the SC induced by electron and hole doping.

  19. Strong nonlinear terahertz response induced by Dirac surface states in Bi2Se3 topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Giorgianni, Flavio; Chiadroni, Enrica; Rovere, Andrea; Cestelli-Guidi, Mariangela; Perucchi, Andrea; Bellaveglia, Marco; Castellano, Michele; Di Giovenale, Domenico; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Pompili, Riccardo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Villa, Fabio; Cianchi, Alessandro; Mostacci, Andrea; Petrarca, Massimo; Brahlek, Matthew; Koirala, Nikesh; Oh, Seongshik; Lupi, Stefano

    2016-04-26

    Electrons with a linear energy/momentum dispersion are called massless Dirac electrons and represent the low-energy excitations in exotic materials such as graphene and topological insulators. Dirac electrons are characterized by notable properties such as a high mobility, a tunable density and, in topological insulators, a protection against backscattering through the spin-momentum locking mechanism. All those properties make graphene and topological insulators appealing for plasmonics applications. However, Dirac electrons are expected to present also a strong nonlinear optical behaviour. This should mirror in phenomena such as electromagnetic-induced transparency and harmonic generation. Here we demonstrate that in Bi2Se3 topological insulator, an electromagnetic-induced transparency is achieved under the application of a strong terahertz electric field. This effect, concomitantly determined by harmonic generation and charge-mobility reduction, is exclusively related to the presence of Dirac electron at the surface of Bi2Se3, and opens the road towards tunable terahertz nonlinear optical devices based on topological insulator materials.

  20. Strong nonlinear terahertz response induced by Dirac surface states in Bi2Se3 topological insulator

    PubMed Central

    Giorgianni, Flavio; Chiadroni, Enrica; Rovere, Andrea; Cestelli-Guidi, Mariangela; Perucchi, Andrea; Bellaveglia, Marco; Castellano, Michele; Di Giovenale, Domenico; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Pompili, Riccardo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Villa, Fabio; Cianchi, Alessandro; Mostacci, Andrea; Petrarca, Massimo; Brahlek, Matthew; Koirala, Nikesh; Oh, Seongshik; Lupi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Electrons with a linear energy/momentum dispersion are called massless Dirac electrons and represent the low-energy excitations in exotic materials such as graphene and topological insulators. Dirac electrons are characterized by notable properties such as a high mobility, a tunable density and, in topological insulators, a protection against backscattering through the spin–momentum locking mechanism. All those properties make graphene and topological insulators appealing for plasmonics applications. However, Dirac electrons are expected to present also a strong nonlinear optical behaviour. This should mirror in phenomena such as electromagnetic-induced transparency and harmonic generation. Here we demonstrate that in Bi2Se3 topological insulator, an electromagnetic-induced transparency is achieved under the application of a strong terahertz electric field. This effect, concomitantly determined by harmonic generation and charge-mobility reduction, is exclusively related to the presence of Dirac electron at the surface of Bi2Se3, and opens the road towards tunable terahertz nonlinear optical devices based on topological insulator materials. PMID:27113395

  1. Strong nonlinear terahertz response induced by Dirac surface states in Bi2Se3 topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgianni, Flavio; Chiadroni, Enrica; Rovere, Andrea; Cestelli-Guidi, Mariangela; Perucchi, Andrea; Bellaveglia, Marco; Castellano, Michele; di Giovenale, Domenico; di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Pompili, Riccardo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Villa, Fabio; Cianchi, Alessandro; Mostacci, Andrea; Petrarca, Massimo; Brahlek, Matthew; Koirala, Nikesh; Oh, Seongshik; Lupi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Electrons with a linear energy/momentum dispersion are called massless Dirac electrons and represent the low-energy excitations in exotic materials such as graphene and topological insulators. Dirac electrons are characterized by notable properties such as a high mobility, a tunable density and, in topological insulators, a protection against backscattering through the spin-momentum locking mechanism. All those properties make graphene and topological insulators appealing for plasmonics applications. However, Dirac electrons are expected to present also a strong nonlinear optical behaviour. This should mirror in phenomena such as electromagnetic-induced transparency and harmonic generation. Here we demonstrate that in Bi2Se3 topological insulator, an electromagnetic-induced transparency is achieved under the application of a strong terahertz electric field. This effect, concomitantly determined by harmonic generation and charge-mobility reduction, is exclusively related to the presence of Dirac electron at the surface of Bi2Se3, and opens the road towards tunable terahertz nonlinear optical devices based on topological insulator materials.

  2. Scale coupling in Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, M.; Stellingwerf, R. F.; Cassibry, J. T.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2012-08-01

    We perform the first systematic study of the nonlinear evolution and scale coupling in Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHC) is employed to ensure accurate shock capturing, interface tracking and accounting for the dissipation processes. We find that in strong-shock-driven RMI the background motion is supersonic. The amplitude of the initial perturbation strongly influences the flow evolution and the interfacial mixing that can be sub-sonic or supersonic. At late times the flow remains laminar rather than turbulent, and RM bubbles flatten and decelerate. In the fluid bulk, reverse cumulative jets appear and "hot spots" are formed—local heterogeneous microstructures with temperature substantially higher than that in the ambient. Our numerical simulations agree with the zero-order, linear, weakly nonlinear, and highly nonlinear theoretical analyses as well as with the experiments and suggest that the evolution of RMI is a multi-scale and heterogeneous process with a complicated character of scale coupling.

  3. On the possibility of inducing strong plasma convection in the divertor of MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Helander, P.; Cohen, R. H.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, a theory is developed to describe scrape-off layer (SOL) broadening by inducing convective cells through divertor plate biasing in a tokamak. The theory is applied to the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak, where such experiments are planned in the near future. Criteria are derived for achieving strong broadening and for exciting shear-flow turbulence in the SOL, and these criteria are shown to be attainable in practice. It is also shown that the magnetic shear present in the vicinity of the X-point is likely to confine the potential perturbations to the divertor region below the X-point, leaving the part of the SOL that is in direct contact with the core plasma intact. The current created in the SOL by the biasing and the associated heating power are also calculated and are found to be modest.

  4. Plasmon-induced strong interaction between chiral molecules and orbital angular momentum of light

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Rongyao; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not chiral interaction exists between the optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) and a chiral molecule remains unanswered. So far, such an interaction has not been observed experimentally. Here we present a T-matrix method to study the interaction between optical OAM and the chiral molecule in a cluster of nanoparticles. We find that strong interaction between the chiral molecule and OAM can be induced by the excitation of plasmon resonances. An experimental scheme to observe such an interaction has been proposed. Furthermore, we have found that the signal of the OAM dichroism can be either positive or negative, depending on the spatial positions of nanocomposites in the cross-sections of OAM beams. The cancellation between positive and negative signals in the spatial average can explain why the interaction has not been observed in former experiments. PMID:26656892

  5. Strong coupling among semiconductor quantum dots induced by a metal nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), we investigate the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in a metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in an SQD-MNP coupled system. We propose a quantum transformation method to strongly reveal the exciton energy shift and the modified decay rate of SQD as well as the coupling among SQDs. To obtain these parameters, a simple system composed of an SQD, an MNP, and a weak signal light is designed. Furthermore, we consider a model to demonstrate the coupling of two SQDs mediated by SPP field under two cases. It is shown that two SQDs can be entangled in the presence of MNP. A high concurrence can be achieved, which is the best evidence that the coupling among SQDs induced by SPP field in MNP. This scheme may have the potential applications in all-optical plasmon-enhanced nanoscale devices. PMID:22297024

  6. Developmental abnormality induced by strong static magnetic field in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Du, Hua; Guo, Xiaoying; Wang, Xinan; Wang, Meimei; Wang, Yichen; Wang, Min; Chen, Shaopeng; Wu, Lijun; Xu, An

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the effects of strong static magnetic fields (SMFs) on living organisms is significant in health risk assessment, but underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In the present study, we determined developmental abnormalities induced by 8.5Tesla (T) SMFs in a well-established in vivo model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Exposure of C. elegans eggs to 8.5 T SMF resulted in a time-dependent lifespan decrease, whereas only slight changes were observed upon exposure to 5 T SMF. Although SMF exposure did not alter brood size, development rate and stages were significantly modified by 8.5 T SMF. Germ cell apoptosis dramatically increased upon exposure to 8.5 T SMF in adult worms, as confirmed by ced-3 and ced-4 mutants, and could be prevented by concurrent treatment with a free radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide. Compared to wild-type worms, shorter lifespan and greater numbers of apoptotic cells were observed in abnormal methyl viologen sensitivity-1 (mev-1(kn1)) nematodes with increased sensitivity to oxidative damage. Furthermore, exposure to 8.5 T SMF increased expression of superoxide dismutase-3 (sod-3), which is thought to protect against oxidative stress. However, 8.5 T SMF had minimal effects on lifespans of daf-2 and daf-16 mutants, which have compromised insulin/IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factors-1) mediated signaling pathways; this finding was consistent with the expression of these genes in wild-type worms. Our results indicate that developmental toxicity induced by strong SMF in C. elegans is mediated by oxidative stress and may be regulated by the insulin-like receptor pathway.

  7. Strong interface-induced spin-orbit interaction in graphene on WS2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Ki, Dong-Keun; Chen, Hua; Berger, Helmuth; MacDonald, Allan H; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2015-09-22

    Interfacial interactions allow the electronic properties of graphene to be modified, as recently demonstrated by the appearance of satellite Dirac cones in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride substrates. Ongoing research strives to explore interfacial interactions with other materials to engineer targeted electronic properties. Here we show that with a tungsten disulfide (WS2) substrate, the strength of the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) in graphene is very strongly enhanced. The induced SOI leads to a pronounced low-temperature weak anti-localization effect and to a spin-relaxation time two to three orders of magnitude smaller than in graphene on conventional substrates. To interpret our findings we have performed first-principle electronic structure calculations, which confirm that carriers in graphene on WS2 experience a strong SOI and allow us to extract a spin-dependent low-energy effective Hamiltonian. Our analysis shows that the use of WS2 substrates opens a possible new route to access topological states of matter in graphene-based systems.

  8. Effect of initial perturbation amplitude on Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Zachary; Stellingwerf, Robert; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect initial perturbation on the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks in fluids with contrasting densities. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations are employed. Broad range of shock strengths and density ratios is considered (Mach=3,5,10, and Atwood=0.6,0.8,0.95). The amplitude of initial single mode sinusoidal perturbation of the interface varies from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. We analyze the initial growth-rate of the RMI immediately after the shock passage, when the perturbation amplitude increases linearly with time. We find that the initial growth-rate of RMI is a non-monotone function of the amplitude of the initial perturbation. This restrains the amount of energy that can be deposited by the shock at the interface. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate depends strongly and the corresponding value of the initial perturbation amplitude depends only slightly on the shock strength and density ratio. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate increases with the increase of the Atwood number for a fixed Mach number, and decreases with the increase of the Mach number for a fixed Atwood number. We argue that the non-monotonicity of RMI growth-rate is a result of a combination of geometric effect and the effect of secondary shocks.

  9. Effect of initial perturbation amplitude on Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Zachary; Stellingwerf, Robert; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect initial perturbation on the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks in fluids with contrasting densities. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations are employed. Broad range of shock strengths and density ratios is considered (Mach=3,5,10, and Atwood=0.6,0.8,0.95). The amplitude of initial single mode sinusoidal perturbation of the interface varies from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. We analyze the initial growth-rate of the RMI immediately after the shock passage, when the perturbation amplitude increases linearly with time. We find that the initial growth-rate of RMI is a non-monotone function of the amplitude of the initial perturbation. This restrains the amount of energy that can be deposited by the shock at the interface. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate depends strongly and the corresponding value of the initial perturbation amplitude depends only slightly on the shock strength and density ratio. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate increases with the increase of the Atwood number for a fixed Mach number, and decreases with the increase of the Mach number for a fixed Atwood number. We argue that the non-monotonicity of RMI growth-rate is a result of a combination of geometric effect and the effect of secondary shocks. Support of the National Science Foundation is warmly appreciated.

  10. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N.; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy. PMID:25609199

  11. Strong-mixing induced deep ocean heat uptake events in the North Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somavilla Cabrillo, Raquel; Gonzalez-Pola, Cesar; Schauer, Ursula; Budeus, Gedeon

    2015-04-01

    The deceleration of the upper ocean heat storage during the last decade has resulted in an active search for the 'missing heat' in the deep ocean. Modeling work has provided new insights into the role of the central Pacific Ocean on the present hiatus in global warming and the efficient transfer of heat to the deep ocean, but recent studies have highlighted also the large contribution of the North Atlantic basin to these processes, mainly based on ocean observations. The deep ocean heat uptake (below 300 m) in the North Atlantic is not confined to the subpolar gyre region but extends to mid-latitudes of the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), requiring an additional process for its explanation other than deep convection considered until now. Here, using oceanographic in-situ data, we describe a mechanism of heat and salt injection to the deep ocean after years of warming and saltening at the surface occurred both in regions of mode (43°-48°N) and deep water (74°-76°N) formation in the ENA. The mechanism, although punctual meditated by strong winter mixing events, is between 2 and 6 times higher than the 2000-2010 ocean heat uptake at depths of mode (300-700m) and deep water (>2000m) formation, contributing significantly to the observed deep ocean heat uptake in the North Atlantic. Nutrient, hydrographic and reanalysis data indicate that the strong mixing-induced deep ocean heat uptake events at areas of mode and deep water formation in the North Atlantic are connected through the northward propagation of salty ENA mode waters triggered by the contraction of the subpolar gyre reinforced by the occurrences of blocking anomalies in the ENA. Such connection is not unique of the last decade but observed also during the 1960s. Natural climate variability seems the ultimate driver of the strong mixing-induced deep ocean heat uptake events, although the anthropogenic global warming and its forcing on the Arctic sea-ice retreat and frequency of extreme weather events could

  12. [Conformational changes of actin induced by strong or weak myosin subfragment-1 binding].

    PubMed

    Dedova, I V; Avrova, S V; Vikhoreva, N N; Vikhorev, R G; Hazlett, T L; Van der Meer, W; Dos Remedios, C G; Borovikov, Iu S

    2004-01-01

    Movements of different areas of polypeptide chains within F-actin monomers induced by S1 or pPDM-S1 binding were studied by polarized fluorimetry. Thin filaments of ghost muscle were reconstructed by adding G-actin labeled with fluorescent probes attached alternatively to different sites of actin molecule. These sites were: Cys-374 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, TMRIA or 5-IAF; Lys-373 labeled with NBD-Cl; Lys-113 labeled with Alexa-488; Lys-61 labeled with FITC; Gln-41 labeled with DED and Cys-10 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, 5-IAF or fluorescein-maleimid. In addition, we used TRITC-, FITC-falloidin and e-ADP that were located, respectively, in filament groove and interdomain cleft. The data were analysed by model-dependent and model-independent methods (see appendixes). The orientation and mobility of fluorescent probes were significantly changed when actin and myosin interacted, depending on fluorophore location and binding site of actomyosin. Strong binding of S with actin leads to 1) a decrease in the orientation of oscillators of derivatives of falloidin (TRITC-falloidin, FITC-falloidin) and actin-bound nucleotide (e-ADP); 2) an increase in the orientation of dye oscillators located in the "front' surface of the small domain (where actin is viewed in the standard orientation with subdomains 1/2 and 3/4 oriented to the right and to the left, respectively); 3) a decrease in the angles of dye oscillators located on the "back" surface of subdomain-1. In contrast, a weak binding of S1 to actin induces the opposite effects in orientation of these probes. These data suggest that during the ATP hydrolysis cycle myosin heads induce a change in actin monomer (a tilt and twisting of its small domain). Presumably, these alterations in F-actin conformation play an important role in muscle contraction.

  13. Inducible antisense suppression of glycolate oxidase reveals its strong regulation over photosynthesis in rice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huawei; Zhang, Jianjun; Zeng, Jiwu; Jiang, Linrong; Liu, Ee; Peng, Changlian; He, Zhenghui; Peng, Xinxiang

    2009-01-01

    Photorespiration is one of the most intensively studied topics in plant biology. While a number of mutants deficient in photorespiratory enzymes have been identified and characterized for their physiological functions, efforts on glycolate oxidase (GLO; EC 1.1.3.15) have not been so successful. This is a report about the generation of transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants carrying a GLO antisense gene driven by an estradiol-inducible promoter, which allowed for controllable suppressions of GLO and its detailed functional analyses. The GLO-suppressed plants showed typical photorespiration-deficient phenotypes. More intriguingly, it was found that a positive and linear correlation existed between GLO activities and the net photosynthetic rates (P(N)), and photoinhibition subsequently occurred once P(N) reduction surpassed 60%, indicating GLO can exert a strong regulation over photosynthesis. Various expression analyses identified that Rubisco activase was transcriptionally suppressed in the GLO-suppressed plants, consistent with the decreased Rubisco activation states. While the substrate glycolate accumulated substantially, few changes were observed for the product glyoxylate, and for some other downstream metabolites or genes as well in the transgenic plants. Further analyses revealed that isocitrate lyase and malate synthase, two key enzymes in the glyoxylate cycle, were highly up-regulated under GLO deficiency. Taken together, the results suggest that GLO is a typical photorespiratory enzyme and that it can exert a strong regulation over photosynthesis, possibly through a feed-back inhibition on Rubisco activase, and that the glyoxylate cycle may be partially activated to compensate for the photorespiratory glyoxylate when GLO is suppressed in rice.

  14. Wood Ash Induced pH Changes Strongly Affect Soil Bacterial Numbers and Community Composition.

    PubMed

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Nielsen, Jeppe T; Voriskova, Jana; Heise, Janine; Rønn, Regin; Kjøller, Rasmus; Hansen, Hans C B; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2017-01-01

    Recirculation of wood ash from energy production to forest soil improves the sustainability of this energy production form as recycled wood ash contains nutrients that otherwise would be lost at harvest. In addition, wood-ash is beneficial to many soils due to its inherent acid-neutralizing capabilities. However, wood ash has several ecosystem-perturbing effects like increased soil pH and pore water electrical conductivity both known to strongly impact soil bacterial numbers and community composition. Studies investigating soil bacterial community responses to wood ash application remain sparse and the available results are ambiguous and remain at a general taxonomic level. Here we investigate the response of bacterial communities in a spruce forest soil to wood ash addition corresponding to 0, 5, 22, and 167 t wood ash ha(-1). We used culture-based enumerations of general bacteria, Pseudomonas and sporeforming bacteria combined with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to valuate soil bacterial responses to wood ash application. Results showed that wood ash addition strongly increased soil pH and electrical conductivity. Soil pH increased from acidic through neutral at 22 t ha(-1) to alkaline at 167 t ha(-1). Bacterial numbers significantly increased up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha(-1) followed by significant decrease at 167 t ha(-1) wood ash. The soil bacterial community composition changed after wood ash application with copiotrophic bacteria responding positively up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha(-1) while the adverse effect was seen for oligotrophic bacteria. Marked changes in bacterial community composition occurred at a wood ash dose of 167 t ha(-1) with a single alkaliphilic genus dominating. Additionally, spore-formers became abundant at an ash dose of 167 t ha(-1) whereas this was not the case at lower ash doses. Lastly, bacterial richness and diversity strongly decreased with increasing amount of wood ash applied. All of the observed bacterial responses can

  15. Wood Ash Induced pH Changes Strongly Affect Soil Bacterial Numbers and Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Nielsen, Jeppe T.; Voriskova, Jana; Heise, Janine; Rønn, Regin; Kjøller, Rasmus; Hansen, Hans C. B.; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2017-01-01

    Recirculation of wood ash from energy production to forest soil improves the sustainability of this energy production form as recycled wood ash contains nutrients that otherwise would be lost at harvest. In addition, wood-ash is beneficial to many soils due to its inherent acid-neutralizing capabilities. However, wood ash has several ecosystem-perturbing effects like increased soil pH and pore water electrical conductivity both known to strongly impact soil bacterial numbers and community composition. Studies investigating soil bacterial community responses to wood ash application remain sparse and the available results are ambiguous and remain at a general taxonomic level. Here we investigate the response of bacterial communities in a spruce forest soil to wood ash addition corresponding to 0, 5, 22, and 167 t wood ash ha-1. We used culture-based enumerations of general bacteria, Pseudomonas and sporeforming bacteria combined with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to valuate soil bacterial responses to wood ash application. Results showed that wood ash addition strongly increased soil pH and electrical conductivity. Soil pH increased from acidic through neutral at 22 t ha-1 to alkaline at 167 t ha-1. Bacterial numbers significantly increased up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha-1 followed by significant decrease at 167 t ha-1 wood ash. The soil bacterial community composition changed after wood ash application with copiotrophic bacteria responding positively up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha-1 while the adverse effect was seen for oligotrophic bacteria. Marked changes in bacterial community composition occurred at a wood ash dose of 167 t ha-1 with a single alkaliphilic genus dominating. Additionally, spore-formers became abundant at an ash dose of 167 t ha-1 whereas this was not the case at lower ash doses. Lastly, bacterial richness and diversity strongly decreased with increasing amount of wood ash applied. All of the observed bacterial responses can be directly

  16. Effect of a strong, DC-induced magnetic field on circadian singing activity of the house cricket (orthoptera:gryllidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, K.C.; Bitzer, R.J.; Galliart, L.

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a strong, DC-induced electromagnetic field (EMF) on the circadian singing activity of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.). Groups of 10 crickets were exposed to strong, DC-induced EMFs under two light regimes, 12:12 (L:D) h and 0:24 (L:D) h. Exposure to the strong EMF resulted in an increase in mean time per hour during which one or more crickets were singing and in number of crickets singing per hour. Correcting for phase shift during O:24 (L:D) h, the daily pattern of singing was apparently unaffected by any treatment. The greatest percentage of singing and number of crickets singing per hour occurred during actual or expected scotophase. This is the first report of an increase in insect activity during exposure to a strong DC-induced EMF.

  17. Platelet lysate induces in vitro wound healing of human keratinocytes associated with a strong proinflammatory response.

    PubMed

    El Backly, Rania; Ulivi, Valentina; Tonachini, Laura; Cancedda, Ranieri; Descalzi, Fiorella; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2011-07-01

    Platelet lysates (PL), which are derived from platelets, are cocktails of growth factors and cytokines that can promote tissue regeneration. Until today, most studies have focused on growth factor content of platelets rather than on their potential as a reservoir of mediators and cytokines. Taking advantage of an in vitro scratch assay performed under both normal and inflammatory conditions, in the present work, we report that at physiologic concentrations, PL enhanced wound closure rates of NCTC 2544 human keratinocytes. This effect was clearly detectable 6 h after wounding. Moreover, PL induced a strong cell actin cytoskeletal re-organization that persisted up to 24 h. The accelerated wound closure promoted by PL, in either presence or absence of serum, was associated with a high expression of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8. Further, after 24 h PL treatment, confluent keratinocytes also expressed low amounts of interleukin-8 and of the antimicrobial peptide neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, which dramatically increased under inflammatory conditions. These effects were associated with activation of the inflammatory pathways, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-κB. Our findings support the concept that platelet-derived preparations could accelerate regeneration of difficult-to-heal wounds by triggering an inflammatory cascade and having an antimicrobial role.

  18. Effect of initial perturbation amplitude on Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Dell, Z.; Abarzhi, S. I. E-mail: sabarji@andrew.cmu.edu; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2015-09-15

    We systematically study the effect of the initial perturbation on Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks in fluids with contrasting densities. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations are employed. A broad range of shock strengths and density ratios is considered. The amplitude of the initial single mode sinusoidal perturbation of the interface varies from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. The simulations results are compared, wherever possible, with four rigorous theories, and with other experiments and simulations, achieving good quantitative and qualitative agreement. Our study is focused on early time dynamics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). We analyze the initial growth-rate of RMI immediately after the shock passage, when the perturbation amplitude increases linearly with time. For the first time, to the authors' knowledge, we find that the initial growth-rate of RMI is a non-monotone function of the initial perturbation amplitude, thus restraining the amount of energy that can be deposited by the shock at the interface. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate depends on the shock strength and the density ratio, whereas the corresponding value of the initial perturbation amplitude depends only slightly on the shock strength and density ratio.

  19. Large mixing induced by the strong coupling with a single bulk neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. S.

    2002-03-01

    The neutrino is a good probe of extra dimensions. Large mixing and the apparent lack of very complicated oscillation patterns may be an indication of large couplings between the brane and a single bulk neutrino. A simple and realistic five-dimensional model of this kind is discussed. It requires a sterile neutrino in addition to three active neutrinos on the brane, all coupled strongly to one common bulk neutrino, but not directly among themselves. Mindful that sterile neutrinos are disfavored in the atmospheric and solar data, we demand induced mixing to occur among the active neutrinos, but not between the active and the sterile. The size R of the extra dimension is arbitrary in this model, otherwise it contains six parameters which can be used to fit the three neutrino masses and the three mixing angles. However, in the model these six parameters must be suitably ordered, so a successful fit is not guaranteed. It turns out that not only can the data be fitted, but, as a result of the ordering, a natural connection between the smallness of the reactor angle θ13 and the smallness of the mass-gap ratio ΔM2solar/ΔM2atmospheric can be derived.

  20. Interferon-β gene transfer induces a strong cytotoxic bystander effect on melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Úrsula A; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Villaverde, Marcela S; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-05-01

    A local gene therapy scheme for the delivery of type I interferons could be an alternative for the treatment of melanoma. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of interferon-β (IFNβ) gene lipofection on tumor cell lines derived from three human cutaneous and four canine mucosal melanomas. The cytotoxicity of human IFNβ gene lipofection resulted higher or equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) to human cells. IFNβ gene lipofection was not cytotoxic for only one canine melanoma cell line. When cultured as monolayers, three human and three canine IFNβ-lipofected melanoma cell lines displayed a remarkable bystander effect. As spheroids, the same six cell lines were sensitive to IFNβ gene transfer, two displaying a significant multicell resistance phenotype. The effects of conditioned IFNβ-lipofected canine melanoma cell culture media suggested the release of at least one soluble thermolabile cytotoxic factor that could not be detected in human melanoma cells. By using a secretion signal-free truncated human IFNβ, we showed that its intracellular expression was enough to induce cytotoxicity in two human melanoma cell lines. The lower cytoplasmatic levels of reactive oxygen species detected after intracellular IFNβ expression could be related to the resistance displayed by one human melanoma cell line. As IFNβ gene transfer was effective against most of the assayed melanomas in a way not limited by relatively low lipofection efficiencies, the clinical potential of this approach is strongly supported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Giant Faraday rotation induced by the Berry phase in bilayer graphene under strong terahertz fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Xu, Xiaodong; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-04-01

    High-order terahertz (THz) sideband generation in semiconductors is a phenomenon with physics similar to that of high-order harmonic generation but in a regime of much lower frequency. Our previous paper [1] found that the electron-hole pair excited by a weak optical laser can accumulate a Berry phase along a cyclic trajectory under the driving of a strong elliptically polarized THz field. Furthermore, the Berry phase appears as the Faraday rotation angle of the emission signal under short-pulse excitation in monolayer MoS_{2}. In this paper, the theory of the Berry phase in THz extreme nonlinear optics is applied to biased bilayer graphene with Bernal stacking, which has similar Bloch band features and optical properties to monolayer MoS_{2}, such as the time-reversal related valleys and the valley contrasting optical selection rule. However, the biased bilayer graphene has much larger Berry curvature than monolayer MoS_{2}, which leads to a large Berry phase of the quantum trajectory and in turn a giant Faraday rotation of the optical emission (˜1 rad for a THz field with frequency 1 THz and strength 8 kV cm-1). This surprisingly big angle shows that the Faraday rotation can be induced more efficiently by the Berry curvature in momentum space than by the magnetic field in real space. It provides opportunities to use bilayer graphene and THz lasers for ultrafast electro-optical devices.

  2. Mucosal vaccination with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces strong central memory responses and protects against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Deepak; Foreman, Taylor W.; Gautam, Uma S.; Alvarez, Xavier; Adekambi, Toidi; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Golden, Nadia A.; Johnson, Ann-Marie F.; Phillips, Bonnie L.; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Doyle, Lara A.; Roy, Chad J.; Didier, Peter J.; Blanchard, James L.; Rengarajan, Jyothi; Lackner, Andrew A.; Khader, Shabaana A.; Mehra, Smriti

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global pandaemic, partially due to the failure of vaccination approaches. Novel anti-TB vaccines are therefore urgently required. Here we show that aerosol immunization of macaques with the Mtb mutant in SigH (MtbΔsigH) results in significant recruitment of inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing activation and proliferation markers to the lungs. Further, the findings indicate that pulmonary vaccination with MtbΔsigH elicited strong central memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in the lung. Vaccination with MtbΔsigH results in significant protection against a lethal TB challenge, as evidenced by an approximately three log reduction in bacterial burdens, significantly diminished clinical manifestations and granulomatous pathology and characterized by the presence of profound iBALT. This highly protective response is virtually absent in unvaccinated and BCG-vaccinated animals after challenge. These results suggest that future TB vaccine candidates can be developed on the basis of MtbΔsigH. PMID:26460802

  3. Phase transitions in ensembles of solitons induced by an optical pumping or a strong electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, P.; Brazovskii, S.

    2016-09-01

    The latest trend in studies of modern electronically and/or optically active materials is to provoke phase transformations induced by high electric fields or by short (femtosecond) powerful optical pulses. The systems of choice are cooperative electronic states whose broken symmetries give rise to topological defects. For typical quasi-one-dimensional architectures, those are the microscopic solitons taking from electrons the major roles as carriers of charge or spin. Because of the long-range ordering, the solitons experience unusual super-long-range forces leading to a sequence of phase transitions in their ensembles: the higher-temperature transition of the confinement and the lower one of aggregation into macroscopic walls. Here we present results of an extensive numerical modeling for ensembles of both neutral and charged solitons in both two- and three-dimensional systems. We suggest a specific Monte Carlo algorithm preserving the number of solitons, which substantially facilitates the calculations, allows to extend them to the three-dimensional case and to include the important long-range Coulomb interactions. The results confirm the first confinement transition, except for a very strong Coulomb repulsion, and demonstrate a pattern formation at the second transition of aggregation.

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce strong oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Huerta-García, Elizabeth; Pérez-Arizti, José Antonio; Márquez-Ramírez, Sandra Gissela; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma Laura; Chirino, Yolanda Irasema; Iglesias, Gisela Gutiérrez; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2014-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used in the chemical, electrical, and electronic industries. TiO2 NPs can enter directly into the brain through the olfactory bulb and can be deposited in the hippocampus region; therefore, we determined the toxic effect of TiO2 NPs on rat and human glial cells, C6 and U373, respectively. We evaluated some events related to oxidative stress: (1) redox-signaling mechanisms by oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate; (2) peroxidation of lipids by cis-parinaric acid; (3) antioxidant enzyme expression by PCR in real time; and (4) mitochondrial damage by MitoTracker Green FM staining and Rh123. TiO2 NPs induced a strong oxidative stress in both glial cell lines by mediating changes in the cellular redox state and lipid peroxidation associated with a rise in the expression of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase 2. TiO2 NPs also produced morphological changes, damage of mitochondria, and an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating toxicity. TiO2 NPs had a cytotoxic effect on glial cells; however, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to ascertain that exposure to TiO2 NPs can cause brain injury and be hazardous to health.

  5. Two-dimensional metal-insulator transition as a strong localization induced crossover phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Sarma, S.; Hwang, E. H.

    2014-06-01

    Low-disorder and high-mobility two-dimensional (2D) electron (or hole) systems confined in semiconductor heterostructures undergo an apparent metal-insulator transition (MIT) at low temperatures as the carrier density (n) is varied. In some situations, the 2D MIT can be caused at a fixed low carrier density by changing an externally applied in-plane magnetic field parallel to the 2D layer. The goal of the current work is to obtain the critical density (nc) for the 2D MIT with the system being an effective metal (Anderson insulator) for density n above (below) nc. We study the 2D MIT phenomenon theoretically as a possible strong localization induced crossover process controlled by the Ioffe-Regel criterion, kFl=1, where kF(n) is the 2D Fermi wave vector and l (n) is the disorder-limited quantum mean free path on the metallic side. Calculating the quantum mean free path in the effective metallic phase from a realistic Boltzmann transport theory including disorder scattering effects, we solve the integral equation (with l depending on n through multidimensional integrals) defined by the Ioffe-Regel criterion to obtain the nonuniversal critical density nc as a function of the applicable physical experimental parameters including disorder strength, in-plane magnetic field, spin and valley degeneracy, background dielectric constant and carrier effective mass, and temperature. The key physics underlying the nonuniversal parameter dependence of the critical density is the density dependence of the screened Coulomb disorder. Our calculated results for the crossover critical density nc appear to be in qualitative and semiquantitative agreement with the available experimental data in different 2D semiconductor systems lending credence to the possibility that the apparent 2D MIT signals the onset of the strong localization crossover in disordered 2D systems. We also compare the calculated critical density obtained from the Ioffe-Regel criterion with that obtained from a

  6. Vv-AMP1, a ripening induced peptide from Vitis vinifera shows strong antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Abré; Vivier, Melané A

    2008-01-01

    Background Latest research shows that small antimicrobial peptides play a role in the innate defense system of plants. These peptides typically contribute to preformed defense by developing protective barriers around germinating seeds or between different tissue layers within plant organs. The encoding genes could also be upregulated by abiotic and biotic stimuli during active defense processes. The peptides display a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. Their potent anti-pathogenic characteristics have ensured that they are promising targets in the medical and agricultural biotechnology sectors. Results A berry specific cDNA sequence designated Vv-AMP1, Vitis vinifera antimicrobial peptide 1, was isolated from Vitis vinifera. Vv-AMP1 encodes for a 77 amino acid peptide that shows sequence homology to the family of plant defensins. Vv-AMP1 is expressed in a tissue specific, developmentally regulated manner, being only expressed in berry tissue at the onset of berry ripening and onwards. Treatment of leaf and berry tissue with biotic or abiotic factors did not lead to increased expression of Vv-AMP1 under the conditions tested. The predicted signal peptide of Vv-AMP1, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP), showed that the signal peptide allowed accumulation of its product in the apoplast. Vv-AMP1 peptide, produced in Escherichia coli, had a molecular mass of 5.495 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry. Recombinant Vv-AMP1 was extremely heat-stable and showed strong antifungal activity against a broad spectrum of plant pathogenic fungi, with very high levels of activity against the wilting disease causing pathogens Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae. The Vv-AMP1 peptide did not induce morphological changes on the treated fungal hyphae, but instead strongly inhibited hyphal elongation. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of Vv-AMP1 might be associated with altering the membrane permeability of the fungal

  7. Interfaces between strongly correlated oxides: controlling charge transfer and induced magnetism by hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibes, Manuel

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from correlations between transition metal and oxygen ions. Strong correlations thus offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. In this talk we will show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we have probed charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3 using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We show that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate (observed by XMCD), exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. Work supported by ERC CoG MINT #615759.

  8. Interparticle Capillary Forces at a Fluid-Fluid Interface with Strong Polymer-Induced Aging.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, Stefano; de Jong, Arthur M; Baudry, Jean; Prins, Menno W J

    2017-01-24

    We report on a measurement of forces between particles adsorbed at a water-oil interface in the presence of an oil-soluble polymer. The cationic polymer interacts electrostatically with the negatively charged particles, thereby modulating the particle contact angle and the magnitude of capillary attraction between the particles. However, polymer adsorption to the interface also generates an increase in the apparent interfacial viscosity over several orders of magnitude in a time span of a few hours. We have designed an experiment in which repeated motion trajectories are measured on pairs of particles. The experiment gives an independent quantification of the interfacial drag coefficient (10(-7)-10(-4) Ns/m) and of the interparticle capillary forces (0.1-10 pN). We observed that the attractive capillary force depends on the amount of polymer in the oil phase and on the particle pair. However, the attraction appears to be independent of the surface rheology, with changes over a wide range of apparent viscosity values due to aging. Given the direction (attraction), the range (∼μm), and the distance dependence (∼1/S(5)) of the observed interparticle force, we interpret the force as being caused by quadrupolar deformations of the fluid-fluid interface induced by particle surface roughness. The results suggest that capillary forces are equilibrated in the early stages of interface aging and thereafter do not change anymore, even though strong changes in surface rheology still occur. The described experimental approach is powerful for studying dissipative as well as conservative forces of micro- and nanoparticles at fluid-fluid interfaces for systems out of equilibrium.

  9. Advanced In vivo Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Anti-sense DNA Inhibition for Gene Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandon J.; Azam, Amber B.; Gillon, Colleen J.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Zovkic, Iva B.

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain–behavior relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene editing technology now allows neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene editing in the adult nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knockout genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the toolbox is widely accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knockdown genes in the brain. The main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their simplicity, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories. PMID:26793235

  10. Widespread anti-sense transcription in apple is correlated with siRNA production and indicates a large potential for transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Bruneau, Maryline; Pelletier, Sandra; Aubourg, Sébastien; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Navarro, Lionel; Laurens, François; Renou, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Characterizing the transcriptome of eukaryotic organisms is essential for studying gene regulation and its impact on phenotype. The realization that anti-sense (AS) and noncoding RNA transcription is pervasive in many genomes has emphasized our limited understanding of gene transcription and post-transcriptional regulation. Numerous mechanisms including convergent transcription, anti-correlated expression of sense and AS transcripts, and RNAi remain ill-defined. Here, we have combined microarray analysis and high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs) to unravel the complexity of transcriptional and potential post-transcriptional regulation in eight organs of apple (Malus × domestica). The percentage of AS transcript expression is higher than that identified in annual plants such as rice and Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we show that a majority of AS transcripts are transcribed beyond 3'UTR regions, and may cover a significant portion of the predicted sense transcripts. Finally we demonstrate at a genome-wide scale that anti-sense transcript expression is correlated with the presence of both short (21-23 nt) and long (> 30 nt) siRNAs, and that the sRNA coverage depth varies with the level of AS transcript expression. Our study provides a new insight on the functional role of anti-sense transcripts at the genome-wide level, and a new basis for the understanding of sRNA biogenesis in plants.

  11. Coexistence of sense and anti-sense mRNAs of variant surface protein in Giardia lamblia trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junli; Zheng, Wenyu; Wang, Yuehua; Li, Yao; Lu, Siqi; Feng, Xianmin

    2014-02-14

    A strategy of the parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia to evade attack from the host immune system is periodic changes of its surface antigen, a member of the variant surface protein (VSP) family. A post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism has been proposed to explain the presence of only one among many possible VSPs at any time. To investigate this phenomenon further, we extracted total RNA from cultured trophozoites of the G. lamblia C2 isolate, and cDNA was reverse-transcribed from the RNA. Sense and anti-sense VSPs were amplified from the total cDNA using nested PCR with primers designed from the 3'-conserved region and the known 5' or 3' end of the cDNA library. Sequence analyses of the amplified products revealed more than 34 full-length antisense VSPs and a smear of sense VSPs. Sequence alignments and comparisons revealed that these VSPs contained variable N-termini and conserved C-termini, and could be classified into 5 clades based on the sizes and variations of the N-terminal sequence. All antisense VSPs existed in the sense forms, but no corresponding antisense VSP existed for sense RNA (snsRNA) 16. The coexistence of sense and antisense VSP mRNAs in cultured G. lamblia supports the post-transcriptional regulation of VSP expression. We propose that VSPs transcribed simultaneously in the sense and antisense forms form double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) which are degraded by the Dicer endonuclease, while a VSP without an antisense transcription (e.g., snsRNA16) will be expressed on the surface of Giardia. In addition, in the course of this investigation VSPs were identified that were previously not known. PCR-based amplification of specific sense and antisense VSP cDNAs can be used to identify the specific VSP on G. lamblia trophozoites, which is easier than using specific monoclonal antibody approaches. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides induce strong up-regulation of interleukin 33 via Toll-like receptor 9.

    PubMed

    Shimosato, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Megumi; Tohno, Masanori; Sato, Takashi; Tateo, Mariko; Otani, Hajime; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2010-03-26

    We previously reported the strong immunostimulatory effects of a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), designated MsST, from the lacZ gene of Streptococcus (S.) thermophilus ATCC19258. Here we show that 24h of stimulation with MsST in mouse splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages strongly induces expression of interleukin (IL)-33, a cytokine in the IL-1 superfamily. Other IL-1 superfamily members, including IL-1alpha, IL-1beta and IL-18, are down-regulated after 24h of stimulation of MsST. We also found that MsST-induced IL-33 mRNA expression is inhibited by the suppressive ODN A151, which can inhibit Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated responses. This is the first report to show that IL-33 can be induced by CpG ODNs. The strong induction of IL-33 by MsST suggests that it may be a potential therapeutic ODN for the treatment of inflammatory disease. The presence of a strong CpG ODN in S. thermophilus also suggests that the bacterium may be a good candidate as a starter culture for the development of new physiologically functional foods.

  13. Routes to probe Bismuth induced strong-coupling superconductivity in bimetallic BiIn alloys.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Ashish Chhaganlal; Wu, Sheng Yun

    2017-08-25

    We report the observation of strong electron-phonon coupling in intergranular linked BiIn superconductors over an infinite range mediated by low-lying phonons. An enhanced superconducting transition temperature was observed from the magnetization, revealing a main diamagnetic Meissner state below TC(0) = 5.86(1) K and a critical field HC(0) = 1355(15) Oe with an In2Bi phase of the composite sample. The electron-phonon coupling to low lying phonons is found to be the leading mechanism for observed strong-coupling superconductivity in the BiIn system. Our findings suggest that In2Bi is in the strong-coupling region with TC(0) = 5.62(1) K, λep = 1.45, ωln = 45.92 K and α = 2.23. The estimated upper critical field can be well-described by a power law with α value higher than 2, consistent with the strong electron-phonon coupling.

  14. New mechanism of kinetic exchange interaction induced by strong magnetic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the kinetic exchange interaction between single-occupied magnetic orbitals (s-s) is always antiferromagnetic, while between single- and double-occupied orbitals (s-d) is always ferromagnetic and much weaker. Here we show that the exchange interaction between strongly anisotropic doublets of lanthanides, actinides and transition metal ions with unquenched orbital momentum contains a new s-d kinetic contribution equal in strength with the s-s one. In non-collinear magnetic systems, this s-d kinetic mechanism can cause an overall ferromagnetic exchange interaction which can become very strong for transition metal ions. These findings are fully confirmed by DFT based analysis of exchange interaction in several Ln3+ complexes. PMID:27098292

  15. Vertical oscillations of dust particles in a strongly magnetized plasma sheath induced by horizontal laser manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttscher, M.; Melzer, A.; Konopka, U.; LeBlanc, S.; Lynch, B.; Thomas, E.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental studies are presented where dust particles are suspended in the lower sheath region of an argon rf discharge at a strong vertical magnetic field from B =1.5 T up to 2.27 T. There the particles arranged in an ordered pattern imposed by the upper mesh electrode. It is observed that the particles jump to a new equilibrium position, where they exhibit self-excited vertical oscillations when illuminated by a horizontal laser beam. The dust motion is weakly damped during an upward jump and strongly damped during the return to the equilibrium after the laser is switched off. A model based on delayed charging is presented that can describe the observed behavior.

  16. Strong single-ion anisotropy and anisotropic interactions of magnetic adatoms induced by topological surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenglu; Yang, Jihui; Chen, Guohong; Whangbo, M.-H.; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xingao

    2013-03-01

    The nature of the magnetism brought about by Fe adatoms on the surface of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 was examined in terms of density functional calculations. The Fe adatoms exhibit strong easy-axis magnetic anisotropy in the dilute adsorption limit due to the topological surface states (TSS). The spin exchange J between the Fe adatoms follows a Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida behavior with substantial anisotropy, and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction between them is quite strong with |D/J| ~ 0.3 under the mediation by the TSS, and can be further raised to 0.6 by an external electric field. The apparent single-ion anisotropy of a Fe adatom is indispensable in determining the spin orientation. NSFC, FANEDD, Pujiang Plan, Eastern Scholar

  17. Sulfur Doping Induces Strong Ferromagnetic Ordering in Graphene: Effect of Concentration and Substitution Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Błoński, Piotr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Šimek, Petr; Petr, Martin; Pumera, Martin; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-01

    Imprinting ferromagnetism to a graphene structure by substitution of carbon atoms with sulfur is reported. S-doped graphene (4.2 at%) shows strong ferromagnetic properties with saturation magnetization exceeding 5.5 emu g(-1) at 2 K, which is among the highest values reported for any sp-based system. The remarkable magnetic response is attributed to delocalization of electrons from sulfur injected into the graphene conduction band.

  18. An antibody blocking activin type II receptors induces strong skeletal muscle hypertrophy and protects from atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lach-Trifilieff, Estelle; Minetti, Giulia C; Sheppard, KellyAnn; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Feige, Jerome N; Hartmann, Steffen; Brachat, Sophie; Rivet, Helene; Koelbing, Claudia; Morvan, Frederic; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Glass, David J

    2014-02-01

    The myostatin/activin type II receptor (ActRII) pathway has been identified to be critical in regulating skeletal muscle size. Several other ligands, including GDF11 and the activins, signal through this pathway, suggesting that the ActRII receptors are major regulatory nodes in the regulation of muscle mass. We have developed a novel, human anti-ActRII antibody (bimagrumab, or BYM338) to prevent binding of ligands to the receptors and thus inhibit downstream signaling. BYM338 enhances differentiation of primary human skeletal myoblasts and counteracts the inhibition of differentiation induced by myostatin or activin A. BYM338 prevents myostatin- or activin A-induced atrophy through inhibition of Smad2/3 phosphorylation, thus sparing the myosin heavy chain from degradation. BYM338 dramatically increases skeletal muscle mass in mice, beyond sole inhibition of myostatin, detected by comparing the antibody with a myostatin inhibitor. A mouse version of the antibody induces enhanced muscle hypertrophy in myostatin mutant mice, further confirming a beneficial effect on muscle growth beyond myostatin inhibition alone through blockade of ActRII ligands. BYM338 protects muscles from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy and weakness via prevention of muscle and tetanic force losses. These data highlight the compelling therapeutic potential of BYM338 for the treatment of skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness in multiple settings.

  19. An Antibody Blocking Activin Type II Receptors Induces Strong Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy and Protects from Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, Giulia C.; Sheppard, KellyAnn; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Feige, Jerome N.; Hartmann, Steffen; Brachat, Sophie; Rivet, Helene; Koelbing, Claudia; Morvan, Frederic; Hatakeyama, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    The myostatin/activin type II receptor (ActRII) pathway has been identified to be critical in regulating skeletal muscle size. Several other ligands, including GDF11 and the activins, signal through this pathway, suggesting that the ActRII receptors are major regulatory nodes in the regulation of muscle mass. We have developed a novel, human anti-ActRII antibody (bimagrumab, or BYM338) to prevent binding of ligands to the receptors and thus inhibit downstream signaling. BYM338 enhances differentiation of primary human skeletal myoblasts and counteracts the inhibition of differentiation induced by myostatin or activin A. BYM338 prevents myostatin- or activin A-induced atrophy through inhibition of Smad2/3 phosphorylation, thus sparing the myosin heavy chain from degradation. BYM338 dramatically increases skeletal muscle mass in mice, beyond sole inhibition of myostatin, detected by comparing the antibody with a myostatin inhibitor. A mouse version of the antibody induces enhanced muscle hypertrophy in myostatin mutant mice, further confirming a beneficial effect on muscle growth beyond myostatin inhibition alone through blockade of ActRII ligands. BYM338 protects muscles from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy and weakness via prevention of muscle and tetanic force losses. These data highlight the compelling therapeutic potential of BYM338 for the treatment of skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness in multiple settings. PMID:24298022

  20. Fate of disorder-induced inhomogeneities in strongly correlated d-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debmalya; Ghosal, Amit

    2014-10-01

    We analyze the complex interplay of the strong correlations and impurities in a high temperature superconductor and show that both the nature and degree of the inhomogeneities at zero temperature in the local-order parameters change drastically from those obtained in a simple Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Although both the strong electronic repulsions and disorder contribute to the nanoscale inhomogeneity in the population of charge-carriers, we find they compete with each other, leading to a relatively smooth variation of the local density. Our self-consistent calculations modify the spatial fluctuations in the pairing amplitude by suppressing all the double occupancy within a Gutzwiller formalism and prohibit the formation of distinct superconducting ‘islands’. In contrast, presence of such ‘islands’ controls the outcome if strong correlations are neglected. The reorganization of the spatial structures in the Gutzwiller method makes these superconductors surprisingly insensitive to the impurities. This is illustrated by a very weak decay of superfluid stiffness, off-diagonal long-range order and local density of states up to a large disorder strength. Exploring the origin of such a robustness, we conclude that the underlying one-particle normal states reshape in a rich manner, such that the superconductor formed by pairing these states experiences a weaker but spatially correlated effective disorder. Such a route to superconductivity is evocative of Anderson's theorem. Our results capture the key experimental trends in the cuprates.

  1. Distribution of plasma and magnetic field in the Venus induced magnetosphere is strongly asymmetrical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Zhang, T.-L.; Woch, J.; Wei, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2013-09-01

    Venus Express spacecraft have provided us a wealth of in-situ observations of characteristics of induced magnetosphere of Venus. One of its important features is a distinct asymmetry in plasma and field characteristics between the hemisphere pointed in the direction of the motional electric field and the opposite hemisphere. Asymmetry starts from formation of the magnetic barrier, then continues to low altitudes where effects of finite conductivity become important and further to the near Venus tail where the magnetic tail and plasma sheet are formed. As a result, the structure and dynamics of the induced magnetosphere in both hemispheres occur different. We present different aspects of such an asymmetry and discuss possible mechanisms of its appearance.

  2. Distribution of plasma and magnetic field in the Venus induced magnetosphere is strongly asymmetrical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Zhang, T.; Woch, J. G.; Wei, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S. V.; Lundin, R. N.

    2013-12-01

    Venus Express spacecraft have provided us a wealth of in-situ observations of characteristics of induced magnetosphere of Venus. One of its important features is a distinct asymmetry in plasma and field characteristics between the hemisphere pointed in the direction of the motional electric field and the opposite hemisphere. Asymmetry starts from formation of the magnetic barrier, then continues to low altitudes where effects of finite conductivity become important and further to the near Venus tail where the magnetic tail and plasma sheet are formed. As a result, the structure and dynamics of the induced magnetosphere in both hemispheres occur different. We present different aspects of such an asymmetry and discuss possible mechanisms of its appearance.

  3. Enhanced turbulent mixing induced by strong wind on the South China Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Tian, Jiwei

    2014-06-01

    Integrated observations were made on the South China Sea shelf at 19°37' N, 112°04' E, under strong wind and heavy raining weather conditions in August 2005. Current data were obtained using a moored 150-kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate were measured with TurboMapII, and temperature was recorded by thermistor chains. Both the mixed layer thickness and the corresponding mean dissipation rate increased after the strong wind bursts. Average surface mixed layer thickness was 13.4 m pre-wind and 22.4 m post-wind, and the average turbulent dissipation rate in the mixed layer pre-wind and post-wind were 4.26 × 10-7 and 1.09 × 10-6 Wkg-1, respectively. The post-wind dissipation rate was 2.5 times larger than the pre-wind dissipation rate in the interior layer and four times larger in the intermediate water column. Spectra and vertical mode analysis revealed that near-inertial motion post-wind, especially with high modes, was strengthened and propagated downward toward the intermediate layer. The downward group velocity of near-inertial current was about 8.1 × 10-5 ms-1 during the strong wind bursts. The mean percentage of wind work transmitted into the intermediate layer is about 4.2 %. The ratio of post-wind high-mode energy to total horizontal kinetic energy increased below the surface mixed layer, which would have caused instabilities and result in turbulent mixing. Based on these data, we discuss a previous parameterization that relates dissipation rate, stratification, and shear variance calculated from baroclinic currents with high modes (higher than mode 1) which concentrate a large fraction of energy.

  4. Strong Field-Induced Frequency Conversion of Laser Radiation in Plasma Plumes: Recent Achievements

    PubMed Central

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    New findings in plasma harmonics studies using strong laser fields are reviewed. We discuss recent achievements in the growth of the efficiency of coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation sources based on frequency conversion of the ultrashort pulses in the laser-produced plasmas, which allowed for the spectral and structural studies of matter through the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy. These studies showed that plasma HHG can open new opportunities in many unexpected areas of laser-matter interaction. Besides being considered as an alternative method for generation of coherent XUV radiation, it can be used as a powerful tool for various spectroscopic and analytical applications. PMID:23864818

  5. Strong cooperative coupling of pressure-induced magnetic order and nematicity in FeSe

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, K.; Böhmer, A. E.; Jayasekara, W. T.; Ueland, B. G.; Das, P.; Sapkota, A.; Taufour, V.; Xiao, Y.; Alp, E.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of the iron-based superconductors is the strong coupling between magnetic, structural and electronic degrees of freedom. However, a universal picture of the normal state properties of these compounds has been confounded by recent investigations of FeSe where the nematic (structural) and magnetic transitions appear to be decoupled. Here, using synchrotron-based high-energy x-ray diffraction and time-domain Mössbauer spectroscopy, we show that nematicity and magnetism in FeSe under applied pressure are indeed strongly coupled. Distinct structural and magnetic transitions are observed for pressures between 1.0 and 1.7 GPa and merge into a single first-order transition for pressures ≳1.7 GPa, reminiscent of what has been found for the evolution of these transitions in the prototypical system Ba(Fe1−xCox)2As2. Our results are consistent with a spin-driven mechanism for nematic order in FeSe and provide an important step towards a universal description of the normal state properties of the iron-based superconductors. PMID:27582003

  6. Strong cooperative coupling of pressure-induced magnetic order and nematicity in FeSe

    SciTech Connect

    Kothapalli, K.; Bohmer, A. E.; Jayasekara, W. T.; Ueland, B. G.; Das, P.; Sapkota, A.; Taufour, V.; Xiao, Y.; Alp, E.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    A hallmark of the iron-based superconductors is the strong coupling between magnetic, structural and electronic degrees of freedom. However, a universal picture of the normal state properties of these compounds has been confounded by recent investigations of FeSe where the nematic (structural) and magnetic transitions appear to be decoupled. Here, using synchrotron-based high-energy x-ray diffraction and time-domain Mossbauer spectroscopy, we show that nematicity and magnetism in FeSe under applied pressure are indeed strongly coupled. Distinct structural and magnetic transitions are observed for pressures between 1.0 and 1.7 GPa and merge into a single first-order transition for pressures ≳1.7 GPa, reminiscent of what has been found for the evolution of these transitions in the prototypical system Ba(Fe1–xCox)2As2. Lastly, our results are consistent with a spin-driven mechanism for nematic order in FeSe and provide an important step towards a universal description of the normal state properties of the iron-based superconductors.

  7. Strong cooperative coupling of pressure-induced magnetic order and nematicity in FeSe.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, K; Böhmer, A E; Jayasekara, W T; Ueland, B G; Das, P; Sapkota, A; Taufour, V; Xiao, Y; Alp, E; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C; Kreyssig, A; Goldman, A I

    2016-09-01

    A hallmark of the iron-based superconductors is the strong coupling between magnetic, structural and electronic degrees of freedom. However, a universal picture of the normal state properties of these compounds has been confounded by recent investigations of FeSe where the nematic (structural) and magnetic transitions appear to be decoupled. Here, using synchrotron-based high-energy x-ray diffraction and time-domain Mössbauer spectroscopy, we show that nematicity and magnetism in FeSe under applied pressure are indeed strongly coupled. Distinct structural and magnetic transitions are observed for pressures between 1.0 and 1.7 GPa and merge into a single first-order transition for pressures ≳1.7 GPa, reminiscent of what has been found for the evolution of these transitions in the prototypical system Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2. Our results are consistent with a spin-driven mechanism for nematic order in FeSe and provide an important step towards a universal description of the normal state properties of the iron-based superconductors.

  8. Strong cooperative coupling of pressure-induced magnetic order and nematicity in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothapalli, K.; Böhmer, A. E.; Jayasekara, W. T.; Ueland, B. G.; Das, P.; Sapkota, A.; Taufour, V.; Xiao, Y.; Alp, E.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    A hallmark of the iron-based superconductors is the strong coupling between magnetic, structural and electronic degrees of freedom. However, a universal picture of the normal state properties of these compounds has been confounded by recent investigations of FeSe where the nematic (structural) and magnetic transitions appear to be decoupled. Here, using synchrotron-based high-energy x-ray diffraction and time-domain Mössbauer spectroscopy, we show that nematicity and magnetism in FeSe under applied pressure are indeed strongly coupled. Distinct structural and magnetic transitions are observed for pressures between 1.0 and 1.7 GPa and merge into a single first-order transition for pressures >~1.7 GPa, reminiscent of what has been found for the evolution of these transitions in the prototypical system Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2. Our results are consistent with a spin-driven mechanism for nematic order in FeSe and provide an important step towards a universal description of the normal state properties of the iron-based superconductors.

  9. Model simulations of strong atmospheric conductivity disturbances and induced responses of the Global Electric Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertner, A. J.; Lehto, E.; Neely, R. R.; English, J. M.; Zhu, Y.; Lucas, G.; Thayer, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical conductivity in the troposphere and stratosphere is an important quantity that determines the distribution of currents in the GEC (Global Electric Circuit), as well as the potential difference between the Earth and the ionosphere. Recently, progress in modeling atmospheric conductivity has been achieved by integrating the conductivity calculation into an AC-GCM (atmospheric chemistry general circulation model), which provides all relevant data. In this study, WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model) is used for conductivity calculations and an analysis of the effects of strong disturbances on the GEC. This includes volcanic eruptions of Pinatubo in 1991 and the super volcano Toba, polar stratospheric clouds, radioactive releases, and the recent strong galactic cosmic ray maximum. In general, there is a decrease in conductivity from enhanced aerosol number densities, resulting from volcanic eruptions or polar stratospheric clouds. Conductivity is increased by additional ionization sources such as radioactive releases, or galactic cosmic ray increases such as during the last solar minimum. The effects of such events on conductivity, column and total resistance, and estimate effects on current distribution and the earth-ionosphere potential difference will be quantified. Percentage change in conductivity at 20 km altitude two months after the Toba volcanic eruption (WACCM model simulation). The enhanced aerosol concentrations lead to a "conductivity hole" between 30°S and 45° N.

  10. Strong cooperative coupling of pressure-induced magnetic order and nematicity in FeSe

    DOE PAGES

    Kothapalli, K.; Bohmer, A. E.; Jayasekara, W. T.; ...

    2016-09-01

    A hallmark of the iron-based superconductors is the strong coupling between magnetic, structural and electronic degrees of freedom. However, a universal picture of the normal state properties of these compounds has been confounded by recent investigations of FeSe where the nematic (structural) and magnetic transitions appear to be decoupled. Here, using synchrotron-based high-energy x-ray diffraction and time-domain Mossbauer spectroscopy, we show that nematicity and magnetism in FeSe under applied pressure are indeed strongly coupled. Distinct structural and magnetic transitions are observed for pressures between 1.0 and 1.7 GPa and merge into a single first-order transition for pressures ≳1.7 GPa, reminiscentmore » of what has been found for the evolution of these transitions in the prototypical system Ba(Fe1–xCox)2As2. Lastly, our results are consistent with a spin-driven mechanism for nematic order in FeSe and provide an important step towards a universal description of the normal state properties of the iron-based superconductors.« less

  11. Strong adhesion by regulatory T cells induces dendritic cell cytoskeletal polarization and contact-dependent lethargy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiahuan; Ganguly, Anutosh; Mucsi, Ashley D; Meng, Junchen; Yan, Jiacong; Detampel, Pascal; Munro, Fay; Zhang, Zongde; Wu, Mei; Hari, Aswin; Stenner, Melanie D; Zheng, Wencheng; Kubes, Paul; Xia, Tie; Amrein, Matthias W; Qi, Hai; Shi, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Dendritic cells are targeted by regulatory T (T reg) cells, in a manner that operates as an indirect mode of T cell suppression. In this study, using a combination of single-cell force spectroscopy and structured illumination microscopy, we analyze individual T reg cell-DC interaction events and show that T reg cells exhibit strong intrinsic adhesiveness to DCs. This increased DC adhesion reduces the ability of contacted DCs to engage other antigen-specific cells. We show that this unusually strong LFA-1-dependent adhesiveness of T reg cells is caused in part by their low calpain activities, which normally release integrin-cytoskeleton linkage, and thereby reduce adhesion. Super resolution imaging reveals that such T reg cell adhesion causes sequestration of Fascin-1, an actin-bundling protein essential for immunological synapse formation, and skews Fascin-1-dependent actin polarization in DCs toward the T reg cell adhesion zone. Although it is reversible upon T reg cell disengagement, this sequestration of essential cytoskeletal components causes a lethargic state of DCs, leading to reduced T cell priming. Our results reveal a dynamic cytoskeletal component underlying T reg cell-mediated DC suppression in a contact-dependent manner. © 2017 Chen et al.

  12. Counterion-induced entropic interactions in solutions of strongly stretched, osmotic polyelectrolyte stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusufi, A.; Likos, C. N.; Lowen, H.

    2002-06-01

    We examine the conformations and effective interactions of star-branched polyelectrolytes with and without added salt, by employing monomer-resolved molecular dynamics simulations and an analytical theory. The simulations take into account the excluded-volume and Coulomb interactions between the individual monomers, as well as the counter- and coions. The theory is based on a variational free energy that is written as a sum of electrostatic, polymer, and entropic contributions of the counter- and coions. For the conformations of isolated polyelectrolyte stars, we find strong stretching of the chains, resulting in a linear scaling of the star radius with the degree of polymerization, as well as trapping and condensation of a large fraction of counterions. The effective interactions at arbitrarily strong overlaps between the stars are shown to be dominated by the entropic contributions of the trapped counterions, with the electrostatic contribution playing only a minor role due to an almost complete neutralization of the stars. In the case of added salt, we find a shrinking of the star size as well as a weakening of the effective force due to a generalized depletion mechanism. The good agreement between theory and simulations allows us to put forward analytic expressions for the effective interaction between polyelectrolyte stars at arbitrary separations.

  13. Strong adhesion by regulatory T cells induces dendritic cell cytoskeletal polarization and contact-dependent lethargy

    PubMed Central

    Mucsi, Ashley D.; Meng, Junchen; Yan, Jiacong; Zhang, Zongde; Wu, Mei; Hari, Aswin; Stenner, Melanie D.; Zheng, Wencheng; Kubes, Paul; Xia, Tie; Amrein, Matthias W.

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells are targeted by regulatory T (T reg) cells, in a manner that operates as an indirect mode of T cell suppression. In this study, using a combination of single-cell force spectroscopy and structured illumination microscopy, we analyze individual T reg cell–DC interaction events and show that T reg cells exhibit strong intrinsic adhesiveness to DCs. This increased DC adhesion reduces the ability of contacted DCs to engage other antigen-specific cells. We show that this unusually strong LFA-1–dependent adhesiveness of T reg cells is caused in part by their low calpain activities, which normally release integrin–cytoskeleton linkage, and thereby reduce adhesion. Super resolution imaging reveals that such T reg cell adhesion causes sequestration of Fascin-1, an actin-bundling protein essential for immunological synapse formation, and skews Fascin-1–dependent actin polarization in DCs toward the T reg cell adhesion zone. Although it is reversible upon T reg cell disengagement, this sequestration of essential cytoskeletal components causes a lethargic state of DCs, leading to reduced T cell priming. Our results reveal a dynamic cytoskeletal component underlying T reg cell–mediated DC suppression in a contact-dependent manner. PMID:28082358

  14. Strong protection induced by an experimental DIVA subunit vaccine against bluetongue virus serotype 8 in cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jenna; Hägglund, Sara; Bréard, Emmanuel; Riou, Mickaël; Zohari, Siamak; Comtet, Loic; Olofson, Ann-Sophie; Gélineau, Robert; Martin, Guillaume; Elvander, Marianne; Blomqvist, Gunilla; Zientara, Stéphan; Valarcher, Jean Francois

    2014-11-20

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infections in ruminants pose a permanent agricultural threat since new serotypes are constantly emerging in new locations. Clinical disease is mainly observed in sheep, but cattle were unusually affected during an outbreak of BTV seroype 8 (BTV-8) in Europe. We previously developed an experimental vaccine based on recombinant viral protein 2 (VP2) of BTV-8 and non-structural proteins 1 (NS1) and NS2 of BTV-2, mixed with an immunostimulating complex (ISCOM)-matrix adjuvant. We demonstrated that bovine immune responses induced by this vaccine were as good or superior to those induced by a classic commercial inactivated vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the experimental vaccine in cattle and, based on the detection of VP7 antibodies, assessed its DIVA compliancy following virus challenge. Two groups of BTV-seronegative calves were subcutaneously immunized twice at a 3-week interval with the subunit vaccine (n=6) or with adjuvant alone (n=6). Following BTV-8 challenge 3 weeks after second immunization, controls developed viremia and fever associated with other mild clinical signs of bluetongue disease, whereas vaccinated animals were clinically and virologically protected. The vaccine-induced protection was likely mediated by high virus-neutralizing antibody titers directed against VP2 and perhaps by cellular responses to NS1 and NS2. T lymphocyte responses were cross-reactive between BTV-2 and BTV-8, suggesting that NS1 and NS2 may provide the basis of an adaptable vaccine that can be varied by using VP2 of different serotypes. The detection of different levels of VP7 antibodies in vaccinated animals and controls after challenge suggested a compliancy between the vaccine and the DIVA companion test. This BTV subunit vaccine is a promising candidate that should be further evaluated and developed to protect against different serotypes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Antigen-conjugated N-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan nanoparticles induce strong immune responses after nasal administration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingfeng; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Zhang, Chi; Shao, Xiayan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2015-01-01

    Antigens were conjugated on the surface of N-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles to induce systemic and mucosal immune responses after nasal immunization. TMC was synthesized by free radical polymerization and blank nanoparticles were prepared by ionic crosslinking of TMC and sodium tripolyphosphate. The model antigen (ovalbumin) was conjugated on the surface of blank nanoparticles (OVA-NP) through thioester bond formation. The cellular uptake of OVA-NP was investigated in Raw 264.7 macrophages and biodistribution of antigens was studied by the radioiodine labeling method. The immunological effects were evaluated by nasal administration of OVA-NP to Balb/C mice. The transport mechanism and nasal toxicity of OVA-NP were studied in rats. The cellular uptake of OVA-NP was significantly higher than that of ovalbumin-encapsulated nanoparticles (NPe) after 30 min. Nasally administered OVA-NP showed higher transport of antigens to cervical lymph nodes with higher targeting efficiency than all other groups. Compared with NPe, OVA-NP induced much higher levels of systemic and mucosal immune responses in Balb/C mice after three nasal immunizations. Ex vivo culturing of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) confirmed its participation in nasal immunization. The transport mechanism study revealed that OVA-NP can be transported across the nasal epithelium through glands and may be taken up in NALT through M cells. OVA-NP did not induce obvious toxicity to nasal mucosa or hemolysis in animals. The present study demonstrated that the conjugation of TMC nanoparticles with antigens is an effective strategy for nasal vaccination.

  16. MAGNETIC FIELD-DECAY-INDUCED ELECTRON CAPTURES: A STRONG HEAT SOURCE IN MAGNETAR CRUSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Randall L.; Kaplan, David L. E-mail: dkaplan@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2010-01-10

    We propose a new heating mechanism in magnetar crusts. Magnetars' crustal magnetic fields are much stronger than their surface fields; therefore, magnetic pressure partially supports the crust against gravity. The crust loses magnetic pressure support as the field decays and must compensate by increasing the electron degeneracy pressure; the accompanying increase in the electron Fermi energy induces nonequilibrium, exothermic electron captures. The total heat released via field-decay electron captures is comparable to the total magnetic energy in the crust. Thus, field-decay electron captures are an important, if not the primary, mechanism powering magnetars' soft X-ray emission.

  17. Substrate-induced effects on the plasmonic properties of strongly coupled silver nanocubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezgot, Daniel; Ianoul, Anatoli

    2014-02-01

    The behaviour of the plasmonic modes of supported strongly coupled silver nanocubes is studied. Silver nanocube monolayers with controlled particle density were fabricated via the Langmuir-Blodgett technique and deposited on substrates with varying refractive indices. Substrates include glass, thin films of silicon, and titanium oxide on glass. The dipolar and bonded dipolar modes are red shifted with increasing refractive index of the substrate. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is used as a tool to probe the electric field enhancements of the silver nanocube monolayers. SERS enhancement of silver nanocube monolayers is found to be highly substrate dependant, typically decreasing with increasing refractive index of the underlying substrate. This work aims to find the source of this enhancement decrease, and distinguishes between effects related electromagnetic enhancement and effects caused by the optics of the Raman spectroscopy system itself.

  18. Quantum-trajectory analysis for charge transfer in solid materials induced by strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shicheng; Yu, Chao; Yuan, Guanglu; Wu, Tong; Wang, Ziwen; Lu, Ruifeng

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the dependence of charge transfer on the intensity of driving laser field when SiO2 crystal is irradiated by an 800 nm laser. It is surprising that the direction of charge transfer undergoes a sudden reversal when the driving laser intensity exceeds critical values with different carrier-envelope phases. By applying quantum-trajectory analysis, we find that the Bloch oscillation plays an important role in charge transfer in solids. Also, we study the interaction of a strong laser with gallium nitride (GaN), which is widely used in optoelectronics. A pump-probe scheme is applied to control the quantum trajectories of the electrons in the conduction band. The signal of charge transfer is controlled successfully by means of a theoretically proposed approach.

  19. Magnetic field induced by strong transverse plasmons in ultra-relativistic electron-positron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Li, X. Q.; Liu, S. Q.

    2012-08-01

    Context. We investigated the generation of localized magnetic fields in an ultra-relativistic non-isothermal electron-positron plasma by strong electromagnetic plasmons. Aims: The results obtained can be used to explain the origin of small-scale magnetic fields in the internal shock region of gamma-ray bursts with ultra-relativistic electron positron plasmas. Methods: The generation of magnetic fields was investigated with kinetic Vlasov Maxwell equations. Results: The self-generated magnetic field will collapse for modulation instability, leading to spatially highly intermittent magnetic fluxes, whose characteristic scale is much larger than relativistic plasma skin depth, which in turn is conducive to the generation of the long-life small-scale magnetic fields in the internal shock region of gamma-ray bursts.

  20. Phase-transition oscillations induced by a strongly focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devailly, Clémence; Crauste-Thibierge, Caroline; Petrosyan, Artyom; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    We report the observation of a surprising phenomenon consisting in a oscillating phase transition which appears in a binary mixture when this is enlightened by a strongly focused infrared laser beam. The mixture is poly-methyl-meth-acrylate (PMMA)-3-octanone, which has an upper critical solution temperature at Tc=306.6 K and volume fraction ϕc=12.8 % [Crauste et al., arXiv:1310.6720, 2013]. We describe the dynamical properties of the oscillations, which are produced by a competition between various effects: the local accumulation of PMMA produced by the laser beam, thermophoresis, and nonlinear diffusion. We show that the main properties of this kind of oscillations can be reproduced in the Landau theory for a binary mixture in which a local driving mechanism, simulating the laser beam, is introduced.

  1. Archaeosome Vaccine Adjuvants Induce Strong Humoral, Cell-Mediated, and Memory Responses: Comparison to Conventional Liposomes and Alum†

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lakshmi; Dicaire, Chantal J.; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Sprott, G. Dennis

    2000-01-01

    Ether glycerolipids extracted from various archaeobacteria were formulated into liposomes (archaeosomes) possessing strong adjuvant properties. Mice of varying genetic backgrounds, immunized by different parenteral routes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) entrapped in archaeosomes (∼200-nm vesicles), demonstrated markedly enhanced serum anti-BSA antibody titers. These titers were often comparable to those achieved with Freund's adjuvant and considerably more than those with alum or conventional liposomes (phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylglycerol-cholesterol, 1.8:0.2:1.5 molar ratio). Furthermore, antigen-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2a, and IgG2b isotype antibodies were all induced. Association of BSA with the lipid vesicles was required for induction of a strong response, and >80% of the protein was internalized within most archaeosome types, suggesting efficient release of antigen in vivo. Encapsulation of ovalbumin and hen egg lysozyme within archaeosomes showed similar immune responses. Antigen-archaeosome immunizations also induced a strong cell-mediated immune response: antigen-dependent proliferation and substantial production of cytokines gamma interferon (Th1) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) (Th2) by spleen cells in vitro. In contrast, conventional liposomes induced little cell-mediated immunity, whereas alum stimulated only an IL-4 response. In contrast to alum and Freund's adjuvant, archaeosomes composed of Thermoplasma acidophilum lipids evoked a dramatic memory antibody response to the encapsulated protein (at ∼300 days) after only two initial immunizations (days 0 and 14). This correlated with increased antigen-specific cell cycling of CD4+ T cells: increase in synthetic (S) and mitotic (G2/M) and decrease in resting (G1) phases. Thus, archaeosomes may be potent vaccine carriers capable of facilitating strong primary and memory humoral, and cell-mediated immune responses to the entrapped antigen. PMID:10603368

  2. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  3. Vacuum Particle-Antiparticle Creation in Strong Fields as a Field-Induced Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyansky, S. A.; Panferov, A. D.; Blaschke, D. B.; Juchnowski, L.; Kämpfer, B.; Otto, A.

    2017-03-01

    We study the special features of vacuum particle creation in an external classical field for two simple external field models in standard QED. Our investigation is based on a kinetic equation that is a nonperturbative consequence of the fundamental QED equations of motion. We identify the special features of system evolution that apply qualitatively also for other systems and are therefore rather general. The common basis for a description of these systems is formed by kinetic equations for vacuum particle creation belonging to the class of integro-differential equations of non-Markovian type with fastly oscillating kernel. This allows us to characterize the processes of this type as belonging to the class of field-induced phase transitions. Examples range from condensed matter physics to cosmology.

  4. Soft-sediment deformation structures induced by strong earthquakes in southern Siberia and their paleoseismic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunina, Oksana V.; Gladkov, Andrey S.

    2016-10-01

    Liquefaction-induced soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDS) formed by earthquakes in southern Siberia, that were historically mentioned or monitored by instruments, are described and analyzed. Clastic dikes are the most common among all SSDS in the epicentral areas of the investigated seismic events. They are also the most reliable paleoseismic indicators in regions where cryogenic processes are intense. We suggest seven criteria that may be useful to distinguish the seismogenic clastic dikes from non-seismogenic SSDS in a single outcrop: (1) pushed up sedimentary blocks within the dike body; (2) regular distorted contacts of a dike with host sediments, reflecting cyclic loading during propagation of seismic waves; (3) turned up layers of host deposits on contacts with a dike; (4) displacement along dike contacts usually in the form of a normal fault caused by subsidence that compensates for the removed sediment; (5) a dike structure similar to a diapir; (6) filling of a clasic dike with coarser materials than the host sediments; and (7) a sediment layer extruded on the surface or between strata, similar in composition to the dike. In the extruded sandy-gravel-pebble layer, rock fragments show normal grading (from large to small clasts). In addition to these indicators, fractures may indirectly indicate the seismogenic genesis of liquefaction-induced SSDS. Due to the close spatial relationship of dikes with the fault structures of the investigated areas, they can be used to identify seismogenic fault, and the characteristics of dikes (lateral gradual changes in the frequency, size, and type of the deformations) can help to determine the epicenter, magnitude and the local intensity of the associated earthquakes.

  5. Oxygen induced strong mobility modulation in few-layer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheng; Hu, Zehua; Carvalho, Alexandra; Guo, Na; Zhang, Jialin; Hu, Fang; Xiang, Du; Wu, Jing; Lei, Bo; Wang, Li; Zhang, Chun; Castro Neto, A. H.; Chen, Wei

    2017-06-01

    2D black phosphorus configured field-effect transistors generally show a hole-transport-dominated ambipolar characteristic, owing to the severely restricted electron mobility by air ambient. Here, we demonstrate the strongly modulated mobility of few-layer black phosphorus in contact with oxygen. Pure oxygen exposure can dramatically decrease the electron mobility of black phosphorus by over three orders of magnitudes without degrading the hole transport. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization reveals the physisorption nature of oxygen on black phosphorus. Density functional theory calculations identify the unoccupied states of molecular oxygen physisorbed on few-layer black phosphorus, that serves as electron trap but not as hole trap, consistent with the aforementioned mobility modulation. In contrast, oxygen exposure upon light illumination exhibits a significant attenuation for both electron and hole transport, originating from the photoactivated oxidation of black phosphorus, as corroborated by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Our findings clarify the predominant role of oxygen in modulating transport properties of black phosphorus, thereby providing deeper insight to the design of black phosphorus based complementary electronics.

  6. O.H.--a strong slow wave sleep inducing factor in tortoise (Emys orbicularis).

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, E

    1997-01-01

    The paper would be a contribution to the very complex and not yet clarified field of neurochemistry of slow wave sleep (SWS). The study was performed on 30 tortoises (Emys orbicularis): 20 "donors" and 10 "receivers". The animals were equipped with chronic cannula inserted in the third ventricular space and electrodes for electrographic recording (EEG, EOG, EMG and ECG). The controls consisted in administration into the third ventricle of receivers of 30 microliters of saline or concentrated cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) extracts from awake donors. The results were negative, i.e. the injected tortoises conserved their waking state indefinitely. The experiments were performed by introduction of 30 microliters of concentrated CSF extracts obtained from asleep donors into the third ventricular space of receivers. All the animals presented the behavioural and electrographic signs of the physiological SWS. The logical conclusion is that in the development of reptilian SWS, an endogenous SWS-inducing factor, which I called "O.H." (orbicularis hormone), was secreted by some hypnogenic structures and discharged in the CSF, with the consequences presented above.

  7. BMP4 and FGF strongly induce differentiation of mouse ES cells into oral ectoderm.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Hiroshi; Suga, Hidetaka; Yamada, Tomiko; Sakakibara, Mayu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Ozone, Chikafumi; Ogawa, Koichiro; Goto, Motomitsu; Banno, Ryoichi; Tsunekawa, Shin; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arima, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, oral ectoderm differentiates into the adenohypophysis, dental epithelia, salivary glands, and nasal pit. Few reports exist concerning the induction of oral ectoderm from embryonic stem (ES) cells. Generally, any lot differences in fetal bovine serum (FBS) and serum replacer may affect the induction of ES cell-differentiation. Using a previously established culture strategy for differentiation, the proportion of cell aggregates containing Pitx1+ oral ectoderm varied widely between 9-36% when several different lots of FBS or serum replacer were used. We therefore tried to enhance the differentiation method. We found that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) treatments improved oral ectoderm induction. Such treatment also improved the differentiation of oral ectoderm into the adenohypophysis. Furthermore, increased BMP4 treatment induced dental epithelium and mesenchyme. Such differentiation suggests that the Pitx1+ layer displays similar properties to oral ectoderm, as found in vivo. Differentiation of ES cells into oral ectoderm using different lots of FBS and serum replacer increased 78-90% after treatment with BMP4 and FGF. In summary, we have established a robust strategy for the induction of oral ectoderm differentiation from mouse ES cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Dysplasia of human prostate CD133(hi) sub-population in NOD-SCIDS is blocked by c-myc anti-sense.

    PubMed

    Goodyear, S M; Amatangelo, M D; Stearns, M E

    2009-05-15

    The CD133(hi) sub-population of prostate epithelial cells has been demonstrated to possess tumor-initiating capacity consistent with that of the cancer stem cell theory. However, the involvement of oncogenes such as c-myc has not been fully elucidated in the CD133(hi) sub-population. We have isolated primary prostate cell strains (IBC-10a) and immortalized them by transfection with hTERT. The in vitro and in vivo tumorigenic capacity of isolated CD133(hi) and CD133(lo) cells was evaluated with respect to c-myc expression using specific sense and anti-sense oligonucleotides. Freshly immortalized cells consisted of <3.3% CD133(hi)/CD24(hi) sub-population (SP). "Prostaspheres" generated from single CD133(hi) cells in the presence of EGF consisted of approximately 10% CD133(hi) SPs in 12-21 day cultures. A single Prostasphere generated from single CD133(hi) cells (6-10 cell stage at day 6 injected i.t.) produced dysplastic lesions in NOD-SCID mice (n = 4/5). Treatment of Prostaspheres from CD133(hi) SPs in vitro with c-myc or cyclin D1 anti-sense oligonucleotides totally blocked colony forming ability and growth. Furthermore, treatment of fully formed, 6-day Prostaspheres for 48 hr with c-myc anti-sense significantly reduced c-myc expression and their ability to generate lesions in NOD-SCIDs (n = 10 Prostaspheres injected i.t./mouse). These data demonstrate for the first time that a single CD133(hi) cell is competent to generate Prostaspheres in vitro and that CD133(hi) Prostaspheres require c-myc to grow and form dysplastic lesions in vivo. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Aerosol-Induced Changes of Convective Cloud Anvils Produce Strong Climate Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koren, I.; Remer, L. A.; Altaratz, O.; Martins, J. V.; Davidi, A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of aerosol on clouds poses one of the largest uncertainties in estimating the anthropogenic contribution to climate change. Small human-induced perturbations to cloud characteristics via aerosol pathways can create a change in the top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing of hundreds of Wm(exp-2) . Here we focus on links between aerosol and deep convective clouds of the Atlantic and Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zones, noting that the aerosol environment in each region is entirely different. The tops of these vertically developed clouds consisting of mostly ice can reach high levels of the atmosphere, overshooting the lower stratosphere and reaching altitudes greater than 16 km. We show a link between aerosol, clouds and the free atmosphere wind profile that can change the magnitude and sign of the overall climate radiative forcing. We find that increased aerosol loading is associated with taller cloud towers and anvils. The taller clouds reach levels of enhanced wind speeds that act to spread and thin the anvi1 clouds, increasing areal coverage and decreasing cloud optical depth. The radiative effect of this transition is to create a positive radiative forcing (warming) at top-of-atmosphere. Furthermore we introduce the cloud optical depth (r), cloud height (Z) forcing space and show that underestimation of radiative forcing is likely to occur in cases of non homogenous clouds. Specifically, the mean radiative forcing of towers and anvils in the same scene can be several times greater than simply calculating the forcing from the mean cloud optical depth in the scene. Limitations of the method are discussed, alternative sources of aerosol loading are tested and meteorological variance is restricted, but the trend of taller clouds; increased and thinner anvils associated with increased aerosol loading remains robust through all the different tests and perturbations.

  10. HIV-1 infection induces strong production of IP-10 through TLR7/9-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    SIMMONS, Rachel P.; SCULLY, Eileen P.; GRODEN, Erin E.; BENEDICT, Kelly F.; CHANG, J. Judy; LANE, Kim; LIFSON, Jeff; ROSENBERG, Eric; LAUFFENBURGER, Douglas A.; ALTFELD, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the cytokine/chemokine profiles in response to HIV-1 viremia, and elucidate the pathways leading to HIV-1-induced inflammation. Design/Methods Plasma levels of 19 cytokines in individuals with early HIV-1 infection and individuals undergoing treatment interruptions were evaluated via multiplex assay. To investigate the cellular sources of relevant cytokines, sorted cells from HIV-1 infected individuals were assessed for mRNA expression. Relevant signaling pathways were assessed by comparing cytokine production patterns of PBMCs stimulated with intact HIV-1 or specific TLR stimulants with and without a TLR7/9 antagonist. Results IP-10 plasma concentration was most significantly associated with HIV-1 viral load and was the most significant contributor in a multivariate model. IP-10 mRNA was highly expressed in monocytes and mDCs and these cells were the dominant producers after in vitro stimulation with TLR7/8 ligands (CL097 and ssRNAGag1166), AT-2 HIV-1, and HIV-1NL43 virus. Partial least square discriminant analysis of culture supernatants revealed distinct cytokine/chemokine secretion profiles associated with intact viruses compared to TLR7/8 ligands alone, with IP-10 production linked to the former. A TLR7/9 antagonist blocked IP-10 production following whole virus stimulation, suggesting the involvement of TLR7/9 in the recognition of HIV-1 by these cells. Conclusions Monocytes and mDCs produce significant amounts of IP-10 in response to HIV-1 viremia and after in vitro stimulation with HIV-1. Stimulation with HIV-1-derived TLR7/8-ligands versus HIV-1 resulted in distinct cytokine/chemokine profiles, indicating additional pathways other than TLR7/8 that lead to the activation of innate immune cells by HIV-1. PMID:24096630

  11. Temperature-tunable Fano resonance induced by strong coupling between Weyl fermions and phonons in TaAs

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Bing; Dai, Yaomin M.; Zhao, Lingxiao X.; ...

    2017-03-30

    Strong coupling between discrete phonon and continuous electron–hole pair excitations can induce a pronounced asymmetry in the phonon line shape, known as the Fano resonance. This effect has been observed in various systems. We reveal explicit evidence for strong coupling between an infrared-active phonon and electronic transitions near the Weyl points through the observation of a Fano resonance in the Weyl semimetal TaAs. The resulting asymmetry in the phonon line shape, conspicuous at low temperatures, diminishes continuously with increasing temperature. Furthermore, this behaviour originates from the suppression of electronic transitions near the Weyl points due to the decreasing occupation ofmore » electronic states below the Fermi level (EF) with increasing temperature, as well as Pauli blocking caused by thermally excited electrons above EF. These findings not only elucidate the mechanism governing the tunable Fano resonance but also open a route for exploring exotic physical phenomena through phonon properties in Weyl semimetals.« less

  12. Temperature-tunable Fano resonance induced by strong coupling between Weyl fermions and phonons in TaAs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, B.; Dai, Y. M.; Zhao, L. X.; Wang, K.; Yang, R.; Zhang, W.; Liu, J. Y.; Xiao, H.; Chen, G. F.; Trugman, S. A.; Zhu, J-X; Taylor, A. J.; Yarotski, D. A.; Prasankumar, R. P.; Qiu, X. G.

    2017-01-01

    Strong coupling between discrete phonon and continuous electron–hole pair excitations can induce a pronounced asymmetry in the phonon line shape, known as the Fano resonance. This effect has been observed in various systems. Here we reveal explicit evidence for strong coupling between an infrared-active phonon and electronic transitions near the Weyl points through the observation of a Fano resonance in the Weyl semimetal TaAs. The resulting asymmetry in the phonon line shape, conspicuous at low temperatures, diminishes continuously with increasing temperature. This behaviour originates from the suppression of electronic transitions near the Weyl points due to the decreasing occupation of electronic states below the Fermi level (EF) with increasing temperature, as well as Pauli blocking caused by thermally excited electrons above EF. Our findings not only elucidate the mechanism governing the tunable Fano resonance but also open a route for exploring exotic physical phenomena through phonon properties in Weyl semimetals. PMID:28358027

  13. Temperature-tunable Fano resonance induced by strong coupling between Weyl fermions and phonons in TaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Dai, Y. M.; Zhao, L. X.; Wang, K.; Yang, R.; Zhang, W.; Liu, J. Y.; Xiao, H.; Chen, G. F.; Trugman, S. A.; Zhu, J.-X.; Taylor, A. J.; Yarotski, D. A.; Prasankumar, R. P.; Qiu, X. G.

    2017-03-01

    Strong coupling between discrete phonon and continuous electron-hole pair excitations can induce a pronounced asymmetry in the phonon line shape, known as the Fano resonance. This effect has been observed in various systems. Here we reveal explicit evidence for strong coupling between an infrared-active phonon and electronic transitions near the Weyl points through the observation of a Fano resonance in the Weyl semimetal TaAs. The resulting asymmetry in the phonon line shape, conspicuous at low temperatures, diminishes continuously with increasing temperature. This behaviour originates from the suppression of electronic transitions near the Weyl points due to the decreasing occupation of electronic states below the Fermi level (EF) with increasing temperature, as well as Pauli blocking caused by thermally excited electrons above EF. Our findings not only elucidate the mechanism governing the tunable Fano resonance but also open a route for exploring exotic physical phenomena through phonon properties in Weyl semimetals.

  14. Size/morphology induced tunable luminescence in upconversion crystals: ultra-strong single-band emission and underlying mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaofeng; Zeng, Songshan; Yu, Jingfang; Ji, Xiaoming; Zeng, Huidan; Xin, Shuangyu; Wang, Yuhua; Sun, Luyi

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present a two-step method to controllably synthesize novel and highly efficient upconversion materials, Lu5O4F7:Er3+,Yb3+ nano/micro-crystals, and investigate their size/morphology induced tunable upconversion properties. In addition to the common phenomenon aroused by a surface quenching effect, direct experimental evidence for the regulation of phonon modes is obtained in nanoparticles. The findings in this work advance the existing mechanisms for the general explanation of size/morphology induced upconversion features. Because of the adjustment of phonon energy and density as well as the surface quenching effect, the biocompatible Lu5O4F7:Er3+,Yb3+ nanoparticles exhibit an ultra-strong single-band red upconversion, rendering them promising for biomedical applications.In this work, we present a two-step method to controllably synthesize novel and highly efficient upconversion materials, Lu5O4F7:Er3+,Yb3+ nano/micro-crystals, and investigate their size/morphology induced tunable upconversion properties. In addition to the common phenomenon aroused by a surface quenching effect, direct experimental evidence for the regulation of phonon modes is obtained in nanoparticles. The findings in this work advance the existing mechanisms for the general explanation of size/morphology induced upconversion features. Because of the adjustment of phonon energy and density as well as the surface quenching effect, the biocompatible Lu5O4F7:Er3+,Yb3+ nanoparticles exhibit an ultra-strong single-band red upconversion, rendering them promising for biomedical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Crystal structure analysis, UV-Vis absorption spectra, SEM micrographs, surface micro-structure investigation, biocompatibility of Lu5O4F7: Er3+, Yb3+, as well as morphology and upconversion properties of the control sample NaYF4: Er3+, Yb3+. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01008j

  15. Strong-field induced dissociation dynamics in 1,2-dibromoethane traced by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterley, A. S.; Lackner, F.; Neumark, D. M.; Leone, S. R.; Gessner, O.

    2016-05-01

    Strong field induced dissociation dynamics of the small haloalkane 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) have been explored using femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy. Dynamics are initiated by a near IR pump pulse with intensities between 75 and 220 TW cm-2, and are probed by the atomic site specific XUV absorption of the Br 3d levels. Immediately upon ionization, the spectral signatures of molecular ions appear. These molecular peaks decay in tandem with the appearance of atomic Br peaks in charge states of 0, + 1 and + 2, which are all monitored simultaneously. Neutral Br atoms are eliminated in 300 fs, presumably from statistical dissociation of vibrationally hot DBE+ ions, Br+ ions are eliminated in 70 fs from a more energetic dissociative ionization pathway, and Br++ ions are eliminated within the duration of the 35 fs pump pulse. The simultaneous recording of multiple parent molecule and fragment ion traces enables new insight into predominant dissociation pathways induced by strong field ionization of organic molecules.

  16. Complex dynamics induced by strong confinement - From tracer diffusion in strongly heterogeneous media to glassy relaxation of dense fluids in narrow slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Suvendu; Spanner-Denzer, Markus; Leitmann, Sebastian; Franosch, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We provide an overview of recent advances of the complex dynamics of particles in strong confinements. The first paradigm is the Lorentz model where tracers explore a quenched disordered host structure. Such systems naturally occur as limiting cases of binary glass-forming systems if the dynamics of one component is much faster than the other. For a certain critical density of the host structure the tracers undergo a localization transition which constitutes a critical phenomenon. A series of predictions in the vicinity of the transition have been elaborated and tested versus computer simulations. Analytical progress is achieved for small obstacle densities. The second paradigm is a dense strongly interacting liquid confined to a narrow slab. Then the glass transition depends nonmonotonically on the separation of the plates due to an interplay of local packing and layering. Very small slab widths allow to address certain features of the statics and dynamics analytically.

  17. Functional consequences of anti-sense RNA-mediated inhibition of CD8 surface expression in a human T cell clone

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    An experimental approach for defining the function of CD8 has been developed by linking anti-sense RNA mutagenesis and T cell cloning technologies. We have transfected an anti-sense CD8 episomal expression vector into a CD8+ nontransformed human T cell clone that is specific for the human class I alloantigen HLA-B35. Expression of CD8 on this T cell clone, JH.ARL.1, was selectively and efficiently inhibited. Stimulation of this CD8- variant with specific alloantigen resulted in a marked loss of a number of functional responses, including cytotoxicity, proliferation, IL-2 secretion, and IL-2-R expression. However, these same functional responses could be elicited with stimuli that do not require antigen recognition to activate the T cell (anti- CD3 mAbs, PHA). The results of our study support the hypothesis that CD8 is required for recognition of class I MHC alloantigens that results in activation of T cell functional responses. PMID:2459296

  18. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kuan Rong; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Bestagno, Marco; Ooi, Eng Eong; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII) of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE) in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well. PMID:26218926

  19. Strong resilience of soil respiration components to drought-induced die-off resulting in forest secondary succession.

    PubMed

    Barba, Josep; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Poyatos, Rafael; Janssens, Ivan A; Lloret, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    How forests cope with drought-induced perturbations and how the dependence of soil respiration on environmental and biological drivers is affected in a warming and drying context are becoming key questions. The aims of this study were to determine whether drought-induced die-off and forest succession were reflected in soil respiration and its components and to determine the influence of climate on the soil respiration components. We used the mesh exclusion method to study seasonal variations in soil respiration (R S) and its components: heterotrophic (R H) and autotrophic (R A) [further split into fine root (R R) and mycorrhizal respiration (R M)] in a mixed Mediterranean forest where Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is undergoing a drought-induced die-off and is being replaced by holm oak (Quercus ilex L.). Drought-induced pine die-off was not reflected in R S nor in its components, which denotes a high functional resilience of the plant and soil system to pine die-off. However, the succession from Scots pine to holm oak resulted in a reduction of R H and thus in an important decrease of total respiration (R S was 36 % lower in holm oaks than in non-defoliated pines). Furthermore, R S and all its components were strongly regulated by soil water content-and-temperature interaction. Since Scots pine die-off and Quercus species colonization seems to be widely occurring at the driest limit of the Scots pine distribution, the functional resilience of the soil system over die-off and the decrease of R S from Scots pine to holm oak could have direct consequences for the C balance of these ecosystems.

  20. Native musk and synthetic musk ketone strongly induced the growth repression and the apoptosis of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Cao, Yi

    2016-12-08

    Musk is widely used in clinical practice for its anti-cancer properties. Here, we treated various types of cancer using musk to determine which cancers are sensitive to musk treatment. We also compared effects of native musk and synthetic musk ketone in cancer cells. Furthermore, we investigated mechanisms underlying effects of musk. Twenty two cancer cell lines were treated with musk. Cell proliferation and apoptosis analyses were carried out. Native musk and synthetic musk ketone were analyzed by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) assay. Differentially expressed genes were determined by microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Native musk strongly induced the growth repression and the apoptosis in the majority of cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, but distinct types of cancer showed significantly different reactions. Cancer cells which originated from epithelial cells showed higher sensitivity for musk treatment. By contrast, leukaemia and lymphoma cells were not sensitive. GC-MS analysis demonstrated that native musk contains more than 30 contents in which musk ketone is a major component; synthetic musk ketone was consistent with natural musk ketone, and the used sample of synthetic musk ketone contained only sole component. Similar to native musk, synthetic musk ketone induced the growth repression and the apoptosis of cancer cells. Additionally, numerous genes were differentially expressed in lung cancer cells after native musk treatment. These differentially expressed genes were involved in many signalling pathways. Among these pathways, apoptosis-related pathways included interleukin family, tumor necrosis factor family, and MAPK signalling pathway. Native musk and synthetic musk ketone can up-regulate IL-24 (interleukin family) and DDIT3 (MAPK signalling pathway) in lung cancer cells. This research provided strong evidence that native musk and synthetic musk ketone can induce the growth repression and the

  1. Engineered Microvessels with Strong Alignment and High Lumen Density Via Cell-Induced Fibrin Gel Compaction and Interstitial Flow

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Kristen T.; Dries-Devlin, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of engineered microvessels with clinically relevant characteristics is a critical step toward the creation of engineered myocardium. Alignment is one such characteristic that must be achieved, as it both mimics native capillary beds and provides natural inlet and outlet sides for perfusion. A second characteristic that is currently deficient is cross-sectional lumen density, typically under 100 lumens/mm2; the equivalent value for human myocardium is 2000 lumens/mm2. Therefore, this study examined the effects of gel compaction and interstitial flow on microvessel alignment and lumen density. Strong microvessel alignment was achieved via mechanically constrained cell-induced fibrin gel compaction following vasculogenesis, and high lumen density (650 lumens/mm2) was achieved by the subsequent application of low levels of interstitial flow. Low interstitial flow also conferred microvessel barrier function. PMID:24083839

  2. Second-order magnetic field gradient-induced strong coupling between nitrogen-vacancy centers and a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Kang; Wang, RuiXia; Yin, ZhangQi; Long, GuiLu

    2017-07-01

    We consider a cantilever mechanical oscillator (MO) made of diamond. A nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center lies at the end of the cantilever. Two magnetic tips near the NV center induce a strong second-order magnetic field gradient. Under coherent driving of the MO, we find that the coupling between the MO and the NV center is greatly enhanced. We studied how to generate entanglement between the MO and the NV center and realize quantum state transfer between them. We also propose a scheme to generate two-mode squeezing between different MO modes by coupling them to the same NV center. The decoherence and dissipation effects for both the MO and the NV center are numerically calculated using the present parameter values of the experimental configuration. We have achieved high fidelity for entanglement generation, quantum state transfer, and large two-mode squeezing.

  3. Current-horn suppression for reduced coherent-synchrotron-radiation-induced emittance growth in strong bunch compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, T. K.; Paganin, D. M.; Latina, A.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R. T.

    2017-03-01

    Control of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR)-induced emittance growth is essential in linear accelerators designed to deliver very high brightness electron beams. Extreme current values at the head and tail of the electron bunch, resulting from strong bunch compression, are responsible for large CSR production leading to significant transverse projected emittance growth. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) truncates the head and tail current spikes which greatly improves free electron laser (FEL) performance. Here we consider the underlying dynamics that lead to formation of current spikes (also referred to as current horns), which has been identified as caustics forming in electron trajectories. We present a method to analytically determine conditions required to avoid the caustic formation and therefore prevent the current spikes from forming. These required conditions can be easily met, without increasing the transverse slice emittance, through inclusion of an octupole magnet in the middle of a bunch compressor.

  4. Strong ionization asymmetry in a geometrically symmetric radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma induced by sawtooth voltage waveforms.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, Bastien; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Greb, Arthur; Johnson, Erik V; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-27

    The ionization dynamics in geometrically symmetric parallel plate capacitively coupled plasmas driven by radio frequency tailored voltage waveforms is investigated using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Temporally asymmetric waveforms induce spatial asymmetries and offer control of the spatiotemporal dynamics of electron heating and associated ionization structures. Sawtooth waveforms with different rise and fall rates are employed using truncated Fourier series approximations of an ideal sawtooth. Experimental PROES results obtained in argon plasmas are compared with PIC simulations, showing excellent agreement. With waveforms comprising a fast voltage drop followed by a slower rise, the faster sheath expansion in front of the powered electrode causes strongly enhanced ionization in this region. The complementary waveform causes an analogous effect in front of the grounded electrode.

  5. Metal-ligand interplay in strongly correlated oxides: a parametrized phase diagram for pressure-induced spin transitions.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Aleksi; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Badro, James; Vankó, György; Shukla, Abhay

    2007-05-11

    We investigate the magnetic properties of archetypal transition-metal oxides MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO under very high pressure by x-ray emission spectroscopy at the Kbeta line. We observe a strong modification of the magnetism in the megabar range in all the samples except NiO. The results are analyzed within a multiplet approach including charge-transfer effects. The spectral changes are well accounted for by changes of the ligand field acting on the d electrons and allows us to extract the d-hybridization strength, O-2p bandwidth and ionic crystal field across the magnetic transition. This approach allows first-hand insight into the mechanism of the pressure-induced spin transition.

  6. Computational study of vortex-induced vibration of a sprung rigid circular cylinder with a strongly nonlinear internal attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumkur, Ravi Kumar R.; Calderer, Ramon; Masud, Arif; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2013-07-01

    For a Reynolds number (Re) based on cylinder diameter of 100, and a ratio of cylinder density to fluid density of 10, we investigate the effect of a strongly nonlinear internal attachment on the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a rigid circular cylinder restrained by a linear spring, and constrained to move perpendicularly to the mean flow. The variational multiscale residual-based stabilized finite-element method used to compute approximate solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations about the moving cylinder is coupled to a simple model of a "nonlinear energy sink" (NES), an essentially nonlinear oscillator consisting of a mass, a linear damper, and a strongly nonlinear spring. The NES promotes nearly one-way transfer of energy to itself from the primary structure (the cylinder), resulting in reduction of the amplitude of the limit-cycle oscillation by as much as 75%, depending on the parameters characterizing the NES. Various mechanisms of nonlinear interaction of the NES with the cylinder undergoing VIV are discussed. Although no optimization of the NES is performed in this work, we demonstrate capacity for passive suppression of VIV and compare the performance of the NES to the tuned linear absorber of equal mass.

  7. Seismic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in rocks with strong permeability fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Germán Rubino, J; Monachesi, Leonardo B; Müller, Tobias M; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Oscillatory fluid movements in heterogeneous porous rocks induced by seismic waves cause dissipation of wave field energy. The resulting seismic signature depends not only on the rock compressibility distribution, but also on a statistically averaged permeability. This so-called equivalent seismic permeability does not, however, coincide with the respective equivalent flow permeability. While this issue has been analyzed for one-dimensional (1D) media, the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cases remain unexplored. In this work, this topic is analyzed for 2D random medium realizations having strong permeability fluctuations. With this objective, oscillatory compressibility simulations based on the quasi-static poroelasticity equations are performed. Numerical analysis shows that strong permeability fluctuations diminish the magnitude of attenuation and velocity dispersion due to fluid flow, while the frequency range where these effects are significant gets broader. By comparing the acoustic responses obtained using different permeability averages, it is also shown that at very low frequencies the equivalent seismic permeability is similar to the equivalent flow permeability, while for very high frequencies this parameter approaches the arithmetic average of the permeability field. These seemingly generic findings have potentially important implications with regard to the estimation of equivalent flow permeability from seismic data.

  8. Thymoquinone strongly inhibits fMLF-induced neutrophil functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boudiaf, Kaouthar; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Belambri, Sahra Amel; Marie, Jean-Claude; Derradji, Yacine; Benboubetra, Mustapha; El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2016-03-15

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are key players in host defense against pathogens through the robust production of superoxide anion by the NADPH oxidase and the release of antibacterial proteins from granules. However, inappropriate release of these agents in the extracellular environment induces severe tissue injury, thereby contributing to the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. Many studies have been carried out to identify molecules capable of inhibiting phagocyte functions, in particular superoxide anion production, for therapeutic purposes. In the present study, we show that thymoquinone (TQ), the major component of the volatile oil from Nigella sativa (black cumin) seeds strongly inhibits fMLF-induced superoxide production and granules exocytosis in neutrophils. The inhibition of superoxide anion was not due to a scavenger effect, as TQ did not inhibit superoxide anion produced by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. Interestingly, TQ impaired the phosphorylation on Ser-304 and Ser-328 of p47(PHOX), a cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase. TQ also attenuated specific and azurophilic granule exocytosis in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of gp91(PHOX) and CD11b, and release of myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, both the PKC and MAPK pathways, which are involved in p47(PHOX) phosphorylation and granules exocytosis, respectively, were inhibited by TQ in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils. Finally, in a model of pleurisy induced by λ-carrageenan in rats, TQ reduced neutrophil accumulation in the pleural space, showing that it not only inhibits PMN functions in vitro, but also exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. Thus, TQ possesses promising anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sterile-filtered saliva is a strong inducer of IL-6 and IL-8 in oral fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cvikl, Barbara; Lussi, Adrian; Moritz, Andreas; Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    Saliva has been implicated to support oral wound healing, a process that requires a transient inflammatory reaction. However, definitive proof that saliva can provoke an inflammatory response remained elusive. We investigated the ability of freshly harvested and sterile-filtered saliva to cause an inflammatory response of oral fibroblasts and epithelial cells. The expression of cytokines and chemokines was assessed by microarray, RT-PCR, immunoassays, and Luminex technology. The involvement of signaling pathways was determined by Western blot analysis and pharmacologic inhibitors. We report that sterile-filtered whole saliva was a potent inducer of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts from the gingiva, the palate, and the periodontal ligament, but not of oral epithelial cells. This strong inflammatory response requires nuclear factor-kappa B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. The pro-inflammatory capacity is heat stable and has a molecular weight of <40 kDa. Genome-wide microarrays and Luminex technology further revealed that saliva substantially increased expression of other inflammatory genes and various chemokines. To preclude that the observed pro-inflammatory activity is the result of oral bacteria, sterile-filtered parotid saliva, collected under almost aseptic conditions, was used and also increased IL-6 and IL-8 expression in gingiva fibroblasts. The inflammatory response was, furthermore, independent of MYD88, an adapter protein of the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. We conclude that saliva can provoke a robust inflammatory response in oral fibroblasts involving the classical nuclear factor-kappa B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Since fibroblasts but not epithelial cells show a strong inflammatory response, saliva may support the innate immunity of defect sites exposing the oral connective tissue.

  10. Unusually strong binding to the DNA minor groove by a highly twisted benzimidazole diphenylether: induced fit and bound water.

    PubMed

    Tanious, Farial A; Laine, William; Peixoto, Paul; Bailly, Christian; Goodwin, Kristie D; Lewis, Mark A; Long, Eric C; Georgiadis, Millie M; Tidwell, Richard R; Wilson, W David

    2007-06-12

    RT29 is a dicationic diamidine derivative that does not obey the classical "rules" for shape and functional group placement that are expected to result in strong binding and specific recognition of the DNA minor groove. The compound contains a benzimidazole diphenyl ether core that is flanked by the amidine cations. The diphenyl ether is highly twisted and gives the entire compound too much curvature to fit well to the shape of the minor groove. DNase I footprinting, fluorescence intercalator displacement studies, and circular dichroism spectra, however, indicate that the compound is an AT specific minor groove binding agent. Even more surprisingly, quantitative biosensor-surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetric results indicate that the compound binds with exceptional strength to certain AT sequences in DNA with a large negative enthalpy of binding. Crystallographic results for the DNA complex of RT29 compared to calculated results for the free compound show that the compound undergoes significant conformational changes to enhance its minor groove interactions. In addition, a water molecule is incorporated directly into the complex to complete the compound-DNA interface, and it forms an essential link between the compound and base pair edges at the floor of the minor groove. The calculated DeltaCp value for complex formation is substantially less than the experimentally observed value, which supports the idea of water being an intrinsic part of the complex with a major contribution to the DeltaCp value. Both the induced fit conformational changes of the compound and the bound water are essential for strong binding to DNA by RT29.

  11. Mycobacterium vaccae induces a strong Th1 response that subsequently declines in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijiao; Jiang, Yanlong; Cui, Ziyin; Yang, Wentao; Yue, Limin; Ma, Yingcong; Shi, Shaohua; Wang, Chunfang

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium (M.) vaccae is a fast-growing species of saprophytic bacteria that is widely distributed. To understand the host immune responses induced by M. vaccae isolated from bovine submaxillary lymph nodes, C57BL/6 mice were infected with reference strain M. vaccae Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and isolated M. vaccae using intraperitoneal injections. Comparison of the bacterial replication and organ pathology between M. vaccae and M. vaccae BCG revealed that M. vaccae was more malignant than M. vaccae in mice. We also demonstrated that serum from the M. vaccae-infected mice contained a higher expression level of gamma-interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12, IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta than did the other groups, especially after week 4. Furthermore, when the numbers of CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+ and CD3+CD4+IL4+ cells in the infected mice were observed by flow cytometry, we found that a powerful T helper 1 (Th1) response was induced by M. vaccae infection, which was associated with the emergence of CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+ cells. However, the Th1 response declined over time, which was associated with appearance of the CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ and CD4+CD25+CD152+Treg cell reaction. In addition, a strong Th2 response was found. Finally, we found that M. vaccae infection increased the production of type I IFNs, which was associated with a reduced Th1 response. PMID:27994210

  12. Sand Fly Salivary Proteins Induce Strong Cellular Immunity in a Natural Reservoir of Visceral Leishmaniasis with Adverse Consequences for Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Nicolas; Gomes, Regis; Teixeira, Clarissa; Cheng, Lily; Laughinghouse, Andre; Ward, Jerrold M.; Elnaiem, Dia-Eldin; Fischer, Laurent; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Kamhawi, Shaden

    2009-01-01

    Immunity to a sand fly salivary protein protects against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in hamsters. This protection was associated with the development of cellular immunity in the form of a delayed-type hypersensitivity response and the presence of IFN-γ at the site of sand fly bites. To date, there are no data available regarding the cellular immune response to sand fly saliva in dogs, the main reservoirs of VL in Latin America, and its role in protection from this fatal disease. Two of 35 salivary proteins from the vector sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, identified using a novel approach termed reverse antigen screening, elicited strong cellular immunity in dogs. Immunization with either molecule induced high IgG2 antibody levels and significant IFN-γ production following in vitro stimulation of PBMC with salivary gland homogenate (SGH). Upon challenge with uninfected or infected flies, immunized dogs developed a cellular response at the bite site characterized by lymphocytic infiltration and IFN-γ and IL-12 expression. Additionally, SGH-stimulated lymphocytes from immunized dogs efficiently killed Leishmania infantum chagasi within autologous macrophages. Certain sand fly salivary proteins are potent immunogens obligatorily co-deposited with Leishmania parasites during transmission. Their inclusion in an anti-Leishmania vaccine would exploit anti-saliva immunity following an infective sand fly bite and set the stage for a protective anti-Leishmania immune response. PMID:19461875

  13. Strong TCR-mediated signals suppress integrated stress responses induced by KDELR1 deficiency in naive T cells.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Daisuke; Arima, Yasunobu; Tsuruoka, Mineko; Jiang, Jing-Jing; Bando, Hidenori; Meng, Jie; Sabharwal, Lavannya; Stofkova, Andrea; Nishikawa, Naoki; Higuchi, Kotaro; Ogura, Hideki; Atsumi, Toru; Murakami, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    KDEL receptor 1 (KDELR1) regulates integrated stress responses (ISR) to promote naive T-cell survival in vivo. In a mouse line having nonfunctional KDELR1, T-Red (naive T-cell reduced) mice, polyclonal naive T cells show excessive ISR and eventually undergo apoptosis. However, breeding T-Red mice with TCR-transgenic mice bearing relatively high TCR affinity rescued the T-Red phenotype, implying a link between ISR-induced apoptosis and TCR-mediated signaling. Here, we showed that strong TCR stimulation reduces ISR in naive T cells. In mice lacking functional KDELR1, surviving naive T cells expressed significantly higher levels of CD5, a surrogate marker of TCR self-reactivity. In addition, higher TCR affinity/avidity was confirmed using a tetramer dissociation assay on the surviving naive T cells, suggesting that among the naive T-cell repertoire, those that receive relatively stronger TCR-mediated signals via self-antigens survive enhanced ISR. Consistent with this observation, weak TCR stimulation with altered peptide ligands decreased the survival and proliferation of naive T cells, whereas stimulation with ligands having higher affinity had no such effect. These results suggest a novel role of TCR-mediated signals in the attenuation of ISR in vivo.

  14. APR-246 (PRIMA-1(MET)) strongly synergizes with AZD2281 (olaparib) induced PARP inhibition to induce apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Deben, Christophe; Lardon, Filip; Wouters, An; Op de Beeck, Ken; Van den Bossche, Jolien; Jacobs, Julie; Van Der Steen, Nele; Peeters, Marc; Rolfo, Christian; Deschoolmeester, Vanessa; Pauwels, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    APR-246 (PRIMA-1(Met)) is able to bind mutant p53 and restore its normal conformation and function. The compound has also been shown to increase intracellular ROS levels. Importantly, the poly-[ADP-ribose] polymerase-1 (PARP-1) enzyme plays an important role in the repair of ROS-induced DNA damage. We hypothesize that by blocking this repair with the PARP-inhibitor AZD2281 (olaparib), DNA damage would accumulate in the cell leading to massive apoptosis. We observed that APR-246 synergistically enhanced the cytotoxic response of olaparib in TP53 mutant non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, resulting in a strong apoptotic response. In the presence of wild type p53 a G2/M cell cycle block was predominantly observed. NOXA expression levels were significantly increased in a TP53 mutant background, and remained unchanged in the wild type cell line. The combined treatment of APR-246 and olaparib induced cell death that was associated with increased ROS production, accumulation of DNA damage and translocation of p53 to the mitochondria. Out data suggest a promising targeted combination strategy in which the response to olaparib is synergistically enhanced by the addition of APR-246, especially in a TP53 mutant background. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence reveals strong representation of photosynthesis at ecosystem level in rice paddy field in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nasahara, K. N.; Akitsu, T.; Ono, K.; Miyata, A.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence emission from ecosystem induced by sunlight (Sun-Induced Fluorescence: SIF) is now a key factor to accurately estimate the ecosystem-level photosynthesis activity as suggested by satellite studies, and has been recently detected by satellites [Frankenberg et al., 2011; Guanter et al., 2012; Joiner et al., 2013] and measured at field stations [Daumard et al., 2010; Porcar-Castell, 2011]. However, the few example of field-based assessment on the representation ability reduces its value for the availability to better understand the dynamics in CO2uptake by land ecosystem. To elucidate the potential of SIF to estimate ecosystem GPP in typical Asian crop type, the canopy-top SIF was calculated from the spectrum data in Japanese rice paddy field in Mase in central Japan (36°03'N, 140°01'E, 11 m a.s.l.), and compared with eddy-tower measured GPP on half-hourly and daily bases during seven years from 2006 to 2012. The rice (Oriza sativa L.; cultivar Koshihikari) was transplanted in May and harvested in September normally. The SIF was estimated from the spectrums of downward Sun irradiance and upward canopy-reflected radiance measured at the height of 3m above ground by HemiSpherical Spectro-Radiometer (HSSR), consisting of the spectroradiometer (MS-700, Eko inc., Tokyo, Japan) with the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of 10 nm and wavelength interval of 3.3 nm. The SIF around 760nm (O2-A band: Fs760) was calculated according to the Fraunhofer Line Depth principle [Maier et al., 2003] with several additional arrangements. The GPP increased almost linearly as both Fs760 and APAR (Absorbed Photosyntethically Active Radiation) increased based on monthly-averaged diurnal courses during the growing season in 2006. The slopes of their regression lines differed much among the months in APAR, but in Fs760. These nearly constant relationships among the months between GPP and Fs760 were kept for all the observation years. Daily averaged GPP and Fs760

  16. Tendon Progenitor Cells in Injured Tendons Have Strong Chondrogenic Potential: The CD105-Negative Subpopulation Induces Chondrogenic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J.; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L.; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous BMPs or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a co-receptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair. PMID:25220576

  17. Tendon progenitor cells in injured tendons have strong chondrogenic potential: the CD105-negative subpopulation induces chondrogenic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-12-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers, and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous bone morphogenetic proteins or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a coreceptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair.

  18. Synonymous Deoptimization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Causes Attenuation In Vivo while Inducing a Strong Neutralizing Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Medina, Gisselle N.; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Koster, Marla; Grubman, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Codon bias deoptimization has been previously used to successfully attenuate human pathogens, including poliovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. We have applied a similar technology to deoptimize the capsid-coding region (P1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite the introduction of 489 nucleotide changes (19%), synonymous deoptimization of the P1 region rendered a viable FMDV progeny. The resulting strain was stable and reached cell culture titers similar to those obtained for wild-type (WT) virus, but at reduced specific infectivity. Studies in mice showed that 100% of animals inoculated with the FMDV A12 P1 deoptimized mutant (A12-P1 deopt) survived, even when the animals were infected at doses 100 times higher than the dose required to cause death by WT virus. All mice inoculated with the A12-P1 deopt mutant developed a strong antibody response and were protected against subsequent lethal challenge with WT virus at 21 days postinoculation. Remarkably, the vaccine safety margin was at least 1,000-fold higher for A12-P1 deopt than for WT virus. Similar patterns of attenuation were observed in swine, in which animals inoculated with A12-P1 deopt virus did not develop clinical disease until doses reached 1,000 to 10,000 times the dose required to cause severe disease in 2 days with WT A12. Consistently, high levels of antibody titers were induced, even at the lowest dose tested. These results highlight the potential use of synonymous codon pair deoptimization as a strategy to safely attenuate FMDV and further develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to control such a feared livestock disease. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most feared viral diseases that can affect livestock. Although this disease appeared to be contained in developed nations by the end of the last century, recent outbreaks in Europe, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, etc., have demonstrated that infection can spread rapidly, causing

  19. Strong synergistic induction of CYP1A1 expression by andrographolide plus typical CYP1A inducers in mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaruchotikamol, Atika; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan Sirisangtrakul, Wanna; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Kawasaki, Yuki; Nemoto, Nobuo

    2007-10-15

    The effects of andrographolide, the major diterpenoid constituent of Andrographis paniculata, on the expression of cytochrome P450 superfamily 1 members, including CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1, as well as on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes were investigated in comparison with the effects of typical CYP1A inducers, including benz[a]anthracene, {beta}-naphthoflavone, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. Andrographolide significantly induced the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs in a concentration-dependent manner, as did the typical CYP1A inducers, but did not induce that of CYP1B1 or AhR. Interestingly, andrographolide plus the typical CYP1A inducers synergistically induced CYP1A1 expression, and the synergism was blocked by an AhR antagonist, resveratrol. The CYP1A1 enzyme activity showed a similar pattern of induction. This is the first report that shows that andrographolide has a potency to induce CYP1A1 enzyme and indicates that andrographolide could be a very useful compound for investigating the regulatory mechanism of the CYP1A1 induction pathway. In addition, our findings suggest preparing advice for rational administration of A. paniculata, according to its ability to induce CYP1A1 expression.

  20. Alignment- and orientation-dependent strong-field ionization of molecules: Field-induced orbital distortion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiewanowski, Maciej Dominik; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2015-05-01

    Strong-field ionization (SFI) is a starting point for many strong-field phenomena, e.g., high-order harmonic generation, as well as a source of fundamental information about the ionized target. Therefore, investigation of SFI of atoms and molecules has been the aim for research since the first strong laser pulses became available. We present a recently developed method, adiabatic strong-field approximation, to study ionization yields as a function of alignment angle for CO2, CO, and OCS molecules. We show that orbital distortion plays an important role in explaining the position and relative strength of maxima in the yields for both polar and nonpolar molecules, even for targets with low polarizabilities at low laser intensities. In particular, we report that for ionization of CO2 the maximum in ionization yield shifts towards the experimentally-measured maximum with respect to the strong-field approximation. For ionization of the CO molecule, not only does the theory predict the preferred direction of ionization correctly, but also the ratio between yields for the two molecular orientations where the electric field points either towards the C or towards the O end. Finally, we find that ionization of OCS is more probable for the laser pointing from the O end towards the S end. Work supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the ERC-StG (Project No. 277767-TDMET), and the VKR center of excellence, QUS- COPE.

  1. Strong hyperfine-induced modulation of an optically driven hole spin in an InAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S. G.; Economou, Sophia E.; Greilich, A.; Barnes, Edwin; Sweeney, T.; Bracker, A. S.; Gammon, D.

    2014-02-01

    Compared to electrons, holes in InAs quantum dots have a significantly weaker hyperfine interaction that leads to less dephasing from nuclear spins. Thus many recent studies have suggested that nuclear spins are unimportant for hole-spin dynamics compared to electric-field fluctuations. We show that the hole hyperfine interaction can have a strong effect on hole-spin coherence measurements through a nuclear feedback effect. The nuclear polarization is generated through a unique process that is dependent on the anisotropy of the hole hyperfine interaction and the coherent precession of nuclear spins, giving rise to strong modulation at the nuclear precession frequency.

  2. BH3-mimetic ABT-737 induces strong mitochondrial membrane depolarization in platelets but only weakly stimulates apoptotic morphological changes, platelet shrinkage and microparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Gyulkhandanyan, Armen V; Mutlu, Asuman; Allen, David J; Freedman, John; Leytin, Valery

    2014-01-01

    Depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) is a key biochemical manifestation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in anucleate platelets. Little is known, however, about the relationship between ΔΨm depolarization and downstream morphological manifestations of platelet apoptosis, cell shrinkage and microparticle (MP) formation. To elucidate this relationship in human platelets. Using flow cytometry, we analyzed ΔΨm depolarization, platelet shrinkage and MP formation in platelets treated with BH3-mimetic ABT-737 and calcium ionophore A23187, well-known inducers of intrinsic platelet apoptosis. We found that at optimal treatment conditions (90min, 37°C) both ABT-737 and A23187 induce ΔΨm depolarization in the majority (88-94%) of platelets and strongly increase intracellular free calcium. In contrast, effects of A23187 and ABT-737 on platelet shrinkage and MP formation are quite different. A23187 strongly stimulates cell shrinkage and MP formation, whereas ABT-737 only weakly induces these events (10-20% of the effect seen with A23187, P<0.0001). These data indicate that a high level of ΔΨm depolarization and intracellular free calcium does not obligatorily ensure strong platelet shrinkage and MP formation. Since ABT-737 efficiently induces clearance of platelets from the circulation, our results suggest that platelet clearance may occur in the absence of the morphological manifestations of apoptosis. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Isolation and identification of cell-specific microRNAs targeting a messenger RNA using a biotinylated anti-sense oligonucleotide capture affinity technique

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Tidi; Smith, Stephen G. J.; Gaughan, Kevin; Oglesby, Irene K.; O’Neill, Shane; McElvaney, Noel G.; Greene, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate expression by translational repression or messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation. Although numerous bioinformatic prediction models exist to identify miRNA–mRNA interactions, experimental validation of bona fide interactions can be difficult and laborious. Few methods can comprehensively identify miRNAs that target a single mRNA. We have developed an experimental approach to search for miRNAs targeting any mRNA using a capture affinity assay involving a biotinylated DNA anti-sense oligonucleotide. This method identifies miRNAs targeting the full length of the mRNA. The method was tested using three separate mRNA targets: alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) mRNA, interleukin-8 mRNA and secretory leucoprotease inhibitor mRNA. AAT mRNA-specific and total miRNAs from three different cell lines (monocytic THP-1, bronchial epithelial 16HBE14o− and liver HepG2 cells) were profiled, and validation studies revealed that AAT mRNA-specific miRNAs functionally target the AAT mRNA in a cell-specific manner, providing the first evidence of innate miRNAs selectively targeting and modulating AAT mRNA expression. Interleukin-8 and secretory leucoprotease inhibitor mRNAs and their cognate miRNAs were also successfully captured using this approach. This is a simple and an efficient method to potentially identify miRNAs targeting sequences within the full length of a given mRNA transcript. PMID:23325846

  4. Tunability over three frequency bands induced by mode transition in relativistic backward wave oscillator with strong end reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Fan, Juping; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Deng, Yuqun; Sun, Jun

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an efficient approach to realizing the frequency tunability of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) over three frequency bands by mode transition without changing the slow wave structure (SWS). It is figured out that the transition of the operation mode in the RBWO can be efficiently achieved by using the strong end reflection of the SWS. This mode transition results in the tunability of the RBWO over three frequency bands at high power and high efficiency without changing the SWS. In numerical simulation, the output frequency of the RBWO can jump over 7.9 GHz in C-band, 9.9 GHz in X-band, and 12.4 GHz in Ku-band with output power exceeding 3.0 GW and conversion efficiency higher than 35% by just reasonably transforming the structures of the front and post resonant reflectors which provide the strong end reflection for the SWS.

  5. EB 1089, a novel vitamin D analogue, has strong antiproliferative and differentiation inducing effects on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mathiasen, I S; Colston, K W; Binderup, L

    1993-09-01

    EB 1089 is a novel vitamin D analogue which in vitro strongly inhibits the proliferation of U937 histiocytic lymphoma cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with a potency of 50 to 100 times that of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]. Studies of c-myc and c-fos expression in MCF-7 cells and of differentiation markers in U937 cells show that growth inhibition by EB 1089 is accompanied by induction of differentiation. The ability of EB 1089 to affect calcium metabolism in vivo in rats is decreased, compared to 1,25(OH)2D3. This low calcemic effect combined with the strong biological effect on cancer cells in vitro, makes EB 1089 an interesting candidate for treatment of cancer.

  6. Strong thermo-induced single and two-photon green luminescence in self-organized peptide microtubes.

    PubMed

    Semin, S; van Etteger, A; Cattaneo, L; Amdursky, N; Kulyuk, L; Lavrov, S; Sigov, A; Mishina, E; Rosenman, G; Rasing, Th

    2015-03-01

    Diphenylalanine peptide nano- and microtubes formed by self-assembly demonstrate strongly enhanced and tunable single-photon and two-photon luminescence in the visible range, which appears after heat- or laser treatment of these self-organized peptide microtubes. This process significantly extends the functionality of these microstructures and can trigger a new interest in the optical properties of structures based on short peptides.

  7. Strong covalency-induced recombination centers in perovskite solar cell material CH3NH3PbI3.

    PubMed

    Agiorgousis, Michael L; Sun, Yi-Yang; Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Shengbai

    2014-10-15

    Inorganic-organic hybrid perovskites are a new family of solar cell materials, which have recently been used to make solar cells with efficiency approaching 20%. Here, we report the unique defect chemistry of the prototype material, CH3NH3PbI3, based on first-principles calculation. We found that both the Pb cations and I anions in this material exhibit strong covalency as characterized by the formation of Pb dimers and I trimers with strong covalent bonds at some of the intrinsic defects. The Pb dimers and I trimers are only stabilized in a particular charge state with significantly lowered energy, which leads to deep charge-state transition levels within the band gap, in contradiction to a recent proposal that this system has only shallow intrinsic defects. Our results show that, in order to prevent the deep-level defects from being effective recombination centers, the equilibrium carrier concentrations should be controlled so that the Fermi energy is about 0.3 eV away from the band edges. Beyond this range, according to a Shockley-Read-Hall analysis, the non-equilibrium carrier lifetime will be strongly affected by the concentration of I vacancies and the anti-site defects with I occupying a CH3NH3 site.

  8. Dual role of the p38 MAPK/cPLA2 pathway in the regulation of platelet apoptosis induced by ABT-737 and strong platelet agonists

    PubMed Central

    Rukoyatkina, N; Mindukshev, I; Walter, U; Gambaryan, S

    2013-01-01

    p38 Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is involved in the apoptosis of nucleated cells. Although platelets are anucleated cells, apoptotic proteins have been shown to regulate platelet lifespan. However, the involvement of p38 MAP kinase in platelet apoptosis is not yet clearly defined. Therefore, we investigated the role of p38 MAP kinase in apoptosis induced by a mimetic of BH3-only proteins, ABT-737, and in apoptosis-like events induced by such strong platelet agonists as thrombin in combination with convulxin (Thr/Cvx), both of which result in p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation and activation. A p38 inhibitor (SB202190) inhibited the apoptotic events induced by ABT-737 but did not influence those induced by Thr/Cvx. The inhibitor also reduced the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an established p38 substrate, induced by ABT-737 or Thr/Cvx. ABT-737, but not Thr/Cvx, induced the caspase 3-dependent cleavage and inactivation of cPLA2. Thus, p38 MAPK promotes ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the cPLA2/arachidonate pathway. We also show that arachidonic acid (AA) itself and in combination with Thr/Cvx or ABT-737 at low concentrations prevented apoptotic events, whereas at high concentrations it enhanced such events. Our data support the hypothesis that the p38 MAPK-triggered arachidonate pathway serves as a defense mechanism against apoptosis under physiological conditions. PMID:24263105

  9. Control of strong ground motion of mining-induced earthquakes by the strength of the seismogenic rock mass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.

    2002-01-01

    The shear stress ?? that can be sustained by the rock mass in the environs of a mining-induced earthquake controls the near-fault peak ground velocity v of that event according to v???0.25(??/G) ??, where ?? is the shear wave speed and G is the modulus of rigidity. To estimate ?? at mining depths, I review the results of four studies involving Witwatersrand tremors that relate to the bulk shear strength. The first and most general analysis uses the common assumptions that the seismogenic crust is pervasively faulted, has hydrostatic pore pressure before mining, and an extensional stress state that is close to failure. Mining operations reduce the pore pressure to zero within the mine and redistribute the stresses such that, in localized regions, the state of stress is again at the point of failure. Laboratory friction experiments can be used to estimate ?? in the zero-pore-pressure regime. Second, model calculations of states of stress in the vicinity of milling at about 3 km depth indicated the shear stress available to cause faulting near the centre of a distribution of induced earthquakes. Third, laboratory experiments combined with microscopic analyses of fault gouge from the rupture zone of a mining-induced event provided an estimate of the average shear stress acting on the fault to cause this earthquake at a depth of 2 km. Fourth, moment tensors determined for mining- induced earthquakes usually show substantial implosive components, from which it is straightforward to estimate ??. These four different analyses yield estimates of ?? that fall in the range 30 to 61 MPa which implies that near-fault particle velocities could he as high as about 1.5 m/s. To the extent that the causative fault ruptures previously intact rock, both ?? and v, in localized regions, could be several times higher than 61 MPa and 1.5 m/s.

  10. SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds induce RISC-mediated antisense strand selection and strong gene-silencing activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Takanori; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Takei, Yoshifumi; Mihara, Keichiro; Sato, Yuichiro; Seyama, Toshio

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds (Ar-siRNAs) at 5 Prime -sense strand were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs increased resistance against nuclease degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs were thermodynamically stable compared with the unmodified siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High levels of cellular uptake and cytoplasmic localization were found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong gene-silencing efficacy was exhibited in the Ar-siRNAs. -- Abstract: Short interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells. In this study, we focused on the development of siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds in order to improve the potency of RNAi and thus to overcome several problems with siRNAs, such as cellular delivery and nuclease stability. The siRNAs conjugated with phenyl, hydroxyphenyl, naphthyl, and pyrenyl derivatives showed strong resistance to nuclease degradation, and were thermodynamically stable compared with unmodified siRNA. A high level of membrane permeability in HeLa cells was also observed. Moreover, these siRNAs exhibited enhanced RNAi efficacy, which exceeded that of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified siRNAs, against exogenous Renilla luciferase in HeLa cells. In particular, abundant cytoplasmic localization and strong gene-silencing efficacy were found in the siRNAs conjugated with phenyl and hydroxyphenyl derivatives. The novel siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds are promising candidates for a new generation of modified siRNAs that can solve many of the problems associated with RNAi technology.

  11. A Bacterial Flagellin, Vibrio vulnificus FlaB, Has a Strong Mucosal Adjuvant Activity To Induce Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shee Eun; Kim, Soo Young; Jeong, Byung Chul; Kim, Young Ran; Bae, Soo Jang; Ahn, Ouk Seon; Lee, Je-Jung; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Jung Mogg; Choy, Hyon E.; Chung, Sun Sik; Kweon, Mi-Na; Rhee, Joon Haeng

    2006-01-01

    Flagellin, the structural component of flagellar filament in various locomotive bacteria, is the ligand for Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) of host cells. TLR stimulation by various pathogen-associated molecular patterns leads to activation of innate and subsequent adaptive immune responses. Therefore, TLR ligands are considered attractive adjuvant candidates in vaccine development. In this study, we show the highly potent mucosal adjuvant activity of a Vibrio vulnificus major flagellin (FlaB). Using an intranasal immunization mouse model, we observed that coadministration of the flagellin with tetanus toxoid (TT) induced significantly enhanced TT-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses in both mucosal and systemic compartments and IgG responses in the systemic compartment. The mice immunized with TT plus FlaB were completely protected from systemic challenge with a 200× minimum lethal dose of tetanus toxin. Radiolabeled FlaB administered into the nasal cavity readily reached the cervical lymph nodes and systemic circulation. FlaB bound directly to human TLR5 expressed on cultured epithelial cells and consequently induced NF-κB and interleukin-8 activation. Intranasally administered FlaB colocalized with CD11c as patches in putative dendritic cells and caused an increase in the number of TLR5-expressing cells in cervical lymph nodes. These results indicate that flagellin would serve as an efficacious mucosal adjuvant inducing protective immune responses through TLR5 activation. PMID:16369026

  12. Tunability over three frequency bands induced by mode transition in relativistic backward wave oscillator with strong end reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Fan, Juping; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Sun, Jun

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents an efficient approach to realizing the frequency tunability of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) over three frequency bands by mode transition without changing the slow wave structure (SWS). It is figured out that the transition of the operation mode in the RBWO can be efficiently achieved by using the strong end reflection of the SWS. This mode transition results in the tunability of the RBWO over three frequency bands at high power and high efficiency without changing the SWS. In numerical simulation, the output frequency of the RBWO can jump over 7.9 GHz in C-band, 9.9 GHz in X-band, and 12.4 GHz in Ku-band with output power exceeding 3.0 GW and conversion efficiency higher than 35% by just reasonably transforming the structures of the front and post resonant reflectors which provide the strong end reflection for the SWS.

  13. Hot Carrier Transport at the Graphene-Metal Interface Induced by Strong Lateral Photo-Dember Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang-Hua; Chang, You-Chia; Dissanayake, Nanditha; Zhang, Yaozhong; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2013-03-01

    Ultrafast photo-excitation in a semiconductor can lead to transient spatial charge gradient if electrons and holes have different drift velocities. The charge gradient builds up the transient electric field and causes the subsequent terahertz pulse emission. This phenomenon, known as the photo-Dember effect, was typically considered insignificant in graphene due to its similar electron and hole mobilities. Here, we observe hot carrier transport at the graphene-metal interface driven by the photo-Dember electric field under femtosecond pulse laser excitation. The polarity of hot carrier transport is determined by the asymmetry of electron and hole mobilities of the graphene device and cannot be flipped sign by tuning graphene doping level. This indicates the formation of strong photo-Dember field, dominating over the graphene/metal built-in electric field or thermal electric field. We further analyze the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the transient electric field near the contact edge by using the drift-diffusion model. The modeling results suggest that strong photo-Dember effect is caused by the low electronic specific heat of graphene and a huge charge gradient near the graphene-metal interface under pulse laser excitation. This work was supported from the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund and the U-M/SJTU Collaborative Research Program in Renewable Energy Science and Technology.

  14. Strong Electron-Phonon Coupling Superconductivity Induced by a Low-Lying Phonon in IrGe

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Daigorou; Ali, Mazhar N.; Cava, Robert J.

    2014-02-26

    The physical properties of the previously reported superconductor IrGe and the Rh1-xIrxGe solid solution are investigated. IrGe has an exceptionally high superconducting transition temperature (Tc=4.7 K) among the isostructural 1:1 late-metal germanides MGe (M=Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt). Specific-heat measurements reveal that IrGe has an anomalously low Debye temperature, originating from a low-lying phonon, compared to the other MGe phases. A large jump at Tc in the specific-heat data clearly indicates that IrGe is a strong coupling superconductor. In the Rh1-xIrxGe solid solution, a relationship between an anomalous change in lattice constants and the Debye temperature is observed. We conclude that the unusually high Tc for IrGe is likely due to strong electron–phonon coupling derived from the presence of a low-lying phonon.

  15. Sphingomyelin Liposomes Containing Soluble Leishmania major antigens Induced Strong Th2 Immune Response in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chavoshian, Omid; Biari, Nazanin; Badiee, Ali; Khamesipour, Ali; Abbasi, Azam; Saberi, Zahra; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA) provide suitable protection against leishmaniasis in murine model when delivered by an appropriate delivery system. Liposomes have been shown to be suitable vaccine delivery systems against leishmaniasis, however, the phospholipase-A (PLA) activity of SLA is a drawback to prepare a stable liposomal SLA. One strategy to overcome this problem might be using a lipid which is resistant to PLA activity of SLA such as sphingomyelin (SM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of stable SM liposomes containing SLA on the immune response induced against leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice . Materials and Methods: BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously, three times with 2-week intervals, with SLA, SM-liposome-SLA, empty liposome or buffer. As criteria for protection, footpads swelling at the site of challenge and foot parasite loads were assessed. The immune responses were also evaluated by determination of IgG subtypes and the level of IFN-γ and IL-4 in cultured splenocytes. Results: The group of mice receiving SM-liposome-SLA, showed a significant large footpad swelling, higher parasite burden in foot and higher IL-4 level compared to the group immunized with buffer. In terms of IgG and IgG isotypes, there was no significant difference between the mice receiving SM-liposome-SLA and the mice that received buffer. Moreover, the immune response induced by SM-liposome-SLA showed no significant difference compared with the one caused by SLA alone. Conclusion: It is concluded that SM-liposome-SLA is not an appropriate strategy to induce Th1 immune response and protect the mice against Leishmaniasis; however, SM-liposomes could be suitable vaccine delivery systems when a Th2 response is needed. PMID:24171074

  16. Ferromagnetism: Sulfur Doping Induces Strong Ferromagnetic Ordering in Graphene: Effect of Concentration and Substitution Mechanism (Adv. Mater. 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Błoński, Piotr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Šimek, Petr; Petr, Martin; Pumera, Martin; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-01

    R. Zbořil and co-workers show that doping a graphene lattice with sulfur induces magnetic centers which display ferromagnetic order below ≈62 K. As described on page 5045, sulfur doping promotes magnetically active configurations resembling the gamma-thiothiapyrone motif. Enhanced magnetic properties of sulfur-doped graphene are attributed to two unpaired electrons from each sulfur atom injected into the graphene conducting band where they are delocalized between the S and C atoms. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Strong anharmonicity induces quantum melting of charge density wave in 2 H -NbSe2 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Maxime; Errea, Ion; Le Tacon, Mathieu; Souliou, Sofia-Michaela; Garbarino, Gaston; Cario, Laurent; Bosak, Alexey; Mauri, Francesco; Calandra, Matteo; Rodière, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    The pressure and temperature dependence of the phonon dispersion of 2 H -NbSe2 is measured by inelastic x-ray scattering. A strong temperature dependent soft phonon mode, reminiscent of the charge density wave (CDW), is found to persist up to a pressure as high as 16 GPa, far above the critical pressure at which the CDW disappears at 0 K. By using ab initio calculations beyond the harmonic approximation, we obtain an accurate, quantitative description of the (P ,T ) dependence of the phonon spectrum. Our results show that the rapid destruction of the CDW under pressure is related to the zero mode vibrations—or quantum fluctuations—of the lattice renormalized by the anharmonic part of the lattice potential. The calculations also show that the low-energy longitudinal acoustic mode that drives the CDW transition barely contributes to superconductivity, explaining the insensitivity of the superconducting critical temperature to the CDW transition.

  18. Biofilm microenvironment induces a widespread adaptive amino-acid fermentation pathway conferring strong fitness advantage in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Létoffé, Sylvie; Chalabaev, Sabina; Dugay, José; Stressmann, Franziska; Audrain, Bianca; Portais, Jean-Charles; Letisse, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial metabolism has been studied primarily in liquid cultures, and exploration of other natural growth conditions may reveal new aspects of bacterial biology. Here, we investigate metabolic changes occurring when Escherichia coli grows as surface-attached biofilms, a common but still poorly characterized bacterial lifestyle. We show that E. coli adapts to hypoxic conditions prevailing within biofilms by reducing the amino acid threonine into 1-propanol, an important industrial commodity not known to be naturally produced by Enterobacteriaceae. We demonstrate that threonine degradation corresponds to a fermentation process maintaining cellular redox balance, which confers a strong fitness advantage during anaerobic and biofilm growth but not in aerobic conditions. Whereas our study identifies a fermentation pathway known in Clostridia but previously undocumented in Enterobacteriaceae, it also provides novel insight into how growth in anaerobic biofilm microenvironments can trigger adaptive metabolic pathways edging out competition with in mixed bacterial communities. PMID:28542503

  19. Strong Rashba-Edelstein Effect-Induced Spin-Orbit Torques in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide/Ferromagnet Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qiming; Yu, Guoqiang; Lan, Yann-Wen; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Ming-Yang; Zheng, Cheng; Zhu, Xiaodan; Li, Lain-Jong; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L

    2016-12-14

    The electronic and optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional materials have been extensively explored in graphene and layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Spintronics in these two-dimensional materials could provide novel opportunities for future electronics, for example, efficient generation of spin current, which should enable the efficient manipulation of magnetic elements. So far, the quantitative determination of charge current-induced spin current and spin-orbit torques (SOTs) on the magnetic layer adjacent to two-dimensional materials is still lacking. Here, we report a large SOT generated by current-induced spin accumulation through the Rashba-Edelstein effect in the composites of monolayer TMD (MoS2 or WSe2)/CoFeB bilayer. The effective spin conductivity corresponding to the SOT turns out to be almost temperature-independent. Our results suggest that the charge-spin conversion in the chemical vapor deposition-grown large-scale monolayer TMDs could potentially lead to high energy efficiency for magnetization reversal and convenient device integration for future spintronics based on two-dimensional materials.

  20. Galectin-3-Binding Glycomimetics that Strongly Reduce Bleomycin-Induced Lung Fibrosis and Modulate Intracellular Glycan Recognition.

    PubMed

    Delaine, Tamara; Collins, Patrick; MacKinnon, Alison; Sharma, G; Stegmayr, John; Rajput, Vishal K; Mandal, Santanu; Cumpstey, Ian; Larumbe, Amaia; Salameh, Bader A; Kahl-Knutsson, Barbro; van Hattum, Hilde; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Pieters, Roland J; Sethi, Tariq; Schambye, Hans; Oredsson, Stina; Leffler, Hakon; Blanchard, Helen; Nilsson, Ulf J

    2016-09-15

    Discovery of glycan-competitive galectin-3-binding compounds that attenuate lung fibrosis in a murine model and that block intracellular galectin-3 accumulation at damaged vesicles, hence revealing galectin-3-glycan interactions involved in fibrosis progression and in intracellular galectin-3 activities, is reported. 3,3'-Bis-(4-aryltriazol-1-yl)thiodigalactosides were synthesized and evaluated as antagonists of galectin-1, -2, -3, and -4 N-terminal, -4 C-terminal, -7 and -8 N-terminal, -9 N-terminal, and -9 C-terminal domains. Compounds displaying low-nanomolar affinities for galectins-1 and -3 were identified in a competitive fluorescence anisotropy assay. X-ray structural analysis of selected compounds in complex with galectin-3, together with galectin-3 mutant binding experiments, revealed that both the aryltriazolyl moieties and fluoro substituents on the compounds are involved in key interactions responsible for exceptional affinities towards galectin-3. The most potent galectin-3 antagonist was demonstrated to act in an assay monitoring galectin-3 accumulation upon amitriptyline-induced vesicle damage, visualizing a biochemically/medically relevant intracellular lectin-carbohydrate binding event and that it can be blocked by a small molecule. The same antagonist administered intratracheally attenuated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model with a dose/response profile comparing favorably with that of oral administration of the marketed antifibrotic compound pirfenidone. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Interstitial atoms enable joint twinning and transformation induced plasticity in strong and ductile high-entropy alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiming; Tasan, Cemal Cem; Springer, Hauke; Gault, Baptiste; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) consisting of multiple principle elements provide an avenue for realizing exceptional mechanical, physical and chemical properties. We report a novel strategy for designing a new class of HEAs incorporating the additional interstitial element carbon. This results in joint activation of twinning- and transformation-induced plasticity (TWIP and TRIP) by tuning the matrix phase’s instability in a metastable TRIP-assisted dual-phase HEA. Besides TWIP and TRIP, such alloys benefit from massive substitutional and interstitial solid solution strengthening as well as from the composite effect associated with its dual-phase structure. Nanosize particle formation and grain size reduction are also utilized. The new interstitial TWIP-TRIP-HEA thus unifies all metallic strengthening mechanisms in one material, leading to twice the tensile strength compared to a single-phase HEA with similar composition, yet, at identical ductility. PMID:28079175

  2. Interstitial atoms enable joint twinning and transformation induced plasticity in strong and ductile high-entropy alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiming; Tasan, Cemal Cem; Springer, Hauke; Gault, Baptiste; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-01-12

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) consisting of multiple principle elements provide an avenue for realizing exceptional mechanical, physical and chemical properties. We report a novel strategy for designing a new class of HEAs incorporating the additional interstitial element carbon. This results in joint activation of twinning- and transformation-induced plasticity (TWIP and TRIP) by tuning the matrix phase's instability in a metastable TRIP-assisted dual-phase HEA. Besides TWIP and TRIP, such alloys benefit from massive substitutional and interstitial solid solution strengthening as well as from the composite effect associated with its dual-phase structure. Nanosize particle formation and grain size reduction are also utilized. The new interstitial TWIP-TRIP-HEA thus unifies all metallic strengthening mechanisms in one material, leading to twice the tensile strength compared to a single-phase HEA with similar composition, yet, at identical ductility.

  3. Interstitial atoms enable joint twinning and transformation induced plasticity in strong and ductile high-entropy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiming; Tasan, Cemal Cem; Springer, Hauke; Gault, Baptiste; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) consisting of multiple principle elements provide an avenue for realizing exceptional mechanical, physical and chemical properties. We report a novel strategy for designing a new class of HEAs incorporating the additional interstitial element carbon. This results in joint activation of twinning- and transformation-induced plasticity (TWIP and TRIP) by tuning the matrix phase’s instability in a metastable TRIP-assisted dual-phase HEA. Besides TWIP and TRIP, such alloys benefit from massive substitutional and interstitial solid solution strengthening as well as from the composite effect associated with its dual-phase structure. Nanosize particle formation and grain size reduction are also utilized. The new interstitial TWIP-TRIP-HEA thus unifies all metallic strengthening mechanisms in one material, leading to twice the tensile strength compared to a single-phase HEA with similar composition, yet, at identical ductility.

  4. DMSO is a strong inducer of DNA hydroxymethylation in pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Roman; Spitzer, Silvia; Karlic, Heidrun; Klaushofer, Klaus; Varga, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Artificial induction of active DNA demethylation appears to be a possible and useful strategy in molecular biology research and therapy development. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was shown to cause phenotypic changes in embryonic stem cells altering the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles. Here we report that DMSO increases global and gene-specific DNA hydroxymethylation levels in pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. After 1 day, DMSO increased the expression of genes involved in DNA hydroxymethylation (TET) and nucleotide excision repair (GADD45) and decreased the expression of genes related to DNA methylation (Dnmt1, Dnmt3b, Hells). Already 12 hours after seeding, before first replication, DMSO increased the expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Fas and of the early osteoblastic factor Dlx5, which proved to be Tet1 dependent. At this time an increase of 5-methyl-cytosine hydroxylation (5-hmC) with a concomitant loss of methyl-cytosines on Fas and Dlx5 promoters as well as an increase in global 5-hmC and loss in global DNA methylation was observed. Time course-staining of nuclei suggested euchromatic localization of DMSO induced 5-hmC. As consequence of induced Fas expression, caspase 3/7 and 8 activities were increased indicating apoptosis. After 5 days, the effect of DMSO on promoter- and global methylation as well as on gene expression of Fas and Dlx5 and on caspases activities was reduced or reversed indicating down-regulation of apoptosis. At this time, up regulation of genes important for matrix synthesis suggests that DMSO via hydroxymethylation of the Fas promoter initially stimulates apoptosis in a subpopulation of the heterogeneous MC3T3-E1 cell line, leaving a cell population of extra-cellular matrix producing osteoblasts.  PMID:22507896

  5. An mTOR anti-sense oligonucleotide decreases polycystic kidney disease in mice with a targeted mutation in Pkd2

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Zafar, Iram; He, Zhibin; Doctor, R. Brian; Moldovan, Radu; Mullick, Adam E.; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common life-threatening hereditary disease in the USA. In human ADPKD studies, sirolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor, had little therapeutic effect. While sirolimus robustly inhibits mTORC1, it has a minimal effect on mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). Polycystic kidneys of Pkd2WS25/− mice, an orthologous model of human ADPKD caused by a mutation in the Pkd2 gene, had an early increase in pS6 (marker of mTORC1) and pAktSer473 (marker of mTORC2). To investigate the effect of combined mTORC1 and 2 inhibition, Pkd2WS25/− mice were treated with an mTOR anti-sense oligonucleotide (ASO) that blocks mTOR expression thus inhibiting both mTORC1 and 2. The mTOR ASO resulted in a significant decrease in mTOR protein, pS6 and pAktSer473. Pkd2WS25/− mice treated with the ASO had a normalization of kidney weights and kidney function and a marked decrease in cyst volume. The mTOR ASO resulted in a significant decrease in proliferation and apoptosis of tubular epithelial cells. To demonstrate the role of mTORC2 on cyst growth, Rictor, the functional component of mTORC2, was silenced in Madin-Darby canine kidney cell cysts grown in 3D cultures. Silencing Rictor significantly decreased cyst volume and expression of pAktSer473. The decreased cyst size in the Rictor silenced cells was reversed by introduction of a constitutively active Akt1. In vitro, combined mTORC1 and 2 inhibition reduced cyst growth more than inhibition of mTORC1 or 2 alone. In conclusion, combined mTORC1 and 2 inhibition has therapeutic potential in ADPKD. PMID:24847003

  6. Seismically induced rock slope failures resulting from topographic amplification of strong ground motions: The case of Pacoima Canyon, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, S.A.; Murphy, W.; Jibson, R.W.; Petley, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge earthquake (Mw = 6.7) triggered extensive rock slope failures in Pacoima Canyon, immediately north of Los Angeles, California. Pacoima Canyon is a narrow and steep canyon incised in gneissic and granitic rocks. Peak accelerations of nearly 1.6 g were recorded at a ridge that forms the left abutment of Pacoima Dam; peak accelerations at the bottom of the canyon were less than 0.5 g, suggesting the occurrence of topographic amplification. Topographic effects have been previously suggested to explain similarly high ground motions at the site during the 1971 (Mw = 6.7) San Fernando earthquake. Furthermore, high landslide concentrations observed in the area have been attributed to unusually strong ground motions rather than higher susceptibility to sliding compared with nearby zones. We conducted field investigations and slope stability back-analyses to confirm the impact of topographic amplification on the triggering of landslides during the 1994 earthquake. Our results suggest that the observed extensive rock sliding and falling would have not been possible under unamplified seismic conditions, which would have generated a significantly lower number of areas affected by landslides. In contrast, modelling slope stability using amplified ground shaking predicts slope failure distributions matching what occurred in 1994. This observation confirms a significant role for topographic amplification on the triggering of landslides at the site, and emphasises the need to select carefully the inputs for seismic slope stability analyses. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Qubit-flip-induced cavity mode squeezing in the strong dispersive regime of the quantum Rabi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chaitanya; Irish, Elinor K.; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2017-03-01

    Squeezed states of light are a set of nonclassical states in which the quantum fluctuations of one quadrature component are reduced below the standard quantum limit. With less noise than the best stabilised laser sources, squeezed light is a key resource in the field of quantum technologies and has already improved sensing capabilities in areas ranging from gravitational wave detection to biomedical applications. In this work we propose a novel technique for generating squeezed states of a confined light field strongly coupled to a two-level system, or qubit, in the dispersive regime. Utilising the dispersive energy shift caused by the interaction, control of the qubit state produces a time-dependent change in the frequency of the light field. An appropriately timed sequence of sudden frequency changes reduces the quantum noise fluctuations in one quadrature of the field well below the standard quantum limit. The degree of squeezing and the time of generation are directly controlled by the number of frequency shifts applied. Even in the presence of realistic noise and imperfections, our protocol promises to be capable of generating a useful degree of squeezing with present experimental capabilities.

  8. Control of dynamical self-assembly of strongly Brownian nanoparticles through convective forces induced by ultrafast laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilday, Serim; Akguc, Gursoy B.; Tokel, Onur; Makey, Ghaith; Yavuz, Ozgun; Yavuz, Koray; Pavlov, Ihor; Ilday, F. Omer; Gulseren, Oguz

    We report a new dynamical self-assembly mechanism, where judicious use of convective and strong Brownian forces enables effective patterning of colloidal nanoparticles that are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than the laser beam. Optical trapping or tweezing effects are not involved, but the laser is used to create steep thermal gradients through multi-photon absorption, and thereby guide the colloids through convective forces. Convective forces can be thought as a positive feedback mechanism that helps to form and reinforce pattern, while Brownian motion act as a competing negative feedback mechanism to limit the growth of the pattern, as well as to increase the possibilities of bifurcation into different patterns, analogous to the competition observed in reaction-diffusion systems. By steering stochastic processes through these forces, we are able to gain control over the emergent pattern such as to form-deform-reform of a pattern, to change its shape and transport it spatially within seconds. This enables us to dynamically initiate and control large patterns comprised of hundreds of colloids. Further, by not relying on any specific chemical, optical or magnetic interaction, this new method is, in principle, completely independent of the material type being assembled.

  9. Recombinant Newcastle Disease virus capsids displaying enterovirus 71 VP1 fragment induce a strong immune response in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sivasamugham, Lalita Ambigai; Cardosa, Mary Jane; Tan, Wen Siang; Yusoff, Khatijah

    2006-08-01

    The complete VP1 protein of EV71 was truncated into six segments and fused to the C-terminal ends of full-length nucleocapsid protein (NPfl) and truncated NP (NPt; lacks 20% amino acid residues from its C-terminal end) of newcastle disease virus (NDV). Western blot analysis using anti-VP1 rabbit serum showed that the N-terminal region of the VP1 protein contains a major antigenic region. The recombinant proteins carrying the truncated VP1 protein, VP1(1-100), were expressed most efficiently in Escherichia coli as determined by Western blot analysis. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified recombinant protein, NPt-VP(1-100) revealed that it predominantly self-assembled into intact ring-like structures whereas NPfl-VP(1-100) recombinant proteins showed disrupted ring-like formations. Rabbits immunized with the purified NPt-VP(1-100) and NPfl-VP(1-100) exhibited a strong immune response against the complete VP1 protein. The antisera of these recombinant proteins also reacted positively with authentic enterovirus 71 and the closely related Coxsackievirus A16 when analyzed by an immunofluorescence assay suggesting their potential as immunological reagents for the detection of anti-enterovirus 71 antibodies in serum samples.

  10. Qubit-flip-induced cavity mode squeezing in the strong dispersive regime of the quantum Rabi model

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Chaitanya; Irish, Elinor K.; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2017-01-01

    Squeezed states of light are a set of nonclassical states in which the quantum fluctuations of one quadrature component are reduced below the standard quantum limit. With less noise than the best stabilised laser sources, squeezed light is a key resource in the field of quantum technologies and has already improved sensing capabilities in areas ranging from gravitational wave detection to biomedical applications. In this work we propose a novel technique for generating squeezed states of a confined light field strongly coupled to a two-level system, or qubit, in the dispersive regime. Utilising the dispersive energy shift caused by the interaction, control of the qubit state produces a time-dependent change in the frequency of the light field. An appropriately timed sequence of sudden frequency changes reduces the quantum noise fluctuations in one quadrature of the field well below the standard quantum limit. The degree of squeezing and the time of generation are directly controlled by the number of frequency shifts applied. Even in the presence of realistic noise and imperfections, our protocol promises to be capable of generating a useful degree of squeezing with present experimental capabilities. PMID:28358025

  11. Strong protection against ricin challenge induced by a novel modified ricin A-chain protein in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Yang, Hao; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Xin, Wenwen; Yao, Wenwu; Zhuang, Xiangjin; Ji, Bin; Wang, Jinglin

    2015-01-01

    Ricin toxin (RT) is an extremely potent toxin derived from the castor bean plant. As a possible bioterrorist weapon, it was categorized as a level B agent in international society. With the growing awareness and concerns of the “white powder incident” in recent years, it is indispensable to develop an effective countermeasure against RT intoxication. In this study we used site-directed mutagenesis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques to modify the gene of ricin A-chain (RTA). As a result, we have generated a mutated and truncated ricin A-chain (mtRTA) vaccine antigen by E.coli strain. The cytotoxicity assay was used to evaluate the safety of the as-prepared mtRTA antigen, and the results showed that there was no residual toxicity observed when compared to the recombinant RTA (rRTA) or native RT. Furthermore, BALB/c mice were subcutaneously (s.c.) vaccinated with mtRTA 3 times at an interval of 2 weeks, and then the survivals were evaluated after intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intratracheal challenge of RT. The vaccinated mice developed a strong protective immune response that was wholly protective against 40 × LD50 of RT i.p. injection or 20 × LD50 of RT intratracheal spraying. The mtRTA antigen has great potential to be a vaccine candidate for future application in humans. PMID:26038805

  12. Strong-Field Induced Dissociative Ionization of Vinyl Bromide Probed by Femtosecond Extreme Ultraviolet (xuv) Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Neumark, Daniel; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-06-01

    A table-top high harmonic XUV light source (50 eV to 70 eV) has been successfully utilized to explore the ultrafast dynamics of vinyl bromide (CH2=CHBr) with electronic state specificity and elemental sensitivity. Strong-field ionization (SFI) provides a method to produce ions in different ionic states. The production and dissociation dynamics of these ionic states are investigated by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy. The XUV photons probe the time-dependent spectroscopic features associated with transitions of the Br (3d) inner-shell electrons to vacancies in molecular and atomic valence orbitals. The experimental observation shows that two ionic states are produced by SFI. The first ionic excited state is dissociative, leading to C-Br bond dissociation which is observed in real time as a shift in the absorption energy. The results offer powerful new insights about orbital-specific electronic processes in high field ionization, coupled vibrational relaxation and dissociation dynamics, and the correlation of valence hole-state location and dissociation in polyatomic molecules, all probed simultaneously by ultrafast table-top XUV spectroscopy.

  13. Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi infection in mice induces strong B cell responses and striking but temporary changes in splenic cell distribution.

    PubMed

    Achtman, Ariel H; Khan, Mahmood; MacLennan, Ian C M; Langhorne, Jean

    2003-07-01

    B cells and Abs play a key role in controlling the erythrocytic stage of malaria. However, little is known about the way the humoral response develops during infection. We show that Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi causes major, but temporary changes in the distribution of leukocytes in the spleen. Despite these changes, an ordered response to infection develops, which includes vigorous extrafollicular growth of plasmablasts and germinal center formation. Early in the response, the lymphocytes in the T zone and follicles become widely spaced, and the edges of these compartments blur. This effect is maximal around the peak of parasitemia. Germinal centers are apparent by day 8, peak at day 20, and persist through day 60. Extrafollicular foci of plasmablasts are visible from day 4 and initiate a very strong plasma cell response. Initially, the plasma cells have a conventional red pulp distribution, but by day 10 they are unconventionally sited in the periarteriolar region of the white pulp. In this region they form clusters occupying part of the area normally filled by T cells. B cells are absent from the marginal zone for at least 30 days after the peak of infection, although flow cytometry shows their continued presence in the spleen throughout infection. Relatively normal splenic architecture is regained by day 60 of infection. These results show that the changes in splenic cell distribution are linked to the presence of parasites and do not seem to interfere with the development of the humoral response.

  14. Strong protection against ricin challenge induced by a novel modified ricin A-chain protein in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Yang, Hao; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Xin, Wenwen; Yao, Wenwu; Zhuang, Xiangjin; Ji, Bin; Wang, Jinglin

    2015-01-01

    Ricin toxin (RT) is an extremely potent toxin derived from the castor bean plant. As a possible bioterrorist weapon, it was categorized as a level B agent in international society. With the growing awareness and concerns of the "white powder incident" in recent years, it is indispensable to develop an effective countermeasure against RT intoxication. In this study we used site-directed mutagenesis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques to modify the gene of ricin A-chain (RTA). As a result, we have generated a mutated and truncated ricin A-chain (mtRTA) vaccine antigen by E.coli strain. The cytotoxicity assay was used to evaluate the safety of the as-prepared mtRTA antigen, and the results showed that there was no residual toxicity observed when compared to the recombinant RTA (rRTA) or native RT. Furthermore, BALB/c mice were subcutaneously (s.c.) vaccinated with mtRTA 3 times at an interval of 2 weeks, and then the survivals were evaluated after intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intratracheal challenge of RT. The vaccinated mice developed a strong protective immune response that was wholly protective against 40 × LD50 of RT i.p. injection or 20 × LD50 of RT intratracheal spraying. The mtRTA antigen has great potential to be a vaccine candidate for future application in humans.

  15. Mucosal Immunization of Lactating Female Rhesus Monkeys with a Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Envelope Induces Strong Env-Specific IgA Antibody Responses in Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Fouda, Genevieve G. A.; Amos, Joshua D.; Wilks, Andrew B.; Pollara, Justin; Ray, Caroline A.; Chand, Anjali; Kunz, Erika L.; Liebl, Brooke E.; Whitaker, Kaylan; Carville, Angela; Smith, Shannon; Colvin, Lisa; Pickup, David J.; Staats, Herman F.; Overman, Glenn; Eutsey-Lloyd, Krissey; Parks, Robert; Chen, Haiyan; LaBranche, Celia; Barnett, Susan; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido; Montefiori, David C.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Letvin, Norman L.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that vaccination of lactating rhesus monkeys with a DNA prime/vector boost strategy induces strong T-cell responses but limited envelope (Env)-specific humoral responses in breast milk. To improve vaccine-elicited antibody responses in milk, hormone-induced lactating rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with a transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV Env immunogen in a prime-boost strategy modeled after the moderately protective RV144 HIV vaccine. Lactating rhesus monkeys were intramuscularly primed with either recombinant DNA (n = 4) or modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) poxvirus vector (n = 4) expressing the T/F HIV Env C.1086 and then boosted twice intramuscularly with C.1086 gp120 and the adjuvant MF59. The vaccines induced Env-binding IgG and IgA as well as neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses in plasma and milk of most vaccinated animals. Importantly, plasma neutralization titers against clade C HIV variants MW965 (P = 0.03) and CAP45 (P = 0.04) were significantly higher in MVA-primed than in DNA-primed animals. The superior systemic prime-boost regimen was then compared to a mucosal-boost regimen, in which animals were boosted twice intranasally with C.1086 gp120 and the TLR 7/8 agonist R848 following the same systemic prime. While the systemic and mucosal vaccine regimens elicited comparable levels of Env-binding IgG antibodies, mucosal immunization induced significantly stronger Env-binding IgA responses in milk (P = 0.03). However, the mucosal regimen was not as potent at inducing functional IgG responses. This study shows that systemic MVA prime followed by either intranasal or systemic protein boosts can elicit strong humoral responses in breast milk and may be a useful strategy to interrupt postnatal HIV-1 transmission. PMID:23596289

  16. Sodium dodecyl sulphate, a strong inducer of thermostable glucanhydrolase secretion from a derepressed mutant strain of Bacillus alcalophilus GCBNA-4.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Nadia; Ali, Sikander; Ul-Haq, Ikram

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we report the optimisation of batch conditions for improved α-1,4-glucan-glucanohydrolase (GGH) secretion by a nitrous acid (NA)-treated Bacillus alcalophilus. The wild (isolate GCB-18) and NA-derivative (mutant GCBNA-4) were grown in a medium containing 10 g/L nutrient broth, 10 g/L starch, 5 g/L lactose, 2 g/L ammonium sulphate, 2 g/L CaCl2 and phosphate buffer (pH 7.6). Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was used as an enzyme inducer while batch fermentations were carried out at 40 °C. The mutant produced GGH in 40 h which was 15-fold higher than the wild in presence of SDS. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the mutant culture exhibited the capability for improved enzyme activity over a broad range of temperature (35-70 °C). The enzyme was purified by cation-exchange column chromatography with ~80 % recovery. The performance of fuzzy-logic system control was found to be highly promising for the improved substrate conversion rate. The correlation (1.045E + 0025) among variables demonstrated the model terms as highly significant indicating commercial utility of the culture used (P < 0.05).

  17. Targeting of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase is strongly influenced by the sequence and structure of the targeted DNA.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong Ming; Ratnam, Sarayu; Storb, Ursula

    2005-12-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM). Since in vitro AID was shown to deaminate cytosines on single-stranded DNA or the nontranscribed strand, it remained a puzzle how in vivo AID targets both DNA strands equally. Here we investigate the roles of transcription and DNA sequence in cytosine deamination. Strikingly different results are found with different substrates. Depending on the target sequence, the transcribed DNA strand is targeted as well as or better than the nontranscribed strand. The preferential targeting is not related to the frequency of AID hot spots. Comparison of cytosine deamination by AID and bisulfite shows different targeting patterns suggesting that AID may locally unwind the DNA. We conclude that somatic hypermutation on both DNA strands is the natural outcome of AID action on a transcribed gene; furthermore, the DNA sequence or structure and topology play major roles in targeting AID in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, the lack of mutations in the first approximately 100 nucleotides and beyond about 1 to 2 kb from the promoter of immunoglobulin genes during SHM must be due to special conditions of transcription and chromatin in vivo.

  18. Regulatory T cells are strong promoters of acute ischemic stroke in mice by inducing dysfunction of the cerebral microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kraft, Peter; Dreykluft, Angela; Hagedorn, Ina; Göbel, Kerstin; Schuhmann, Michael K; Langhauser, Friederike; Helluy, Xavier; Schwarz, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Mayer, Christian T; Brede, Marc; Varallyay, Csanad; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Jakob, Peter; Magnus, Tim; Meuth, Sven G; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Zernecke, Alma; Sparwasser, Tim; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stoll, Guido; Wiendl, Heinz

    2013-01-24

    We have recently identified T cells as important mediators of ischemic brain damage, but the contribution of the different T-cell subsets is unclear. Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T cells (Tregs) are generally regarded as prototypic anti-inflammatory cells that maintain immune tolerance and counteract tissue damage in a variety of immune-mediated disorders. In the present study, we examined the role of Tregs after experimental brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. Selective depletion of Tregs in the DEREG mouse model dramatically reduced infarct size and improved neurologic function 24 hours after stroke and this protective effect was preserved at later stages of infarct development. The specificity of this detrimental Treg effect was confirmed by adoptive transfer experiments in wild-type mice and in Rag1(-/-) mice lacking lymphocytes. Mechanistically, Tregs induced microvascular dysfunction in vivo by increased interaction with the ischemic brain endothelium via the LFA-1/ICAM-1 pathway and platelets and these findings were confirmed in vitro. Ablation of Tregs reduced microvascular thrombus formation and improved cerebral reperfusion on stroke, as revealed by ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging at 17.6 Tesla. In contrast, established immunoregulatory characteristics of Tregs had no functional relevance. We define herein a novel and unexpected role of Tregs in a primary nonimmunologic disease state.

  19. EB 1089, a novel vitamin D analog with strong antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing effects on target cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, C M; Mäenpää, P H

    1997-12-01

    The physiologically active form of vitamin D, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, plays an important role not only in the establishment and maintenance of calcium metabolism, but also in regulating cell growth and differentiation. As the clinical usefulness of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is limited by its tendency to cause hypercalcemia, new analogs with a better therapeutic profile have been synthesized. One of these new synthetic vitamin D analogs is EB 1089, which is characterized by an altered side chain structure featuring 26,27-dimethyl groups and two double bonds. This analog has been shown to be more potent than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in inhibiting proliferation, stimulating differentiation, and inducing apoptosis in a number of different cell types, including cancer cells. Despite being more potent than 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 with respect to its cell regulatory effects, EB 1089 displays weaker calcemic side-effects. These characteristics make EB 1089 a potentially useful compound for the treatment of a diversity of clinical disorders, including cancer and metabolic bone diseases. A promising phase I study with EB 1089 in patients with advanced breast and colon cancer has already been carried out, and more clinical trials evaluating the clinical effectiveness of EB 1089 in other types of cancer are in progress.

  20. The gallium complex KP46 exerts strong activity against primary explanted melanoma cells and induces apoptosis in melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Valiahdi, Seied Mojtaba; Heffeter, Petra; Jakupec, Michael A.; Marculescu, Rodrig; Berger, Walter; Rappersberger, Klemens; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2012-01-01

    The antineoplastic properties of gallium are well documented. Owing to their robust accumulation of gallium, melanoma cells should be amenable to gallium-based anticancer drugs. With the aim of improving the disappointingly low activity of inorganic gallium salts, we have developed the orally bioavailable gallium complex KP46 [tris(8-quinolinolato)gallium(III)] that was already successfully studied in a phase I clinical trial. To assess its therapeutic potential in malignant melanoma, its antiproliferative effects were investigated in series of human cell lines and primary explanted melanoma samples by means of the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and the Human Tumor Cloning Assay, respectively. When compared with other cell lines, the majority of melanoma cells rank among the KP46-sensitive cell lines (50% inhibitory concentration values: 0.8–3.7 μmol/l). Clinically achievable concentrations of KP46 proved to be highly effective in melanoma cells from primary explants of cutaneous and lymph node metastases. Colony growth was inhibited in 10 of 10 specimens by 5 lmol/l KP46 (corresponding to the steady-state plasma concentration measured earlier in a study patient) and in four of 10 specimens by 0.5 μmol/l KP46. In-vitro potency of KP46 is higher than that of dacarbazine or fotemustine and comparable with that of cisplatin. The effects induced by KP46 in melanoma cell lines involve cell cycle perturbations (S-phase arrest) and apoptosis (activation of caspase-9, PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase] cleavage, formation of apoptotic bodies). No effects on DNA secondary structure could be observed in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay using double-stranded plasmid DNA. Thus, further studies on the therapeutic applicability of KP46 in malignant melanoma are warranted. PMID:19584767

  1. Coherent phenomena in terahertz 2D plasmonic structures: strong coupling, plasmonic crystals, and induced transparency by coupling of localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gregory C.; Aizin, Gregory R.; Allen, S. James; Grine, Albert D.; Bethke, Don; Reno, John L.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2014-05-01

    The device applications of plasmonic systems such as graphene and two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in III-V heterostructures include terahertz detectors, mixers, oscillators and modulators. These two dimensional (2D) plasmonic systems are not only well-suited for device integration, but also enable the broad tunability of underdamped plasma excitations via an applied electric field. We present demonstrations of the coherent coupling of multiple voltage tuned GaAs/AlGaAs 2D plasmonic resonators under terahertz irradiation. By utilizing a plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism to downconvert the near field of plasma waves to a DC signal, we directly detect the spectrum of coupled plasmonic micro-resonator structures at cryogenic temperatures. The 2DEG in the studied devices can be interpreted as a plasmonic waveguide where multiple gate terminals control the 2DEG kinetic inductance. When the gate tuning of the 2DEG is spatially periodic, a one-dimensional finite plasmonic crystal forms. This results in a subwavelength structure, much like a metamaterial element, that nonetheless Bragg scatters plasma waves from a repeated crystal unit cell. A 50% in situ tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges is observed. By introducing gate-controlled defects or simply terminating the lattice, localized states arise in the plasmonic crystal. Inherent asymmetries at the finite crystal boundaries produce an induced transparency-like phenomenon due to the coupling of defect modes and crystal surface states known as Tamm states. The demonstrated active control of coupled plasmonic resonators opens previously unexplored avenues for sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detection, planar metamaterials, and slow-light devices.

  2. Wave disturbances induced by crustal earthquakes: Case study of two strong earthquakes in the Caucasian-Anatolian sector of the Alpine Mediterranean mobile belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhin, E. A.; Sobisevich, L. E.

    2014-03-01

    The display conditions of strong earthquakes in the Caucasian-Anatolian sector of the Mediterranean mobile belt are analyzed with allowance for the instrumental observations by titlmeters and magnetic variometers at the North Caucasian geophysical observatory of Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth of the Russian Academy of Sciences (NCGO IPE RAS) (Elbrus volcanic region) and at the magnetic stations operated by the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN). It is demonstrated that the geophysical information obtained during the preparatory stages of the earthquakes on March 8, 2010 and January 19, 2011 in Turkey and the North Caucasus, respectively, reflect the fine structure of the anomalous wave processes of the preparation and evolution of the crustal earthquakes. The results provide a general idea of the geomagnetic activity and some characteristic features of the induced anomalous disturbances in the Caucasian-Anatolian sector of the Alpine Mediterranean mobile belt, which precede and accompany strong seismic events.

  3. Experimental observation of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes during strong tearing modes on the EAST tokamak in fast-electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Chen, W.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhou, R. J.; Zhong, G. Q.; Shi, T. H.; Xu, L. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, Y. W.; Lin, S. Y.; Shen, B.; the EAST Team

    2013-06-01

    Beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) during strong tearing modes are investigated on the EAST tokamak systematically, and the relation between the BAE frequencies and plasma parameters such as electron density \\bar{n}_e , ion temperature Ti, the profile of safety factor q(ρ) or the intensity of \\dot{B}_\\theta (the width of the magnetic island w) is given in detail during the injection of the power of lower hybrid wave (LHW) (or is also accompanied by the injection of ion cyclotron resonance frequency) comprehensively. All the conditions show that the values of BAE frequencies f_BAE \\propto (T_\\rme + \\frac{7}{4} T_\\rmi)^{1/2} are in agreement with the generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation, and the activities of the BAEs have a strong interaction with the process of magnetic reconnection. The BAEs are formed during the injection of the power of LHW, and disappear immediately when the power of LHW is turned off on the EAST tokamak. The LHW plasmas or the runaway discharge in Ohmic plasmas can increase the population of fast electrons, which plays a role in the activities of BAEs and a possible excitation mechanism for the BAEs during the strong tearing mode activities.

  4. Oral Immunization with a Recombinant Lactococcus lactis-Expressing HIV-1 Antigen on Group A Streptococcus Pilus Induces Strong Mucosal Immunity in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Jones, Andrew; Quigley, Bernard R; Scott, June R; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-11-15

    The induction of a potent humoral and cellular immune response in mucosal tissue is important for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Most of the current HIV vaccines under development use the i.m. route for immunization, which is relatively poor in generating potent and long-lived mucosal immune responses. In this article, we explore the ability of an oral vaccination with a probiotic organism, Lactococcus lactis, to elicit HIV-specific immune responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments of BALB/c mice. We expressed the HIV-1 Gag-p24 on the tip of the T3 pilus of Streptococcus pyogenes as a fusion to the Cpa protein (LL-Gag). After four monthly LL-Gag oral immunizations, we observed strong Gag-specific IgG and IgA responses in serum, feces, and vaginal secretions. However, the Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses in the blood were at or below our detection limit. After an i.m. modified vaccinia Ankara/Gag boost, we observed robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses both in systemic and in mucosal tissues, including intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes of the small intestine, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Consistent with strong immunogenicity, the LL-Gag induced activation of CD11c(+) CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches after oral immunization. Our results demonstrate that oral immunization with L. lactis expressing an Ag on the tip of the group A Streptococcus pilus serves as an excellent vaccine platform to induce strong mucosal humoral and cellular immunity against HIV. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Engineering an inducible gene expression system for Bacillus subtilis from a strong constitutive promoter and a theophylline-activated synthetic riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenjing; Han, Laichuang; Cheng, Jintao; Liu, Zhongmei; Zhou, Li; Guo, Junling; Zhou, Zhemin

    2016-11-22

    Synthetic riboswitches have been increasingly used to control and tune gene expression in diverse organisms. Although a set of theophylline-responsive riboswitches have been developed for bacteria, fully functional expression elements mediated by synthetic riboswitches in Bacillus subtilis are rarely used because of the host-dependent compatibility between the promoters and riboswitches. A novel genetic element composed of the promoter P43 and a theophylline-riboswitch was developed and characterized in B. subtilis. When combined with a P43 promoter (P43'-riboE1), the theophylline-riboswitch successfully switched the constitutive expression pattern of P43 to an induced pattern. The expression mediated by the novel element could be activated at the translational level by theophylline with a relatively high induction ratio. The induction ratios for P43'-riboE1 by 4-mM theophylline were elevated during the induction period. The level of induced expression was dependent on the theophylline dose. Correspondingly, the induction ratios gradually increased in parallel with the elevated dose of theophylline. Importantly, the induced expression level was higher than three other strong constitutive promoters including PsrfA, PaprE, and the native P43. It was found that the distance between the SD sequence within the expression element and the start codon significantly influenced both the level of induced expression and the induction ratio. A 9-bp spacer was suitable for producing desirable expression level and induction ratio. Longer spacer reduced the activation efficiency. Importantly, the system successfully overexpressed β-glucuronidase at equal levels, and induction ratio was similar to that of GFP. The constructed theophylline-inducible gene expression system has broad compatibility and robustness, which has great potential in over-production of pharmaceutical and industrial proteins and utilization in building more complex gene circuits.

  6. A multi-subunit Chlamydia vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies and strong IFN-γ⁺ CMI responses protects against a genital infection in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Bøje, Sarah; Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Erneholm, Karin; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Jungersen, Gregers; Andersen, Peter; Follmann, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Chlamydia is the most widespread sexually transmitted bacterial disease and a prophylactic vaccine is highly needed. Ideally, this vaccine is required to induce a combined response of Th1 cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in concert with neutralizing antibodies. Using a novel Göttingen minipig animal model, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a multi-subunit vaccine formulated in the strong Th1-inducing adjuvant CAF01. We evaluated a mixture of two fusion proteins (Hirep1 and CTH93) designed to promote either neutralizing antibodies or cell-mediated immunity, respectively. Hirep1 is a novel immunogen based on the variant domain (VD) 4 region from major outer membrane protein (MOMP) serovar (Sv) D, SvE and SvF, and CTH93 is a fusion molecule of three antigens (CT043, CT414 and MOMP). Pigs were immunized twice intramuscularly with either Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01, UV-inactivated Chlamydia trachomatis SvD bacteria (UV-SvD/CAF01) or CAF01. The Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine induced a strong CMI response against the vaccine antigens and high titers of antibodies, particularly against the VD4 region of MOMP. Sera from Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 immunized pigs neutralized C. trachomatis SvD and SvF infectivity in vitro. Both Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 and UV-SvD/CAF01 vaccination protected pigs against a vaginal C. trachomatis SvD infection. In conclusion, the Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine proved highly immunogenic and equally protective as UV-SvD/CAF01 showing promise for the development of a subunit vaccine against Chlamydia.

  7. A multi-subunit Chlamydia vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies and strong IFN-γ+ CMI responses protects against a genital infection in minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Bøje, Sarah; Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Erneholm, Karin; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Jungersen, Gregers; Andersen, Peter; Follmann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia is the most widespread sexually transmitted bacterial disease and a prophylactic vaccine is highly needed. Ideally, this vaccine is required to induce a combined response of Th1 cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in concert with neutralizing antibodies. Using a novel Göttingen minipig animal model, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a multi-subunit vaccine formulated in the strong Th1-inducing adjuvant CAF01. We evaluated a mixture of two fusion proteins (Hirep1 and CTH93) designed to promote either neutralizing antibodies or cell-mediated immunity, respectively. Hirep1 is a novel immunogen based on the variant domain (VD) 4 region from major outer membrane protein (MOMP) serovar (Sv) D, SvE and SvF, and CTH93 is a fusion molecule of three antigens (CT043, CT414 and MOMP). Pigs were immunized twice intramuscularly with either Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01, UV-inactivated Chlamydia trachomatis SvD bacteria (UV-SvD/CAF01) or CAF01. The Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine induced a strong CMI response against the vaccine antigens and high titers of antibodies, particularly against the VD4 region of MOMP. Sera from Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 immunized pigs neutralized C. trachomatis SvD and SvF infectivity in vitro. Both Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 and UV-SvD/CAF01 vaccination protected pigs against a vaginal C. trachomatis SvD infection. In conclusion, the Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine proved highly immunogenic and equally protective as UV-SvD/CAF01 showing promise for the development of a subunit vaccine against Chlamydia. PMID:26268662

  8. Strong induced polarity between Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) and α-SiC and its influence on dielectric permittivity and loss of their composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yefeng; Gong, Honghong; Xie, Yunchuan; Wei, Xiaoyong; Yang, Lanjun; Zhang, Zhicheng

    2015-03-01

    Interface polarization and interface zone have been widely utilized to account for the abnormally improved dielectric properties of composites although their formation is rather vague and their influence has never been directly measured. In this work, micro α-SiC was designed as the filler particles incorporated into poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) with internal double bonds (P(VDF-CTFE-DB)) to construct polymer micro composites through solution casting method. The dielectric constant of the composites is found to be increasing linearly as SiC content increases at lower content and the highest value is obtained as 83 at 100 Hz, which is unusually higher than both pristine polymer (13@100 Hz) and SiC filler (17@100 Hz). By studying the dielectric properties of a bilayer model composite, the real dielectric permittivity of SiC sheet and P(VDF-CTFE-DB) layer has been directly measured to be significantly enhanced than their original value. The induced polarity between high polar PVDF units in polymer matrix and the electron-hole dipoles in α-SiC is responsible for the elevated dielectric properties of both components, which could address the failure of binary series and parallel models in predicting the dielectric permittivity of 0-3 composites as well. The strong dependence of induced polarity on the volume content, thickness, and polar nature of both components strongly suggests establishing promising high induced polarity between polymer matrix and fillers may provide an alternative strategy for fabricating high-k composites.

  9. Strong induced polarity between Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) and α-SiC and its influence on dielectric permittivity and loss of their composites

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yefeng; Gong, Honghong; Xie, Yunchuan; Zhang, Zhicheng; Wei, Xiaoyong; Yang, Lanjun

    2015-03-07

    Interface polarization and interface zone have been widely utilized to account for the abnormally improved dielectric properties of composites although their formation is rather vague and their influence has never been directly measured. In this work, micro α-SiC was designed as the filler particles incorporated into poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) with internal double bonds (P(VDF-CTFE-DB)) to construct polymer micro composites through solution casting method. The dielectric constant of the composites is found to be increasing linearly as SiC content increases at lower content and the highest value is obtained as 83 at 100 Hz, which is unusually higher than both pristine polymer (13@100 Hz) and SiC filler (17@100 Hz). By studying the dielectric properties of a bilayer model composite, the real dielectric permittivity of SiC sheet and P(VDF-CTFE-DB) layer has been directly measured to be significantly enhanced than their original value. The induced polarity between high polar PVDF units in polymer matrix and the electron-hole dipoles in α-SiC is responsible for the elevated dielectric properties of both components, which could address the failure of binary series and parallel models in predicting the dielectric permittivity of 0-3 composites as well. The strong dependence of induced polarity on the volume content, thickness, and polar nature of both components strongly suggests establishing promising high induced polarity between polymer matrix and fillers may provide an alternative strategy for fabricating high-k composites.

  10. Oral Combination Vaccine, Comprising Bifidobacterium Displaying Hepatitis C Virus Nonstructural Protein 3 and Interferon-α, Induces Strong Cellular Immunity Specific to Nonstructural Protein 3 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Koichi; Omoto, Chika; Oda, Tsugumi; Araki, Ayame; Saito, Hiroki; Shigemura, Katsumi; Katayama, Takane; Hotta, Hak; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2017-01-23

    We previously generated an oral hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine using Bifidobacterium displaying the HCV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) polypeptide. NS3-specific cellular immunity is important for viral clearance and recovery from HCV infection. In this study, we enhanced the cellular immune responses induced by our oral HCV vaccine, Bifidobacterium longum 2165 (B. longum 2165), by combining interferon-α (IFN-α) as an adjuvant with the vaccine in a mouse experimental model. IFN-α is a widely used cytokine meeting the standard of care (SOC) for HCV infection and plays various immunoregulatory roles. We treated C57BL/6N mice with B. longum 2165 every other day and/or IFN-α twice a week for a month and then analyzed the immune responses using spleen cells. We determined the induction of NS3-specific cellular immunity by cytokine quantification, intracellular cytokine staining, and a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assay targeting EL4 tumor cells expressing NS3/4A protein (EL4-NS3/4A). We also treated mice bearing EL4-NS3/4A tumor with the combination therapy in vivo. The results confirmed that the combination therapy of B. longum 2165 and IFN-α induced significantly higher IFN-γ secretion, higher population of CD4(+)T and CD8(+)T cells secreting IFN-γ, and higher CTL activity against EL4-NS3/4A cells compared with the control groups of phosphate-buffered saline, B. longum 2165 alone, and IFN-α alone (p < 0.05). We also confirmed that the combination therapy strongly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory effects in vivo with no serious adverse effects (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the combination of B. longum 2165 and IFN-α could induce a strong cellular immunity specific to NS3 protein as a combination therapy augmenting the current SOC immunotherapy against chronic HCV infection.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF NICOTINE ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR SUBUNITS IN THE COCKROACH Periplaneta americana MUSHROOM BODIES REVEALS A STRONG EXPRESSION OF β1 SUBUNIT: INVOLVEMENT IN NICOTINE-INDUCED CURRENTS.

    PubMed

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Thany, Steeve H

    2016-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ligand-gated ion channels expressed in many insect structures, such as mushroom bodies, in which they play a central role. We have recently demonstrated using electrophysiological recordings that different native nicotinic receptors are expressed in cockroach mushroom bodies Kenyon cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that eight genes coding for cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits are expressed in the mushroom bodies. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments demonstrated that β1 subunit was the most expressed in the mushroom bodies. Moreover, antisense oligonucleotides performed against β1 subunit revealed that inhibition of β1 expression strongly decreases nicotine-induced currents amplitudes. Moreover, co-application with 0.5 μM α-bungarotoxin completely inhibited nicotine currents whereas 10 μM d-tubocurarine had a partial effect demonstrating that β1-containing neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes could be sensitive to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist α-bungarotoxin.

  12. The characterization of six auxin-induced tomato GH3 genes uncovers a member, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dehua; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Aiqun; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Jianjian; Liu, Junli; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the GH3 gene family is widely considered to be involved in a broad range of plant physiological processes, through modulation of hormonal homeostasis. Multiple GH3 genes have been functionally characterized in several plant species; however, to date, limited works to study the GH3 genes in tomato have been reported. Here, we characterize the expression and regulatory profiles of six tomato GH3 genes, SlGH3.2, SlGH3.3, SlGH3.4, SlGH3.7, SlGH3.9 and SlGH3.15, in response to different phytohormone applications and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization. All six GH3 genes showed inducible responses to external IAA, and three members were significantly up-regulated in response to AM symbiosis. In particular, SlGH3.4, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal growth conditions, was strongly activated in the IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots. A comparison of the SlGH3.4 expression in wild-type plants and M161, a mutant with a defect in AM symbiosis, confirmed that SlGH3.4 expression is highly correlated to mycorrhizal colonization. Histochemical staining demonstrated that a 2,258 bp SlGH3.4 promoter fragment could drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression strongly in root tips, steles and cortical cells of IAA-treated roots, but predominantly in the fungal-colonized cells of mycorrhizal roots. A truncated 654 bp promoter failed to direct GUS expression in IAA-treated roots, but maintained the symbiosis-induced activity in mycorrhizal roots. In summary, our results suggest that a mycorrhizal signaling pathway that is at least partially independent of the auxin signaling pathway has evolved for the co-regulation of the auxin- and mycorrhiza-activated GH3 genes in plants.

  13. Mechanically induced strong red emission in samarium ions doped piezoelectric semiconductor CaZnOS for dynamic pressure sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Peng, Dengfeng; Zhang, Hanlu; Yang, Xiaohong; Pan, Caofeng

    2017-07-01

    Piezoelectric semiconductor with optical, electrical and mechanical multifunctions has great potential applications in future optoelectronic devices. The rich properties and applications mainly encompass the intrinsic structures and their coupling effects. Here, we report that lanthanide ions doped piezoelectric semiconductor CaZnOS:Sm3+ showing strong red emission induced by dynamic mechanical stress. Under moderate mechanical load, the doped piezoelectric semiconductor exhibits strong visible red emission to the naked eyes even under the day light. A flexible dynamic pressure sensor device is fabricated based on the prepared CaZnOS:Sm3+ powders. The mechanical-induced emission properties of the device are investigated by the optical fiber spectrometer. The linear characteristic emissions are attributed to the 4G5/2→6H5/2 (566 nm), 4G5/2→6H7/2 (580-632 nm), 4G5/2→6H9/2 (653-673 nm) and 4G5/2→6H11/2 (712-735 nm) f-f transitions of Sm3+ ions. The integral emission intensity is proportional to the value of applied pressure. By using the linear relationship between integrated emission intensity and the dynamic pressure, the real-time pressure distribution is visualized and recorded. Our results highlight that the incorporation of lanthanide luminescent ions into piezoelectric semiconductors as smart materials could be applied into the flexible mechanical-optical sensor device without additional auxiliary power, which has great potential for promising applications such as mapping of personalized handwriting, smart display, and human machine interface.

  14. Distribution characteristics of earthquake-induced landslide with the earthquake source fault-the cases of recent strong earthquakes in eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasi, B.; Ishii, Y.; Maruyama, K.; Terada, H.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, 3 strong earthquakes, the Mid-Niigata earthquake (M6.8, October 23, 2004), the Noto Peninsula earthquake (M6.9, March 25, 2007), the Chuetsu-offshore earthquake (M6.8, July 16, 2007), stroke eastern Japan. All of these earthquakes occurred inland by reverse fault, with depth 11-17km hypocenter, triggered a large number of landslides and caused serious damage to the involved regions due to these landslides. To clarify the distribution characteristics of landslides induced by these earthquakes, we interpreted landslides by using aerial photographs taken immediately after the earthquakes, and analyzed landslide distributions with the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and seismic intensity (in Japan Meteorological Agency intensity scale), source fault of the mainshock of each earthquake. The analyzing results revealed that: 1) Most of the landslides occurred in the area where the PGA is larger than 500 gal, and the maximum seismic intensity is larger than 5 plus ; 2) The landslides occurred in a short distance from the source fault (the shortest distance from the surface projection of top tip of the fault), about 80% occurred within the distance of 20 km; 3) More than 80% of landslides occurred on the hanging wall, and the size of landslide (length, width, area) is larger than that occurred on the footwall of the source fault; 4) The number and size of landslide tends to deceases with the distance from the source fault. Our results suggesting that the distance from the source fault of earthquake could be a parameter to analyze the landslide occurrence induce by strong earthquake.

  15. Strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information of visual stimuli: an approach using large-size Navon letters.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yasuki; Tomoike, Kouta

    2016-01-12

    Recent studies argue that strongly-motivated positive emotions (e.g. desire) narrow a scope of attention. This argument is mainly based on an observation that, while humans normally respond faster to global than local information of a visual stimulus (global advantage), positive affects eliminated the global advantage by selectively speeding responses to local (but not global) information. In other words, narrowing of attentional scope was indirectly evidenced by the elimination of global advantage (the same speed of processing between global and local information). No study has directly shown that strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information while excluding a bias for global information (global advantage) in a baseline (emotionally-neutral) condition. In the present study, we addressed this issue by eliminating the global advantage in a baseline (neutral) state. Induction of positive affects under this state resulted in faster responses to local than global information. Our results provided direct evidence that positive affects in high motivational intensity narrow a scope of attention.

  16. The response of short-scale density fluctuations to the activity of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes during strong tearing modes on EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, G. M.; Li, Y. D.; Li, Q.; Sun, P. J.; Wu, G. J.; Hu, L. Q.; the EAST Team

    2015-08-01

    Beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) during strong tearing modes (TMs) have been frequently observed in fast-electron plasmas of EAST tokamak. The dynamics of the short-scale ({k}\\perp {ρ }s~{1.5-4.3}) density fluctuations during the activity of BAEs with strong TMs has been preliminarily investigated by a tangential CO2 laser collective scattering system. The results suggest the active, but different, response of short-scale density fluctuations to the TMs and BAEs. In the low-frequency (0-10 kHz) part of density fluctuations, there are harmonic oscillations totally corresponding to those of TMs. In the medium-high frequency (10-250 kHz) part of density fluctuations, with the appearance of the BAEs, the medium-high frequency density fluctuations begin to be dominated by several quasi-coherent (QC) modes, and the frequencies of the QC modes seem to be related to the changes of both TMs and BAEs. These results would shed some light on the understanding of the multi-scale interaction physics.

  17. Diet-Induced Metabolic Improvements in a Hamster Model of Hypercholesterolemia Are Strongly Linked to Alterations of the Gut Microbiota▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Inés; Wallace, Grant; Zhang, Chaomei; Legge, Ryan; Benson, Andrew K.; Carr, Timothy P.; Moriyama, Etsuko N.; Walter, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal microbiota exerts a strong influence on host lipid and cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we have characterized the interplay among diet, gut microbial ecology, and cholesterol metabolism in a hamster model of hypercholesterolemia. Previous work in this model had shown that grain sorghum lipid extract (GSL) included in the diet significantly improved the high-density lipoprotein (HDL)/non-HDL cholesterol equilibrium (T. P. Carr, C. L. Weller, V. L. Schlegel, S. L. Cuppett, D. M. Guderian, Jr., and K. R. Johnson, J. Nutr. 135:2236-2240, 2005). Molecular analysis of the hamsters' fecal bacterial populations by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA tags, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and Bifidobacterium-specific quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the improvements in cholesterol homeostasis induced through feeding the hamsters GSL were strongly associated with alterations of the gut microbiota. Bifidobacteria, which significantly increased in abundance in hamsters fed GSL, showed a strong positive association with HDL plasma cholesterol levels (r = 0.75; P = 0.001). The proportion of members of the family Coriobacteriaceae decreased when the hamsters were fed GSL and showed a high positive association with non-HDL plasma cholesterol levels (r = 0.84; P = 0.0002). These correlations were more significant than those between daily GSL intake and animal metabolic markers, implying that the dietary effects on host cholesterol metabolism are conferred, at least in part, through an effect on the gut microbiota. This study provides evidence that modulation of the gut microbiota-host metabolic interrelationship by dietary intervention has the potential to improve mammalian cholesterol homeostasis, which has relevance for cardiovascular health. PMID:19411417

  18. Antibiotics, arsenate and H2O2 induce the promoter of Staphylococcus aureus cspC gene more strongly than cold.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Palas Kumar; Mondal, Rajkrishna; Sau, Keya; Sau, Subrata

    2009-04-01

    Proteins expressed by the bacterial cold shock genes are highly conserved at sequence level and perform various biological functions in both the cold-stressed and normal cells. To study the effects of various agents on the cold shock genes of Staphylococcus aureus, we have cloned the upstream region of cspC from S. aureus Newman and found that the above region possesses appreciable promoter (P(c)) activity even at 37 degrees C. A reporter S. aureus strain CHANDA2, constructed by inserting the P(c)-lacZ transcriptional fusion into S. aureus RN4220 genome, was found to express very low level of beta-galactosidase after cold shock, indicating that low temperature induces P(c) very weakly. Interestingly, transcription from P(c ) was induced very strongly by several antibiotics, hydrogen peroxide and arsenate salt. Cold shock proteins expressed by S. aureus are highly identical at sequence level and bear single-strand nucleic acid binding motifs. A 16 nt downstream box and a 13 nt upstream box were identified at the downstream of initiation codon and at the upstream of ribosome binding site of csp transcripts. Their roles in S. aureus cold shock gene expression have been discussed elaborately.

  19. Mucin-depleted foci show strong activation of inflammatory markers in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced carcinogenesis and are promoted by the inflammatory agent sodium dextran sulfate.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Dolara, Piero; Luceri, Cristina; Salvadori, Maddalena; Caderni, Giovanna

    2009-08-01

    Mucin-depleted foci (MDF), formed by dysplastic crypts devoid of mucins, have been identified in the colon of carcinogen-treated rodents and in humans at high risk for colon cancer. The lack of the protective layer of mucus may cause inflammation which has been linked to colon carcinogenesis, therefore, the expression of markers such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS) and macrophage infiltration was studied with immunohistochemistry (IH) in MDF harvested from F344 rats treated with the colon carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The same determinations were performed in aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and, at a later time point, in tumours. A dramatic increase in COX-2, i-NOS and macrophage infiltration was observed in MDF but ACF showed a moderate increase compared with the paired normal mucosa. Tumours were positive for all the markers. RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that i-NOS RNA expression was increased in a set of MDF confirming the results obtained with immunohistochemistry. In an inflammation-cancer experimental model [mice treated with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)], we observed that DSS-induced inflammation promoted MDF in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ACF were not affected. In conclusion, we report here for the first time a strong activation of the inflammatory process in MDF, which may contribute to the further progression of MDF to tumours.

  20. Transgenic tobacco expressed HPV16-L1 and LT-B combined immunization induces strong mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hongli, Liu; Xukui, Li; Ting, Lei; Wensheng, Li; Lusheng, Si; Jin, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although there are two HPV vaccines have been used to prevent cervical cancer, the cost limits their application in developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of plant-based HPV16L1 and LTB proteins as a high-efficiency, low-cost and easy-to-use HPV16L1 oral vaccine. Results: Transgenic plant-derived HPV16L1 and LTB were identified, which display potent immunogenicity and biologic activity. Higher levels of specific IgG and IgA levels of HPV16L1 were induced when mice were immunized with L1 combined with LTB by the oral route. The stimulation index (SI) of spleen cells from the L1/LTB-immunized group was significantly higher than that in the L1-immunized group (p < 0.05). The percentage of IFN-γ+/IL-4+ CD4+ T cells from the L1/LTB group was clearly increased compared with that in the L1 and control groups (p < 0.05). Methods: Plant-expressed HPV16L1 and LTB proteins were extracted from transgenic tobacco leaves, and their biologic characteristics and activity were examined with electron microscopy and GM1-binding assays respectively. Mice were immunized orally with either HPV16L1 or LTB alone or in combination. Induced mucosal and systemic immune responses were detected by ELISA, Hemagglutination inhibition (HAI), lymphocyte proliferation assays and flow cytometry analysis. Conclusion: Strong mucosal and systemic immune responses were induced by transgenic tobacco derived HPV16-L1 and LTB combined immunization. This study will lay the foundation for the development of a new type of vaccine to decrease HPV16 infections, which may lead to the prevention of cervical cancer. PMID:23108357

  1. DNA vaccine encoding type IV pilin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae induces strong immune response but confers limited protective efficacy against serotype 2 challenge.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Chun; Li, Min-Chen; Chen, Yi-Min; Chu, Chun-Yen; Lin, Shuen-Fuh; Yang, Wen-Jen

    2011-10-13

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes swine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious and often fatal disease that occurs worldwide. Our previous study showed that DNA vaccines encoding Apx exotoxin structural proteins ApxIA and/or ApxIIA, are a promising novel approach for immunization against the lethal challenge of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Vaccination against A. pleuropneumoniae is impeded by the lack of vaccines inducing reliable cross-serotype protection. Type IV fimbrial protein ApfA has been shown to be present and highly conserved in various serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. A novel DNA vaccine encoding ApfA (pcDNA-apfA) was constructed to evaluate the protective efficacy against infection with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2. A significant antibody response against pilin was generated following pcDNA-apfA immunization, suggesting that it was expressed in vivo. The IgG subclass (IgG1 and IgG2a) analysis indicates that the pcDNA-apfA vaccine induces both Th1 and Th2 immune responses. The IgA analysis shows that mucosal immunity could be enhanced by this DNA vaccine. Nevertheless, the strong antibody response induced by pcDNA-apfA vaccine only provided limited 30% protective efficacy against the serotype 2 challenge. These results in this study do not coincide with that the utility of type IV pilin is a good vaccine candidate against other infectious pathogens. It indicates that pilin should play a limited role in the development of a vaccine against A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

  2. Infection of equine monocyte-derived macrophages with an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) strain induces a strong resistance to the infection by a virulent EIAV strain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Wang, Shan-Shan; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Liu, Hai-Fang; Liu, Qiang; Wei, Hua-Mian; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yu-Hong; Du, Cheng; Kong, Xian-Gang; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-08-09

    The Chinese attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine has successfully protected millions of equine animals from EIA disease in China. Given that the induction of immune protection results from the interactions between viruses and hosts, a better understanding of the characteristics of vaccine strain infection and host responses would be useful for elucidating the mechanism of the induction of immune protection by the Chinese attenuated EIAV strain. In this study, we demonstrate in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDM) that EIAVFDDV13, a Chinese attenuated EIAV strain, induced a strong resistance to subsequent infection by a pathogenic strain, EIAVUK3. Further experiments indicate that the expression of the soluble EIAV receptor sELR1, Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and interferon β (IFNβ) was up-regulated in eMDM infected with EIAVFDDV13 compared with eMDM infected with EIAVUK3. Stimulating eMDM with poly I:C resulted in similar resistance to EIAV infection as induced by EIAVFDDV13 and was correlated with enhanced TLR3, sELR1 and IFNβ expression. The knock down of TLR3 mRNA significantly impaired poly I:C-stimulated resistance to EIAV, greatly reducing the expression of sELR1 and IFNβ and lowered the level of infection resistance induced by EIAVFDDV13. These results indicate that the induction of restraining infection by EIAVFDDV13 in macrophages is partially mediated through the up-regulated expression of the soluble viral receptor and IFNβ, and that the TLR3 pathway activation plays an important role in the development of an EIAV-resistant intracellular environment.

  3. Strong ground motion generated by controlled blasting experiments and mining induced seismic events recorded underground at deep level mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, A.; Selllers, E.; Skorpen, L.; Scheepers, L.; Murphy, S.; Spottiswoode, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground at deep level gold mines in South Africa in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to strong ground motion. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The simulated rockbursts involved the design of the seismic source, seismic observations in the near and far field, high-speed video filming, a study of rock mass conditions such as fractures, joints, rock strength etc. Knowledge of the site conditions before and after the simulated rockbursts was also gained. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of peak particle velocities, was found to be proportional to R^-1.7. Special investigations were carried out to evaluate the mechanism and the magnitude of damage, as well as the support behaviour under excessive dynamic loading. The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied, as part of this work, not only to characterize the rock mass response, but also to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instrument especially designed for recording strong ground motions was used to create a large database of peak particle velocities measured on stope hangingwalls. A total number of 58 sites located in stopes where the Carbon Leader Reef, Ventersdorp Contact Reef, Vaal Reef and Basal Reef are mined, were monitored. The peak particle velocities were measured at the surface of the excavations to identify the effect of the free surface and the fractures surrounding the underground mining. Based on these measurements the generally accepted velocity criterion of 3 m

  4. A maize landrace that emits defense volatiles in response to herbivore eggs possesses a strongly inducible terpene synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Tamiru, Amanuel; Bruce, Toby J A; Richter, Annett; Woodcock, Christine M; Midega, Charles A O; Degenhardt, Jörg; Kelemu, Segenet; Pickett, John A; Khan, Zeyaur R

    2017-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays) emits volatile terpenes in response to insect feeding and egg deposition to defend itself against harmful pests. However, maize cultivars differ strongly in their ability to produce the defense signal. To further understand the agroecological role and underlying genetic mechanisms for variation in terpene emission among maize cultivars, we studied the production of an important signaling component (E)-caryophyllene in a South American maize landrace Braz1006 possessing stemborer Chilo partellus egg inducible defense trait, in comparison with the European maize line Delprim and North American inbred line B73. The (E)-caryophyllene production level and transcript abundance of TPS23, terpene synthase responsible for (E)-caryophyllene formation, were compared between Braz1006, Delprim, and B73 after mimicked herbivory. Braz1006-TPS23 was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and amino acid sequences were determined. Furthermore, electrophysiological and behavioral responses of a key parasitic wasp Cotesia sesamiae to C. partellus egg-induced Braz1006 volatiles were determined using coupled gas chromatography electroantennography and olfactometer bioassay studies. After elicitor treatment, Braz1006 released eightfold higher (E)-caryophyllene than Delprim, whereas no (E)-caryophyllene was detected in B73. The superior (E)-caryophyllene production by Braz1006 was positively correlated with high transcript levels of TPS23 in the landrace compared to Delprim. TPS23 alleles from Braz1006 showed dissimilarities at different sequence positions with Delprim and B73 and encodes an active enzyme. Cotesia sesamiae was attracted to egg-induced volatiles from Braz1006 and synthetic (E)-caryophyllene. The variation in (E)-caryophyllene emission between Braz1006 and Delprim is positively correlated with induced levels of TPS23 transcripts. The enhanced TPS23 activity and corresponding (E)-caryophyllene production by the maize landrace could be attributed to the

  5. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  6. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep.

  7. Light Deprivation-Induced Inhibition of Chloroplast Biogenesis Does Not Arrest Embryo Morphogenesis But Strongly Reduces the Accumulation of Storage Reserves during Embryo Maturation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huichao; Wang, Xiaoxia; Ren, Kaixuan; Li, Kai; Wei, Mengmeng; Wang, Wenjie; Sheng, Xianyong

    2017-01-01

    The chloroplast is one of the most important organelles found exclusively in plant and algal cells. Previous reports indicated that the chloroplast is involved in plant embryogenesis, but the role of the organelle during embryo morphogenesis and maturation is still a controversial question demanding further research. In the present study, siliques of Arabidopsis at the early globular stage were enwrapped using tinfoil, and light deprivation-induced inhibition of the chloroplast biogenesis were validated by stereomicroscope, laser scanning confocal microscope and transmission electron microscope. Besides, the effects of inhibited chloroplast differentiation on embryogenesis, especially on the reserve deposition were analyzed using periodic acid-Schiff reaction, Nile red labeling, and Coomassie brilliant blue staining. Our results indicated that tinfoil enwrapping strongly inhibited the formation of chloroplasts, which did not arrest embryo morphogenesis, but markedly influenced embryo maturation, mainly through reducing the accumulation of storage reserves, especially starch grains and oil. Our data provide a new insight into the roles of the chloroplast during embryogenesis.

  8. Induced quadrupole effects near a crossover in a tetragonal TbLiF{sub 4} sheelite in a strong magnetic field up to 50 T

    SciTech Connect

    Kazei, Z. A. Snegirev, V. V.; Broto, J.-M.; Abdulsabirov, R. Yu.; Korableva, S. L.

    2012-12-15

    The anomalies of magnetic properties of TbLiF{sub 4} caused by the interaction of the energy levels of a rare-earth ion in a strong magnetic field up to 50 T directed along the [100] and [110] axes are studied experimentally and theoretically. The jumps in magnetization M(H) and the maxima of the differential magnetic susceptibility dM(H)/dH are found in critical fields H{sub c} = 28 and 31 T, where the lower component of the excited doublet approaches the ground-state singlet of a Tb{sup 3+} ion. Based on the crystal-field model with known interaction parameters, we calculated the Zeeman effect and the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility curves for the TbLiF{sub 4} crystal, which adequately describe magnetic anomalies and critical parameters of a crossover. It is shown that the jumpwise change in the {alpha}- and {gamma}-symmetry quadrupole interactions in TbLiF{sub 4} caused by changes in the corresponding quadrupole moments during the crossing of energy levels leads, in accordance with experiments, to a decrease in the critical field H{sub c} by approximately 4 T and an increase in the maximum of the differential susceptibility dM(H)/dH near the crossover more than twofold. This behavior can be considered as an analog of the induced quadrupole transition caused by a change of the ground state of the rare-earth ion during crossover.

  9. Light Deprivation-Induced Inhibition of Chloroplast Biogenesis Does Not Arrest Embryo Morphogenesis But Strongly Reduces the Accumulation of Storage Reserves during Embryo Maturation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huichao; Wang, Xiaoxia; Ren, Kaixuan; Li, Kai; Wei, Mengmeng; Wang, Wenjie; Sheng, Xianyong

    2017-01-01

    The chloroplast is one of the most important organelles found exclusively in plant and algal cells. Previous reports indicated that the chloroplast is involved in plant embryogenesis, but the role of the organelle during embryo morphogenesis and maturation is still a controversial question demanding further research. In the present study, siliques of Arabidopsis at the early globular stage were enwrapped using tinfoil, and light deprivation-induced inhibition of the chloroplast biogenesis were validated by stereomicroscope, laser scanning confocal microscope and transmission electron microscope. Besides, the effects of inhibited chloroplast differentiation on embryogenesis, especially on the reserve deposition were analyzed using periodic acid-Schiff reaction, Nile red labeling, and Coomassie brilliant blue staining. Our results indicated that tinfoil enwrapping strongly inhibited the formation of chloroplasts, which did not arrest embryo morphogenesis, but markedly influenced embryo maturation, mainly through reducing the accumulation of storage reserves, especially starch grains and oil. Our data provide a new insight into the roles of the chloroplast during embryogenesis. PMID:28775734

  10. Bimetallic Au2 Cu6 Nanoclusters: Strong Luminescence Induced by the Aggregation of Copper(I) Complexes with Gold(0) Species.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xi; Wang, Shuxin; Song, Yongbo; Jin, Shan; Sun, Guodong; Yu, Haizhu; Zhu, Manzhou

    2016-03-07

    The concept of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) has been exploited to render non-luminescent Cu(I) SR complexes strongly luminescent. The Cu(I) SR complexes underwent controlled aggregation with Au(0) . Unlike previous AIE methods, our strategy does not require insoluble solutions or cations. X-ray crystallography validated the structure of this highly fluorescent nanocluster: Six thiolated Cu atoms are aggregated by two Au atoms (Au2 Cu6 nanoclusters). The quantum yield of this nanocluster is 11.7 %. DFT calculations imply that the fluorescence originates from ligand (aryl groups on the phosphine) to metal (Cu(I) ) charge transfer (LMCT). Furthermore, the aggregation is affected by the restriction of intramolecular rotation (RIR), and the high rigidity of the outer ligands enhances the fluorescence of the Au2 Cu6 nanoclusters. This study thus presents a novel strategy for enhancing the luminescence of metal nanoclusters (by the aggregation of active metal complexes with inert metal atoms), and also provides fundamental insights into the controllable synthesis of highly luminescent metal nanoclusters.

  11. Guest Induced Strong Cooperative One- and Two-Step Spin Transitions in Highly Porous Iron(II) Hofmann-Type Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro-López, Lucı A; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco Javier; Seredyuk, Maksym; Muñoz, M Carmen; Haukka, Matti; Real, José Antonio

    2017-06-19

    The synthesis, crystal structure, magnetic, calorimetric, and Mössbauer studies of a series of new Hofmann-type spin crossover (SCO) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is reported. The new SCO-MOFs arise from self-assembly of Fe(II), bis(4-pyridyl)butadiyne (bpb), and [Ag(CN)2](-) or [M(II)(CN)4](2-) (M(II) = Ni, Pd). Interpenetration of four identical 3D networks with α-Po topology are obtained for {Fe(bpb)[Ag(I)(CN)2]2} due to the length of the rod-like bismonodentate bpb and [Ag(CN)2](-) ligands. The four networks are tightly packed and organized in two subsets orthogonally interpenetrated, while the networks in each subset display parallel interpenetration. This nonporous material undergoes a very incomplete SCO, which is rationalized from its intricate structure. In contrast, the single network Hofmann-type MOFs {Fe(bpb)[M(II)(CN)4]}·nGuest (M(II) = Ni, Pd) feature enhanced porosity and display complete one-step or two-step cooperative SCO behaviors when the pores are filled with two molecules of nitrobenzene or naphthalene that interact strongly with the pyridyl and cyano moieties of the bpb ligands via π-π stacking. The lack of these guest molecules favors stabilization of the high-spin state in the whole range of temperatures. However, application of hydrostatic pressure induces one- and two-step SCO.

  12. Epstein-Barr Virus–induced Molecule 1 Ligand Chemokine Is Expressed by Dendritic Cells in Lymphoid Tissues and Strongly Attracts Naive T Cells and Activated B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Lucy Tang, H.; Cyster, Jason G.

    1998-01-01

    Movement of T and B lymphocytes through secondary lymphoid tissues is likely to involve multiple cues that help the cells navigate to appropriate compartments. Epstein-Barr virus– induced molecule 1 (EBI-1) ligand chemokine (ELC/MIP3β) is expressed constitutively within lymphoid tissues and may act as such a guidance cue. Here, we have isolated mouse ELC and characterized its expression pattern and chemotactic properties. ELC is expressed constitutively in dendritic cells within the T cell zone of secondary lymphoid tissues. Recombinant ELC was strongly chemotactic for naive (L-selectinhi) CD4 T cells and for CD8 T cells and weakly attractive for resting B cells and memory (L-selectinlo) CD4 T cells. After activation through the B cell receptor, the chemotactic response of B cells was enhanced. Like its human counterpart, murine ELC stimulated cells transfected with EBI-1/CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7). Our findings suggest a central role for ELC in promoting encounters between recirculating T cells and dendritic cells and in the migration of activated B cells into the T zone of secondary lymphoid tissues. PMID:9653094

  13. Epstein-Barr virus-induced molecule 1 ligand chemokine is expressed by dendritic cells in lymphoid tissues and strongly attracts naive T cells and activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Ngo, V N; Tang, H L; Cyster, J G

    1998-07-06

    Movement of T and B lymphocytes through secondary lymphoid tissues is likely to involve multiple cues that help the cells navigate to appropriate compartments. Epstein-Barr virus- induced molecule 1 (EBI-1) ligand chemokine (ELC/MIP3beta) is expressed constitutively within lymphoid tissues and may act as such a guidance cue. Here, we have isolated mouse ELC and characterized its expression pattern and chemotactic properties. ELC is expressed constitutively in dendritic cells within the T cell zone of secondary lymphoid tissues. Recombinant ELC was strongly chemotactic for naive (L-selectinhi) CD4 T cells and for CD8 T cells and weakly attractive for resting B cells and memory (L-selectinlo) CD4 T cells. After activation through the B cell receptor, the chemotactic response of B cells was enhanced. Like its human counterpart, murine ELC stimulated cells transfected with EBI-1/CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7). Our findings suggest a central role for ELC in promoting encounters between recirculating T cells and dendritic cells and in the migration of activated B cells into the T zone of secondary lymphoid tissues.

  14. Exploring the 5'-UTR DNA region as a target for optimizing recombinant gene expression from the strong and inducible Pm promoter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Berg, Laila; Kucharova, Veronika; Bakke, Ingrid; Valla, Svein; Brautaset, Trygve

    2012-04-30

    By using the strong and inducible Pm promoter as a model, we recently reported that the β-lactamase production (encoded by bla) can be stimulated up to 20-fold in Escherichia coli by mutating the DNA region corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of mRNA (UTR). One striking observation was the unexpected large stimulatory effect some of these UTR variants had on the bla transcript production level. We here demonstrate that such UTR variants can also be used to improve the expression level of the alternative genes celB (encoding phosphoglucomutase) and inf-α2b (encoding human cytokine interferon α2b), which both can be expressed to high levels even with the wild-type Pm UTR DNA sequence. Our data indicated some degree of context dependency between the UTR DNA and concomitant recombinant gene sequences. By constructing and using a synthetic operon, we demonstrated that UTR variants optimized for high-level expression of probably any recombinant gene can be efficiently selected from large UTR mutant libraries. The stimulation affected both the transcript production and translational level, and such modified UTR sequences therefore clearly have a significant applied potential for improvement of recombinant gene expression processes.

  15. Strong metal-support interaction in novel core-shell Au-CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihua; Fu, Huifen; Tian, Ziwei; Han, Dongmei; Gu, Fubo

    2016-03-21

    Yolk-shell Au/CeO2 (Y-Au/CeO2) and encapsulated Au/CeO2 (E-Au/CeO2) nanocatalysts were prepared by using silica templates. A strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in the Au/CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation were studied. E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 had the best performance, followed by Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2, Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2, and E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2. The reasons for the different activities were discussed. There were two kinds of strong metal-support interactions (SMSI) between Au and CeO2 termed as R-SMSI (pretreated in reductive atmosphere) and O-SMSI (pretreated in oxidation atmosphere). Because of the smaller size of the Au and the larger contact area, both the R-SMSI and O-SMSI of E-Au/CeO2 were larger than those of Y-Au/CeO2. The O-SMSI was accompanied by the formation of cationic Au species that were beneficial to the enhancing of activity. As expected, the activity of E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 with a Au size less than 5 nm was higher than that of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 with 25 nm Au. However, it is surprisingly found that the activity of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 with 25 nm Au was higher than that of E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 with a Au size less than 5 nm. R-SMSI resulted in the formation of a AuCe alloy that had a negative effect on the activity. Compared with E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2, Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 exhibited a smaller relative content of the AuCe alloy, leading to a better activity of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2.

  16. Addition of αGal HyperAcute™ technology to recombinant avian influenza vaccines induces strong low-dose antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenlan Alex; Zhang, Jinjin; Hall, Katie M; Martin, Carol B; Kisselev, Serguei; Dasen, Emily J; Vahanian, Nicholas N; Link, Charles J; Martin, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza represents a severe public health threat. Over the last decade, the demand for highly efficacious vaccines against avian influenza viruses has grown, especially after the 2013 H7N9 outbreak in China that resulted in over 600 human cases with over 200 deaths. Currently, there are several H5N1 and H7N9 influenza vaccines in clinical trials, all of which employ traditional oil-in-water adjuvants due to the poor immunogenicity of avian influenza virus antigens. In this study, we developed potent recombinant avian influenza vaccine candidates using HyperAcute™ Technology, which takes advantage of naturally-acquired anti-αGal immunity in humans. We successfully generated αGal-positive recombinant protein and virus-like particle vaccine candidates of H5N1 and H7N9 influenza strains using either biological or our novel CarboLink chemical αGal modification techniques. Strikingly, two doses of 100 ng αGal-modified vaccine, with no traditional adjuvant, was able to induce a much stronger humoral response in αGT BALB/c knockout mice (the only experimental system readily available for testing αGal in vivo) than unmodified vaccines even at 10-fold higher dose (1000 ng/dose). Our data strongly suggest that αGal modification significantly enhances the humoral immunogenicity of the recombinant influenza vaccine candidates. Use of αGal HyperAcute™ technology allows significant dose-sparing while retaining desired immunogenicity. Our success in the development of highly potent H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine candidates demonstrated the potential of αGal HyperAcute™ technology for the development of vaccines against other infectious diseases.

  17. Addition of αGal HyperAcute™ technology to recombinant avian influenza vaccines induces strong low-dose antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Katie M.; Martin, Carol B.; Kisselev, Serguei; Dasen, Emily J.; Vahanian, Nicholas N.; Link, Charles J.; Martin, Brian K.

    2017-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza represents a severe public health threat. Over the last decade, the demand for highly efficacious vaccines against avian influenza viruses has grown, especially after the 2013 H7N9 outbreak in China that resulted in over 600 human cases with over 200 deaths. Currently, there are several H5N1 and H7N9 influenza vaccines in clinical trials, all of which employ traditional oil-in-water adjuvants due to the poor immunogenicity of avian influenza virus antigens. In this study, we developed potent recombinant avian influenza vaccine candidates using HyperAcute™ Technology, which takes advantage of naturally-acquired anti-αGal immunity in humans. We successfully generated αGal-positive recombinant protein and virus-like particle vaccine candidates of H5N1 and H7N9 influenza strains using either biological or our novel CarboLink chemical αGal modification techniques. Strikingly, two doses of 100 ng αGal-modified vaccine, with no traditional adjuvant, was able to induce a much stronger humoral response in αGT BALB/c knockout mice (the only experimental system readily available for testing αGal in vivo) than unmodified vaccines even at 10-fold higher dose (1000 ng/dose). Our data strongly suggest that αGal modification significantly enhances the humoral immunogenicity of the recombinant influenza vaccine candidates. Use of αGal HyperAcute™ technology allows significant dose-sparing while retaining desired immunogenicity. Our success in the development of highly potent H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine candidates demonstrated the potential of αGal HyperAcute™ technology for the development of vaccines against other infectious diseases. PMID:28787006

  18. Strong metal-support interaction in novel core-shell Au-CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihua; Fu, Huifen; Tian, Ziwei; Han, Dongmei; Gu, Fubo

    2016-03-01

    Yolk-shell Au/CeO2 (Y-Au/CeO2) and encapsulated Au/CeO2 (E-Au/CeO2) nanocatalysts were prepared by using silica templates. A strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in the Au/CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation were studied. E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 had the best performance, followed by Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2, Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2, and E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2. The reasons for the different activities were discussed. There were two kinds of strong metal-support interactions (SMSI) between Au and CeO2 termed as R-SMSI (pretreated in reductive atmosphere) and O-SMSI (pretreated in oxidation atmosphere). Because of the smaller size of the Au and the larger contact area, both the R-SMSI and O-SMSI of E-Au/CeO2 were larger than those of Y-Au/CeO2. The O-SMSI was accompanied by the formation of cationic Au species that were beneficial to the enhancing of activity. As expected, the activity of E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 with a Au size less than 5 nm was higher than that of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 with 25 nm Au. However, it is surprisingly found that the activity of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 with 25 nm Au was higher than that of E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 with a Au size less than 5 nm. R-SMSI resulted in the formation of a AuCe alloy that had a negative effect on the activity. Compared with E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2, Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 exhibited a smaller relative content of the AuCe alloy, leading to a better activity of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2.Yolk-shell Au/CeO2 (Y-Au/CeO2) and encapsulated Au/CeO2 (E-Au/CeO2) nanocatalysts were prepared by using silica templates. A strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in the Au/CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation were studied. E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 had the best performance, followed by Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2, Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2, and E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2

  19. Exploratory effects of a strong CYP3A inhibitor (ketoconazole), a strong CYP3A inducer (rifampicin), and concomitant ethanol on piragliatin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Jianguo; Zhai, Suoping; Georgy, Angela; Liang, Zhenming; Boldrin, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Piragliatin is a CYP3A substrate; its inactive metabolite M4, formed through cytosolic reductase, is reversibly metabolized back to piragliatin through CYP3A. The impact of concomitant CYP3A modifiers thus cannot be predicted. Drinking alcohol under fasting conditions is associated with a recognized glucose-lowering effect, which might be synergistic with piragliatin's hypoglycemic effect. Two exploratory studies were conducted to examine these potential interactions in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients: 16 completed an open-label, sequential 2-way crossover, 2-arm (randomized to ketoconazole and rifampicin) CYP3A study; another 18 participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized 3-way crossover ethanol study. Administration of piragliatin (100-mg single dose) resulted in a 32% Cmax and 44% area under the curve (AUC∞ ) increase in piragliatin exposure without affecting glucose AUC0-6h following ketoconazole (400 mg QD × 5 days); 30% Cmax and 72% AUC∞ decrease in piragliatin exposure with a 13% increase in glucose AUC0-6h following rifampicin (600 mg QD × 5 days); and, unexpectedly, a 32% Cmax and 23% AUC0-6h decrease (no change in AUC∞ ) in piragliatin exposure with a 13% increase in glucose AUC0-6h following alcohol (40-g single dose). In conclusion, a strong CYP3A modifier or concomitant alcohol could lead to a change in exposure to piragliatin with a potential alteration in glucose-lowering effect.

  20. How Strong Is the Evidence for Sodium Bicarbonate to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Coronary Angiography and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention?

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuhao; Zhang, Bin; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-02-01

    Hydration with sodium bicarbonate is one of the strategies to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). The purpose of this study was to determine how strong is the evidence for sodium bicarbonate to prevent CI-AKI after coronary angiography (CAG) and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).We conducted PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases to search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate with sodium chloride to prevent CI-AKI after CAG and/or PCI. Relative risk (RR), standardized mean difference (SMD), or weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was calculated. Heterogeneity, publication bias, and study quality were evaluated, sensitivity analyses, cumulative analyses, and subgroup analyses were performed. The risk of random errors was assessed by trial sequential analysis (TSA).Sixteen RCTs (3537 patients) met the eligibility criteria. Hydration with sodium bicarbonate showed significant beneficial effects in preventing CI-AKI (RR 0.67; 95% CI: 0.47-0.96, P = 0.029), decreasing the change in serum creatinine (SCr) (SMD -0.31 95% CI: -0.55 to -0.07, P = 0.011) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (SMD -0.17 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.04, P = 0.013). But no significant differences were observed in the requirement for dialysis (RR 1.11; 95% CI: 0.60-2.07, P = 0.729), mortality (RR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.41-1.21, P = 0.204) and reducing the length of hospital stay (LHS) (WMD -1.47; 95% CI: -4.14 to 1.20, P = 0.279). The result of TSA on incidence of CI-AKI showed the required information size (RIS = 6614) was not reached and cumulative z curve did not cross TSA boundary. The result of TSA on the requirement for dialysis and mortality demonstrated the required information sizes (RIS = 170,510 and 19,516, respectively) were not reached, and the cumulative z-curve did not cross any boundaries.The evidence that sodium bicarbonate reduces the incidence of

  1. Induced migration of non-magnetic particles and fabrication of metallic-based graded materials by applying a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Guo, M.; Vleugels, J.; Blanpain, B.; Van der Biest, O.

    2011-04-01

    Strong magnetic fields e.g., 10 T are now frequently used during materials preparation. In the present paper, a method of metal-ceramics graded materials preparation is proposed by applying a strong magnetic field with a high gradient. Experimental and theoretical analyses are performed to investigate the effect of the strong magnetic field on the migration and interaction behavior of diamagnetic oxide particles in a liquid metal. The migration of micrometer or sub-micrometer sized particles is clearly enhanced by the magnetic field gradient. After being treated by the strong magnetic field, a self-assembly structure of the particles is achieved. Various factors such as the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction and chain-chain interaction, are governing the particles assembly. The present results provide direct evidence that nonmetallic particles of micrometer size or less can be manipulated in a conductive melt by applying a strong magnetic field and as a consequence graded materials can be prepared.

  2. Strong Manual Acupuncture Stimulation of “Huantiao” (GB 30) Reduces Pain-Induced Anxiety and p-ERK in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiao-mei; Shen, Zui; Sun, Jing; Fang, Fang; Fang, Jun-fan; Wu, Yuan-yuan; Fang, Jian-qiao

    2015-01-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain is associated with anxiety. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays an important role in pain-induced anxiety. Acupuncture is widely used for pain and anxiety. However, little is known about which acupuncture technique is optimal on pain-induced anxiety and the relationship between acupuncture effect and p-ERK. The rat model was induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Male adult SD rats were randomly divided into control, SNL, strong manual acupuncture (sMA), mild manual acupuncture (mMA), and electroacupuncture (EA) group. Bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30) were stimulated by sMA, mMA, and EA, respectively. The pain withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) and anxiety behavior were measured, and p-ERK protein expression and immunoreactivity cells in ACC were detected. PWTs increased significantly in both sMA and EA groups. Meanwhile, anxiety-like behavior was improved significantly in the sMA and mMA groups. Furthermore, the overexpression of p-ERK induced by SNL was downregulated by strong and mild manual acupuncture. Therefore, strong manual acupuncture on bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30) could be a proper therapy relieving both pain and pain-induced anxiety. The effect of different acupuncture techniques on pain-induced anxiety may arise from the regulation of p-ERK in ACC. PMID:26770252

  3. Assessment of the effects of ISIS 2302, an anti-sense inhibitor of human ICAM-1, on cellular and humoral immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Henry, Scott P; Levin, Arthur A; White, Kimber; Mennear, John H

    2006-12-01

    ISIS 2302 is a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide designed to inhibit human ICAM-1 and is intended for treatment of inflammatory diseases. Molecules of this class are known to elicit pro-inflammatory effects, and immunotoxicity studies were performed in mice to elucidate the nature of effects of ISIS 2302 on mammalian immune function. ISIS 2302 (1, 5, 20, or 50 mg/kg/dose) was administered intravenously every other day for 27 days. The pro-inflammatory properties of the drug were observed at doses > or = 20 mg/kg. A dose-dependent increase in spleen weight was associated with increased absolute splenocyte and B-lymphocyte counts after the 50 mg/kg/dose regimen. The mitogenic response of B-lymphocytes to bacterial lipopolysaccharide was increased after the 20 and 50 mg/kg/doses but antibody-forming cell activities remained unchanged. Total serum IgG concentration was decreased after the 20 and 50 mg/kg/dose regimens but IgM titers were unchanged. Increases in IL-6, IL-12, and MCP-1 as well as NK cell activity were observed after administration of 20 and 50 mg/kg/dose. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity was decreased by the 50 mg/kg/dose regimen. Other changes in immune function were not observed in ISIS 2302-dosed mice. ISIS 3082, a murine active ICAM-1 inhibitor, was used to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of ICAM-1 inhibition in the 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced contact sensitization model. Intravenous administration of 1 mg/kg of ISIS 3082 every other day for 27 days was unequivocally anti-inflammatory in the contact sensitization test. The results of these experiments support the conclusion that the prophlogistic effects of ISIS 2302 in mice are observed only at suprapharmacologic doses.

  4. IL-15 induces strong but short-lived tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cell responses through the regulation of Tim-3 in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Heon, Elise K.; Wulan, Hasi; Macdonald, Loch P.; Malek, Adel O.; Braunstein, Glenn H.; Eaves, Connie G.; Schattner, Mark D.; Allen, Peter M.; Alexander, Michael O.; Hawkins, Cynthia A.; McGovern, Dermot W.; Freeman, Richard L.; Amir, Eitan P.; Huse, Jason D.; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S.; Kauff, Noah P.; Meyers, Paul G.; Gleason, Michelle H.; Overholtzer, Michael G.; Wiseman, Sam S.; and others

    2015-08-14

    IL-15 has pivotal roles in the control of CD8{sup +} memory T cells and has been investigated as a therapeutic option in cancer therapy. Although IL-15 and IL-2 share many functions together, including the stimulation of CD8 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, the different in vivo roles of IL-15 and IL-2 have been increasingly recognized. Here, we explored the different effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells from resected breast tumors. We found that neither IL-2 nor IL-15 induced intratumoral CD8 T cell proliferation by itself, but after CD3/CD28-stimulation, IL-15 induced significantly higher proliferation than IL-2 during early time points, at day 2, day 3 and day 6. However, the IL-15-induced proliferation leveled off at day 9 and day 12, whereas IL-2 induced lower but progressive proliferation at each time point. Furthermore, IL-15 caused an early and robust increase of IFN-γ in the supernatant of TI cell cultures, which diminished at later time points, while the IL-2-induced IFN-γ production remained constant over time. In addition, the IL-15-costimulated CD8 T cells presented higher frequencies of apoptotic cells. The diminishing IL-15-induced response was possibly due to regulatory and/or exhaustion mechanisms. We did not observe increased IL-10 or PD-1 upregulation, but we have found an increase of Tim-3 upregulation on IL-15-, but not IL-2-stimulated cells. Blocking Tim-3 function using anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in increased IL-15-induced proliferation and IFN-γ production for a prolonged period of time, whereas adding Tim-3 ligand galectin 9 led to reduced proliferation and IFN-γ production. Our results suggest that IL-15 in combination of Tim-3 blocking antibodies could potentially act as an IL-2 alternative in tumor CD8 T cell expansion in vitro, a crucial step in adoptive T cell therapy. - Highlights: • We explored the effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells of breast cancer. • IL-15

  5. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    SciTech Connect

    Volkas, R. R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G. C.

    1989-07-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3)/sub 1//direct product/SU(3)/sub 2//direct product/SU(3)/sub 3/ gauge theory, where quarks of the /ital i/th generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub /ital i// and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements.

  6. Strong induction of cytochrome P450 1A/3A, but not P450 2B, in cultured hepatocytes from common marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys by typical human P450 inducing agents.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takako; Inoue, Takashi; Utoh, Masahiro; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-14

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) are used as non-human primate models in preclinical studies for drug development. The assessment of P450 induction in hepatocytes from marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys was performed using typical P450 inducers. Induction of cytochrome P450 1-4 family enzymes was analyzed in two lots of cultured hepatocytes from common marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys after 24-h treatment with typical human P450 inducing agents by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Marmoset P450 3A4 mRNA and P450 2C8/2C19 mRNA in hepatocytes were strongly (>10-fold) and weakly (>2) induced by rifampicin, respectively. Marmoset 1A1 and 1A2 mRNA were induced strongly (>200-fold) by β-naphthoflavone and omeprazole. Marmoset P450 2B6 mRNA was induced (~5-fold) by a constitutive androstane receptor agonist, but not by phenobarbital. Cynomolgus monkey P450 3A4 mRNA and P450 1A1 mRNA in cultured hepatocytes were also induced by rifampicin and omeprazole, respectively, but P450 2B6 mRNA was not induced by phenobarbital. These results indicated that P450 1A/3A induction by typical human P450 inducers in hepatocytes from marmosets and/or cynomolgus monkeys were similar to those of humans, except for P450 2B induction by phenobarbital in humans, suggesting that marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys might be suitable models for evaluating the drug interactions in preclinical studies.

  7. Source mechanism analysis of strong mining induced seismic event and its influence on ground deformation observed by InSAR technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Lukasz; Mirek, Katarzyna; Mirek, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    On April 17th, 2015 a strong shallow seismic event M4.0 struck a mining panel in the Wujek-Slask coal mine, southern Poland. The event was widely felt, followed with rockburst and caused a strong damages inside mining corridors. Unfortunately two miners are trapped by tunnels collapse. Full Moment Tensor (MT) estimated with regional broad-band signals shows that the event was characterized with very high isotropic (implosive) part. Mining inspections verified the occurrence of a rockfall and floor uplift. Very shallow foci depth (less than 1000m) and collapse - like MT solution suggest that event could be responsible for surface deformation in the vicinity of epicenter. To verified this issue we used the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique (InSAR). The InSAR relies on measuring phase differences between two SAR images (radarograms). The measured differences may be computed into a single interferometric image. i.e. an interferogram. Interferogram computed from two radarograms of the same terrain taken at different time allows detecting changes in elevation of the terrain. Two SAR scenes acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite (European Space Agency) were processed to obtain the interferogram covered study area (12.04.2015 and 24.04.2015). 12 days interval differential interferogram shows distinctive concentric feature which indicate subsidence trough. Subsidence pattern shows 1 cycle of deformation corresponding with about 2.5 cm subsidence. The InSAR solution support the reliability of very strong implosive MT part.

  8. IL-15 induces strong but short-lived tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cell responses through the regulation of Tim-3 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Heon, Elise K; Wulan, Hasi; Macdonald, Loch P; Malek, Adel O; Braunstein, Glenn H; Eaves, Connie G; Schattner, Mark D; Allen, Peter M; Alexander, Michael O; Hawkins, Cynthia A; McGovern, Dermot W; Freeman, Richard L; Amir, Eitan P; Huse, Jason D; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S; Kauff, Noah P; Meyers, Paul G; Gleason, Michelle H; Overholtzer, Michael G; Wiseman, Sam S; Streutker, Catherine D; Asa, Sylvia W; McAlindon, Timothy P; Newcomb, Polly O; Sorensen, Poul M; Press, Oliver A

    2015-08-14

    IL-15 has pivotal roles in the control of CD8(+) memory T cells and has been investigated as a therapeutic option in cancer therapy. Although IL-15 and IL-2 share many functions together, including the stimulation of CD8 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, the different in vivo roles of IL-15 and IL-2 have been increasingly recognized. Here, we explored the different effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells from resected breast tumors. We found that neither IL-2 nor IL-15 induced intratumoral CD8 T cell proliferation by itself, but after CD3/CD28-stimulation, IL-15 induced significantly higher proliferation than IL-2 during early time points, at day 2, day 3 and day 6. However, the IL-15-induced proliferation leveled off at day 9 and day 12, whereas IL-2 induced lower but progressive proliferation at each time point. Furthermore, IL-15 caused an early and robust increase of IFN-γ in the supernatant of TI cell cultures, which diminished at later time points, while the IL-2-induced IFN-γ production remained constant over time. In addition, the IL-15-costimulated CD8 T cells presented higher frequencies of apoptotic cells. The diminishing IL-15-induced response was possibly due to regulatory and/or exhaustion mechanisms. We did not observe increased IL-10 or PD-1 upregulation, but we have found an increase of Tim-3 upregulation on IL-15-, but not IL-2-stimulated cells. Blocking Tim-3 function using anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in increased IL-15-induced proliferation and IFN-γ production for a prolonged period of time, whereas adding Tim-3 ligand galectin 9 led to reduced proliferation and IFN-γ production. Our results suggest that IL-15 in combination of Tim-3 blocking antibodies could potentially act as an IL-2 alternative in tumor CD8 T cell expansion in vitro, a crucial step in adoptive T cell therapy.

  9. CD40 triggering induces strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus immunization in mice: a new vaccine strategy for staphylococcal mastitis.

    PubMed

    Wallemacq, Hugues; Bedoret, Denis; Pujol, Julien; Desmet, Christophe; Drion, Pierre-Vincent; Farnir, Frédéric; Mainil, Jacques; Lekeux, Pierre; Bureau, Fabrice; Fiévez, Laurence

    2012-03-09

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a major pathogen involved in chronic bovine mastitis. Staphylococcal mastitis is difficult to control due to the ability of S. aureus to invade and survive within host cells. We therefore postulated that induction of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses leading to destruction of infected cells could help in the control of S. aureus mastitis. We demonstrate that immunization of mice with heat-killed S. aureus together with agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies elicits strong CTL responses capable of reducing the severity of subsequent staphylococcal mastitis. Our study shows promise for CTL-dependent vaccination against S. aureus mastitis.

  10. Strong-coupling induced damping of spin-echo modulations in magic-angle-spinning NMR: Implications for J coupling measurements in disordered solids.

    PubMed

    Guerry, Paul; Brown, Steven P; Smith, Mark E

    2017-08-19

    In the context of improving J coupling measurements in disordered solids, strong coupling effects have been investigated in the spin-echo and refocused INADEQUATE spin-echo (REINE) modulations of three- and four-spin systems under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), using density matrix simulations and solid-state NMR experiments on a cadmium phosphate glass. Analytical models are developed for the different modulation regimes, which are shown to be distinguishable in practice using Akaike's information criterion. REINE modulations are shown to be free of the damping that occurs for spin-echo modulations when the observed spin has the same isotropic chemical shift as its neighbour. Damping also occurs when the observed spin is bonded to a strongly-coupled pair. For mid-chain units, the presence of both direct and relayed damping makes both REINE and spin-echo modulations impossible to interpret quantitatively. We nonetheless outline how a qualitative comparison of the modulation curves can provide valuable information on disordered networks, possibly also pertaining to dynamic effects therein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anion-Exchange Induced Strong π-π Interactions in Single Crystalline Naphthalene Diimide for Nitroexplosive Sensing: An Electronic Prototype for Visual on-Site Detection.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Anamika; Hussain, Sameer; Malik, Akhtar Hussain; Barman, Ujjwol; Goswami, Namami; Iyer, Parameswar Krishnan

    2016-09-28

    A new derivative of naphthalene diimide (NDMI) was synthesized that displayed optical, electrical, and visual changes exclusively for the most widespread nitroexplosive and highly water-soluble toxicant picric acid (PA) due to strong π-π interactions, dipole-charge interaction, and a favorable ground state electron transfer process facilitated by Coulombic attraction. The sensing mechanism and interaction between NDMI with PA is demonstrated via X-ray diffraction analysis, (1)H NMR studies, cyclic voltammetry, UV-visible/fluorescence spectroscopy, and lifetime measurements. Single crystal X-ray structure of NDMI revealed the formation of self-assembled crystalline network assisted by noncovalent C-H···I interactions that get disrupted upon introducing PA as a result of anion exchange and strong π-π stacking between NDMI and PA. Morphological studies of NDMI displayed large numbers of single crystalline microrods along with some three-dimensional (3D) daisy-like structures which were fabricated on Al-coated glass substrate to construct a low-cost two terminal sensor device for realizing vapor mode detection of PA at room temperature and under ambient conditions. Furthermore, an economical and portable electronic prototype was developed for visual and on-site detection of PA vapors under exceptionally realistic conditions.

  12. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema. PMID:26863147

  13. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Angelika; Kunze, Reiner; Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko; Marti, Hugo H

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema.

  14. UV-induced formation of pyrimidine dimers in nucleosome core DNA is strongly modulated with a period of 10. 3 bases

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, J.M.; Nissen, K.A.; Smerdon, M.J.

    1987-10-01

    We have determined the distribution of the major UV-induced photoproducts in nucleosome core DNA using the 3'----5' exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase, which has been shown to stop digestion immediately 3' to UV-induced pyrimidine dimers. This assay is extremely sensitive since all DNA fragments without photoproducts (background) are reduced to small oligonucleotides, which can be separated from those fragments containing photoproducts. The results show that the distribution of UV-induced photoproducts (primarily cyclobutane dipyrimidines) is not uniform throughout core DNA but displays a striking 10.3 (+/- 0.1) base periodicity. Furthermore, this characteristic distribution of photoproducts was obtained regardless of whether nucleosome core DNA was isolated from UV-irradiated intact chromatin fibers, histone H1-depleted chromatin fibers, isolated mononucleosomes, or cells in culture. The yield of pyrimidine dimers along the DNA seems to be modulated in a manner that reflects structural features of the nucleosome unit, possibly core histone-DNA interactions, since this pattern was not obtained for UV-irradiated core DNA either free in solution or bound tightly to calcium phosphate crystals. Based on their location relative to DNase I cutting sites, the sites of maximum pyrimidine dimer formation in core DNA mapped to positions where the phosphate backbone is farthest from the core histone surface. These results indicate that within the core region of nucleosomes, histone-DNA interactions significantly alter the quantum yield of cyclobutane dipyrimidines, possibly by restraining conformational changes in the DNA helix required for formation of these photoproducts.

  15. [A novel immunization strategy to induce strong humoral responses against HIV-1 using combined DNA, recombinant vaccinia virus and protein vaccines].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Shu-hui; Ren, Li; Hao, Yan-ling; Zhang, Qi-cheng; Liu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    To optimize the immunization strategy against HIV-1, a DNA vaccine was combined with a recombinant vaccinia virus (rTV) vaccine and a protein vaccine. Immune responses against HIV-1 were detected in 30 female guinea pigs divided into six groups. Three groups of guinea pigs were primed with HIV-1 DNA vaccine three times, boosted with rTV at week 14, and then boosted with gp140 protein at intervals of 4, 8 or 12 weeks. Simultaneously, the other three groups of animals were primed with rTV vaccine once, and then boosted with gp140 after 4, 8 or 12 weeks. The HIV-1 specific binding antibody and neutralizing antibody, in addition to the relative affinity of these antibodies, were detected at different time points after the final administration of vaccine in each group. The DNA-rTV-gp140 immune regimen induced higher titers and affinity levels of HIV-1 gp120/gp140 antibodies and stronger V1V2-gp70 antibodies than the rTV-gp140 regimen. In the guinea pigs that underwent the DNA-rTV-gp140 regimen, the highest V1V2-gp70 antibody was induced in the 12-week-interval group. However, the avidity of antibodies was improved in the 4-week-interval group. Using the rTV-gp140 immunization strategy, guinea pigs boosted at 8 or 12 weeks after rTV priming elicited stronger humoral responses than those boosted at 4 weeks after priming. In conclusion, this study shows that the immunization strategy of HIV-1 DNA vaccine priming, followed by rTV and protein vaccine boosting, could strengthen the humoral response against HIV-1. Longer intervals were better to induce V1V2-gp70-specific antibodies, while shorter intervals were more beneficial to enhance the avidity of antibodies.

  16. Strong vortex core pinning and Barkhausen-free magnetization response in thin Permalloy disks induced by implantation of 1 × 10{sup 4} Ga{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fani Sani, F. E-mail: mark.freeman@ualberta.ca; Losby, J. E.; Diao, Z.; Parsons, L. C.; Burgess, J. A. J.; Hiebert, W. K.; Freeman, M. R. E-mail: mark.freeman@ualberta.ca; Vick, D.

    2014-05-07

    Artificial vortex core pinning sites are induced in thin Permalloy disks by point exposure to as few as 10 000 ions from a focused Ga{sup +} beam. These pinning sites yield a first-order change in the magnetization response of the disk. A single site can keep the vortex core pinned over an applied field range comparable to the vortex annihilation field of the unaltered disk. Several widely separated sites can work together to keep the core pinned in one place, while the Barkhausen effect is eliminated from the magnetization curve over a range approaching the saturation moment of the disk.

  17. Strong Fermi-level pinning induced by argon inductively coupled plasma treatment and post-metal deposition annealing on 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Bing-Yue; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Yen, Cheng-Tyng; Lee, Chawn-Ying

    2017-07-01

    The effect of pre-metal deposition cleaning on 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) by using Ar ion bombardment in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) chamber was investigated. The ICP treatment produced a thin and Si-depleted amorphous layer on the SiC surface. Partial graphitization was observed in the amorphous layer after post-metal deposition (PMD) annealing. This interfacial layer strongly pinned the Schottky barrier height (SBH). PMD annealing at 500 °C resulted in a constant SBH (approximately 1.1 eV) and narrow SBH distribution (standard deviation < 3 meV). However, the amorphous layer was consumed after 600 °C PMD annealing due to interfacial reactions. These results suggest that the Ar ion bombardment technique with a suitable thermal budget can be used to form relatively uniform SBDs.

  18. Substrate misorientation induced strong increase in the hole concentration in Mg doped GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Suski, T.; Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Piotrzkowski, R.; Krysko, M.; Nowak, G.; Franssen, G.; Dmowski, L. H.; Lucznik, B.

    2008-10-27

    We demonstrate that relatively small GaN substrate misorientation can strongly change hole carrier concentration in Mg doped GaN layers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. In this work intentionally misoriented GaN substrates (up to 2 deg. with respect to ideal <0001> plane) were employed. An increase in the hole carrier concentration to the level above 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a decrease in GaN:Mg resistivity below 1 {omega} cm were achieved. Using secondary ion mass spectroscopy we found that Mg incorporation does not change with varying misorientation angle. This finding suggests that the compensation rate, i.e., a decrease in unintentional donor density, is responsible for the observed increase in the hole concentration. Analysis of the temperature dependence of electrical transport confirms this interpretation.

  19. Gene conversion is strongly induced in human cells by double-strand breaks and is modulated by the expression of BCL-x(L)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Pierce, Andrew J.; Gauny, Stacey S.; Jasin, Maria; Kronenberg, Amy; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability in rodent cells, and it has been assumed that HDR is of similar importance in DSB repair in human cells. However, some outcomes of homologous recombination can be deleterious, suggesting that factors exist to regulate HDR. We demonstrated previously that overexpression of BCL-2 or BCL-x(L) enhanced the frequency of X-ray-induced TK1 mutations, including loss of heterozygosity events presumed to arise by mitotic recombination. The present study was designed to test whether HDR is a prominent DSB repair pathway in human cells and to determine whether ectopic expression of BCL-x(L) affects HDR. Using TK6-neo cells, we find that a single DSB in an integrated HDR reporter stimulates gene conversion 40-50-fold, demonstrating efficient DSB repair by gene conversion in human cells. Significantly, DSB-induced gene conversion events are 3-4-fold more frequent in TK6 cells that stably overexpress the antiapoptotic protein BCL-X(L). Thus, HDR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity in human cells, and ectopic expression of BCL-x(L) enhances HDR of DSBs. This is the first study to highlight a function for BCL-x(L) in modulating DSB repair in human cells.

  20. Gene conversion is strongly induced in human cells by double-strand breaks and is modulated by the expression of BCL-x(L)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Pierce, Andrew J.; Gauny, Stacey S.; Jasin, Maria; Kronenberg, Amy; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability in rodent cells, and it has been assumed that HDR is of similar importance in DSB repair in human cells. However, some outcomes of homologous recombination can be deleterious, suggesting that factors exist to regulate HDR. We demonstrated previously that overexpression of BCL-2 or BCL-x(L) enhanced the frequency of X-ray-induced TK1 mutations, including loss of heterozygosity events presumed to arise by mitotic recombination. The present study was designed to test whether HDR is a prominent DSB repair pathway in human cells and to determine whether ectopic expression of BCL-x(L) affects HDR. Using TK6-neo cells, we find that a single DSB in an integrated HDR reporter stimulates gene conversion 40-50-fold, demonstrating efficient DSB repair by gene conversion in human cells. Significantly, DSB-induced gene conversion events are 3-4-fold more frequent in TK6 cells that stably overexpress the antiapoptotic protein BCL-X(L). Thus, HDR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity in human cells, and ectopic expression of BCL-x(L) enhances HDR of DSBs. This is the first study to highlight a function for BCL-x(L) in modulating DSB repair in human cells.

  1. Light- and pH-dependent conformational changes in protein structure induce strong bending of purple membranes--active membranes studied by cryo-SEM.

    PubMed

    Rhinow, Daniel; Hampp, Norbert A

    2008-10-16

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) undergoes a conformational change during the photocycle and the proton transport through the membrane. For the first time, we could demonstrate by direct imaging of freely suspended native purple membranes (PMs) that the flat disk-like shape of PMs changes dramatically as soon as most of the BRs are in a state characterized by a deprotonated Schiff base. Light-induced shape changes are easily observed with mutated BRs of the BR-D96N type, i.e., all variants which show an increased M 2 lifetime. On the other hand, large-scale shape changes are induced by pH changes with PM containing mutated BRs of the BR-D85T type, where Asp85 is replaced for a neutral amino acid. In such PMs, all BRs are titrated simultaneously and the resulting shape of the membranes depends on the initial shape only. As the majority of PMs in the "flat" state are more or less round disks, the bent membranes often comprise bowl-like and tube-like bent structures. The method presented here enables one to derive size changes of membrane-embedded BRs on the single molecule level from "macroscopic", easily accessible data like the curvature radii observed in cryo-SEM. The potential of BR as a pH-controlled and/or light-controlled microscaled biological actuator needs further consideration.

  2. Influenza Virus–induced Dendritic Cell Maturation Is Associated with the Induction of Strong T Cell Immunity to a Coadministered, Normally Nonimmunogenic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brimnes, Marie K.; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M.; Moran, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the proposal that during microbial infection, dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation and present a mixture of peptides derived from the microbe as well as harmless environmental antigens. Mice were exposed to an aerosol of endotoxin free ovalbumin (OVA) in the absence or presence of influenza virus. In its absence, OVA failed to induce B and T cell responses and even tolerized, but with influenza, OVA-specific antibodies and CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes developed. With or without infection, OVA was presented selectively in the draining mediastinal lymph nodes, as assessed by the comparable proliferation of infused, CD8+ and CD4+, TCR transgenic T cells. In the absence of influenza, these OVA-specific T cells produced little IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ, but with infection, both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells made high levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ. The OVA plus influenza-treated mice also showed accelerated recovery to a challenge with recombinant vaccinia OVA virus. CD11c+ DCs from the mediastinal lymph nodes of infected mice selectively stimulated both OVA- and influenza-specific T cells and underwent maturation, with higher levels of MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 molecules. The relatively slow (2–3 d) kinetics of maturation correlated closely to the time at which OVA inhalation elicited specific antibodies. Therefore respiratory infection can induce DC maturation and simultaneously B and T cell immunity to an innocuous antigen inhaled concurrently. PMID:12847140

  3. Host-induced gene silencing of cytochrome P450 lanosterol C14α-demethylase-encoding genes confers strong resistance to Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Koch, Aline; Kumar, Neelendra; Weber, Lennart; Keller, Harald; Imani, Jafargholi; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-11-26

    Head blight, which is caused by mycotoxin-producing fungi of the genus Fusarium, is an economically important crop disease. We assessed the potential of host-induced gene silencing targeting the fungal cytochrome P450 lanosterol C-14α-demethylase (CYP51) genes, which are essential for ergosterol biosynthesis, to restrict fungal infection. In axenic cultures of Fusarium graminearum, in vitro feeding of CYP3RNA, a 791-nt double-stranded (ds)RNA complementary to CYP51A, CYP51B, and CYP51C, resulted in growth inhibition [half-maximum growth inhibition (IC50) = 1.2 nM] as well as altered fungal morphology, similar to that observed after treatment with the azole fungicide tebuconazole, for which the CYP51 enzyme is a target. Expression of the same dsRNA in Arabidopsis and barley rendered susceptible plants highly resistant to fungal infection. Microscopic analysis revealed that mycelium formation on CYP3RNA-expressing leaves was restricted to the inoculation sites, and that inoculated barley caryopses were virtually free of fungal hyphae. This inhibition of fungal growth correlated with in planta production of siRNAs corresponding to the targeted CYP51 sequences, as well as highly efficient silencing of the fungal CYP51 genes. The high efficiency of fungal inhibition suggests that host-induced gene-silencing targeting of the CYP51 genes is an alternative to chemical treatments for the control of devastating fungal diseases.

  4. Host-induced gene silencing of cytochrome P450 lanosterol C14α-demethylase–encoding genes confers strong resistance to Fusarium species

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Aline; Kumar, Neelendra; Weber, Lennart; Keller, Harald; Imani, Jafargholi; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Head blight, which is caused by mycotoxin-producing fungi of the genus Fusarium, is an economically important crop disease. We assessed the potential of host-induced gene silencing targeting the fungal cytochrome P450 lanosterol C-14α-demethylase (CYP51) genes, which are essential for ergosterol biosynthesis, to restrict fungal infection. In axenic cultures of Fusarium graminearum, in vitro feeding of CYP3RNA, a 791-nt double-stranded (ds)RNA complementary to CYP51A, CYP51B, and CYP51C, resulted in growth inhibition [half-maximum growth inhibition (IC50) = 1.2 nM] as well as altered fungal morphology, similar to that observed after treatment with the azole fungicide tebuconazole, for which the CYP51 enzyme is a target. Expression of the same dsRNA in Arabidopsis and barley rendered susceptible plants highly resistant to fungal infection. Microscopic analysis revealed that mycelium formation on CYP3RNA-expressing leaves was restricted to the inoculation sites, and that inoculated barley caryopses were virtually free of fungal hyphae. This inhibition of fungal growth correlated with in planta production of siRNAs corresponding to the targeted CYP51 sequences, as well as highly efficient silencing of the fungal CYP51 genes. The high efficiency of fungal inhibition suggests that host-induced gene-silencing targeting of the CYP51 genes is an alternative to chemical treatments for the control of devastating fungal diseases. PMID:24218613

  5. Compensation of phonon-induced renormalization of vacuum Rabi splitting in large quantum dots: Towards temperature-stable strong coupling in the solid state with quantum dot-micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopfmann, C.; Musiał, A.; Strauß, M.; Barth, A. M.; Glässl, M.; Vagov, A.; Strauß, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Axt, V. M.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-12-01

    We study experimentally the influence of temperature on the emission characteristics of quantum dot-micropillars in the strong coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED). In particular, we investigate its impact on the vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) and we address the important question of the temperature stability of the coherent coupling regime in a semiconductor system, which is relevant in view of both fundamental study and future applications. To study the temperature dependence we investigate an unprecedentedly large number of strong coupling cases (89) in a wide temperature range from 10 up to 50 K, which constitutes a good basis for statistical analysis. The experiment indicates a statistically significant increase of the VRS with temperature in contrast to an expected decrease of the VRS due to the dephasing induced by acoustic phonons. From the theoretical point of view, the phonon-induced renormalization of the VRS is calculated using a real-time path-integral approach for strongly confined quantum dots (QDs), which allows for a numerical exact treatment of the coupling between the QD and a continuum of longitudinal acoustic phonons. The absence of the expected decrease of the VRS with temperature in our experimental data can be attributed to a unique optical property of laterally extended I n0.4G a0.6As QDs used in this study. Their electronic structure facilitates an effective temperature-driven increase of the oscillator strength of the excitonic state by up to 40% in the given temperature range. This leads to enhanced light-matter interaction and overcompensates the phonon-related decrease of the VRS. The observed persistence of strong coupling in the presence of phonon-induced decoherence demonstrates the appealing possibility to counteract detrimental phonon effects in the cQED regime via engineering the electronic structure of QDs.

  6. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments.

  7. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  8. Relaxation of the normal electrical resistivity induced by high-pressure in strongly underdoped YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Nazyrov, Z. F.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the relaxation of the normal electrical resistivity, induced by high-pressure in YBa2Cu3O6.45 single crystals. It is determined that the pressure affects to the phase composition of the sample. Under pressure phases with different (but similar) critical temperatures form. It is determined that the application-removal pressure process is completely reversible. Above Tc the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the layers' plane at different hydrostatic pressures can be approximated with high accuracy with the scattering of electrons by phonons model. With increasing pressure, the residual resistance is reduced and the contribution of intraband s-s scattering increases. Additionally, the role of the interband s-d scattering and the Debye temperature is enhanced.

  9. Application of outer membrane vesicle of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B as a new adjuvant to induce strongly Th1-oriented responses against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Salmani, Ali Sharifat; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Javadi, Foozieh; Memarnejadian, Arash; Vahabpour, Rouhoullah; Zabihollahi, Rezvan; Moshiri, Arfa; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2011-12-01

    Despite the worldwide efforts made in the field of HIV vaccine development, an efficient AIDS vaccine strategy is still vague. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the introduced aspects for HIV vaccine development since the non-replicative nature of HIV VLPs, resulting from the lack of viral genomic RNA, makes them suitable for broad applications. We have previously designed and introduced non-infectious VLPs (mzNL4-3) by introduction of a deletion mutation in the reverse transcriptase and integrase coding regions of HV-1. There are evidences suggesting that an effective cellular immune response against HIV-1 is able to control and suppress viremia during primary and chronic HIV infections. In the present study we have evaluated the potency of mzNL4-3 VLPs mixed with Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B outer-membrane vesicle (OMV), which is among the microbial components with proved adjuvant properties, to induce humoral and cellular responses against HIV-1. Analysis of anti-HIV-1 responses elicited in immunized BALB/c mice following different immunization regimens indicated OMV+VLP as an immunopotent combination which significantly induced anti-HIV-1 IgG with IgG2a dominancy. Results of cytokine and ELISpot assays also showed the capability of VLP+OMV immunogen for effective induction of IFN-gamma; and IL4 secreting cells and further suggested the promotion of Th1-oriented response that was evidenced with the increased IFN-γ/IL4 secretion ratio. According to our study, HIV-1 VLPs combined with N. meningitidis B OMVs seem to be a promising approach in vaccine development against HIV-1.

  10. The bovine viral diarrhea virus E2 protein formulated with a novel adjuvant induces strong, balanced immune responses and provides protection from viral challenge in cattle.

    PubMed

    Snider, Marlene; Garg, Ravendra; Brownlie, Robert; van den Hurk, Jan V; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2014-11-28

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is still one of the most serious pathogens in cattle, meriting the development of improved vaccines. Recently, we developed a new adjuvant consisting of poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)]-phosphazene (PCEP), either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), and an immune defense regulator (IDR) peptide. As this adjuvant has been shown to mediate the induction of robust, balanced immune responses, it was evaluated in an E2 subunit vaccine against BVDV in lambs and calves. The BVDV type 2 E2 protein was produced at high levels in a mammalian expression system and purified. When formulated with either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), together with IDR and PCEP, the E2 protein elicited high antibody titers and production of IFN-γ secreting cells in lambs. As the immune responses were stronger when poly(I:C) was used, the E2 protein with poly(I:C), IDR and PCEP was subsequently tested in cattle. Robust virus neutralizing antibodies as well as cell-mediated immune responses, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses, were induced. The fact that CTL responses were demonstrated in calves vaccinated with an E2 protein subunit vaccine indicates that this adjuvant formulation promotes cross-presentation. Furthermore, upon challenge with a high dose of virulent BVDV-2, the vaccinated calves showed almost no temperature response, weight loss, leukopenia or virus replication, in contrast to the control animals, which had severe clinical disease. These data suggest that this E2 subunit formulation induces significant protection from BVDV-2 challenge, and thus is a promising BVDV vaccine candidate; in addition, the adjuvant platform has applications in bovine vaccines in general.

  11. Gene conversion is strongly induced in human cells by double-strand breaks and is modulated by the expression of BCL-XL

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Pierce, Andrew J.; Gauny, Stacey S.; Jasin, Maria; Kronenberg, Amy

    2001-09-25

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a well-established mechanism that contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability in rodent cells, and it has been assumed that HDR is of similar importance in the repair of DSBs in human cells. However, in addition to promoting genomic stability, some outcomes of homologous recombination can be deleterious, suggesting that factors exist to regulate HDR. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of BCL-2 or BCL-xL enhanced the frequency of x-ray-induced mutations involving the TK1 locus, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events presumed to arise by mitotic recombination. The present study was designed to test whether HDR is a prominent DSB repair pathway in human cells, and to directly determine whether ectopic expression of BCL-xL affects HDR. We used the B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6, which expresses wild-type TP53 and resembles normal lymphocytes in undergoing apoptosis following! genotoxic stress. U sing isogenic derivatives of TK6 cells (TK6-neo, TK6-bcl-xL), we find that a DSB in an integrated HDR reporter stimulates gene conversion 40-50-fold in TK6-neo cells, demonstrating that a DSB can be efficiently repaired by gene conversion in human cells. Significantly, DSB-induced gene conversion events are 3- to 4-fold more frequent in BCL-xL overexpressing cells. The results demonstrate that HDR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity in human cells and that ectopic expression of BCL-xL enhances HDR of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight a function for BCL-xL in modulating DSB repair in human cells.

  12. Low iron availability in continuous in vitro colonic fermentations induces strong dysbiosis of the child gut microbial consortium and a decrease of main metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Dostal, Alexandra; Fehlbaum, Sophie; Chassard, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; Lacroix, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects an estimated 2 billion people worldwide and Fe supplements are a common corrective strategy. The impact of Fe deficiency and Fe supplementation on the complex microbial community of the child gut was studied using in vitro colonic fermentation models inoculated with immobilized fecal microbiota. Chyme media (all Fe chelated by 2,2’-dipyridyl to 26.5 mg Fe L-1) mimicking Fe deficiency and supplementation were continuously fermented. Fermentation effluent samples were analyzed daily on the microbial composition and metabolites by qPCR, 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing and HPLC. Low Fe conditions (1.56 mg Fe L-1) significantly decreased acetate concentrations and subsequent Fe supplementation (26.5 mg Fe L-1) restored acetate production. High Fe following normal Fe conditions had no impact on the gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity. During very low Fe conditions (0 . 9 m g F e L-1 or Fe chelated b y 2,2’-dipyridyl), a decrease of Roseburia spp./Eubacterium rectale, Clostridium Cluster IV members and Bacteroides spp. was observed while Lactobacillus spp. and Enterobacteriaceae increased consistent with a decrease of butyrate (-84%) and propionate (-55%). The strong dysbiosis of the gut microbiota together with decrease of main gut microbiota metabolites observed with very low iron conditions could weaken the barrier effect of the microbiota and negatively impact gut health. PMID:22845175

  13. Identification of ter94, Drosophila VCP, as a strong modulator of motor neuron degeneration induced by knockdown of Caz, Drosophila FUS.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yumiko; Tokuda, Takahiko; Shimamura, Mai; Kyotani, Akane; Sasayama, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Mizuta, Ikuko; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Fujikake, Nobuhiro; Ueyama, Morio; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2014-07-01

    In humans, mutations in the fused in sarcoma (FUS) gene have been identified in sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Cabeza (Caz) is the Drosophila ortholog of human FUS. Previously, we established Drosophila models of ALS harboring Caz-knockdown. These flies develop locomotive deficits and anatomical defects in motoneurons (MNs) at neuromuscular junctions; these phenotypes indicate that loss of physiological FUS functions in the nucleus can cause MN degeneration similar to that seen in FUS-related ALS. Here, we aimed to explore molecules that affect these ALS-like phenotypes of our Drosophila models with eye-specific and neuron-specific Caz-knockdown. We examined several previously reported ALS-related genes and found genetic links between Caz and ter94, the Drosophila ortholog of human Valosin-containing protein (VCP). Genetic crossing the strongest loss-of-function allele of ter94 with Caz-knockdown strongly enhanced the rough-eye phenotype and the MN-degeneration phenotype caused by Caz-knockdown. Conversely, the overexpression of wild-type ter94 in the background of Caz-knockdown remarkably suppressed those phenotypes. Our data demonstrated that expression levels of Drosophila VCP ortholog dramatically modified the phenotypes caused by Caz-knockdown in either direction, exacerbation or remission. Our results indicate that therapeutic agents that up-regulate the function of human VCP could modify the pathogenic processes that lead to the degeneration of MNs in ALS.

  14. Amorphization-induced strong localization of electronic states in CsPbBr3 and CsPbCl3 studied by optical absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, S.; Sakai, T.; Tanaka, H.; Saito, T.

    1998-11-01

    Optical absorption spectra of amorphous CsPbX3 films (X=Br,Cl) are characterized by two Gaussian bands near the fundamental edge, with the optical energy gap largely blueshifted and the absorption intensity strongly reduced as compared with the crystalline films. The peak energies of the bands are close to those of the A and C bands of Pb-doped alkali halides. The spectral features are discussed in terms of a molecular orbital theory based on a quasicomplex Pb2+(X-)6 model similar to the complex model for the doped alkali halides. It is shown that not only Pb2+ 6s and 6p extended states near the band edges but also X- p states contributing to upper valence bands are localized by amorphization. The transitions from the localized Pb2+ 6s to 6p states produce the spin-orbit allowed 3P1 and dipole allowed 1P1 states responsible for the two Gaussians. The localized X- p states lie deeper in energy than the localized Pb2+ 6s state and only contribute to higher-energy absorption above the Gaussian bands, giving the reason for the reduced absorption near the fundamental edge. The blueshift of the optical energy gap is attributed to the disappearance of k dispersions for these one-electron states.

  15. The iSelect 9 K SNP analysis revealed polyploidization induced revolutionary changes and intense human selection causing strong haplotype blocks in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Chenyang; Wang, Yuquan; Chao, Shiaoman; Li, Tian; Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Lanfen; Zhang, Xueyong

    2017-01-01

    A Chinese wheat mini core collection was genotyped using the wheat 9 K iSelect SNP array. Total 2420 and 2396 polymorphic SNPs were detected on the A and the B genome chromosomes, which formed 878 haplotype blocks. There were more blocks in the B genome, but the average block size was significantly (P < 0.05) smaller than those in the A genome. Intense selection (domestication and breeding) had a stronger effect on the A than on the B genome chromosomes. Based on the genetic pedigrees, many blocks can be traced back to a well-known Strampelli cross, which was made one century ago. Furthermore, polyploidization of wheat (both tetraploidization and hexaploidization) induced revolutionary changes in both the A and the B genomes, with a greater increase of gene diversity compared to their diploid ancestors. Modern breeding has dramatically increased diversity in the gene coding regions, though obvious blocks were formed on most of the chromosomes in both tetraploid and hexaploid wheats. Tag-SNP markers identified in this study can be used for marker assisted selection using haplotype blocks as a wheat breeding strategy. This strategy can also be employed to facilitate genome selection in other self-pollinating crop species. PMID:28134278

  16. Intersubunit contacts made by tryptophan 120 with biotin are essential for both strong biotin binding and biotin-induced tighter subunit association of streptavidin

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Takeshi; Cantor, C.R.

    1995-04-11

    In natural streptavidin, tryptophan 120 of each subunit makes contacts with the biotin bound by an adjacent subunit through the dimer-dimer interface. To understand quantitatively the role of tryptophan 120 and its intersubunit communication in the properties of streptavidin, a streptavidin mutant in which tryptophan 120 is converted to phenylalanine was produced and characterized. The streptavidin mutant forms a tetrameric molecule and binds one biotin per subunit, as does natural streptavidin, indicating that the mutation of tryptophan 120 to phenylalanine has no significant effect on the basic properties of streptavidin. However, its biotin-binding affinity was reduced substantially, to approximately 10{sup 8} M{sup {minus}1}, indicating that the contact made by tryptophan 120 to biotin has a considerable contribution o the extremely tight biotin binding by streptavidin. The mutant retained bound biotin over a wide pH range or with the addition of urea up to 6 M at neutral pH. However, bound biotin was efficiently released by the addition of excess free biotin due, presumably, to exchange reactions. Electrophoretic analysis revealed that the intersubunit contact made by tryptophan 120 to biotin through the dimer-dimer interface is the major interaction responsible for the biotin-induced, tighter subunit association of streptavidin. In addition, the mutant has weaker subunit association than natural streptavidin even in the absence of biotin, indicating that tryptophan 120 also contributes to the subunit association of tetramers in the absence of biotin. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Strong bonding between sputtered bioglass-ceramic films and Ti-substrate implants induced by atomic inter-diffusion post-deposition heat-treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, G. E.; Popa, A. C.; Galca, A. C.; Aldica, G.; Ferreira, J. M. F.

    2013-09-01

    Bioglasses (BG) are the inorganic materials exhibiting the highest indices of bioactivity. Their appliance as films for bio-functionalization of metallic implant surfaces has been regarded as an optimal solution for surpassing their limited bulk mechanical properties. This study reports on magnetron sputtering of alkali-free BG thin films by varying the target-to-substrate working distance, which proved to play an important role in determining the films’ properties. Post deposition heat-treatments at temperatures slightly above the glass transformation temperature were then applied to induce inter-diffusion processes at the BG/titanium substrate interface and strengthening the bonding as determined by pull-out adherence measurements. The morphological and structural features assessed by SEM-EDS, XRD, and FTIR revealed a good correlation between the formations of inter-metallic titanium silicide phases and the films’ bonding strength. The highest mean value of pull-out adherence (60.3 ± 4.6 MPa), which is adequate even for load-bearing biomedical applications, was recorded for films deposited at a working distance of 35 mm followed by a heat-treatment at 750 °C for 2 h in air. The experimental findings are explained on the basis of structural, compositional and thermodynamic considerations.

  18. Perturbation of cytokinin and ethylene-signalling pathways explain the strong rooting phenotype exhibited by Arabidopsis expressing the Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitotic inducer, cdc25

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Entry into mitosis is regulated by cyclin dependent kinases that in turn are phosphoregulated. In most eukaryotes, phosphoregulation is through WEE1 kinase and CDC25 phosphatase. In higher plants a homologous CDC25 gene is unconfirmed and hence the mitotic inducer Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Sp) cdc25 has been used as a tool in transgenic plants to probe cell cycle function. Expression of Spcdc25 in tobacco BY-2 cells accelerates entry into mitosis and depletes cytokinins; in whole plants it stimulates lateral root production. Here we show, for the first time, that alterations to cytokinin and ethylene signaling explain the rooting phenotype elicited by Spcdc25 expression in Arabidopsis. Results Expressing Spcdc25 in Arabidopsis results in increased formation of lateral and adventitious roots, a reduction of primary root width and more isodiametric cells in the root apical meristem (RAM) compared with wild type. Furthermore it stimulates root morphogenesis from hypocotyls when cultured on two way grids of increasing auxin and cytokinin concentrations. Microarray analysis of seedling roots expressing Spcdc25 reveals that expression of 167 genes is changed by > 2-fold. As well as genes related to stress responses and defence, these include 19 genes related to transcriptional regulation and signaling. Amongst these was the up-regulation of genes associated with ethylene synthesis and signaling. Seedlings expressing Spcdc25 produced 2-fold more ethylene than WT and exhibited a significant reduction in hypocotyl length both in darkness or when exposed to 10 ppm ethylene. Furthermore in Spcdc25 expressing plants, the cytokinin receptor AHK3 was down-regulated, and endogenous levels of iPA were reduced whereas endogeous IAA concentrations in the roots increased. Conclusions We suggest that the reduction in root width and change to a more isodiametric cell phenotype in the RAM in Spcdc25 expressing plants is a response to ethylene over-production. The increased

  19. Partially strong WW scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Kingman; Chiang Chengwei; Yuan Tzuchiang

    2008-09-01

    What if only a light Higgs boson is discovered at the CERN LHC? Conventional wisdom tells us that the scattering of longitudinal weak gauge bosons would not grow strong at high energies. However, this is generally not true. In some composite models or general two-Higgs-doublet models, the presence of a light Higgs boson does not guarantee complete unitarization of the WW scattering. After partial unitarization by the light Higgs boson, the WW scattering becomes strongly interacting until it hits one or more heavier Higgs bosons or other strong dynamics. We analyze how LHC experiments can reveal this interesting possibility of partially strong WW scattering.

  20. Strong Navajo Marriages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogrand, Linda; Mueller, Mary Lou; Arrington, Rachel; LeBlanc, Heidi; Spotted Elk, Davina; Dayzie, Irene; Rosenbrand, Reva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, conducted in two Navajo Nation chapters, was to learn what makes Navajo marriages strong because no research has been done on this topic. Twenty-one Navajo couples (42 individuals) who felt they had strong marriages volunteered to participate in the study. Couples identified the following marital strengths:…

  1. Living Bones, Strong Bones

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In this classroom activity, engineering, nutrition, and physical activity collide when students design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increas...

  2. The Strong Nuclear Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-05-24

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  3. The Strong Nuclear Force

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  4. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  5. Ultraviolet B irradiation of the mouse eye induces pigmentation of the skin more strongly than does stress loading, by increasing the levels of prohormone convertase 2 and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, K; Yamate, Y; Kobayashi, H; Ishii, M; Sato, E F; Inoue, M

    2013-01-01

    In previous studies, we made the unexpected finding that in mice, ultraviolet (UV)B irradiation of the eye increased the concentration of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in plasma, and systemically stimulated epidermal melanocytes. To compare the extent of the pigmentation induced by social and restraint stress (which activate the hippocampus-pituitary system) with that induced by UVB irradiation. DBA/2 and sham-operated or hypophysectomized DBA/2 mice were subjected to local UVB exposure using a sunlamp directed at the eye, and two types of stress (social and restraint) were imposed. UVB irradiation of the eye or exposure to stress loading both increased the number of Dopa-positive melanocytes in the epidermis, and hypophysectomy strongly inhibited the UVB-induced and stress-induced stimulation of melanocytes. Irradiation of the eye caused a much greater increase in dopamine than did the stress load. Both UVB eye irradiation and stress increased the blood levels of α-MSH and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). In addition, the increase in plasma α-MSH was greater in animals subjected to UVB eye irradiation than in those subjected to stress loading, whereas the reverse occurred for plasma ACTH. UVB irradiation to the eye and stress loading increased the expression of prohormone convertase (PC)1/3 and PC2 in the pituitary gland. The increase in expression of pituitary PC2 was greater in animals subjected to UVB eye irradiation than to stress, whereas no difference was seen between the two groups for the increase in PC1/3. UVB eye irradiation exerts a stronger effect on pigmentation than stress loading, and is related to increased levels of α-MSH and PC2. © The Author(s). CED © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Kinetic mixing at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zotto, Michele; Heckman, Jonathan J.; Kumar, Piyush; Malekian, Arada; Wecht, Brian

    2017-01-01

    A common feature of many string-motivated particle physics models is additional strongly coupled U (1 )'s. In such sectors, electric and magnetic states have comparable mass, and integrating out modes also charged under U (1 ) hypercharge generically yields C P preserving electric kinetic mixing and C P violating magnetic kinetic mixing terms. Even though these extra sectors are strongly coupled, we show that in the limit where the extra sector has approximate N =2 supersymmetry, we can use formal methods from Seiberg-Witten theory to compute these couplings. We also calculate various quantities of phenomenological interest such as the cross section for scattering between visible sector states and heavy extra sector states as well as the effects of supersymmetry breaking induced from coupling to the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model.

  7. Rock mass response to strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events and blasting observed at the surface of the excavations in deep level gold mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, Alexander; Durrheim, Ray; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to extreme ground motion and derive the attenuation factors in near field. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of the ground motion was found to be proportional to the distance from the source following R^-1.1 & R^-1.7 for compact rock and R^-3.1 & R^-3.4 for more fractured rock close to the surface of the tunnel. In addition the ground motion was compared to the quasi-static deformations taking place around the underground excavations. The quasi-static deformations were measured by means of strain, tilt and closure. A good correspondence

  8. On Strong Anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, N.; Turvey, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    We examine Dubois's (2003) distinction between weak anticipation and strong anticipation. Anticipation is weak if it arises from a model of the system via internal simulations. Anticipation is strong if it arises from the system itself via lawful regularities embedded in the system's ordinary mode of functioning. The assumption of weak anticipation dominates cognitive science and neuroscience and in particular the study of perception and action. The assumption of strong anticipation, however, seems to be required by anticipation's ubiquity. It is, for example, characteristic of homeostatic processes at the level of the organism, organs, and cells. We develop the formal distinction between strong and weak anticipation by elaboration of anticipating synchronization, a phenomenon arising from time delays in appropriately coupled dynamical systems. The elaboration is conducted in respect to (a) strictly physical systems, (b) the defining features of circadian rhythms, often viewed as paradigmatic of biological behavior based in internal models, (c) Pavlovian learning, and (d) forward models in motor control. We identify the common thread of strongly anticipatory systems and argue for its significance in furthering understanding of notions such as “internal”, “model” and “prediction”. PMID:20191086

  9. Yugoslav strong motion network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailov, Vladimir

    1985-04-01

    Data concerning ground motion and the response of structures during strong earthquakes are necessary for seismic hazard evaluation and the definition of design criteria for structures to be constructed in seismically active zones. The only way to obtain such data is the installation of a strong-motion instrument network. The Yugoslav strong-motion programme was created in 1972 to recover strong-motion response data used by the structural engineering community in developing earthquake resistant design. Instruments, accelerographs SMA-1 and seismoscopes WM-1, were installed in free-field stations and on structures (high-rise buildings, dams, bridges, etc.). A total number of 176 accelerographs and 137 seismoscopes have been installed and are operating in Yugoslavia. The strong-motion programme in Yugoslavia consists of five subactivities: network design, network operation, data processing, network management and research as well as application. All these activities are under the responsibility of IZIIS in cooperation with the Yugoslav Association of Seismology. By 1975 in the realisation of this project participated the CALTECH as cooperative institution in the joint American-Yugoslav cooperative project. The results obtained which are presented in this paper, and their application in the aseismic design justify the necessity for the existence of such a network in Yugoslavia.

  10. Strong Little Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moloney, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Did you know that some strong little cylindrical magnets available in local hardware stores can have an effective circumferential current of 2500 A? This intriguing information can be obtained by hanging a pair of magnets at the center of a coil, as shown in Fig. 1, and measuring the oscillation frequency as a function of coil current.

  11. Partners: Forging Strong Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Ellen, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This newsletter issue asserts that sound, effective relationships in which diverse groups of people and organizations work together toward a common goal are the basis of the collaborative efforts in education that can accomplish change. The first article, "Partners: Forging Strong Relationships" (Sarah E. Torian), briefly describes the…

  12. Strong Little Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moloney, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Did you know that some strong little cylindrical magnets available in local hardware stores can have an effective circumferential current of 2500 A? This intriguing information can be obtained by hanging a pair of magnets at the center of a coil, as shown in Fig. 1, and measuring the oscillation frequency as a function of coil current.

  13. Networks of strong ties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaolin; Adamic, Lada A.; Strauss, Martin J.

    2007-05-01

    Social networks transmitting covert or sensitive information cannot use all ties for this purpose. Rather, they can only use a subset of ties that are strong enough to be “trusted”. This paper addresses whether it is still possible, under this restriction, for information to be transmitted widely and rapidly in social networks. We use transitivity as evidence of strong ties, requiring one or more shared contacts in order to count an edge as strong. We examine the effect of removing all non-transitive ties in two real social network data sets, imposing varying thresholds in the number of shared contacts. We observe that transitive ties occupy a large portion of the network and that removing all other ties, while causing some individuals to become disconnected, preserves the majority of the giant connected component. Furthermore, the average shortest path, important for the rapid diffusion of information, increases only slightly relative to the original network. We also evaluate the cost of forming transitive ties by modeling a random graph composed entirely of closed triads and comparing its connectivity and average shortest path with the equivalent Erdös-Renyi random graph. Both the empirical study and random model point to a robustness of strong ties with respect to the connectivity and small world property of social networks.

  14. Strong HCV NS3/4a, NS4b, NS5a, NS5b-specific cellular immune responses induced in Rhesus macaques by a novel HCV genotype 1a/1b consensus DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Brian; Toporovski, Roberta; Yan, Jian; Pankhong, Panyupa; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Welles, Seth L; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Weiner, David B; Kutzler, Michele A

    2014-01-01

    Chronic HCV is a surreptitious disease currently affecting approximately 3% of the world's population that can lead to liver failure and cancer decades following initial infection. However, there are currently no vaccines available for the prevention of chronic HCV. From patients who acutely resolve HCV infection, it is apparent that a strong and broad cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is important in HCV clearance. DNA vaccines are naked plasmid DNA molecules that encode pathogen antigens to induce a pathogen-specific immune response. They are inexpensive to produce and have an excellent safety profile in animals and humans. Additionally, DNA vaccines are able to induce strong CTL responses, making them well-suited for an HCV vaccine. We aimed to maximize vaccine recipients' opportunity to induce a broad T cell response with a novel antigenic sequence, multi-antigen vaccine strategy. We have generated DNA plasmids encoding consensus sequences of HCV genotypes 1a and 1b non-structural proteins NS3/4a, NS4b, NS5a, and NS5b. Rhesus macaques were used to study the immunogenicity of these constructs. Four animals were immunized 3 times, 6 weeks apart, at a dose of 1.0mg per antigen construct, as an intramuscular injection followed by in vivo electroporation, which greatly increases DNA uptake by local cells. Immune responses were measured 2 weeks post-immunization regimen (PIR) in immunized rhesus macaques and showed a broad response to multiple HCV nonstructural antigens, with up to 4680 spot-forming units per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as measured by Interferon-γ ELISpot. In addition, multiparametric flow cytometry detected HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses by intracellular cytokine staining and detected HCV-specific CD107a+/GrzB+ CD8+ T cells indicating an antigen specific cytolytic response 2 weeks PIR compared with baseline measurements. At the final study time point, 6 weeks PIR, HCV-specific CD45RA- memory-like T cells

  15. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, E

    2009-05-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally wrong even though that human being is not being deprived of a "valuable future". So Marquis would be wrong in thinking that what is essential about the wrongness of killing an adult human being is that they are being deprived of a valuable future. This paper shows that whichever way the concept of "valuable future" is interpreted, the proposed counterexamples fail: if it is interpreted as "future like ours", the proposed counterexamples have no bearing on Marquis's argument. If the concept is interpreted as referring to the patient's preferences, it must be either conceded that the patients in Strong's scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims.

  16. Pellet feed adsorbed with the recombinant Lactococcus lactis BFE920 expressing SiMA antigen induced strong recall vaccine effects against Streptococcus iniae infection in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel; Beck, Bo Ram; Lee, Sun Min; Jeon, Jongsu; Lee, Dong Wook; Lee, Jae Il; Song, Seong Kyu

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a fish feed vaccine that provides effective disease prevention and convenient application. A lactic acid bacterium (LAB), Lactococcus lactis BFE920, was modified to express the SiMA antigen, a membrane protein of Streptococcus iniae. The antigen was engineered to be expressed under the nisin promoter, which is induced by nisin produced naturally by the host LAB. Various sizes (40 ± 3.5 g, 80 ± 2.1 g, and 221 ± 2.4 g) of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) were vaccinated by feeding the extruded pellet feed, onto which the SiMA-expressing L. lactis BFE920 (1.0 × 10(7) CFU/g) was adsorbed. Vaccine-treated feed was administered twice a day for 1 week, and priming and boosting were performed with a 1-week interval in between. The vaccinated fish had significantly elevated levels of antigen-specific serum antibodies and T cell marker mRNAs: CD4-1, CD4-2, and CD8a. In addition, the feed vaccine significantly induced T cell effector functions, such as the production of IFN-γ and activation of the transcription factor that induces its expression, T-bet. When the flounder were challenged by intraperitoneal infection and bath immersion with S. iniae, the vaccinated fish showed 84% and 82% relative percent survival (RPS), respectively. Furthermore, similar protective effects were confirmed even 3 months after vaccination in a field study (n = 4800), indicating that this feed vaccine elicited prolonged duration of immunopotency. In addition, the vaccinated flounder gained 21% more weight and required 16% less feed to gain a unit of body weight compared to the control group. The data clearly demonstrate that the L. lactis BFE920-SiMA feed vaccine has strong protective effects, induces prolonged vaccine efficacy, and has probiotic effects. In addition, this LAB-based fish feed vaccine can be easily used to target many different pathogens of diverse fish species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tilts in strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.

    2006-01-01

    Most instruments used in seismological practice to record ground motion are pendulum seismographs, velocigraphs, or accelerographs. In most cases it is assumed that seismic instruments are only sensitive to the translational motion of the instrument's base. In this study the full equation of pendulum motion, including the inputs of rotations and tilts, is considered. It is shown that tilting the accelerograph's base can severely impact its response to the ground motion. The method of tilt evaluation using uncorrected strong-motion accelerograms was first suggested by Graizer (1989), and later tested in several laboratory experiments with different strong-motion instruments. The method is based on the difference in the tilt sensitivity of the horizontal and vertical pendulums. The method was applied to many of the strongest records of the Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake of 1994. Examples are shown when relatively large tilts of up to a few degrees occurred during strong earthquake ground motion. Residual tilt extracted from the strong-motion record at the Pacoima Dam-Upper Left Abutment reached 3.1?? in N45??E direction, and was a result of local earthquake-induced tilting due to high-amplitude shaking. This value is in agreement with the residual tilt measured by using electronic level a few days after the earthquake. The method was applied to the building records from the Northridge earthquake. According to the estimates, residual tilt reached 2.6?? on the ground floor of the 12-story Hotel in Ventura. Processing of most of the strongest records of the Northridge earthquake shows that tilts, if happened, were within the error of the method, or less than about 0.5??.

  18. Abrupt transitions of the top-down controlled Black Sea pelagic ecosystem during 1960 2000: Evidence for regime-shifts under strong fishery exploitation and nutrient enrichment modulated by climate-induced variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz, Temel; Gilbert, Denis

    2007-02-01

    -shifts appear to be sporadic events forced by strong transient decadal perturbations, and therefore differ from the multi-decadal scale cyclical events observed in pelagic ocean ecosystems under low-frequency climatic forcing. The Black Sea observations illustrate that eutrophication and extreme fishery exploitation can indeed induce hysteresis in large marine ecosystems, when they can exert sufficiently strong forcing onto the system. They further illustrate the link between the disruption of the top predators, proliferation of new predator stocks, and regime-shift events. Examples of these features have been reported for some aquatic ecosystems, but are extremely limited for large marine ecosystems.

  19. Strongly Regular Graphs,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-10-01

    The theory of strongly regular graphs was introduced by Bose r7 1 in 1963, in connection with partial geometries and 2 class association schemes. One...non adjacent vertices is constant and equal to ~. We shall denote by ~(p) (reap.r(p)) the set of vertices adjacent (resp.non adjacent) to a vertex p...is the complement of .2’ if the set of vertices of ~ is the set of vertices of .2’ and if two vertices in .2’ are adjacent if and only if they were

  20. Electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Jenet, F. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-02-15

    The first large-scale simulations of continuously driven, two-dimensional electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence are performed, for electron thermal speeds 0.01c{<=}v{<=}0.57c, by integrating the Zakharov equations for coupled Langmuir and transverse (T) waves near the plasma frequency. Turbulence scalings and wave number spectra are calculated, a transition is found from a mix of trapped and free T eigenstates for v{>=}0.1c to just free eigenstates for v{<=}0.1c, and wave energy densities are observed to undergo slow quasiperiodic oscillations.

  1. Downregulation of miR-210 expression inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and enhances radiosensitivity in hypoxic human hepatoma cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Ting; Cao, Jianping; Liu, Fenju; Tian, Ye; Zhu, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and an important contributor to tumor radioresistance. miR-210 is the most consistently and robustly induced microRNA under hypoxia in different types of tumor cells and normal cells. In the present study, to explore the feasibility of miR-210 as an effective therapeutic target, lentiviral-mediated anti-sense miR-210 gene transfer technique was employed to downregulate miR-210 expression in hypoxic human hepatoma SMMC-7721, HepG2 and HuH7 cells, and phenotypic changes of which were analyzed. Hypoxia led to an increased hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and miR-210 expression and cell arrest in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase in all cell lines. miR-210 downregulation significantly suppressed cell viability, induced cell arrest in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase, increased apoptotic rate and enhanced radiosensitivity in hypoxic human hepatoma cells. Moreover, apoptosis-inducing factor, mitochondrion-associated, 3 (AIFM3) was identified as a direct target gene of miR-210. AIFM3 downregulation by siRNA attenuated radiation induced apoptosis in miR-210 downregulated hypoxic human hepatoma cells. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-210 might be a potential therapeutic target and specific inhibition of miR-210 expression in combination with radiotherapy might be expected to exert strong anti-tumor effect on hypoxic human hepatoma cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-210 downregulation radiosensitized hypoxic hepatoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIFM3 was identified as a direct target gene of miR-210. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-210 might be a therapeutic target to hypoxic hepatoma.

  2. Strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Si, Qimiao

    2012-09-18

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective and offer possibilities for technological applications. This article looks at these materials through the lens of research performed at Rice University. Topics examined include: Quantum phase transitions and quantum criticality in "heavy fermion" materials and the iron pnictide high temperature superconductors; computational ab initio methods to examine strongly correlated materials and their interface with analytical theory techniques; layered dichalcogenides as example correlated materials with rich phases (charge density waves, superconductivity, hard ferromagnetism) that may be tuned by composition, pressure, and magnetic field; and nanostructure methods applied to the correlated oxides VO₂ and Fe₃O₄, where metal-insulator transitions can be manipulated by doping at the nanoscale or driving the system out of equilibrium. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting prospects for this class of materials.

  3. A truncated receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV spike protein potently inhibits MERS-CoV infection and induces strong neutralizing antibody responses: implication for developing therapeutics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Du, Lanying; Kou, Zhihua; Ma, Cuiqing; Tao, Xinrong; Wang, Lili; Zhao, Guangyu; Chen, Yaoqing; Yu, Fei; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-01

    An emerging respiratory infectious disease with high mortality, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), is caused by a novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV). It was first reported in 2012 in Saudi Arabia and has now spread to eight countries. Development of effective therapeutics and vaccines is crucial to save lives and halt the spread of MERS-CoV. Here, we show that a recombinant protein containing a 212-amino acid fragment (residues 377-588) in the truncated receptor-binding domain (RBD: residues 367-606) of MERS-CoV spike (S) protein fused with human IgG Fc fragment (S377-588-Fc) is highly expressed in the culture supernatant of transfected 293T cells. The purified S377-588-Fc protein efficiently binds to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), the receptor of MERS-CoV, and potently inhibited MERS-CoV infection, suggesting its potential to be further developed as a therapeutic modality for treating MERS-CoV infection and saving the patients' lives. The recombinant S377-588-Fc is able to induce in the vaccinated mice strong MERS-CoV S-specific antibodies, which blocks the binding of RBD to DPP4 receptor and effectively neutralizes MERS-CoV infection. These findings indicate that this truncated RBD protein shows promise for further development as an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of MERS-CoV infection.

  4. Strong, Lightweight, Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, James C.; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Ilhan, Ulvi

    2007-01-01

    A new class of strong, lightweight, porous materials has been invented as an outgrowth of an effort to develop reinforced silica aerogels. The new material, called X-Aerogel is less hygroscopic, but no less porous and of similar density to the corresponding unmodified aerogels. However, the property that sets X-Aerogels apart is their mechanical strength, which can be as much as two and a half orders of magnitude stronger that the unmodified aerogels. X-Aerogels are envisioned to be useful for making extremely lightweight, thermally insulating, structural components, but they may also have applications as electrical insulators, components of laminates, catalyst supports, templates for electrode materials, fuel-cell components, and filter membranes.

  5. Quine's 'needlessly strong' holism.

    PubMed

    Verhaegh, Sander

    2017-02-01

    Quine is routinely perceived as having changed his mind about the scope of the Duhem-Quine thesis, shifting from what has been called an 'extreme holism' to a more moderate view. Where the Quine of 'Two Dogmas of Empiricism' argues that "the unit of empirical significance is the whole of science" (1951, 42), the later Quine seems to back away from this "needlessly strong statement of holism" (1991, 393). In this paper, I show that the received view is incorrect. I distinguish three ways in which Quine's early holism can be said to be wide-scoped and show that he has never changed his mind about any one of these aspects of his early view. Instead, I argue that Quine's apparent change of mind can be explained away as a mere shift of emphasis.

  6. Strongly correlated electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.; Albers, R.; Balatsky, A.; Bishop, A.; Bonca, J.; Gubernatis, J.; Gulasci, M.; Silver, R.; Trugman, S.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a 3-year project. Novel electronic materials characterized by strong electronic correlations display a number of unexpected, often extraordinary, properties. These are likely to play a major role in purpose-specific high-technology electronic materials of the future developed for electronic, magnetic, and optical applications. This project sought to develop predictive control of the novel properties by formulating, solving and applying many-body models for the underlying microscopic physics. This predictive control required the development of new analytical and numerical many-body techniques and strategies for materials of varying strengths of interactions, dimensionality and geometry. Results are compared with experiment on classes of novel materials, and the robust techniques are used to predict additional properties and motivate key additional experiments.

  7. Strongly Interacting Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Both ground-based Doppler surveys and NASA's Kepler mission have discovered a diversity of planetary system architectures that challenge theories of planet formation. Systems of tightly-packed or near-resonant planets are particularly useful for constraining theories of orbital migration and the excitation of orbital eccentricities and inclinations. In particular, transit timing variations (TTVs) provide a powerful tool to characterize the masses and orbits of dozens of small planets, including many planets at orbital periods beyond the reach of both current Doppler surveys and photoevaporation-induced atmospheric loss. Dynamical modeling of these systems has identified some ``supper-puffy'' planets, i.e., low mass planets with surprisingly large radii and low densities. I will describe a few particularly interesting planetary systems and discuss the implications for the formation of planets ranging from gaseous super-Earth-size planets to rocky planets the size of Mars.

  8. Disordered strongly correlated electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Mard, Hossein

    Disorder can have a vast variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this dissertation we study the effects of quenched disorder on electronic systmens at zero temperature. First, we perform variational studies of the interaction-localization problem to describe the interaction-induced renormalizations of the effective (screened) random potential seen by quasiparticles. Here we present results of careful finite-size scaling studies for the conductance of disordered Hubbard chains at half-filling and zero temperature. While our results indicate that quasiparticle wave functions remain exponentially localized even in the presence of moderate to strong repulsive interactions, we show that interactions produce a strong decrease of the characteristic conductance scale g* signaling the crossover to strong localization. This effect, which cannot be captured by a simple renormalization of the disorder strength, instead reflects a peculiar non-Gaussian form of the spatial correlations of the screened disordered potential, a hitherto neglected mechanism to dramatically reduce the impact of Anderson localization (interference) effects. Second, we formulate a strong-disorder renormalization-group (SDRG) approach to study the beta function of the tight-binding model in one dimension with both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder for states at the band center. We show that the SDRG method, when used to compute transport properties, yields exact results since it is identical to the transfer matrix method. The beta function is shown to be universal when only off-diagonal disorder is present even though single-parameter scaling is known to be violated. A different single-parameter scaling theory is formulated for this particular (particle-hole symmetric) case. Upon breaking particle-hole symmetry (by adding diagonal disorder), the beta function is shown to

  9. Foreshocks of strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, A. V.; Sobisevich, L. E.; Sobisevich, A. L.; Lavrov, I. P.

    2014-07-01

    The specific enhancement of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) electromagnetic oscillations a few hours prior to the strong earthquakes, which was previously mentioned in the literature, motivated us to search for the distinctive features of the mechanical (foreshock) activity of the Earth's crust in the epicentral zones of the future earthquakes. Activation of the foreshocks three hours before the main shock is revealed, which is roughly similar to the enhancement of the specific electromagnetic ULF emission. It is hypothesized that the round-the-world seismic echo signals from the earthquakes, which form the peak of energy release 2 h 50 min before the main events, act as the triggers of the main shocks due to the cumulative action of the surface waves converging to the epicenter. It is established that the frequency of the fluctuations in the foreshock activity decreases at the final stages of the preparation of the main shocks, which probably testifies to the so-called mode softening at the approach of the failure point according to the catastrophe theory.

  10. Kinematics of Strong Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, K.; Nguyen, G.; Sulsky, D.

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides a detailed view of the Arctic ice cover. When processed with the RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS), it provides estimates of sea ice motion and deformation over large regions of the Arctic for extended periods of time. The deformation is dominated by the appearance of linear kinematic features that have been associated with the presence of leads. The RGPS deformation products are based on the assumption that the displacement and velocity are smooth functions of the spatial coordinates. However, if the dominant deformation of multiyear ice results from the opening, closing and shearing of leads, then the displacement and velocity can be discontinuous. This presentation discusses the kinematics associated with strong discontinuities that describe possible jumps in displacement or velocity. Ice motion from SAR data are analyzed using this framework. It is assumed that RGPS cells deform due to the presence of a lead. The lead orientation is calculated to optimally account for the observed deformation. It is shown that almost all observed deformation can be represented by lead opening and shearing. The procedure used to reprocess motion data to account for leads will be described and applied to regions of the Beaufort Sea. The procedure not only provides a new view of ice deformation, it can be used to obtain information about the presence of leads for initialization and/or validation of numerical simulations.

  11. Electrophoresis in strong electric fields.

    PubMed

    Barany, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of non-linear electrophoresis (ef) that can be detected in strong electric fields (several hundred V/cm) are considered. The first ("classical" non-linear ef) is due to the interaction of the outer field with field-induced ionic charges in the electric double layer (EDL) under conditions, when field-induced variations of electrolyte concentration remain to be small comparatively to its equilibrium value. According to the Shilov theory, the non-linear component of the electrophoretic velocity for dielectric particles is proportional to the cubic power of the applied field strength (cubic electrophoresis) and to the second power of the particles radius; it is independent of the zeta-potential but is determined by the surface conductivity of particles. The second one, the so-called "superfast electrophoresis" is connected with the interaction of a strong outer field with a secondary diffuse layer of counterions (space charge) that is induced outside the primary (classical) diffuse EDL by the external field itself because of concentration polarization. The Dukhin-Mishchuk theory of "superfast electrophoresis" predicts quadratic dependence of the electrophoretic velocity of unipolar (ionically or electronically) conducting particles on the external field gradient and linear dependence on the particle's size in strong electric fields. These are in sharp contrast to the laws of classical electrophoresis (no dependence of V(ef) on the particle's size and linear dependence on the electric field gradient). A new method to measure the ef velocity of particles in strong electric fields is developed that is based on separation of the effects of sedimentation and electrophoresis using videoimaging and a new flowcell and use of short electric pulses. To test the "classical" non-linear electrophoresis, we have measured the ef velocity of non-conducting polystyrene, aluminium-oxide and (semiconductor) graphite particles as well as Saccharomice cerevisiae yeast cells as a

  12. Novel influenza virus vectors expressing Brucella L7/L12 or Omp16 proteins in cattle induced a strong T-cell immune response, as well as high protectiveness against B. abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Yespembetov, Bolat; Zinina, Nadezhda; Assanzhanova, Nurika; Kozhamkulov, Yerken; Inkarbekov, Dulat; Gotskina, Tatyana; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2014-04-11

    This paper presents the results of a study of the immunogenicity and protectiveness of new candidate vector vaccine against Brucella abortus - a bivalent vaccine formulation consisting of a mixture of recombinant influenza A subtype H5N1 or H1N1 (viral constructs vaccine formulation) viruses expressing Brucella ribosomal protein L7/L12 and Omp16, in cattle. To increase the effectiveness of the candidate vaccine, adjuvants such as Montanide Gel01 or chitosan were included in its composition. Immunization of cattle (heifers aged 1-1.5 years, 5 animals per group) with the viral constructs vaccine formulation only, or its combination with adjuvants Montanide Gel01 or chitosan, was conducted via the conjunctival method using cross prime (influenza virus subtype H5N1) and booster (influenza virus subtype H1N1) vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. Vaccine candidates were evaluated in comparison with the positive (B. abortus S19) and negative (PBS) controls. The viral constructs vaccine formulations, particularly in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant promoted formation of IgG antibodies (with a predominance of antibodies of isotype IgG2a) against Brucella L7/L12 and Omp16 proteins in ELISA. Moreover, these vaccines in cattle induced a strong antigen-specific T-cell immune response, as indicated by a high number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, as well as the concentration of IFN-γ, and most importantly provided a high level of protectiveness comparable to the commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine and superior to the B. abortus S19 vaccine in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant. Based on these findings, we recommended the bivalent vaccine formulation containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 for practical use in cattle.

  13. Studies on Strong Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriano, Claudio

    Five studies, four in Quantum field theory and one in fermionic molecular dynamics are presented. In the first study, introduced in chapter one and developed in chapter two of this dissertation, we formulate an extension of QCD sum rules to Compton scattering of the pion at intermediate energy. The chapter is based on the research paper Fixed angle pion Compton scattering and QCD sum rules by Prof. George Sterman and the author, which has been submitted for publication as a regular article. In chapter 3 we discuss the relation between traditional bosonic exchange models of nuclear strong interaction and soliton models, in the particular case of the sine-Gordon model. The chapter is based on the research paper "Scattering in soliton models and bosonic exchange descriptions", by R. R. Parwani, H. Yamagishi, I. Zahed and the author, and is published in Phys. Rev. D 45 (1992), 2542. A preprint of this paper (Preprint 1) has been included as an Appendix to the Chapter. In Chapter 4 we discuss aspects of the propagation of quantized fields in classical backgrounds, using the light-cone expansion of the propagator. The chapter is based on the research papers "Electrodynamics in the presence of an axion", published by the author in Modern Physics Letters A 7 (1992), 1253, and on the paper "Singularity of Green's function and the effective action in massive Yang Mills theories, by Prof. H. Yamagishi and the author. This last paper is published in Physical Review D 41 (1990), 3226 and its reprint appears in the final part of the Chapter (Reprint 1). In chapter 5, entitled "On the time dependent Rayleigh-Ritz equations", we discuss aspects of the variational approach to fermionic molecular dynamics. This investigation by R. Parwani, H. Yamagishi and the author has been published in Nucl. Physics A 522 (1991), 591. A preprint of this research paper has been inserted in the final part of the Chapter (Preprint 2).

  14. Thermonuclear fusion in a strong laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, V. P.

    2014-08-01

    Thermonuclear fusion induced by the irradiation of solid deuterated cluster targets and foils with fields of strong femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses is discussed. The thermonuclear-fusion process D( d, n)3He in a collision of two deuterons at an energy of 50 to 100 keV in a deuterium cluster target irradiated with a strong laser pulse is discussed. A theory of thermonuclear fusion proceeding upon the irradiation of clusters formed by deuterium iodide (DI) molecules with the field of a superintense femtosecond laser pulse is developed. This theory is based on an above-barrier process in which the sequential multiple inner ionization of atomic ions within a cluster is accompanied by field-induced outer ionization. The yield of neutrons from thermonuclear fusion in a deuteron-deuteron collision after the completion of a laser pulse is calculated. The yield of neutrons is determined for the thermonuclear-fusion reaction proceeding in the interaction of an intense picosecond laser pulse with thin TiD2 foils. A multiple ionization of titanium atoms at the front edge of the laser pulse is considered. The heating of free electron occurs in induced inverse bremsstrahlung in the process of electron scattering on multiply charged titanium ions. The yield of alpha particles in the thermonuclear-fusion reaction involving protons and 11B nuclei that is induced in microdrops by a strong laser field is determined. Experimental data on laser-induced thermonuclear fusion are discussed.

  15. Landslides induced by heavy rainfall in July 2012 in Northern Kyushu District, Japan and the influence of long term rainfall increase comparing with the slope destabilization due to strong seismic shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Aditian, Aril

    2013-04-01

    1. Objective We had a deluge in July 2012 in the northern Kyushu district with intense rainfall of 800mm and 108mm/hr. This intensity yielded countless traces of debris flow and landslides, slope failures that induced tremendous damage and causalities in the area. Hence, several field investigations and reconnaissance tasks were conducted to delve into this sediment-related disaster. The various results and the information obtained through this investigation were reported, mentioning the damage, the meteorological condition, geologic-geomorphologic features and hydraulic characteristics of the debris flows, vegetation effects, and the influence of the climate change. Increase in rainfall that may be induced by the global climate change is obvious in Kyushu district, Japan, according to the analysis of rain data observed in various locations including mountainside points that are not influenced by local warming due to urbanization. On this point of view, we are intrigued to elucidate the response of landslide to this increase in rainfall. Hence, its long term impact on this landslide disaster is also analyzed comparing with the slope destabilization due to strong seismic shaking. 2. Method and target areas Field investigation on landslides slopes, slope failures and torrents where debris flows occurred are conducted to obtain the geologic data, geo-structure, vegetation feature, soil samples and topographic data i.e. cross sections, then soil shear tests and soil permeability tests are also conducted. The rainfall data at the nearest rain observatory were obtained from the database of Japan meteorological agency. The long term impact on the slope stability at some slopes in the area is analyzed by the finite element method (FEM) combined with rain infiltration and seepage analysis with the long term rainfall fluctuation data, obtaining factor of safety ( Fs) on real landslide slopes. The results are compared with the destabilized influence on the slopes due to the

  16. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-09

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  17. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  18. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines1, 2, 3, 4. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number5. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes6. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  19. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; ...

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes.more » Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.« less

  20. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  1. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  2. Metallic Clusters in Strong Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suraud, Eric; Reinhard, P.-G.; Ullrich, Carsten A.

    1998-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron response of a Na_9^+ cluster excited by strong femtosecond laser pulses.(C. A. Ullrich, P.-G. Reinhard, and E. Suraud, J. Phys. B 30), 5043 (1997) Our approach is based on time-dependent density functional theory within the adiabatic local density approximation, including a recently developed self-interaction correction scheme. We investigate numerically the full electronic dipolar response and multiphoton ionization of the cluster and discuss the ionization mechanism. A strong correlation between induced electronic dipole oscillations and electron emission is observed, leading to a pronounced resonant enhancement of ionization at the frequency of the Mie plasmon.

  3. Relativistically modulational instability by strong Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Liu, S. Q.; Li, X. Q.

    2012-09-15

    Based on the set of nonlinear coupling equations, which has considered the relativistic effects of electrons, modulational instability by strong Langmuir waves has been investigated in this paper. Both the characteristic scale and maximum growth rate of the Langmuir field will enhance with the increase in the electron relativistic effect. The numerical results indicate that longitudinal perturbations induce greater instability than transverse perturbations do, which will lead to collapse and formation of the pancake-like structure.

  4. Enhanced betatron radiation in strongly magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, K. Q.; Zheng, C. Y. He, X. T.; Cao, L. H.; Liu, Z. J.

    2016-04-15

    Betatron radiation in strongly magnetized plasma is investigated by two dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The results show that the betatron radiation in magnetized plasmas is strongly enhanced and is more collimated compared to that in unmagnetized plasma. Single particle model analysis shows that the frequency and the amplitude of the electrons's betatron oscillation are strongly influenced by the axial external magnetic field and the axial self-generated magnetic field. And the 2D PIC simulation shows that the axial magnetic field is actually induced by the external magnetic field and tends to increase the betatron frequency. By disturbing the perturbation of the plasma density in the laser-produced channel, the hosing instability is also suppressed, which results in a better angular distribution and a better symmetry of the betatron radiation.

  5. Coherency properties of strong Langmuir turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, H.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Russell, D. )

    1989-01-01

    Strongly correlated Langmuir wave collapse has been observed in two dimensional simulations of Zakharov's model in a regime characterized by strong ion sound wave damping and an external drive frequency, {omega}{sub 0}, close to but less than the plasma frequency, ({omega}{sub p} {minus} {omega}{sub 0})/{omega}{sub 0} > {epsilon} with {epsilon} {approx equal} 0.005. Caviton-caviton interactions induce temporal correlations between different collapse sites on a time scale the order of a collapse cycle, and on a longer time scale site locations migrate possibly leading to strong spatial correlations. Certain features of ionospheric incoherent scatter radar (ISR) spectra are consistent with such correlations. 6 refs.

  6. Strong WW Interaction at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaez, Jose R

    1998-12-14

    We present a brief pedagogical introduction to the Effective Electroweak Chiral Lagrangians, which provide a model independent description of the WW interactions in the strong regime. When it is complemented with some unitarization or a dispersive approach, this formalism allows the study of the general strong scenario expected at the LHC, including resonances.

  7. Strong Beginnings: Learning To Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Save the Children, Westport, CT.

    The Strong Beginnings program, initiated by the Save the Children Fund in 1991, supports community-based activities in 20 countries aimed at reconstructing educational systems in developing countries. This report presents the vision of the Strong Beginnings program, describes its components, and describes the continuing challenge to improve access…

  8. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  9. Strain- and surface-induced modification of photoluminescence from self-assembled GaN/Al0.5Ga0.5N quantum dots: strong effect of capping layer and atmospheric condition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Je-Hyung; Elmaghraoui, Donia; Leroux, Mathieu; Korytov, Maxim; Vennéguès, Philippe; Jaziri, Sihem; Brault, Julien; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    We report on the influence of a capping layer on the photoluminescence properties of self-assembled GaN quantum dots grown on an Al(0.5)Ga(0.5)N template. Self-assembled GaN quantum dots show a large quantum confined Stark shift and long carrier recombination time due to strong built-in spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields. Nevertheless, owing to strong carrier localization and suppressed nonradiative processes, these quantum dots have a high-quantum efficiency even at room temperature. Here, we show that the capping thickness has an important role on the optical properties of the GaN quantum dots. The radiative and nonradiative recombination processes of quantum dots are strongly affected by adjusting the capping thickness, and the GaN quantum dots with 12 monolayers-thick Al(0.5)Ga(0.5)N capping layer show a remarkably high internal quantum efficiency of more than 80% at room temperature. We also studied photoluminescence quenching and enhancement for surface (uncapped) quantum dots caused by photoadsorption and photodesorption of oxygen.

  10. Effects of strong disorder in strongly correlated superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debmalya; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Ghosal, Amit

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of strong disorder on a system with strong electronic repulsion. In the absence of disorder, the system has a d-wave superconducting ground state with strong non-BCS features due to its proximity to a Mott insulator. We find that while strong correlations make superconductivity in this system immune to weak disorder, superconductivity is destroyed efficiently when disorder strength is comparable to the effective bandwidth. The suppression of charge motion in regions of strong potential fluctuation leads to the formation of Mott insulating patches, which anchor a larger nonsuperconducting region around them. The system thus breaks into islands of Mott insulating and superconducting regions, with Anderson insulating regions occurring along the boundary of these regions. Thus, electronic correlation and disorder, when both are strong, aid each other in destroying superconductivity, in contrast to their competition at weak disorder. Our results shed light on why zinc impurities are efficient in destroying superconductivity in cuprates, even though it is robust to weaker impurities.

  11. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  12. Dendritic cells pulsed with tumor cells killed by high hydrostatic pressure induce strong immune responses and display therapeutic effects both in murine TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumors when combined with docetaxel chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    MIKYŠKOVÁ, ROMANA; ŠTĚPÁNEK, IVAN; INDROVÁ, MARIE; BIEBLOVÁ, JANA; ŠÍMOVÁ, JANA; TRUXOVÁ, IVA; MOSEROVÁ, IRENA; FUČÍKOVÁ, JITKA; BARTŮŇKOVÁ, JIŘINA; ŠPÍŠEK, RADEK; REINIŠ, MILAN

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been shown to induce immunogenic cell death of cancer cells, facilitating their uptake by dendritic cells (DC) and subsequent presentation of tumor antigens. In the present study, we demonstrated immunogenicity of the HHP-treated tumor cells in mice. HHP was able to induce immunogenic cell death of both TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumor cells, representing murine models for human papilloma virus-associated tumors and prostate cancer, respectively. HHP-treated cells induced stronger immune responses in mice immunized with these tumor cells, documented by higher spleen cell cytotoxicity and increased IFNγ production as compared to irradiated tumor cells, accompanied by suppression of tumor growth in vivo in the case of TC-1 tumors, but not TRAMP-C2 tumors. Furthermore, HHP-treated cells were used for DC-based vaccine antigen pulsing. DC co-cultured with HHP-treated tumor cells and matured by a TLR 9 agonist exhibited higher cell surface expression of maturation markers and production of IL-12 and other cytokines, as compared to the DC pulsed with irradiated tumor cells. Immunization with DC cell-based vaccines pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells induced high immune responses, detected by increased spleen cell cytotoxicity and elevated IFNγ production. The DC-based vaccine pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells combined with docetaxel chemotherapy significantly inhibited growth of both TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumors. Our results indicate that DC-based vaccines pulsed with HHP-inactivated tumor cells can be a suitable tool for chemoimmunotherapy, particularly with regard to the findings that poorly immunogenic TRAMP-C2 tumors were susceptible to this treatment modality. PMID:26718011

  13. Creating and Nurturing Strong Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kaye M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses ways to create and sustain strong teaching teams, including matching curriculum goals, complementary professional strengths, and exercise of autonomy. Elaborates the administrator's role in nurturing and supporting teamwork. (JPB)

  14. Cavity quantum electrodynamics: Beyond strong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murch, Kater

    2017-01-01

    When light and matter are strongly coupled, they lose their distinct character and merge into a hybrid state. Three experiments explore this exotic regime using artificial atoms, with promise for quantum technologies.

  15. Inelastic x-ray scattering study of superconducting SmFeAsO1-xFy single crystals: Evidence for strong momentum-dependent doping-induced renormalizations of optical phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tacon, M.; Forrest, T. R.; Rüegg, Ch.; Bosak, A.; Walters, A. C.; Mittal, R.; Rønnow, H. M.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Karpinski, J.; Hill, J. P.; Krisch, M.; McMorrow, D. F.

    2009-12-01

    We report inelastic x-ray scattering experiments on the lattice dynamics in SmFeAsO and superconducting SmFeAsO0.60F0.35 single crystals. Particular attention was paid to the dispersions along the [100] direction of three optical modes close to 23 meV, polarized out of the FeAs planes. Remarkably, two of these modes are strongly renormalized upon fluorine doping. These results provide significant insight into the energy and momentum dependence of the coupling of the lattice to the electron system and underline the importance of spin-phonon coupling in the superconducting iron pnictides.

  16. Simulating strongly correlated electrons with a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John E.

    2013-05-28

    The quantum many-body physics of strongly-correlated fermions is studied in a degenerate, strongly- interacting atomic Fermi gas, first realized by our group with DOE support in 2002. This system, which exhibits strong spin pairing, is now widely studied and provides an important paradigm for testing predictions based on state-of-the-art many-body theory in fields ranging from nuclear matter to high temperature superfluidity and superconductivity. As the system is strongly interacting, both the superfluid and the normal fluid are nontrivial and of great interest. A central part of our program on Fermi gases is the connection between the study of thermodynamics, supported by DOE and the study of hydrodynamic transport, supported by NSF. This connection is especially interesting in view of a recent conjecture from the string theory community on the concept of nearly perfect normal fluids, which exhibit a minimum ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in strongly-interacting, scale-invariant systems.

  17. Peltier effect in strongly driven quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzejewski, M.; Crivelli, D.; Prelovšek, P.

    2014-08-01

    We study a microscopic model of a thermocouple device with two connected correlated quantum wires driven by a constant electric field. In such a closed system we follow the time and position dependence of the entropy density using the concept of the reduced density matrix. At weak driving, the initial changes of the entropy at the junctions can be described by the linear Peltier response. At longer times the quasiequilibrium situation is reached with well defined local temperatures which increase due to an overall Joule heating. On the other hand, a strong electric field induces a nontrivial nonlinear thermoelectric response, e.g., the Bloch oscillations of the energy current. Moreover, we show for the doped Mott insulators that strong driving can reverse the Peltier effect.

  18. The immunodominant T helper 2 (Th2) response elicited in BALB/c mice by the Leishmania LiP2a and LiP2b acidic ribosomal proteins cannot be reverted by strong Th1 inducers.

    PubMed

    Iborra, S; Abánades, D R; Parody, N; Carrión, J; Risueño, R M; Pineda, M A; Bonay, P; Alonso, C; Soto, M

    2007-11-01

    The search for disease-associated T helper 2 (Th2) Leishmania antigens and the induction of a Th1 immune response to them using defined vaccination protocols is a potential strategy to induce protection against Leishmania infection. Leishmania infantum LiP2a and LiP2b acidic ribosomal protein (P proteins) have been described as prominent antigens during human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. In this study we demonstrate that BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major develop a Th2-like humoral response against Leishmania LiP2a and LiP2b proteins and that the same response is induced in BALB/c mice when the parasite P proteins are immunized as recombinant molecules without adjuvant. The genetic immunization of BALB/c mice with eukaryotic expression plasmids coding for these proteins was unable to redirect the Th2-like response induced by these antigens, and only the co-administration of the recombinant P proteins with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) promoted a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response. According to the preponderance of a Th2 or mixed Th1/Th2 responses elicited by the different regimens of immunization tested, no evidence of protection was observed in mice after challenge with L. major. Although alterations of the clinical outcome were not detected in mice presensitized with the P proteins, the enhanced IgG1 and interleukin (IL)-4 response against total Leishmania antigens in these mice may indicate an exacerbation of the disease.

  19. Intermolecular Redox-Neutral Amine C-H Functionalization Induced by the Strong Boron Lewis Acid B(C6 F5 )3 in the Frustrated Lewis Pair Regime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Kehr, Gerald; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Bursch, Markus; Grimme, Stefan; Erker, Gerhard

    2017-02-06

    N,N-Dimethylmesitylamine undergoes an intermolecular redox-neutral C-H activation/C-C coupling process upon treatment with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate and the strong boron Lewis acid B(C6 F5 )3 . Similarly, N,N-dimethylmesitylamine reacts with two molar equivalents of ethyl acrylate to give the respective unsaturated coupling product with H2 transfer to the acrylic ester to form the ethyl propionate/B(C6 F5 )3 adduct. N,N-Dimethylmesitylamine also undergoes a C-H activation at the benzylic ortho sp(3) -carbon atom with dihydrogen formation upon treatment with Piers' borane [HB(C6 F5 )2 ]. The last two reactions of N,N-dimethylmesitylamine were analyzed by DFT calculations.

  20. Strong intrinsic mixing in vortex magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Shea-Rohwer, Lauren; Solis, Kyle J

    2009-07-01

    We report a method of magnetic mixing wherein a "vortex" magnetic field applied to a suspension of magnetic particles creates strong homogeneous mixing throughout the fluid volume. Experiments designed to elucidate the microscopic mechanism of mixing show that the torque is quadratic in the field, decreases with field frequency, and is optimized at a vortex field angle of approximately 55 degrees . Theory and simulations indicate that the field-induced formation of volatile particle chains is responsible for these phenomena. This technique has applications in microfluidic devices and is ideally suited to applications such as accelerating the binding of target biomolecules to biofunctionalized magnetic microbeads.

  1. Strong fiber-reinforced hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Animesh; Rahbar, Nima; Calvert, Paul D

    2013-02-01

    In biological hydrogels, the gel matrix is usually reinforced with micro- or nanofibers, and the resulting composite is tough and strong. In contrast, synthetic hydrogels are weak and brittle, although they are highly elastic. The are many potential applications for strong synthetic hydrogels in medical devices, including as scaffolds for tissue growth. This work describes a new class of hydrogel composites reinforced with elastic fibers, giving them a cartilage-like structure. A three-dimensional rapid prototyping technique was used to form crossed "log-piles" of elastic fibers that are then impregnated with an epoxy-based hydrogel in order to form the fiber-reinforced gel. The fibrous construct improves the strength, modulus and toughness of the hydrogel, and also constrains the swelling. By altering the construct geometry and studying the effect on mechanical properties, we will develop the understanding needed to design strong hydrogels for biomedical devices and soft machines. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Strong Photoassociation in Ultracold Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Jamison, Alan; Rvachov, Timur; Ebadi, Sepher; Son, Hyungmok; Jiang, Yijun; Zwierlein, Martin; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Despite many studies there are still open questions about strong photoassociation in ultracold gases. Photoassociation occurs only at short range and thus can be used as a tool to probe and control the two-body correlation function in an interacting many-body system and to engineer Hamiltonians using dissipation. We propose the possibility to slow down decoherence by photoassociation through the quantum Zeno effect. This can realized by shining strong photoassociation light on the superposition of the lowest two hyperfine states of Lithium 6. NSF, ARO-MURI, Samsung, NSERC.

  3. Enhanced Surface-and-Interface Coupling in Pd-Nanoparticle-coated LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Heterostructures: Strong Gas- and Photo-Induced Conductance Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haeri; Chan, Ngai Yui; Dai, Ji-yan; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Pd nanoparticle (NP) coated LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterointerface exhibits more notable conductance (G) change while varying the ambient gas (N2, H2/N2, and O2) and illuminating with UV light (wavelength: 365 nm) than a sample without the NPs. Simultaneous Kelvin probe force microscopy and transport measurements reveal close relationships between the surface work function (W) and G of the samples. Quantitative analyses suggest that a surface adsorption/desorption-mediated reaction and redox, resulting in a band-alignment modification and charge-transfer, could explain the gas- and photo-induced conductance modulation at the LAO/STO interface. Such surface-and-interface coupling enhanced by catalytic Pd NPs is a unique feature, quite distinct from conventional semiconductor hetero-junctions, which enables the significant conductance tunability at ultrathin oxide heterointerfaces by external stimuli. PMID:25704566

  4. Enhanced surface-and-interface coupling in Pd-nanoparticle-coated LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures: strong gas- and photo-induced conductance modulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haeri; Chan, Ngai Yui; Dai, Ji-yan; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-02-23

    Pd nanoparticle (NP) coated LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterointerface exhibits more notable conductance (G) change while varying the ambient gas (N2, H2/N2, and O2) and illuminating with UV light (wavelength: 365 nm) than a sample without the NPs. Simultaneous Kelvin probe force microscopy and transport measurements reveal close relationships between the surface work function (W) and G of the samples. Quantitative analyses suggest that a surface adsorption/desorption-mediated reaction and redox, resulting in a band-alignment modification and charge-transfer, could explain the gas- and photo-induced conductance modulation at the LAO/STO interface. Such surface-and-interface coupling enhanced by catalytic Pd NPs is a unique feature, quite distinct from conventional semiconductor hetero-junctions, which enables the significant conductance tunability at ultrathin oxide heterointerfaces by external stimuli.

  5. Recombinant rubistatin (r-Rub), an MVD disintegrin, inhibits cell migration and proliferation, and is a strong apoptotic inducer of the human melanoma cell line SK-Mel-28.

    PubMed

    Carey, Clayton M; Bueno, Raymund; Gutierrez, Daniel A; Petro, Christopher; Lucena, Sara E; Sanchez, Elda E; Soto, Julio G

    2012-02-01

    Disintegrins are low molecular weight peptides isolated from viper venom. These peptides bind to integrin receptors using a conserved binding motif sequence containing an RGD or similar motif. As a consequence, disintegrins can inhibit platelet aggregation and inhibit cell migration, proliferation, and initiate apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Rubistatin is a MVD disintegrin cloned from a Crotalus ruber ruber venom gland. The biological activity of MVD disintegrins is poorly understood. Recombinant rubistatin (r-Rub) was cloned into a pET32b plasmid and expressed in reductase-deficient Escherichia coli. Expression was induced with IPTG and the resulting fusion peptide was affinity purified, followed by thrombin cleavage, and removal of vector coded sequences. r-Rub peptide inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation by 54% ± 6.38 in whole blood. We assessed the ability of r-Rub to initiate apoptosis in three human cancer cell lines. Cultures of SK-Mel-28, HeLA, and T24 cells were grown for 24 h with 2.5 μM r-Rub followed by Hoechst staining. Chromatin fragmentation was observed in treated SK-Mel-28, but not in T24 or HeLA cells. A TUNEL assay revealed that 51.55% ± 5.28 of SK-Mel-28 cells were apoptotic after 18 h of treatment with 3.5 μM of r-Rub. Cell migration and proliferation assays were performed in order to further characterize the biological effects of r-Rub on SK-Mel-28 cells. At 3 μM, r-Rub inhibited cell migration by 44.4% ± 0.5, while at 3.5 μM it was able to inhibit cell proliferation by 83% ± 6.0. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, David; Senatore, Gaetano

    2009-05-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS), held from 29 July-2 August 2008 at the University of Camerino. Camerino is an ancient hill-top town located in the Apennine mountains of Italy, 200 kilometres northeast of Rome, with a university dating back to 1336. The Camerino conference was the 11th in a series which started in 1977: 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (hosted by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (hosted by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, New York, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) 2005: Moscow, Russia (hosted by Vladimir E Fortov and Vladimir Vorob'ev). The name of the series was changed in 1996 from Strongly Coupled Plasmas to Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems to reflect a wider range of topics. 'Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems' encompasses diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. The purpose of the conferences is to provide a regular international forum for the presentation and discussion of research achievements and ideas relating to a variety of plasma, liquid and condensed matter systems that are dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphases that have followed new discoveries and new techniques. The field has continued to see new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions, most recently in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas

  7. Strong Ties and Job Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Stephen O.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This study of 299 social and physical scientists at universities reveals that strong personal contacts were more useful than reliance on weak ties (acquaintances) for job information. Using personal connections for employment information is thus an efficient job seeking method. (SK)

  8. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  9. Strongly Coupled Nanotube Electromechanical Resonators.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guang-Wei; Zhu, Dong; Wang, Xin-He; Zou, Chang-Ling; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Liu, Di; Li, Yan; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Kai-Li; Dai, Xing-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2016-09-14

    Coupling an electromechanical resonator with carbon-nanotube quantum dots is a significant method to control both the electronic charge and the spin quantum states. By exploiting a novel microtransfer technique, we fabricate two separate strongly coupled and electrically tunable mechanical resonators for the first time. The frequency of the two resonators can be individually tuned by the bottom gates, and in each resonator, the electron transport through the quantum dot can be strongly affected by the phonon mode and vice versa. Furthermore, the conductance of either resonator can be nonlocally modulated by the other resonator through phonon-phonon interaction between the two resonators. Strong coupling is observed between the phonon modes of the two resonators, where the coupling strength larger than 200 kHz can be reached. This strongly coupled nanotube electromechanical resonator array provides an experimental platform for future studies of the coherent electron-phonon interaction, the phonon-mediated long-distance electron interaction, and entanglement state generation.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Asymmetric NaCl and KCl Solutions Separated by Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers: Potential Drops and Structural Changes Induced by Strong Na+-Lipid Interactions and Finite Size Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Joo; Song, Yuhua; Baker, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    Differences of ionic concentrations across lipid bilayers are some of the primary energetic driving forces for cellular electrophysiology. While macroscopic models of asymmetric ionic solutions are well-developed, their connection to ion, water, and lipid interactions at the atomic scale are much more poorly understood. In this study, we used molecular dynamics to examine a system of two chambers of equal ionic strength, but differing amounts of NaCl and KCl, separated by a lipid bilayer. Our expectation was that the net electrostatic potential difference between the two chambers should be small or zero. Contrary to our expectation, a large potential difference (−70 mV) slowly evolved across the two water chambers over the course of our 172-ns simulation. This potential primarily originated from strong Na+ binding to the carbonyls of the phosphatidylcholine lipids. This ion adsorption also led to significant structural and mechanical changes in the lipid bilayer. We discuss this surprising result in the context of indirect experimental evidence for Na+ interaction with bilayers as well as potential caveats in current biomembrane simulation methodology, including force-field parameters and finite size effects. PMID:18222999

  11. Chokka-Chaffa' Kilimpi', Chikashshiyaakni' Kilimpi': strong family, strong nation.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Zermarie; Pendley, Joy; Hinson, Waymon R; Hinson, Joshua D

    2011-01-01

    To encourage the health and well-being of American Indian (AI) communities, it is first necessary to understand the meaning of health for particular tribes. As such, this investigation reports on the meaning of health and well-being for Chickasaw families. Findings from this investigation additionally highlight ways in which characteristics of strong Chickasaw families are both similar to and different from those of other AI tribes. Implications for science and practice are discussed.

  12. Galaxies with Strong Nitrogen Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, T. S.; Pastoriza, M. G.

    1987-05-01

    ABSTRACT. From a qualitative spectroscopic survey of southern galaxies made by Pastoriza, a group with different morphological types whose nuclear region showed particular strong emission [N II]A6548-6584 lines when compared to Hn, was selected in order to investigate why [N II] is so strong. This work presents the results of a first analysis of the spectra of some of the galaxies above obtained with the 1-m telescope plus 2DFRUTTI detector of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The spectra are all very similar showing strong stellar continuum and absorption lines, and all the emission spectra show [0111] >[OII], [NIl] > H . None of the spectra show H in emission. Using the relative intensities of the H and K Call lines (Talent 1982, PLtb. A.S.P., 94,36), the obtained integrated spectra for all the observed galaxies is later than GO, which means that the H absorption lines should not be strong. From the relative intensities of the emission lines, we conclude that these galaxies cannot be classified as Starburst or LINERS. They are similar to Seyfert 2 (Osterbrock 1986, Act#va QSO4, preprint), but the FWHM of the lines is less than 300 km s . Also Ol X6300 is not clearly seen, and the absorption spectrum is strong relative to the emission spectrum. The preliminary conclusion is an activity similar but milder than that present in Seyfert 2 galaxies, as sug gested by Rose and Searle (1982, Ap. 5., 253, 556) and Rose and Cecil (1983, Ap. 5., 266, 531) for the nucleus of M51, maybe affected by an anomalous nitrogen abundance. K o : GALAXIES-ACTIVE - SPECTROSCOPY

  13. Quality control by <strong>HyperS>pectral <strong>I>maging (HSI) in solid waste recycling: logics, algorithms and procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    In secondary raw materials and recycling sectors, the products quality represents, more and more, the key issue to pursuit in order to be competitive in a more and more demanding market, where quality standards and products certification play a preheminent role. These goals assume particular importance when recycling actions are applied. Recovered products, resulting from waste materials, and/or dismissed products processing, are, in fact, always seen with a certain suspect. An adequate response of the industry to the market can only be given through the utilization of equipment and procedures ensuring pure, high-quality production, and efficient work and cost. All these goals can be reached adopting not only more efficient equipment and layouts, but also introducing new processing logics able to realize a full control of the handled material flow streams fulfilling, at the same time, i) an easy management of the procedures, ii) an efficient use of the energy, iii) the definition and set up of reliable and robust procedures, iv) the possibility to implement network connectivity capabilities finalized to a remote monitoring and control of the processes and v) a full data storage, analysis and retrieving. Furthermore the ongoing legislation and regulation require the implementation of recycling infrastructure characterised by high resources efficiency and low environmental impacts, both aspects being strongly linked to the waste materials and/or dismissed products original characteristics. For these reasons an optimal recycling infrastructure design primarily requires a full knowledge of the characteristics of the input waste. What previously outlined requires the introduction of a new important concept to apply in solid waste recycling, the recycling-oriented characterization, that is the set of actions addressed to strategically determine selected attributes, in order to get goaloriented data on waste for the development, implementation or improvement of recycling

  14. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  15. Dynamics of strongly dissipative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, H. P.

    1994-06-01

    The attractors in two-dimensional (2D) phase space of the strongly dissipative Hénon map are reduced to those of an effectively 1D map. From the grammar for this effectively 1D map we can generate all of the unstable periodic orbits, which are exactly consistent with those from the 2D map obtained directly both with a Newton procedure and the techniques of Biham and Wenzel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 819 (1989)]. This idea provides a method to give a very precise and not too cumbersome estimate of the characteristic quantities of strange attractors of strongly dissipative systems. It is also helpful to understand many observations on high-dimensional systems both experimentally and numerically.

  16. Strongly Coupled Quantum Heat Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-09-03

    Energy conversion of heat into work at the quantum level is modeled by quantum heat machines (QHMs) generally assumed to operate at weak coupling to the baths. This supposition is grounded in the separability principle between systems and allows the derivation of the evolution equation. In the weak coupling regime, the machine’s output is limited by the coupling strength, restricting their application. Seeking to overcome this limitation, we analyze QHMs in the virtually unexplored strong coupling regime here, where separability, as well as other standard thermodynamic assumptions, may no longer hold. We show that strongly coupled QHMs may be as efficient as their weakly coupled counterparts. In addition, we find a novel turnover behavior where their output saturates and disappears in the limit of ultrastrong coupling.

  17. Photochemically induced nuclear spin polarization in reaction centers of photosystem II observed by 13C-solid-state NMR reveals a strongly asymmetric electronic structure of the P680.+ primary donor chlorophyll

    PubMed Central

    Matysik, Jörg; Alia; Gast, Peter; van Gorkom, Hans J.; Hoff, Arnold J.; de Groot, Huub J. M.

    2000-01-01

    We report 13C magic angle spinning NMR observation of photochemically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarization (photo- CIDNP) in the reaction center (RC) of photosystem II (PS2). The light-enhanced NMR signals of the natural abundance 13C provide information on the electronic structure of the primary electron donor P680 (chlorophyll a molecules absorbing around 680 nm) and on the pz spin density pattern in its oxidized form, P680⨥. Most centerband signals can be attributed to a single chlorophyll a (Chl a) cofactor that has little interaction with other pigments. The chemical shift anisotropy of the most intense signals is characteristic for aromatic carbon atoms. The data reveal a pronounced asymmetry of the electronic spin density distribution within the P680⨥. PS2 shows only a single broad and intense emissive signal, which is assigned to both the C-10 and C-15 methine carbon atoms. The spin density appears shifted toward ring III. This shift is remarkable, because, for monomeric Chl a radical cations in solution, the region of highest spin density is around ring II. It leads to a first hypothesis as to how the planet can provide itself with the chemical potential to split water and generate an oxygen atmosphere using the Chl a macroaromatic cycle. A local electrostatic field close to ring III can polarize the electronic charge and associated spin density and increase the redox potential of P680 by stabilizing the highest occupied molecular orbital, without a major change of color. This field could be produced, e.g., by protonation of the keto group of ring V. Finally, the radical cation electronic structure in PS2 is different from that in the bacterial RC, which shows at least four emissive centerbands, indicating a symmetric spin density distribution over the entire bacteriochlorophyll macrocycle. PMID:10944191

  18. Strongly interacting parton matter equilibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ozvenchuk, V.; Linnyk, O.; Bratkovskaya, E.; Gorenstein, M.; Cassing, W.

    2012-07-15

    We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different energy densities. Particle abundances, kinetic energy distributions, and the detailed balance of the off-shell quarks and gluons in the strongly-interacting quarkgluon plasma are addressed and discussed.

  19. Strong sphalerons and electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, G. F.; Shaposhnikov, M.

    1994-04-01

    We analyze the spontaneous baryogenesis and charge transform mechanisms suggested by Cohen, Kaplan and Nelson for baryon asymmetry generation in extended versions of electroweak theory. We find that accounting for non-perturbative chirality-breaking transitions due to strong sphalerons reduces the baryonic asymmetry by the factor (mt/πT)2 or αW, provided those processes are in thermal equilibrium. On leave of absence from the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312, Russia.

  20. Flavour democracy in strong unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, S. A.; King, S. F.

    1998-09-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of ``strong unification''. Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged SU(3)LxSU(3)R family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  1. Strong subadditivity and emergent surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce two bounds which we call the upper differential entropy and the lower differential entropy for an infinite family of intervals (strips) in quantum field theory. The two bounds are equal provided that the theory is translational invariant and the entanglement entropy varies smoothly with respect to the interval. When the theory has a holographic dual, strong subadditivity of entanglement entropy indicates that there is always an emergent surface whose gravitational entropy is exactly given by the bound.

  2. Topics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in two approaches to the study of strong Langmuir turbulence is reported. In two spatial dimensions, numerical solution of the Zakharov equations yields a steady state involving linear growth, linear damping, and a collection of coherent, long-lived entities which might loosely be called solitons. In one spatial dimension, a statistical theory is applied to the cubically nonlinear Schroedinger equation and is solved analytically in a special case.

  3. Topics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in two approaches to the study of strong Langmuir turbulence is reported. In two spatial dimensions, numerical solution of the Zakharov equations yields a steady state involving linear growth, linear damping, and a collection of coherent, long-lived entities which might loosely be called solitons. In one spatial dimension, a statistical theory is applied to the cubically nonlinear Schroedinger equation and is solved analytically in a special case.

  4. Strongly magnetized classical plasma models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Peyraud, J.; Dewitt, C.

    1974-01-01

    Discrete particle processes in the presence of a strong external magnetic field were investigated. These processes include equations of state and other equilibrium thermodynamic relations, thermal relaxation phenomena, transport properties, and microscopic statistical fluctuations in such quantities as the electric field and the charge density. Results from the equilibrium statistical mechanics of two-dimensional plasmas are discussed, along with nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of the electrostatic guiding-center plasma (a two-dimensional plasma model).

  5. Strong interactive massive particles from a strong coupled theory

    SciTech Connect

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.; Kouvaris, Chris

    2008-03-15

    Minimal walking technicolor models can provide a nontrivial solution for cosmological dark matter, if the lightest technibaryon is doubly charged. Technibaryon asymmetry generated in the early Universe is related to baryon asymmetry, and it is possible to create an excess of techniparticles with charge (-2). These excessive techniparticles are all captured by {sup 4}He, creating techni-O-helium tOHe atoms, as soon as {sup 4}He is formed in big bang nucleosynthesis. The interaction of techni-O-helium with nuclei opens new paths to the creation of heavy nuclei in big bang nucleosynthesis. Because of the large mass of technibaryons, the tOHe ''atomic'' gas decouples from the baryonic matter and plays the role of dark matter in large scale structure formation, while structures in small scales are suppressed. Nuclear interactions with matter slow down cosmic techni-O-helium in the Earth below the threshold of underground dark matter detectors, thus escaping severe cryogenic dark matter search constraints. On the other hand, these nuclear interactions are not sufficiently strong to exclude this form of strongly interactive massive particles by constraints from the XQC experiment. Experimental tests of this hypothesis are possible in the search for tOHe in balloon-borne experiments (or on the ground) and for its charged techniparticle constituents in cosmic rays and accelerators. The tOHe atoms can cause cold nuclear transformations in matter and might form anomalous isotopes, offering possible ways to exclude (or prove?) their existence.

  6. Strongly interacting phases of metallic wires in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulmash, Daniel; Jian, Chao-Ming; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2017-07-01

    We investigate theoretically an interacting metallic wire with a strong magnetic field directed along its length and show that it is a highly tunable one-dimensional system. By considering a suitable change in spatial geometry, we build an analogy between the problem in the zeroth Landau level with Landau level degeneracy N to one-dimensional fermions with an N -component pseudospin degree of freedom and S U (2 ) -symmetric interactions. This analogy allows us to establish the phase diagram as a function of the interactions for small N (and make conjectures for large N ) using renormalization group and bosonization techniques. We find pseudospin-charge separation with a gapless U (1 ) charge sector and several possible strong-coupling phases in the pseudospin sector. For odd N , we find a fluctuating pseudospin-singlet charge density wave phase and a fluctuating pseudospin-singlet superconducting phase which are topologically distinct. For even N >2 , similar phases exist, although they are not topologically distinct, and an additional novel pseudospin-gapless phase appears. We discuss experimental conditions for observing our proposals.

  7. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E.; Golden, Kenneth I.; Norman, Genri E.

    2006-04-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) which was held during the week of 20 24 June 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The Moscow conference was the tenth in a series of conferences. The previous conferences were organized as follows. 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (organized by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (organized by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, NY, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) After 1995 the name of the series was changed from `Strongly Coupled Plasmas' to the present name in order to extend the topics of the conferences. The planned frequency for the future is once every three years. The purpose of these conferences is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of research accomplishments and ideas relating to a variety of plasma liquid and condensed matter systems, dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Strongly coupled Coulomb systems encompass diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphasis as new discoveries and new methods appear. This year, sessions were organized for invited presentations and posters on dense plasmas and warm matter, astrophysics and dense hydrogen, non-neutral and ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, condensed matter 2D and layered charged-particle systems, Coulomb liquids, and statistical theory of SCCS. Within

  8. Strong turbulence of plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews recent work related to modulational instability and wave envelope self-focusing in dynamical and statistical systems. After introductory remarks pertinent to nonlinear optics realizations of these effects, the author summarizes the status of the subject in plasma physics, where it has come to be called 'strong Langmuir turbulence'. The paper treats the historical development of pertinent concepts, analytical theory, numerical simulations, laboratory experiments, and spacecraft observations. The role of self-similar self-focusing Langmuir envelope wave packets is emphasized, both in the Zakharov equation model for the wave dynamics and in a statistical theory based on this dynamical model.

  9. Strong Plate, Weak Slab Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, R. I.; Stegman, D. R.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Models of mantle convection on Earth produce styles of convection that are not observed on Earth.Moreover non-Earth-like modes, such as two-sided downwellings, are the de facto mode of convection in such models.To recreate Earth style subduction, i.e. one-sided asymmetric recycling of the lithosphere, proper treatment of the plates and plate interface are required. Previous work has identified several model features that promote subduction. A free surface or pseudo-free surface and a layer of material with a relatively low strength material (weak crust) allow downgoing plates to bend and slide past overriding without creating undue stress at the plate interface. (Crameri, et al. 2012, GRL)A low viscosity mantle wedge, possibly a result of slab dehydration, decouples the plates in the system. (Gerya et al. 2007, Geo)Plates must be composed of material which, in the case of the overriding plate, are is strong enough to resist bending stresses imposed by the subducting plate and yet, as in the case of the subducting plate, be weak enough to bend and subduct when pulled by the already subducted slab. (Petersen et al. 2015, PEPI) Though strong surface plates are required for subduction such plates may present a problem when they encounter the lower mantle.As the subducting slab approaches the higher viscosity, lower mantle stresses are imposed on the tip.Strong slabs transmit this stress to the surface.There the stress field at the plate interface is modified and potentially modifies the style of convection. In addition to modifying the stress at the plate interface, the strength of the slab affects the morphology of the slab at the base of the upper mantle. (Stegman, et al 2010, Tectonophysics)Slabs that maintain a sufficient portion of their strength after being bent require high stresses to unbend or otherwise change their shape.On the other hand slabs that are weakened though the bending process are more amenable to changes in morphology. We present the results of

  10. Dynamics of strongly correlated and strongly inhomogeneous plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kählert, Hanno; Kalman, Gabor J; Bonitz, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Kinetic and fluid equations are derived for the dynamics of classical inhomogeneous trapped plasmas in the strong coupling regime. The starting point is an extended Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjölander (STLS) ansatz for the dynamic correlation function, which is allowed to depend on time and both particle coordinates separately. The time evolution of the correlation function is determined from the second equation of the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy. We study the equations in the linear limit and derive a nonlocal equation for the fluid displacement field. Comparisons to first-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal an excellent quality of our approach thereby overcoming the limitations of the broadly used STLS scheme.

  11. Strong correlations in bosons and fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilahun, Dagim

    If there is a general theme to this thesis, it is the effects of strong correlations in both bosons and fermions. The bosonic system considered here consists of ultracold alkali atoms trapped by interfering lasers, so called optical lattices. Strong interactions, realized by increasing the depth of the lattice potential, or through the phenomenon of Feshbach resonances induce strong correlations amongst the atoms, rendering attempts to describe the systems in terms of single particle type physics unsuccessful. Of course strong correlations are not the exclusive domain of bosons, and also are not caused only by strong interactions. Other factors such as reduced dimensionality, in one-dimensional electron gases, or strong magnetic fields, in two-dimensional electron gases are known to induce strong correlations. In this thesis, we explore the manifestations of strong correlations in ultracold atoms in optical lattices and interacting electron gases. Optical lattices provide a near-perfect realization of lattice models, such as the bosonic Hubbard model (BHM) that have been formulated to study solid state systems. This follows from the absence of defects or impurities that usually plague real solid state systems. Another novel feature of optical lattices is the unprecedented control experimenters have in tuning the different lattice parameters, such as the lattice spacing and the intensity of the lasers. This control enables one to study the model Hamiltonians over a wide range of variables, such as the interaction strength between the atoms, thereby opening the door towards the observation of diverse and interesting phenomena. The BHM, and also its variants, predict various quantum phases, such as the strongly correlated Mott insulator (MI) phase that appears as a function of the parameter t/U, the ratio of the nearest neighbor hopping amplitude to the on-site interaction, which one varies experimentally over a wide range of values simply by switching the intensity

  12. Strong-Coupling Superconductivity. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Schrieffer, J. R.; Wilkins, J. W.

    The pairing theory of superconductivity is extended to treat systems having strong electron-phonon coupling. In this regime the Landau quasiparticle approximation is invalid. In the theory we treat phonon and Coulomb interactions on the same basis and carry out the analysis using the nonzero-temperature Green's functions of the Nambu formalism. The generalized energy-gap equation thus obtained is solved (at T = 0°K) for a model which closely represents lead and the complex energy-gap parameter Δ(ω)) is plotted as a function of energy for several choices of phonon and Coulomb interaction strengths. An expression for the single-particle tunneling density of states is derived, which, when combined with Δ(ω), gives excellent agreement with experiment, if the phonon interaction strength is chosen to give the observed energy gap Δ0 at zero temperature. The tunneling experiments therefore give a detailed justification of the phonon mechanism of superconductivity and of the validity of the strong-coupling theory. In addition, by combining theory and the tunneling experiments, much can be learned about the electron-phon interaction and the phonon density of states. The theory is accurate to terms of order the square root of the electron-ion mass ratio, 10-2-10-3.

  13. Strong dynamics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ittisamai, Pawin

    The limitations of the Standard Model of particle physics, despite its being a well-established theory, have prompted various proposals for new physics capable of addressing its shortcomings. The particular issue to be explored here is the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, the probing of which lies within the TeV-scale physics accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This thesis focuses on the phenomenology of a class of models featuring a dynamical breaking of the electroweak symmetry via strong dynamics. Consequences of recent experiments and aspects of near-future experiments are presented. We study the implications of the LHC Higgs searches available at the time the related journal article was written for technicolor models that feature colored technifermions. Then we discuss the properties of a technicolor model featuring strong-top dynamics that is viable for explaining the recently discovered boson of mass 126 GeV. We introduce a novel method of characterizing the color structure of a new massive vector boson, often predicted in various new physics models, using information that will be promptly available if it is discovered in the near-future experiments at the LHC. We generalize the idea for more realistic models where a vector boson has flavor non-universal couplings to quarks. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of probing the chiral structure of a new color-octet vector boson.

  14. Numerical micromagnetism of strong inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Christian; Gliga, Sebastian; Hertel, Riccardo

    2014-08-01

    The size of micromagnetic structures, such as domain walls or vortices, is comparable to the exchange length of the ferromagnet. Both, the exchange length of the stray field ls and the magnetocrystalline exchange length lk, are material-dependent quantities that usually lie in the nanometer range. This emphasizes the theoretical challenges associated with the mesoscopic nature of micromagnetism: the magnetic structures are much larger than the atomic lattice constant, but at the same time much smaller than the sample size. In computer simulations, the smallest exchange length serves as an estimate for the largest cell size admissible to prevent appreciable discretization errors. This general rule is not valid in special situations where the magnetization becomes particularly inhomogeneous. When such strongly inhomogeneous structures develop, micromagnetic simulations inevitably contain systematic and numerical errors. It is suggested to combine micromagnetic theory with a Heisenberg model to resolve such problems. We analyze cases where strongly inhomogeneous structures pose limits to standard micromagnetic simulations, arising from fundamental aspects as well as from numerical drawbacks.

  15. Strong Localization of Positive Charge in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uskov, Dmitry; Burin, Alex

    2008-05-01

    The positive charge transfer in a DNA molecule is determined by two main factors: the structure and composition of specific DNA strand, and interaction of a positive charge with the DNA environment. In this letter we present results of microscopic linear response theory for balance of charge transfer reaction in synthetic strands GAGG and GAGGG, where experimental data on the rates of electron hole migration has been reported by Lewis et al Nature, 406, 51-53 (2000). Our theoretical predictions, based on experimental data for the ratio of reaction rates G^+A(G)n<->GA(G)n^+ , n=2,3, suggest that charge in DNA is strongly localized within the single base pair because of the self-induced reorganization of classical environment. The onset of localization has a threshold behavior characteristic to quantum bistability. We also demonstrate that our conclusion does not depend on details of the model.

  16. Circuit electromechanics with single photon strong coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan Yang, Li-Na; Zhou, Jian

    2015-07-13

    In circuit electromechanics, the coupling strength is usually very small. Here, replacing the capacitor in circuit electromechanics by a superconducting flux qubit, we show that the coupling among the qubit and the two resonators can induce effective electromechanical coupling which can attain the strong coupling regime at the single photon level with feasible experimental parameters. We use dispersive couplings among two resonators and the qubit while the qubit is also driven by an external classical field. These couplings form a three-wave mixing configuration among the three elements where the qubit degree of freedom can be adiabatically eliminated, and thus results in the enhanced coupling between the two resonators. Therefore, our work constitutes the first step towards studying quantum nonlinear effect in circuit electromechanics.

  17. Eikonal Scattering at Strong Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irizarry-Gelpi, Melvin Eloy

    The scattering of subatomic particles is a source of important physical phenomena. Decades of work have yielded many techniques for the computation of scattering amplitudes. Most of these techniques involve perturbative quantum field theory and thus apply only at weak coupling. Complementary to scattering is the formation of bound states, which are intrinsically nonperturbative. Regge theory arose in the late 1950s as an attempt to describe, with a single framework, both scattering and the formation of bound states. In Regge theory one obtains an amplitude with bound state poles after analytic continuation of a nonperturbative scattering amplitude, corresponding to a sum of an infinite number of Feynman diagrams at large energy and fixed momentum transfer (but with crossed kinematics). Thus, in order to obtain bound states at fixed energy, one computes an amplitude at large momentum transfer. In this dissertation we calculate amplitudes with bound states in the regime of fixed energy and small momentum transfer. We formulate the elastic scattering problem in terms of many-body path integrals, familiar from quantum mechanics. Then we invoke the semiclassical JWKB approximation, where the path integral is dominated by classical paths. The dynamics in the semiclassical regime are strongly coupled, as found by Halpern and Siegel. When the momentum transfer is small, the classical paths are simple straight lines and the resulting semiclassical amplitudes display a spectrum of bound states that agrees with the spectrum found by solving wave equations with potentials. In this work we study the bound states of matter particles with various types of interactions, including electromagnetic and gravitational interactions. Our work has many analogies with the work started by Alday and Maldacena, who computed scattering amplitudes of gluons at strong coupling with semiclassical quantum mechanics of strings in anti de-Sitter spacetime. We hope that in the future we can apply our

  18. Strong electron correlation and nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Haranath

    2012-07-01

    Based on experimental and theoretical research during the last decade, giant optical nonlinearities found in Mott-Hubbard insulators like Sr2CuO3,Ca2CuO3, Nickel halides ([Ni(chxn)2X]X2 where X = Br, Cl and `chxn' refers to cyclohexanediamine) are presented. These materials are reported to be potential materials for all optical switching devices. The occurrence of nearly degenerate lowest one- and two-photon states, strong Coulomb correlation and strong dipole coupling between the one- and two-photon states are believed to be the reason for such colossal optical nonlinearities in these systems. In some of these materials (at least), the two photon state is below the one-photon state. This leads to the possibility that such material can be excited to the lowest optical state by shinning laser of suitable wavelength, the populations thus generated decays to the two-photon state at ultrafast short time. Thus nonlinear measurements can be made from an excited state (we call as excited state nonlinear optical properties). One dimensional strongly correlated materials are predicted to have several orders-of-magnitude larger excited state optical non-linearities in comparison to that from the ground state, in the wavelength region suitable for terahertz communications. A large number of measurable nonlinear optical properties like Two Photon absorption, Photo induced absorption, Third Harmonic generation, Stimulated Raman Scattering are obtained theoretically and compared with available experimental observations. Then a large number excited state nonlinear optical properties are predicted which are experimentally measurable. We emphasize that the mechanism of nonlinear optics in one dimensional Mott-Hubbard insulators is different from that of the π-conjugated polymers — in the former spin excitation play an important role. We argue from detailed understanding of nonlinear optics of π-conjugated systems that some features in the Third Harmonic Generation

  19. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W; Brennan, J M; Cameron, P; Connolly, R; Montag, C; Peggs, S; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D; Van Zeijts, J

    2003-05-12

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far.

  20. Strong Winds over the Keel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    The latest ESO image reveals amazing detail in the intricate structures of one of the largest and brightest nebulae in the sky, the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372), where strong winds and powerful radiation from an armada of massive stars are creating havoc in the large cloud of dust and gas from which the stars were born. ESO PR Photo 05a/09 The Carina Nebula ESO PR Video 05a/09 Pan over the Carina Nebula ESO PR Video 05b/09 Carina Nebula Zoom-in The large and beautiful image displays the full variety of this impressive skyscape, spattered with clusters of young stars, large nebulae of dust and gas, dust pillars, globules, and adorned by one of the Universe's most impressive binary stars. It was produced by combining exposures through six different filters from the Wide Field Imager (WFI), attached to the 2.2 m ESO/MPG telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory, in Chile. The Carina Nebula is located about 7500 light-years away in the constellation of the same name (Carina; the Keel). Spanning about 100 light-years, it is four times larger than the famous Orion Nebula and far brighter. It is an intensive star-forming region with dark lanes of cool dust splitting up the glowing nebula gas that surrounds its many clusters of stars. The glow of the Carina Nebula comes mainly from hot hydrogen basking in the strong radiation of monster baby stars. The interaction between the hydrogen and the ultraviolet light results in its characteristic red and purple colour. The immense nebula contains over a dozen stars with at least 50 to 100 times the mass of our Sun. Such stars have a very short lifespan, a few million years at most, the blink of an eye compared with the Sun's expected lifetime of ten billion years. One of the Universe's most impressive stars, Eta Carinae, is found in the nebula. It is one of the most massive stars in our Milky Way, over 100 times the mass of the Sun and about four million times brighter, making it the most luminous star known. Eta Carinae is highly

  1. Paradoxical stabilization of forced oscillations by strong nonlinear friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Bulanov, Sergei V.

    2017-08-01

    In a dissipative dynamic system driven by an oscillating force, a strong nonlinear highly oscillatory friction force can create a quasi-steady tug, which is always directed opposite to the ponderomotive force induced due to a spatial inhomogeneity of oscillations. When the friction-induced tug exceeds the ponderomotive force, the friction stabilizes the system oscillations near the maxima of the oscillation spatial amplitude of the driving force.

  2. THE PENETRATION OF STRONG ELECTROLYTES

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, W. C.; Dorcas, M. J.; Osterhout, W. J. V.

    1929-01-01

    The entrance of strong electrolytes into Valonia is very slow unless the cells are injured. This, together with the very high electrical resistance of the protoplasm, suggests that they may penetrate largely as undissociated molecules formed at the surface of the protoplasm by the collision of ions. Under favorable circumstances KCl may be absorbed to the extent of 3 x 10–8 mols per hour per sq. cm. of surface together with about 0.17 as much NaCl. Other substances which seem to penetrate to some extent are Li, Rb, Br, BrO3, I, IO3, and selenite. Little or no penetration is shown by SCN, ferricyanide, ferrocyanide, formate, salicylate, tungstate, seleniate, NO2, SO3, Sb, glycerophosphate, and many heavy metals and the alkaline earths. In sea water whose specific gravity had been increased by CsCl cells of Valonia floated for over a year and there was little or no penetration of Cs except as the result of injury. The penetration of NH4Cl decreases the specific gravity of the sap and causes the cells to float: under these circumstances they live indefinitely. It is probable that NH3 or NH4OH penetrates and is subsequently changed to NH4Cl. It would seem that if the sea contained a little more ammonia this would be a floating organism. PMID:19872471

  3. Confinement-induced super strong PS/MWNT composite nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y.; Li, C.; Wang, G.; Koo, J.; Ge, S.; Li, B.; Jiang, J.; Herzberg, B.; Klein, T.; Chen, S.; Sokolov, J. C.; Rafailovich, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    Shear Modulation Force Microscopy (SMFM) together with the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based three-point bending technique were used to measure the mechanical properties of electrospun polymers and polymer nanocomposite fibers. Both techniques showed that the moduli of the fibers increased significantly with decreasing fiber diameter. We attributed this enhancement to the orientation of polymer chains which occurs during the electrospinning process. We then predicted, and confirmed experimentally, that the phenomenon scales with Rg rather than with the absolute fiber diameter and can propagate radially for large distances (~20Rg) into the fiber interior. The inclusion of nanotubes into the fibers further enhanced the orientation by introducing additional surfaces. The additional increase in modulus (more than an order of magnitude) could then be explained by the same model and scaled on a universal curve.

  4. Nematic twist cell: Strong chirality induced at the surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Nemitz, Ian R.; Pendery, Joel S.; Schubert, Christopher P. J.; Lemieux, Robert P.; Rosenblatt, Charles

    2013-04-01

    A nematic twist cell having a thickness gradient was filled with a mixture containing a configurationally achiral liquid crystal (LC) and chiral dopant. A chiral-based linear electrooptic effect was observed on application of an ac electric field. This "electroclinic effect" varied monotonically with d, changing sign at d =d0 where the chiral dopant exactly compensated the imposed twist. The results indicate that a significant chiral electrooptic effect always exists near the surfaces of a twist cell containing molecules that can be conformationally deracemized. Additionally, this approach can be used to measure the helical twisting power (HTP) of a chiral dopant in a liquid crystal.

  5. Chiral spiral induced by a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuki, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    We study the modification of the chiral phase structure of QCD due to an external magnetic field. We first demonstrate how the effect of magnetic field can systematically be incorporated into a generalized Ginzburg-Landau framework. We then analyze the phase structure in the vicinity of the chiral critical point. In the chiral limit, the effect is found to be so drastic that it brings a "continent" of chiral spiral in the phase diagram, by which the chiral tricritical point is totally washed out. This is the case no matter how small the intensity of magnetic field is. On the other hand, the current quark mass protects the chiral critical point from a weak magnetic field. However, the critical point will eventually be covered by the chiral spiral phase as the magnetic field grows.

  6. Promoting Strong Written Communication Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reason that an improvement in the quality of technical writing is still needed in the classroom is due to the fact that universities are facing challenging problems not only on the technological front but also on the socio-economic front. The universities are actively responding to the changes that are taking place in the global consumer marketplace. Obviously, there are numerous benefits of promoting strong written communication skills. They can be summarized into the following six categories. First, and perhaps the most important: The University achieves learner satisfaction. The learner has documented verbally, that the necessary knowledge has been successfully acquired. This results in learner loyalty that in turn will attract more qualified learners.Second, quality communication lowers the cost per pupil, consequently resulting in increased productivity backed by a stronger economic structure and forecast. Third, quality communications help to improve the cash flow and cash reserves of the university. Fourth, having high quality communication enables the university to justify the need for high costs of tuition and fees. Fifth, better quality in written communication skills result in attracting top-quality learners. This will lead to happier and satisfied learners, not to mention greater prosperity for the university as a whole. Sixth, quality written communication skills result in reduced complaints, thus meaning fewer hours spent on answering or correcting the situation. The University faculty and staff are thus able to devote more time on scholarly activities, meaningful research and productive community service. References Boyer, Ernest L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the Professorate.Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Hawkins, P., & Winter, J. (1997). Mastering change: Learning the lessons of the enterprise.London: Department for Education and Employment. Buzzel, Robert D., and Bradley T. Gale. (1987

  7. The strong maximum principle revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Patrizia; Serrin, James

    In this paper we first present the classical maximum principle due to E. Hopf, together with an extended commentary and discussion of Hopf's paper. We emphasize the comparison technique invented by Hopf to prove this principle, which has since become a main mathematical tool for the study of second order elliptic partial differential equations and has generated an enormous number of important applications. While Hopf's principle is generally understood to apply to linear equations, it is in fact also crucial in nonlinear theories, such as those under consideration here. In particular, we shall treat and discuss recent generalizations of the strong maximum principle, and also the compact support principle, for the case of singular quasilinear elliptic differential inequalities, under generally weak assumptions on the quasilinear operators and the nonlinearities involved. Our principal interest is in necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of both principles; in exposing and simplifying earlier proofs of corresponding results; and in extending the conclusions to wider classes of singular operators than previously considered. The results have unexpected ramifications for other problems, as will develop from the exposition, e.g. two point boundary value problems for singular quasilinear ordinary differential equations (Sections 3 and 4); the exterior Dirichlet boundary value problem (Section 5); the existence of dead cores and compact support solutions, i.e. dead cores at infinity (Section 7); Euler-Lagrange inequalities on a Riemannian manifold (Section 9); comparison and uniqueness theorems for solutions of singular quasilinear differential inequalities (Section 10). The case of p-regular elliptic inequalities is briefly considered in Section 11.

  8. Confinining properties of QCD in strong magnetic backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonati, Claudio; D'Elia, Massimo; Mariti, Marco; Mesiti, Michele; Negro, Francesco; Rucci, Andrea; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Strong magnetic backgrounds are known to modify QCD properties at a nonperturbative level. We discuss recent lattice results, obtained for Nf = 2 + 1 QCD with physical quark masses, concerning in particular the modifications and the anisotropies induced at the level of the static quark-antiquark potential, both at zero and finite temperature.

  9. Quantum dynamics in strong fluctuating fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goychuk, Igor; Hänggi, Peter

    A large number of multifaceted quantum transport processes in molecular systems and physical nanosystems, such as e.g. nonadiabatic electron transfer in proteins, can be treated in terms of quantum relaxation processes which couple to one or several fluctuating environments. A thermal equilibrium environment can conveniently be modelled by a thermal bath of harmonic oscillators. An archetype situation provides a two-state dissipative quantum dynamics, commonly known under the label of a spin-boson dynamics. An interesting and nontrivial physical situation emerges, however, when the quantum dynamics evolves far away from thermal equilibrium. This occurs, for example, when a charge transferring medium possesses nonequilibrium degrees of freedom, or when a strong time-dependent control field is applied externally. Accordingly, certain parameters of underlying quantum subsystem acquire stochastic character. This may occur, for example, for the tunnelling coupling between the donor and acceptor states of the transferring electron, or for the corresponding energy difference between electronic states which assume via the coupling to the fluctuating environment an explicit stochastic or deterministic time-dependence. Here, we review the general theoretical framework which is based on the method of projector operators, yielding the quantum master equations for systems that are exposed to strong external fields. This allows one to investigate on a common basis, the influence of nonequilibrium fluctuations and periodic electrical fields on those already mentioned dynamics and related quantum transport processes. Most importantly, such strong fluctuating fields induce a whole variety of nonlinear and nonequilibrium phenomena. A characteristic feature of such dynamics is the absence of thermal (quantum) detailed balance.ContentsPAGE1. Introduction5262. Quantum dynamics in stochastic fields531 2.1. Stochastic Liouville equation531 2.2. Non-Markovian vs. Markovian discrete

  10. 77 FR 53212 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request Strong Cities Strong Communities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Communities National Resource Network AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and... Proposal: Strong Cities Strong Communities National Resource Network. OMB Control Number, if applicable... Transformation Initiative (TI) account. Through the Strong Cities Strong Communities National Resource Network...

  11. Atoms and Molecules in Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelcher, P.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    Selected topics on atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields are reviewed. The enormous progress made for the hydrogen atom in a magnetic field and its impact on different areas like, for example, modern semi-classics and dynamics of non-integrable systems as well as laser spectroscopy are outlined. Due to the non-separability of the centre of mass and electronic motion of atoms/molecules in magnetic fields a variety of two-body phenomena can be observed in highly excited systems. Examples are the classical diffusion of the centre of mass and the giant dipole states for crossed fields. For ions energy transfer processes lead to the so-called self-ionisation process. Magnetically induced crossovers for the ground states of atoms are investigated. The increasing complexity of the ground state behaviour of magnetically dressed multi-electron atoms due to changes of the spin polarisation as well as spatial orbitals is demonstrated. For molecules, both fundamental aspects as well as the electronic structure of few-electron diatomics are reviewed.

  12. Strong curvature singularities and causal simplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Krolak, A. )

    1992-02-01

    Techniques of differential topology in Lorentzian manifolds developed by Geroch, Hawking, and Penrose are used to rule out a class of locally naked strong curvature singularities in strongly causal space-times. This result yields some support to the validity of Penrose's strong cosmic censorship hypothesis.

  13. Strong gravitation and models of particles

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, V.F.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of determining the most realistic model of particles in strong gravitation is considered. The relation between the hypothesis of strong gravitation and the structure of the proton is analyzed. The thermodynamics of a hadron as a black hole in strong gravitation is studied.

  14. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. R. D.; Gericke, D. O.; Cammarata, M.; Cho, B. I.; Döppner, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Förster, E.; Fortmann, C.; Fritz, D.; Galtier, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Harmand, M.; Heimann, P.; Kugland, N. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, R. W.; Lemke, H.; Makita, M.; Moinard, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Plagemann, K.-U.; Redmer, R.; Riley, D.; Rosmej, F. B.; Sperling, P.; Toleikis, S.; Vinko, S. M.; Vorberger, J.; White, S.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Tschentscher, T.; Gregori, G.

    2014-06-01

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen close to their original positions in the fluid.

  15. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon.

    PubMed

    Brown, C R D; Gericke, D O; Cammarata, M; Cho, B I; Döppner, T; Engelhorn, K; Förster, E; Fortmann, C; Fritz, D; Galtier, E; Glenzer, S H; Harmand, M; Heimann, P; Kugland, N L; Lamb, D Q; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Lemke, H; Makita, M; Moinard, A; Murphy, C D; Nagler, B; Neumayer, P; Plagemann, K-U; Redmer, R; Riley, D; Rosmej, F B; Sperling, P; Toleikis, S; Vinko, S M; Vorberger, J; White, S; White, T G; Wünsch, K; Zastrau, U; Zhu, D; Tschentscher, T; Gregori, G

    2014-06-09

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen close to their original positions in the fluid.

  16. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C. R. D.; Gericke, D. O.; Cammarata, M.; Cho, B. I.; Gwangju Inst. of Science and Technology, Gwangju; Inst. for Basic Science, Gwangju ; Döppner, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Förster, E.; Fortmann, C.; Fritz, D.; Galtier, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Harmand, M.; Heimann, P.; Kugland, N. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, R. W.; Lemke, H.; Makita, M.; Moinard, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Plagemann, K. -U.; Redmer, R.; Riley, D.; Rosmej, F. B.; Sperling, P.; Toleikis, S.; Vinko, S. M.; Vorberger, J.; White, S.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Tschentscher, T.; Gregori, G.

    2014-06-09

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen close to their original positions in the fluid.

  17. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Vezzani, A.

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of {sup 41}K induces a significant loss of coherence in {sup 87}Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices.

  18. Driven optical lattices as strong-field simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinghaus, Stephan; Holthaus, Martin

    2010-06-15

    We argue that ultracold atoms in strongly shaken optical lattices can be subjected to conditions similar to those experienced by electrons in laser-irradiated crystalline solids, but without introducing secondary polarization effects. As a consequence, one can induce nonperturbative multiphoton-like resonances due to the mutual penetration of ac-Stark-shifted Bloch bands. These phenomena can be detected with a combination of currently available laboratory techniques.

  19. Energy Exchange in Driven Open Quantum Systems at Strong Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrega, Matteo; Solinas, Paolo; Sassetti, Maura; Weiss, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    The time-dependent energy transfer in a driven quantum system strongly coupled to a heat bath is studied within an influence functional approach. Exact formal expressions for the statistics of energy dissipation into the different channels are derived. The general method is applied to the driven dissipative two-state system. It is shown that the energy flows obey a balance relation, and that, for strong coupling, the interaction may constitute the major dissipative channel. Results in analytic form are presented for the particular value K =1/2 of strong Ohmic dissipation. The energy flows show interesting behaviors including driving-induced coherences and quantum stochastic resonances. It is found that the general characteristics persists for K near 1/2 .

  20. Strongly Magnetized Accretion Disks Around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2017-01-01

    Recent observations are suggestive of strongly magnetized accretion disks around black holes. Performing local (shearing box) simulations of accretion disks, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. We demonstrate that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion disks. We also show that black hole spin measurements can become unconstrained if magnetic fields provide a significant contribution to the vertical pressure support of the accretion disk atmosphere.

  1. Effect of dilute strongly pinning impurities on charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Jun-ichi; Millis, Andrew J.

    2015-05-01

    We study theoretically the effects of strong pinning centers on a charge density wave in the limit that the charge density wave coherence length is shorter than the average interimpurity distance. An analysis based on a Ginzburg-Landau model shows that long-range forces arising from the elastic response of the charge density wave induce a kind of collective pinning which suppresses impurity-induced phase fluctuations, leading to a long-range ordered ground state. The correlations induced by impurities are characterized by a length scale parametrically longer than the average interimpurity distance. Long-wavelength fluctuations are found to be gapped, implying the stability of the ground state. We also present Monte Carlo simulations that confirm the basic features of the analytical results.

  2. Keeping Marriages Strong in Challenging Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ober, Marci Wolff

    2009-01-01

    What makes a strong marriage anyway...? There are definite qualities that exist in healthy marriages, that is, a marriage that is defined by both partners to be "mostly" or "usually" very satisfying. This article explores these qualities and looks at what really works to make and keep marriages strong, healthy, and satisfying…

  3. Keeping Marriages Strong in Challenging Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ober, Marci Wolff

    2009-01-01

    What makes a strong marriage anyway...? There are definite qualities that exist in healthy marriages, that is, a marriage that is defined by both partners to be "mostly" or "usually" very satisfying. This article explores these qualities and looks at what really works to make and keep marriages strong, healthy, and satisfying…

  4. 78 FR 15710 - Strong Sensitizer Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... supplemental definition of ``strong sensitizer'' due to advancements in the science of sensitization that have... sensitization and made recommendations for proposed changes to the current definition, which eliminate... sensitization characteristics of substances, rank the criteria for classification of strong sensitizers in order...

  5. On the Strong Direct Summand Conjecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Jason

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, our aim is the study the Vanishing of Maps of Tor Conjecture of Hochster and Huneke. We mainly focus on an equivalent characterization called the Strong Direct Summand Conjecture, due to N. Ranganathan. Our results are separated into three chapters. In Chapter 3, we prove special cases of the Strong Direct Summand Conjecture in…

  6. Holographic equilibration at strong and intermediate coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-01-22

    In these conference proceedings, I will descibe recent developments in the study of thermalization dynamics in strongly, but not infinitely strongly coupled field theories using holography. After reviewing the main tools required in these calculations, I will introduce a set of central results, discuss their physical implications, and finally outline a number of challenges to be tackled in the future.

  7. Strong diamagnetism of normal metals and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, O. V.; Gradov, O. M.; Kyrie, A. Yu

    1992-07-01

    The theory of strong diamagnetism of metals caused by the formation of a superlattice with the period being much larger than the crystal cell size has been developed. Strong diamagnetism has been shown to be the cause of the superconductivity of metals.

  8. On the Strong Direct Summand Conjecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Jason

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, our aim is the study the Vanishing of Maps of Tor Conjecture of Hochster and Huneke. We mainly focus on an equivalent characterization called the Strong Direct Summand Conjecture, due to N. Ranganathan. Our results are separated into three chapters. In Chapter 3, we prove special cases of the Strong Direct Summand Conjecture in…

  9. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOEpatents

    Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

    1995-05-30

    A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

  10. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOEpatents

    Harben, Philip E.; Rodgers, Peter W.; Ewert, Daniel W.

    1995-01-01

    A seismic switching device that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period.

  11. Strong dietary restrictions protect Drosophila against anoxia/reoxygenation injuries.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Paul; Tauc, Michel; Frelin, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Reoxygenation of ischemic tissues is a major factor that determines the severity of cardiovascular diseases. This paper describes the consequences of anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) stresses on Drosophila, a useful, anoxia tolerant, model organism. Newly emerged adult male flies were exposed to anoxic conditions (<1% O2) for 1 to 6 hours, reoxygenated and their survival was monitored. A/R stresses induced a transient increase in mortality which peaked at the time of reoxygenation. Then flies recovered low mortality rates similar to those of control flies. A/R induced mortality was strongly dependent on dietary conditions during the 48 h that preceded anoxia. Well fed flies were anoxia sensitive. Strong dietary restrictions and starvation conditions protected flies against A/R injuries. The tolerance to anoxia was associated to large decreases in glycogen, protein, and ATP contents. During anoxia, anoxia tolerant flies produced more lactate, less phosphate and they maintained more stable ATP levels than anoxia sensitive flies. Moderate dietary restrictions, which increased the longevity of normoxic flies, did not promote resistance to A/R stresses. Diet dependent A/R injuries were still observed in sigma loss of function mutants and they were insensitive to dietary rapamycin or resveratrol. AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribose-furanoside), an activator AMP kinase decreased A/R injuries. Mutants in the insulin signalling pathway were more anoxia tolerant in a fed state. Long A/R stresses induce a transient increase in mortality in Drosophila. This mortality is highly dependent on dietary conditions prior to the stress. Strong dietary restrictions and starvation conditions protect flies against A/R injuries, probably by inducing a major remodelling of energy metabolism. The results also indicate that mechanistically different responses develop in response to dietary restrictions of different strengths. AMP kinase and the insulin signalling pathway are

  12. Strong Dietary Restrictions Protect Drosophila against Anoxia/Reoxygenation Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Vigne, Paul; Tauc, Michel; Frelin, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background Reoxygenation of ischemic tissues is a major factor that determines the severity of cardiovascular diseases. This paper describes the consequences of anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) stresses on Drosophila, a useful, anoxia tolerant, model organism. Methodology/Principal Findings Newly emerged adult male flies were exposed to anoxic conditions (<1% O2) for 1 to 6 hours, reoxygenated and their survival was monitored. Results A/R stresses induced a transient increase in mortality which peaked at the time of reoxygenation. Then flies recovered low mortality rates similar to those of control flies. A/R induced mortality was strongly dependent on dietary conditions during the 48 h that preceded anoxia. Well fed flies were anoxia sensitive. Strong dietary restrictions and starvation conditions protected flies against A/R injuries. The tolerance to anoxia was associated to large decreases in glycogen, protein, and ATP contents. During anoxia, anoxia tolerant flies produced more lactate, less phosphate and they maintained more stable ATP levels than anoxia sensitive flies. Moderate dietary restrictions, which increased the longevity of normoxic flies, did not promote resistance to A/R stresses. Diet dependent A/R injuries were still observed in sima loss of function mutants and they were insensitive to dietary rapamycin or resveratrol. AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribosefuranoside), an activator AMP kinase decreased A/R injuries. Mutants in the insulin signalling pathway were more anoxia tolerant in a fed state. Conclusion/Significance Long A/R stresses induce a transient increase in mortality in Drosophila. This mortality is highly dependent on dietary conditions prior to the stress. Strong dietary restrictions and starvation conditions protect flies against A/R injuries, probably by inducing a major remodelling of energy metabolism. The results also indicate that mechanistically different responses develop in response to dietary restrictions of

  13. Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Martínez-Cruzado, J. A.; Martínez-Pagan, J.; Santana-Torres, E. X.; Torres-O, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network is currently in charge of the operation of: (i) free-field (ff) strong motion stations, (ii) instrumented structures (STR) (Dams, Bridges, Buildings), and (iii) the data acquisition/monitoring and analysis of earthquakes considered strong from the point of view of their intensity and magnitude. All these instruments are deployed in the Puerto Rico Island (PRI), US-, and British-Virgin Islands (BVI), and Dominican Republic (DR). The Puerto Rico Island and the Caribbean region have high potential to be affected by earthquakes that could be catastrophic for the area. The Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network (actually Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program, PRSMP) has grown since 1970's from 7 ff strong motion stations and one instrumented building with analog accelerographs to 111 ff strong motion stations and 16 instrumented buildings with digital accelerographs: PRI: 88 ff, 16 STR., DR: 13 ff, BVI: 5 ff, 2 STR collecting data via IP (internet), DU (telephone), and stand alone stations The current stage of the PRSMP seismic network, the analysis of moderate earthquakes that were recorded and/or occurred on the island, results of the intensity distribution of selected earthquakes, as well as results of dynamic parameter identification of some of the instrumented structures are here presented.

  14. Performance of wavefront sensors in strong scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchers, Jeffrey D.; Fried, David L.; Link, Donald J.; Tyler, Glenn A.; Moretti, William; Brennan, Terry J.; Fugate, Robert Q.

    2003-02-01

    The estimation accuracy of wavefront sensors in strong scintillation is examined. Wave optical simulation is used to characterize the performance of several wavefront sensors in the absence of measurement noise. The estimation accuracy of a Schack-Hartmann sensor is shown to be poor in strong scintillation due primarily to the presence of branch points in the phase function. The estimation accuracy of a unit-shear, shearing interferometer is found to be significantly better than that of a Hartmann sensor in strong scintillation. The estimation accuracy of a phase shifting point diffraction interferometer is shown to be invariant with scintillation.

  15. Dual field theory of strong interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.

    1987-07-01

    A dual field theory of strong interactions is derived from a Lagrangian of the Yang-Mills and Higgs fields. The existence of a magnetic monopole of mass 2397 MeV and Dirac charge g = (137/2)e is incorporated into the theory. Unification of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces is shown to converge at the mass of the intermediate vector boson W/sup +/-/. The coupling constants of the strong and weak interactions are derived in terms of the fine-structure constant ..cap alpha.. = 1/137.

  16. Strong photoassociation in a degenerate fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rvachov, Timur; Jamison, Alan; Jing, Li; Son, Hyungmok; Ebadi, Sepehr; Jiang, Yijun; Zwierlein, Martin; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Despite many studies there remain open questions about strong photoassociation in ultracold gases. We study the effects of strong photoassociation in ultracold fermions. Photoassociation occurs only at short range and thus can be used as a tool to probe and control the two-body correlation function in an interacting many-body system. We study the effects of strong photoassociation in 6 Li, the onset of saturation, and its effects on spin polarized and interacting spin-mixtures. This work was funded by the NSF, ARO-MURI, SAMSUNG, and NSERC.

  17. Strong-field ionization via a high-order Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Michael; Daněk, Jiří; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2017-02-01

    Signatures of the Coulomb corrections in the photoelectron momentum distribution during laser-induced ionization of atoms or ions in tunneling and multiphoton regimes are investigated analytically in the case of a one-dimensional problem. A high-order Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation is applied, where the exact continuum state in the S matrix is approximated by the eikonal Coulomb-Volkov state including the second-order corrections to the eikonal. Although without high-order corrections our theory coincides with the known analytical R -matrix (ARM) theory, we propose a simplified procedure for the matrix element derivation. Rather than matching the eikonal Coulomb-Volkov wave function with the bound state as in the ARM theory to remove the Coulomb singularity, we calculate the matrix element via the saddle-point integration method by time as well as by coordinate, and in this way avoiding the Coulomb singularity. The momentum shift in the photoelectron momentum distribution with respect to the ARM theory due to high-order corrections is analyzed for tunneling and multiphoton regimes. The relation of the quantum corrections to the tunneling delay time is discussed.

  18. Electronic spectra of strongly modulated aperiodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Barache, D. ); Luck, J.M. )

    1994-06-01

    We consider the tight-binding Hamiltonian on strongly modulated aperiodic chains (e.g., quasiperiodic, self-similar, random). The site energies are distributed according to a given binary sequence ([ital V][sub [ital n

  19. Finding quantum effects in strong classical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Labun, Lance; Labun, Ou Z.

    2017-06-01

    The long-standing challenge to describing charged particle dynamics in strong classical electromagnetic fields is how to incorporate classical radiation, classical radiation reaction and quantized photon emission into a consistent unified framework. The current, semiclassical methods to describe the dynamics of quantum particles in strong classical fields also provide the theoretical framework for fundamental questions in gravity and hadron-hadron collisions, including Hawking radiation, cosmological particle production and thermalization of particles created in heavy-ion collisions. However, as we show, these methods break down for highly relativistic particles propagating in strong fields. They must therefore be improved and adapted for the description of laser-plasma experiments that typically involve the acceleration of electrons. Theory developed from quantum electrodynamics, together with dedicated experimental efforts, offer the best controllable context to establish a robust, experimentally validated foundation for the fundamental theory of quantum effects in strong classical potentials.

  20. Quantum Strong Coupling with Protein Vibrational Modes.

    PubMed

    Vergauwe, Robrecht M A; George, Jino; Chervy, Thibault; Hutchison, James A; Shalabney, Atef; Torbeev, Vladimir Y; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-10-07

    In quantum electrodynamics, matter can be hybridized to confined optical fields by a process known as light-matter strong coupling. This gives rise to new hybrid light-matter states and energy levels in the coupled material, leading to modified physical and chemical properties. Here, we report for the first time the strong coupling of vibrational modes of proteins with the vacuum field of a Fabry-Perot mid-infrared cavity. For two model systems, poly(l-glutamic acid) and bovine serum albumin, strong coupling is confirmed by the anticrossing in the dispersion curve, the square root dependence on the concentration, and a vacuum Rabi splitting that is larger than the cavity and vibration line widths. These results demonstrate that strong coupling can be applied to the study of proteins with many possible applications including the elucidation of the role of vibrational dynamics in enzyme catalysis and in H/D exchange experiments.

  1. Norman Rostoker and strongly correlated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimaru, Setsuo

    2016-03-01

    If Norman were alive and attended this symposium, he might have quipped: "Setsuo! What are you talking about! A plasma is, after all, a strongly correlated object, and there is nothing so special about it!" "Yes, Norman, you are so correct! A statistical system consisting of mutually non-interacting and thus uncorrelated particles may be an "ideal-gas" system from a physics teacher's pedagogical point of view, but real systems do consist of mutually interacting and thus strongly correlated particles; a plasma is definitely one of them.Here, in the memory of Professor Rostoker's outstanding contributions to strongly correlated plasmas for the past 60 years, we wish to survey on "Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by a Strongly Correlated Plasma" and "Multi-particle Correlation, Equations of State, and Phase Diagrams" in what follows.

  2. Cooking with Strong Lenses and Other Ingredients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Adam; SLACS; BELLS; SDSS-III

    2013-07-01

    Strong lensing offers the most direct method for constraining the distribution of mass in galaxies at cosmological distances. The combination of strong lensing with other observables increases its power, but often in ways that are model-dependent and resistant to intuition. In this talk, I will unpack the information content of spectroscopic, photometric, kinematic, and strong-lensing observables as they translate into constraints on the macroscopic distribution of luminous and dark matter in massive elliptical galaxies. I will also highlight how the choice of priors and analysis methods affects the conclusions drawn from a given set of observations. Finally, in this context I will present the latest results from observational efforts to extend strong-lensing analyses to lower mass galaxies in the Sloan Lens ACS Survey (SLACS) and to earlier cosmic times in the BOSS Emission-Line Lens Survey (BELLS).

  3. Green jobs and a strong middle class.

    PubMed

    Podesta, John D

    2009-01-01

    Green jobs are critical to building a strong middle class, and millions of green jobs can be created through energy efficiency. The models already exist for this work, but we need sustained investment to bring them to scale.

  4. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  5. Attract Academically Strong Students: Market the Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Charles E.; Walters, James C.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a marketing strategy to assist admissions personnel in recruiting academically strong students to colleges and universities. Discusses the importance of institutional prestige and faculty achievement as well as the need to involve faculty in student recruitment. (JAC)

  6. Diffusive Mixing in Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, Abdourahmane; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    A multispecies hydrodynamic model based on moments of the Born-Bogolyubov-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy is developed for physical conditions relevant to astrophysical plasmas. The modified transport equations incorporate strong correlations through a density functional theory closure, while fluctuations enters through a mixture BGK operator. This model extends the usual Burgers equations for a dilute gas to strongly coupled and isothermal plasmas mixtures. The diffusive currents for these strongly coupled plasmas is self-consistently derived. The settling of impurities and its impact on cooling of white dwarfs and neutron stars can be greatly affected by strong Coulomb coupling, which we show can be quantified using the direct-correlation function. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0344).

  7. Attract Academically Strong Students: Market the Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Charles E.; Walters, James C.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a marketing strategy to assist admissions personnel in recruiting academically strong students to colleges and universities. Discusses the importance of institutional prestige and faculty achievement as well as the need to involve faculty in student recruitment. (JAC)

  8. Radio-Frequency Spectroscopy of a Strongly Interacting Two-Dimensional Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Froehlich, Bernd; Feld, Michael; Vogt, Enrico; Koschorreck, Marco; Koehl, Michael; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2011-03-11

    We realize and study a strongly interacting two-component atomic Fermi gas confined to two dimensions in an optical lattice. Using radio-frequency spectroscopy we measure the interaction energy of the strongly interacting gas. We observe the confinement-induced Feshbach resonance on the attractive side of the 3D Feshbach resonance and find the existence of confinement-induced molecules in very good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  9. Evolutionary games on cycles with strong selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altrock, P. M.; Traulsen, A.; Nowak, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Evolutionary games on graphs describe how strategic interactions and population structure determine evolutionary success, quantified by the probability that a single mutant takes over a population. Graph structures, compared to the well-mixed case, can act as amplifiers or suppressors of selection by increasing or decreasing the fixation probability of a beneficial mutant. Properties of the associated mean fixation times can be more intricate, especially when selection is strong. The intuition is that fixation of a beneficial mutant happens fast in a dominance game, that fixation takes very long in a coexistence game, and that strong selection eliminates demographic noise. Here we show that these intuitions can be misleading in structured populations. We analyze mean fixation times on the cycle graph under strong frequency-dependent selection for two different microscopic evolutionary update rules (death-birth and birth-death). We establish exact analytical results for fixation times under strong selection and show that there are coexistence games in which fixation occurs in time polynomial in population size. Depending on the underlying game, we observe inherence of demographic noise even under strong selection if the process is driven by random death before selection for birth of an offspring (death-birth update). In contrast, if selection for an offspring occurs before random removal (birth-death update), then strong selection can remove demographic noise almost entirely.

  10. Evolutionary games on cycles with strong selection.

    PubMed

    Altrock, P M; Traulsen, A; Nowak, M A

    2017-02-01

    Evolutionary games on graphs describe how strategic interactions and population structure determine evolutionary success, quantified by the probability that a single mutant takes over a population. Graph structures, compared to the well-mixed case, can act as amplifiers or suppressors of selection by increasing or decreasing the fixation probability of a beneficial mutant. Properties of the associated mean fixation times can be more intricate, especially when selection is strong. The intuition is that fixation of a beneficial mutant happens fast in a dominance game, that fixation takes very long in a coexistence game, and that strong selection eliminates demographic noise. Here we show that these intuitions can be misleading in structured populations. We analyze mean fixation times on the cycle graph under strong frequency-dependent selection for two different microscopic evolutionary update rules (death-birth and birth-death). We establish exact analytical results for fixation times under strong selection and show that there are coexistence games in which fixation occurs in time polynomial in population size. Depending on the underlying game, we observe inherence of demographic noise even under strong selection if the process is driven by random death before selection for birth of an offspring (death-birth update). In contrast, if selection for an offspring occurs before random removal (birth-death update), then strong selection can remove demographic noise almost entirely.

  11. XUV Transient Absorption of Strong-Field Ionized Ferrocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterley, Adam S.; Lackner, Florian; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption experiments are underway to study the dynamics of ferrocene following strong field ionization. Ferrocene is a textbook organometallic compound, composed of an iron atom sandwiched between two aromatic organic rings. An intense infrared (IR, 790 nm) pump pulse is used to ionize the ferrocene molecules. Femtosecond XUV pulses, created by high harmonic generation (HHG) are used to probe the induced dynamics. Iron 3p inner-shell to valence transitions (M edge, 50 eV strong-field induced molecular dynamics from the perspective of the metal center. We will induce dissociation dynamics at high field intensities and use lower IR intensities to study dynamics of electronically and/or vibrationally excited ferrocene cations. Preliminary results will be presented, demonstrating current progress of XUV transient absorption experiments on moderately large molecular systems.

  12. Theoretical prediction of a strongly correlated Dirac metal.

    PubMed

    Mazin, I I; Jeschke, Harald O; Lechermann, Frank; Lee, Hunpyo; Fink, Mario; Thomale, Ronny; Valentí, Roser

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the most intensely studied objects in the electronic theory of solids have been strongly correlated systems and graphene. However, the fact that the Dirac bands in graphene are made up of sp(2) electrons, which are subject to neither strong Hubbard repulsion U nor strong Hund's rule coupling J, creates certain limitations in terms of novel, interaction-induced physics that could be derived from Dirac points. Here we propose GaCu3(OH)6Cl2 (Ga-substituted herbertsmithite) as a correlated Dirac-Kagome metal combining Dirac electrons, strong interactions and frustrated magnetic interactions. Using density functional theory, we calculate its crystallographic and electronic properties, and observe that it has symmetry-protected Dirac points at the Fermi level. Its many-body physics is diverse, with possible charge, magnetic and superconducting instabilities. Through a combination of various many-body methods we study possible symmetry-lowering phase transitions such as Mott-Hubbard, charge or magnetic ordering, and unconventional superconductivity, which in this compound assumes an f-wave symmetry.

  13. Semiclassical approximation for strong-laser-field processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, D. B.

    2017-08-01

    The exact time-evolution operator of an atom in the presence of a strong laser field is expressed using the phase-space path integral. Presenting this result in the form of a perturbative expansion in the effective interaction of the electron with the rest of the atom enables straightforward derivation of the well-known strong-field approximation and its higher-order corrections. Alternatively, one can use this exact result to obtain a semiclassical approximation by expansion in powers of small fluctuations around the classical trajectories. We present a derivation of such a semiclassical approximation. The obtained result for the momentum-space matrix element of the total time-evolution operator can be useful for studying various processes in strong-field physics. Using the example of above-threshold ionization, it is shown how this approximation can be applied to laser-induced processes. More attention is devoted to the laser-assisted scattering. Using the example of few-cycle laser-pulse-assisted electron-atom potential scattering, we show similarities and differences between the semiclassical and the strong-field approximations. For low energies, the semiclassical scattering cross section is modified and there are trajectories along which the electron is temporarily captured by the atomic potential. Applying stationary-phase method to the integral over the scattering time, we clearly identified relevant semiclassical electron trajectories.

  14. Robust mesoscopic superposition of strongly correlated ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hallwood, David W.; Ernst, Thomas; Brand, Joachim

    2010-12-15

    We propose a scheme to create coherent superpositions of annular flow of strongly interacting bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional ring trap. The nonrotating ground state is coupled to a vortex state with mesoscopic angular momentum by means of a narrow potential barrier and an applied phase that originates from either rotation or a synthetic magnetic field. We show that superposition states in the Tonks-Girardeau regime are robust against single-particle loss due to the effects of strong correlations. The coupling between the mesoscopically distinct states scales much more favorably with particle number than in schemes relying on weak interactions, thus making particle numbers of hundreds or thousands feasible. Coherent oscillations induced by time variation of parameters may serve as a 'smoking gun' signature for detecting superposition states.

  15. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C. R. D.; Gericke, D. O.; Cammarata, M.; Cho, B. I.; Döppner, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Förster, E.; Fortmann, C.; Fritz, D.; Galtier, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Harmand, M.; Heimann, P.; Kugland, N. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, R. W.; Lemke, H.; Makita, M.; Moinard, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Plagemann, K.-U.; Redmer, R.; Riley, D.; Rosmej, F. B.; Sperling, P.; Toleikis, S.; Vinko, S. M.; Vorberger, J.; White, S.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Tschentscher, T.; Gregori, G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen close to their original positions in the fluid. PMID:24909903

  16. Evidence for a glassy state in strongly driven carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, C. R. D.; Gericke, D. O.; Cammarata, M.; ...

    2014-06-09

    Here, we report results of an experiment creating a transient, highly correlated carbon state using a combination of optical and x-ray lasers. Scattered x-rays reveal a highly ordered state with an electrostatic energy significantly exceeding the thermal energy of the ions. Strong Coulomb forces are predicted to induce nucleation into a crystalline ion structure within a few picoseconds. However, we observe no evidence of such phase transition after several tens of picoseconds but strong indications for an over-correlated fluid state. The experiment suggests a much slower nucleation and points to an intermediate glassy state where the ions are frozen closemore » to their original positions in the fluid.« less

  17. Strong anisotropic thermal conductivity of monolayer WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinlong; Chen, Yani; Han, Zheng; Li, Wu

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) has attracted increasing attention due to its large magnetoresistance and pressure-induced superconductivity. In this work, we investigate the thermal conductivity (κ) of monolayer WTe2 by performing first-principles calculations, and find strong anisotropic κ with predicted room-temperature values of 9 and 20 W m-1 K-1 along two principal lattice directions, respectively. Such strong anisotropy suggests the importance of orientation when engineering thermal-related applications based on WTe2. The anisotropy of κ is attributed to the in-plane linear acoustic phonon branches, while the out-of-plane quadratic acoustic phonon branch is almost isotropic. The size dependence of κ shows that the size effect can persists up to 10 μm, and the anisotropy decreases with decreasing sample size due to the suppression of low-frequency anisotropic phonons by boundary scattering.

  18. Atom-Pair Kinetics with Strong Electric-Dipole Interactions.

    PubMed

    Thaicharoen, N; Gonçalves, L F; Raithel, G

    2016-05-27

    Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly to a strongly interacting regime via adiabatic transformation of the atoms from an approximately nonpolar into a highly dipolar quantum state. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces are probed using a device akin to a field ion microscope. Ion imaging and pair-correlation analysis reveal the kinetics of the interacting atoms. Dumbbell-shaped pair-correlation images demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipolar C_{3} coefficient, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The results indicate many-body dynamics akin to disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems.

  19. Vortex creep and thermal depinning within strong pinning theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willa, Roland; Buchacek, Martin; Geshkenbein, Vadim B.; Blatter, Gianni

    Vortex pinning in type-II superconductors can occur through the collective action of many pins (weak collective pinning scenario) or through plastic deformations induced by a low density of defects (strong pinning scenario). For the latter case, a new formalism has recently be developed to provide a quantitative link between the microscopic pinning landscape and experimentally accessible quantities describing pinning on a macroscopic level. Examples are the critical current density jc, the I- V characteristics, or the ac Campbell length λC. Inspired by the original work of Larkin and Brazovskii on density wave pinning, we have extended the strong pinning formalism to account for thermal depinning of flux lines and vortex creep.

  20. Studies of Strong Langmuir Turbulence at the HAARP Ionospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Bacon, M. E.; Gerres, J. M.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Oyama, S. I.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2008-11-01

    High power HF transmitters have induced a number of plasma instabilities in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. We report results from a series of such experiments using over one gigawatt of HF power (ERP) in comprehensive studies of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and particle acceleration at the HAARP Observatory, Gakona, Alaska. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including the outshifted plasma line or free-mode, appearance of a short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effect, collapse, cascade and co-existing spectra, control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the plasma line, and suprathermal electrons. We explore the observed magnetic-zenith effect of enhanced turbulence backscatter with the HF pump wave directed up the field line. We have discovered a second region of strong interaction displaced southward of the primary HF interaction region. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  1. Superfluid Density and Phase Relaxation in Superconductors with Strong Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, G.; Benfatto, L.; Castellani, C.; Lorenzana, J.

    2012-05-01

    We consider the attractive Hubbard model with on-site disorder as a prototype of a disordered superconductor. We solve the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations on two-dimensional finite clusters at zero temperature and evaluate the electromagnetic response to a vector potential. We find that the standard decoupling between transverse and longitudinal response does not apply in the presence of disorder. Moreover, the superfluid density is strongly reduced by the relaxation of the phase of the order parameter already at mean-field level when disorder is large. We also find that the anharmonicity of the phase fluctuations is strongly enhanced by disorder. Beyond mean field, this provides an enhancement of quantum fluctuations inducing a zero-temperature transition to a nonsuperconducting phase of disordered preformed pairs. Finally, the connection of our findings with the glassy physics for extreme dirty superconductors is discussed.

  2. Attosecond Electron Wave Packet Dynamics in Strong Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, P.; Remetter, T.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Valentin, C.; Balcou, Ph.; Kazamias, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M. B.; Schafer, K. J.; Mairesse, Y.; Wabnitz, H.; Salieres, P.

    2005-07-01

    We use a train of sub-200 attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses with energies just above the ionization threshold in argon to create a train of temporally localized electron wave packets. We study the energy transfer from a strong infrared (IR) laser field to the ionized electrons as a function of the delay between the XUV and IR fields. When the wave packets are born at the zero crossings of the IR field, a significant amount of energy ({approx}20 eV) is transferred from the field to the electrons. This results in dramatically enhanced above-threshold ionization in conditions where the IR field alone does not induce any significant ionization. Because both the energy and duration of the wave packets can be varied independently of the IR laser, they are valuable tools for studying and controlling strong-field processes.

  3. The extended reciprocity: Strong belief outperforms persistence.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Shun

    2017-05-21

    The existence of cooperation is a mysterious phenomenon and demands explanation, and direct reciprocity is one key potential explanation for the evolution of cooperation. Direct reciprocity allows cooperation to evolve for cooperators who switch their behavior on the basis of information about the opponent's behavior. Here, relevant to direct reciprocity is information deficiency. When the opponent's last move is unknown, how should players behave? One possibility is to choose cooperation with some default probability without using any further information. In fact, our previous paper (Kurokawa, 2016a) examined this strategy. However, there might be beneficial information other than the opponent's last move. A subsequent study of ours (Kurokawa, 2017) examined the strategy which uses the own last move when the opponent's last move is unknown, and revealed that referring to the own move and trying to imitate it when information is absent is beneficial. Is there any other beneficial information else? How about strong belief (i.e., have infinite memory and believe that the opponent's behavior is unchanged)? Here, we examine the evolution of strategies with strong belief. Analyzing the repeated prisoner's dilemma game and using evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) analysis against an invasion by unconditional defectors, we find the strategy with strong belief is more likely to evolve than the strategy which does not use information other than the opponent player's last move and more likely to evolve than the strategy which uses not only the opponent player's last move but also the own last move. Strong belief produces the extended reciprocity and facilitates the evolution of cooperation. Additionally, we consider the two strategies game between strategies with strong belief and any strategy, and we consider the four strategies game in which unconditional cooperators, unconditional defectors, pessimistic reciprocators with strong belief, and optimistic reciprocators with

  4. The Italian Strong Motion Network (RAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Giovanni; Ammirati, Alfredo; de Nardis, Rita; Filippi, Luisa; Gallo, Antonella; Lavecchia, Giusy; Sirignano, Sebastiano; Zambonelli, Elisa; Nicoletti, Mario

    2014-05-01

    A network for the strong motion monitoring of the territory allows recording data that provide an excellent opportunity to study the source, path, and site effects on the ground motions, specifically in near source area, for updating seismic hazard map and consequently construction codes and earthquake resistant design. Strong motion data also help to increase the effective preparation and response to seismic emergencies and the ability of a community to quickly recover from the damages of an earthquake contributes to lower the seismic risk usually measured in term of casualties and economic losses. The Italian network for monitoring the strong movement of the national territory (RAN) is the result of a fruitful cooperation over the last 16 years between the Italian government, the regions and local authorities and now counts more than 500 stations. Over the years, as a priority the DPC has focused mainly on the expansion of the network in terms of the number of measurement points and technological improvement of instrumentation as well as the data transmission system. A data acquisition centre was implemented in which the Antelope software collects, processes and archives, automatically, the data of the RAN and of the external strong motion networks that contribute to the database of the RAN. Recently the DPC has dedicated specific resources to improve the response of the network, in particular, in case of emergency. The efficiency of the network on a daily basis is not less than 95% and temporary networks were installed in the epicentral area within 24 hours after the earthquake and connected to the data acquisition centre in Rome. A fast seismic data analysis is essential to provide useful information to Authorities which make decisions immediately after a strong earthquake occurrence. During a strong earthquake, the modern accelerometers are the only instruments which can provide near source high-quality data that are important both for scientific and for civil

  5. Strong Motion Recording in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archuleta, R. J.; Fletcher, J. B.; Shakal, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The United States strong motion program began in 1932 when the Coast and Geodetic Survey (C&GS) installed eight strong motion accelerographs in California. During the March 1933 Long Beach earthquake, three of these produced the first strong motion records. With this success the C&GS expanded the number of accelerographs to 71 by 1964. With development of less expensive, mass-produced accelerographs the number of strong motion accelerographs expanded to ~575 by 1972. Responsibilities for operating the network and disseminating data were transferred to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 1970 and then to the U.S. Geological Survey in 1973. In 1972 the California Legislature established the California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP). CSMIP operates accelerographs at 812 ground stations, with multi-channel accelerographs in 228 buildings, 125 lifelines and 37 geotechnical arrays, in California. The USGS and the ANSS effort operate accelerographs at 1584 ground stations, 96 buildings, 14 bridges, 70 dams, and 15 multi-channel geotechnical arrays. The USC Los Angeles array has 78 ground stations; UCSB operates 5 geotechnical arrays; other government and private institutions also operate accelerographs. Almost all accelerographs are now digital with a sampling rate of 200 Hz. Most of the strong motion data can be downloaded from the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data (http://strongmotioncenter.org). As accelerographs have become more sophisticated, the concept of what constitutes strong motion has blurred because small earthquakes (M ~3) are well recorded on accelerometers as well as seismometers. However, when accelerations are over ~10%g and velocities over ~1 cm/s, the accelerometers remain on scale, providing the unclipped data necessary to analyze the ground motion and its consequences. Strong motion data are essential to the development of ground motion prediction equations, understanding structural response, performance

  6. Visible periodicity of strong nucleosome DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bilal; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Lowary and Widom assembled nucleosomes on synthetic random sequence DNA molecules, selected the strongest nucleosomes and discovered that the TA dinucleotides in these strong nucleosome sequences often appear at 10-11 bases from one another or at distances which are multiples of this period. We repeated this experiment computationally, on large ensembles of natural genomic sequences, by selecting the strongest nucleosomes--i.e. those with such distances between like-named dinucleotides, multiples of 10.4 bases, the structural and sequence period of nucleosome DNA. The analysis confirmed the periodicity of TA dinucleotides in the strong nucleosomes, and revealed as well other periodic sequence elements, notably classical AA and TT dinucleotides. The matrices of DNA bendability and their simple linear forms--nucleosome positioning motifs--are calculated from the strong nucleosome DNA sequences. The motifs are in full accord with nucleosome positioning sequences derived earlier, thus confirming that the new technique, indeed, detects strong nucleosomes. Species- and isochore-specific variations of the matrices and of the positioning motifs are demonstrated. The strong nucleosome DNA sequences manifest the highest hitherto nucleosome positioning sequence signals, showing the dinucleotide periodicities in directly observable rather than in hidden form.

  7. Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios

    2010-12-15

    Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

  8. Surface plasmons: a strong alliance of electrons and light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroó, Norbert; Varró, Sándor; Rácz, Péter; Dombi, Péter

    2016-05-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) have several unique properties, including their strong-field enhancing effect in near field. This means, among other things, that nonlinear phenomena may be studied at much lower laser intensities. The present paper describes in detail the theory of basic properties of SPPs, and our model of a laser-induced oscillating double-layer potential. The SPPs may decay into photons and hot electrons. The latter may be emitted by a multi-plasmon process. Experiments on both photon and electron emission from a gold film are briefly presented.

  9. Strongly anisotropic wetting on one-dimensional nanopatterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xia, Deying; Brueck, S R J

    2008-09-01

    This communication reports strongly anisotropic wetting behavior on one-dimensional nanopatterned surfaces. Contact angles, degree of anisotropy, and droplet distortion are measured on micro- and nanopatterned surfaces fabricated with interference lithography. Both the degree of anisotropy and the droplet distortion are extremely high as compared with previous reports because of the well-defined nanostructural morphology. The surface is manipulated to tune with the wetting from hydrophobic to hydrophilic while retaining the structural wetting anisotropy with a simple silica nanoparticle overcoat. The wetting mechanisms are discussed. Potential applications in microfluidic devices and evaporation-induced pattern formation are demonstrated.

  10. Nanostructure studies of strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiang; Natelson, Douglas

    2011-09-01

    Strongly correlated materials exhibit an amazing variety of phenomena, including metal-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance, and high temperature superconductivity, as strong electron-electron and electron-phonon couplings lead to competing correlated ground states. Recently, researchers have begun to apply nanostructure-based techniques to this class of materials, examining electronic transport properties on previously inaccessible length scales, and applying perturbations to drive systems out of equilibrium. We review progress in this area, particularly emphasizing work in transition metal oxides (Fe(3)O(4), VO(2)), manganites, and high temperature cuprate superconductors. We conclude that such nanostructure-based studies have strong potential to reveal new information about the rich physics at work in these materials.

  11. Global gyrokinetic simulations with strong flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, J. D.; McMillan, B. F.; Robinson, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the investigation of strong toroidal rotation effects in a global tokamak code, ORB5. This includes the implementation of a strong flow gyrokinetic Lagrangian, allowing a complete treatment of centrifugal and Coriolis effects in the laboratory frame. In order to consistently perform the linear analysis in this system, an axisymmetric gyrokinetic equilibrium distribution function is defined using the constants of motion: we show it corresponds to the standard choice in the local limit and is close to the neoclassical solution in the banana regime. The energy and momentum transport equations are presented in an analogous form to those for the weak flow system. Linear studies of Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) modes in rotating plasmas are performed to determine how the global effects interact with the effects of strong rotation. We also determine the geodesic acoustic mode dispersion with respect to plasma rotation rate in this gyrokinetic model and compare it to MHD theory.

  12. Cosmological particle production at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangamani, Mukund; Rozali, Moshe; Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2015-09-01

    We study the dynamics of a strongly-coupled quantum field theory in a cosmological spacetime using the holographic AdS/CFT correspondence. Specifically we consider a confining gauge theory in an expanding FRW universe and track the evolution of the stress-energy tensor during a period of expansion, varying the initial temperature as well as the rate and amplitude of the expansion. At strong coupling, particle production is inseparable from entropy production. Consequently, we find significant qualitative differences from the weak coupling results: at strong coupling the system rapidly loses memory of its initial state as the amplitude is increased. Furthermore, in the regime where the Hubble parameter is much smaller than the initial temperature, the dynamics is well-modelled as a plasma evolving hydrodynamically.

  13. Strongly nonlinear stress waves in dissipative metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yichao; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of measurements and numerical simulations of stress wave propagation in a one-dimensional strongly nonlinear dissipative metamaterial composed of steel disks and Nitrile O-rings. The incoming bell shape stress wave is generated by the strikers with different masses. Numerical modeling including a viscous dissipative term to describe dynamic behavior of O-rings is developed to predict the wave amplitude, shape and propagation speed of stress waves. The viscous dissipation prevented the incoming pulse from splitting into trains of solitary waves typical for non-dissipative strongly nonlinear discrete systems. The linear momentum and energy from the striker were completely transferred into this strongly nonlinear "soft" metamaterial.

  14. Multiscale equations for strongly stratified turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Greg; Rocha, Cesar; Julien, Keith; Caulfield, Colm-Cille

    2016-11-01

    Strongly stratified turbulent shear flows are of fundamental importance owing to their widespread occurrence and their impact on diabatic mixing, yet direct numerical simulations of such flows remain challenging. Here, a reduced, multiscale description of turbulent shear flows in the presence of strong stable density stratification is derived via asymptotic analysis of the governing Boussinesq equations. The analysis explicitly recognizes the occurrence of dynamics on disparate spatiotemoporal scales, and yields simplified partial differential equations governing the coupled evolution of slowly-evolving small aspect-ratio ('pancake') modes and isotropic, strongly non-hydrostatic stratified-shear (e.g. Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability modes. The reduced model is formally valid in the physically-relevant regime in which the aspect-ratio of the pancake structures tends to zero in direct proportion to the horizontal Froude number. Relative to the full Boussinesq equations, the model offers both computational and conceptual advantages.

  15. The strong side of weak topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Yaacov; Ringel, Zohar; Stern, Ady

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional topological insulators are classified into ``strong'' (STI) and ``weak'' (WTI) according to the nature of their surface states. While the surface states of the STI are topologically protected, in the WTI they are believed to be very fragile to disorder. In this work we show that the WTI surface states are actually protected from any random perturbation which does not break time-reversal symmetry, and does not close the bulk energy gap. Consequently, the conductivity of metallic surfaces in the clean system will remain finite even in the presence of strong disorder of this type. In the weak disorder limit the surfaces are perfect metals, and strong surface disorder only acts to push them inwards. We find that WTI's differ from STI's primarily in their anisotropy, and that the anisotropy is not a sign of their weakness but rather of their richness.

  16. The Coulomb Anomaly in Strongly Disordered Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    r- AD-A271 0951 III [II[ I[Il ~ !!D T ! SC T 0 •9 3 The Coulomb Anomaly in Strongly Disordered FiiA 4 ’ Shih-Ying Hsu and J.M. Valles, Jr...strongly disordered quench condensed granular films are presented. The strength of this anomaly grows with increasing sheet resistance, RN, at low RN...Increases in the static disorder in metal The disordered films were deposited onto films degrades the screening capabilities of cooled substrates (-’ 8K

  17. De Sitter vacua of strongly interacting QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchel, Alex; Karapetyan, Aleksandr

    2017-03-01

    We use holographic correspondence to argue that Euclidean (Bunch-Davies) vacuum is a late-time attractor of the dynamical evolution of quantum gauge theories at strong coupling. The Bunch-Davies vacuum is not an adiabatic state, if the gauge theory is non-conformal — the comoving entropy production rate is nonzero. Using the N={2}^{\\ast } gauge theory holography, we explore prospects of explaining current accelerated expansion of the Universe as due to the vacuum energy of a strongly coupled QFT.

  18. Evaporation of droplets on strongly hydrophobic substrates.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Jutta M; Wilson, Stephen K; Duffy, Brian R; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-03-31

    The manner in which the extreme modes of droplet evaporation (namely, the constant contact radius and the constant contact angle modes) become indistinguishable on strongly hydrophobic substrates is described. Simple asymptotic expressions are obtained which provide good approximations to the evolutions of the contact radius, the contact angle, and the volume of droplets evaporating in the extreme modes for a wide range of hydrophobic substrates. As a consequence, on strongly hydrophobic substrates it is appropriate to use the so-called "2/3 power law" to extrapolate the lifetimes of droplets evaporating in the constant contact radius mode as well as in the constant contact angle mode.

  19. The strong coupling constant at large distances

    SciTech Connect

    Deur, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss effective strong coupling constants. Those are well behaved in the low-$Q^2$ domain, contrarily to $\\alpha_s$ from pQCD. We present an extraction of an effective strong coupling constant from Jefferson Lab polarized data at intermediate and low $Q^2$. We also show how these data, together with spin sum rules, allow us to obtain the effective coupling constant over the entire $Q^2$ range. We then discuss the relation between the experimentally extracted coupling constant and theoretical calculations at low $Q^2$. We conclude on the importance of such study for the application of the AdS/CFT correspondence to QCD.

  20. Thermodynamical instabilities under strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.

    2017-03-01

    The thermodynamical instabilities of low densities in the n p matter and n p e matter are studied within several relativistic nuclear models under some values of magnetic fields. The results are compared between each other and the effects of the symmetry energy slope at saturation density on the instability are investigated. The instability regions can exhibit bands due to the presence of Landau levels for very strong magnetic fields of the order of 1017 G, while for weaker magnetic fields, the bands are replaced by many diffused or scattered pieces. It also shows that the proton fraction in the inner crust of neutron stars may be complex under strong magnetic fields.

  1. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Jin; Stockman, Mark I.; Kim, D.

    2016-02-01

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drive this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics.

  2. Strongly correlated photons on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Andreas; Volz, Thomas; Winger, Martin; Badolato, Antonio; Hennessy, Kevin J.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Imamoğlu, Ataç

    2012-02-01

    Optical nonlinearities at the single-photon level are key ingredients for future photonic quantum technologies. Prime candidates for the realization of the strong photon-photon interactions necessary for implementing quantum information processing tasks, as well as for studying strongly correlated photons in an integrated photonic device setting, are quantum dots embedded in photonic-crystal nanocavities. Here, we report strong quantum correlations between photons on picosecond timescales. We observe (i) photon antibunching upon resonant excitation of the lowest-energy polariton state, proving that the first cavity photon blocks the subsequent injection events, and (ii) photon bunching when the laser field is in two-photon resonance with the polariton eigenstates of the second Jaynes-Cummings manifold, demonstrating that two photons at this colour are more likely to be injected into the cavity jointly than they would otherwise. Together, these results demonstrate unprecedented strong single-photon nonlinearities, paving the way for the realization of a quantum optical Josephson interferometer or a single-photon transistor.

  3. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    DOE PAGES

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; ...

    2016-02-18

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drivemore » this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Lastly, our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics.« less

  4. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ojoon; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum -Kyu; Kim, Ju -Jin; Stockman, Mark I.; Kim, D.

    2016-02-18

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drive this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Lastly, our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics.

  5. Strongly coupled semidirect mediation of supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, M.; Izawa, K.-I.; Nakai, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Strongly coupled semidirect gauge mediation models of supersymmetry breaking through massive mediators with standard-model charges are investigated by means of composite degrees of freedom. Sizable mediation is realized to generate the standard-model gaugino masses for a small mediator mass without breaking the standard-model symmetries.

  6. Entangled states with strong positive partial transpose

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Kil-Chan

    2010-06-15

    Chruscinski, Jurkowski, and Kossakowski [Phys. Rev. A 77, 022113 (2008)] studied quantum states with strong positive partial transpose (SPPT) and conjectured that all SPPT states are separable. We construct a two-parameter class of 3 x 3 entangled SPPT states, so the conjecture does not hold true for general SPPT states.

  7. Strong motion duration and earthquake magnitude relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, M.W.; Short, S.A.; Kennedy, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    Earthquake duration is the total time of ground shaking from the arrival of seismic waves until the return to ambient conditions. Much of this time is at relatively low shaking levels which have little effect on seismic structural response and on earthquake damage potential. As a result, a parameter termed ``strong motion duration`` has been defined by a number of investigators to be used for the purpose of evaluating seismic response and assessing the potential for structural damage due to earthquakes. This report presents methods for determining strong motion duration and a time history envelope function appropriate for various evaluation purposes, for earthquake magnitude and distance, and for site soil properties. There are numerous definitions of strong motion duration. For most of these definitions, empirical studies have been completed which relate duration to earthquake magnitude and distance and to site soil properties. Each of these definitions recognizes that only the portion of an earthquake record which has sufficiently high acceleration amplitude, energy content, or some other parameters significantly affects seismic response. Studies have been performed which indicate that the portion of an earthquake record in which the power (average rate of energy input) is maximum correlates most closely with potential damage to stiff nuclear power plant structures. Hence, this report will concentrate on energy based strong motion duration definitions.

  8. Strong Student Governments...and Their Advisement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatman, Sara

    1988-01-01

    The ideal student government and the ideal student government adviser were discussed by advisers who met at the NACA National Student Government Workshop. Key issues in a strong student government are described including information, access, mutual respect, and institutional impact. (MLW)

  9. CLASSSTRONG: Classical simulations of strong field processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Pérez-Hernández, J. A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2014-01-01

    A set of Mathematica functions is presented to model classically two of the most important processes in strong field physics, namely high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI). Our approach is based on the numerical solution of the Newton-Lorentz equation of an electron moving on an electric field and takes advantage of the symbolic languages features and graphical power of Mathematica. Like in the Strong Field Approximation (SFA), the effects of atomic potential on the motion of electron in the laser field are neglected. The SFA was proven to be an essential tool in strong field physics in the sense that it is able to predict with great precision the harmonic (in the HHG) and energy (in the ATI) limits. We have extended substantially the conventional classical simulations, where the electric field is only dependent on time, including spatial nonhomogeneous fields and spatial and temporal synthesized fields. Spatial nonhomogeneous fields appear when metal nanosystems interact with strong and short laser pulses and temporal synthesized fields are routinely generated in attosecond laboratories around the world. Temporal and spatial synthesized fields have received special attention nowadays because they would allow to exceed considerably the conventional harmonic and electron energy frontiers. Classical simulations are an invaluable tool to explore exhaustively the parameters domain at a cheap computational cost, before massive quantum mechanical calculations, absolutely indispensable for the detailed analysis, are performed.

  10. Patterns of strong coupling for LHC searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Pomarol, Alex; Rattazzi, Riccardo; Riva, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Even though the Standard Model (SM) is weakly coupled at the Fermi scale, a new strong dynamics involving its degrees of freedom may conceivably lurk at slightly higher energies, in the multi TeV range. Approximate symmetries provide a structurally robust context where, within the low energy description, the dimensionless SM couplings are weak, while the new strong dynamics manifests itself exclusively through higher-derivative interactions. We present an exhaustive classification of such scenarios in the form of effective field theories, paying special attention to new classes of models where the strong dynamics involves, along with the Higgs boson, the SM gauge bosons and/or the fermions. The IR softness of the new dynamics suppresses its effects at LEP energies, but deviations are in principle detectable at the LHC, even at energies below the threshold for production of new states. We believe our construction provides the so far unique structurally robust context where to motivate several LHC searches in Higgs physics, diboson production, or W W scattering. Perhaps surprisingly, the interplay between weak coupling, strong coupling and derivatives, which is controlled by symmetries, can override the naive expansion in operator dimension, providing instances where dimension-8 dominates dimension-6, well within the domain of validity of the low energy effective theory. This result reveals the limitations of an analysis that is both ambitiously general and restricted to dimension-6 operators.

  11. Markovian evolution of strongly coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chaitanya; Öhberg, Patrik; Cresser, James D.; Andersson, Erika

    2014-12-01

    We investigate how to model Markovian evolution of coupled harmonic oscillators, each of them interacting with a local environment. When the coupling between the oscillators is weak, dissipation may be modeled using local Lindblad terms for each of the oscillators in the master equation, as is commonly done. When the coupling between oscillators is strong, this model may become invalid. We derive a master equation for two coupled harmonic oscillators that are subject to individual heat baths modeled by a collection of harmonic oscillators and show that this master equation in general contains nonlocal Lindblad terms. We compare the resulting time evolution with that obtained for dissipation through local Lindblad terms for each individual oscillator and show that the evolution is different in the two cases. In particular, the two descriptions give different predictions for the steady state and for the entanglement between strongly coupled oscillators. This shows that when describing strongly coupled harmonic oscillators, one must take great care in how dissipation is modeled and that a description using local Lindblad terms may fail. This may be particularly relevant when attempting to generate entangled states of strongly coupled quantum systems.

  12. MRS photodiode in strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Rykalin, V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Zutshi, v.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2004-12-01

    The experimental results on the performance of the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiode in the strong magnetic field of 4.4T, and the possible impact of the quench of the magnet at 4.5T on sensor's operation are reported.

  13. Strong fibers and films of microbial polyesters.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Tadahisa

    2005-08-12

    Poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (P(3HB)) and its copolymers are accumulated by a wide variety of microorganisms as intracellular carbon and energy material, and are extensively studied as biodegradable and biocompatible thermoplastics. However, these microbial polyesters have not been recognized as practical because of their stiffness and brittleness. Recently, by new drawing techniques, we succeeded in obtaining strong fibers and films from microbial polyesters, produced by both wild-type and recombinant bacteria. The improvement in mechanical properties of the fibers and films is due not only to the orientation of molecular chains, but also to the generation of a zigzag conformation and network structure, formed by fibrillar and lamellar crystals. The structure of strong fibers with a tensile strength over 1.0 GPa was analyzed by micro-beam X-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation. The strong fibers and films were completely degraded in natural, river freshwater or by extracellular polyhydroxybutyrate depolymerases. In this feature article, the processing, mechanical properties, highly ordered structure and biodegradability of strong fibers and films produced from microbial polyesters are presented.

  14. Strong Female Characters in Recent Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heine, Pat; Inkster, Christine; Kazemek, Frank; Williams, Sandra; Raschke, Sylvia; Stevens, Della

    1999-01-01

    Shares the authors' criteria for evaluating female characters as positive role models in children's literature. Explores the criteria by examining "The Ballad of Lucy Wipple" (Karen Cushman). Discusses other recently published picture books and novels which feature strong females in history, in contemporary times, and in fantasy. (SR)

  15. Charm production in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C. S.; Navarra, F. S.; Noronha, J.; Oliveira, E. G. de; Strickland, M.

    2014-11-11

    We discuss the effects of a strong magnetic field on B and D mesons, focusing on the changes of the energy levels and the masses of the bound states. Using the Color Evaporation Model we discuss the possible changes in the production of J/ψ and Υ. We briefly comment the recent experimental data.

  16. Three Strands Form Strong School Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saphier, Jon; King, Matt; D'Auria, John

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors illustrate the three fundamental elements of school leadership: academic focus, shared beliefs and values, and productive professional relationships. These three elements purportedly produce strong organizational cultures, more teaching expertise, and better student achievement and more thoughtful and caring citizens.…

  17. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Jin; Stockman, Mark I.; Kim, D.

    2016-01-01

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drive this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics. PMID:26888147

  18. Robert Lowth and the Strong Verb System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ostade, Ingrid Tieken-Boon

    2002-01-01

    Traces the origin of the grammatical rule that strong verbs should distinguish between past tense and past participle forms. The rule, credited to Robert Lowth, did not in fact originate from Lowth nor did it reflect his usage as found in his private unpublished letters. (Author/VWL)

  19. Weak detonations, their paths and transition to strong detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Mark; Dold, J. W.

    2002-06-01

    Previously, a quasi-steady form of the classical Rankine-Hugoniot weak detonation has been shown to play an integral part in describing certain forms of detonation initiation, arising during an intermediate stage between the thermal ignition of the material and the first appearance of a strong detonation with Zeldovich-von Neumann-Döring (ZND) structure. In this paper, we use a parametric variable integration to calculate numerically the path of the weak detonation in two important initiation scenarios, shock-induced and initial disturbance-induced transition to detonation, via a large activation energy induction domain model. The influence that the nature of the path may have on the weak detonation structure is also discussed. In each case these calculations enable us to predict how, where and when the transition to a strong detonation with ZND structure will occur. Explanations for several phenomena observed in both experiments and numerical studies on transition to detonation are also uncovered by these calculations.

  20. Using strong electromagnetic fields to control x-ray processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Buth, C.; Dunford, R. W.; Ho, P.; Kanter, E. P.; Kraessig, B.; Peterson, E. R.; Rohringer, N.; Santra, R.; Southworth, S. H.

    2010-06-01

    Exploration of a new ultrafast-ultrasmall frontier in atomic and molecular physics has begun. Not only is is possible to control outer-shell electron dynamics with intense ultrafast optical lasers, but now control of inner-shell processes has become possible by combining intense infrared/optical lasers with tunable sources of X-ray radiation. This marriage of strong-field laser and X-ray physics has led to the discovery of methods to control reversibly resonant X-ray absorption in atoms and molecules on ultrafast timescales. Using a strong optical dressing field, resonant X-ray absorption in atoms can be markedly suppressed, yielding an example of electromagnetically induced transparency for x rays. Resonant X-ray absorption can also be controlled in molecules using strong non-resonant, polarized laser fields to align the framework of a molecule, and therefore its unoccupied molecular orbitals to which resonant absorption occurs. At higher laser intensities, ultrafast field ionization produces an irreversible change in X-ray absorption. Finally, the advent of X-ray free electron lasers enables first exploration of non-linear X-ray processes.

  1. Strong-Field Control of Laser Filamentation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levis, Robert; Romanov, Dmitri; Filin, Aleskey; Compton, Ryan

    2008-05-01

    The propagation of short strong-file laser pulses in gas and solution phases often result in formation of filaments. This phenomenon involves many nonlinear processes including Kerr lensing, group velocity dispersion, multi-photon ionization, plasma defocusing, intensity clamping, and self-steepening. Of these, formation and dynamics of pencil-shape plasma areas plays a crucial role. The fundamental understanding of these laser-induced plasmas requires additional effort, because the process is highly nonlinear and complex. We studied the ultrafast laser-generated plasma dynamics both experimentally and theoretically. Ultrafast plasma dynamics was probed using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering. The measurements were made in a room temperature gas maintained at 1 atm in a flowing cell. The time dependent scattering was measured by delaying the CARS probe with respect to the intense laser excitation pulse. A general trend is observed between the spacing of the ground state and the first allowed excited state with the rise time for the noble gas series and the molecular gases. This trend is consistent with our theoretical model, which considers the ultrafast dynamics of the strong field generated plasma as a three-step process; (i) strong-field ionization followed by the electron gaining considerable kinetic energy during the pulse; (ii) immediate post-pulse dynamics: fast thermalization, impact-ionization-driven electron multiplication and cooling; (iii) ensuing relaxation: evolution to electron-ion equilibrium and eventual recombination.

  2. CSMIP (California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program) strong-motion records from the Santa Cruz Mountains (Loma Prieta), California earthquake of 17 October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Shakal, A.; Reichle, M.; Ventura, C.; Cao, T.; Sherburne, R.; Savage, M.; Darragh, R.; Petersen, C.

    1990-01-01

    Strong-motion records were recovered from 93 stations of the California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP) after the earthquake. CSMIP provides information on the force of ground motion and the deformation induced in structures and in rock and soil by earthquake-generated ground motion. This information is recorded by strong-motion sensors placed in engineered structures and at free field (ground) sites, and is used by earthquake engineers and earth scientists to improve the design of earthquake-resistant structures. The strong-motion instrumentation program was established after the San Fernando earthquake in 1971. A total of 125 records were recovered from the 93 CSMIP stations which recorded the Loma Prieta event. These 125 records contain data from a total of 690 strong-motion sensors. These data are important because of the unique structures and sites at which records were obtained during this event. Some highlights of particular interest are included in this paper.

  3. Strong gravitational lensing and dark energy complementarity

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2004-01-21

    In the search for the nature of dark energy most cosmological probes measure simple functions of the expansion rate. While powerful, these all involve roughly the same dependence on the dark energy equation of state parameters, with anticorrelation between its present value w{sub 0} and time variation w{sub a}. Quantities that have instead positive correlation and so a sensitivity direction largely orthogonal to, e.g., distance probes offer the hope of achieving tight constraints through complementarity. Such quantities are found in strong gravitational lensing observations of image separations and time delays. While degeneracy between cosmological parameters prevents full complementarity, strong lensing measurements to 1 percent accuracy can improve equation of state characterization by 15-50 percent. Next generation surveys should provide data on roughly 105 lens systems, though systematic errors will remain challenging.

  4. Photoneutrino energy losses in strong magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Fassio-Canuto, L.

    1973-01-01

    Previously computed rates of energy losses (Petrosian et al., 1967) ignored the presence of strong magnetic fields, hence the change brought in when such a field (about 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 13th power G) is included is studied. The results indicate that for T about 10 to the 8th power K and densities rho of about 10,000 g/cu cm, the presence of a strong H field decreases the energy losses by at the most a factor between 10 and 100 in the region up to rho = 1,000,000 g/cu cm. At higher densities the neutrino emissivities are almost identical.

  5. Strong ground motion prediction using virtual earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Denolle, M A; Dunham, E M; Prieto, G A; Beroza, G C

    2014-01-24

    Sedimentary basins increase the damaging effects of earthquakes by trapping and amplifying seismic waves. Simulations of seismic wave propagation in sedimentary basins capture this effect; however, there exists no method to validate these results for earthquakes that have not yet occurred. We present a new approach for ground motion prediction that uses the ambient seismic field. We apply our method to a suite of magnitude 7 scenario earthquakes on the southern San Andreas fault and compare our ground motion predictions with simulations. Both methods find strong amplification and coupling of source and structure effects, but they predict substantially different shaking patterns across the Los Angeles Basin. The virtual earthquake approach provides a new approach for predicting long-period strong ground motion.

  6. Strong regularizing effect of integrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin

    1997-11-01

    Many time evolution problems have the so-called strong regularization effect, that is, with any irregular initial data, as soon as becomes greater than 0, the solution becomes C{sup {infinity}} for both spacial and temporal variables. This paper studies 1 x 1 dimension integrable systems for such regularizing effect. In the work by Sachs, Kappler [S][K], (see also earlier works [KFJ] and [Ka]), strong regularizing effect is proved for KdV with rapidly decaying irregular initial data, using the inverse scattering method. There are two equivalent Gel`fand-Levitan-Marchenko (GLM) equations associated to an inverse scattering problem, one is normalized at x = {infinity} and another at x = {infinity}. The method of [S][K] relies on the fact that the KdV waves propagate only in one direction and therefore one of the two GLM equations remains normalized and can be differentiated infinitely many times. 15 refs.

  7. Deterministic strong-field quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaletto, Stefano M.; Harman, Zoltán; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2017-04-01

    Strong-field quantum-state control is investigated, taking advantage of the full—amplitude and phase—characterization of the interaction between matter and intense ultrashort pulses via transient-absorption spectroscopy. As an example, we apply the method to a nondegenerate V -type three-level system modeling atomic Rb, and use a sequence of intense delayed pulses, whose parameters are tailored to steer the system into a desired quantum state. We show how to experimentally enable this optimization by retrieving all quantum features of the light-matter interaction from observable spectra. This provides a full characterization of the action of strong fields on the atomic system, including the dependence upon possibly unknown pulse properties and atomic structures. Precision and robustness of the scheme are tested, in the presence of surrounding atomic levels influencing the system's dynamics.

  8. Strongly correlated quantum walks in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Philipp M; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Zupancic, Philip; Lahini, Yoav; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2015-03-13

    Full control over the dynamics of interacting, indistinguishable quantum particles is an important prerequisite for the experimental study of strongly correlated quantum matter and the implementation of high-fidelity quantum information processing. We demonstrate such control over the quantum walk-the quantum mechanical analog of the classical random walk-in the regime where dynamics are dominated by interparticle interactions. Using interacting bosonic atoms in an optical lattice, we directly observed fundamental effects such as the emergence of correlations in two-particle quantum walks, as well as strongly correlated Bloch oscillations in tilted optical lattices. Our approach can be scaled to larger systems, greatly extending the class of problems accessible via quantum walks. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Firefly flashing under strong static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Barua, Anurup Gohain; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Miyashita, Yuito; Kurita, Satoru; Owada, Norio

    2012-02-01

    Firefly flashing has been the subject of numerous scientific investigations. Here we present in vivo flashes from male specimens of three species of fireflies-two Japanese species Luciola cruciata, Luciola lateralis and one Indian species Luciola praeusta-positioned under a superconducting magnet. When the OFF state of the firefly becomes long after flashing in an immobile state under the strong static magnetic field of strength 10 Tesla for a long time, which varies widely from species to species as well as from specimen to specimen, the effect of the field becomes noticeable. The flashes in general are more rapid, and occasionally overlap to produce broad compound flashes. We present the broadest flashes recorded to date, and propose that the strong static magnetic field affects the neural activities of fireflies, especially those in the spent up or 'exhausted' condition.

  10. Model reduction of strong-weak neurons.

    PubMed

    Du, Bosen; Sorensen, Danny; Cox, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    We consider neurons with large dendritic trees that are weakly excitable in the sense that back propagating action potentials are severly attenuated as they travel from the small, strongly excitable, spike initiation zone. In previous work we have shown that the computational size of weakly excitable cell models may be reduced by two or more orders of magnitude, and that the size of strongly excitable models may be reduced by at least one order of magnitude, without sacrificing the spatio-temporal nature of its inputs (in the sense we reproduce the cell's precise mapping of inputs to outputs). We combine the best of these two strategies via a predictor-corrector decomposition scheme and achieve a drastically reduced highly accurate model of a caricature of the neuron responsible for collision detection in the locust.

  11. Model reduction of strong-weak neurons

    PubMed Central

    Du, Bosen; Sorensen, Danny; Cox, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    We consider neurons with large dendritic trees that are weakly excitable in the sense that back propagating action potentials are severly attenuated as they travel from the small, strongly excitable, spike initiation zone. In previous work we have shown that the computational size of weakly excitable cell models may be reduced by two or more orders of magnitude, and that the size of strongly excitable models may be reduced by at least one order of magnitude, without sacrificing the spatio–temporal nature of its inputs (in the sense we reproduce the cell's precise mapping of inputs to outputs). We combine the best of these two strategies via a predictor-corrector decomposition scheme and achieve a drastically reduced highly accurate model of a caricature of the neuron responsible for collision detection in the locust. PMID:25566048

  12. New strong interactions above the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.

    1994-08-09

    Theoretical arguments for a new higher-color quark sector, based on Pomeron physics in QCD, are briefly described. The electroweak symmetry-breaking, Strong CP conservation, and electroweak scale CP violation, that is naturally produced by this sector is also outlined. A further consequence is that above the electroweak scale there will be a radical change in the strong interaction. Electroweak states, in particular multiple W`s and Z`s, and new, semi-stable, very massive, baryons, will be commonly produced. The possible correlation of expected phenomena with a wide range of observed Cosmic Ray effects at and above the primary spectrum knee is described. Related phenomena that might be seen in the highest energy hard scattering events at the Fermilab Tevatron, some of which could be confused with top production, are also briefly discussed.

  13. Solvable model of a strongly driven micromaser

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, P.; Walther, H.; Casagrande, F.; Lulli, A.; Englert, B.-G.; Solano, E.

    2004-02-01

    We study the dynamics of a micromaser where the pumping atoms are strongly driven by a resonant classical field during their transit through the cavity mode. We derive a master equation for this strongly driven micromaser, involving the contributions of the unitary atom-field interactions and the dissipative effects of a thermal bath. We find analytical solutions for the temporal evolution and the steady state of this system by means of phase-space techniques, providing an unusual solvable model of an open quantum system, including pumping and decoherence. We derive closed expressions for all relevant expectation values, describing the statistics of the cavity field and the detected atomic levels. The transient regime shows the buildup of mixtures of mesoscopic fields evolving towards a super-Poissonian steady-state field that, nevertheless, yields atomic correlations that exhibit stronger nonclassical features than the conventional micromaser.

  14. Cosmogenic photons strongly constrain UHECR source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vliet, Arjen

    2017-03-01

    With the newest version of our Monte Carlo code for ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) propagation, CRPropa 3, the flux of neutrinos and photons due to interactions of UHECRs with extragalactic background light can be predicted. Together with the recently updated data for the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background (IGRB) by Fermi LAT, it is now possible to severely constrain UHECR source models. The evolution of the UHECR sources especially plays an important role in the determination of the expected secondary photon spectrum. Pure proton UHECR models are already strongly constrained, primarily by the highest energy bins of Fermi LAT's IGRB, as long as their number density is not strongly peaked at recent times.

  15. Strong sum distance in fuzzy graphs.

    PubMed

    Tom, Mini; Sunitha, Muraleedharan Shetty

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the idea of strong sum distance which is a metric, in a fuzzy graph is introduced. Based on this metric the concepts of eccentricity, radius, diameter, center and self centered fuzzy graphs are studied. Some properties of eccentric nodes, peripheral nodes and central nodes are obtained. A characterisation of self centered complete fuzzy graph is obtained and conditions under which a fuzzy cycle is self centered are established. We have proved that based on this metric, an eccentric node of a fuzzy tree G is a fuzzy end node of G and a node is an eccentric node of a fuzzy tree if and only if it is a peripheral node of G and the center of a fuzzy tree consists of either one or two neighboring nodes. The concepts of boundary nodes and interior nodes in a fuzzy graph based on strong sum distance are introduced. Some properties of boundary nodes, interior nodes and complete nodes are studied.

  16. Strong side of weak topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringel, Zohar; Kraus, Yaacov E.; Stern, Ady

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional topological insulators are classified into “strong” (STI) and “weak” (WTI) according to the nature of their surface states. While the surface states of the STI are topologically protected from localization, this does not hold for the WTI. In this work, we show that the surface states of the WTI are actually protected from any random perturbation that does not break time-reversal symmetry, and does not close the bulk energy gap. Consequently, the conductivity of metallic surfaces in the clean system remains finite even in the presence of strong disorder of this type. In the weak disorder limit, the surfaces are found to be perfect metals, and strong surface disorder only acts to push the metallic surfaces inwards. We find that the WTI differs from the STI primarily in its anisotropy, and that the anisotropy is not a sign of its weakness but rather of its richness.

  17. Photoneutrino energy losses in strong magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Fassio-Canuto, L.

    1973-01-01

    Previously computed rates of energy losses (Petrosian et al., 1967) ignored the presence of strong magnetic fields, hence the change brought in when such a field (about 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 13th power G) is included is studied. The results indicate that for T about 10 to the 8th power K and densities rho of about 10,000 g/cu cm, the presence of a strong H field decreases the energy losses by at the most a factor between 10 and 100 in the region up to rho = 1,000,000 g/cu cm. At higher densities the neutrino emissivities are almost identical.

  18. Molecular systems in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbiner, Alexander V.

    2007-04-01

    Brief overview of one-two electron molecular systems made out of protons and/or α-particles in a strong magnetic field B≤4.414×1013 G is presented. A particular emphasis is given to the one-electron exotic ions H 3 ++ (pppe), He 2 3+ (α α e) and to two-electron ionsH 3 + (pppee), He 2 ++ (α α ee). Quantitative studies in a strong magnetic field are very complicated technically. Novel approach to the few-electron Coulomb systems in magnetic field, which provides accurate results, based on variational calculus with physically relevant trial functions is briefly described.

  19. Quantum strongly secure ramp secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Paul; Matsumoto, Ryutaroh

    2015-02-01

    Quantum secret sharing is a scheme for encoding a quantum state (the secret) into multiple shares and distributing them among several participants. If a sufficient number of shares are put together, then the secret can be fully reconstructed. If an insufficient number of shares are put together however, no information about the secret can be revealed. In quantum ramp secret sharing, partial information about the secret is allowed to leak to a set of participants, called an unqualified set, that cannot fully reconstruct the secret. By allowing this, the size of a share can be drastically reduced. This paper introduces a quantum analog of classical strong security in ramp secret sharing schemes. While the ramp secret sharing scheme still leaks partial information about the secret to unqualified sets of participants, the strong security condition ensures that qudits with critical information can no longer be leaked.

  20. Decay of Resonaces in Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We suggest that decay properties (branching ratios) of hadronic resonances may become modified in strong external magnetic field. The behavior of K±*, K0* vector mesons as well as Λ* (1520) and Ξ0* baryonic states is considered in static fields 1013-1015 T. In particular, n = 0 Landau level energy increase of charged particles in the external magnetic field, and the interaction of hadron magnetic moments with the field is taken into account. We suggest that enhanced yield of dileptons and photons from ρ0(770) mesons may occur if strong decay channel ρ0 → π+π- is significantly suppressed. CP - violating π+π- decays of pseudoscalar ηc and η(547) mesons in the magnetic field are discussed, and superpositions of quarkonium states ηc,b and χc,b(nP) with Ψ(nS), ϒ(nS) mesons in the external field are considered.

  1. Strong bending of purple membranes in the M-state.

    PubMed

    Porschke, Dietmar

    2003-08-15

    Structure changes of purple membranes during the photocycle were analysed in solution by measurements of the electric dichroism. The D96N-mutant was used to characterize the M-state at neutral pH. The transition from the resting state to 61% photo-stationary M-state is associated with a strong reduction of the dichroism decay time constant by a factor of approximately 2. Because the change of the time constant is independent of the bacteriorhodopsin concentration, the effect is not attributed to light-induced dissociation but to light-induced bending of purple membranes. After termination of light-activation the dichroism decay of the resting state is restored with a time constant close to that of the M-state decay, which is more than two orders of magnitude slower than proton transfer to the bulk. Thus, bending is not due to asymmetric protonation but to the structure of the M-state. A very similar reduction of decay time constants at a corresponding degree of light-activation was found for wild-type bacteriorhodopsin at pH-values 7.8-9.3, where the lifetime of the M-state is extended. Light-induced bending is also reflected in changes of the stationary dichroism, whereas the overall permanent dipole moment remains almost constant, suggesting compensation of changes in molecular and global contributions. Bead model simulations indicate that disks of approximately 1 microm diameter are bent at a degree of photo-activation of 61% to a radius of approximately 0.25 microm, assuming a cylindrical bending modus. The large light-induced bending effect is consistent with light-induced opening of the protein on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane detected by electron crystallography, which is amplified due to coupling of monomers in the membrane. Bending may function as a mechanical signal.

  2. Quantum states with strong positive partial transpose

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Jurkowski, Jacek; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2008-02-15

    We construct a large class of bipartite M x N quantum states which defines a proper subset of states with positive partial transposes (PPTs). Any state from this class has PPT but the positivity of its partial transposition is recognized with respect to canonical factorization of the original density operator. We propose to call elements from this class states with strong positive partial transposes (SPPTs). We conjecture that all SPPT states are separable.

  3. Strong coupling QED with two fermionic flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.C.

    1990-11-01

    We report the recent results of our simulation of strong coupling QED, with non-compact action, on lattices 10{sup 4} and 16{sup 4}. Since we are dealing with two staggered fermionic flavors, we use hybrid algorithm to do the simulation. In addition to the measurement of the chiral order parameter {l angle}{bar {psi}}{psi}{r angle}, we also measure magnetic monopole susceptibility, {chi}, throughout the region of chiral transition. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Strong transverse fields in delta-spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold; Wang, Haimin

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of the strength and direction of transverse magnetic fields in six delta-spots are presented. The field direction is determined by the relative strength of the pi- and sigma-components at different polarizer orientations, and is, with one exception, parallel to the neutral line and as strong as the umbral field. Field strengths determined by line splitting are as high as 3980 G.

  5. Kinetic Characterization of Strongly Coupled Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Knapek, C. A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Klumov, B. A.; Morfill, G. E.; Samsonov, D.

    2007-01-05

    We propose a simple method to determine the local coupling strength {gamma} experimentally, by linking the individual particle dynamics with the local density and crystal structure of a 2D plasma crystal. By measuring particle trajectories with high spatial and temporal resolution we obtain the first maps of {gamma} and temperature at individual particle resolution. We employ numerical simulations to test this new method, and discuss the implications to characterize strongly coupled systems.

  6. Strongly Interacting Fermi Gases in Two Dimensions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-17

    strong dipolar interactions. Figure 6 Radiofrequency association of ultracold Feshbach molecules of NaK . Starting with a mixture of sodium atoms in...12. H2.00004 : Ultracold Feshbach Moleules of NaK . Presented by: C.-H. Wu...magnetic fields. In the singlet rovibrational ground state, the NaK molecule is known to have a large permanent electric dipole moment of 2.72(6) D [27,28

  7. Manifold reconnection and diffusion in strong chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, S. D.; Corso, G.

    2000-08-01

    We analyse diffusion across a reconnecting zone in a regime of strong chaos. Numerical estimates from the angular correlation functions averaged over a suitable set of phase-space initial conditions are compared to a local diffusion coefficient obtained using Fick’s law. It emerges that the diffusion coefficient is enhanced from small to larger values as successive reconnection-like processes or more usual bifurcations take place. This feature is illustrated using a quadratic nontwist map.

  8. NON-PARAMETRIC ESTIMATION UNDER STRONG DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhibiao; Zhang, Yiyun; Li, Runze

    2014-01-01

    We study non-parametric regression function estimation for models with strong dependence. Compared with short-range dependent models, long-range dependent models often result in slower convergence rates. We propose a simple differencing-sequence based non-parametric estimator that achieves the same convergence rate as if the data were independent. Simulation studies show that the proposed method has good finite sample performance. PMID:25018572

  9. Strong transverse fields in delta-spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold; Wang, Haimin

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of the strength and direction of transverse magnetic fields in six delta-spots are presented. The field direction is determined by the relative strength of the pi- and sigma-components at different polarizer orientations, and is, with one exception, parallel to the neutral line and as strong as the umbral field. Field strengths determined by line splitting are as high as 3980 G.

  10. Concepts in strong Langmuir turbulence theory

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, D.F.; Rose, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the basic concepts of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) theory are reviewed. In SLT system, a major fraction of the turbulent energy is carried by local, time-dependent, nonlinear excitations called cavitons. Modulational instability, localization of Langmuir fields by density fluctuations, caviton nucleation, collapse, and burnout and caviton correlations are reviewed. Recent experimental evidence will be presented for SLT phenomena in the interaction of powerful HF waves with the ionosphere and in laser-plasma interaction experiments. 38 refs., 11 figs.

  11. NON-PARAMETRIC ESTIMATION UNDER STRONG DEPENDENCE.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhibiao; Zhang, Yiyun; Li, Runze

    2014-01-01

    We study non-parametric regression function estimation for models with strong dependence. Compared with short-range dependent models, long-range dependent models often result in slower convergence rates. We propose a simple differencing-sequence based non-parametric estimator that achieves the same convergence rate as if the data were independent. Simulation studies show that the proposed method has good finite sample performance.

  12. Bose polarons in the strongly interacting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, Dhruv; Hu, Ming-Guang; van de Graaff, Michael; Corson, John; Cornell, Eric; Jin, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    Impurities immersed in and interacting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are predicted to form quasiparticle excitations called Bose polarons. I will present experimental evidence of Bose polarons in cold atoms obtained using radio-frequency spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of fermionic K-40 impurities interacting with a BEC of Rb-87 atoms. We use an interspecies Feshbach resonance to tune the interactions between the impurities and the bosons, and we take data in the strongly interacting regime.

  13. The STRONG STAR Multidisciplinary PTSD Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    induced levels of corticosterone and ACTH . 10 Figure 7: Effect of prenatal stress and adult stress on plasma corticosterone. The...interfere with our measure of fear conditioning and extinction. Thus, we overcame a serious technical challenge that was discussed in last year’s

  14. Spin equilibrium in strongly magnetized accreting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, C. R.

    2017-09-01

    Strongly magnetized accreting stars are often hypothesized to be in 'spin equilibrium' with their surrounding accretion flows, which requires that the accretion rate changes more slowly than it takes the star to reach spin equilibrium. This is not true for most magnetically accreting stars, which have strongly variable accretion outbursts on time-scales much shorter than the time it would take to reach spin equilibrium. This paper examines how accretion outbursts affect the time a star takes to reach spin equilibrium and its final equilibrium spin period. I consider several different models for angular momentum loss - either carried away in an outflow, lost to a stellar wind, or transferred back to the accretion disc (the 'trapped disc'). For transient sources, the outflow scenario leads to significantly longer times to reach spin equilibrium (∼10 ×), and shorter equilibrium spin periods than would be expected from spin equilibrium arguments, while the 'trapped disc' does not. The results suggest that disc trapping plays a significant role in the spin evolution of strongly magnetic stars, with some caveats for young stellar objects.

  15. Strong CP, Flavor, and Twisted Split Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Perez, Gilad; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Shirman, Yuri

    2004-11-10

    We present a natural solution to the strong CP problem in the context of split fermions. By assuming CP is spontaneously broken in the bulk, a weak CKM phase is created in the standard model due to a twisting in flavor space of the bulk fermion wavefunctions. But the strong CP phase remains zero, being essentially protected by parity in the bulk and CP on the branes. As always in models of spontaneous CP breaking, radiative corrections to theta bar from the standard model are tiny, but even higher dimension operators are not that dangerous. The twisting phenomenon was recently shown to be generic, and not to interfere with the way that split fermions naturally weaves small numbers into the standard model. It follows that out approach to strong CP is compatible with flavor, and we sketch a comprehensive model. We also look at deconstructed version of this setup which provides a viable 4D model of spontaneous CP breaking which is not in the Nelson-Barr class.

  16. Inflationary magnetogenesis without the strong coupling problem

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Ricardo J.Z.; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sloth, Martin S. E-mail: jain@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2013-10-01

    The simplest gauge invariant models of inflationary magnetogenesis are known to suffer from the problems of either large backreaction or strong coupling, which make it difficult to self-consistently achieve cosmic magnetic fields from inflation with a field strength larger than 10{sup −32}G today on the Mpc scale. Such a strength is insufficient to act as seed for the galactic dynamo effect, which requires a magnetic field larger than 10{sup −20}G. In this paper we analyze simple extensions of the minimal model, which avoid both the strong coupling and back reaction problems, in order to generate sufficiently large magnetic fields on the Mpc scale today. First we study the possibility that the coupling function which breaks the conformal invariance of electromagnetism is non-monotonic with sharp features. Subsequently, we consider the effect of lowering the energy scale of inflation jointly with a scenario of prolonged reheating where the universe is dominated by a stiff fluid for a short period after inflation. In the latter case, a systematic study shows upper bounds for the magnetic field strength today on the Mpc scale of 10{sup −13}G for low scale inflation and 10{sup −25}G for high scale inflation, thus improving on the previous result by 7-19 orders of magnitude. These results are consistent with the strong coupling and backreaction constraints.

  17. Cosmological test using strong gravitational lensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. C.; Wang, F. Y.

    2015-09-01

    As one of the probes of universe, strong gravitational lensing systems allow us to compare different cosmological models and constrain vital cosmological parameters. This purpose can be reached from the dynamic and geometry properties of strong gravitational lensing systems, for instance, time-delay Δτ of images, the velocity dispersion σ of the lensing galaxies and the combination of these two effects, Δτ/σ2. In this paper, in order to carry out one-on-one comparisons between ΛCDM universe and Rh = ct universe, we use a sample containing 36 strong lensing systems with the measurement of velocity dispersion from the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS) and Lens Structure and Dynamic survey (LSD) survey. Concerning the time-delay effect, 12 two-image lensing systems with Δτ are also used. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations are used to compare the efficiency of the three methods as mentioned above. From simulations, we estimate the number of lenses required to rule out one model at the 99.7 per cent confidence level. Comparing with constraints from Δτ and the velocity dispersion σ, we find that using Δτ/σ2 can improve the discrimination between cosmological models. Despite the independence tests of these methods reveal a correlation between Δτ/σ2 and σ, Δτ/σ2 could be considered as an improved method of σ if more data samples are available.

  18. Cosmology with Strong-lensing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Piórkowska, Aleksandra; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we assemble a catalog of 118 strong gravitational lensing systems from the Sloan Lens ACS Survey, BOSS emission-line lens survey, Lens Structure and Dynamics, and Strong Lensing Legacy Survey and use them to constrain the cosmic equation of state. In particular, we consider two cases of dark energy phenomenology: the XCDM model, where dark energy is modeled by a fluid with constant w equation-of-state parameter, and in the Chevalier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) parameterization, where w is allowed to evolve with redshift, w(z)={{w}0}+{{w}1}\\frac{z}{1 + z} . We assume spherically symmetric mass distribution in lensing galaxies, but we relax the rigid assumption of the SIS model in favor of a more general power-law index γ, also allowing it to evolve with redshifts γ (z). Our results for the XCDM cosmology show agreement with values (concerning both w and γ parameters) obtained by other authors. We go further and constrain the CPL parameters jointly with γ (z). The resulting confidence regions for the parameters are much better than those obtained with a similar method in the past. They are also showing a trend of being complementary to the Type Ia supernova data. Our analysis demonstrates that strong gravitational lensing systems can be used to probe cosmological parameters like the cosmic equation of state for dark energy. Moreover, they have a potential to judge whether the cosmic equation of state evolved with time or not.

  19. Diphotons, new vacuum angles, and strong CP

    DOE PAGES

    Draper, Patrick; McKeen, David

    2016-04-20

    The Standard Model contains a well-understood, natural, spin-0 diphoton resonance: the π0. Numerous studies have pointed out that the hint of a new diphoton resonance at 750 GeV could be a pion analog, identified with the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of a chiral symmetry spontaneously broken by new strong dynamics at the TeV scale. These “hypercolor” models are generically expected to violate parity through a topological angle θ~. We discuss the physics of θ~ and its impact on the phenomenology of the new sector. We also describe some of the theoretical implications of a nonzero θ~. In particular, θ~ can generate anmore » O(1) threshold correction to the QCD vacuum angle θ near the TeV scale, sharply constraining ultraviolet solutions to the strong CP problem. Furthermore, finding that θ~ is small may be interpreted as evidence in favor of UV solutions to strong CP, particularly those based on spontaneously broken P or CP symmetries.« less

  20. A photometric survey of strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesterly, Katie

    Strong gravitational lenses of active galactic nuclei are useful tools for studying many astrophysical issues including the rate of expansion of the universe and the equation of state of dark energy. These issues are highly dependent on the mass distribution near or in the line-of-sight of the lens. Because gravitational lenses often lie in poorly-studied complex environments, models for the mass distribution have been poorly constructed. Over the past decade, our team has been involved in a large study to fully characterize the environments of and line-of-sight structures toward a number of strong gravitational lenses. One vexing problem has been that nearby structures are important contributors to lensing potentials, but our photometry of these is incomplete due to saturation of galaxy cores on the deep images from the project. The purpose of this thesis is to complete a photometric survey of 28 lenses found by CASTLEs that will be combined with a previous study done by Williams et al. (2006). The previous study's data and my data are combined to form a large catalog of strong gravitational lenses that will be used for further studies.