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Sample records for inducible stat1 binding

  1. Toxoplasma gondii Inhibits gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and IFN-β-induced host cell STAT1 transcriptional activity by increasing the association of STAT1 with DNA.

    PubMed

    Rosowski, Emily E; Nguyen, Quynh P; Camejo, Ana; Spooner, Eric; Saeij, Jeroen P J

    2014-02-01

    The gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response, mediated by the STAT1 transcription factor, is crucial for host defense against the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, but prior infection with Toxoplasma can inhibit this response. Recently, it was reported that the Toxoplasma type II NTE strain prevents the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes containing Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG-1) to promoters of IFN-γ-induced secondary response genes such as Ciita and major histocompatibility complex class II genes in murine macrophages, thereby inhibiting their expression. We report here that a type I strain of Toxoplasma inhibits the expression of primary IFN-γ response genes such as IRF1 through a distinct mechanism not dependent on the activity of histone deacetylases. Instead, infection with a type I, II, or III strain of Toxoplasma inhibits the dissociation of STAT1 from DNA, preventing its recycling and further rounds of STAT1-mediated transcriptional activation. This leads to increased IFN-γ-induced binding of STAT1 at the IRF1 promoter in host cells and increased global IFN-γ-induced association of STAT1 with chromatin. Toxoplasma type I infection also inhibits IFN-β-induced interferon-stimulated gene factor 3-mediated gene expression, and this inhibition is also linked to increased association of STAT1 with chromatin. The secretion of proteins into the host cell by a type I strain of Toxoplasma without complete parasite invasion is not sufficient to block STAT1-mediated expression, suggesting that the effector protein responsible for this inhibition is not derived from the rhoptries.

  2. Lupus Risk Variant Increases pSTAT1 Binding and Decreases ETS1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoming; Zoller, Erin E.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Wu, Zhiguo; Namjou, Bahram; Williams, Adrienne H.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Adler, Adam; Shen, Nan; Nath, Swapan K.; Stevens, Anne M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Tsao, Betty P.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kamen, Diane L.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Reveille, John D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Petri, Michelle; Scofield, R. Hal; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Joo, Young Bin; Choi, Jeongim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Graham, Deborah Cunninghame; Vyse, Timothy J.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Harley, John B.; Kottyan, Leah C.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants at chromosomal region 11q23.3, near the gene ETS1, have been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or lupus, in independent cohorts of Asian ancestry. Several recent studies have implicated ETS1 as a critical driver of immune cell function and differentiation, and mice deficient in ETS1 develop an SLE-like autoimmunity. We performed a fine-mapping study of 14,551 subjects from multi-ancestral cohorts by starting with genotyped variants and imputing to all common variants spanning ETS1. By constructing genetic models via frequentist and Bayesian association methods, we identified 16 variants that are statistically likely to be causal. We functionally assessed each of these variants on the basis of their likelihood of affecting transcription factor binding, miRNA binding, or chromatin state. Of the four variants that we experimentally examined, only rs6590330 differentially binds lysate from B cells. Using mass spectrometry, we found more binding of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) to DNA near the risk allele of rs6590330 than near the non-risk allele. Immunoblot analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation of pSTAT1 in B cells heterozygous for rs6590330 confirmed that the risk allele increased binding to the active form of STAT1. Analysis with expression quantitative trait loci indicated that the risk allele of rs6590330 is associated with decreased ETS1 expression in Han Chinese, but not other ancestral cohorts. We propose a model in which the risk allele of rs6590330 is associated with decreased ETS1 expression and increases SLE risk by enhancing the binding of pSTAT1. PMID:25865496

  3. Tim-3 promotes tumor-promoting M2 macrophage polarization by binding to STAT1 and suppressing the STAT1-miR-155 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingwei; Zhou, Tingting; Xiao, Yan; Yu, Jiahui; Dou, Shuaijie; Chen, Guojiang; Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Wei; Shi, Qingzhu; Feng, Jiannan; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Han, Gencheng

    2016-01-01

    T cell Ig mucin-3 (Tim-3), an immune checkpoint inhibitor, shows therapeutic potential. However, the molecular mechanism by which Tim-3 regulates immune responses remains to be determined. In particular, very little is known about how Tim-3 works in innate immune cells. Here, we demonstrated that Tim-3 is involved in the development of tumor-promoting M2 macrophages in colon cancer. Manipulation of the Tim-3 pathway significantly affected the polarization status of intestinal macrophages and the progression of colon cancer. The Tim-3 signaling pathway in macrophages was explored using microarray, co-immunoprecipitation, gene mutation, and high-content analysis. For the first time, we demonstrated that Tim-3 polarizes macrophages by directly binding to STAT1 via residue Y256 and Y263 in its intracellular tail and inhibiting the STAT1-miR-155-SOCS1 signaling axis. We also identified a new signaling adaptor of Tim-3 in macrophages, and, by modulating the Tim-3 pathway, demonstrated the feasibility of altering macrophage polarization as a potential tool for treating this kind of disease.

  4. Henipavirus V protein association with Polo-like kinase reveals functional overlap with STAT1 binding and interferon evasion.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Louise E; Lo, Michael K; Rodriguez, Jason J; Rota, Paul A; Horvath, Curt M

    2008-07-01

    Emerging viruses in the paramyxovirus genus Henipavirus evade host antiviral responses via protein interactions between the viral V and W proteins and cellular STAT1 and STAT2 and the cytosolic RNA sensor MDA5. Polo-like kinase (PLK1) is identified as being an additional cellular partner that can bind to Nipah virus P, V, and W proteins. For both Nipah virus and Hendra virus, contact between the V protein and the PLK1 polo box domain is required for V protein phosphorylation. Results indicate that PLK1 is engaged by Nipah virus V protein amino acids 100 to 160, previously identified as being the STAT1 binding domain responsible for host interferon (IFN) signaling evasion, via a Thr-Ser-Ser-Pro motif surrounding residue 130. A distinct Ser-Thr-Pro motif surrounding residue 199 mediates the PLK1 interaction with Hendra virus V protein. Select mutations in the motif surrounding residue 130 also influenced STAT1 binding and innate immune interference, and data indicate that the V:PLK1 and V:STAT complexes are V mediated yet independent of one another. The effects of STAT1/PLK1 binding motif mutations on the function the Nipah virus P protein in directing RNA synthesis were tested. Remarkably, mutations that selectively disrupt the STAT or PLK1 interaction site have no effects on Nipah virus P protein-mediated viral RNA synthesis. Therefore, mutations targeting V protein-mediated IFN evasion will not alter the RNA synthetic capacity of the virus, supporting an attenuation strategy based on disrupting host protein interactions.

  5. The Ebola Virus Interferon Antagonist VP24 Directly Binds STAT1 and Has a Novel, Pyramidal Fold

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Adrianna P. P.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Liu, Tong; Abelson, Dafna M.; Lee, David E.; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2012-01-01

    Ebolaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with up to 90% lethality and in fatal cases, are characterized by early suppression of the host innate immune system. One of the proteins likely responsible for this effect is VP24. VP24 is known to antagonize interferon signaling by binding host karyopherin α proteins, thereby preventing them from transporting the tyrosine-phosphorylated transcription factor STAT1 to the nucleus. Here, we report that VP24 binds STAT1 directly, suggesting that VP24 can suppress at least two distinct branches of the interferon pathway. Here, we also report the first crystal structures of VP24, derived from different species of ebolavirus that are pathogenic (Sudan) and nonpathogenic to humans (Reston). These structures reveal that VP24 has a novel, pyramidal fold. A site on a particular face of the pyramid exhibits reduced solvent exchange when in complex with STAT1. This site is above two highly conserved pockets in VP24 that contain key residues previously implicated in virulence. These crystal structures and accompanying biochemical analysis map differences between pathogenic and nonpathogenic viruses, offer templates for drug design, and provide the three-dimensional framework necessary for biological dissection of the many functions of VP24 in the virus life cycle. PMID:22383882

  6. Ebola virus VP24 targets a unique NLS-binding site on karyopherin5 to selectively compete with nuclear import of phosphorylated STAT1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Edwards, Megan R.; Borek, Dominika M.; Feagins, Alicia R.; Mittal, Anuradha; Alinger, Joshua B.; Berry, Kayla N.; Yen, Benjamin; Hamilton, Jennifer; Brett, Tom J.; Pappu, Rohit V.; Leung, Daisy W.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During anti-viral defense, interferon (IFN) signaling triggers nuclear transport of tyrosine phosphorylated STAT1 (PY-STAT1), which occurs via a subset of karyopherin alpha (KPNA) nuclear transporters. Many viruses, including Ebola virus, actively antagonize STAT1 signaling to counteract the antiviral effects of IFN. Ebola virus VP24 protein (eVP24) binds KPNA to inhibit PY-STAT1 nuclear transport and render cells refractory to IFNs. We describe the structure of human KPNA5 C-terminus in complex with eVP24. In the complex, eVP24 recognizes a unique non-classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) binding site on KPNA5 that is necessary for efficient PY-STAT1 nuclear transport. eVP24 binds KPNA5 with very high affinity to effectively compete with and inhibit PY-STAT1 nuclear transport. In contrast, eVP24 binding does not affect the transport of classical NLS cargo. Thus, eVP24 counters cell-intrinsic innate immunity by selectively targeting PY-STAT1 nuclear import while leaving the transport of other cargo that maybe required for viral replication unaffected. PMID:25121748

  7. IL-27 controls the development of inducible regulatory T cells and Th17 cells via differential effects on STAT1.

    PubMed

    Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Wirtz, Stefan; Fantini, Massimo C; Weigmann, Benno; Galle, Peter R; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-07-01

    IL-27 is an IL-12-related cytokine frequently present at sites of inflammation that can promote both anti- and pro-inflammatory immune responses. Here, we have analyzed the mechanisms how IL-27 may drive such divergent immune responses. While IL-27 suppressed the development of proinflammatory Th17 cells, a novel role for this cytokine in inhibiting the development of anti-inflammatory, inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg) was identified. In fact, IL-27 suppressed the development of adaptive, TGF-beta-induced Forkhead box transcription factor p3-positive (Foxp3(+)) Treg. Whereas the blockade of Th17 development was dependent on the transcription factor STAT1, the suppression of iTreg development was STAT1 independent, suggesting that IL-27 utilizes different signaling pathways to shape T cell-driven immune responses. Our data thus demonstrate that IL-27 controls the development of Th17 and iTreg cells via differential effects on STAT1.

  8. Selective STAT protein degradation induced by paramyxoviruses requires both STAT1 and STAT2 but is independent of alpha/beta interferon signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Parisien, Jean-Patrick; Lau, Joe F; Rodriguez, Jason J; Ulane, Christina M; Horvath, Curt M

    2002-05-01

    The alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta)-induced STAT signal transduction pathway leading to activation of the ISGF3 transcription complex and subsequent antiviral responses is the target of viral pathogenesis strategies. Members of the Rubulavirus genus of the Paramyxovirus family of RNA viruses have acquired the ability to specifically target either STAT1 or STAT2 for proteolytic degradation as a countermeasure for evading IFN responses. While type II human parainfluenza virus induces STAT2 degradation, simian virus 5 induces STAT1 degradation. The components of the IFN signaling system that are required for STAT protein degradation by these paramyxoviruses have been investigated in a series of human somatic cell lines deficient in IFN signaling proteins. Results indicate that neither the IFN-alpha/beta receptor, the tyrosine kinases Jak1 or Tyk2, nor the ISGF3 DNA-binding subunit, IFN regulatory factor 9 (IRF9), is required for STAT protein degradation induced by either virus. Nonetheless, both STAT1 and STAT2 are strictly required in the host cell to establish a degradation-permissive environment enabling both viruses to target their respective STAT protein. Complementation studies reveal that STAT protein-activating tyrosine phosphorylation and functional src homology 2 (SH2) domains are dispensable for creating a permissive STAT degradation environment in degradation-incompetent cells, but the N terminus of the missing STAT protein is essential. Protein-protein interaction analysis indicates that V and STAT proteins interact physically in vitro and in vivo. These results constitute genetic and biochemical evidence supporting a virus-induced, IFN-independent STAT protein degradation complex that contains at least STAT1 and STAT2.

  9. Activation of JAK2/STAT1-alpha-dependent signaling events during Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Mauricio; Olivier, Martin; García, Luis F

    2002-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage involves TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) production and caspase cascade activation; however, the intracellular signaling pathways implicated remain to be established. Our results indicate that infection of the B10R murine macrophage line with M. tuberculosis induces apoptosis independent of mycobacterial phagocytosis and that M. tuberculosis induces protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity, JAK2/STAT1-alpha phosphorylation, and STAT1-alpha nuclear translocation. Inhibitors of PTK (AG-126), or JAK2 (AG-490) inhibited TNF-alpha and NO production, caspase 1 activation and apoptosis, suggesting that M. tuberculosis-induction of these events depends on JAK2/STAT1-alpha activation. In addition, we have obtained evidence that ManLAM capacity to inhibit M. tuberculosis-induced apoptosis involves the activation of the PTP SHP-1. The finding that M. tuberculosis infection activate JAK2/STAT1-alpha pathway suggests that M. tuberculosis might mimic macrophage-activating stimuli.

  10. Glucocorticoid-induced S-adenosylmethionine enhances the interferon signaling pathway by restoring STAT1 protein methylation in hepatitis B virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Bing, Yuntao; Zhu, Siying; Yu, Guozheng; Li, Ting; Liu, Weijun; Li, Changsheng; Wang, Yitao; Qi, Haolong; Guo, Tao; Yuan, Yufeng; He, Yueming; Liu, Zhisu; Liu, Quanyan

    2014-11-21

    Patients with chronic hepatitis B usually exhibit a low response to treatment with interferon α (IFN-α). An alternative approach to increase the response rate of IFN-α might be to immunologically stimulate the host with glucocorticoids (GCs) before treatment with IFN-α, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that the GCs enhance IFN signaling by inducing S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) when hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication was effectively suppressed by IFN-α. Here, we investigated the effect of GCs and IFN-α on AdoMet production and methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A) expression in vitro. Furthermore, we determined whether post-transcriptional regulation is involved in HBV-repressed MAT1A expression and AdoMet production induced by dexamethasone (Dex). We found that AdoMet homeostasis was disrupted by Dex and that Dex directly regulated MAT1A expression by enhancing the binding of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to the glucocorticoid-response element (GRE) of the MAT1A promoter. HBV reduced AdoMet production by increasing methylation at GRE sites within the MAT1A promoter. The X protein of hepatitis B virus led to hypermethylation in the MAT1A promoter by recruiting DNA methyltransferase 1, and it inhibited GR binding to the GRE in the MAT1A promoter. Dex could increase an antiviral effect by inducing AdoMet production via a positive feedback loop when HBV is effectively suppressed by IFN-α, and the mechanism that involves Dex-induced AdoMet could increase STAT1 methylation rather than STAT1 phosphorylation. These findings provide a possible mechanism by which GC-induced AdoMet enhances the antiviral activity of IFN-α by restoring STAT1 methylation in HBV-infected cells.

  11. HDAC Inhibitor-Mediated Beta-Cell Protection Against Cytokine-Induced Toxicity Is STAT1 Tyr701 Phosphorylation Independent

    PubMed Central

    Dahllöf, Mattias S.; Christensen, Dan P.; Harving, Mette; Wagner, Bridget K.; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition protects pancreatic beta-cells against apoptosis induced by the combination of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and interferon (IFN)-γ. Decreased expression of cell damage-related genes is observed on the transcriptional level upon HDAC inhibition using either IL-1β or IFN-γ alone. Whereas HDAC inhibition has been shown to regulate NFκB-activity, related primarily to IL-1β signaling, it is unknown whether the inhibition of HDACs affect IFN-γ signaling in beta-cells. Further, in non-beta-cells, there is a dispute whether HDAC inhibition regulates IFN-γ signaling at the level of STAT1 Tyr701 phosphorylation. Using different small molecule HDAC inhibitors with varying class selectivity, INS-1E wild type and stable HDAC1-3 knockdown pancreatic INS-1 cell lines, we show that IFN-γ-induced Cxcl9 and iNos expression as well as Cxcl9 and GAS reporter activity were decreased by HDAC inhibition in a STAT1 Tyr701 phosphorylation-independent fashion. In fact, knockdown of HDAC1 increased IFN-γ-induced STAT1 phosphorylation. PMID:25062500

  12. Liver X receptor and STAT1 cooperate downstream of Gas6/Mer to induce anti-inflammatory arginase 2 expression in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si-Yoon; Lim, Eun-Jin; Yoon, Young-So; Ahn, Young-Ho; Park, Eun-Mi; Kim, Hee-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Mer signaling increases the transcriptional activity of liver X receptor (LXR) to promote the resolution of acute sterile inflammation. Here, we aimed to understand the pathway downstream of Mer signaling after growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6) treatment that leads to LXR expression and transcriptional activity in mouse bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM). Gas6-induced increases in LXRα and LXRβ and expression of their target genes were inhibited in BMDM from STAT1−/− mice or by the STAT1-specific inhibitor fludarabine. Gas6-induced STAT1 phosphorylation, LXR activation, and LXR target gene expression were inhibited in BMDM from Mer−/− mice or by inhibition of PI3K or Akt. Gas6-induced Akt phosphorylation was inhibited in BMDM from STAT1−/− mice or in the presence of fludarabine. Gas6-induced LXR activity was enhanced through an interaction between LXRα and STAT1 on the DNA promoter of Arg2. Additionally, we found that Gas6 inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrite production in a STAT1 and LXR pathway-dependent manner in BMDM. Additionally, Mer-neutralizing antibody reduced LXR and Arg2 expression in lung tissue and enhanced NO production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in LPS-induced acute lung injury. Our data suggest the possibility that the Gas6-Mer-PI3K/Akt-STAT1-LXR-Arg2 pathway plays an essential role for resolving inflammatory response in acute lung injury. PMID:27406916

  13. STAT1 negatively regulates spatial memory formation and mediates the memory-impairing effect of Aβ.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Ma, Yun-Li; Hsieh, Ding-You; Liu, Yen-Chen; Lee, Eminy Hy

    2014-02-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) has an important role in inflammation and the innate immune response, but its role in the central nervous system is less well understood. Here, we examined the role of STAT1 in spatial learning and memory, and assessed the involvement of STAT1 in mediating the memory-impairing effect of amyloid-beta (Aβ). We found that water maze training downregulated STAT1 expression in the rat hippocampal CA1 area, and spatial learning and memory function was enhanced in Stat1-knockout mice. Conversely, overexpression of STAT1 impaired water maze performance. STAT1 strongly upregulated the expression of the extracellular matrix protein laminin β1 (LB1), which also impaired water maze performance in rats. Furthermore, Aβ impaired spatial learning and memory in association with a dose-dependent increase in STAT1 and LB1 expression, but knockdown of STAT1 and LB1 both reversed this effect of Aβ. This Aβ-induced increase in STAT1 and LB1 expression was also associated with a decrease in the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits, NR1, and NR2B. Overexpression of NR1 or NR2B or exogenous application of NMDA reversed Aβ-induced learning and memory deficits as well as Aβ-induced STAT1 and LB1 expression. Our results demonstrate that STAT1 negatively regulates spatial learning and memory through transcriptional regulation of LB1 expression. We also identified a novel mechanism for Aβ pathogenesis through STAT1 induction. Notably, impairment of spatial learning and memory by this STAT1-mediated mechanism is independent of cAMP responsive element-binding protein signaling.

  14. Analysis of STAT1 expression and biological activity reveals interferon-tau-dependent STAT1-regulated SOCS genes in the bovine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Vitorino Carvalho, A; Eozenou, C; Healey, G D; Forde, N; Reinaud, P; Chebrout, M; Gall, L; Rodde, N; Padilla, A Lesage; Delville, C Giraud; Leveugle, M; Richard, C; Sheldon, I M; Lonergan, P; Jolivet, G; Sandra, O

    2016-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins are critical for the regulation of numerous biological processes. In cattle, microarray analyses identified STAT1 as a differentially expressed gene in the endometrium during the peri-implantation period. To gain new insights about STAT1 during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy, we investigated STAT1 transcript and protein expression, as well as its biological activity in bovine tissue and cells of endometrial origin. Pregnancy increased STAT1 expression on Day 16, and protein and phosphorylation levels on Day 20. In cyclic and pregnant females, STAT1 was located in endometrial cells but not in the luminal epithelium at Day 20 of pregnancy. The expression of STAT1 during the oestrous cycle was not affected by progesterone supplementation. In vivo and in vitro, interferon-tau (IFNT) stimulated STAT1 mRNA expression, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation in IFNT-stimulated endometrial cells, we demonstrated an increase of STAT1 binding on interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1), cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH), suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 (SOCS1, SOCS3) gene promoters consistent with the induction of their transcripts. Our data provide novel molecular insights into the biological functions of STAT1 in the various cells composing the endometrium during maternal pregnancy recognition and implantation.

  15. Sophocarpine Protects Mice from ConA-Induced Hepatitis via Inhibition of the IFN-Gamma/STAT1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Xiu-Xiu; Wang, Rui-Lin; Zhang, Cong-En; Liu, Shi-Jing; Shen, Hong-Hui; Guo, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Ya-Ming; Niu, Ming; Wang, Jia-Bo; Bai, Zhao-Fang; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2017-01-01

    Sophocarpine is the major pharmacologically active compound of the traditional Chinese herbal medicine Radix Sophorae Subprostratae which has been used in treating hepatitis for years in China. It has been demonstrated that Sophocarpine exerts an activity in immune modulation and significantly decreases the production of inflammatory cytokines. However, the protective effects of Sophocarpine in T cell-dependent immune hepatitis remained unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effects and pharmacological mechanisms of Sophocarpine on Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis, an experimental model of T cell-mediated liver injury. BALB/C mice were pretreated with Sophocarpine or Bicyclol for five consecutive days. Thirty minutes after the final administration, the mice were injected with 15 mg⋅kg-1 of ConA intravenously. The results indicated that pretreatment with Sophocarpine significantly ameliorated liver inflammation and injury as evidenced by both biochemical and histopathological observations. Moreover, in Sophocarpine-pretreated mice, liver messenger RNA expression levels of chemokines and adhesion molecules, such as macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, CXC chemokine ligand 10, and Intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were markedly reduced. Further studies revealed that Sophocarpine significantly downregulated the expression of T-bet via inhibition of signal transducers and activators of transcription1 (STAT1) activation and overexpression of suppressor of cytokine signaling1, inhibiting the activation of Th1 cells and the expression of Interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Altogether, these results suggest new opportunities to use Sophocarpine in the treatment of T cell-mediated liver disease. In summary, Sophocarpine could attenuate ConA-induced liver injury, and the protective effect of Sophocarpine was associated with its inhibition effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and the IFN-γ/STAT1 signaling pathway. PMID:28377718

  16. The p127 subunit (DDB1) of the UV-DNA damage repair binding protein is essential for the targeted degradation of STAT1 by the V protein of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5.

    PubMed

    Andrejeva, J; Poole, E; Young, D F; Goodbourn, S; Randall, R E

    2002-11-01

    The V protein of simian virus 5 (SV5) blocks interferon signaling by targeting STAT1 for proteasome-mediated degradation. Here we present three main pieces of evidence which demonstrate that the p127 subunit (DDB1) of the UV damage-specific DNA binding protein (DDB) plays a central role in this degradation process. First, the V protein of an SV5 mutant which fails to target STAT1 for degradation does not bind DDB1. Second, mutations in the N and C termini of V which abolish the binding of V to DDB1 also prevent V from blocking interferon (IFN) signaling. Third, treatment of HeLa/SV5-V cells, which constitutively express the V protein of SV5 and thus lack STAT1, with short interfering RNAs specific for DDB1 resulted in a reduction in DDB1 levels with a concomitant increase in STAT1 levels and a restoration of IFN signaling. Furthermore, STAT1 is degraded in GM02415 (2RO) cells, which have a mutation in DDB2 (the p48 subunit of DDB) which abolishes its ability to interact with DDB1, thereby demonstrating that the role of DDB1 in STAT1 degradation is independent of its association with DDB2. Evidence is also presented which demonstrates that STAT2 is required for the degradation of STAT1 by SV5. These results suggest that DDB1, STAT1, STAT2, and V may form part of a large multiprotein complex which leads to the targeted degradation of STAT1 by the proteasome.

  17. Melatonin inhibits Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of nitric oxide and interleukin-6 in murine macrophages by suppressing NF-κB and STAT1 activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jin, Ji-Young; Lee, Ju-Youn; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2011-03-01

    Although a range of biological and pharmacological activities of melatonin have been reported, little is known about its potential anti-inflammatory efficacy in periodontal disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of melatonin on the production of inflammatory mediators by murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a major cause of inflammatory reactions in the periodontium, and sought to determine the underlying mechanisms of action. Melatonin suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) at both gene transcription and translation levels in P. intermedia LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. P. intermedia LPS-induced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity was significantly inhibited by melatonin. Melatonin did not reduce NF-κB transcriptional activity at the level of IκB-α degradation. Melatonin blocked NF-κB signaling through the inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p50 subunit and suppressed STAT1 signaling. Although further research is required to clarify the detailed mechanism of action, we conclude that melatonin may contribute to blockade of the host-destructive processes mediated by these two proinflammatory mediators and could be a highly efficient modulator of host response in the treatment of inflammatory periodontal disease.

  18. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Subunit Vaccines Induce High Levels of Neutralizing Antibodies But No Protection in STAT1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Kortekaas, Jeroen; Vloet, Rianka P M; McAuley, Alexander J; Shen, Xiaoli; Bosch, Berend Jan; de Vries, Laura; Moormann, Rob J M; Bente, Dennis A

    2015-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus is a tick-borne bunyavirus of the Nairovirus genus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans with high case fatality. Here, we report the development of subunit vaccines and their efficacy in signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) knockout mice. Ectodomains of the structural glycoproteins Gn and Gc were produced using a Drosophila insect cell-based expression system. A single vaccination of STAT129 mice with adjuvanted Gn or Gc ectodomains induced neutralizing antibody responses, which were boosted by a second vaccination. Despite these antibody responses, mice were not protected from a CCHFV challenge infection. These results suggest that neutralizing antibodies against CCHFV do not correlate with protection of STAT1 knockout mice.

  19. STAT1, STAT3 and p38MAPK are involved in the apoptotic effect induced by a chimeric cyclic interferon-{alpha}2b peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Viviana C.; Pena, Clara; Roguin, Leonor P.

    2010-02-15

    In the search of mimetic peptides of the interferon-{alpha}2b molecule (IFN-{alpha}2b), we have previously designed and synthesized a chimeric cyclic peptide of the IFN-{alpha}2b that inhibits WISH cell proliferation by inducing an apoptotic response. Here, we first studied the ability of this peptide to activate intracellular signaling pathways and then evaluated the participation of some signals in the induction of apoptosis. Stimulation of WISH cells with the cyclic peptide showed tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak1 and Tyk2 kinases, tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 transcription factors and activation of p38 MAPK pathway, although phosphorylation levels or kinetics were in some conditions different to those obtained under IFN-{alpha}2b stimulus. JNK and p44/42 pathways were not activated by the peptide in WISH cells. We also showed that STAT1 and STAT3 downregulation by RNA interference decreased the antiproliferative activity and the amount of apoptotic cells induced by the peptide. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK also reduced the peptide growth inhibitory activity and the apoptotic effect. Thus, we demonstrated that the cyclic peptide regulates WISH cell proliferation through the activation of Jak/STAT signaling pathway. In addition, our results indicate that p38 MAPK may also be involved in cell growth regulation. This study suggests that STAT1, STAT3 and p38 MAPK would be mediating the antitumor and apoptotic response triggered by the cyclic peptide in WISH cells.

  20. STAT1-Induced HLA Class I Upregulation Enhances Immunogenicity and Clinical Response to Anti-EGFR mAb Cetuximab Therapy in HNC Patients.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Raghvendra M; Trivedi, Sumita; Concha-Benavente, Fernando; Hyun-Bae, Jie; Wang, Lin; Seethala, Raja R; Branstetter, Barton F; Ferrone, Soldano; Ferris, Robert L

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying cetuximab-mediated upregulation of HLA class I antigen-processing machinery components in head and neck cancer (HNC) cells and to determine the clinical significance of these changes in cetuximab-treated HNC patients. Flow cytometry, signaling studies, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were performed using HNC cells treated with cetuximab alone or with Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-bearing lymphocytes to establish the mechanism of EGFR-dependent regulation of HLA APM expression. A prospective phase II clinical trial of neoadjuvant cetuximab was used to correlate HLA class I expression with clinical response in HNC patients. EGFR blockade triggered STAT1 activation and HLA upregulation, in a src homology-containing protein (SHP)-2-dependent fashion, more prominently in HLA-B/C than in HLA-A alleles. EGFR signaling blockade also enhanced IFNγ receptor 1 (IFNAR) expression, augmenting induction of HLA class I and TAP1/2 expression by IFNγ, which was abrogated in STAT1(-/-) cells. Cetuximab enhanced HNC cell recognition by EGFR853-861-specific CTLs, and notably enhanced surface presentation of a non-EGFR peptide (MAGE-3271-279). HLA class I upregulation was significantly associated with clinical response in cetuximab-treated HNC patients. EGFR induces HLA downregulation through SHP-2/STAT1 suppression. Reversal of HLA class I downregulation was more prominent in clinical responders to cetuximab therapy, supporting an important role for adaptive immunity in cetuximab antitumor activity. Abrogating EGFR-induced immune escape mechanisms and restoring STAT1 signaling to reverse HLA downregulation using cetuximab should be combined with strategies to enhance adaptive cellular immunity.

  1. Structural Basis of the Inhibition of STAT1 Activity by Sendai Virus C Protein

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Kosuke; Matoba, Yasuyuki; Irie, Takashi; Kawabata, Ryoko; Fukushi, Masaya; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    inert. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of STAT1 associated with the C-terminal half of the C protein. Molecular modeling and experiments suggested that the two C proteins bind to and stabilize the parallel form of the STAT1 dimer, which are likely to be phosphorylated at Tyr701, further inducing high-molecular-weight complex formation and inhibition of transcription by IFN-γ. We also discuss the possible mechanism of inhibition of the IFN-α/β pathways by the C protein. This is the first structural report of the C protein, suggesting a mechanism of evasion of the paramyxovirus from innate immunity. PMID:26339056

  2. Biflorin, Isolated from the Flower Buds of Syzygium aromaticum L., Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Mediators via STAT1 Inactivation in Macrophages and Protects Mice from Endotoxin Shock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi-Ho; Shin, Ji-Sun; Lee, Woo-Seok; Ryu, Byeol; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-04-22

    Two chromone C-glucosides, biflorin (1) and isobiflorin (2), were isolated from the flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum L. (Myrtaceae). Here, inhibitory effects of 1 and 2 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW 264.7 macrophages were evaluated, and 1 (IC50 = 51.7 and 37.1 μM, respectively) was more potent than 2 (IC50 > 60 and 46.0 μM). The suppression of NO and PGE2 production by 1 correlated with inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Compound 1 reduced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression via inhibition of their promoter activities. Compound 1 inhibited the LPS-induced production and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, 1 reduced p-STAT1 and p-p38 expression but did not affect the activity of nuclear factor κ light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) or activator protein 1 (AP-1). In a mouse model of LPS-induced endotoxemia, 1 reduced the mRNA levels of iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α, and the phosphorylation-mediated activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), consequently improving the survival rates of mice. Compound 1 showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema and croton-oil-induced ear edema in rats. The collective data indicate that the suppression of pro-inflammatory gene expression via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and STAT1 inactivation may be a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of 1.

  3. KAP1 regulates type I interferon/STAT1-mediated IRF-1 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kamitani, Shinya; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Togi, Sumihito; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Ishiyama, Hironobu; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2008-05-30

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in immune responses, hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, and other biological processes. Recently, we showed that KAP1 is a novel STAT-binding partner that regulates STAT3-mediated transactivation. KAP1 is a universal co-repressor protein for the KRAB zinc finger protein superfamily of transcriptional repressors. In this study, we found KAP1-dependent repression of interferon (IFN)/STAT1-mediated signaling. We also demonstrated that endogenous KAP1 associates with endogenous STAT1 in vivo. Importantly, a small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction in KAP1 expression enhanced IFN-induced STAT1-dependent IRF-1 gene expression. These results indicate that KAP1 may act as an endogenous regulator of the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway.

  4. STAT1 acts as a tumor promoter for leukemia development.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Boris; Stoiber, Dagmar; Moriggl, Richard; Weisz, Eva; Ott, René G; Kreibich, Rita; Levy, David E; Beug, Hartmut; Freissmuth, Michael; Sexl, Veronika

    2006-07-01

    The tumor suppressor STAT1 is considered a key regulator of the surveillance of developing tumors. Here, we describe an unexpected tumor-promoting role for STAT1 in leukemia. STAT1(-/-) mice are partially protected from leukemia development, and STAT1(-/-) tumor cells induce leukemia in RAG2(-/-) and immunocompetent mice with increased latency. The low MHC class I protein levels of STAT1(-/-) tumor cells enable efficient NK cell lysis and account for the enhanced tumor clearance. Strikingly, STAT1(-/-) tumor cells acquire increased MHC class I expression upon leukemia progression. These findings define STAT1 as a tumor promoter in leukemia development. Furthermore, we describe the upregulation of MHC class I expression as a general mechanism that allows for the escape of hematopoietic malignancies from immune surveillance.

  5. Elevated level of Interleukin-35 in colorectal cancer induces conversion of T cells into iTr35 by activating STAT1/STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guohua; Zhou, Yunlan; Yue, Chaoyan; Yuan, Xiangliang; Zheng, Yingxia; Wang, Weiwei; Deng, Lin; Shen, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    IL-35 is a novel heterodimeric and inhibitory cytokine, composed of interleukin-12 subunit alpha (P35) and Epstein-Barr virus -induced gene 3 (EBI3). IL-35 has been reported to be produced by a range of cell types, especially regulatory T cells, and to exert immunosuppressive effects via the STATx signaling pathway. In this study, we demonstrated that IL-35 expression was elevated in both serum and tumors in patients with colorectal cancer. IL-35 mainly expressed in CD4+ T cells in human colorectal cancer tumors and adjacent tissues. Increased IL-35 expression in tumor-adjacent tissues was significantly associated with tumor metastasis. IL-35 inhibited the proliferation of CD4+CD25− T effector cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, and its suppression was partially reversed by applying IL-35-neutralizing antibodies. IL-35 treatment activated the phosphorylation of both STAT1 and STAT3 in human CD4+ T cells. Meanwhile, IL-35 induced a positive feedback loop to promote its own production. We observed that Tregs obtained from colorectal cancer patients were capable of inducing more IL-35 production. In addition, EBI3 promoter-driven luciferase activity was higher than that of the mock plasmid after IL-35stimulation. Thus, our study indicates that the high level of IL-35 in colorectal cancer promotes the production of IL-35 via STAT1 and STAT3, which suppresses T cell proliferation and may participate in tumor immunotolerance. PMID:27682874

  6. Tannic acid inhibits EGFR/STAT1/3 and enhances p38/STAT1 signalling axis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Darvin, Pramod; Joung, Youn Hee; Kang, Dong Young; Sp, Nipin; Byun, Hyo Joo; Hwang, Tae Sook; Sasidharakurup, Hema; Lee, Chi Ho; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Yang, Young Mok

    2017-04-01

    Tannic acid (TA), a naturally occurring polyphenol, is a potent anti-oxidant with anti-proliferative effects on multiple cancers. However, its ability to modulate gene-specific expression of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes has not been assessed. This work investigates the mechanism of TA to regulate canonical and non-canonical STAT pathways to impose the gene-specific induction of G1-arrest and apoptosis. Regardless of the p53 status and membrane receptors, TA induced G1-arrest and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Tannic acid distinctly modulated both canonical and non-canonical STAT pathways, each with a specific role in TA-induced anti-cancer effects. Tannic acid enhanced STAT1 ser727 phosphorylation via upstream serine kinase p38. This STAT1 ser727 phosphorylation enhanced the DNA-binding activity of STAT1 and in turn enhanced expression of p21(Waf1/Cip1) . However, TA binds to EGF-R and inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of both STAT1 and STAT3. This inhibition leads to the inhibition of STAT3/BCL-2 DNA-binding activity. As a result, the expression and mitochondrial localization of BCl-2 are declined. This altered expression and localization of mitochondrial anti-pore factors resulted in the release of cytochrome c and the activation of intrinsic apoptosis cascade involving caspases. Taken together, our results suggest that TA modulates EGF-R/Jak2/STAT1/3 and P38/STAT1/p21(Waf1/Cip1) pathways and induce G1-arrest and intrinsic apoptosis in breast carcinomas.

  7. STAT1 regulates MD-2 expression in monocytes of sepsis via miR-30a.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhong; Li, Tiehua; Wu, Benquan; Liu, Hui; Luo, Jinmei; Feng, Dingyun; Shi, Yunfeng

    2014-12-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. MD-2 is a 25-kDa lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein that forms a heterodimer with TLR42, but its regulation in sepsis is not clear. This study aims to investigate the molecular mechanism of regulation of MD-2. Inflammation cytokines in monocytes were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, and it was found that IL-10 was elevated significantly in the monocytes with LPS treatment. And then, when the cells were treated with IL-10, STAT1 was activated in the monocytes using Western blotting. It was also found that STAT1 could enhance MD-2 expression on transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Finally, miR-30a was predicted to the molecule that may regulate STAT1 expression. It was verified that STAT1 was a new target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a could inhibit IL-10-induced cytokine release by targeting STAT1-MD-2 in monocytes. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated that miR-30a inhibits MD-2 expression by targeting of STAT1 in human monocytes.

  8. IL-7 Promotes CD95-Induced Apoptosis in B Cells via the IFN-γ/STAT1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Dang Vu Phuong, Linh; Ruffin, Nicolas; Pham Hong, Thang; Lantto, Rebecka; Vivar, Nancy; Chiodi, Francesca; Rethi, Bence

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) concentrations are increased in the blood of CD4+ T cell depleted individuals, including HIV-1 infected patients. High IL-7 levels might stimulate T cell activation and, as we have shown earlier, IL-7 can prime resting T cell to CD95 induced apoptosis as well. HIV-1 infection leads to B cell abnormalities including increased apoptosis via the CD95 (Fas) death receptor pathway and loss of memory B cells. Peripheral B cells are not sensitive for IL-7, due to the lack of IL-7Ra expression on their surface; however, here we demonstrate that high IL-7 concentration can prime resting B cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis via an indirect mechanism. T cells cultured with IL-7 induced high CD95 expression on resting B cells together with an increased sensitivity to CD95 mediated apoptosis. As the mediator molecule responsible for B cell priming to CD95 mediated apoptosis we identified the cytokine IFN-γ that T cells secreted in high amounts in response to IL-7. These results suggest that the lymphopenia induced cytokine IL-7 can contribute to the increased B cell apoptosis observed in HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:22194871

  9. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Tretiakova, Maria; Zhang Zhongfa; Li Yan; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Gao Yuanhong; Mai Weiyuan; Furge, Kyle; Qian Chaonan; Amato, Robert; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10{sup -8} for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10{sup -4} for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  10. STAT1 drives tumor progression in serous papillary endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kharma, Budiman; Baba, Tsukasa; Matsumura, Noriomi; Kang, Hyun Sook; Hamanishi, Junzo; Murakami, Ryusuke; McConechy, Melissa M; Leung, Samuel; Yamaguchi, Ken; Hosoe, Yuko; Yoshioka, Yumiko; Murphy, Susan K; Mandai, Masaki; Hunstman, David G; Konishi, Ikuo

    2014-11-15

    Recent studies of the interferon-induced transcription factor STAT1 have associated its dysregulation with poor prognosis in some cancers, but its mechanistic contributions are not well defined. In this study, we report that the STAT1 pathway is constitutively upregulated in type II endometrial cancers. STAT1 pathway alteration was especially prominent in serous papillary endometrial cancers (SPEC) that are refractive to therapy. Our results defined a "SPEC signature" as a molecular definition of its malignant features and poor prognosis. Specifically, we found that STAT1 regulated MYC as well as ICAM1, PD-L1, and SMAD7, as well as the capacity for proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion, and in vivo tumorigenecity in cells with a high SPEC signature. Together, our results define STAT1 as a driver oncogene in SPEC that modulates disease progression. We propose that STAT1 functions as a prosurvival gene in SPEC, in a manner important to tumor progression, and that STAT1 may be a novel target for molecular therapy in this disease.

  11. Complex roles of Stat1 in regulating gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramana, C V; Chatterjee-Kishore, M; Nguyen, H; Stark, G R

    2000-05-15

    Stat1 is a fascinating and complex protein with multiple, yet contrasting transcriptional functions. Upon activation, it drives the expression of many genes but also suppresses the transcription of others. These opposing characteristics also apply to its role in facilitating crosstalk between signal transduction pathways, as it participates in both synergistic activation and inhibition of gene expression. Stat1 is a functional transcription factor even in the absence of inducer-mediated activation, participating in the constitutive expression of some genes. This review summarizes the well studied involvement of Stat1 in IFN-dependent and growth factor-dependent signaling and then describes the roles of Stat1 in positive, negative and constitutive regulation of gene expression as well as its participation in crosstalk between signal transduction pathways. Oncogene (2000).

  12. STAT1 is essential for the inhibition of hepatitis C virus replication by interferon-λ but not by interferon-α

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Shota; Takeuchi, Kenji; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Honjoh, Chisato; Kato, Yuji; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Hotta, Hak; Sada, Kiyonao

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) and IFN-λ are structurally distinct cytokines that bind to different receptors, but induce expression of similar sets of genes through Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathways. The difference between IFN-α and IFN-λ signaling remains poorly understood. Here, using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, we examine the role of STAT1 and STAT2 in the inhibition of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication by IFN-α and IFN-λ. Treatment with IFN-α increases expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) and decreases viral RNA and protein levels in HCV-infected Huh-7.5 human hepatoma cells. These responses are only partially attenuated by knockout of STAT1 but are abolished by knockout of STAT2. In contrast, the inhibition of HCV replication by IFN-λ is abolished by knockout of STAT1 or STAT2. Microarray analysis reveals that IFN-α but not IFN-λ can induce expression of the majority of ISGs in STAT1 knockout cells. These findings suggest that IFN-α can inhibit HCV replication through a STAT2-dependent but STAT1-independent pathway, whereas IFN-λ induces ISG expression and inhibits HCV replication exclusively through a STAT1- and STAT2-dependent pathway. PMID:27929099

  13. Unphosphorylated STAT1 promotes sarcoma development through repressing expression of Fas and Bad and conferring apoptotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Mary A.; Rahman, Nur-Taz; Yang, Dafeng; Lahat, Guy; Lazar, Alexander J.; Pollock, Raphael; Lev, Dina; Liu, Kebin

    2012-01-01

    STAT1 exists in phosphorylated (pSTAT1) and unphosphorylated (uSTAT1) forms each regulated by IFN-γ. Although STAT1 is a key mediator of the IFN-γ signaling pathway, an essential component of the host cancer immunosurveillance system, STAT1 is also overexpressed in certain human cancers where the functions of pSTAT1 and uSTAT1 are ill-defined. Using a murine model of soft tissue sarcoma (STS), we demonstrate that disruption of the IFN effector molecule IRF8 decreases pSTAT1 and increases uSTAT1 in STS cells, thereby increasing their metastatic potential. We determined that the IRF8 gene promoter was hypermethylated frequently in human STS. An analysis of 123 human STS specimens revealed that high uSTAT1 levels in tumor cells was correlated with a reduction in disease-specific survival, whereas high pSTAT1 levels in tumor cells was correlated with an increase in disease-specific survival. In addition, uSTAT1 levels were negatively correlated with pSTAT1 levels in these STS specimens. Mechanistic investigations revealed that IRF8 suppressed STAT1 transcription by binding the STAT1 promoter. RNAi-mediated silencing of STAT1 in STS cells was sufficient to increase expression of the apoptotic mediators Fas and Bad and to elevate the sensitivity of STS cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis. Together, our findings show how the phosphorylation status of pSTAT1 determines its function as a tumor suppressor, with uSTAT1 acting as a tumor promoter that acts by elevating resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis to promote immune escape. PMID:22805310

  14. GYF-17, a chloride substituted 2-(2-phenethyl)-chromone, suppresses LPS-induced inflammatory mediator production in RAW264.7 cells by inhibiting STAT1/3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhixiang; Gu, Yufan; Zhao, Yunfang; Song, Yuelin; Li, Jun; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-06-01

    GYF-17, a 2-(2-phenethyl)-chromone derivative, was isolated from agarwood and showed superior activity of inhibiting NO production of RAW264.7 cells induced by LPS in our preliminary pharmacodynamic screening. In order to develop novel therapeutic drug for acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, the anti-inflammatory activity and underlying mechanism of GYF-17 were investigated in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells. The results showed that GYF-17 could reduce LPS-induced expression of iNOS and then result in the decrement of NO production. More meaningful, the expression and secretion of key pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, were intensively inhibited by GYF-17. Furthermore, GYF-17 also down regulated the expression of COX2 and the production of PGE2 which plays important role in causing algesthesia during inflammatory response. In mechanism study, GYF-17 selectively suppressed phosphorylation of STAT1/3 and ERK1/2 during the activation of NF-κB, MAPK and STAT signaling pathways induced by LPS. Collectively, GYF-17 can intensively suppress the production of LPS-induced inflammatory mediators in RAW264.7 cells by inhibiting STAT1/3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and thereby shows great potential to be developed into therapeutic drug for inflammatory diseases.

  15. Alantolactone from Saussurea lappa Exerts Antiinflammatory Effects by Inhibiting Chemokine Production and STAT1 Phosphorylation in TNF-α and IFN-γ-induced in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hye-Sun; Jin, Sung-Eun; Kim, Ohn-Soon; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo; Jeong, Soo-Jin

    2015-07-01

    Skin inflammation is the most common condition seen in dermatology practice and can be caused by various allergic reactions and certain toxins or chemicals. In the present study, we investigated the antiinflammatory effects of Saussurea lappa, a medicinal herb, and its marker compounds alantolactone, caryophyllene, costic acid, costunolide, and dehydrocostuslactone in the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. HaCaT cells were stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and treated with S. lappa or each of five marker compounds. Chemokine production and expression were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 was determined by immunoblotting. Stimulation with TNF-α and IFN-γ significantly increased the production of the following chemokines: thymus-regulated and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC): regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES): macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC): and interleukin-8 (IL-8). By contrast, S. lappa and the five marker compounds significantly reduced the production of these chemokines by TNF-α and IFN-γ-treated cells. S. lappa and alantolactone suppressed the TNF-α and IFN-γ-stimulated increase in the phosphorylation of STAT1. Our results demonstrate that alantolactone from S. lappa suppresses TNF-α and IFN-γ-induced production of RANTES and IL-8 by blocking STAT1 phosphorylation in HaCaT cells.

  16. The HER2 inhibitor TAK165 Sensitizes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Retinoic Acid-Induced Myeloid Differentiation by activating MEK/ERK mediated RARα/STAT1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xuejing; Liu, Yujia; Li, Yangling; Xian, Miao; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Bo; Ying, Meidan; He, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The success of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in differentiation therapy for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) highly encourages researches to apply this therapy to other types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, AML, with the exception of APL, fails to respond to differentiation therapy. Therefore, research strategies to further sensitize cells to retinoids and to extend the range of AMLs that respond to retinoids beyond APLs are urgently needed. In this study, we showed that TAK165, a HER2 inhibitor, exhibited a strong synergy with ATRA to promote AML cell differentiation. We observed that TAK165 sensitized the AML cells to ATRA-induced cell growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, CD11b expression, mature morphologic changes, NBT reduction and myeloid regulator expression. Unexpectedly, HER2 pathway might not be essential for TAK165-enhanced differentiation when combined with ATRA, while the enhanced differentiation was dependent on the activation of the RARα/STAT1 axis. Furthermore, the MEK/ERK cascade regulated the activation of STAT1. Taken together, our study is the first to evaluate the synergy of TAK165 and ATRA in AML cell differentiation and to assess new opportunities for the combination of TAK165 and ATRA as a promising approach for future differentiation therapy. PMID:27074819

  17. STAT1 and STAT3 in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Avalle, Lidia; Pensa, Sara; Regis, Gabriella; Novelli, Francesco; Poli, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factors STAT1 and STAT3 appear to play opposite roles in tumorigenesis. While STAT3 promotes cell survival/proliferation, motility and immune tolerance and is considered as an oncogene, STAT1 mostly triggers anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses while enhancing anti-tumor immunity. Despite being activated downstream of common cytokine and growth factor receptors, their activation is reciprocally regulated and perturbation in their balanced expression or phosphorylation levels may re-direct cytokine/growth factor signals from proliferative to apoptotic, or from inflammatory to anti-inflammatory. Here we review the functional canonical and non-canonical effects of STAT1 and STAT3 activation in tumorigenesis and their potential cross-regulation mechanisms. PMID:24058752

  18. The Effects of Aerosolized STAT1 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Rat Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjun; Liao, Bin; Zeng, Ming; Zhu, Chen; Fan, Xianming

    2009-01-01

    Previous study showed that aerosolized signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASON) inhibited the expression of STAT1 and ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and decreased the concentrations of TGF-β, PDGF and TNF-α in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in bleomycin (BLM)-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. Administration of STAT1 ASON ameliorated alveolitis in rat pulmonary fibrosis. However, further investigations are needed to determine whether there is an effect from administration of STAT1 ASON on fibrosis. This study investigated the effect of aerosolized STAT1 ASON on the expressions of inflammatory mediators, hydroxyproline and type I and type III collagen mRNA in BLM-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. The results showed that STAT1 ASON applied by aerosolization could ameliorate alveolitis and fibrosis, inhibit the expressions of inflammatory mediators, decrease the content of hydroxyproline, and suppress the expressions of type I and type III collagen mRNA in lung tissue in BLM-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. These results suggest that aerosolized STAT1 ASON might be considered as a promising new strategy in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19254480

  19. Non-Canonical Role of IKKα in the Regulation of STAT1 Phosphorylation in Antiviral Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Shiba, Yuko; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Non-self RNA is recognized by retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), inducing type I interferons (IFNs). Type I IFN promotes the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which requires the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1). We previously reported that dsRNA induced STAT1 phosphorylation via a type I IFN-independent pathway in addition to the well-known type I IFN-dependent pathway. IκB kinase α (IKKα) is involved in antiviral signaling induced by dsRNA; however, its role is incompletely understood. Here, we explored the function of IKKα in RLR-mediated STAT1 phosphorylation. Silencing of IKKα markedly decreased the level of IFN-β and STAT1 phosphorylation inHeH response to dsRNA. However, the inhibition of IKKα did not alter the RLR signaling-mediated dimerization of interferon responsive factor 3 (IRF3) or the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB). These results suggest a non-canonical role of IKKα in RLR signaling. Furthermore, phosphorylation of STAT1 was suppressed by IKKα knockdown in cells treated with a specific neutralizing antibody for the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) and in IFNAR-deficient cells. Collectively, the dual regulation of STAT1 by IKKα in antiviral signaling suggests a role for IKKα in the fine-tuning of antiviral signaling in response to non-self RNA. PMID:27992555

  20. STAT1 signaling is essential for protection against Cryptococcus neoformans infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Hole, Camaron R; Wozniak, Karen L; Olszewski, Michal A; Wormley, Floyd L

    2014-10-15

    Nonprotective immune responses to highly virulent Cryptococcus neoformans strains, such as H99, are associated with Th2-type cytokine production, alternatively activated macrophages, and inability of the host to clear the fungus. In contrast, experimental studies show that protective immune responses against cryptococcosis are associated with Th1-type cytokine production and classical macrophage activation. The protective response induced during C. neoformans strain H99γ (C. neoformans strain H99 engineered to produce murine IFN-γ) infection correlates with enhanced phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT1 in macrophages; however, the role of STAT1 in protective immunity to C. neoformans is unknown. The current studies examined the effect of STAT1 deletion in murine models of protective immunity to C. neoformans. Survival and fungal burden were evaluated in wild-type and STAT1 knockout (KO) mice infected with either strain H99γ or C. neoformans strain 52D (unmodified clinical isolate). Both strains H99γ and 52D were rapidly cleared from the lungs, did not disseminate to the CNS, or cause mortality in the wild-type mice. Conversely, STAT1 KO mice infected with H99γ or 52D had significantly increased pulmonary fungal burden, CNS dissemination, and 90-100% mortality. STAT1 deletion resulted in a shift from Th1 to Th2 cytokine bias, pronounced lung inflammation, and defective classical macrophage activation. Pulmonary macrophages from STAT1 KO mice exhibited defects in NO production correlating with inefficient inhibition of fungal proliferation. These studies demonstrate that STAT1 signaling is essential not only for regulation of immune polarization but also for the classical activation of macrophages that occurs during protective anticryptococcal immune responses.

  1. Newcastle Disease Virus V Protein Targets Phosphorylated STAT1 to Block IFN-I Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xusheng; Fu, Qiang; Meng, Chunchun; Yu, Shengqing; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Luna; Song, Cuiping; Sun, Yingjie; Tan, Lei; Hu, Shunlin; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan; Ding, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) V protein is considered as an effector for IFN antagonism, however, the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, the expression of STAT1 and phospho-STAT1 in cells infected with NDV or transfected with V protein-expressing plasmids were analyzed. Our results showed that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 reduction in the cells depends on the stimulation of IFN-α. In addition, a V-deficient genotype VII recombinant NDV strain rZJ1-VS was constructed using reverse genetic technique to confirm the results. The rZJ1-VS lost the ability to reduce phospho-STAT1 and induced higher expression of IFN-responsive genes in infected cells. Furthermore, treatment with an ubiquitin E1 inhibitor PYR-41 demonstrated that phospho-STAT1 reduction was caused by degradation, but not de-phosphorylation. We conclude that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 degradation to block IFN-α signaling, which adds novel knowledge to the strategies used by paramyxoviruses to evade IFN. PMID:26859759

  2. MiRNA203 suppresses the expression of protumorigenic STAT1 in glioblastoma to inhibit tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chuan He; Wang, Yinan; Sims, Michelle; Cai, Chun; He, Ping; Yue, Junming; Cheng, Jinjun; Boop, Frederick A.; Pfeffer, Susan R.; Pfeffer, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in regulating cancer cell proliferation, migration, survival and sensitivity to chemotherapy. The potential application of using miRNAs for cancer prognosis holds great promise but miRNAs with predictive value remain to be identified and underlying mechanisms of how they promote or suppress tumorigenesis are not completely understood. Here, we show a strong correlation between miR203 expression and brain cancer patient survival. Low miR203 expression is found in subsets of brain cancer patients, especially glioblastoma. Ectopic miR203 expression in glioblastoma cell lines inhibited cell proliferation and migration, increased sensitivity to apoptosis induced by interferon or temozolomide in vitro, and inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. We further show that STAT1 is a direct functional target of miR203, and miR203 level is negatively correlated with STAT1 expression in brain cancer patients. Knockdown of STAT1 expression mimicked the effect of overexpression of miR203 in glioblastoma cell lines, and inhibited cell proliferation and migration, increased sensitivity to apoptosis induced by IFN or temozolomide in vitro, and inhibited glioblastoma tumorigenesis in vivo. High STAT1 expression significantly correlated with poor survival in brain cancer patients. Mechanistically, we found that enforced miR203 expression in glioblastoma suppressed STAT1 expression directly, as well as that of a number of STAT1 regulated genes. Taken together, our data suggest that miR203 acts as a tumor suppressor in glioblastoma by suppressing the pro-tumorigenic action of STAT1. MiR203 may serve as a predictive biomarker and potential therapeutic target in subsets of cancer patients with low miR203 expression. PMID:27705947

  3. Distal regulatory element of the STAT1 gene potentially mediates positive feedback control of STAT1 expression.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Hijikata, Takao

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified a distal regulatory element located approximately 5.5-kb upstream of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) gene, thereafter designating it as 5.5-kb upstream regulatory region (5.5URR). In this study, we investigated the functional roles of 5.5URR in the transcriptional regulation of STAT1 gene. A chromosome conformation capture assay indicated physical interaction of 5.5URR with the STAT1 core promoter. In luciferase reporter assays, 5.5URR-combined STAT1 core promoter exhibited significant increase in reporter activity enhanced by forced STAT1 expression or interferon (IFN) treatment, but STAT1 core promoter alone did not. The 5.5URR contained IFN-stimulated response element and GAS sites, which bound STAT1 complexes in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays of HEK293 cells with Halo-tagged STAT1 expression indicated the association of Halo-tagged STAT1 with 5.5URR. ChIP assays with IFN treatment demonstrated that IFNs promoted the recruitment of Halo-tagged STAT1 to 5.5URR. Forced STAT1 expression or IFN treatment increased the expression of endogenous STAT1 and other IFN signaling pathway components, such as STAT2, IRF9 and IRF1, besides IFN-responsive genes. Collectively, the results suggest that 5.5URR may provide a regulatory platform for positive feedback control of STAT1 expression possibly to amplify or sustain the intracellular IFN signals.

  4. Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early 1 Protein Rewires Upstream STAT3 to Downstream STAT1 Signaling Switching an IL6-Type to an IFNγ-Like Response

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Simone; Zenger, Marion; Reitberger, Tobias; Danzer, Daniela; Übner, Theresa; Munday, Diane C.; Paulus, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) major immediate-early 1 protein (IE1) is best known for activating transcription to facilitate viral replication. Here we present transcriptome data indicating that IE1 is as significant a repressor as it is an activator of host gene expression. Human cells induced to express IE1 exhibit global repression of IL6- and oncostatin M-responsive STAT3 target genes. This repression is followed by STAT1 phosphorylation and activation of STAT1 target genes normally induced by IFNγ. The observed repression and subsequent activation are both mediated through the same region (amino acids 410 to 445) in the C-terminal domain of IE1, and this region serves as a binding site for STAT3. Depletion of STAT3 phenocopies the STAT1-dependent IFNγ-like response to IE1. In contrast, depletion of the IL6 receptor (IL6ST) or the STAT kinase JAK1 prevents this response. Accordingly, treatment with IL6 leads to prolonged STAT1 instead of STAT3 activation in wild-type IE1 expressing cells, but not in cells expressing a mutant protein (IE1dl410-420) deficient for STAT3 binding. A very similar STAT1-directed response to IL6 is also present in cells infected with a wild-type or revertant hCMV, but not an IE1dl410-420 mutant virus, and this response results in restricted viral replication. We conclude that IE1 is sufficient and necessary to rewire upstream IL6-type to downstream IFNγ-like signaling, two pathways linked to opposing actions, resulting in repressed STAT3- and activated STAT1-responsive genes. These findings relate transcriptional repressor and activator functions of IE1 and suggest unexpected outcomes relevant to viral pathogenesis in response to cytokines or growth factors that signal through the IL6ST-JAK1-STAT3 axis in hCMV-infected cells. Our results also reveal that IE1, a protein considered to be a key activator of the hCMV productive cycle, has an unanticipated role in tempering viral replication. PMID:27387064

  5. Cystatin B and HIV regulate the STAT-1 signaling circuit in HIV-infected and INF-β-treated human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rivera, L E; Kraiselburd, E; Meléndez, L M

    2016-10-01

    Cystatin B is a cysteine protease inhibitor that induces HIV replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). This protein interacts with signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT-1) factor and inhibits the interferon (IFN-β) response in Vero cells by preventing STAT-1 translocation to the nucleus. Cystatin B also decreases the levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT-1 (STAT-1PY). However, the mechanisms of cystatin B regulation on STAT-1 phosphorylation in MDM are unknown. We hypothesized that cystatin B inhibits IFN-β antiviral responses and induces HIV replication in macrophage reservoirs through the inhibition of STAT-1 phosphorylation. Macrophages were transfected with cystatin B siRNA prior to interferon-β treatment or infected with HIV-ADA to determine the effect of cystatin B modulation in STAT-1 localization and activation using immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays. Cystatin B decreased STAT-1PY and its transportation to the nucleus, while HIV infection retained unphosphorylated STAT (USTAT-1) in the nucleus avoiding its exit to the cytoplasm for eventual phosphorylation. In IFN-β-treated MDM, cystatin B inhibited the nuclear translocation of both, USTAT-1 and STAT-1PY. These results demonstrate that cystatin B interferes with the STAT-1 signaling and IFN-β-antiviral responses perpetuating HIV in macrophage reservoirs.

  6. STAT2 Is a Pervasive Cytokine Regulator due to Its Inhibition of STAT1 in Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Johnathan; Pelzel, Christin; Begitt, Andreas; Mee, Maureen; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Scott, David J.; Vinkemeier, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    STAT2 is the quintessential transcription factor for type 1 interferons (IFNs), where it functions as a heterodimer with STAT1. However, the human and murine STAT2-deficient phenotypes suggest important additional and currently unidentified type 1 IFN-independent activities. Here, we show that STAT2 constitutively bound to STAT1, but not STAT3, via a conserved interface. While this interaction was irrelevant for type 1 interferon signaling and STAT1 activation, it precluded the nuclear translocation specifically of STAT1 in response to IFN-γ, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-27. This is explained by the dimerization between activated STAT1 and unphosphorylated STAT2, whereby the semiphosphorylated dimers adopted a conformation incapable of importin-α binding. This, in turn, substantially attenuated cardinal IFN-γ responses, including MHC expression, senescence, and antiparasitic immunity, and shifted the transcriptional output of IL-27 from STAT1 to STAT3. Our results uncover STAT2 as a pervasive cytokine regulator due to its inhibition of STAT1 in multiple signaling pathways and provide an understanding of the type 1 interferon-independent activities of this protein. PMID:27780205

  7. Two domains of the V protein of virulent canine distemper virus selectively inhibit STAT1 and STAT2 nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Röthlisberger, Anne; Wiener, Dominique; Schweizer, Matthias; Peterhans, Ernst; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plattet, Philippe

    2010-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes in dogs a severe systemic infection, with a high frequency of demyelinating encephalitis. Among the six genes transcribed by CDV, the P gene encodes the polymerase cofactor protein (P) as well as two additional nonstructural proteins, C and V; of these V was shown to act as a virulence factor. We investigated the molecular mechanisms by which the P gene products of the neurovirulent CDV A75/17 strain disrupt type I interferon (IFN-alpha/beta)-induced signaling that results in the establishment of the antiviral state. Using recombinant knockout A75/17 viruses, the V protein was identified as the main antagonist of IFN-alpha/beta-mediated signaling. Importantly, immunofluorescence analysis illustrated that the inhibition of IFN-alpha/beta-mediated signaling correlated with impaired STAT1/STAT2 nuclear import, whereas the phosphorylation state of these proteins was not affected. Coimmunoprecipitation assays identified the N-terminal region of V (VNT) responsible for STAT1 targeting, which correlated with its ability to inhibit the activity of the IFN-alpha/beta-mediated antiviral state. Conversely, while the C-terminal domain of V (VCT) could not function autonomously, when fused to VNT it optimally interacted with STAT2 and subsequently efficiently suppressed the IFN-alpha/beta-mediated signaling pathway. The latter result was further supported by a single mutation at position 110 within the VNT domain of CDV V protein, resulting in a mutant that lost STAT1 binding while retaining a partial STAT2 association. Taken together, our results identified the CDV VNT and VCT as two essential modules that complement each other to interfere with the antiviral state induced by IFN-alpha/beta-mediated signaling. Hence, our experiments reveal a novel mechanism of IFN-alpha/beta evasion among the morbilliviruses.

  8. STAT1 signaling within macrophages is required for antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Hole, Camaron R; Wozniak, Karen L; Olszewski, Michal A; Mueller, Mathias; Wormley, Floyd L

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily affects AIDS patients and patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. In immunocompromised individuals, C. neoformans can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Studies using a virulent strain of C. neoformans engineered to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ), denoted H99γ, demonstrated that protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection is associated with the generation of a T helper 1 (Th1)-type immune response and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-mediated classical (M1) macrophage activation. However, the critical mechanism by which M1 macrophages mediate their anti-C. neoformans activity remains unknown. The current studies demonstrate that infection with C. neoformans strain H99γ in mice with macrophage-specific STAT1 ablation resulted in severely increased inflammation of the pulmonary tissue, a dysregulated Th1/Th2-type immune response, increased fungal burden, deficient M1 macrophage activation, and loss of protection. STAT1-deficient macrophages produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) than STAT1-sufficient macrophages, correlating with an inability to control intracellular cryptococcal proliferation, even in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, macrophages from inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, which had intact ROS production, were deficient in anticryptococcal activity. These data indicate that STAT1 activation within macrophages is required for M1 macrophage activation and anti-C. neoformans activity via the production of NO.

  9. Modulation of Stat-1 in Human Macrophages Infected with Different Species of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Sabrina; Rinaldi, Laura; Cangiano, Alfonsina Mariarosaria; Brandi, Giorgio; Magnani, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The infection of human macrophages by pathogenic bacteria induces different signaling pathways depending on the type of cellular receptors involved in the microorganism entry and on their mechanism(s) of survival and replication in the host cell. It was reported that Stat proteins play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the changes in Stat-1 activation (phosphorylation in p-tyr701) after uptake of two Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila) characterized by their varying abilities to enter, survive, and replicate in human macrophages. Comparing the results obtained with Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, Stat-1 activation in macrophages does not seem to be related to LPS content. The p-tyr701Stat-1 expression levels were found to be independent of the internalized bacterial number and IFN-γ release. On the contrary, Jak/Stat-1 pathway activation only occurs when an active infection has been established in the host macrophage, and it is plausible that the differences in the expression levels of p-tyr701Stat-1 could be due to different survival mechanisms or to differences in bacteria life cycles within macrophages. PMID:27437406

  10. STAT1 Inhibits miR-181a Expression to Suppress Colorectal Cancer Cell Proliferation through PTEN/Akt.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingwen; Li, Xiang; Tan, Fengbo; Yu, Nanhui; Pei, Haiping

    2017-03-21

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) exhibits tumor-suppressor properties by inhibiting oncogenic pathways and promoting tumor immunosurveillance. MicroRNAs, a group of non-coding endogenous ones, may regulate gene expression and plays specific roles in tumorigenesis. Recently, miR-181a has been reported to be associated with poor prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Using human colorectal cancer cell lines, we demonstrated that STAT1 suppresses both LoVo and SW480 cell growth by down-regulating miR-181a. STAT1 regulates the expression of miR-181a through binding to the elements in the miR-181a's promoter region. Further, we revealed that miR-181a accelerates CRC cell proliferation through phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten (PTEN). In addition, PTEN protein was upregulated in response to STAT1 overexpression or miR-181a inhibition, downregulated in response to STAT1 knockdown or miR-181a overexpression. Without changes on the AKT protein level, p-AKT was downregulated by STAT1 overexpression or miR-181a inhibition while upregulated by STAT1 knockdown or miR-181a overexpression, indicating PTEN/Akt pathway activated in STAT1/miR-181a regulation of CRC cell proliferation. Taken together, our findings shed new light on the STAT1/miR-181a/PTEN pathway in colorectal cancer and add new insight regarding the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. PI3Kα and STAT1 Interplay Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Immune Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Mounayar, Marwan; Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Smith, Brian; Solhjou, Zhabiz; Maarouf, Omar H.; Azzi, Jamil; Chabtini, Lola; Fiorina, Paolo; Kraus, Morey; Briddell, Robert; Fodor, William; Herrlich, Andreas; Abdi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is critical for their use in therapeutic applications. MSC response to specific inflammatory cues allows them to switch between a proinflammatory (MSC1) or anti-inflammatory (MSC2) phenotype. Regulatory mechanisms controlling this switch remain to be defined. One characteristic feature of MSC2 is their ability to respond to IFNγ with induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), representing the key immunoregulatory molecule released by human MSC. Here, we show that STAT1 and PI3Kα pathways interplay regulates IFNγ-induced IDO production in MSC. Chemical phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pan-inhibition, PI3Kα-specific inhibition or shRNA knockdown diminished IFNγ-induced IDO production. This effect involved PI3Kα-mediated upregulation of STAT1 protein levels and phosphorylation at Ser727. Overexpression of STAT1 or of a constitutively active PI3Kα mutant failed to induce basal IDO production, but shifted MSC into an MSC2-like phenotype by strongly enhancing IDO production in response to IFNγ as compared to controls. STAT1 overexpression strongly enhanced MSC-mediated T-cell suppression. The same effect could be induced using short-term pretreatment of MSC with a chemical inhibitor of the counter player of PI3K, phosphatase and tensin homolog. Finally, downregulation of STAT1 abrogated the immunosuppressive capacity of MSC. Our results for the first time identify critical upstream signals for the induced production of IDO in MSCs that could be manipulated therapeutically to enhance their immunosuppressive phenotype. PMID:25753288

  12. Expression patterns of NLRC5 and key genes in the STAT1 pathway following infection with Salmonella pullorum.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lingling; Ma, Teng; Chang, Guobin; Liu, Xiangping; Guo, Xiaomin; Xu, Lu; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Xu, Qi; Chen, Guohong

    2017-01-15

    NLRC5, a protein belonging to the NOD-like receptor protein family (NLRs), is highly expressed in immune tissues and cells. NLRC5 plays an important role in the immune response of humans, where its regulatory mechanism has been elucidated. However, the function and regulation of NLRC5 in chickens remains unclear. In this study, temporal expression characteristics of NLRC5 and associated genes in the STAT1 pathway in chickens following infection with Salmonella pullorum were investigated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and hierarchical cluster analyses. The role of transcription factor STAT1 in NLRC5 promoter activity was studied via point mutation of the STAT1-binding cis-element and dual-luciferase assays. Our results showed a strong correlation between NLRC5 and NF-κB. In addition, STAT1 played a crucial role in NLRC5 promoter activity, and may be activated via the interferon pathway. There was also a close relationship between CD80 and NF-κB, and CD80 may up-regulate NF-κB expression and enhance its protein activity in chickens. These findings reveal the temporal characteristics of chicken NLRC5 and STAT1 genes during S. pullorum infection, and highlight the role of STAT1 in NLRC5 promoter activity. This information aids our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of NLRC5 and associated genes, and will help elucidate their function in the immune response of chickens.

  13. STAT1 is overexpressed in tumors selected for radioresistance and confers protection from radiation in transduced sensitive cells

    PubMed Central

    Khodarev, Nikolai N.; Beckett, Michael; Labay, Edwardine; Darga, Thomas; Roizman, Bernard; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2004-01-01

    Nu61, a radiation-resistant human tumor xenograft, was selected from a parental radiosensitive tumor SCC-61 by eight serial cycles of passage in athymic nude mice and in vivo irradiation. Replicate DNA array experiments identified 52 genes differentially expressed in nu61 tumors compared with SCC-61 tumors. Of these, 19 genes were in the IFN-signaling pathway and moreover, 25 of the 52 genes were inducible by IFN in the nu61 cell line. Among the genes involved in IFN signaling, STAT1α and STAT1β were the most highly overexpressed in nu61 compared to SCC-61. STAT1α and STAT1β cDNAs were cloned and stably transfected into SCC-61 tumor cells. Clones of SCC-61 tumor cells transfected with vectors expressing STAT1α and STAT1β demonstrated radioprotection after exposure to 3 Gy (P < 0.038). The results indicate that radioresistance acquired during radiotherapy treatment may account for some treatment failures and demonstrate an association of acquired tumor radioresistance with up-regulation of components of the IFN-related signaling pathway. PMID:14755057

  14. STAT1‐associated intratumoural TH1 immunity predicts chemotherapy resistance in high‐grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Au, Katrina K; Le Page, Cécile; Ren, Runhan; Meunier, Liliane; Clément, Isabelle; Tyrishkin, Kathrin; Peterson, Nichole; Kendall‐Dupont, Jennifer; Childs, Timothy; Francis, Julie‐Ann; Graham, Charles H; Craig, Andrew W; Squire, Jeremy A; Mes‐Masson, Anne‐Marie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High‐grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC) accounts for 70% of all epithelial ovarian cancers but clinical management is challenged by a lack of accurate prognostic and predictive biomarkers of chemotherapy response. This study evaluated the role of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) as an independent prognostic and predictive biomarker and its correlation with intratumoural CD8+ T cells in a second independent biomarker validation study. Tumour STAT1 expression and intratumoural CD8+ T cell infiltration were assessed by immunohistochemistry as a multicentre validation study conducted on 734 chemotherapy‐naïve HGSCs. NanoString‐based profiling was performed to correlate expression of STAT1 target genes CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 with CD8A transcript expression in 143 primary tumours. Multiplexed cytokine analysis of pre‐treatment plasma from resistant and sensitive patients was performed to assess systemic levels of STAT1induced cytokines. STAT1 was validated as a prognostic and predictive biomarker in both univariate and multivariate models and its expression correlated significantly with intra‐epithelial CD8+ T cell infiltration in HGSC. STAT1 levels increased the prognostic and predictive value of intratumoural CD8+ T cells, confirming their synergistic role as biomarkers in HGSC. In addition, expression of STAT1 target genes (CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11) correlated significantly with levels of, and CD8A transcripts from intratumoural CD8+ T cells within the resistant and sensitive tumours. Our findings provide compelling evidence that high levels of STAT1, STAT1induced chemokines and CD8+ T cells correlate with improved chemotherapy response in HGSC. These results identify STAT1 and its target genes as novel biomarkers of chemosensitivity in HGSC. These findings provide new translational opportunities for patient stratification for immunotherapies based on emerging biomarkers of inflammation in HGSC. An improved

  15. A STAT-1 knockout mouse model for Machupo virus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Machupo virus (MACV), a member of the Arenaviridae, causes Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, with ~20% lethality in humans. The pathogenesis of MACV infection is poorly understood, and there are no clinically proven treatments for disease. This is due, in part, to a paucity of small animal models for MACV infection in which to discover and explore candidate therapeutics. Methods Mice lacking signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) were infected with MACV. Lethality, viral replication, metabolic changes, hematology, histopathology, and systemic cytokine expression were analyzed throughout the course of infection. Results We report here that STAT-1 knockout mice succumbed to MACV infection within 7-8 days, and presented some relevant clinical and histopathological manifestations of disease. Furthermore, the model was used to validate the efficacy of ribavirin in protection against infection. Conclusions The STAT-1 knockout mouse model can be a useful small animal model for drug testing and preliminary immunological analysis of lethal MACV infection. PMID:21672221

  16. Bcl6 promotes osteoblastogenesis through Stat1 inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Fujie, Atsuhiro; Funayama, Atsushi; Miyauchi, Yoshiteru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Kanagawa, Hiroya; Katsuyama, Eri; Hao, Wu; Tando, Toshimi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Miyamoto, Kana; Kanaji, Arihiko; Morioka, Hideo; Matsumoto, Morio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-02-13

    Bone mass is tightly controlled by a balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities. Although these cell types mature via different pathways, some factors reportedly regulate differentiation of both. Here, in a search for factors governing osteoblastogenesis but also expressed in osteoclasts to control both cell types by one molecule, we identified B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) as one of those factors and show that it promotes osteoblast differentiation. Bcl6 was previously shown to negatively regulate osteoclastogenesis. We report that lack of Bcl6 results in significant inhibition of osteoblastogensis in vivo and in vitro and in defects in secondary ossification center formation in vivo. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (Stat1) reportedly attenuates osteoblast differentiation by inhibiting nuclear translocation of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which is essential for osteoblast differentiation. We found that lack of Bcl6 resulted in significant elevation of Stat1 mRNA and protein expression in osteoblasts and showed that Stat1 is a direct target of Bcl6 using a chromatin immune-precipitation assay. Mice lacking both Bcl6 and Stat1 (DKO) exhibited significant rescue of bone mass and osteoblastic parameters as well as partial rescue of secondary ossification center formation compared with Bcl6-deficient mice in vivo. Altered osteoblastogenesis in Bcl6-deficient cells was also restored in DKO in vitro. Thus, Bcl6 plays crucial roles in regulating both osteoblast activation and osteoclast inhibition. - Highlights: • Bcl6 is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Bcl6{sup −/−} mice exhibited altered osteoblastogenesis and reduced bone mass in vivo and in vitro. • We identified Stat1 as a direct target of Bcl6 in osteoblasts. • Bcl6 and Stat1 doubly deficient mice exhibited rescued bone phenotypes compared with Bcl6{sup −/−} mice.

  17. Early STAT1 activation after systemic delivery of HSV amplicon vectors suppresses transcription of the vector-encoded transgene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masataka; Chiocca, E Antonio; Saeki, Yoshinaga

    2007-11-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector is a powerful gene delivery vehicle that can accommodate up to 150 kilobase of exogenous DNA. However, amplicon-mediated transgene expression is often transient outside the nervous system. In order to define the role of host immune responses in silencing amplicon-encoded transgenes, we evaluated the kinetics of cytokine-/chemokine-expression after tail-vein injection of a luciferase-encoding amplicon into mice. Type I interferons (IFNs) were induced earliest, within an hour after injection, and several other cytokines/chemokines were subsequently upregulated in the livers of wild-type (WT) mice. When the same experiment was performed in signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1)-knockout (KO) mice, the levels of type I IFN expression were significantly lower and chemokine induction was almost non-existent. Importantly, STAT1-KO mice exhibited significantly higher and more sustained luciferase activity than did the WT mice, which is attributable to increased transcriptional activity rather than increased copy numbers of luciferase-encoding vector DNA. Further studies using primary cultured fibroblasts derived from WT and STAT1-KO mice revealed the significance of STAT1 signaling in transcriptional silencing of the amplicon-encoded transgene in vitro. Our results indicate that type I IFNs induced by systemic delivery of HSV amplicon vectors initiate a cascade of immune responses and suppress transgene expression at the transcriptional level by activation of STAT1.

  18. Exploring dual inhibitors for STAT1 and STAT5 receptors utilizing virtual screening and dynamics simulation validation.

    PubMed

    Raj, Utkarsh; Kumar, Himansu; Gupta, Saurabh; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins are latent cytoplasmic transcription factors that transduce signals from cytokines and growth factors to the nucleus and thereby regulate the expression of a variety of target genes. Although mutations of STATs have not been reported in human tumors but the activity of several members of the family, such as STAT1 and STAT5, is deregulated in a variety of human carcinoma. STAT1 and STAT5 share a structural similarity with a highly conserved SH2 domain which is responsible for the activation of STAT proteins on interaction with phosphotyrosine motifs for specific STAT-receptor contacts and STAT dimerization. The purpose of this study is to identify domain-specific dual inhibitors for both STAT1 and STAT5 proteins from a database of natural products and natural product-like compounds comprising of over 90,000 compounds. Virtual screening-based molecular docking was performed in order to find novel natural dual inhibitors. Further, the study was supported by the 50-ns molecular dynamics simulation for receptor-ligand complexes (STAT1-STOCK-1N-69677 and STAT5-STOCK-1N-69677). Analysis of molecular interactions in the SH2 domains of both STAT1 and STAT5 proteins with the ligand revealed few conserved amino acid residues which are responsible to stabilize the ligands within the binding pocket through bonded and non-bonded interactions. This study suggested that compound STOCK-1N-69677 might putatively act as a dual inhibitor of STAT1 and STAT5 receptors, through its binding to the SH2 domain.

  19. PARP9 and PARP14 cross-regulate macrophage activation via STAT1 ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Hiroshi; Goettsch, Claudia; Sharma, Amitabh; Ricchiuto, Piero; Goh, Wilson Wen Bin; Halu, Arda; Yamada, Iwao; Yoshida, Hideo; Hara, Takuya; Wei, Mei; Inoue, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Daiju; Mojcher, Alexander; Mattson, Peter C.; Barabási, Albert-László; Boothby, Mark; Aikawa, Elena; Singh, Sasha A.; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Despite the global impact of macrophage activation in vascular disease, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show, with global proteomic analysis of macrophage cell lines treated with either IFNγ or IL-4, that PARP9 and PARP14 regulate macrophage activation. In primary macrophages, PARP9 and PARP14 have opposing roles in macrophage activation. PARP14 silencing induces pro-inflammatory genes and STAT1 phosphorylation in M(IFNγ) cells, whereas it suppresses anti-inflammatory gene expression and STAT6 phosphorylation in M(IL-4) cells. PARP9 silencing suppresses pro-inflammatory genes and STAT1 phosphorylation in M(IFNγ) cells. PARP14 induces ADP-ribosylation of STAT1, which is suppressed by PARP9. Mutations at these ADP-ribosylation sites lead to increased phosphorylation. Network analysis links PARP9–PARP14 with human coronary artery disease. PARP14 deficiency in haematopoietic cells accelerates the development and inflammatory burden of acute and chronic arterial lesions in mice. These findings suggest that PARP9 and PARP14 cross-regulate macrophage activation. PMID:27796300

  20. Prostacyclin inhibits IFN-γ-stimulated cytokine expression by reduced recruitment of p300/CBP to STAT1 in a SOCS-1 independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Strassheim, Derek; Riddle, Suzzette R.; Burke, Danielle L.; Geraci, Mark W; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) is a vascular inflammatory disease. Prostacyclin (PGI2) is widely used to treat PAH and is believed to benefit patients largely through vasodilatory effects. PGI2 is also increasingly believed to have anti-inflammatory effects; including decreasing leukocyte cytokine production, yet few mechanistic details exist to explain how these effects are mediated at the transcriptional level. Since activated monocytes are critical sources of MCP-1 and other cytokines in cardiovascular inflammation, we examined the effects of iloprost on IFN-γ and IL-6 stimulated cytokine production in human monocytes. We found iloprost inhibited IFN-γ and IL-6-induced MCP-1, IL-8, RANTES, and TNF-α production in monocytes indicating wide-ranging anti-inflammatory action. We found that activation of STAT1 was critical for IFN-γ-induced MCP-1 production and demonstrated that iloprost inhibited STAT1 activation by several actions: 1) iloprost inhibited the phosphorylation of STAT1-S727 in the transactivation domain (TAD), thereby reducing recruitment of the histone acetylase and co-activator CBP/p300 to STAT1; 2) iloprost selectively inhibited activation of janus kinase 2 (JAK2), but not JAK1, both responsible for activation STAT1 via phosphorylation of STAT1-Y701, resulting in reduced nuclear recruitment and activation of STAT1; 3) SOCS-1, which normally terminates IFN-γ-signaling, was not involved in iloprost-mediated inhibition of STAT1, indicating divergence from the classical pathway for terminating IFN-γ-signaling. We conclude that PGI2 exerts anti-inflammatory action by inhibiting STAT1 induced cytokine production, in part by targeting the transactivation domain induced recruitment of the histone acetylase CBP/p300. PMID:19915063

  1. SAHA down-regulates the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase via inhibition of the JAK/STAT1 signaling pathway in gallbladder carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Jiang, Guanmin; Gao, Jiao; Li, Lingling; Du, Jun; Jiao, Xingyuan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the JAK/STAT1 signaling pathway in suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)-mediated down-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in gallbladder carcinoma cells. We treated SGC-996 gallbladder carcinoma cells with IFN-γ and SAHA. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of IDO, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation and interferon regulatory factor genes-1 (IRF-1). Confocal microscopy analysis was used to detect STAT1 translocation. Transient transfection and reporter gene assay was used for detecting the activation of γ-activated sites (GAS) and interferon-stimulated response elements (ISRE). The results revealed that IDO was expressed in SGC-996 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner when stimulated with IFN-γ and SAHA down-regulated the expression of IDO induced by IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. SAHA blocked the expression of IRF-1 induced by IFN-γ and SAHA inhibited IFN-γ-induced STAT1 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. In addition, SAHA down-regulated IFN-γ-induced activation of GAS and ISRE. In conclusion, SAHA down-regulated IDO expression via inhibition of the activation of members of the JAK/STAT1 signaling pathway. Therefore, regulation of the JAK/STAT1 signaling pathway may provide a new gallbladder carcinoma immunotherapeutic strategy to break tumor immune tolerance.

  2. Adenosine A1 Receptor Protects Against Cisplatin Ototoxicity by Suppressing the NOX3/STAT1 Inflammatory Pathway in the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Tejbeer; Borse, Vikrant; Sheth, Sandeep; Sheehan, Kelly; Ghosh, Sumana; Tupal, Srinivasan; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used antineoplastic agent that produces ototoxicity that is mediated in part by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the NOX3 NADPH oxidase pathway in the cochlea. Recent studies implicate ROS generation in mediating inflammatory and apoptotic processes and hearing loss by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1). In this study, we show that the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) protects against cisplatin ototoxicity by suppressing an inflammatory response initiated by ROS generation via NOX3 NADPH oxidase, leading to inhibition of STAT1. Trans-tympanic administration of the A1AR agonist R-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA) inhibited cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, as measured by auditory brainstem responses and scanning electron microscopy in male Wistar rats. This was associated with reduced NOX3 expression, STAT1 activation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and apoptosis in the cochlea. In vitro studies in UB/OC-1 cells, an organ of Corti immortalized cell line, showed that R-PIA reduced cisplatin-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 Ser727 (but not Tyr701) and STAT1 luciferase activity by suppressing the ERK1/2, p38, and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. R-PIA also decreased the expression of STAT1 target genes, such as TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and reduced cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. These data suggest that the A1AR provides otoprotection by suppressing NOX3 and inflammation in the cochlea and could serve as an ideal target for otoprotective drug therapy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors. Its use results in significant and permanent hearing loss, for which no US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment is currently available. In this study, we targeted the cochlear adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) by trans-tympanic injections of the agonist R

  3. Interaction of mumps virus V protein variants with STAT1-STAT2 heterodimer: experimental and theoretical studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mumps virus V protein has the ability to inhibit the interferon-mediated antiviral response by inducing degradation of STAT proteins. Two virus variants purified from Urabe AM9 mumps virus vaccine differ in their replication and transcription efficiency in cells primed with interferon. Virus susceptibility to IFN was associated with insertion of a non-coded glycine at position 156 in the V protein (VGly) of one virus variant, whereas resistance to IFN was associated with preservation of wild-type phenotype in the V protein (VWT) of the other variant. Results VWT and VGly variants of mumps virus were cloned and sequenced from Urabe AM9 vaccine strain. VGly differs from VWT protein because it possesses an amino acid change Gln103Pro (Pro103) and the Gly156 insertion. The effect of V protein variants on components of the interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3), STAT1 and STAT2 proteins were experimentally tested in cervical carcinoma cell lines. Expression of VWT protein decreased STAT1 phosphorylation, whereas VGly had no inhibitory effect on either STAT1 or STAT2 phosphorylation. For theoretical analysis of the interaction between V proteins and STAT proteins, 3D structural models of VWT and VGly were predicted by comparing with simian virus 5 (SV5) V protein structure in complex with STAT1-STAT2 heterodimer. In silico analysis showed that VWT-STAT1-STAT2 complex occurs through the V protein Trp-motif (W174, W178, W189) and Glu95 residue close to the Arg409 and Lys415 of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of STAT2, leaving exposed STAT1 Lys residues (K85, K87, K296, K413, K525, K679, K685), which are susceptible to proteasome degradation. In contrast, the interaction between VGly and STAT1-STAT2 heterodimer occurs in a region far from the NLS of STAT2 without blocking of Lys residues in both STAT1 and STAT2. Conclusions Our results suggest that VWT protein of Urabe AM9 strain of mumps virus may be more efficient than VGly to inactivate both the IFN

  4. STAT1 Pathway Mediates Amplification of Metastatic Potential and Resistance to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pitroda, Sean P.; Golden, Daniel W.; Bhayani, Mihir; Shao, Michael Y.; Darga, Thomas E.; Beveridge, Mara G.; Sood, Ravi F.; Sutton, Harold G.; Beckett, Michael A.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Posner, Mitchell C.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Traditionally IFN/STAT1 signaling is connected with an anti-viral response and pro-apoptotic tumor-suppressor functions. Emerging functions of a constitutively activated IFN/STAT1 pathway suggest an association with an aggressive tumor phenotype. We hypothesized that tumor clones that constitutively overexpress this pathway are preferentially selected by the host microenvironment due to a resistance to STAT1-dependent cytotoxicity and demonstrate increased metastatic ability combined with increased resistance to genotoxic stress. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that clones of B16F1 tumors grown in the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice demonstrate variable transcriptional levels of IFN/STAT1 pathway expression. Tumor cells that constitutively overexpress the IFN/STAT1 pathway (STAT1H genotype) are selected by the lung microenvironment. STAT1H tumor cells also demonstrate resistance to IFN-gamma (IFNγ), ionizing radiation (IR), and doxorubicin relative to parental B16F1 and low expressors of the IFN/STAT1 pathway (STAT1L genotype). Stable knockdown of STAT1 reversed the aggressive phenotype and decreased both lung colonization and resistance to genotoxic stress. Conclusions Our results identify a pathway activated by tumor-stromal interactions thereby selecting for pro-metastatic and therapy-resistant tumor clones. New therapies targeted against the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway may provide an effective strategy to treat or sensitize aggressive tumor clones to conventional cancer therapies and potentially prevent distant organ colonization. PMID:19503789

  5. VP8, the Major Tegument Protein of Bovine Herpesvirus 1, Interacts with Cellular STAT1 and Inhibits Interferon Beta Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Sharmin; Brownlie, Robert; Fodje, Michel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The UL47 gene product, VP8, is the most abundant tegument protein of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1). Previously, we demonstrated that a UL47-deleted BoHV-1 mutant (BoHV1-ΔUL47) exhibits 100-fold-reduced virulence in vitro and is avirulent in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that VP8 expression or BoHV-1 infection inhibits interferon beta (IFN-β) signaling by using an IFN-α/β-responsive plasmid in a luciferase assay. As transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) is an essential component in the IFN-signaling pathways, the effect of VP8 on STAT was investigated. An interaction between VP8 and STAT1 was established by coimmunoprecipitation assays in both VP8-transfected and BoHV-1-infected cells. Two domains of VP8, amino acids 259 to 482 and 632 to 686, were found to be responsible for its interaction with STAT1. The expression of VP8 did not induce STAT1 ubiquitination or degradation. Moreover, VP8 did not reduce STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation to downregulate IFN-β signaling. However, the expression of VP8 or a version of VP8 (amino acids 219 to 741) that contains the STAT1-interacting domains but not the nuclear localization signal prevented nuclear accumulation of STAT1. Inhibition of nuclear accumulation of STAT1 also occurred during BoHV-1 infection, while nuclear translocation of STAT1 was observed in BoHV1-ΔUL47-infected cells. During BoHV-1 infection, VP8 was detected in the cytoplasm at 2 h postinfection without any de novo protein synthesis, at which time STAT1 was already retained in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that viral VP8 downregulates IFN-β signaling early during infection, thus playing a role in overcoming the antiviral response of BoHV-1-infected cells. IMPORTANCE Since VP8 is the most abundant protein in BoHV-1 virions and thus may be released in large amounts into the host cell immediately upon infection, we proposed that it might have a function in the establishment of conditions suitable for viral replication

  6. STAT1 is Critical for Apoptosis in Macrophages Subjected to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Vitro and in Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesions in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wah-Seng; Timmins, Jenelle M.; Seimon, Tracie A.; Sadler, Anthony; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Tabas, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Background Macrophage apoptosis is a critical process in the formation of necrotic cores in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. In-vitro and in-vivo data suggest that macrophage apoptosis in advanced atheromata may be triggered by a combination of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and engagement of the type A scavenger receptor (SRA), which together induce death through a rise in cytosolic calcium and activation of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Methods and Results Using both primary peritoneal macrophages and studies in advanced atheromata in vivo, we introduce Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-1 (STAT1) as a critical and necessary component of ER stress/SRA-induced macrophage apoptosis. We show that STAT1 is serine-phosphorylated in macrophages subjected to SRA ligands and ER stress in a manner requiring cytosolic calcium, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and TLR4. Remarkably, apoptosis was inhibited by ~80–90% (p < 0.05) by STAT1 deficiency or CaMKII inhibition. In vivo, nuclear Ser-P-STAT1 was found in macrophage-rich regions of advanced murine and human atheromata. Most importantly, macrophage apoptosis was decreased by 61% (p = 0.034) and plaque necrosis by 34% (p = 0.02) in the plaques of fat-fed Ldlr−/− mice transplanted with Stat1−/− bone marrow. Conclusions STAT1 is critical for ER stress/SRA-induced apoptosis in primary tissue macrophages and in macrophage apoptosis in advanced atheromata. These findings suggest a potentially important role for STAT1-mediated macrophage apoptosis in atherosclerotic plaque progression. PMID:18227389

  7. STING Negatively Regulates Double-Stranded DNA-Activated JAK1-STAT1 Signaling via SHP-1/2 in B Cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guanjun; You, Ming; Ding, Liang; Fan, Hongye; Liu, Fei; Ren, Deshan; Hou, Yayi

    2015-05-01

    Recognition of cytosolic DNA initiates a series of innate immune responses by inducing IFN-I production and subsequent triggering JAK1-STAT1 signaling which plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of infection, inflammation and autoimmune diseases through promoting B cell activation and antibody responses. The stimulator of interferon genes protein (STING) has been demonstrated to be a critical hub of type I IFN induction in cytosolic DNA-sensing pathways. However, it still remains unknown whether cytosolic DNA can directly activate the JAK1-STAT1 signaling or not. And the role of STING is also unclear in this response. In the present study, we found that dsDNA directly triggered the JAK1-STAT1 signaling by inducing phosphorylation of the Lyn kinase. Moreover, this response is not dependent on type I IFN receptors. Interestingly, STING could inhibit dsDNA-triggered activation of JAK1-STAT1 signaling by inducing SHP-1 and SHP-2 phosphorylation. In addition, compared with normal B cells, the expression of STING was significantly lower and the phosphorylation level of JAK1 was significantly higher in B cells from MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice, highlighting the close association between STING low-expression and JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation in B cells in autoimmune diseases. Our data provide a molecular insight into the novel role of STING in dsDNA-mediated inflammatory disorders.

  8. IL-4 confers resistance to IL-27-mediated suppression on CD4+ T cells by impairing STAT1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihong; Wang, Shanze; Erekosima, Nkiruka; Li, Yapeng; Hong, Jessie; Qi, Xiaopeng; Merkel, Patricia; Nagabhushanam, Vijaya; Choo, Eugene; Katial, Rohit; Alam, Rafeul; Trikha, Anita; Chu, HongWei; Zhuang, Yonghua; Jin, Meiling; Bai, Chunxue; Huang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Th2 cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. Established Th2 cells have been shown to resist reprogramming into Th1 cells. The inherent stability of Th2 cells poses a significant barrier to treating allergic diseases. Objective We sought to understand the mechanisms by which CD4+ T cells from asthmatic patients resist the IL-27-mediated inhibition. Methods We isolated and cultured CD4+ T cells from both healthy individuals and allergic asthmatic patients in order to test whether IL-27 can inhibit IL-4 production by the cultured CD4+ T cells using ELISA. Culturing conditions that resulted in resistance to IL-27 were determined using both murine and human CD4+ T cell culture systems. STAT1 phosphorylation was analyzed by Western blot and flow cytometry. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (Socs) mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR. The small interfering RNA method was used to knockdown the expression of Socs3 mRNA. Main Results We demonstrated that CD4+ T cells from asthmatic patients resisted the suppression of IL-4 production mediated by IL-27. We observed that repeated exposure to Th2-inducing conditions rendered healthy human CD4+ T cells resistant to IL-27-mediated inhibition. Using an in vitro murine culture system, we further demonstrated that repeated or higher doses of IL-4 stimulation, but not IL-2 stimulation, upregulated Socs3 mRNA expression and impaired IL-27-induced STAT1 phosphorylation. The Knockdown of Socs3 mRNA expression restored IL-27-induced STAT1 phosphorylation and IL-27-mediated inhibition of IL-4-production. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that differentiated Th2 cells can resist IL-27-induced reprogramming toward Th1 cells by downregulating STAT1 phosphorylation and likely explain why the CD4+ T cells of asthmatic patients are resistant to IL-27-mediated inhibition. PMID:23958647

  9. Involvement of the transcription factor STAT1 in the regulation of porcine ovarian granulosa cell functions treated and not treated with ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Benco, A; Sirotkin, A V; Vasícek, D; Pavlová, S; Zemanová, J; Kotwica, J; Darlak, K; Valenzuela, F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of our in vitro experiments was to study the role of the transcription factor STAT1 and the hormone ghrelin in controlling porcine ovarian function. The effects of treatment with ghrelin (0, 1, 10, 100 ng/ml), transfection-induced overexpression of transcription factor STAT1, and their combination on apoptosis (expression of apoptosis-related peptides caspase-3, BAX and anti-apoptotic peptide BCL2), proliferation (expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigene PCNA, proliferation-associated protein kinase MAPK/ERK1,2) and release of the hormones progesterone (P(4)), prostaglandin F (PGF) and oxytocin (OXT) in cultured porcine ovarian granulosa cells was evaluated using RIA, immunocytochemistry and SDS-PAGE-western immunoblotting. It was found that ghrelin, when given alone, increased the expression of proliferation-associated PCNA and MAPK/ERK1,2, decreased the accumulation of apoptosis-related substances caspase-3, BAX, BCL2, decreased P(4), and increased PGF and OXT release. Ghrelin tended to promote accumulation of STAT1 in both control and transfected cells, although in transfected cells ghrelin at 1 ng/ml decreased STAT1 accumulation. Transfection of porcine granulosa cells by a gene construct encoding STAT1 promoted the expression of STAT1 and apoptosis-related-BAX but the expression of BCL2 did not, and decreased the accumulation of proliferation-associated MAPK/ERK1,2 but not that of PCNA. It also promoted PGF and OXT but not P(4) release. Overexpression of STAT1 reversed the effect of ghrelin on STAT1, PCNA, PGF, OXT (from stimulatory to inhibitory), BCL2, P(4) (from inhibitory to stimulatory), prevented ghrelin effect on caspase-3 and BAX, but did not affect ghrelin's effect on MAPK/ERK1,2 expression. These results suggest that ghrelin directly affects porcine ovarian cells function - stimulates proliferation, inhibits apoptosis and affects secretory activity. Furthermore, they demonstrated the involvement of the transcription factor STAT1 in

  10. A Novel Heterozygous Mutation in the STAT1 SH2 Domain Causes Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis, Atypically Diverse Infections, Autoimmunity, and Impaired Cytokine Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meesilpavikkai, Kornvalee; Dik, Willem A.; Schrijver, Benjamin; Nagtzaam, Nicole M. A.; van Rijswijk, Angelique; Driessen, Gertjan J.; van der Spek, Peter J.; van Hagen, P. Martin; Dalm, Virgil A. S. H.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by persistent or recurrent skin and mucosal surface infections with Candida species. Different gene mutations leading to CMC have been identified. These include various heterozygous gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) that are not only associated with infections but also with autoimmune manifestations. Recently, two STAT1 GOF mutations involving the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain have been reported, while so far, over 50 mutations have been described mainly in the coiled coil and the DNA-binding domains. Here, we present two members of a Dutch family with a novel STAT1 mutation located in the SH2 domain. T lymphocytes of these patients revealed STAT1 hyperphosphorylation and higher expression of STAT1 target genes. The clinical picture of CMC in our patients could be explained by diminished production of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-22, cytokines important in the protection against fungal infections. PMID:28348565

  11. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jane Q; Mori, Hidetoshi; Cardiff, Robert D; Trott, Josephine F; Hovey, Russell C; Hubbard, Neil E; Engelberg, Jesse A; Tepper, Clifford G; Willis, Brandon J; Khan, Imran H; Ravindran, Resmi K; Chan, Szeman R; Schreiber, Robert D; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1(tm1Rds) homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment.

  12. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, Robert D.; Trott, Josephine F.; Hovey, Russell C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Engelberg, Jesse A.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Willis, Brandon J.; Khan, Imran H.; Ravindran, Resmi K.; Chan, Szeman R.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1tm1Rds homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment. PMID:26075897

  13. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of the STAT1 gene in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Deng, Tingxian; Pang, Chunying; Zhu, Peng; Liao, Biyun; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Bingzhuang; Liang, Xianwei

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) is a critical component of the transcription factor complex in the interferon (IFN) signaling pathways. Of the seven STAT isoforms, STAT1 is a key mediator of type I and type III IFN signaling, but limited information is available for the STAT genes in the water buffalo. Here, we amplified and identified the complete coding sequence (CDS) of the buffalo STAT1 gene by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Sequence analysis indicated that the buffalo STAT1 gene length size was 3437 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 2244 bp that encoded 747 amino acids for the first time. The buffalo STAT1 CDS showed 99, 98, 89, 93, 86, 85, and 87% identity with that of Bos taurus, Ovis aries, Homo sapiens, Sus scrofa, Rattus norvegicus, Mus musculus, and Capra hircus. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that the nearest relationship existed between the water buffalo and B. taurus. The STAT1 gene was ubiquitously expressed in 11 buffalo tissues by real-time PCR, whereas STAT1 was expressed at higher levels in the lymph. The STAT1 gene contained five targeted microRNA sequences compared with the B. taurus by the miRBase software that provide a fundamental for identifying the STAT1 gene function.

  14. Monocyte-expressed urokinase inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell growth by activating Stat1.

    PubMed

    Kunigal, Sateesh; Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Natalia; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2003-12-15

    After vascular injury, a remodeling process occurs that features leukocyte migration and infiltration. Loss of endothelial integrity allows the leukocytes to interact with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to elicit "marching orders"; however, the signaling processes are poorly understood. We found that human monocytes inhibit VSMC proliferation and induce a migratory potential. The monocytes signal the VSMCs through the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). The VSMC uPA receptor (uPAR) receives the signal and activates the transcription factor Stat1 that, in turn, mediates the antiproliferative effects. These results provide the first evidence that monocytes signal VSMCs by mechanisms involving the fibrinolytic system, and they imply an important link between the uPA/uPAR-related signaling machinery and human vascular disease.

  15. Glucolipotoxicity initiates pancreatic β-cell death through TNFR5/CD40-mediated STAT1 and NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Bagnati, Marta; Ogunkolade, Babatunji W; Marshall, Catriona; Tucci, Carmen; Hanna, Katie; Jones, Tania A; Bugliani, Marco; Nedjai, Belinda; Caton, Paul W; Kieswich, Julius; Yaqoob, Muhammed M; Ball, Graham R; Marchetti, Piero; Hitman, Graham A; Turner, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder, where failure to maintain normal glucose homoeostasis is associated with, and exacerbated by, obesity and the concomitant-elevated free fatty acid concentrations typically found in these patients. Hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia together contribute to a decline in insulin-producing β-cell mass through activation of the transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1. There are however a large number of molecules potentially able to modulate NF-κB and STAT1 activity, and the mechanism(s) by which glucolipotoxicity initially induces NF-κB and STAT1 activation is currently poorly defined. Using high-density microarray analysis of the β-cell transcritptome, we have identified those genes and proteins most sensitive to glucose and fatty acid environment. Our data show that of those potentially able to activate STAT1 or NF-κB pathways, tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-5 is the most highly upregulated by glucolipotoxicity. Importantly, our data also show that the physiological ligand for TNFR5, CD40L, elicits NF-κB activity in β-cells, whereas selective knockdown of TNFR5 ameliorates glucolipotoxic induction of STAT1 expression and NF-κB activity. This data indicate for the first time that TNFR5 signalling has a major role in triggering glucolipotoxic islet cell death. PMID:27512950

  16. The measles virus phosphoprotein interacts with the linker domain of STAT1

    SciTech Connect

    Devaux, Patricia Priniski, Lauren; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-09-15

    The measles virus (MV) phosphoprotein (P) and V proteins block the interferon (IFN) response by impeding phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1). We characterized how STAT1 mutants interact with P and JAK1 phosphorylation. Certain mutants of the linker, the Src-homology 2 domain (SH2), or the transactivation domain had reduced or abolished phosphorylation through JAK1 after IFN treatment. Other mutants, mainly localized in the linker, failed to interact with P as documented by the lack of interference with nuclear translocation. Thus the functional footprint of P on STAT1 localizes mainly to the linker domain; there is also some overlap with the STAT1 phosphorylation functional footprint on the SH2 domain. Based on these observations, we discuss how the MV-P might operate to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway. - Highlights: • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for MV-P interaction. • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for STAT1 phosphorylation. • Residues interferring with both functions have similar location on STAT1. • The viral P and V proteins may operate in concert to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway.

  17. The non-pathogenic Henipavirus Cedar paramyxovirus phosphoprotein has a compromised ability to target STAT1 and STAT2.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Kim G; Marsh, Glenn A; Wang, Lin-Fa; Netter, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Immune evasion by the lethal henipaviruses, Hendra (HeV) and Nipah virus, is mediated by its interferon (IFN) antagonist P gene products, phosphoprotein (P), and the related V and W proteins, which can target the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 proteins to inhibit IFN/STAT signaling. However, it is not clear if the recently identified non-pathogenic Henipavirus, Cedar paramyxovirus (CedPV), is also able to antagonize the STAT proteins. We performed comparative studies between the HeV P gene products (P/V/W) and CedPV-P (CedPV does not encode V or W) and demonstrate that differences exist in their ability to engage the STAT proteins using immunoprecipitation and quantitative confocal microscopic analysis. In contrast to HeV-P gene encoded proteins, the ability of CedPV-P to interact with and relocalize STAT1 or STAT2 is compromised, correlating with a reduced capacity to inhibit the mRNA synthesis of IFN-inducible gene MxA. Furthermore, infection studies with HeV and CedPV demonstrate that HeV is more potent than CedPV in inhibiting the IFN-α-mediated nuclear accumulation of STAT1. These results strongly suggest that the ability of CedPV to counteract the IFN/STAT response is compromised compared to HeV.

  18. Taenia crassiceps infection and its excreted/secreted products inhibit STAT1 activation in response to IFN-γ.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Díaz, Mireya; Terrazas, Luis I

    2014-08-01

    It is well understood that helminth infections modulate the immune responses of their hosts but the mechanisms involved in this modulation are not fully known. Macrophages and dendritic cells appear to be consistently affected during this type of infection and are common target cells for helminth-derived molecules. In this report, we show that macrophages obtained from chronically Taenia crassiceps-infected mice displayed an impaired response to recombinant murine IFN-γ, but not to recombinant murine IL-4, as measured based on the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT6, respectively. These macrophages expressed high levels of SOCS3. However, the inhibition of phosphatase activity by orthovanadate restored the IFN-γ response of these macrophages by increasing STAT1 phosphorylation without affecting SOCS3 expression. Therefore, we aimed to identify the phosphatases associated with IFN-γ signaling inhibition and found that macrophages from T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed enhanced SHP-1 expression. Interestingly, the exposure of naïve macrophages to T. crassiceps excreted/secreted products similarly interfered with IFN-γ-induced STAT1 phosphorylation. Moreover, macrophages exposed to T. crassiceps excreted/secreted products expressed high levels of SOCS3 as well as SHP-1. Strikingly, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were exposed to T. crassiceps excreted/secreted products in vitro also displayed impaired STAT1 phosphorylation in response to IFN-γ; again, phosphatase inhibition abrogated the T. crassiceps excreted/secreted product-altered IFN-γ signaling. These data demonstrate a new mechanism by which helminth infection and the products derived during this infection target intracellular pathways to block the response to inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ in both murine and human cells.

  19. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Cytokine-Mediated STAT1 Signal Transduction In β-Cells With Improved Aqueous Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Stephen S.; Tang, Alicia J.; Lundh, Morten; Mosher, Carrie M.; Perkins, Kedar M.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of BRD0476 (1), a small molecule generated by diversity-oriented synthesis that suppresses cytokine-induced β-cell apoptosis. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 1 and analogs with improved aqueous solubility. By replacing naphthyl with quinoline moieties, we prepared active analogs with up to a 1400-fold increase in solubility from 1. In addition, we demonstrated that compound 1 and analogs inhibit STAT1 signal transduction induced by IFN-γ. PMID:23617753

  20. Revealing the cellular localization of STAT1 during the cell cycle by super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yanhou; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2015-03-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) can transduce cytokine signals and regulate gene expression. The cellular localization and nuclear trafficking of STAT1, a representative of the STAT family with multiple transcriptional functions, is tightly related with transcription process, which usually happens in the interphase of the cell cycle. However, these priority questions regarding STAT1 distribution and localization at the different cell-cycle stages remain unclear. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we found that the nuclear expression level of STAT1 increased gradually as the cell cycle carried out, especially after EGF stimulation. Furthermore, STAT1 formed clusters in the whole cell during the cell cycle, with the size and the number of clusters also increasing significantly from G1 to G2 phase, suggesting that transcription and other cell-cycle related activities can promote STAT1 to form more and larger clusters for fast response to signals. Our work reveals that the cellular localization and clustering distribution of STAT1 are associated with the cell cycle, and further provides an insight into the mechanism of cell-cycle regulated STAT1 signal transduction.

  1. A heterozygous dominant-negative mutation in the coiled-coil domain of STAT1 is the cause of autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masafumi; Ito, Kenta; Tozawa, Yusuke; Morino, Saeko; Horikoshi, Yuho; Takada, Hidetoshi; Abdrabou, Shimaa Said Mohamed Ali; Takezaki, Shunichiro; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Ariga, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous dominant-negative mutations of STAT1 are responsible for autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (AD-MSMD). So far, only 7 mutations have been previously described and are localized to 3 domains: the DNA-binding domain, the SH2 domain, and the tail segment. In this study, we demonstrated the first coiled-coil domain (CCD) mutation of c.749G>C, p.G250A (G250A) in STAT1 as a genetic cause of AD-MSMD in a patient with mycobacterial multiple osteomyelitis. This de novo heterozygous mutation was shown to have a dominant-negative effect on the gamma-activated sequence (GAS) transcriptional activity following IFN-γ stimulation, which could be attributable to the abolished phosphorylation of STAT1 from the wild-type (WT) allele. The three-dimensional structure of STAT1 revealed the G250 residue was located distant from a cluster of residues affected by gain-of-function mutations responsible for chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

  2. Defective STAT1 activation associated with impaired IFN-γ production in NK and T lymphocytes from metastatic melanoma patients treated with IL-2.

    PubMed

    Sim, Geok Choo; Wu, Sheng; Jin, Lei; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo G

    2016-06-14

    High dose (HD) IL-2 therapy has been used for almost two decades as an immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma. IL-2 promotes the proliferation and effector function of T and NK cells through the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription factors (STAT), especially STAT5. However, whether any defects in STAT activation exist in T and NK lymphocytes from melanoma patients are under debate. Here, we measured the extent of HD IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5 and STAT1 in lymphocyte subsets from metastatic melanoma patients and healthy controls at a single cell level using flow cytometry. We found no defects in IL-2-induced STAT5 phosphorylation and induction of proliferation in T and NK cell subsets in vitro. This was confirmed by measuring ex vivo STAT5 activation in whole blood collected from patients during their first bolus HD IL-2 infusion. IL-2 also induced STAT1 phosphorylation via IFN-γ receptors in T and NK cell subsets through the release of IFN-γ by CD56hi and CD56lo NK cells. Further analysis revealed that melanoma patients had a sub-optimal STAT1 activation response linked to lower IL-2-induced IFN-γ secretion in both CD56hi and CD56low NK cell subsets. STAT1 activation in response to IL-2 also showed an age-related decline in melanoma patients not linked to tumor burden indicating a premature loss of NK cell function. Taken together, these findings indicate that, although STAT5 activation is normal in metastatic melanoma patients in response to IL-2, indirect STAT1 activation is defective owing to deficiencies in the NK cell response to IL-2.

  3. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  4. MicroRNA-194 promotes osteoblast differentiation via downregulating STAT1

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; He, Xijing; Wei, Wenzhi; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2015-05-01

    Osteoblast differentiation is a vital process in maintaining bone homeostasis in which various transcriptional factors, signaling molecules, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved. Recently, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) has been found to play an important role in regulating osteoblast differentiation. Here, we identified that STAT1 expression was regulated by miR-194. Using mouse bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), we found that miR-194 expression was significantly increased following osteoblast differentiation induction. Overexpression of miR-194 by lentivirus-mediated gene transfer markedly increased osteoblast differentiation, whereas inhibition of miR-194 significantly suppressed osteoblast differentiation of BMSCs. Using a dual-luciferase reporter assay, a direct interaction between miR-194 and the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of STAT1 was confirmed. Additionally, miR-194 regulated mRNA and protein expression of STAT1 in BMSCs. Further analysis showed that miR-194 overexpression promoted the nuclear translocation of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which is critical for osteoblast differentiation. In contrast, inhibition of miR-194 blocked the nuclear translocation of Runx2. Moreover, overexpression of STAT1 significantly blocked Runx2 nuclear translocation and osteoblast differentiation mediated by miR-194 overexpression. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-194 regulates osteoblast differentiation through modulating STAT1-mediated Runx2 nuclear translocation. - Highlights: • Overexpression of miR-194 significantly increased osteoblast differentiation. • miR-194 directly targeted the 3′- UTR of STAT1. • miR-194 regulated the expression of STAT1. • Overexpression of miR-194 promoted the nuclear translocation of Runx2.

  5. Activated STAT1 transcription factors conduct distinct saltatory movements in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Speil, Jasmin; Baumgart, Eugen; Siebrasse, Jan-Peter; Veith, Roman; Vinkemeier, Uwe; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2011-12-07

    The activation of STAT transcription factors is a critical determinant of their subcellular distribution and their ability to regulate gene expression. Yet, it is not known how activation affects the behavior of individual STAT molecules in the cytoplasm and nucleus. To investigate this issue, we injected fluorescently labeled STAT1 in living HeLa cells and traced them by single-molecule microscopy. We determined that STAT1 moved stochastically in the cytoplasm and nucleus with very short residence times (<0.03 s) before activation. Upon activation, STAT1 mobility in the cytoplasm decreased ∼2.5-fold, indicating reduced movement of STAT1/importinα/β complexes to the nucleus. In the nucleus, activated STAT1 displayed a distinct saltatory mobility, with residence times of up to 5 s and intermittent diffusive motion. In this manner, activated STAT1 factors can occupy their putative chromatin target sites within ∼2 s. These results provide a better understanding of the timescales on which cellular signaling and regulated gene transcription operate at the single-molecule level.

  6. Glatiramer acetate attenuates the activation of CD4+ T cells by modulating STAT1 and −3 signaling in glia

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ye-Hyeon; Jeon, Sae-Bom; Chang, Chi Young; Goh, Eun-Ah; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Ho Jin; Song, Jaewhan; Park, Eun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between immune effector cells of the central nervous system appear to directly or indirectly influence the progress/regression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we report that glial STAT1 and −3 are distinctively phosphorylated following the interaction of activated lymphocytes and glia, and this effect is significantly inhibited by glatiramer acetate (GA), a disease-modifying drug for MS. GA also reduces the activations of STAT1 and −3 by MS-associated stimuli such as IFNγ or LPS in primary glia, but not neurons. Experiments in IFNγ- and IFNγ receptor-deficient mice revealed that GA-induced inhibitions of STAT signaling are independent of IFNγ and its receptor. Interestingly, GA induces the expression levels of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 and −3, representative negative regulators of STAT signaling in glia. We further found that GA attenuates the LPS-triggered enhancement of IL-2, a highly produced cytokine in patients with active MS, in CD4+ T cells co-cultured with glia, but not in CD4+ T cells alone. Collectively, these results provide that activation of glial STATs is an essential event in the interaction between glia and T cells, which is a possible underlying mechanism of GA action in MS. These findings provide an insight for the development of targeted therapies against MS. PMID:28094337

  7. Lactation-induced cadmium-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Solaiman, D.; Garvey, J.S.; Miyazaki, W.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated an increase during midlactation in /sup 109/Cd adsorption and increased retention by the duodenum, kidney, and mammary tissue of mouse dams receiving environmental levels of cadmium//sup 109/Cd via drinking water, with little change in /sup 109/Cd retention in liver and jejunum compared to nonpregnant controls. Results are reported here of a study of cadmium deposition during midlactation as associated with induction of metallothionein (MT). A cadmium/hemoglobin (Cd/Hb) assay and radioimmunoassay for MT which measures heat-stable cadmium binding capacity in tissues was used to determine MT concentrations in fractions of kidney, liver, duodenum, and jejunum from female mice. Both assays demonstrated clear lactation-induced increases in MT concentrations in liver, kidney, and duodenum, with MT concentrations falling rapidly to control levels after weaning. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  8. STAT1 and STAT3 in tumorigenesis: A matter of balance.

    PubMed

    Avalle, Lidia; Pensa, Sara; Regis, Gabriella; Novelli, Francesco; Poli, Valeria

    2012-04-01

    The transcription factors STAT1 and STAT3 appear to play opposite roles in tumorigenesis. While STAT3 promotes cell survival/proliferation, motility and immune tolerance and is considered as an oncogene, STAT1 mostly triggers anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses while enhancing anti-tumor immunity. Despite being activated downstream of common cytokine and growth factor receptors, their activation is reciprocally regulated and perturbation in their balanced expression or phosphorylation levels may re-direct cytokine/growth factor signals from proliferative to apoptotic, or from inflammatory to anti-inflammatory. Here we review the functional canonical and non-canonical effects of STAT1 and STAT3 activation in tumorigenesis and their potential cross-regulation mechanisms.

  9. Partial dysfunction of STAT1 profoundly reduces host resistance to flaviviral infection.

    PubMed

    Larena, Maximilian; Lobigs, Mario

    2017-03-07

    The genetic basis for a dramatically increased virus susceptibility phenotype of MHC-II knockout mice acquired during routine maintenance of the mouse strain was determined. Segregation of the susceptibility allele from the defective MHC-II locus combined with sequence capture and sequencing showed that a Y37L substitution in STAT1 accounted for high flavivirus susceptibility of a newly derived mouse strain, designated Tuara. Interestingly, the mutation in STAT1 gene gave only partial inactivation of the type I interferon antiviral pathway. Accordingly, merely a relatively small impairment of interferon α/β signalling is sufficient to overcome the ability of the host to control the infection.

  10. Tumor STAT1 transcription factor activity enhances breast tumor growth and immune suppression mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Hix, Laura M; Karavitis, John; Khan, Mohammad W; Shi, Yihui H; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Zhang, Ming

    2013-04-26

    Previous studies had implicated the IFN-γ transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) as a tumor suppressor. However, accumulating evidence has correlated increased STAT1 activation with increased tumor progression in multiple types of cancer, including breast cancer. Indeed, we present evidence that tumor up-regulation of STAT1 activity in human and mouse mammary tumors correlates with increasing disease progression to invasive carcinoma. A microarray analysis comparing low aggressive TM40D and highly aggressive TM40D-MB mouse mammary carcinoma cells revealed significantly higher STAT1 activity in the TM40D-MB cells. Ectopic overexpression of constitutively active STAT1 in TM40D cells promoted mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and inhibition of antitumor T cells, resulting in aggressive tumor growth in tumor-transplanted, immunocompetent mice. Conversely, gene knockdown of STAT1 in the metastatic TM40D-MB cells reversed these events and attenuated tumor progression. Importantly, we demonstrate that in human breast cancer, the presence of tumor STAT1 activity and tumor-recruited CD33(+) myeloid cells correlates with increasing disease progression from ductal carcinoma in situ to invasive carcinoma. We conclude that STAT1 activity in breast cancer cells is responsible for shaping an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, and inhibiting STAT1 activity is a promising immune therapeutic approach.

  11. Quantitative Proteomic analysis on Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells reversion Reveal STAT1 as a key regulator between Liver Fibrosis and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Chen, Fangyan; Fan, Xu; Lin, Cong; Hao, Yunwei; Wei, Handong; Lin, Weiran; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the changes of activated HSCs reversion is an essential step toward clarifying the potential roles of HSCs in the treatment of liver fibrosis. In this study, we chose adipocyte differentiation mixture to induce LX-2 cells for 2 days in vitro as reversion phase, comparing with normal cultured LX-2 cells as activation phase. Mass spectrometric-based SILAC technology was adopted to study differentially expressed proteome of LX-2 cells between reversion and activation. Compared with activated HSCs, 273 proteins showed significant differences in reverted HSCs. The main pathway of up-regulated proteins associated with reversion of HSCs mainly related to oxidation-reduction and lipid metabolism, while the top pathway of down-regulated proteins was found in regulated cytoskeleton formation. Changes in the expression levels of selected proteins were verified by Western blotting analysis, especially STAT1, FLNA, LASP1, and NAMPT proteins. The distinct roles of STAT1 were further analyzed between activated and reverted of HSCs, it was found that STAT1 could affect cell proliferation of HSCs and could be viewed as a key regulator in the reversion of HSCs. Thus, the proteomic analysis could accelerate our understanding of the mechanisms of HSC reversion on cessation of fibrogenic stimuli and provide new targets for antifibrotic liver therapy. PMID:28322315

  12. STAT1 Signaling in Astrocytes Is Essential for Control of Infection in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hidano, Shinya; Randall, Louise M.; Dawson, Lucas; Dietrich, Hans K.; Konradt, Christoph; Klover, Peter J.; John, Beena; Harris, Tajie H.; Fang, Qun; Turek, Bradley; Kobayashi, Takashi; Hennighausen, Lothar; Beiting, Daniel P.; Koshy, Anita A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The local production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is important to control Toxoplasma gondii in the brain, but the basis for these protective effects is not fully understood. The studies presented here reveal that the ability of IFN-γ to inhibit parasite replication in astrocytes in vitro is dependent on signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and that mice that specifically lack STAT1 in astrocytes are unable to limit parasite replication in the central nervous system (CNS). This susceptibility is associated with a loss of antimicrobial pathways and increased cyst formation in astrocytes. These results identify a critical role for astrocytes in limiting the replication of an important opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27834206

  13. Mice lacking functional STAT1 are highly susceptible to lethal infection with Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Walker, David H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Walker, Aida G; Smith, Jeanon N; Miller, Milagros; de la Torre, Juan C; Smith, Jennifer K; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Fair, Joseph N; Wauquier, Nadia; Grant, Donald S; Bockarie, Bayon; Bente, Dennis; Paessler, Slobodan

    2013-10-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a potentially lethal human disease that is caused by the arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Annually, around 300,000 infections with up to 10,000 deaths occur in regions of Lassa fever endemicity in West Africa. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking a functional STAT1 pathway are highly susceptible to infection with LASV and develop lethal disease with pathology similar to that reported in humans.

  14. STAT1-activating cytokines limit Th17 responses through both T-bet-dependent and independent mechanisms1

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Alejandro V.; Gallo, Eugenio; Abbas, Abul K.

    2010-01-01

    Given the association with autoimmune disease, there is great interest in defining cellular factors that limit overactive or misdirected Th17-type inflammation. Using in vivo and in vitro models, we investigated the molecular mechanisms for cytokine-mediated inhibition of Th17 responses, focusing on the role of STAT1 and T-bet in this process. These studies demonstrate that, during systemic inflammation, STAT1- and T-bet-deficient T cells each exhibit a hyper-Th17 phenotype relative to WT controls. However, IL-17 production was higher in the absence of T-bet and, when both STAT1 and T-bet were deleted, there was no further increase, with the double-deficient cells instead behaving more like STAT1-deficient counterparts. Similar trends were observed during in vitro priming, with production of Th17-type cytokines higher in T-bet−/− T cells than in either STAT1−/− or STAT1−/− T-bet−/− counterparts. The ability of IFN-γ and IL-27 to suppress Th17 responses was reduced in T-bet-deficient cells and, most importantly, ectopic T-bet could suppress signature Th17 gene products, including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22 and RORγT, even in STAT1-deficient T cells. Taken together, these studies formally establish that, downstream of IFN-γ, IL-27 and likely all STAT1-activating cytokines, there are both STAT1 and T-bet-dependent pathways capable of suppressing Th17 responses. PMID:20974984

  15. Direct interaction of garcinol and related polyisoprenylated benzophenones of Garcinia cambogia fruits with the transcription factor STAT-1 as a likely mechanism of their inhibitory effect on cytokine signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Masullo, Milena; Menegazzi, Marta; Di Micco, Simone; Beffy, Pascale; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Dal Bosco, Martina; Novelli, Michela; Pizza, Cosimo; Masiello, Pellegrino; Piacente, Sonia

    2014-03-28

    Garcinol (1), a polyisoprenylated benzophenone occurring in Garcinia species, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory activity in LPS-stimulated macrophages, through inhibition of NF-κB and/or JAK/STAT-1 activation. In order to provide deeper insight into its effects on the cytokine signaling pathway and to clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms, 1 was isolated from the fruits of Garcinia cambogia along with two other polyisoprenylated benzophenones, guttiferones K (2) and guttiferone M (3), differing from each other in their isoprenyl moieties and their positions on the benzophenone core. The affinities of 1-3 for the STAT-1 protein have been evaluated by surface plasmon resonance and molecular docking studies and resulted in KD values in the micromolar range. Consistent with the observed high affinity toward the STAT-1 protein, garcinol and guttiferones K and M were able to modulate cytokine signaling in different cultured cell lines, mainly by inhibiting STAT-1 nuclear transfer and DNA binding, as assessed by an electrophorectic mobility shift assay.

  16. The Ets-1 transcription factor is required for Stat1-mediated T-bet expression and IgG2a class switching in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai Vu; Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Luinaud, Romain; Despres, Raymonde; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Arnulf, Bertrand; Bories, Jean-Christophe

    2012-05-03

    In response to antigens and cytokines, mouse B cells undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into Ig-secreting cells. T-bet, a T-box transcription factor that is up-regulated in lymphocytes by IFN-γ or IL-27, was shown to regulate CSR to IgG2a after T cell-independent B-cell stimulations. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this process remain unclear. In the present study, we show that inactivation of the Ets-1 transcription factor results in a severe decrease in IgG2a secretion in vivo and in vitro. No T-bet expression was observed in Ets-1-deficient (Ets-1(-/-)) B cells stimulated with IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharide, and forced expression of T-bet in these cells rescued IgG2a secretion. Furthermore, we identified a transcriptional enhancer in the T-bet locus with an activity in B cells that relies on ETS-binding sites. After IFN-γ stimulation of Ets-1(-/-) B cells, activated Stat1, which forms a complex with Ets-1 in wild-type cells, no longer binds to the T-bet enhancer or promotes histone modifications at this site. These results demonstrate that Ets-1 is critical for IgG2a CSR and acts as an essential cofactor for Stat1 in the regulation of T-bet expression in B cells.

  17. Celastrol suppresses expression of adhesion molecules and chemokines by inhibiting JNK-STAT1/NF-κB activation in poly(I:C)-stimulated astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    An, Soo Yeon; Youn, Gi Soo; Kim, Hyejin; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2017-01-01

    In the central nervous system, viral infection can induce inflammation by up-regulating pro-inflammatory mediators that contribute to enhanced infiltration of immune cells into the central nervous areas. Celastrol is known to exert various regulatory functions, including anti-microbial activities. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects and the mechanisms of action of celastrol against astrocytes activated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), a synthetic dsRNA, as a model of pro-inflammatory mediated responses. Celastrol significantly inhibited poly(I:C)-induced expression of adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-1/VCAM-1, and chemokines, such as CCL2, CXCL8, and CXCL10, in CRT-MG human astroglioma cells. In addition, celastrol significantly suppressed poly(I:C)-induced activation of JNK MAPK and STAT1 signaling pathways. Furthermore, celastrol significantly suppressed poly(I:C)-induced activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results suggest that celastrol may exert its regulatory activity by inhibiting poly(I:C)-induced expression of pro-inflammatory mediators by suppressing activation of JNK MAPK-STAT1/NF-κB in astrocytes. PMID:28027722

  18. Camptothecin-binding site in human serum albumin and protein transformations induced by drug binding.

    PubMed

    Fleury, F; Ianoul, A; Berjot, M; Feofanov, A; Alix, A J; Nabiev, I

    1997-07-14

    Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy were employed in order to locate a camptothecin (CPT)-binding site within human serum albumin (HSA) and to identify protein structural transformations induced by CPT binding. A competitive binding of CPT and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (a ligand occupying IIIA structural sub-domain of the protein) to HSA does not show any competition and demonstrates that the ligands are located in the different binding sites, whereas a HSA-bound CPT may be replaced by warfarin, occupying IIA structural sub-domain of the protein. Raman and CD spectra of HSA and HSA/CPT complexes show that the CPT-binding does not induce changes of the global protein secondary structure. On the other hand, Raman spectra reveal pronounced CPT-induced local structural modifications of the HSA molecule, involving changes in configuration of the two disulfide bonds and transfer of a single Trp-residue to hydrophilic environment. These data suggest that CPT is bound in the region of interdomain connections within the IIA structural domain of HSA and it induces relative movement of the protein structural domains.

  19. Requirement of Stat3 but not Stat1 activation for epidermal growth factor receptor- mediated cell growth In vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Grandis, J R; Drenning, S D; Chakraborty, A; Zhou, M Y; Zeng, Q; Pitt, A S; Tweardy, D J

    1998-01-01

    Stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by ligand(s) leads to activation of signaling molecules including Stat1 and Stat3, two members of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) protein family. Activation of Stat1 and Stat3 was constitutive in transformed squamous epithelial cells, which produce elevated levels of TGF-alpha, and was enhanced by the addition of exogenous TGF-alpha. Targeting of Stat3 using antisense oligonucleotides directed against the translation initiation site, resulted in significant growth inhibition. In addition, cells stably transfected with dominant negative mutant Stat3 constructs failed to proliferate in vitro. In contrast, targeting of Stat1 using either antisense or dominant-negative strategies had no effect on cell growth. Thus, TGF-alpha/EGFR-mediated autocrine growth of transformed epithelial cells is dependent on activation of Stat3 but not Stat1. PMID:9769331

  20. Blockage of Glyoxalase I Inhibits Colorectal Tumorigenesis and Tumor Growth via Upregulation of STAT1, p53, and Bax and Downregulation of c-Myc and Bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Fang, Lei; Zhang, Jiali; Li, Gefei; Ma, Mengni; Li, Changxi; Lyu, Jianxin; Meng, Qing H.

    2017-01-01

    GlyoxalaseI (GLOI) is an enzyme that catalyzes methylglyoxal metabolism. Overexpression of GLOI has been documented in numerous tumor tissues, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The antitumor effects of GLOI depletion have been demonstrated in some types of cancer, but its role in CRC and the mechanisms underlying this activity remain largely unknown. Our purpose was to investigate the antitumor effects of depleted GLOI on CRC in vitro and in vivo. RNA interference was used to deplete GLOI activity in four CRC cell lines. The cells’ proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion were assessed by using the Cell Counting Kit-8, plate colony formation assay, flow cytometry, and transwell assays. Protein and mRNA levels were analyzed by western blot and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), respectively. The antitumor effect of GLOI depletion in vivo was investigated in a SW620 xenograft tumor model in BALB/c nude mice. Our results show that GLOI is over-expressed in the CRC cell lines. GLOI depletion inhibited the proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion and induced apoptosis of all CRC cells compared with the controls. The levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), p53, and Bcl-2 assaciated X protein (Bax) were upregulated by GLOI depletion, while cellular homologue of avian myelocytomatosis virus oncogene (c-Myc) and B cell lymphoma/lewkmia-2 (Bcl-2) were downregulated. Moreover, the growth of SW620-induced CRC tumors in BALB/c nude mice was significantly attenuated by GLOI depletion. The expression levels of STAT1, p53, and Bax were increased and those of c-Myc and Bcl-2 were decreased in the GLOI-depleted tumors. Our findings demonstrate that GLOI depletion has an antitumor effect through the STAT1 or p53 signaling pathways in CRC, suggesting that GLOI is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:28282916

  1. Dimerization-induced corepressor binding and relaxed DNA-binding specificity are critical for PML/RARA-induced immortalization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Pérès, Laurent; Honoré, Nicole; Nasr, Rihab; Zhu, Jun; de Thé, Hugues

    2006-06-13

    The pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia involves the transcriptional repression of master genes of myeloid differentiation by the promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha (PML/RARA) oncogene. PML-enforced RARA homodimerization allows the tighter binding of corepressors, silencing RARA target genes. In addition, homodimerization dramatically extends the spectrum of DNA-binding sites of the fusion protein compared with those of normal RARA. Yet, any contribution of these two properties of PML/RARA to differentiation arrest and immortalization of primary mouse hematopoietic progenitors was unknown. We demonstrate that dimerization-induced silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors (SMRT)-enhanced binding and relaxed DNA-binding site specificity are both required for efficient immortalization. Thus, enforced RARA dimerization is critical not only for triggering transcriptional repression but also for extending the repertoire of target genes. Our studies exemplify how dimerization-induced gain of functions converts an unessential transcription factor into a dominant oncogenic protein.

  2. The effect of miR-146a on STAT1 expression and apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Weihong; Guo, Hua; Suo, Feng; Han, Chunling; Zheng, Hua; Chen, Tong

    2017-01-01

    The effect of miR-146a-dependent regulation of STAT1 on apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Jurkat cells was investigated. The miR-146a mimic and miR-146a inhibitor vectors were constructed in vitro, and experimental grouping was as follows: Control group (untreated Jurkat cells), empty vector group (Jurkat cells transfected with empty vector), agonist group (Jurkat cells transfected with miR-146a mimic) and the inhibitor group (Jurkat cells transfected with miR-146a inhibitor). Western blot analysis was used to observe the expression, respectively, of STAT1, p-STAT1 and Bcl-xL, and flow cytometry was used to test apoptosis in Jurkat cells. STAT1 and p-STAT1 expression in the agonist group was higher than that in the control and empty vector groups, but lower in the inhibitor group, and differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The rate of apoptosis in the agonist group was significantly higher than that of the control group and blank vector group, and it was significantly lower in the inhibitor group (P<0.05). As a tumor suppressor, miR-146a can regulate expression of apoptosis-promoting factor STAT1, and anti-apoptosis factor Bcl-xL, and is able to promote apoptosis of ALL Jurkat cells. PMID:28123535

  3. Sodium butyrate enhances STAT 1 expression in PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells and augments their responsiveness to interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Hung, W C; Chuang, L Y

    1999-05-01

    Although interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) has shown great promise in the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis, the anti-tumour effect of this agent in the therapy of liver cancer is unclear. Recent studies have demonstrated that differentiation-inducing agents could modulate the responsiveness of cancer cells to IFN-alpha by regulating the expression of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, a group of transcription factors which play important roles in the IFN signalling pathway. We have reported that sodium butyrate is a potent differentiation inducer for human hepatoma cells. In this study, we investigated whether this drug could regulate the expression of STAT proteins and enhance the anti-tumour effect of IFN-alpha in hepatoma cells. We found that sodium butyrate specifically activated STAT1 gene expression and enhanced IFN-alpha-induced phosphorylation and activation of STAT1 proteins. Co-treatment with these two drugs led to G1 growth arrest, accompanied by down-regulation of cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21WAF-1, and accumulation of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma protein in hepatoma cells. Additionally, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, a biological hallmark of apoptosis, was detected in hepatoma cells after continuous incubation with a combination of these two drugs for 72 h. Our results show that sodium butyrate potently enhances the anti-tumour effect of IFN-alpha in vitro and suggest that a rational combination of these two drugs may be useful for the treatment of liver cancer.

  4. High STAT1 mRNA levels but not its tyrosine phosphorylation are associated with macrophage infiltration and bad prognosis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background STAT1 has been attributed a function as tumor suppressor. However, in breast cancer data from microarray analysis indicated a predictive value of high mRNA expression levels of STAT1 and STAT1 target genes belonging to the interferon-related signature for a poor response to therapy. To clarify this issue we have determined STAT1 expression levels and activation by different methods, and investigated their association with tumor infiltration by immune cells. Additionally, we evaluated the interrelationship of these parameters and their significance for predicting disease outcome. Methods Expression of STAT1, its target genes SOCS1, IRF1, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, IFIT1, IFITM1, MX1 and genes characteristic for immune cell infiltration (CD68, CD163, PD-L1, PD-L2, PD-1, CD45, IFN-γ, FOXP3) was determined by RT-PCR in two independent cohorts comprising 132 breast cancer patients. For a subset of patients, protein levels of total as well as serine and tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1 were ascertained by immunohistochemistry or immunoblotting and protein levels of CXCL10 by ELISA. Results mRNA expression levels of STAT1 and STAT1 target genes, as well as protein levels of total and serine-phosphorylated STAT1 correlated with each other in neoplastic tissue. However, there was no association between tumor levels of STAT1 mRNA and tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1 and between CXCL10 serum levels and CXCL10 expression in the tumor. Tumors with increased STAT1 mRNA amounts exhibited elevated expression of genes characteristic for tumor-associated macrophages and immunosuppressive T lymphocytes. Survival analysis revealed an association of high STAT1 mRNA levels and bad prognosis in both cohorts. A similar prognostically relevant correlation with unfavorable outcome was evident for CXCL10, MX1, CD68, CD163, IFN-γ, and PD-L2 expression in at least one collective. By contrast, activation of STAT1 as assessed by the level of STAT1-Y701 phosphorylation was linked to positive

  5. Loss of STAT1 protects hair cells from ototoxicity through modulation of STAT3, c-Jun, Akt, and autophagy factors

    PubMed Central

    Levano, S; Bodmer, D

    2015-01-01

    Hair cell damage is a side effect of cisplatin and aminoglycoside use. The inhibition or attenuation of this process is a target of many investigations. There is growing evidence that STAT1 deficiency decreases cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity; however, the role of STAT function and the molecules that act in gentamicin-mediated toxicity have not been fully elucidated. We used mice lacking STAT1 to investigate the effect of STAT1 ablation in cultured organs treated with cisplatin and gentamicin. Here we show that ablation of STAT1 decreased cisplatin toxicity and attenuated gentamicin-mediated hair cell damage. More TUNEL-positive hair cells were observed in explants of wild-type mice than that of STAT1−/− mice. Although cisplatin increased serine phosphorylation of STAT1 in wild-type mice and diminished STAT3 expression in wild-type and STAT1−/− mice, gentamicin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 in STAT1−/− mice. The early inflammatory response was manifested in the upregulation of TNF-α and IL-6 in cisplatin-treated explants of wild-type and STAT1−/− mice. Expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was altered in cisplatin-treated explants, upregulated in wild-type explants, and downregulated in STAT1−/− explants. Cisplatin and gentamicin triggered the activation of c-Jun. Activation of Akt was observed in gentamicin-treated explants from STAT1−/− mice. Increased levels of the autophagy proteins Beclin-1 and LC3-II were observed in STAT1−/− explants. These data suggest that STAT1 is a central player in mediating ototoxicity. Gentamicin and cisplatin activate different downstream factors to trigger ototoxicity. Although cisplatin and gentamicin triggered inflammation and activated apoptotic factors, the absence of STAT1 allowed the cells to overcome the effects of these drugs. PMID:26673664

  6. Methylene Blue Attenuates iNOS Induction Through Suppression of Transcriptional Factor Binding Amid iNOS mRNA Transcription.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Tong, Lijuan; Lu, Xu; Wang, Jia; Yao, Wenjuan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) critically contributes to the development of endotoxin-mediated inflammation. It can be induced by cytokines or endotoxins via distinct signaling pathways. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggers iNOS expression through activation of the inhibitor of κB-α (IκB-α)-nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) cascade, whereas interferon-γ (IFN-γ) acts primarily through Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Methylene blue (MB), an agent used clinically to treat numerous ailments, has been shown to reduce NO accumulation through suppression of iNOS activity. But it remains unclear whether MB affects iNOS induction. This knowledge gap is addressed in the present study using cultured cells and endotoxemic mice. With mouse macrophages, MB treatment prevented the LPS- and/or IFN-γ-stimulated iNOS protein expression. Real-time PCR experiments showed that iNOS mRNA transcription was robustly blocked by MB treatment. The inhibitory effect of MB on iNOS expression was confirmed in vivo in endotoxemic mice. Further analysis showed that MB had no significant effect on IκB-α degradation and NF-κB or STAT1 phosphorylation in LPS/IFN-γ-stimulated cells. The nuclear transport of active NF-κB or STAT1 was also not affected by MB treatment. But MB treatment markedly reduced the binding of NF-κB and STAT1 to their DNA elements. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that MB reduced NF-κB and STAT1 bindings to iNOS promoter inside the cell. These studies show that MB attenuates transcriptional factor binding amid iNOS mRNA transcription, providing further insight into the molecular mechanism of MB in disease therapy.

  7. Loss of STAT1 is Associated with Increased Aortic Rupture in an Experimental Model of Aortic Dissection and Aneurysm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Eagleton, Matthew J.; Xu, Jun; Liao, Mingfang; Parine, Brittney; Chisolm, Guy M.; Graham, Linda M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 has been linked to a variety of pathologic states involved with matrix remodeling, but its role in aortic pathology has not been previously described. The current study hypothesizes that STAT1 regulates aneurysmal degeneration and its role will be evaluated in human aortic aneurysms and in a mouse model of aortic dissection. Methods Apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE−/−) or ApoE/STAT1 double knockout mice (ApoE/STAT1−/−) were infused with 1000 ng/kg/min of angiotensin II (Ang II). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured in the rodent tail. At sacrifice, aortic diameters and extent of aneurysm formation were measured by digital microscopy. STAT1 and phosphorylated-STAT1 protein levels were assessed in ApoE−/− mice at 0, 7, 14, and 28 days (n=8/time point) by ELISA. Histology was performed using H&E and Movat stains. Statistical analyses included chi-square test, T-test, and ANOVA. Results STAT1 mRNA and total protein were greater in human AAA compared to non-aneurysmal controls. In addition, aneurysms occurred in 8%, 50%, and 80% of apoE−/− mice at 7, 14, and 28 days respectively. Total STAT1 levels were not altered during the course of Ang II infusion, but phosphorylated STAT1 levels peaked at 7 days with a 1.4-fold increase over baseline (P<0.05). Aneurysms occurred in 0%, 100%, and 100% of apoE/STAT1−/− mice at 3, 5, and 28 days. In mice infused with Ang II for more than 3 days, aortic rupture occurred more frequently in apoE/STAT−/− mice (53% v. 19%, P<0.05) and at earlier time points (4.0±0.5 v. 9.2±0.77 days, P<0.05) compared with apoE−/− mice. SBP did not differ between the groups during Ang II infusion. By 28 days, aneurysms were larger in apoE/STAT1−/− mice compared to apoE−/− mice (2.7±0.4 v. 1.9±0.1 mm, P<0.05), and were more extensive arising at the level of the left subclavian artery and extending to the infrarenal aorta

  8. Tyrosine 110 in the measles virus phosphoprotein is required to block STAT1 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Devaux, Patricia; Messling, Veronika von; Songsungthong, Warangkhana; Springfeld, Christoph; Cattaneo, Roberto . E-mail: cattaneo.roberto@mayo.edu

    2007-03-30

    The measles virus (MV) P gene encodes three proteins: P, an essential polymerase cofactor, and C and V, which have multiple functions including immune evasion. We show here that the MV P protein also contributes to immune evasion, and that tyrosine 110 is required to block nuclear translocation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription factors (STAT) after interferon type I treatment. In particular, MV P inhibits STAT1 phosphorylation. This is shown not only by transient expression but also by reverse genetic analyses based on a new functional infectious cDNA derived from a MV vaccine vial (Moraten strain). Our study also identifies a conserved sequence around P protein tyrosine 110 as a candidate interaction site with a cellular protein.

  9. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; Van Montfrans, Joris; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D.; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D.; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A–producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. PMID:27114460

  10. STAT1-regulated lung MDSC-like cells produce IL-10 and efferocytose apoptotic neutrophils with relevance in resolution of bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Poe, S L; Arora, M; Oriss, T B; Yarlagadda, M; Isse, K; Khare, A; Levy, D E; Lee, J S; Mallampalli, R K; Chan, Y R; Ray, A; Ray, P

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia remains a significant burden worldwide. Although an inflammatory response in the lung is required to fight the causative agent, persistent tissue-resident neutrophils in non-resolving pneumonia can induce collateral tissue damage and precipitate acute lung injury. However, little is known about mechanisms orchestrated in the lung tissue that remove apoptotic neutrophils to restore tissue homeostasis. In mice infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae, a bacterium commonly associated with hospital-acquired pneumonia, we show that interleukin (IL)-10 is essential for resolution of lung inflammation and recovery of mice after infection. Although IL-10(-/-) mice cleared bacteria, they displayed increased morbidity with progressive weight loss and persistent lung inflammation in the later phase after infection. A source of tissue IL-10 was found to be resident CD11b(+)Gr1(int)F4/80(+) cells resembling myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that appeared with a delayed kinetics after infection. These cells efficiently efferocytosed apoptotic neutrophils, which was aided by IL-10. The lung neutrophil burden was attenuated in infected signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)(-/-) mice with concomitant increase in the frequency of the MDSC-like cells and lung IL-10 levels. Thus, inhibiting STAT1 in combination with antibiotics may be a novel therapeutic strategy to address inefficient resolution of bacterial pneumonia.

  11. Infectious Bronchitis Coronavirus Inhibits STAT1 Signaling and Requires Accessory Proteins for Resistance to Type I Interferon Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kint, Joeri; Dickhout, Annemiek; Kutter, Jasmin; Maier, Helena J.; Britton, Paul; Koumans, Joseph; Pijlman, Gorben P.; Fros, Jelke J.; Wiegertjes, Geert F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The innate immune response is the first line of defense against viruses, and type I interferon (IFN) is a critical component of this response. Similar to other viruses, the gammacoronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) has evolved under evolutionary pressure to evade and counteract the IFN response to enable its survival. Previously, we reported that IBV induces a delayed activation of the IFN response. In the present work, we describe the resistance of IBV to IFN and the potential role of accessory proteins herein. We show that IBV is fairly resistant to the antiviral state induced by IFN and identify that viral accessory protein 3a is involved in resistance to IFN, as its absence renders IBV less resistant to IFN treatment. In addition to this, we found that independently of its accessory proteins, IBV inhibits IFN-mediated phosphorylation and translocation of STAT1. In summary, we show that IBV uses multiple strategies to counteract the IFN response. IMPORTANCE In the present study, we show that infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is resistant to IFN treatment and identify a role for accessory protein 3a in the resistance against the type I IFN response. We also demonstrate that, in a time-dependent manner, IBV effectively interferes with IFN signaling and that its accessory proteins are dispensable for this activity. This study demonstrates that the gammacoronavirus IBV, similar to its mammalian counterparts, has evolved multiple strategies to efficiently counteract the IFN response of its avian host, and it identifies accessory protein 3a as multifaceted antagonist of the avian IFN system. PMID:26401035

  12. STAT1 Regulates the Homeostatic Component of Visual Cortical Plasticity via an AMPA Receptor-Mediated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Van Wart, Audra; Petravicz, Jeremy; Tropea, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence points to a role for Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) immune signaling in neuronal function; however, its role in experience-dependent plasticity is unknown. Here we show that one of its components, STAT1, negatively regulates the homeostatic component of ocular dominance plasticity in visual cortex. After brief monocular deprivation (MD), STAT1 knock-out (KO) mice show an accelerated increase of open-eye responses, to a level comparable with open-eye responses after a longer duration of MD in wild-type (WT) mice. Therefore, this component of plasticity is abnormally enhanced in KO mice. Conversely, increasing STAT1 signaling by IFNγ treatment in WT mice reduces the homeostatic component of plasticity by impairing open-eye responses. Enhanced plasticity in KO mice is accompanied by sustained surface levels of GluA1 AMPA receptors and increased amplitude and frequency of AMPA receptor-mediated mEPSCs, which resemble changes in WT mice after a longer duration of MD. These results demonstrate a unique role for STAT1 during visual cortical plasticity in vivo through a mechanism that includes AMPA receptors. PMID:25080587

  13. Measles virus V protein blocks Jak1-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 to escape IFN-{alpha}/{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Caignard, Gregory; Guerbois, Mathilde; Labernardiere, Jean-Louis; Jacob, Yves; Jones, Louis M.; Wild, Fabian; Tangy, Frederic Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2007-11-25

    Viruses have evolved various strategies to escape the antiviral activity of type I interferons (IFN-{alpha}/{beta}). For measles virus, this function is carried by the polycistronic gene P that encodes, by an unusual editing strategy, for the phosphoprotein P and the virulence factor V (MV-V). MV-V prevents STAT1 nuclear translocation by either sequestration or phosphorylation inhibition, thereby blocking IFN-{alpha}/{beta} pathway. We show that both the N- and C-terminal domains of MV-V (PNT and VCT) contribute to the inhibition of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} signaling. Using the two-hybrid system and co-affinity purification experiments, we identified STAT1 and Jak1 as interactors of MV-V and demonstrate that MV-V can block the direct phosphorylation of STAT1 by Jak1. A deleterious mutation within the PNT domain of MV-V (Y110H) impaired its ability to interact and block STAT1 phosphorylation. Thus, MV-V interacts with at least two components of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} receptor complex to block downstream signaling.

  14. STAT1 signaling regulates tumor-associated macrophage-mediated T cell deletion.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2005-04-15

    It is well established that tumor progression is associated with the accumulation of myeloid suppressive cells, which in mice include Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells and F4/80+ macrophages. The paradox is that with the exception of terminal stages of the disease or chemotherapy treatment, tumor-bearing mice or cancer patients do not display a profound systemic immune suppression. We therefore raised the question as to whether myeloid cell-mediated T cell suppression is controlled at a local level at the site of the tumor. We have demonstrated that after adoptive transfer to tumor-bearing recipients, Gr-1+ (immature myeloid cells) freshly isolated from spleens of tumor-bearing mice become F4/80+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). These TAM, but not F4/80+ macrophages or Gr-1+ cells freshly isolated from spleens of tumor-bearing or naive mice were able to inhibit T cell-mediated immune response in vitro via induction of T cell apoptosis. Arginase and NO were both responsible for the apoptotic mechanism, and were seen only in TAM, but not in freshly isolated Gr1+ cells. Using the analysis of STAT activity in combination with STAT knockout mice, we have determined that STAT1, but not STAT3 or STAT6, was responsible for TAM-suppressive activity.

  15. Flavonoids eupatorin and sinensetin present in Orthosiphon stamineus leaves inhibit inflammatory gene expression and STAT1 activation.

    PubMed

    Laavola, Mirka; Nieminen, Riina; Yam, Mun Fei; Sadikun, Amirin; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Basir, Rusliza; Welling, Jukka; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Korhonen, Riku; Moilanen, Eeva

    2012-05-01

    Cytokines and other inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and nitric oxide (NO) produced by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), respectively, activate and drive inflammation and therefore serve as targets for anti-inflammatory drug development. Orthosiphon stamineus is an indigenous medicinal plant of Southeast Asia that has been traditionally used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and other inflammatory disorders. The present study investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of Orthosiphon stamineus leaf chloroform extract (CE), its flavonoid-containing CE fraction 2 (CF2), and the flavonoids eupatorin, eupatorin-5-methyl ether (TMF), and sinensetin, identified from the CF2. It was found that CE (20 and 50 µg/mL) and CF2 (20 and 50 µg/mL) inhibited iNOS expression and NO production, as well as PGE₂ production. Eupatorin and sinensetin inhibited iNOS and COX-2 expression and the production of NO (IC₅₀ 5.2 µM and 9.2 µM for eupatorin and sinensetin, respectively) and PGE₂ (IC₅₀ 5.0 µM and 2.7 µM for eupatorin and sinensetin, respectively) in a dose-dependent manner. The extracts and the compounds also inhibited tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production (IC₅₀ 5.0 µM and 2.7 µM for eupatorin and sinensetin, respectively). Eupatorin and sinensetin inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of transcription factor signal transducers and activators of transcription 1α (STAT1α). Furthermore, eupatorin (50 mg/kg i. p.) and sinensetin (50 mg/kg i. p.) inhibited carrageenan-induced paw inflammation in mice. The results suggest that CE and CF2, as well as the known constituents of CF2, i.e., eupatorin and sinensetin, have meaningful anti-inflammatory properties which may be utilized in the development of novel anti-inflammatory treatments.

  16. Human complete Stat-1 deficiency is associated with defective type I and II IFN responses in vitro but immunity to some low virulence viruses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chapgier, Ariane; Wynn, Robert F; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Zhang, Shenying; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Hawkins, Kay; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Arkwright, Peter D

    2006-04-15

    The autosomal recessive form of human complete Stat-1 deficiency is a rare disorder, thus far reported in two unrelated patients, both of whom developed disseminated bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and subsequently died of viral illnesses before detailed studies of the condition could be performed. It is associated with impaired cellular responses to both IFN-gamma and IFN-alphabeta via Stat-1-containing complexes. We describe a third patient with complete Stat-1 deficiency and disseminated BCG infection, who died 3 mo after bone marrow transplantation. The patient's EBV-transformed B cells did not express Stat-1 protein and did not activate Stat-1-containing transcription factors. We also report the ex vivo responses of a Stat-1-deficient patient's fresh blood cells to IFN-gamma and the in vitro responses of a SV40-transformed fibroblastic cell line to IFN-gamma and IFN-alphabeta. There was no response to IFN-gamma in terms of IL-12 production and HLA class II induction, accounting for vulnerability to BCG. Moreover, IFN-alphabeta did not suppress HSV and vesicular stomatitis virus replication in fibroblasts, although in vivo the patient was able to successfully clear at least some viruses. This study broadens our understanding of complete Stat-1 deficiency, a severe form of innate immunodeficiency. Stat-1 deficiency should be suspected in children with severe infections, notably but not exclusively patients with mycobacterial or viral diseases.

  17. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Dynamical DNA accessibility induced by chromatin remodeling and protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, F.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.; Castelnovo, M.

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodeling factors are enzymes being able to alter locally chromatin structure at the nucleosomal level and they actively participate in the regulation of gene expression. Using simple rules for individual nucleosome motion induced by a remodeling factor, we designed simulations of the remodeling of oligomeric chromatin, in order to address quantitatively collective effects in DNA accessibility upon nucleosome mobilization. Our results suggest that accessibility profiles are inhomogeneous thanks to borders effects like protein binding. Remarkably, we show that the accessibility lifetime of DNA sequence is roughly doubled in the vicinity of borders as compared to its value in bulk regions far from the borders. These results are quantitatively interpreted as resulting from the confined diffusion of a large nucleosome depleted region.

  19. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks—cubes and octahedrons—when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined by the spatial symmetry of the block's facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. The presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices. PMID:25903309

  20. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-04-23

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks—cubes and octahedrons—when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined by the spatial symmetry of the block’s facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. Lastly, the presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices.

  1. Increased PD-1/STAT1 ratio may account for the survival benefit in decitabine therapy for lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Guo, Juan; Tao, Ying; Wu, Ling-Yun; Xu, Feng; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Li-Yu; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Decitabine is an effective therapy for patients with lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, the mechanisms of decitabine's therapeutic effect are not well established. Forty-four lower risk MDS patients received decitabine therapy. 59.1% patients achieved treatment response, and 53.8% patients who were RBC/platelet-dependent cast off the transfusion burden. The median overall survival (OS) was 19.0 months after decitabine treatment. Moreover, polarization toward type 1 in the CD8 + subset was enhanced, and a significantly increased expression of the PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-1/STAT1 ratio was observed in these lower risk MDS. The patients with amplification of PD-1/STAT1 ratio (2-4) achieved longer OS. Thus, our results suggest that the effect mechanism of decitabine toward lower risk MDS may be the moderate increase of PD-1/STAT1, which contributes to hematopoietic improvement. These findings suggest that a different PD-1-related strategy from those used to treat higher risk patients could be used for lower risk MDS patients.

  2. The relationship between total and phosphorylated STAT1 and STAT3 tumour cell expression, components of tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gujam, Fadia J.A.; McMillan, Donald C.; Edwards, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between tumour cell expression of total and phosphorylated STAT1 (ph-STAT1) and STAT3 (ph-STAT-3), components of tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of total and ph-STAT1, and STAT3 were performed on tissue microarray of 384 breast cancer specimens. Tumour cell expression of STAT1 and STAT3 at both cytoplasmic and nuclear locations were combined and identified as STAT1/STAT3 tumour cell expression. These results were related to cancer specific survival (CSS) and phenotypic features of the tumour and the host. High ph-STAT1 and ph-STAT3 tumour cell expression were associated with increased ER (both P≤0.001) and PR (both P <0.05), reduced tumour grade (P=0.015 and P<0.001 respectively) and necrosis (both P=0.001). Ph-STAT1 was associated with increased general inflammatory infiltrate (P=0.007) and ph-STAT3 was associated with lower CD4+ infiltration (P=0.024). In multivariate survival analysis, only high ph-STAT3 tumour cell expression was a predictor of improved CSS (P=0.010) independent of other tumour and host-based factors. STAT1 and STAT3 tumour cell expression appeared to be an important determinant of favourable outcome in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. The present results suggest that STAT1 and STAT3 may affect disease outcome through direct impact on tumour cells, counteracting aggressive tumour features, as well as interaction with the surrounding microenvironment. PMID:27769057

  3. Expression of many immunologically important genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages is independent of both TLR2 and TLR4 but dependent on IFN-alphabeta receptor and STAT1.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuangping; Blumenthal, Antje; Hickey, Christopher M; Gandotra, Sheetal; Levy, David; Ehrt, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    Macrophages respond to several subcellular products of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) through TLR2 or TLR4. However, primary mouse macrophages respond to viable, virulent Mtb by pathways largely independent of MyD88, the common adaptor molecule for TLRs. Using microarrays, quantitative PCR, and ELISA with gene-disrupted macrophages and mice, we now show that viable Mtb elicits the expression of inducible NO synthase, RANTES, IFN-inducible protein 10, immune-responsive gene 1, and many other key genes in macrophages substantially independently of TLR2, TLR4, their combination, or the TLR adaptors Toll-IL-1R domain-containing adapter protein and Toll-IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-beta. Mice deficient in both TLR2 and TLR4 handle aerosol infection with viable Mtb as well as congenic controls. Viable Mtb also up-regulates inducible NO synthase, RANTES, IFN-inducible protein 10, and IRG1 in macrophages that lack mannose receptor, complement receptors 3 and 4, type A scavenger receptor, or CD40. These MyD88, TLR2/4-independent transcriptional responses require IFN-alphabetaR and STAT1, but not IFN-gamma. Conversely, those genes whose expression is MyD88 dependent do not depend on IFN-alphabetaR or STAT1. Transcriptional induction of TNF is TLR2/4, MyD88, STAT1, and IFN-alphabetaR independent, but TNF protein release requires the TLR2/4-MyD88 pathway. Thus, macrophages respond transcriptionally to viable Mtb through at least three pathways. TLR2 mediates the responses of a numerically minor set of genes that collectively do not appear to affect the course of infection in mice; regulation of TNF requires TLR2/4 for post-transcriptional control, but not for transcriptional induction; and many responding genes are regulated through an unknown, TLR2/4-independent pathway that may involve IFN-alphabetaR and STAT1.

  4. Palmitoylation of Interferon-α (IFN-α) Receptor Subunit IFNAR1 Is Required for the Activation of Stat1 and Stat2 by IFN-α*

    PubMed Central

    Claudinon, Julie; Gonnord, Pauline; Beslard, Emilie; Marchetti, Marta; Mitchell, Keith; Boularan, Cédric; Johannes, Ludger; Eid, Pierre; Lamaze, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) bind IFNAR receptors and activate Jak kinases and Stat transcription factors to stimulate the transcription of genes downstream from IFN-stimulated response elements. In this study, we analyze the role of protein palmitoylation, a reversible post-translational lipid modification, in the functional properties of IFNAR. We report that pharmacological inhibition of protein palmitoylation results in severe defects of IFN receptor endocytosis and signaling. We generated mutants of the IFNAR1 subunit of the type I IFN receptor, in which each or both of the two cysteines present in the cytoplasmic domain are replaced by alanines. We show that cysteine 463 of IFNAR1, the more proximal of the two cytoplasmic cysteines, is palmitoylated. A thorough microscopic and biochemical analysis of the palmitoylation-deficient IFNAR1 mutant revealed that IFNAR1 palmitoylation is not required for receptor endocytosis, intracellular distribution, or stability at the cell surface. However, the lack of IFNAR1 palmitoylation affects selectively the activation of Stat2, which results in a lack of efficient Stat1 activation and nuclear translocation and IFN-α-activated gene transcription. Thus, receptor palmitoylation is a previously undescribed mechanism of regulating signaling activity by type I IFNs in the Jak/Stat pathway. PMID:19561067

  5. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yugang; ...

    2015-04-23

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks—cubes and octahedrons—when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined bymore » the spatial symmetry of the block’s facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. Lastly, the presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices.« less

  6. Symbiont-induced odorant binding proteins mediate insect host hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Joshua B; Vigneron, Aurélien; Broderick, Nichole A; Wu, Yineng; Sun, Jennifer S; Carlson, John R; Aksoy, Serap; Weiss, Brian L

    2017-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria assist in maintaining homeostasis of the animal immune system. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie symbiont-mediated host immunity are largely unknown. Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) house maternally transmitted symbionts that regulate the development and function of their host’s immune system. Herein we demonstrate that the obligate mutualist, Wigglesworthia, up-regulates expression of odorant binding protein six in the gut of intrauterine tsetse larvae. This process is necessary and sufficient to induce systemic expression of the hematopoietic RUNX transcription factor lozenge and the subsequent production of crystal cells, which actuate the melanotic immune response in adult tsetse. Larval Drosophila’s indigenous microbiota, which is acquired from the environment, regulates an orthologous hematopoietic pathway in their host. These findings provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that underlie enteric symbiont-stimulated systemic immune system development, and indicate that these processes are evolutionarily conserved despite the divergent nature of host-symbiont interactions in these model systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19535.001 PMID:28079523

  7. Inducible cadmium binding complexes of cabbage and tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.J.; Trotter, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    Cadmium complexes with apparent molecular weights of 10,000 were observed in aqueous extracts of Cd-treated cabbage (Brassica capitata L., cv. red danish) and tobacco (hybrid of Nicotiana glauca and N. langsdorffii) plants. The amount of complex (as Cd) recovered was found to be dependent on the concentration of the metal in the growth medium and the total time of exposure of plants to the metal. Induction of the complex at moderate levels of /sup 112/Cd exposure was monitored after labeling the complex with /sup 109/Cd in vitro. The constitutive nature of the ligand of the complex in cabbage and tobacco leaves was suggested when control plant extracts were exposed to /sup 109/Cd. Such extracts contained /sup 109/Cd, which eluted froom Sephadex G-50 in the region of Cd complex. Simultaneous labeling with /sup 112/Cd and /sup 35/S or /sup 32/P indicated that the complex contained sulfur but probably not phosphorus. The amount of /sup 35/S which eluted coincident with /sup 112/Cd complex increased during complex induction. No evidence was found for the presence of 10,000 molecular weight Cd complex in stem exudates (vascular sap) of Cd-treated plants. The results obtained are consistent with the presence in these tissues of a ligand which is both inducible and consitutive and binds Cd in mercaptide bonds. All of these properties and oters reported earlier, are characteristic of Cd-metallothionein formed in animals.

  8. Elevated interleukin-27 levels in human neonatal macrophages regulate indoleamine dioxygenase in a STAT-1 and STAT-3-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joo-Yong; Gleave Parson, Madeline; Kraft, Jennifer D; Lyda, Logan; Kobe, Brianna; Davis, Celestia; Robinson, Jembber; Peña, Maria Marjorette O; Robinson, Cory M

    2016-09-01

    Microbial infections are a major cause of infant mortality as a result of limitations in immune defences. Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a heterodimeric cytokine produced primarily by leucocytes and is immunosuppressive toward lymphocytes and leucocytes. Our laboratory demonstrated that human neonatal macrophages express IL-27 more abundantly than adult macrophages. Similarly in mice, IL-27 expression is elevated early in life and maintained through infancy. To determine IL-27-regulated mechanisms that may limit immunity, we evaluated the expression of a number of genes in response to this cytokine in primary human neonatal macrophages. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) gene expression was increased dose-responsively by IL-27. We have previously demonstrated inhibition of T-cell proliferation and cytokine production by neonatal macrophage-generated IL-27, and IDO is often implicated in this negative regulation. An increase in IDO protein was demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy and was consistent with increased enzyme activity following treatment with IL-27. Inclusion of a soluble receptor to neutralize endogenous IL-27, decreased IDO expression and activity compared with untreated macrophages. In response to IL-27, neonatal macrophages phosphorylate signal transdcuer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) and STAT-3. Both transcription factors are recruited to the IDO regulatory region. STAT-3 dominates during steady-state regulation by lower levels of endogenous IL-27 production. A shift to enhanced STAT-1 recruitment occurs during increased levels of exogenously supplied IL-27. These data suggest an interesting interplay of STAT-1 and STAT-3 to regulate IDO activity and immunosuppression in response to different levels of IL-27 in the microenvironment of the immune response that may further our understanding of this interesting cytokine.

  9. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of ligand binding and ligand binding-induced tertiary structure formation by the thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Kulshina, Nadia; Edwards, Thomas E; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2010-01-01

    The thi-box riboswitch regulates gene expression in response to the intracellular concentration of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) in archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. To complement previous biochemical, genetic, and structural studies of this phylogenetically widespread RNA domain, we have characterized its interaction with TPP by isothermal titration calorimetry. This shows that TPP binding is highly dependent on Mg(2+) concentration. The dissociation constant decreases from approximately 200 nM at 0.5 mM Mg(2+) concentration to approximately 9 nM at 2.5 mM Mg(2+) concentration. Binding is enthalpically driven, but the unfavorable entropy of binding decreases as Mg(2+) concentration rises, suggesting that divalent cations serve to pre-organize the RNA. Mutagenesis, biochemical analysis, and a new crystal structure of the riboswitch suggest that a critical element that participates in organizing the riboswitch structure is the tertiary interaction formed between the P3 and L5 regions. This tertiary contact is distant from the TPP binding site, but calorimetric analysis reveals that even subtle mutations in L5 can have readily detectable effects on TPP binding. The thermodynamic signatures of these mutations, namely decreased favorable enthalpy of binding and small effects on entropy of binding, are consistent with the P3-L5 association contributing allosterically to TPP-induced compaction of the RNA.

  11. A computational analysis of binding modes and conformation changes of MDM2 induced by p53 and inhibitor bindings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Wang, Jinan; Zhu, Weiliang; Li, Guohui

    2013-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations followed by principal component analysis were performed to study the conformational change of MDM2 induced by p53 and two inhibitor (P4 and MI63a) bindings. The results show that the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2 is very flexible and adaptive to different structural binding partners. The cleft tends to become wider and more stable as MDM2 binds to the three binding partners, while unbound MDM2 shows a narrower and pretty flexible cleft, which agrees with recent experimental data and theoretical studies. It was also found that the binding of P4 and p53 stabilizes the motion of the loop L2 linking the helix α2 and β strand (β3), but the presence of MI63a makes the motion of L2 disordered. In addition, the binding free energies of the three partners to MDM2 were calculated using molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area to explain the binding modes of these three partners to MDM2. This study will be helpful not only for better understanding the functional, concerted motion of MDM2, but also for the rational design of potent anticancer drugs targeting the p53-MDM2 interaction.

  12. The Shc1 adaptor simultaneously balances Stat1 and Stat3 activity to promote breast cancer immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ryuhjin; Sabourin, Valérie; Bolt, Alicia M.; Hébert, Steven; Totten, Stephanie; De Jay, Nicolas; Festa, Maria Carolina; Young, Yoon Kow; Im, Young Kyuen; Pawson, Tony; Koromilas, Antonis E.; Muller, William J.; Mann, Koren K.; Kleinman, Claudia L.; Ursini-Siegel, Josie

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase signalling within cancer cells is central to the establishment of an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors act, in part, to augment adaptive immunity, the increased heterogeneity and functional redundancy of the tyrosine kinome is a hurdle to achieving durable responses to immunotherapies. We previously identified the Shc1 (ShcA) scaffold, a central regulator of tyrosine kinase signalling, as essential for promoting breast cancer immune suppression. Herein we show that the ShcA pathway simultaneously activates STAT3 immunosuppressive signals and impairs STAT1-driven immune surveillance in breast cancer cells. Impaired Y239/Y240-ShcA phosphorylation selectively reduces STAT3 activation in breast tumours, profoundly sensitizing them to immune checkpoint inhibitors and tumour vaccines. Finally, the ability of diminished tyrosine kinase signalling to initiate STAT1-driven immune surveillance can be overcome by compensatory STAT3 hyperactivation in breast tumours. Our data indicate that inhibition of pY239/240-ShcA-dependent STAT3 signalling may represent an attractive therapeutic strategy to sensitize breast tumours to multiple immunotherapies. PMID:28276425

  13. A new animal model containing human SCARB2 and lacking stat-1 is highly susceptible to EV71.

    PubMed

    Liou, An-Ting; Wu, Szu-Yao; Liao, Chun-Che; Chang, Ya-Shu; Chang, Chih-Shin; Shih, Chiaho

    2016-08-08

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major threat to children worldwide. Children infected with EV71 could develop subclinical infection and hand-foot-and -mouth disease (HFMD). In severe cases, patients could develop encephalitis, paralysis, pulmonary edema, and death. A more user-friendly and robust animal model is essential to investigating EV71 pathogenesis. Here, we established a hybrid (hSCARB2(+/+)/stat-1(-/-)) mouse strain from crossbreeding SCARB2 transgenic and stat-1 KO mice, and compared the susceptibilities to EV71 infection and pathogenesis between parental and hybrid mice. Virus-encoded VP1 protein can be detected in the streaking nerve fibers in brain and spinal cord. This hybrid mouse strain at 2-week-old age can still be infected with different genotypes of EV71 at 1000-fold lower titer via an ip route. Infected hybrid mice developed earlier onset of CNS disease, paralysis, and death at a higher incidence. These advantages of this novel model meet the urgent need from the scientific community in basic and preclinical research in therapeutics and pathogenesis.

  14. A new animal model containing human SCARB2 and lacking stat-1 is highly susceptible to EV71

    PubMed Central

    Liou, An-Ting; Wu, Szu-Yao; Liao, Chun-Che; Chang, Ya-Shu; Chang, Chih-Shin; Shih, Chiaho

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major threat to children worldwide. Children infected with EV71 could develop subclinical infection and hand-foot-and -mouth disease (HFMD). In severe cases, patients could develop encephalitis, paralysis, pulmonary edema, and death. A more user-friendly and robust animal model is essential to investigating EV71 pathogenesis. Here, we established a hybrid (hSCARB2+/+/stat-1−/−) mouse strain from crossbreeding SCARB2 transgenic and stat-1 KO mice, and compared the susceptibilities to EV71 infection and pathogenesis between parental and hybrid mice. Virus-encoded VP1 protein can be detected in the streaking nerve fibers in brain and spinal cord. This hybrid mouse strain at 2-week-old age can still be infected with different genotypes of EV71 at 1000-fold lower titer via an ip route. Infected hybrid mice developed earlier onset of CNS disease, paralysis, and death at a higher incidence. These advantages of this novel model meet the urgent need from the scientific community in basic and preclinical research in therapeutics and pathogenesis. PMID:27499235

  15. The Shc1 adaptor simultaneously balances Stat1 and Stat3 activity to promote breast cancer immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ryuhjin; Sabourin, Valérie; Bolt, Alicia M; Hébert, Steven; Totten, Stephanie; De Jay, Nicolas; Festa, Maria Carolina; Young, Yoon Kow; Im, Young Kyuen; Pawson, Tony; Koromilas, Antonis E; Muller, William J; Mann, Koren K; Kleinman, Claudia L; Ursini-Siegel, Josie

    2017-03-09

    Tyrosine kinase signalling within cancer cells is central to the establishment of an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors act, in part, to augment adaptive immunity, the increased heterogeneity and functional redundancy of the tyrosine kinome is a hurdle to achieving durable responses to immunotherapies. We previously identified the Shc1 (ShcA) scaffold, a central regulator of tyrosine kinase signalling, as essential for promoting breast cancer immune suppression. Herein we show that the ShcA pathway simultaneously activates STAT3 immunosuppressive signals and impairs STAT1-driven immune surveillance in breast cancer cells. Impaired Y239/Y240-ShcA phosphorylation selectively reduces STAT3 activation in breast tumours, profoundly sensitizing them to immune checkpoint inhibitors and tumour vaccines. Finally, the ability of diminished tyrosine kinase signalling to initiate STAT1-driven immune surveillance can be overcome by compensatory STAT3 hyperactivation in breast tumours. Our data indicate that inhibition of pY239/240-ShcA-dependent STAT3 signalling may represent an attractive therapeutic strategy to sensitize breast tumours to multiple immunotherapies.

  16. STAT1 Interaction with E3-14.7K in Monocytes Affects the Efficacy of Oncolytic Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Spurrell, Emma; Gangeswaran, Rathi; Wang, Pengju; Cao, Fengyu; Gao, Dongling; Feng, Baisui; Wold, William; Tollefson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses based on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) have been developed as a new class of therapeutic agents for cancers that are resistant to conventional therapies. Clinical experience shows that these agents are safe, but virotherapy alone has not achieved long-term cure in cancer patients. The vast majority of oncolytic adenoviruses used in clinical trials to date have deletion of the E3B genes. It has been demonstrated that the antitumor potency of the E3B-deleted mutant (dl309) is inferior to adenovirus with E3B genes intact. Tumors treated with dl309 show markedly greater macrophage infiltration than E3B-intact adenovirus. However, the functional mechanisms for this were not previously known. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of E3B genes increases production of chemokines by monocytes after adenovirus infection and increases monocyte migration. The E3B 14,700-Da protein (E3B-14.7K) inhibits STAT1 function by preventing its phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. The STAT1 inhibitor, fludarabine, rescues the effect of E3B-14.7K deletion by downregulating target chemokine expression in human and murine monocytes and results in an enhanced antitumor efficacy with dl309 in vivo. These findings have important implications for clinical use of E3B-deleted oncolytic adenovirus and other E3B-deleted adenovirus vector-based therapy. PMID:24335311

  17. PUMA binding induces partial unfolding within BCL-xL to disrupt p53 binding and promote apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Follis, Ariele Viacava; Chipuk, Jerry E; Fisher, John C; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Grace, Christy R; Nourse, Amanda; Baran, Katherine; Ou, Li; Min, Lie; White, Stephen W; Green, Douglas R; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2013-03-01

    Following DNA damage, nuclear p53 induces the expression of PUMA, a BH3-only protein that binds and inhibits the antiapoptotic BCL-2 repertoire, including BCL-xL. PUMA, unique among BH3-only proteins, disrupts the interaction between cytosolic p53 and BCL-xL, allowing p53 to promote apoptosis via direct activation of the BCL-2 effector molecules BAX and BAK. Structural investigations using NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography revealed that PUMA binding induced partial unfolding of two α-helices within BCL-xL. Wild-type PUMA or a PUMA mutant incapable of causing binding-induced unfolding of BCL-xL equivalently inhibited the antiapoptotic BCL-2 repertoire to sensitize for death receptor-activated apoptosis, but only wild-type PUMA promoted p53-dependent, DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that PUMA-induced partial unfolding of BCL-xL disrupts interactions between cytosolic p53 and BCL-xL, releasing the bound p53 to initiate apoptosis. We propose that regulated unfolding of BCL-xL provides a mechanism to promote PUMA-dependent signaling within the apoptotic pathways.

  18. Despite Increased Type 1 IFN, Autoimmune Nonobese Diabetic Mice Display Impaired Dendritic Cell Response to CpG and Decreased Nuclear Localization of IFN-Activated STAT1

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Jubayer; Rahir, Gwendoline; Dong, Matthew B.; Zhao, Yongge; Rodrigues, Kameron B.; Hotta-Iwamura, Chie; Chen, Ye; Guerrero, Alan; Tarbell, Kristin V.

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune signals help break self-tolerance to initiate autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, but innate contributions to subsequent regulation of disease progression are less clear. Most studies have measured in vitro innate responses of GM-CSF dendritic cells (DCs) that are functionally distinct from conventional DCs (cDCs) and do not reflect in vivo DC subsets. To determine whether autoimmune NOD mice have alterations in type 1 IFN innate responsiveness, we compared cDCs from prediabetic NOD and control C57BL/6 (B6) mice stimulated in vivo with the TLR9 ligand CpG, a strong type 1 IFN inducer. In response to CpG, NOD mice produce more type 1 IFN and express higher levels of CD40, and NOD monocyte DCs make more TNF. However, the overall CpG-induced transcriptional response is muted in NOD cDCs. Of relevance the costimulatory proteins CD80/CD86, signals needed for regulatory T cell homeostasis, are upregulated less on NOD cDCs. Interestingly, NOD Rag1−/− mice also display a defect in CpG-induced CD86 upregulation compared with B6 Rag1−/−, indicating this particular innate alteration precedes adaptive autoimmunity. The impaired response in NOD DCs is likely downstream of the IFN-α/β receptor because DCs from NOD and B6 mice show similar CpG-induced CD86 levels when anti–IFN-α/β receptor Ab is added. IFN-α–induced nuclear localization of activated STAT1 is markedly reduced in NOD CD11c+ cells, consistent with lower type 1 IFN responsiveness. In conclusion, NOD DCs display altered innate responses characterized by enhanced type 1 IFN and activation of monocyte-derived DCs but diminished cDC type 1 IFN response. PMID:26826238

  19. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  20. Arginine 197 of lac repressor contributes significant energy to inducer binding. Confirmation of homology to periplasmic sugar binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Spotts, R O; Chakerian, A E; Matthews, K S

    1991-12-05

    Based on primary sequence homology between the lactose repressor protein and periplasmic sugar-binding proteins (Müller-Hill, B. (1983) Nature 302, 163-164), a hypothetical sugar-binding site for the lac repressor was proposed using the solved x-ray crystallographic structure of the arabinose-binding protein (ABP) (Sams, C. F., Vyas, N. K., Quiocho, F. A., and Matthews, K. S. (1984) Nature 310, 429-430). By analogy to Arg151 in the ABP sugar site, Arg197 is predicted to play an important role in lac repressor binding to inducer sugars. Hydrogen bonding occurs between Arg151 and the ring oxygen and 4-hydroxyl of the sugar ligand, two backbone carbonyls, and a side chain in ABP, and similar interactions in the lac repressor would be anticipated. To test this hypothesis, Arg197 in the lac repressor protein was altered by oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis to substitute Gly, Leu, or Lys. Introduction of these substitutions at position 197 had no effect on operator binding parameters of the isolated mutant proteins, whereas the affinity for inducer was dramatically decreased, consistent with in vivo phenotypic behavior obtained by suppression of nonsense mutations at this site (Kleina, L. G., and Miller, J. H. (1990) J. Mol. Biol. 212, 295-318). Inducer binding affinity was reduced approximately 3 orders of magnitude for Leu, Gly, or Lys substitutions, corresponding to a loss of 50% of the free energy of binding. The pH shift characteristic of wild-type repressor is conserved in these mutants. Circular dichroic spectra demonstrated no significant alterations in secondary structure for these mutants. Thus, the primary effect of substitution for Arg197 is a very significant decrease in the affinity for inducer sugars. Arginine is uniquely able to make the multiple contacts found in the ABP sugar site, and we conclude that this residue plays a similar role in sugar binding for lactose repressor protein. These results provide experimental validation for the

  1. Upregulation of the Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling 1 and 3 Is Associated with Arrest of Phosphorylated-STAT1 Nuclear Importation and Reduced Innate Response in Denguevirus-Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Jiménez, Tania; Millán-Pérez Peña, Lourdes; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Sedeño-Monge, Virginia; Santos-López, Gerardo; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Terán-Cabanillas, Eli; Hernández, Jesus; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2016-03-01

    To clarify whether the suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are associated with denguevirus (DENV) evasion of the antiviral response, we analyzed the expression kinetics of SOCS1 and SOCS3 and of the antiviral genes MxA and OAS during DENV infection of U937 macrophages that were or not treated with interferon (IFN)-α. DENV infection produced a viral titer three times higher in untreated than in IFN-α-treated cells (p < 0.001 at 72 h postinfection [p.i.]). Partial inhibition of DENV replication was associated with reduced expression of MxA and OAS antiviral genes as well as higher SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in DENV-infected cells than in cells treated only with IFN-α. Complete loss of phosphorylated-signal transducer and activator of transcription (p-STAT)2 and reduced nuclear importation of p-STAT1 were observed in DENV-infected cells compared to IFN-α treatment that induced p-STAT1 and p-STAT2. Our data thus suggest that overexpression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 induced by DENV infection leads to impairment of antiviral response through the inhibition of STAT functionality.

  2. Conformational changes in the metal-binding sites of cardiac troponin C induced by calcium binding

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, G.A.; Brito, R.M.M.; Putkey, J.A.; Rosevear, P.R. )

    1992-02-18

    Isotope labeling of recombinant normal cardiac troponin C (cTnC3) with {sup 15}N-enriched amino acids and multidimensional NMR were used to assign the downfield-shifted amide protons of Gly residues at position 6 in Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops II, III, and IV, as well a tightly hydrogen-bonded amides within the short antiparallel {beta}-sheets between pairs of Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops. The amide protons of Gly70, Gly110, and Gly146 were found to be shifted significantly downfield from the remaining amide proton resonances in Ca{sup 2+}-saturated cTnC3. No downfield-shifted Gly resonance was observed from the naturally inactive site I. Comparison of downfield-shifted amide protons in the Ca{sup 2+}-saturated forms of cTnC3 and CBM-IIA, a mutant having Asp65 replaced by Ala, demonstrated the Gly70 is hydrogen bonded to the carboxylate side chain of Asp65. Thus, the hydrogen bond between Gly and Asp in positions 6 and 1, respectively, of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding loop appears crucial for maintaining the integrity of the helix-loop-helix Ca{sup 2+}-binding sites. The amide protons of Ile112 and Ile148 in the C-terminal domain and Ile36 in the N-terminal domain {beta}-sheets exhibit chemical shifts consistent with hydrogen-bond formation between the pair of Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops in each domain of Ca{sup 2+}-saturated cTnC3. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+}, no strong hydrogen bonds were detected between the {beta}-strands in the N-terminal domain of cTnC3. Thus, Ca{sup 2+} binding at site II results in a tightening of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding loop and formation of one strong hydrogen bond between {beta}-strands in the N-terminal domain. These changes may initiate movement of helices in the N-terminal domain responsible for the interaction of TnC with troponin I.

  3. Rare-event induced binding transition of heteropolymers.

    PubMed

    Tang, L H; Chaté, H

    2001-01-29

    Sequence heterogeneity broadens the binding transition of a polymer onto a linear or planar substrate. This effect is analyzed in a real-space renormalization group scheme designed to capture the statistics of rare events. In the strongly disordered regime, binding initiates at an exponentially rare set of "good contacts." Renormalization of the contact potential yields a Kosterlitz--Thouless-type transition in any dimension. This and other predictions are confirmed by extensive numerical simulations of a directed polymer interacting with a columnar defect.

  4. Fludarabine prevents smooth muscle proliferation in vitro and neointimal hyperplasia in vivo through specific inhibition of STAT-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Torella, Daniele; Curcio, Antonio; Gasparri, Cosimo; Galuppo, Valentina; De Serio, Daniela; Surace, Francesca C; Cavaliere, Anna Lucia; Leone, Angelo; Coppola, Carmela; Ellison, Georgina M; Indolfi, Ciro

    2007-06-01

    Drug-eluting stents are increasingly used to reduce in-stent restenosis and adverse cardiac events after percutaneous coronary interventions. However, the race for the ideal drug-eluting stent is still on, with special regard to the best stent-coating system and the most effective and less toxic drug. Fludarabine, a nucleoside analog, has both anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative cellular effects. The aim of the present study was to assess the cellular and molecular effects of fludarabine on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth in vitro and in vivo and the feasibility and efficacy of a fludarabine-eluting stent. To study the biomolecular effects of fludarabine on VSMC proliferation in vitro, rat VSMCs were grown in the presence of 50 microM fludarabine or in the absence of the same. To evaluate the in vivo effect of this drug, male Wistar rats underwent balloon injury of the carotid artery, and fludarabine was locally delivered at the time of injury. Finally, fludarabine-eluting stents were in-laboratory manufactured and tested in a rabbit model of in-stent restenosis. Fludarabine markedly inhibited VSMC proliferation in cell culture. Furthermore, fludarabine reduced neointimal formation after balloon angioplasty in a dose-dependent manner, and fludarabine-eluting stents reduced neointimal hyperplasia by approximately 50%. These in vitro and in vivo cellular effects were specifically associated with the molecular switch-off of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 activation, without affecting other STAT proteins. Fludarabine abolishes VSMC proliferation in vitro and reduces neointimal formation after balloon injury in vivo through specific inhibition of STAT-1 activation. Fludarabine-eluting stents are feasible and effective in reducing in-stent restenosis in rabbits.

  5. Induced circularly polarized luminescence arising from anion or protein binding to racemic emissive lanthanide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Rachel; Puckrin, Robert; McMahon, Brian K.; Pal, Robert; Parker, David; Pålsson, Lars-Olof

    2014-06-01

    A circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) spectrometer has been built and used to study the binding interaction of lactate and four different proteins with racemic EuIII and TbIII complexes in aqueous solution. Lactate binding gives rise to strong induced CPL spectra, and the observed emission dissymmetry factors vary linearly with enantiomeric composition. Particularly strong induced TbIII CPL also characterizes the binding interaction of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein with a dissociation constant, Kd, of 2.5 μM.

  6. An AP1 binding site upstream of the kappa immunoglobulin intron enhancer binds inducible factors and contributes to expression.

    PubMed Central

    Schanke, J T; Marcuzzi, A; Podzorski, R P; Van Ness, B

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the kappa immunoglobulin light chain gene requires developmental- and tissue-specific regulation by trans-acting factors which interact with two distinct enhancer elements. A new protein-DNA interaction has been identified upstream of the intron enhancer, within the matrix-associated region of the J-C intron. The binding activity is greatly inducible in pre-B cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 but specific complexes are found at all stages of B cell development tested. The footprinted binding site is homologous to the consensus AP1 motif. The protein components of this complex are specifically competed by an AP1 consensus motif and were shown by supershift to include c-Jun and c-Fos, suggesting that this binding site is an AP1 motif and that the Jun and Fos families of transcription factors play a role in the regulation of the kappa light chain gene. Mutation of the AP1 motif in the context of the intron enhancer was shown to decrease enhancer-mediated activation of the promoter in both pre-B cells induced with LPS and constitutive expression in mature B cells. Images PMID:7816634

  7. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  8. IFN-γ Directly Controls IL-33 Protein Level through a STAT1- and LMP2-dependent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Kopach, Pavel; Lockatell, Virginia; Pickering, Edward M.; Haskell, Ronald E.; Anderson, Richard D.; Hasday, Jeffrey D.; Todd, Nevins W.; Luzina, Irina G.; Atamas, Sergei P.

    2014-01-01

    IL-33 contributes to disease processes in association with Th1 and Th2 phenotypes. IL-33 mRNA is rapidly regulated, but the fate of synthesized IL-33 protein is unknown. To understand the interplay among IL-33, IFN-γ, and IL-4 proteins, recombinant replication-deficient adenoviruses were produced and used for dual expression of IL-33 and IFN-γ or IL-33 and IL-4. The effects of such dual gene delivery were compared with the effects of similar expression of each of these cytokines alone. In lung fibroblast culture, co-expression of IL-33 and IFN-γ resulted in suppression of the levels of both proteins, whereas co-expression of IL-33 and IL-4 led to mutual elevation. In vivo, co-expression of IL-33 and IFN-γ in the lungs led to attenuation of IL-33 protein levels. Purified IFN-γ also attenuated IL-33 protein in fibroblast culture, suggesting that IFN-γ controls IL-33 protein degradation. Specific inhibition of caspase-1, -3, and -8 had minimal effect on IFN-γ-driven IL-33 protein down-regulation. Pharmacological inhibition, siRNA-mediated silencing, or gene deficiency of STAT1 potently up-regulated IL-33 protein expression levels and attenuated the down-regulating effect of IFN-γ on IL-33. Stimulation with IFN-γ strongly elevated the levels of the LMP2 proteasome subunit, known for its role in IFN-γ-regulated antigen processing. siRNA-mediated silencing of LMP2 expression abrogated the effect of IFN-γ on IL-33. Thus, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-33 are engaged in a complex interplay. The down-regulation of IL-33 protein levels by IFN-γ in pulmonary fibroblasts and in the lungs in vivo occurs through STAT1 and non-canonical use of the LMP2 proteasome subunit in a caspase-independent fashion. PMID:24619410

  9. BoHV-4-Based Vector Single Heterologous Antigen Delivery Protects STAT1(-/-) Mice from Monkeypoxvirus Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Ryan W.; Doronin, Konstantin; Hembrador, Edguardo; Pompilio, Daniela; Tebaldi, Giulia; Estep, Ryan D.; Wong, Scott W.; Buller, Mark R.; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is the etiological agent of human (MPX). It is an emerging orthopoxvirus zoonosis in the tropical rain forest of Africa and is endemic in the Congo-basin and sporadic in West Africa; it remains a tropical neglected disease of persons in impoverished rural areas. Interaction of the human population with wildlife increases human infection with MPX virus (MPXV), and infection from human to human is possible. Smallpox vaccination provides good cross-protection against MPX; however, the vaccination campaign ended in Africa in 1980, meaning that a large proportion of the population is currently unprotected against MPXV infection. Disease control hinges on deterring zoonotic exposure to the virus and, barring that, interrupting person-to-person spread. However, there are no FDA-approved therapies against MPX, and current vaccines are limited due to safety concerns. For this reason, new studies on pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapeutics are still of great interest, not only for the scientific community but also for the governments concerned that MPXV could be used as a bioterror agent. In the present study, a new vaccination strategy approach based on three recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors, each expressing different MPXV glycoproteins, A29L, M1R and B6R were investigated in terms of protection from a lethal MPXV challenge in STAT1 knockout mice. BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK were successfully constructed by recombineering, and their capacity to express their transgene was demonstrated. A small challenge study was performed, and all three recombinant BoHV-4 appeared safe (no weight-loss or obvious adverse events) following intraperitoneal administration. Further, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK alone or in combination with BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK, was shown to be able to protect, 100% alone and 80% in combination, STAT1(-/-) mice against

  10. Inflammatory impact of IFN-γ in CD8+ T cell-mediated lung injury is mediated by both Stat1-dependent and -independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; DeBerge, Matthew P.; Kumar, Aseem; Alia, Christopher S.; Durbin, Joan E.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza infection results in considerable pulmonary pathology, a significant component of which is mediated by CD8+ T cell effector functions. To isolate the specific contribution of CD8+ T cells to lung immunopathology, we utilized a nonviral murine model in which alveolar epithelial cells express an influenza antigen and injury is initiated by adoptive transfer of influenza-specific CD8+ T cells. We report that IFN-γ production by adoptively transferred influenza-specific CD8+ T cells is a significant contributor to acute lung injury following influenza antigen recognition, in isolation from its impact on viral clearance. CD8+ T cell production of IFN-γ enhanced lung epithelial cell expression of chemokines and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells into the airways. Surprisingly, Stat1 deficiency in the adoptive-transfer recipients exacerbated the lung injury that was mediated by the transferred influenza-specific CD8+ T cells but was still dependent on IFN-γ production by these cells. Loss of Stat1 resulted in sustained activation of Stat3 signaling, dysregulated chemokine expression, and increased infiltration of the airways by inflammatory cells. Taken together, these data identify important roles for IFN-γ signaling and Stat1-independent IFN-γ signaling in regulating CD8+ T cell-mediated acute lung injury. This is the first study to demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect of Stat1 on CD8+ T cell-mediated lung immunopathology without the complication of differences in viral load. PMID:25617378

  11. Amino acid composition of cadmium-binding protein induced in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Maita, Y.; Kawaguchi, S. )

    1989-09-01

    Organisms living in environments polluted with heavy metals develop tolerance against these contaminants. The tolerance has been attributed to the ability to synthesize metal binding substances. These recent findings imply metal binding complexes from animals and plants, although having very similar functional properties, may have entirely different amino acid compositions. Researchers reported that cadystin from fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe was composed of only glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine. A year later, a heavy metal binding substance was isolated from Rauwolfia serpetina which contains only Glu, Cys, and Gly. Heavy metal binding complexes isolated from the water hyacinth and morning glory Datura innoxia also showed an amino acid composition similar to cadystin or phytochelatin. In this study, the cadmium binding protein induced in the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was isolated and purified and its amino acid composition determined.

  12. Vitronectin induces phosphorylation of ezrin/radixin/moesin actin-binding proteins through binding to its novel neuronal receptor telencephalin.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yutaka; Kawasaki, Miwa; Matsuno, Hitomi; Mitsui, Sachiko; Mori, Kensaku; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro

    2012-11-09

    Vitronectin (VN) is an extracellular matrix protein abundantly present in blood and a wide variety of tissues and plays important roles in a number of biological phenomena mainly through its binding to αV integrins. However, its definite function in the brain remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of telencephalin (TLCN/ICAM-5) as a novel VN receptor on neuronal dendrites. VN strongly binds to TLCN, a unique neuronal member of the ICAM family, which is specifically expressed on dendrites of spiny neurons in the mammalian telencephalon. VN-coated microbeads induce the formation of phagocytic cup-like plasma membrane protrusions on dendrites of cultured hippocampal neurons and trigger the activation of TLCN-dependent intracellular signaling cascade including the phosphorylation of ezrin/radixin/moesin actin-binding proteins and recruitment of F-actin and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate for morphological transformation of the dendritic protrusions. These results suggest that the extracellular matrix molecule VN and its neuronal receptor TLCN play a pivotal role in the phosphorylation of ezrin/radixin/moesin proteins and the formation of phagocytic cup-like structures on neuronal dendrites.

  13. Binding site and subclass specificity of the herpes simplex virus type 1-induced Fc receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wiger, D; Michaelsen, T E

    1985-01-01

    Immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity was detected by indirect immunofluorescence employing fluorochrome conjugated F(ab')2 antibody fragments on acetone-fixed cell cultures infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Using this method the Fc receptor-like activity seemed to be restricted to the IgG class of human immunoglobulins. While IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4 myeloma proteins bind to this putative Fc gamma receptor at a concentration of 0.002 mg/ml, IgG3 myeloma proteins were without activity at 0.1 mg/ml. The binding activity was associated with the Fc fragments of IgG, while the pFc' fragments of IgG appeared to be unable to bind in this assay system. The reactivity and specificity of the HSV-1 Fc receptor was independent of both the type of tissue culture cells used and the strain of HSV-1 inducing the Fc receptor-like activity. The HSV-1-induced Fc receptor has a similar specificity for human immunoglobulin class and subclasses as staphylococcal Protein A. However, these two Fc receptors exhibit at least one striking difference. The IgG3 G3m(st) protein which binds to Protein A does not bind to HSV-1-induced Fc receptor. A possible reaction site for the HSV-1 Fc receptor on IgG could be at or near Asp 276. Images Figure 1 PMID:2982735

  14. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Altered SRY Genomic Binding During Gonadal Sex Determination.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Michael K; Bhandari, Ramji K; Haque, M Muksitul; Nilsson, Eric E

    2015-12-01

    A critical transcription factor required for mammalian male sex determination is SRY (sex determining region on the Y chromosome). The expression of SRY in precursor Sertoli cells is one of the initial events in testis development. The current study was designed to determine the impact of environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance on SRY binding during gonadal sex determination in the male. The agricultural fungicide vinclozolin and vehicle control (DMSO) exposed gestating females (F0 generation) during gonadal sex determination promoted the transgenerational inheritance of differential DNA methylation in sperm of the F3 generation (great grand-offspring). The fetal gonads in F3 generation males were used to identify potential alterations in SRY binding sites in the developing Sertoli cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with an SRY antibody followed by genome-wide promoter tiling array (ChIP-Chip) was used to identify alterations in SRY binding. A total of 81 adjacent oligonucleotide sites and 173 single oligo SRY binding sites were identified to be altered transgenerationally in the Sertoli cell vinclozolin lineage F3 generation males. Observations demonstrate the majority of the previously identified normal SRY binding sites were not altered and the altered SRY binding sites were novel and new additional sites. The chromosomal locations, gene associations and potentially modified cellular pathways were investigated. In summary, environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of germline epimutations appears to alter the cellular differentiation and development of the precursor Sertoli cell SRY binding during gonadal sex determination that influence the developmental origins of adult onset testis disease.

  15. Iron Reduces M1 Macrophage Polarization in RAW264.7 Macrophages Associated with Inhibition of STAT1

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Zhen-Shun; Wang, Qian-Qian; Li, Jia-Hui; Wang, Xu-Liang; Wang, Yi-Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Iron metabolism in inflammation has been mostly characterized in macrophages exposed to pathogens or inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study is to investigate the cross-regulatory interactions between M1 macrophage polarization and iron metabolism. Firstly, we characterized the transcription of genes related to iron homeostasis in M1 RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated by IFN-γ. The molecular signature of M1 macrophages showed high levels of iron storage (ferritin), a low level of iron export (ferroportin), and changes of iron regulators (hepcidin and transferrin receptors), which favour iron sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system and are benefit for inflammatory disorders. Then, we evaluated the effect of iron on M1 macrophage polarization. Iron significantly reduced mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS produced by IFN-γ-polarized M1 macrophages. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that iron also reduced iNOS production. However, iron did not compromise but enhanced the ability of M1-polarized macrophages to phagocytose FITC-dextran. Moreover, we demonstrated that STAT1 inhibition was required for reduction of iNOS and M1-related cytokines production by the present of iron. Together, these findings indicated that iron decreased polarization of M1 macrophages and inhibited the production of the proinflammatory cytokines. The results expanded our knowledge about the role of iron in macrophage polarization. PMID:28286378

  16. Pathogenesis and Immune Response of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in a STAT-1 Knockout Mouse Model▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bente, Dennis A.; Alimonti, Judie B.; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Camus, Gaëlle; Ströher, Ute; Zaki, Sherif; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Tick-borne Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) causes a severe hemorrhagic syndrome in humans but not in its vertebrate animal hosts. The pathogenesis of the disease is largely not understood due to the lack of an animal model. Laboratory animals typically show no overt signs of disease. Here, we describe a new small-animal model to study CCHFV pathogenesis that manifests clinical disease, similar to that seen in humans, without adaptation of the virus to the host. Our studies revealed that mice deficient in the STAT-1 signaling molecule were highly susceptible to infection, succumbing within 3 to 5 days. After CCHFV challenge, mice exhibited fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and highly elevated liver enzymes. Rapid viremic dissemination and extensive replication in visceral organs, mainly in liver and spleen, were associated with prominent histopathologic changes in these organs. Dramatically elevated proinflammatory cytokine levels were detected in the blood of the animals, suggestive of a cytokine storm. Immunologic analysis revealed delayed immune cell activation and intensive lymphocyte depletion. Furthermore, this study also demonstrated that ribavirin, a suggested treatment in human cases, protects mice from lethal CCHFV challenge. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the interferon response is crucial in controlling CCHFV replication in this model, and this is the first study that offers an in-depth in vivo analysis of CCHFV pathophysiology. This new mouse model exhibits key features of fatal human CCHF, proves useful for the testing of therapeutic strategies, and can be used to study virus attenuation. PMID:20739514

  17. Elevated levels of STAT1 in Fanconi anemia group A lymphoblasts correlate with the cells’ sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinking drugs

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Remón, Inés; Sánchez-Carrera, Dámaso; López-Duarte, Mónica; Richard, Carlos; Pipaón, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Progressive bone marrow failure starting in the first decade of life is one of the main characteristics of Fanconi anemia. Along with the bone marrow failure, this pathology is characterized by congenital malformations, endocrine dysfunction and an extraordinary predisposition to develop cancer. The fact that hematopoietic progenitor cells from subjects with Fanconi anemia are sensitive to both DNA-interstrand crosslinking agents and inflammatory cytokines, which are aberrantly overproduced in these patients, has led to different explanations for the causes of the bone marrow failure. We analyzed STAT1 expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with Fanconi anemia group A and correlated this with aspects of the Fanconi anemia phenotype such as sensitivity to genotoxic agents or to inhibitory cytokines. We provide evidence of overexpression of STAT1 in FANCA-deficient cells which has both transcriptional and post-translational components, and is related to the constitutive activation of ERK in Fanconi anemia group A cells, since it can be reverted by treatment with U0126. STAT1 phosphorylation was not defective in the lymphoblasts, so these cells accumulated higher levels of active STAT1 in response to interferon gamma, probably in relation to their greater sensitivity to this cytokine. On the other hand, inhibition of STAT1 by genetic or chemical means reverted the hypersensitivity of Fanconi anemia group A lymphoblasts to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents. Our data provide an explanation for the mixed sensitivity of Fanconi anemia group A cells to both genotoxic stress and inflammatory cytokines and indicate new targets for the treatment of bone marrow failure in these patients. PMID:23585528

  18. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins lack an N(T)KXD consensus motif and bind GMP in addition to GDP and GTP.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Patterson, C E; Staeheli, P

    1991-09-01

    The primary structures of interferon (IFN)-induced guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were deduced from cloned human and murine cDNAs. These proteins contained only two of the three sequence motifs typically found in GTP/GDP-binding proteins. The N(T)KXD motif, which is believed to confer guanine specificity in other nucleotide-binding proteins, was absent. Nevertheless, the IFN-induced GBPs exhibited a high degree of selectivity for binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. An interesting feature of IFN-induced GBPs is that they strongly bound to GMP agarose in addition to GDP and GTP agaroses but failed to bind to ATP agarose and all other nucleotide agaroses tested. Both GTP and GMP, but not ATP, competed for binding of murine GBP-1 to agarose-immobilized GMP. The IFN-induced GBPs thus define a distinct novel family of proteins with GTP-binding activity. We further demonstrate that human and murine cells contain at least two genes encoding IFN-induced GBPs. The cloned murine cDNA codes for GBP-1, an IFN-induced protein previously shown to be absent from mice of Gbp-1b genotype.

  19. Prenylation of an interferon-gamma-induced GTP-binding protein: the human guanylate binding protein, huGBP1.

    PubMed

    Nantais, D E; Schwemmle, M; Stickney, J T; Vestal, D J; Buss, J E

    1996-09-01

    Interferons (IFN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause multiple changes in isoprenoid-modified proteins in murine macrophages, the most dramatic being the expression of a prenyl protein of 65 kDa. The guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are IFN-inducible GTP-binding proteins of approximately 65 kDa that possess a CaaX motif at their C-terminus, indicating that they might be substrates for prenyltransferases. The human GBP1 protein, when expressed in transfected COS-1 cells, incorporates radioactivity from the isoprenoid precursor [3H]mevalonate. In addition, huGBPs expressed from the endogenous genes in IFN-gamma-treated human fibroblasts or monocytic cells were also found to be isoprenoid modified. IFN-gamma-induced huGBPs in HL-60 cells were not labeled by the specific C20 isoprenoid, [3H]geranylgeraniol, but did show decreased isoprenoid incorporation in cells treated with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor BZA-5B, indicating that huGBPs in HL-60 cells are probably modified by a C15 farnesyl rather than the more common C20 lipid. Differentiated HL-60 cells treated with IFN-gamma/LPS showed no change in the profile of constitutive isoprenylated proteins and the IFN-gamma/LPS-induced huGBPs remained prenylated. Despite being prenylated, huGBP1 in COS cells and endogenous huGBPs in HL-60 cells were primarily (approximately 85%) cytosolic. Human GBPs are thus among the select group of prenyl proteins whose synthesis is tightly regulated by a cytokine. HuGBP1 is an abundant protein whose prenylation may be vulnerable to farnesyl transferase inhibitors that are designed to prevent farnesylation of Ras proteins.

  20. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  1. Dual-Action Inhibitors of HIF Prolyl Hydroxylases That Induce Binding of a Second Iron Ion

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, Armin; Demetriades, Marina; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Tian, Ya-Min; Stolze, Ineke; McNeill, Luke A.; Lee, Myung Kyu; Woon, Esther C. Y.; Mackeen, Mukram M.; Kawamura, Akane; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Mecinović, Jasmin; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl-hydroxylases (PHD or EGLN enzymes) is of interest for the treatment of anemia and ischemia-related diseases. Most PHD inhibitors work by binding to the single ferrous ion and competing with 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) co-substrate for binding at the PHD active site. Non-specific iron chelators also inhibit the PHDs, both in vitro and in cells. We report the identification of dual action PHD inhibitors, which bind to the active site iron and also induce the binding of a second iron ion at the active site. Following analysis of small-molecule iron complexes and application of non-denaturing protein mass spectrometry to assess PHD2·iron·inhibitor stoichimetry, selected diacylhydrazines were identified as PHD2 inhibitors that induce the binding of a second iron ion. Some compounds were shown to inhibit the HIF hydroxylases in human hepatoma and renal carcinoma cell lines. PMID:23151668

  2. Psoralens potentiate ultraviolet light-induced inhibition of epidermal growth factor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, J.D.; Lee, E.; Laskin, D.L.; Gallo, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    The psoralens, when activated by ultraviolet light of 320-400 nm (UVA light), are potent modulators of epidermal cell growth and differentiation. Previously, we reported that, in mammalian cells, these compounds bind to specific saturable high-affinity cellular receptor sites. In the present studies, we demonstrate that binding of psoralens to their receptors followed by UVA light activation is associated with inhibition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor binding. Inhibition of EGF binding, which required UVA light, was rapid and dependent on the dose of UVA light (0.5-2.0 J/cm2), as well as the concentration of psoralens (10 nM to 1 microM). Higher doses of UVA light (2.0-6.0 J/cm2) by themselves were also inhibitory, indicating that psoralens potentiate the UVA-induced inhibition of EGF binding. A number of biologically active analogs of psoralen, including 8-methoxypsoralen, 5-methoxypsoralen, and 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen, when activated by UVA light, were found to be inhibitors of binding. Inhibition of EGF binding by psoralens was observed in a variety of human and mouse cell culture lines known to possess psoralen receptors. In the epidermal-derived line PAM 212, at least two populations of receptors with different affinities for EGF were found. Psoralens and UVA light selectively inhibited binding to the higher-affinity EGF receptors, an effect analogous to that of the phorbol ester tumor promoters. As observed with phorbol esters, photoactivated psoralens appeared to inhibit EGF binding by an indirect mechanism. These data demonstrate that the psoralens and UVA light have direct biological effects on cell-surface membranes. Since EGF is a growth-regulatory peptide, the ability of psoralens and UVA light to inhibit EGF binding may underlie the biologic effects of these agents in the skin.

  3. Growth factors induce monocyte binding to vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for monocyte retention in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Natarajan, Rama

    2004-09-01

    Adhesive interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) may contribute to subendothelial monocyte-macrophage retention in atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB on VSMC-monocyte interactions. Treatment of human aortic VSMC (HVSMC) with ANG II or PDGF-BB significantly increased binding to human monocytic THP-1 cells and to peripheral blood monocytes. This was inhibited by antibodies to monocyte beta(1)- and beta(2)-integrins. The binding was also attenuated by blocking VSMC arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by inhibitors of 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conversely, binding was enhanced by overexpression of 12/15-LO or COX-2. Direct treatment of HVSMC with AA or its metabolites also increased binding. Furthermore, VSMC derived from 12/15-LO knockout mice displayed reduced binding to mouse monocytic cells relative to genetic control mice. Using specific signal transduction inhibitors, we demonstrated the involvement of Src, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and MAPKs in ANG II- or PDGF-BB-induced binding. Interestingly, after coculture with HVSMC, THP-1 cell surface expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was increased. These results show for the first time that growth factors may play additional roles in atherosclerosis by increasing monocyte binding to VSMC via AA metabolism and key signaling pathways. This can lead to monocyte subendothelial retention, CD36 expression, and foam cell formation.

  4. Proposed Standards for Variable Harmonization Documentation and Referencing: A Case Study Using QuickCharmStats 1.1.

    PubMed

    Winters, Kristi; Netscher, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Comparative statistical analyses often require data harmonization, yet the social sciences do not have clear operationalization frameworks that guide and homogenize variable coding decisions across disciplines. When faced with a need to harmonize variables researchers often look for guidance from various international studies that employ output harmonization, such as the Comparative Survey of Election Studies, which offer recoding structures for the same variable (e.g. marital status). More problematically there are no agreed documentation standards or journal requirements for reporting variable harmonization to facilitate a transparent replication process. We propose a conceptual and data-driven digital solution that creates harmonization documentation standards for publication and scholarly citation: QuickCharmStats 1.1. It is free and open-source software that allows for the organizing, documenting and publishing of data harmonization projects. QuickCharmStats starts at the conceptual level and its workflow ends with a variable recording syntax. It is therefore flexible enough to reflect a variety of theoretical justifications for variable harmonization. Using the socio-demographic variable 'marital status', we demonstrate how the CharmStats workflow collates metadata while being guided by the scientific standards of transparency and replication. It encourages researchers to publish their harmonization work by providing researchers who complete the peer review process a permanent identifier. Those who contribute original data harmonization work to their discipline can now be credited through citations. Finally, we propose peer-review standards for harmonization documentation, describe a route to online publishing, and provide a referencing format to cite harmonization projects. Although CharmStats products are designed for social scientists our adherence to the scientific method ensures our products can be used by researchers across the sciences.

  5. Proposed Standards for Variable Harmonization Documentation and Referencing: A Case Study Using QuickCharmStats 1.1

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Kristi; Netscher, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Comparative statistical analyses often require data harmonization, yet the social sciences do not have clear operationalization frameworks that guide and homogenize variable coding decisions across disciplines. When faced with a need to harmonize variables researchers often look for guidance from various international studies that employ output harmonization, such as the Comparative Survey of Election Studies, which offer recoding structures for the same variable (e.g. marital status). More problematically there are no agreed documentation standards or journal requirements for reporting variable harmonization to facilitate a transparent replication process. We propose a conceptual and data-driven digital solution that creates harmonization documentation standards for publication and scholarly citation: QuickCharmStats 1.1. It is free and open-source software that allows for the organizing, documenting and publishing of data harmonization projects. QuickCharmStats starts at the conceptual level and its workflow ends with a variable recording syntax. It is therefore flexible enough to reflect a variety of theoretical justifications for variable harmonization. Using the socio-demographic variable ‘marital status’, we demonstrate how the CharmStats workflow collates metadata while being guided by the scientific standards of transparency and replication. It encourages researchers to publish their harmonization work by providing researchers who complete the peer review process a permanent identifier. Those who contribute original data harmonization work to their discipline can now be credited through citations. Finally, we propose peer-review standards for harmonization documentation, describe a route to online publishing, and provide a referencing format to cite harmonization projects. Although CharmStats products are designed for social scientists our adherence to the scientific method ensures our products can be used by researchers across the sciences. PMID

  6. Breast Cancer Prevention by Fatty Acid Binding Protein MRG-Induced Pregnancy Like Mammary Gland Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Annual Summary 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 AUG 2004 - 31 JUL 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Breast Cancer Prevention by Fatty Acid Binding Protein...differentiation. Overexpression of MRG in human breast cancer cells induced differentiation with changes in cellular morphology and a significant increase

  7. Ligand-induced conformational changes in a thermophilic ribose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2009-05-21

    Members of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) superfamily are involved in transport and signaling processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Biological responses are typically mediated by ligand-induced conformational changes in which the binding event is coupled to a hinge-bending motion that brings together two domains in a closed form. In all PBP-mediated biological processes, downstream partners recognize the closed form of the protein. This motion has also been exploited in protein engineering experiments to construct biosensors that transduce ligand binding to a variety of physical signals. Understanding the mechanistic details of PBP conformational changes, both global (hinge bending, twisting, shear movements) and local (rotamer changes, backbone motion), therefore is not only important for understanding their biological function but also for protein engineering experiments. Here we present biochemical characterization and crystal structure determination of the periplasmic ribose-binding protein (RBP) from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in its ribose-bound and unliganded state. The T. maritima RBP (tmRBP) has 39% sequence identity and is considerably more resistant to thermal denaturation (appTm value is 108 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli homolog (ecRBP) (appTm value is 56 C). Polar ligand interactions and ligand-induced global conformational changes are conserved among ecRBP and tmRBP; however local structural rearrangements involving side-chain motions in the ligand-binding site are not conserved. Although the large-scale ligand-induced changes are mediated through similar regions, and are produced by similar backbone movements in tmRBP and ecRBP, the small-scale ligand-induced structural rearrangements differentiate the mesophile and thermophile. This suggests there are mechanistic differences in the manner by which these two proteins bind their ligands and are an example of how two structurally similar proteins utilize different

  8. Selective JAK3 Inhibitors with a Covalent Reversible Binding Mode Targeting a New Induced Fit Binding Pocket.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael; Chaikuad, Apirat; Bauer, Silke M; Holstein, Julia; Robers, Matthew B; Corona, Cesear R; Gehringer, Matthias; Pfaffenrot, Ellen; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Knapp, Stefan; Laufer, Stefan A

    2016-11-17

    Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of cytoplasmatic tyrosine kinases that are attractive targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs given their roles in cytokine signaling. One question regarding JAKs and their inhibitors that remains under intensive debate is whether JAK inhibitors should be isoform selective. Since JAK3 functions are restricted to immune cells, an isoform-selective inhibitor for JAK3 could be especially valuable to achieve clinically more useful and precise effects. However, the high degree of structural conservation makes isoform-selective targeting a challenging task. Here, we present picomolar inhibitors with unprecedented kinome-wide selectivity for JAK3. Selectivity was achieved by concurrent covalent reversible targeting of a JAK3-specific cysteine residue and a ligand-induced binding pocket. We confirmed that in vitro activity and selectivity translate well into the cellular environment and suggest that our inhibitors are powerful tools to elucidate JAK3-specific functions.

  9. The milk protein α-casein functions as a tumor suppressor via activation of STAT1 signaling, effectively preventing breast cancer tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Castello-Cros, Remedios; Capozza, Franco; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Xuanmao, Jiao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica

    2012-11-01

    Here, we identified the milk protein α-casein as a novel suppressor of tumor growth and metastasis. Briefly, Met-1 mammary tumor cells expressing α-casein showed a ~5-fold reduction in tumor growth and a near 10-fold decrease in experimental metastasis. To identify the molecular mechanism(s), we performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Interestingly, our results show that α-casein upregulates gene transcripts associated with interferon/STAT1 signaling and downregulates genes associated with "stemness." These findings were validated by immunoblot and FACS analysis, which showed the upregulation and hyperactivation of STAT1 and a decrease in the number of CD44(+) "cancer stem cells." These gene signatures were also able to predict clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that a lactation-based therapeutic strategy using recombinant α-casein would provide a more natural and non-toxic approach to the development of novel anticancer therapies.

  10. Green-Light-Induced Inactivation of Receptor Signaling Using Cobalamin-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Kainrath, Stephanie; Stadler, Manuela; Reichhart, Eva; Distel, Martin; Janovjak, Harald

    2017-04-10

    Optogenetics and photopharmacology provide spatiotemporally precise control over protein interactions and protein function in cells and animals. Optogenetic methods that are sensitive to green light and can be used to break protein complexes are not broadly available but would enable multichromatic experiments with previously inaccessible biological targets. Herein, we repurposed cobalamin (vitamin B12) binding domains of bacterial CarH transcription factors for green-light-induced receptor dissociation. In cultured cells, we observed oligomerization-induced cell signaling for the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 fused to cobalamin-binding domains in the dark that was rapidly eliminated upon illumination. In zebrafish embryos expressing fusion receptors, green light endowed control over aberrant fibroblast growth factor signaling during development. Green-light-induced domain dissociation and light-inactivated receptors will critically expand the optogenetic toolbox for control of biological processes.

  11. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  12. A Novel Protein Domain Induces High Affinity Selenocysteine Insertion Sequence Binding and Elongation Factor Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Jesse; Caban, Kelvin; Ranaweera, Ruchira; Gonzalez-Flores, Jonathan N.; Copeland, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is incorporated at UGA codons in mRNAs possessing a Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element in their 3′-untranslated region. At least three additional factors are necessary for Sec incorporation: SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2), Sec-tRNASec, and a Sec-specific translation elongation factor (eEFSec). The C-terminal half of SBP2 is sufficient to promote Sec incorporation in vitro, which is carried out by the concerted action of a novel Sec incorporation domain and an L7Ae RNA-binding domain. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we show that two distinct regions of the Sec incorporation domain are required for Sec incorporation. Physical separation of the Sec incorporation and RNA-binding domains revealed that they are able to function in trans and established a novel role of the Sec incorporation domain in promoting SECIS and eEFSec binding to the SBP2 RNA-binding domain. We propose a model in which SECIS binding induces a conformational change in SBP2 that recruits eEFSec, which in concert with the Sec incorporation domain gains access to the ribosomal A site. PMID:18948268

  13. The Inflammatory Transcription Factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 Drive Age-Associated Transcriptional Changes in the Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    O'Brown, Zach K; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Higgins, John P; Kim, Stuart K

    2015-12-01

    Human kidney function declines with age, accompanied by stereotyped changes in gene expression and histopathology, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are largely unknown. To identify potential regulators of kidney aging, we compared age-associated transcriptional changes in the human kidney with genome-wide maps of transcription factor occupancy from ChIP-seq datasets in human cells. The strongest candidates were the inflammation-associated transcription factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3, the activities of which increase with age in epithelial compartments of the renal cortex. Stimulation of renal tubular epithelial cells with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (a STAT3 activator), IFNγ (a STAT1 activator), or TNFα (an NFκB activator) recapitulated age-associated gene expression changes. We show that common DNA variants in RELA and NFKB1, the two genes encoding subunits of the NFκB transcription factor, associate with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in gene association studies, providing the first evidence that genetic variation in NFκB contributes to renal aging phenotypes. Our results suggest that NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 underlie transcriptional changes and chronic inflammation in the aging human kidney.

  14. Toxoplasma gondii TgIST co-opts host chromatin repressors dampening STAT1-dependent gene regulation and IFN-γ–mediated host defenses

    PubMed Central

    Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Varesano, Aurélie; De Bock, Pieter-Jan

    2016-01-01

    An early hallmark of Toxoplasma gondii infection is the rapid control of the parasite population by a potent multifaceted innate immune response that engages resident and homing immune cells along with pro- and counter-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, IFN-γ activates a variety of T. gondii–targeting activities in immune and nonimmune cells but can also contribute to host immune pathology. T. gondii has evolved mechanisms to timely counteract the host IFN-γ defenses by interfering with the transcription of IFN-γ–stimulated genes. We now have identified TgIST (T. gondii inhibitor of STAT1 transcriptional activity) as a critical molecular switch that is secreted by intracellular parasites and traffics to the host cell nucleus where it inhibits STAT1-dependent proinflammatory gene expression. We show that TgIST not only sequesters STAT1 on dedicated loci but also promotes shaping of a nonpermissive chromatin through its capacity to recruit the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor. We found that during mice acute infection, TgIST-deficient parasites are rapidly eliminated by the homing Gr1+ inflammatory monocytes, thus highlighting the protective role of TgIST against IFN-γ–mediated killing. By uncovering TgIST functions, this study brings novel evidence on how T. gondii has devised a molecular weapon of choice to take control over a ubiquitous immune gene expression mechanism in metazoans, as a way to promote long-term parasitism. PMID:27503074

  15. Toxoplasma gondii TgIST co-opts host chromatin repressors dampening STAT1-dependent gene regulation and IFN-γ-mediated host defenses.

    PubMed

    Gay, Gabrielle; Braun, Laurence; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Varesano, Aurélie; Touquet, Bastien; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Coute, Yohann; Tardieux, Isabelle; Bougdour, Alexandre; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-08-22

    An early hallmark of Toxoplasma gondii infection is the rapid control of the parasite population by a potent multifaceted innate immune response that engages resident and homing immune cells along with pro- and counter-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, IFN-γ activates a variety of T. gondii-targeting activities in immune and nonimmune cells but can also contribute to host immune pathology. T. gondii has evolved mechanisms to timely counteract the host IFN-γ defenses by interfering with the transcription of IFN-γ-stimulated genes. We now have identified TgIST (T. gondii inhibitor of STAT1 transcriptional activity) as a critical molecular switch that is secreted by intracellular parasites and traffics to the host cell nucleus where it inhibits STAT1-dependent proinflammatory gene expression. We show that TgIST not only sequesters STAT1 on dedicated loci but also promotes shaping of a nonpermissive chromatin through its capacity to recruit the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor. We found that during mice acute infection, TgIST-deficient parasites are rapidly eliminated by the homing Gr1(+) inflammatory monocytes, thus highlighting the protective role of TgIST against IFN-γ-mediated killing. By uncovering TgIST functions, this study brings novel evidence on how T. gondii has devised a molecular weapon of choice to take control over a ubiquitous immune gene expression mechanism in metazoans, as a way to promote long-term parasitism.

  16. Caerulomycin A Enhances Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β)-Smad3 Protein Signaling by Suppressing Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) Protein Signaling to Expand Regulatory T Cells (Tregs)*

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, Rama Krishna; Kujur, Weshely; Maurya, Sudeep K.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines play a very important role in the regulation of immune homeostasis. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) responsible for the generation of peripheral tolerance are under the tight regulation of the cytokine milieu. In this study, we report a novel role of a bipyridyl compound, Caerulomycin A (CaeA), in inducing the generation of Tregs. It was observed that CaeA substantially up-regulated the pool of Tregs, as evidenced by an increased frequency of CD4+ Foxp3+ cells. In addition, CaeA significantly suppressed the number of Th1 and Th17 cells, as supported by a decreased percentage of CD4+/IFN-γ+ and CD4+/IL-17+ cells, respectively. Furthermore, we established the mechanism and observed that CaeA interfered with IFN-γ-induced STAT1 signaling by augmenting SOCS1 expression. An increase in the TGF-β-mediated Smad3 activity was also noted. Furthermore, CaeA rescued Tregs from IFN-γ-induced inhibition. These results were corroborated by blocking Smad3 activity, which abolished the CaeA-facilitated generation of Tregs. In essence, our results indicate a novel role of CaeA in inducing the generation of Tregs. This finding suggests that CaeA has enough potential to be considered as a potent future drug for the treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:24811173

  17. Adrenergic inducibility of AP-1 binding in the rat pineal gland depends on prior photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Guillaumond, F; Becquet, D; Bosler, O; François-Bellan, A M

    2002-10-01

    The main known function of the pineal gland in mammals is the temporal synchronization of physiological rhythms to seasonal changes of day length (photoperiod). In rat, the transcription factor activating protein-1 (AP-1) displays a circadian rhythm in its DNA binding in the pineal gland, which results from the rhythmic expression of Fra-2. We postulated that, if AP-1 is an important component of pineal gland functioning, then variations in photoperiodic conditions should lead to an adaptation of the AP-1 binding rhythm. Here we show that AP-1 binding patterns adapt to variations in lighting conditions, in the same way as the rhythm of arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity. This adaptation appeared to result from photoperiodic adaptation of the rhythmic fra-2 gene expression and was reflected by an adapted delay between the onset of night and the acrophase of the nocturnal peak. We further showed that photoperiodic adaptation of both the AP-1 binding and AA-NAT activity rhythms resulted from adapted changes in adrenergic inducibility of both variables at night onset. We finally provided evidence that AP-1 shared with the CREM gene encoding the transcriptional repressor protein inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) the ability to be hypersensitive or subsensitive to adrenergic stimuli, depending on prior photoperiod.

  18. Integrin binding and mechanical tension induce movement of mRNA and ribosomes to focal adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Singer, R. H.; Meyer, C. J.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) activates signalling pathways that control cell behaviour by binding to cell-surface integrin receptors and inducing the formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs). In addition to clustered integrins, FACs contain proteins that mechanically couple the integrins to the cytoskeleton and to immobilized signal-transducing molecules. Cell adhesion to the ECM also induces a rapid increase in the translation of preexisting messenger RNAs. Gene expression can be controlled locally by targeting mRNAs to specialized cytoskeletal domains. Here we investigate whether cell binding to the ECM promotes formation of a cytoskeletal microcompartment specialized for translational control at the site of integrin binding. High-resolution in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA and ribosomes rapidly and specifically localized to FACs that form when cells bind to ECM-coated microbeads. Relocation of these protein synthesis components to the FAC depended on the ability of integrins to mechanically couple the ECM to the contractile cytoskeleton and on associated tension-moulding of the actin lattice. Our results suggest a new type of gene regulation by integrins and by mechanical stress which may involve translation of mRNAs into proteins near the sites of signal reception.

  19. Identification of a unique binding protein specific for a novel retinoid inducing cellular apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fontana, J A; Dawson, M I; Leid, M; Rishi, A K; Zhang, Y; Hsu, C A; Lu, J S; Peterson, V J; Jong, L; Hobbs, P; Chao, W R; Shroot, B; Reichert, U

    2000-05-15

    The retinoid 6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-naphthalenecarboxylic acid (AHPN, CD437) induces apoptosis in a variety of cell types, many of which are cancer cells that resist the antiproliferative and/or differentiating effects of retinoids. While the retinoids exert their effects by binding to the retinoic acid nuclear receptors (RARs) or retinoid X receptors (RXRs), AHPN (CD437) binds to another protein with different ligand specificity. In nuclear extracts from HL-60R cells the binding of AHPN (CD437) was only minimally competed by either retinoic acid (tRA)or 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA), the natural ligands for the RARs and RXRs, respectively. Moreover, AHPN (CD437) was unable to compete with either tRA or 9-cis-RA for binding to endogenous retinoid receptors in nuclear extracts from the MDA-MB-468 breast carcinoma cell line. Size exclusion chromatography revealed AHPN binding to a 95 kDa protein(s) which is neither an RAR or RXR. Our results suggest that apoptosis induction by AHPN (CD437) may occur through interaction with another protein and is independent of the RAR/RXR-signaling pathways.

  20. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  1. Sendai virus trailer RNA binds TIAR, a cellular protein involved in virus-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Iseni, Frédéric; Garcin, Dominique; Nishio, Machiko; Kedersha, Nancy; Anderson, Paul; Kolakofsky, Daniel

    2002-10-01

    Sendai virus (SeV) leader (le) and trailer (tr) RNAs are short transcripts generated during abortive antigenome and genome synthesis, respectively. Recom binant SeV (rSeV) that express tr-like RNAs from the leader region are non-cytopathic and, moreover, prevent wild-type SeV from inducing apoptosis in mixed infections. These rSeV thus appear to have gained a function. Here we report that tr RNA binds to a cellular protein with many links to apoptosis (TIAR) via the AU-rich sequence 5' UUUUAAAUUUU. Duplication of this AU-rich sequence alone within the le RNA confers TIAR binding on this le* RNA and a non-cytopathic phenotype to these rSeV in cell culture. Transgenic overexpression of TIAR during SeV infection promotes apoptosis and reverses the anti-apoptotic effects of le* RNA expression. More over, TIAR overexpression and SeV infection act synergistically to induce apoptosis. These short viral RNAs may act by sequestering TIAR, a multivalent RNA recognition motif (RRM) family RNA-binding protein involved in SeV-induced apoptosis. In this view, tr RNA is not simply a by-product of abortive genome synthesis, but is also an antigenome transcript that modulates the cellular antiviral response.

  2. Ceramide-CD300f Binding Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-induced Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Emiko; Izawa, Kumi; Kaitani, Ayako; Isobe, Masamichi; Maehara, Akie; Uchida, Koichiro; Maeda, Keiko; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Kitamura, Toshio; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Kitaura, Jiro

    2017-02-17

    LPS triggers inflammatory responses; however, the negative regulation of LPS responses in vivo remains poorly understood. CD300f is an inhibitory receptor among the CD300 family of paired activating and inhibitory receptors. We have previously identified ceramide as a ligand for CD300f and shown that the binding of ceramide to CD300f inhibits IgE-mediated mast cell activation and allergic responses in mouse models. Here we identify the critical role of CD300f in inhibiting LPS-induced skin inflammation. CD300f deficiency remarkably enhanced LPS-induced skin edema and neutrophil recruitment in mice. Higher levels of factors that increase vascular permeability and of factors that induce neutrophil recruitment were detected in LPS-injected skin pouch exudates of CD300f(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type mice. CD300f was highly expressed in mast cells and recruited neutrophils, but not in macrophages, among skin myeloid cells. CD300f deficiency failed to influence the intrinsic migratory ability of neutrophils. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppressed the release of chemical mediators from mast cells and from neutrophils in response to LPS. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that mast cells mediated enhanced edema in LPS-stimulated skin of CD300f(-/-) mice, whereas mast cells together with recruited neutrophils mediated robust neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, administering a ceramide antibody or ceramide-containing vesicles enhanced or suppressed LPS-induced skin inflammation of wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, ceramide-CD300f binding inhibits LPS-induced skin inflammation, implicating CD300f as a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in vivo.

  3. Ceramide-CD300f Binding Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-induced Skin Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Emiko; Izawa, Kumi; Kaitani, Ayako; Isobe, Masamichi; Maehara, Akie; Uchida, Koichiro; Maeda, Keiko; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Kitamura, Toshio; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Kitaura, Jiro

    2017-01-01

    LPS triggers inflammatory responses; however, the negative regulation of LPS responses in vivo remains poorly understood. CD300f is an inhibitory receptor among the CD300 family of paired activating and inhibitory receptors. We have previously identified ceramide as a ligand for CD300f and shown that the binding of ceramide to CD300f inhibits IgE-mediated mast cell activation and allergic responses in mouse models. Here we identify the critical role of CD300f in inhibiting LPS-induced skin inflammation. CD300f deficiency remarkably enhanced LPS-induced skin edema and neutrophil recruitment in mice. Higher levels of factors that increase vascular permeability and of factors that induce neutrophil recruitment were detected in LPS-injected skin pouch exudates of CD300f−/− mice as compared with wild-type mice. CD300f was highly expressed in mast cells and recruited neutrophils, but not in macrophages, among skin myeloid cells. CD300f deficiency failed to influence the intrinsic migratory ability of neutrophils. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppressed the release of chemical mediators from mast cells and from neutrophils in response to LPS. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that mast cells mediated enhanced edema in LPS-stimulated skin of CD300f−/− mice, whereas mast cells together with recruited neutrophils mediated robust neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, administering a ceramide antibody or ceramide-containing vesicles enhanced or suppressed LPS-induced skin inflammation of wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, ceramide-CD300f binding inhibits LPS-induced skin inflammation, implicating CD300f as a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in vivo. PMID:28073916

  4. Endogenous airway mucins carry glycans that bind Siglec-F and induce eosinophil apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher M.; Janssen, William J.; Brummet, Mary E.; Hudson, Sherry A.; Zhu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Background Siglec-F is a glycan binding protein selectively expressed on mouse eosinophils. Its engagement induces apoptosis, suggesting a pathway for ameliorating eosinophilia in asthma and other eosinophil-associated diseases. Siglec-F recognizes sialylated, sulfated glycans in glycan binding assays, but the identities of endogenous sialoside ligands and their glycoprotein carriers in vivo are unknown. Methods Lungs from normal and mucin-deficient mice, as well as mouse tracheal epithelial cells from mice, were interrogated in vitro and in vivo for the expression of Siglec-F ligands. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry used Siglec-F-Fc as a probe for directed purification, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of recognized glycoproteins. Purified components were tested in mouse eosinophil binding assays and flow cytometry-based cell death assays. Results We detected mouse lung glycoproteins that bound to Siglec-F; binding was sialic-acid dependent. Proteomic analysis of Siglec-F binding material identified Muc5b and Muc4. Cross-affinity enrichment and histochemical analysis of lungs from mucin-deficient mice assigned and validated the identity of Muc5b as one glycoprotein ligand for Siglec-F. Purified mucin preparations carried sialylated and sulfated glycans, bound to eosinophils and induced their death in vitro. Mice conditionally deficient in Muc5b displayed exaggerated eosinophilic inflammation in response to intratracheal installation of IL-13. Conclusions These data identify a previously unrecognized endogenous anti-inflammatory property of airway mucins by which their glycans can control lung eosinophilia through engagement of Siglec-F. PMID:25497369

  5. [Conformational changes of actin induced by strong or weak myosin subfragment-1 binding].

    PubMed

    Dedova, I V; Avrova, S V; Vikhoreva, N N; Vikhorev, R G; Hazlett, T L; Van der Meer, W; Dos Remedios, C G; Borovikov, Iu S

    2004-01-01

    Movements of different areas of polypeptide chains within F-actin monomers induced by S1 or pPDM-S1 binding were studied by polarized fluorimetry. Thin filaments of ghost muscle were reconstructed by adding G-actin labeled with fluorescent probes attached alternatively to different sites of actin molecule. These sites were: Cys-374 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, TMRIA or 5-IAF; Lys-373 labeled with NBD-Cl; Lys-113 labeled with Alexa-488; Lys-61 labeled with FITC; Gln-41 labeled with DED and Cys-10 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, 5-IAF or fluorescein-maleimid. In addition, we used TRITC-, FITC-falloidin and e-ADP that were located, respectively, in filament groove and interdomain cleft. The data were analysed by model-dependent and model-independent methods (see appendixes). The orientation and mobility of fluorescent probes were significantly changed when actin and myosin interacted, depending on fluorophore location and binding site of actomyosin. Strong binding of S with actin leads to 1) a decrease in the orientation of oscillators of derivatives of falloidin (TRITC-falloidin, FITC-falloidin) and actin-bound nucleotide (e-ADP); 2) an increase in the orientation of dye oscillators located in the "front' surface of the small domain (where actin is viewed in the standard orientation with subdomains 1/2 and 3/4 oriented to the right and to the left, respectively); 3) a decrease in the angles of dye oscillators located on the "back" surface of subdomain-1. In contrast, a weak binding of S1 to actin induces the opposite effects in orientation of these probes. These data suggest that during the ATP hydrolysis cycle myosin heads induce a change in actin monomer (a tilt and twisting of its small domain). Presumably, these alterations in F-actin conformation play an important role in muscle contraction.

  6. Ansamitocin P3 depolymerizes microtubules and induces apoptosis by binding to tubulin at the vinblastine site.

    PubMed

    Venghateri, Jubina B; Gupta, Tilak Kumar; Verma, Paul J; Kunwar, Ambarish; Panda, Dulal

    2013-01-01

    Maytansinoid conjugates are currently under different phases of clinical trials and have been showing promising activity for various types of cancers. In this study, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of ansamitocin P3, a structural analogue of maytansine for its anticancer activity. Ansamitocin P3 potently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, HeLa, EMT-6/AR1 and MDA-MB-231 cells in culture with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 20±3, 50±0.5, 140±17, and 150±1.1 pM, respectively. Ansamitocin P3 strongly depolymerized both interphase and mitotic microtubules and perturbed chromosome segregation at its proliferation inhibitory concentration range. Treatment of ansamitocin P3 activated spindle checkpoint surveillance proteins, Mad2 and BubR1 and blocked the cells in mitotic phase of the cell cycle. Subsequently, cells underwent apoptosis via p53 mediated apoptotic pathway. Further, ansamitocin P3 was found to bind to purified tubulin in vitro with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.3±0.7 µM. The binding of ansamitocin P3 induced conformational changes in tubulin. A docking analysis suggested that ansamitocin P3 may bind partially to vinblastine binding site on tubulin in two different positions. The analysis indicated that the binding of ansamitocin P3 to tubulin is stabilized by hydrogen bonds. In addition, weak interactions such as halogen-oxygen interactions may also contribute to the binding of ansamitocin P3 to tubulin. The study provided a significant insight in understanding the antiproliferative mechanism of action of ansamitocin P3.

  7. Copper-induced production of copper-binding supernatant proteins by the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Sears, V.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Growth of the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus is temporarily inhibited by micromolar levels of copper. During the copper-induced lag phase, supernatant compounds and detoxify copper are produced. In this study two copper-inducible supernatant proteins having molecular masses of ca. 21 and 19 kilodaltons (CuBP1 and CuPB2) were identified; these proteins were, respectively, 25 and 46 times amplified in supernatants of copper-challenged cultures compared with controls. Experiments in which chloramphenicol was added to cultures indicated that there was de novo synthesis of these proteins in response to copper. When supernatants were separated by gel permeation chromatography, CuBP1 and CuPB2 coeluted with a copper-induced peak in copper-binding activity. CuBP1 and CuBP2 from whole supernatants were concentrated and partially purified by using a copper-charged immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography column, confirming the affinity of these proteins for copper. A comparison of cell pellets and supernatants demonstrated that CuBP1 was more concentrated in supernatants than in cells. Our data are consistent with a model for a novel mechanism of copper detoxification in which excretion of copper-binding protein is induced by copper.

  8. JAK2 V617F stimulates proliferation of erythropoietin-dependent erythroid progenitors and delays their differentiation by activating Stat1 and other nonerythroid signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiahai; Yuan, Bingbing; Hu, Wenqian; Lodish, Harvey

    2016-11-01

    JAK2 V617F is a mutant-activated JAK2 kinase found in most polycythemia vera (PV) patients; it skews normal proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and simulates aberrant expansion of erythroid progenitors. JAK2 V617F is known to activate some signaling pathways not normally activated in mature erythroblasts, but there has been no systematic study of signal transduction pathways or gene expression in erythroid cells expressing JAK2 V617F undergoing erythropoietin (Epo)-dependent terminal differentiation. Here we report that expression of JAK2 V617F in murine fetal liver Epo-dependent progenitors allows them to divide approximately six rather than the normal approximately four times in the presence of Epo, delaying their exit from the cell cycle. Over time, the number of red cells formed from each Epo-dependent progenitor increases fourfold, and these cells eventually differentiate into normal enucleated reticulocytes. We report that purified fetal liver Epo-dependent progenitors express many cytokine receptors additional to the EpoR. Expression of JAK2 V617F triggers activation of Stat5, the only STAT normally activated by Epo, as well as activation of Stat1 and Stat3. Expression of JAK2 V617F also leads to transient induction of many genes not normally activated in terminally differentiating erythroid cells and that are characteristic of other hematopoietic lineages. Inhibition of Stat1 activation blocks JAK2 V617F hyperproliferation of erythroid progenitors, and we conclude that Stat1-mediated activation of nonerythroid signaling pathways delays terminal erythroid differentiation and permits extended cell divisions.

  9. Aptamer/target binding-induced triple helix forming for signal-on electrochemical biosensing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yinfei; Liu, Jinquan; He, Dinggen; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Shi, Hui; Wen, Li

    2015-10-01

    Owing to its diversified structures, high affinity, and specificity for binding a wide range of non-nucleic acid targets, aptamer is a useful molecular recognition tool for the design of various biosensors. Herein, we report a new signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform which is based on an aptamer/target binding-induced strand displacement and triple-helix forming. The biosensing platform is composed of a signal transduction probe (STP) modified with a methylene blue (MB) and a sulfhydryl group, a triplex-forming oligonucleotides probe (TFO) and a target specific aptamer probe (Apt). Through hybridization with the TFO probe and the Apt probe, the self-assembled STP on Au electrode via Au-S bonding keeps its rigid structure. The MB on the STP is distal to the Au electrode surface. It is eT off state. Target binding releases the Apt probe and liberates the end of the MB tagged STP to fold back and form a triplex-helix structure with TFO (STP/TFO/STP), allowing MB to approach the Au electrode surface and generating measurable electrochemical signals (eT ON). As test for the feasibility and universality of this signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform, two aptamers which bind to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and human α-thrombin (Tmb), respectively, are selected as models. The detection limit of ATP was 7.2 nM, whereas the detection limit of Tmb was 0.86 nM.

  10. Binding of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate with thermally-induced bovine serum albumin/ι-carrageenan particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinbing; Wang, Xiaoyong

    2015-02-01

    Novel thermally-induced BSA/ι-carrageenan particles are used as a protective carrier for (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The addition of EGCG to BSA/ι-carrageenan particles can highly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA, which is explained in terms of the binding of EGCG to the hydrophobic pockets of BSA mainly through the hydrophobic force. According to the double logarithm equation, the binding constant is determined as 1.1×10(8)M(-1) for the binding of EGCG with BSA/ι-carrageenan particles. The high binding affinity is ascribed to both the molecular structure of EGCG and the partial unfolding state of BSA in BSA/ι-carrageenan particles. The circular dichroism spectra and calculated α-helix of BSA suggest that the bound EGCG leads to a more random secondary structure of BSA. Furthermore, BSA/ι-carrageenan particles are found to be superior to native BSA and pure BSA particles for improving the stability and radical scavenging activity of EGCG.

  11. Flap loop of GluD2 binds to Cbln1 and induces presynaptic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Tomoaki; Hirano, Tomoo

    2010-07-30

    Glutamate receptor delta2 (GluD2) is selectively expressed on the postsynaptic spines at parallel-fiber (PF)-Purkinje neuron (PN) synapses. GluD2 knockout mice show a reduced number of PF-PN synapses, suggesting that GluD2 is involved in synapse formation. Recent studies revealed that GluD2 induces presynaptic differentiation in a manner dependent on its N-terminal domain (NTD) through binding of Cbln1 secreted from cerebellar granule neurons. However, the underlying mechanism of the specific binding of the NTD to Cbln1 remains elusive. Here, we have identified the flap loop (Arg321-Trp339) in the NTD of GluD2 (GluD2-NTD) as a crucial region for the binding to Cbln1 and the induction of presynaptic differentiation. Both induction of presynaptic differentiation and binding of Cbln1 were abolished in the HEK cells expressing not wild-type GluD2 but GluD2 with mutations in the flap loop. Especially, single amino acid substitution of either Arg321 or Trp323 to alanine was sufficient to disable the GluD2 function. Finally, a homology model of GluD2-NTD suggested that the flap loop is located at the distal end, which appears consistent with an interaction with Cbln1 and a presynaptic varicosity.

  12. DNA-binding activity of TNF-{alpha} inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuhara, T. Suganuma, M.; Oka, K.; Fujiki, H.

    2007-11-03

    Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) inducing protein (Tip{alpha}) is a carcinogenic factor secreted from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), mediated through both enhanced expression of TNF-{alpha} and chemokine genes and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Since Tip{alpha} enters gastric cancer cells, the Tip{alpha} binding molecules in the cells should be investigated. The direct DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was observed by pull down assay using single- and double-stranded genomic DNA cellulose. The surface plasmon resonance assay, indicating an association between Tip{alpha} and DNA, revealed that the affinity of Tip{alpha} for (dGdC)10 is 2400 times stronger than that of del-Tip{alpha}, an inactive Tip{alpha}. This suggests a strong correlation between DNA-binding activity and carcinogenic activity of Tip{alpha}. And the DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was first demonstrated with a molecule secreted from H. pylori.

  13. A zinc-binding site by negative selection induces metallodrug susceptibility in an essential chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Cun, Shujian; Sun, Hongzhe

    2010-01-01

    GroES is an indispensable chaperonin virtually found throughout all life forms. Consequently, mutations of this protein must be critically scrutinized by natural selection. Nevertheless, the homolog from a potentially virulent gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori, strikingly features a histidine/cysteine-rich C terminus that shares no significant homology with other family members. Additionally, three more (H45, C51, and C53) are uniquely present in its apical domain. The statistical analyses show that these residues may have originated from negative selection, presumably driven by either dependent or independent amino acid mutations. In the absence of the C-terminal metal-binding domain, the mutant protein still exhibits a substantial capacity for zinc binding in vivo. The biochemical properties of site-directed mutants indicate that H45, C51, and C53 make up an oxidation-sensitive zinc-binding site that may donate the bound metal to a zinc acceptor. Of interest, bismuth antiulcer drugs strongly bind at this site (Kd of approximately 7 × 10-26 M), replacing the bound zinc and consequently inducing the disruption of the quaternary structure. Because biological features by negative selection are usually inert to change during evolution, this study sheds light on a promising field whereby medicines can be designed or improved to specifically target the residues that uniquely evolved in pathogenic proteins so as to retard the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:20194796

  14. Identification of an Aptamer Binding to Human Osteogenic-Induced Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niederlaender, Jan; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Reinert, Siegmar; Schweizer, Ernst; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Alexander, Dorothea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a specific aptamer against human jaw periosteal cells (JPCs) for tissue engineering applications in oral and maxillofacial surgery. This aptamer should serve as a capture molecule to enrich or even purify osteogenic progenitor cells from JPCs or from adult stem cells of other sources. Using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), we generated the first aptamer to specifically bind to human osteogenically induced JPCs. We did not detect any binding of the aptamer to undifferentiated JPCs, adipogenically and chondrogenically induced JPCs, or to any other cell line tested. However, similar binding patterns of the identified aptamer 74 were detected with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from placental tissue and bone marrow. After cell sorting, we analyzed the expression of osteogenic marker genes in the aptamer 74-positive and aptamer 74-negative fractions and detected no significant differences. Additionally, the analysis of the mineralization capacity revealed a slight tendency for the aptamer positive fraction to have a higher osteogenic potential. In terms of proliferation, JPCs growing in aptamer-coated wells showed increased proliferation rates compared with the controls. Herein, we report the development of an innovative approach for tissue engineering applications. Further studies should be conducted to modify and improve the specificity of the generated aptamer. PMID:23289534

  15. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeong-jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  16. A potentiator induces conformational changes on the recombinant CFTR nucleotide binding domains in solution.

    PubMed

    Galfrè, Elena; Galeno, Lauretta; Moran, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the defective protein in cystic fibrosis, are responsible for controlling the gating of the chloride channel and are the putative binding sites for several candidate drugs in the disease treatment. We studied the effects of the application of 2-pyrimidin-7,8-benzoflavone (PBF), a strong potentiator of the CFTR, on the properties of recombinant and equimolar NBD1/NBD2 mixture in solution. The results indicate that the potentiator induces significant conformational changes of the NBD1/NBD2 dimer in solution. The potentiator does not modify the ATP binding constant, but reduces the ATP hydrolysis activity of the NBD1/NBD2 mixture. The intrinsic fluorescence and the guanidinium denaturation measurements indicate that the potentiator induces different conformational changes on the NBD1/NBD2 mixture in the presence and absence of ATP. It was confirmed from small-angle X-ray scattering experiments that, in absence of ATP, the NBD1/NBD2 dimer was disrupted by the potentiator, but in the presence of 2 mM ATP, the two NBDs kept dimerised, and a major change in the size and the shape of the structure was observed. We propose that these conformational changes could modify the NBDs-intracellular loop interaction in a way that would facilitate the open state of the channel.

  17. Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Marina; Widmaier, Moritz; Böttcher, Ralph T; Rognoni, Emanuel; Veelders, Maik; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Lambacher, Armin; Austen, Katharina; Müller, Daniel J; Zent, Roy; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn2+. Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn2+ enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10130.001 PMID:26821125

  18. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  19. IFN-induced Guanylate Binding Proteins in Inflammasome Activation and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight pre-existing core components being assembled under basal conditions shortly after infection or tissue damage. Recent work, however, suggests the inflammasome machinery is also subject to tunable or inducible signals that may accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these immune signals operate downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of IFN-induced GTPases termed guanylate binding proteins (GBPs). Here, we examine the critical roles for IFN-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity against a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential impact of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases. PMID:27092805

  20. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins in inflammasome activation and host defense.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D; Bradfield, Clinton J; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D

    2016-05-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight the assembly of pre-existing core components shortly after infection or tissue damage. Emerging work, however, suggests that the inflammasome machinery is also subject to 'tunable' or inducible signals that might accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these signals operate downstream of interferon receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of interferon-induced GTPases called 'guanylate-binding proteins' (GBPs). Here we investigate the critical roles of interferon-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential effect of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases.

  1. GTPase properties of the interferon-induced human guanylate-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Neun, R; Richter, M F; Staeheli, P; Schwemmle, M

    1996-07-15

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were originally described as proteins that are strongly induced by interferons and are capable of binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. hGBP1, the first of two members of this protein family in humans, was recently shown to represent a novel type of GTPase that hydrolyzes GTP predominantly to GMP. We now report that purified recombinant hGBP2 also hydrolyzes GTP very efficiently, although GDP rather than GMP was the major reaction product. The biochemical parameters of this reaction were as follows: Km = 313 microM, turnover number = 22 min-1. Both hGBP1 and hGBP2 failed to hydrolyze GDP, however, GDP was an effective inhibitor of the hGBP2- but not the hGBP1-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis reaction. Thus, hGBP1 and hGBP2 have similar biochemical properties, but show pronounced differences in product specificity.

  2. Covalent binding of penicillamine to macrophages: implications for penicillamine-induced autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinze; Mannargudi, Baskar; Uetrecht, Jack P

    2009-07-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDRs) represent a major clinical problem, and at present, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. One animal model that we have used for mechanistic studies of IDRs is penicillamine-induced autoimmunity in Brown Norway (BN) rats. Previous work in our lab found that macrophage activation preceded the clinical autoimmune syndrome. It is thought that one of the interactions between T cells and macrophages involves reversible Schiff base formation between an amine on T cells and an aldehyde on macrophages, but the identity of the molecules involved is unknown. It is also known that penicillamine reacts with aldehyde groups to form a thiazolidine ring, which unlike a Schiff base, is essentially irreversible. Such binding could lead to macrophage activation. Generalized macrophage activation could lead to the observed autoimmune reaction. Hydralazine and isoniazid also react with aldehydes to form stable hydrazones, and they also cause an autoimmune lupus-like syndrome. In this study, isolated spleen cells from male BN rats were incubated with biotin-aldehyde-reactive probe (ARP, a hydroxylamine), biotin-hydrazide, or D-penicillamine. At all concentrations, ARP, hydrazide, and penicillamine preferentially "stained" macrophages relative to other spleen cells. In addition, preincubation of cells with penicillamine or hydralazine decreased ARP staining of macrophages, which further indicates that most of the ARP binding to macrophages involves binding to aldehyde groups. This provides support for the hypothesis that the interaction between aldehyde-containing signaling molecules on macrophages and penicillamine could be the initial event of penicillamine-induced autoimmunity. Several of the proteins to which ARP binds were identified, and some such as myosin are attractive candidates to mediate macrophage activation.

  3. La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus V protein antagonizes type I interferon response by binding STAT2 protein and preventing STATs nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Laurent-Rolle, Maudry; Manicassamy, Balaji; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Morrison, Juliet; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Iovane, Giuseppe; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-02-02

    La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus (LPMV) is a member of the Rubulavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. LPMV is the etiologic agent of "blue eye disease", causing a significant disease burden in swine in Mexico with long-term implications for the agricultural industry. This virus mainly affects piglets and is characterized by meningoencephalitis and respiratory distress. It also affects adult pigs, causing reduced fertility and abortions in females, and orchitis and epididymitis in males. Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family evade the innate immune response by targeting components of the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. The V protein, expressed by most paramyxoviruses, is a well-characterized IFN signaling antagonist. Until now, there were no reports on the role of the LPMV-V protein in inhibiting the IFN response. In this study we demonstrate that LPMV-V protein antagonizes type I but not type II IFN signaling by binding STAT2, a component of the type I IFN cascade. Our results indicate that the last 18 amino acids of LPMV-V protein are required for binding to STAT2 in human and swine cells. While LPMV-V protein does not affect the protein levels of STAT1 or STAT2, it does prevent the IFN-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 thereby inhibiting cellular responses to IFN α/β.

  4. Effect of fullerenol surface chemistry on nanoparticle binding-induced protein misfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radic, Slaven; Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Chen, Ran; Salonen, Emppu; Brown, Jared M.; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and dynamics of ubiquitin. We found that all derivatives bound to the model protein. Specifically, the more hydrophilic nanoparticles with a higher number of hydroxyl groups bound to the surface of the protein via hydrogen bonds, which stabilized the protein without inducing large conformational changes in the protein structure. In contrast, fullerene derivatives with a smaller number of hydroxyl groups buried their hydrophobic surface inside the protein, thereby causing protein denaturation. Overall, our results revealed a distinct role of surface chemistry on nanoparticle-protein binding and binding-induced protein misfolding.Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and

  5. Confinement induced binding in noble gas atoms within a BN-doped carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Confinement induced binding interaction patterns for noble gas atoms (Hen/m, Arn, Krn; n = 2, m = 3) atoms inside pristine and -BN doped (3, 3) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) have been studied through density functional theory calculations. The kinetic stability for He dimer and trimer has been investigated at 100 K and 300 K through an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. The positive role of doping in SWCNT in enhancing the nature of interaction as well as the kinetic stability of the said systems has been found.

  6. Ma Huang Tang Suppresses the Production and Expression of Inflammatory Chemokines via Downregulating STAT1 Phosphorylation in HaCaT Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seong-Eun; Lee, Mee-Young

    2016-01-01

    Ma huang tang (MHT) is a traditional herbal medicine comprising six medicinal herbs and is used to treat influenza-like illness. However, the effects of MHT on inflammatory skin diseases have not been verified scientifically. We investigated determining the inhibitory effects of MHT against inflammation responses in skin using HaCaT human keratinocyte cells. We found that MHT suppressed production of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22), regulated on activation of normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ- (IFN-γ-) stimulated HaCaT cells. Consistently, MHT suppressed the mRNA expression of TARC, MDC, RANTES, and IL-8 in TNF-α and IFN-γ-stimulated cells. Additionally, MHT inhibited TNF-α and IFN-γ-stimulated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner and nuclear translocation in HaCaT cells. Our finding indicates that MHT inhibits production and expression of inflammatory chemokines in the stimulated keratinocytes by downregulating STAT1 phosphorylation, suggesting that MHT may be a possible therapeutic agent for inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:27847527

  7. Impaired T-bet-pSTAT1α and perforin-mediated immune responses in the tumoral region of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Katerina; Denis Iulian Trufa, I; Siegemund, Raphaela; Rieker, Ralf; Hartmann, Arndt; Schmidt, Joachim; Sirbu, Horia; Finotto, Susetta

    2015-01-01

    Background: In spite of modern therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), prognosis for many patients is still poor and survival rates are low. Immunotherapy is the possibility to improve the lung immune response surrounding the tumour. However, this approach requires detailed understanding of the local immune-responses of NSCLC patients. Methods: We analysed samples from three different regions within the lungs of NSCLC patients, whereas we distinguished between patients suffering from adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Expression of type 1 T helper (Th1)/type 1 cytotoxic (Tc1) factors was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, western blot analyses or immunohistochemistry. Cytotoxic cell activity of CD8+ T cells was determined via co-culture with autologous tumour cells and apoptosis assay. Results: We found decreased levels of the transcription factor T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet or Tbx21) and of the downstream activated IFN-γ-dependent pSTAT1α isoform in the lung tumour areas of patients with NSCLC as compared with tumour-free control regions. In these patients, reduced T-bet and pSTAT1α levels were found associated with increased immunosuppressive markers like cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4, programmed cell death 1 and with a suppression of the Th1 cell cytokine production and Tc1 cell activity. Conclusions: These findings confirm a central role of T-bet in targeted immunotherapy for patients with NSCLC. PMID:26348446

  8. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  9. Ischemia-induced alterations in myocardial (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and cardiac glycoside binding.

    PubMed Central

    Beller, G A; Conroy, J; Smith, T W

    1976-01-01

    The effects of ischemia on the canine myocardial (Na+ + K+)-ATPase complex were examined in terms of alterations in cardiac glycoside binding and enzymatic activity. Ability of the myocardial cell to bind tritiated ouabain in vivo was assessed after 1, 2, and 6 h of coronary occlusion followed by 45 min of reperfusion, and correlated with measurements of in vitro (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity and in vitro [3H]ouabain binding after similar periods of ischemia. Regional blood flow alterations during occlusion and reperfusion were simultaneously determined utilizing 15 mum radioactive microspheres to determine the degree to which altered binding of ouabain might be flow related. Anterior wall infarction was produced in 34 dogs by snaring of confluent branches of the left coronary system. Epicardial electrograms delineated ischemic and border zone areas. Coronary reperfusion after 2 and 6 h of occlusion was associated with impaired reflow of blood and markedly impaired uptake of [3H]ouabain in ischemic myocardium. In both groups, in vivo [3H]ouabain binding by ischemic tissue was reduced out of proportion to the reduction in flow. Despite near-complete restoration of flow in seven dogs occluded for 1 h and reperfused, [3H]ouabain remained significantly reduced to 58 +/- 9% of nonischemic uptake in subendocardial layers of the central zone of ischemia. Thus, when coronary flow was restored to areas of myocardium rendered acutely ischemia for 1 or more hours, ischemic zones demonstrated progressively diminished ability to bind ouabain. To determine whether ischemia-induced alteration in myocardial (Na+ + K+)-ATPase might underlie these changes, (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity and [3H]ouabain binding were measured in microsomal fractions from ischemic myocardium after 1, 2, and 6 h of coronary occlusion. In animals occluded for 6 h, (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity was significantly reduced by 40% in epicardial and by 35% in endocardial layers compared with nonischemic myocardium

  10. A substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2013-07-05

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxyl transfer reactions by efficiently coordinating multiple reactions between spatially distinct active sites. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the bicarbonate- and MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To complete the overall reaction, the tethered biotin prosthetic group must first gain access to the biotin carboxylase domain and become carboxylated and then translocate to the carboxyltransferase domain, where the carboxyl group is transferred from biotin to pyruvate. Here, we report structural and kinetic evidence for the formation of a substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of PC from Rhizobium etli. Structures of the carboxyltransferase domain reveal that R. etli PC occupies a symmetrical conformation in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain and that the carboxyltransferase domain active site is conformationally rearranged upon pyruvate binding. This conformational change is stabilized by the interaction of the conserved residues Asp(590) and Tyr(628) and results in the formation of the biotin binding pocket. Site-directed mutations at these residues reduce the rate of biotin-dependent reactions but have no effect on the rate of biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation. Given the conservation with carboxyltransferase domains in oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, the structure-based mechanism described for PC may be applicable to the larger family of biotin-dependent enzymes.

  11. Urea-induced binding between diclofenac sodium and bovine serum albumin: a spectroscopic insight.

    PubMed

    Dohare, Neeraj; Khan, Abbul Bashar; Athar, Fareeda; Thakur, Sonu Chand; Patel, Rajan

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the interaction of diclofenac sodium (Dic.Na) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the absence and presence of urea using different spectroscopic techniques. A fluorescence quenching study revealed that the Stern-Volmer quenching constant decreases in the presence of urea, decreasing further at higher urea concentrations. The binding constant and number of binding sites were also evaluated for the BSA-Dic.Na interaction system in the absence and presence of urea using a modified Stern-Volmer equation. The binding constant is greater at high urea concentrations, as shown by the fluorescence results. In addition, for the BSA-Dic.Na interaction system, a static quenching mechanism was observed, which was further confirmed using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. UV-vis spectroscopy provided information about the formation of a complex between BSA and Dic.Na. Circular dichroism was carried out to explain the conformational changes in BSA induced by Dic.Na in the absence and presence of urea. The presence of urea reduced the α-helical content of BSA as the Dic.Na concentration varied. The distance r between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (Dic.Na) was also obtained in the absence and presence of urea, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins promote cytosolic lipopolysaccharide detection by caspase-11.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a classical pathogen-associated molecular pattern and a strong inducer of immune responses. While the detection of LPS on the cell surface and in the endosome by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been studied for some time, it has only recently been discovered that LPS can also be sensed in the cytosol of cells by a noncanonical inflammasome pathway, resulting in the activation of the cysteine protease caspase-11. Intriguingly, activation of this pathway requires the production of interferons (IFNs) and the induction of a class of IFN-induced GTPases called guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), which have previously been linked to cell-autonomous killing of intracellular microbes. In this study, we review the recent advances in our understanding of cytosolic LPS sensing and the function of mammalian GBPs.

  13. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients.

  14. Subchronic treatment with antiepileptic drugs modifies pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice: Its correlation with benzodiazepine receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Experiments using male CD1 mice were carried out to investigate the effects of subchronic (daily administration for 8 days) pretreatments with drugs enhancing GABAergic transmission (diazepam, 10 mg/kg, ip; gabapentin, 100 mg/kg, po; or vigabatrin, 500 mg/kg, po) on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures, 24 h after the last injection. Subchronic administration of diazepam reduced latencies to clonus, tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic vigabatrin produced enhanced latency to the first clonus but faster occurrence of tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic gabapentin did not modify PTZ-induced seizures. Autoradiography experiments revealed reduced benzodiazepine receptor binding in several brain areas after subchronic treatment with diazepam or gabapentin, whereas subchronic vigabatrin did not induce significant receptor changes. The present results indicate differential effects induced by the subchronic administration of diazepam, vigabatrin, and gabapentin on the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures, benzodiazepine receptor binding, or both. PMID:18830436

  15. Parkinson disease protein DJ-1 binds metals and protects against metal-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-08-02

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD.

  16. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV.

  17. Binding Induced RNA Conformational Changes Control Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by the Thiostrepton Resistance Methyltransferase (Tsr)*

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Emily G.; Conn, Graeme L.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) post-transcriptional modifications are essential for ribosome maturation, translational fidelity, and are one mechanism used by both antibiotic-producing and pathogenic bacteria to resist the effects of antibiotics that target the ribosome. The thiostrepton producer Streptomyces azureus prevents self-intoxication by expressing the thiostrepton-resistance methyltransferase (Tsr), which methylates the 2′-hydroxyl of 23 S rRNA nucleotide adenosine 1067 within the thiostrepton binding site. Tsr is a homodimer with each protomer containing an L30e-like amino-terminal domain (NTD) and a SPOUT methyltransferase family catalytic carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD). We show that both enzyme domains are required for high affinity RNA substrate binding. The Tsr-CTD has intrinsic, weak RNA affinity that is necessary to direct the specific high-affinity Tsr-RNA interaction via NTDs, which have no detectable RNA affinity in isolation. RNA structure probing experiments identify the Tsr footprint on the RNA and structural changes in the substrate, induced specifically upon NTD binding, which are necessary for catalysis by the CTD. Additionally, we identify a key amino acid in each domain responsible for CTD-RNA binding and the observed NTD-dependent RNA structural changes. These studies allow us to develop a model for Tsr-RNA interaction in which the coordinated substrate recognition of each Tsr structural domain is an obligatory pre-catalytic recognition event. Our findings underscore the complexity of substrate recognition by RNA modification enzymes and the potential for direct involvement of the RNA substrate in controlling the process of its modification. PMID:25086036

  18. Collagen-binding vascular endothelial growth factor attenuates CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kangkang; Huang, Rui; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Yong; Yang, Chenchen; Cao, Shufeng; Hou, Xianglin; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serves an important role in promoting angiogenesis and tissue regeneration. However, the lack of an effective delivery system that can target this growth factor to the injured site reduces its therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, in the current study, collagen-binding VEGF was constructed by fusing a collagen-binding domain (CBD) to the N-terminal of native VEGF. The CBD-VEGF can specifically bind to collagen which is the major component of the extracellular matrix in fibrotic liver. The anti-fibrotic effects of this novel material were investigated by the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrotic mouse model. Mice were injected with CCl4 intraperitoneally to induce liver fibrosis. CBD-VEGF was injected directly into the liver tissue of mice. The liver tissues were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for general observation or with Masson's trichrome staining for detection of collagen deposition. The hepatic stellate cell activation, blood vessel formation and hepatocyte proliferation were measured by immunohistochemical staining for α-smooth muscle actin, CD31 and Ki67 in the liver tissue. The fluorescent TUNEL assay was performed to evaluate the hepatocyte apoptosis. The present study identified that the CBD-VEGF injection could significantly promote vascularization of the liver tissue of fibrotic mice and attenuate liver fibrosis. Furthermore, hepatocyte apoptosis and hepatic stellate cell activation were attenuated by CBD-VEGF treatment. CBD-VEGF treatment could additionally promote hepatocyte regeneration in the liver tissue of fibrotic mice. Thus, it was suggested that CBD-VEGF may be used as a novel therapeutic intervention for liver fibrosis. PMID:27748931

  19. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein is an important mediator of alcohol-induced brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rajayer, Salil R; Jacob, Asha; Yang, Weng-Lang; Zhou, Mian; Chaung, Wayne; Wang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Binge drinking has been associated with cerebral dysfunction. Ethanol induced microglial activation initiates an inflammatory process that causes upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines which in turn creates neuronal inflammation and damage. However, the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. We postulate that cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), a novel proinflammatory molecule, can contribute to alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. To test this theory male wild-type (WT) mice were exposed to alcohol at concentrations consistent to binge drinking and blood and brain tissues were collected. At 5 h after alcohol, a significant increase of 53% in the brain of CIRP mRNA was observed and its expression remained elevated at 10 h and 15 h. Brain CIRP protein levels were increased by 184% at 10 h and remained high at 15 h. We then exposed male WT and CIRP knockout (CIRP(-/-)) mice to alcohol, and blood and brain tissues were collected at 15 h post-alcohol infusion. Serum levels of tissue injury markers (AST, ALT and LDH) were significantly elevated in alcohol-exposed WT mice while they were less increased in the CIRP(-/-) mice. Brain TNF-α mRNA and protein expressions along with IL-1β protein levels were significantly increased in WT mice, which was not seen in the CIRP(-/-) mice. In cultured BV2 cells (mouse microglia), ethanol at 100 mM showed an increase of CIRP mRNA by 274% and 408% at 24 h and 48 h respectively. Corresponding increases in TNF-α and IL-1β were also observed. CIRP protein levels were markedly increased in the medium, suggesting that CIRP was secreted by the BV2 cells. From this we conclude that alcohol exposure activates microglia to produce and secrete CIRP and possibly induce pro-inflammatory response and thereby causing neuroinflammation. CIRP could be a novel mediator of alcohol-induced brain inflammation.

  20. Envelope Conformational Changes Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Attachment Inhibitors Prevent CD4 Binding and Downstream Entry Events

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsu-Tso; Fan, Li; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; McAuliffe, Brian; Li, Chang-Ben; Yamanaka, Gregory; Zhou, Nannan; Fang, Hua; Dicker, Ira; Dalterio, Richard; Gong, Yi-Fei; Wang, Tao; Yin, Zhiwei; Ueda, Yasutsugu; Matiskella, John; Kadow, John; Clapham, Paul; Robinson, James; Colonno, Richard; Lin, Pin-Fang

    2006-01-01

    BMS-488043 is a small-molecule human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CD4 attachment inhibitor with demonstrated clinical efficacy. The compound inhibits soluble CD4 (sCD4) binding to the 11 distinct HIV envelope gp120 proteins surveyed. Binding of BMS-488043 and that of sCD4 to gp120 are mutually exclusive, since increased concentrations of one can completely block the binding of the other without affecting the maximal gp120 binding capacity. Similarly, BMS-488043 inhibited virion envelope trimers from binding to sCD4-immunoglobulin G (IgG), with decreasing inhibition as the sCD4-IgG concentration increased, and BMS-488043 blocked the sCD4-induced exposure of the gp41 groove in virions. In both virion binding assays, BMS-488043 was active only when added prior to sCD4. Collectively, these results indicate that obstruction of gp120-sCD4 interactions is the primary inhibition mechanism of this compound and that compound interaction with envelope must precede CD4 binding. By three independent approaches, BMS-488043 was further shown to induce conformational changes within gp120 in both the CD4 and CCR5 binding regions. These changes likely prevent gp120-CD4 interactions and downstream entry events. However, BMS-488043 could only partially inhibit CD4 binding to an HIV variant containing a specific envelope truncation and altered gp120 conformation, despite effectively inhibiting the pseudotyped virus infection. Taken together, BMS-488043 inhibits viral entry primarily through altering the envelope conformation and preventing CD4 binding, and other downstream entry events could also be inhibited as a result of these induced conformational changes. PMID:16571818

  1. Cigarette smoke-induced reduction in binding of the salivary translocator protein is not mediated by free radicals.

    PubMed

    Nagler, R; Savulescu, D; Gavish, M

    2016-02-01

    Oral cancer is the most common malignancy of the head and neck and its main inducer is exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) in the presence of saliva. It is commonly accepted that CS contributes to the pathogenesis of oral cancer via reactive free radicals and volatile aldehydes. The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is an intracellular receptor involved in proliferation and apoptosis, and has been linked to various types of cancer. The presence of TSPO in human saliva has been linked to oral cancer, and its binding affinity to its ligand is reduced following exposure to CS. In the present study we wished to further investigate the mechanism behind the CS-induced reduction of TSPO binding by exploring the possible mediatory role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and volatile aldehydes in this process. We first analyzed TSPO binding in control saliva and in saliva exposed to CS in the presence and absence of various antioxidants. These experiments found that TSPO binding ability was not reversed by any of the antioxidants added, suggesting that CS exerts its effect on TSPO via mechanisms that do not involve volatile aldehydes and free radicals tested. Next, we analyzed TSPO binding in saliva following addition of exogenous ROS in the form of H2O2. These experiments found that TSPO binding was enhanced due to the treatment, once again showing that the CS-induced TSPO binding reduction is not mediated by this common form of ROS. However, the previously reported CS-induced reduction in salivary TSPO binding together with the role of TSPO in cells and its link to cancer strongly suggest that TSPO has a critical role in the pathogenesis of CS-induced oral cancer. The importance of further elucidating the mechanisms behind it should be emphasized.

  2. Effect of azithromycin on Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jin, Ji-Young; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key proinflammatory cytokine which plays a central role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Host modulatory agents targeting at inhibiting IL-6, therefore, appear to be beneficial in slowing the progression of periodontal disease and potentially reducing destructive aspects of the host response. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin on IL-6 generation in murine macrophages treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in inflammatory periodontal disease, and its mechanisms of action. Azithromycin significantly suppressed IL-6 production as well as its mRNA expression in P. intermedia LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. LPS-induced activation of JNK and p38 was not affected by azithromycin treatment. Azithromycin failed to prevent P. intermedia LPS from degrading IκB-α. Instead, azithromycin significantly diminished nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB p50 subunit induced with LPS. Azithromycin inhibited P. intermedia LPS-induced STAT1 and STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, azithromycin up-regulated the mRNA level of SOCS1 in cells treated with LPS. In conclusion, azithromycin significantly attenuated P. intermedia LPS-induced production of IL-6 in murine macrophages via inhibition of NF-κB, STAT1 and STAT3 activation, which is possibly related to the activation of SOCS1 signaling. Further in vivo studies are required to better evaluate the potential of azithromycin in the treatment of periodontal disease.

  3. Prophenoloxidase activation and antimicrobial peptide expression induced by the recombinant microbe binding protein of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo

    2017-04-01

    Manduca sexta microbe binding protein (MBP) is a member of the β-1,3-glucanase-related protein superfamily that includes Gram-negative bacteria-binding proteins (GNBPs), β-1,3-glucan recognition proteins (βGRPs), and β-1,3-glucanases. Our previous and current studies showed that the purified MBP from baculovirus-infected insect cells had stimulated prophenoloxidase (proPO) activation in the hemolymph of naïve and immune challenged larvae and that supplementation of the exogenous MBP and peptidoglycans (PGs) had caused synergistic increases in PO activity. To explore the underlying mechanism, we separated by SDS-PAGE naïve and induced larval plasma treated with buffer or MBP and detected on immunoblots changes in intensity and/or mobility of hemolymph (serine) proteases [HP14, HP21, HP6, HP8, proPO-activating proteases (PAPs) 1-3] and their homologs (SPH1, SPH2). In a nickel pull-down assay, we observed association of MBP with proHP14 (slightly), βGRP2, PG recognition protein-1 (PGRP1, indirectly), SPH1, SPH2, and proPO2. Further experiments indicated that diaminopimelic acid (DAP) or Lys PG, MBP, PGRP1, and proHP14 together trigger the proPO activation system in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Injection of the recombinant MBP into the 5th instar naïve larvae significantly induced the expression of several antimicrobial peptide genes, revealing a possible link between HP14 and immune signal transduction. Together, these results suggest that the recognition of Gram-negative or -positive bacteria via their PGs induces the melanization and Toll pathways in M. sexta.

  4. Kaempferol-human serum albumin interaction: Characterization of the induced chirality upon binding by experimental circular dichroism and TDDFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, Iulia; Ionescu, Sorana; Hillebrand, Mihaela

    2012-10-01

    The experimental induced circular dichroism (ICD) and absorption spectra of the achiral flavonoid kaempferol upon binding to human serum albumin (HSA) were correlated to electronic CD and UV-vis spectra theoretically predicted by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The neutral and four anionic species of kaempferol in various conformations were considered in the calculations. The appearance of the experimental ICD signal was rationalized in terms of kaempferol binding to HSA in a distorted, chiral, rigid conformation. The comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra allowed for the identification of the kaempferol species that binds to HSA, namely the anion generated by deprotonation of the hydroxyl group in position 7. This approach constitutes a convenient method for evidencing the binding species and for determining its conformation in the binding pocket of the protein. Its main advantage over the UV-vis absorption method lays in the fact that only the bound ligand species gives an ICD signal.

  5. Combined albumin and bicarbonate induces head-to-head sperm agglutination which physically prevents equine sperm-oviduct binding.

    PubMed

    Leemans, Bart; Gadella, Bart M; Stout, Tom A E; Sostaric, Edita; De Schauwer, Catharina; Nelis, Hilde; Hoogewijs, Maarten; Van Soom, Ann

    2016-04-01

    In many species, sperm binding to oviduct epithelium is believed to be an essential step in generating a highly fertile capacitated sperm population primed for fertilization. In several mammalian species, this interaction is based on carbohydrate-lectin recognition. D-galactose has previously been characterized as a key molecule that facilitates sperm-oviduct binding in the horse. We used oviduct explant and oviduct apical plasma membrane (APM) assays to investigate the effects of various carbohydrates; glycosaminoglycans; lectins; S-S reductants; and the capacitating factors albumin, Ca(2+) and HCO3(-) on sperm-oviduct binding in the horse. Carbohydrate-specific lectin staining indicated that N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) and D-mannose or D-glucose were the most abundant carbohydrates on equine oviduct epithelia, whereas D-galactose moieties were not detected. However, in a competitive binding assay, sperm-oviduct binding density was not influenced by any tested carbohydrates, glycosaminoglycans, lectins or D-penicillamine, nor did the glycosaminoglycans induce sperm tail-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, N-glycosidase F (PNGase) pretreatment of oviduct explants and APM did not alter sperm-oviduct binding density. By contrast, a combination of the sperm-capacitating factors albumin and HCO3(-) severely reduced (>10-fold) equine sperm-oviduct binding density by inducing rapid head-to-head agglutination, both of which events were independent of Ca(2+) and an elevated pH (7.9). Conversely, neither albumin and HCO3(-) nor any other capacitating factor could induce release of oviduct-bound sperm. In conclusion, a combination of albumin and HCO3(-) markedly induced sperm head-to-head agglutination which physically prevented stallion sperm to bind to oviduct epithelium.

  6. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N; Bayer, K Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira

    2012-10-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding-deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells.

  7. Truncated variants of hyaluronan-binding protein 1 bind hyaluronan and induce identical morphological aberrations in COS-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Aniruddha; Tyagi, Rakesh K; Datta, Kasturi

    2004-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA)-binding protein 1 (HABP1) is multifunctional in nature and exists as a trimer through coiled-coil interaction between alpha-helices at its N- and C-termini. To investigate the importance of trimeric assemblage and HA-binding ability of HABP1, we generated and overexpressed variants of HABP1 by truncating the alpha-helices at its termini. Subsequently, these variants were transiently expressed in COS-1 cells to examine the influence of these structural variations on normal cell morphology, as compared with those imparted by HABP1. Substantiating the centrality of coiled-coil interaction for maintaining the trimeric assembly of HABP1, we demonstrate that disruption of trimerization does not alter the affinity of variants towards its ligand HA. Transient expression of HABP1 altered the morphology of COS-1 cells by generating numerous cytoplasmic vacuoles along with disruption of the f-actin network. Interestingly, the truncated variants also imparted identical morphological changes. Characterization of the cytoplasmic vacuoles revealed that most of these vacuoles were autophagic in nature, resembling those generated under stress conditions. The identical morphological changes manifested in COS-1 cells on transient expression of HABP1 or its variants is attributed to their comparable HA-binding ability, which in concert with endogenous HABP1, may deplete the cellular HA pool. Such quenching of HA below a threshold level in the cellular milieu could generate a stress condition, manifested through cytoplasmic vacuoles and a disassembly of the f-actin network. PMID:15005653

  8. Study of xenon binding in cryptophane-A using laser-induced NMR polarization enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmer, M.; Goodson, B.M.; Song, Y.Q.; Laws, D.D.; Kaiser, L.; Pines, A. |

    1999-04-14

    Xenon is chemically inert, yet exhibits NMR parameters that are highly sensitive to its chemical environment. Considerable work has therefore capitalized on the utility of {sup 129}Xe (I = 1/2) as a magnetic resonance probe of molecules, materials, and biological systems. In solution, spin-polarization transfer between laser-polarized xenon and the hydrogen nuclei of nearby molecules leads to signal enhancements in the resolved {sup 1}H NMR spectrum, offering new opportunities for probing the chemical environment of xenon atoms. Following binding of laser-polarized xenon to molecules of cryptophane-A, selective enhancements of the {sup 1}H NMR signals were observed. A theoretical framework for the interpretation of such experimental results is provided, and the spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effects are shown to yield information about the molecular environment of xenon. The observed selective {sup 1}H enhancements allowed xenon-proton internuclear distances to be estimated. These distances reveal structural characteristics of the complex, including the preferred molecular conformations adopted by cryptophane-A upon binding of xenon.

  9. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K.; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C. Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A.; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits. PMID:26849049

  10. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2016-02-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits.

  11. Endothelial stress induces the release of vitamin D-binding protein, a novel growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Marc-Andre; Desormeaux, Anik; Labelle, Andree; Soulez, Mathilde; Soulez, Gilles; Langelier, Yves; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V.; Hebert, Marie-Josee . E-mail: marie-josee.hebert.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca

    2005-12-23

    Endothelial cells (EC) under stress release paracrine mediators that facilitate accumulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSCM) at sites of vascular injury. We found that medium conditioned by serum-starved EC increase proliferation and migration of VSCM in vitro. Fractionation of the conditioned medium followed by mass spectral analysis identified one bioactive component as vitamin D-binding protein (DBP). DBP induced both proliferation and migration of VSMC in vitro in association with increased phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. PD 98059, a biochemical inhibitor of ERK 1/2, abrogated these proliferative and migratory responses in VSMC. DBP is an important carrier for the vitamin-D sterols, 25-hydroxyvitamin-D, and 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin-D. Both sterols inhibited the activity of DBP on VSMC, suggesting that vitamin D binding sites are important for initiating the activities of DBP on VSMC. Release of DBP at sites of endothelial injury represents a novel pathway favoring accumulation of VSMC at sites of vascular injury.

  12. The Role of Osmotically-induced Tension in Binding of N-BAR to Lipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinsmore, Anthony D.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Wood, Derek A.; Weis, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    We measured the binding affinity of a curvature-sensing protein domain (N-BAR) as a function of applied membrane tension while the membrane curvature was held nearly constant. We focus on the N-BAR domain of Drosophila amphiphysin, which participates in a range of key cell functions including synaptic vesicle endocytosis. We monitored N-BAR binding on unilamellar vesicles composed of 90 mol% DOPC and 10 mol% PIP. Controlled tension was applied by osmotic stress. We found that the bound fraction of N-BAR was enhanced by a factor 6.5 when the tension increased from zero to 2.6 mN/m. This tension-induced response can be explained by the hydrophobic insertion mechanism with a hydrophobic domain area that is consistent with known structure. These results suggest that membrane strain might explain the previously reported curvature affinity of N-BAR. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through grant DMR-0907195.

  13. A programmable DNA origami nanospring that reveals force-induced adjacent binding of myosin VI heads.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, M; Wickham, S F; Ikezaki, K; Yanagida, T; Shih, W M

    2016-12-12

    Mechanosensitive biological nanomachines such as motor proteins and ion channels regulate diverse cellular behaviour. Combined optical trapping with single-molecule fluorescence imaging provides a powerful methodology to clearly characterize the mechanoresponse, structural dynamics and stability of such nanomachines. However, this system requires complicated experimental geometry, preparation and optics, and is limited by low data-acquisition efficiency. Here we develop a programmable DNA origami nanospring that overcomes these issues. We apply our nanospring to human myosin VI, a mechanosensory motor protein, and demonstrate nanometre-precision single-molecule fluorescence imaging of the individual motor domains (heads) under force. We observe force-induced transitions of myosin VI heads from non-adjacent to adjacent binding, which correspond to adapted roles for low-load and high-load transport, respectively. Our technique extends single-molecule studies under force and clarifies the effect of force on biological processes.

  14. A programmable DNA origami nanospring that reveals force-induced adjacent binding of myosin VI heads

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, M.; Wickham, S. F.; Ikezaki, K.; Yanagida, T.; Shih, W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensitive biological nanomachines such as motor proteins and ion channels regulate diverse cellular behaviour. Combined optical trapping with single-molecule fluorescence imaging provides a powerful methodology to clearly characterize the mechanoresponse, structural dynamics and stability of such nanomachines. However, this system requires complicated experimental geometry, preparation and optics, and is limited by low data-acquisition efficiency. Here we develop a programmable DNA origami nanospring that overcomes these issues. We apply our nanospring to human myosin VI, a mechanosensory motor protein, and demonstrate nanometre-precision single-molecule fluorescence imaging of the individual motor domains (heads) under force. We observe force-induced transitions of myosin VI heads from non-adjacent to adjacent binding, which correspond to adapted roles for low-load and high-load transport, respectively. Our technique extends single-molecule studies under force and clarifies the effect of force on biological processes. PMID:27941751

  15. A novel PRD I and TG binding activity involved in virus-induced transcription of IFN-A genes.

    PubMed Central

    Génin, P; Bragança, J; Darracq, N; Doly, J; Civas, A

    1995-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the inducible elements of the mouse interferon A4 and A11 gene promoters (IE-A4 and IE-A11) by transient transfection experiments, DNase 1 footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays resulted in identification of a virus-induced binding activity suggested to be involved in NDV-induced activation of transcription of these genes. The virus-induced factor, termed VIF, is activated early by contact of virions with cells. It specifically recognizes the PRD I-like domain shared by both inducible elements, as well as the TG-like domain of IE-A4. This factor, distinct from the IRF-1, IRF-2 and the alpha F1 binding proteins and presenting a different affinity pattern from that of the TG protein, is proposed as a candidate for IFN-type I gene regulation. Images PMID:8559665

  16. Sialoadhesin Expressed on IFN-Induced Monocytes Binds HIV-1 and Enhances Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Hans; Calosing, Cyrus; Sun, Bing; Pulliam, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Background HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1), a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-α and interferon-γ but not tumor necrosis factor-α. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. Conclusions/Significance Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells. PMID:18414664

  17. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein inhibits neuron apoptosis through the suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Xue, Jing-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Kong, Hai-Bo; Liu, Ai-Jun; Li, Shou-Chun; Xu, Dong-Gang

    2015-10-05

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is induced by mild hypothermia in several mammals, but the precise mechanism by which CIRP mediates hypothermia-induced neuroprotection remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which CIRP protects the nervous system during mild hypothermia. Rat cortical neurons were isolated and cultured in vitro under mild hypothermia (32°C). Apoptosis was measured by annexin V and propidium iodide staining, visualized by flow cytometry. Neuron ultrastructure was visualized by transmission electron microscopy. CIRP overexpression and knockdown were achieved via infection with pL/IRES/GFP-CIRP and pL/shRNA/F-CIRP-A lentivirus. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis and western blotting were used to evaluate the effects of CIRP overexpresion/knockdown on the neurons׳ transcriptome. Neuron late apoptosis was significantly reduced at day 7 of culture by 12h hypothermia, but neuron ultrastructure remained relatively intact. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis of 84 apoptosis pathway-associated factors revealed that mild hypothermia and CIRP overexpression induce similar gene expression profiles, specifically alterations of genes implicated in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Mild hypothermia-treated neurons up-regulated 12 and down-regulated 38 apoptosis pathway-associated genes. CIRP-overexpressing neurons up-regulated 15 and down-regulated 46 genes. CIRP-knocked-down hypothermia-treated cells up-regulated 9 and down-regulated 40 genes. Similar results were obtained at the protein level. In conclusion, CIRP may inhibit neuron apoptosis through the suppression of the mitochondria apoptosis pathway during mild hypothermia.

  18. TGFβ Inducible Early Gene-1 Directly Binds to, and Represses, the OPG Promoter in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, M.; Hawse, J. R.; Bruinsma, E. S.; Grygo, S. B.; Cicek, M.; Oursler, M. J.; Spelsberg, T. C.

    2010-01-01

    TGFβ Inducible Early Gene-1 (TIEG) is a member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors (KLF10) that plays an important role in TGFβ mediated Smad signaling. In order to better understand the role of TIEG in bone, we generated TIEG knockout (KO) mice. Calvarial osteoblasts (OBs) isolated from these mice exhibit a reduced ability to support osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Gene expression studies revealed decreased receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and increased osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression in TIEG KO OBs, suggesting a potential role for TIEG in regulating the expression of these genes. Since OPG and RANKL are two important regulators of osteoclast (OC) differentiation, we sought to determine if TIEG directly regulates their expression. Luciferase constructs, containing fragments of either the mouse OPG promoter (−1486 to +133 bp) or the RANKL promoter (−2000 to +1 bp) were each cloned into the pGL3 basic reporter vector and transiently transfected into TIEG KO calvarial OBs with and without a TIEG expression vector. No significant changes in the activity of the RANKL promoter were detected in the presence of TIEG. However, OPG promoter activity was inhibited in the presence of TIEG protein suggesting that TIEG directly represses the expression of OPG in OBs. In order to determine the region of this promoter through which TIEG acts, sequential 5′-deletion constructs were generated. Transient transfection of these constructs revealed that the TIEG regulatory element(s) reside within a 200 bp region of the OPG promoter. Transient ChIP analyses, using a TIEG-specific antibody, revealed that TIEG binds to this region of the OPG promoter. Since we have previously shown that TIEG regulates target gene expression through Sp-1 sites, we examined this region of the OPG promoter for potential TIEG binding elements and identified four potential Sp-1 binding sites. Site directed mutagenesis was used to determine if TIEG utilizes these Sp-1 elements

  19. Structural Dynamics of the Heterodimeric ABC Transporter TM287/288 Induced by ATP and Substrate Binding.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Tadaomi; Sato, Yukiko; Sakurai, Minoru

    2016-12-06

    TM287/288 is a heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, which harnesses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to transport a wide variety of molecules through the transmembrane domains (TMDs) by alternating inward- and outward-facing conformations. Here, we conducted multiple 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations of TM287/288 in different ATP- and substrate-bound states to elucidate the effects of ATP and substrate binding. As a result, the binding of two ATP molecules to the NBDs induced the formation of the consensus ATP-binding pocket (ABP2) or the NBD dimerization, whereas these processes did not occur in the presence of a single ATP molecule or when the protein was in its apo state. Moreover, binding of the substrate to the TMDs enhanced the formation of ABP2 through allosteric TMD-NBD communication. Furthermore, in the apo state, α-helical subdomains of the NBDs approached each other, acquiring a conformation with core half-pockets exposed to the solvent, appropriate for ATP binding. We propose a "core-exposed" model for this novel conformation found in the apo state of ABC transporters. These findings provide important insights into the structural dynamics of ABC transporters.

  20. CD4-Induced Antibodies Promote Association of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein with CD4-Binding Site Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fellinger, Christoph H.; Prasad, Neha R.; Zhou, Amber S.; Kondur, Hema R.; Joshi, Vinita R.; Quinlan, Brian D.; Farzan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120/gp41 heterodimers that mediates viral entry. Env binds cellular CD4, an association which stabilizes a conformation favorable to its subsequent association with a coreceptor, typically CCR5 or CXCR4. The CD4- and coreceptor-binding sites serve as epitopes for two classes of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies: CD4-binding site (CD4bs) and CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, respectively. Here we observed that, at a fixed total concentration, mixtures of the CD4i antibodies (E51 or 412d) and the CD4bs antibody VRC01 neutralized the HIV-1 isolates 89.6, ADA, SG3, and SA32 more efficiently than either antibody alone. We found that E51, and to a lesser extent 412d and 17b, promoted association of four CD4bs antibodies to the Env trimer but not to monomeric gp120. We further demonstrated that the binding of the sulfotyrosine-binding pocket by CCR5mim2-Ig was sufficient for promoting CD4bs antibody binding to Env. Interestingly, the relationship is not reciprocal: CD4bs antibodies were not as efficient as CD4-Ig at promoting E51 or 412d binding to Env trimer. Consistent with these observations, CD4-Ig, but none of the CD4bs antibodies tested, substantially increased HIV-1 infection of a CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cell line. We conclude that the ability of CD4i antibodies to promote VRC01 association with Env trimers accounts for the increase potency of VRC01 and CD4i antibody mixtures. Our data further suggest that potent CD4bs antibodies avoid inducing Env conformations that bind CD4i antibodies or CCR5. IMPORTANCE Potent HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies can prevent viral transmission and suppress an ongoing infection. Here we show that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which recognize the conserved coreceptor-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env), can increase the association of Env with potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize the CD4-binding site (CD4bs antibodies). We further show that

  1. Parietal disruption alters audiovisual binding in the sound-induced flash illusion.

    PubMed

    Kamke, Marc R; Vieth, Harrison E; Cottrell, David; Mattingley, Jason B

    2012-09-01

    Selective attention and multisensory integration are fundamental to perception, but little is known about whether, or under what circumstances, these processes interact to shape conscious awareness. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the causal role of attention-related brain networks in multisensory integration between visual and auditory stimuli in the sound-induced flash illusion. The flash illusion is a widely studied multisensory phenomenon in which a single flash of light is falsely perceived as multiple flashes in the presence of irrelevant sounds. We investigated the hypothesis that extrastriate regions involved in selective attention, specifically within the right parietal cortex, exert an influence on the multisensory integrative processes that cause the flash illusion. We found that disruption of the right angular gyrus, but not of the adjacent supramarginal gyrus or of a sensory control site, enhanced participants' veridical perception of the multisensory events, thereby reducing their susceptibility to the illusion. Our findings suggest that the same parietal networks that normally act to enhance perception of attended events also play a role in the binding of auditory and visual stimuli in the sound-induced flash illusion.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Induced vs. Spontaneous Models of Autoimmune Uveitis Targeting the Interphotoreceptor Retinoid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Qian, Haohua; Horai, Reiko; Chan, Chi-Chao; Falick, Yishay; Caspi, Rachel R.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of autoimmunity to the retina mimic specific features of human uveitis, but no model by itself reproduces the full spectrum of human disease. We compared three mouse models of uveitis that target the interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP): (i) the “classical” model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunization with IRBP; (ii) spontaneous uveitis in IRBP T cell receptor transgenic mice (R161H) and (iii) spontaneous uveitis in Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE)−/− mice. Disease course and severity, pathology and changes in visual function were studied using fundus imaging and histological examinations, optical coherence tomography and electroretinography. All models were on the B10.RIII background. Unlike previously reported, IRBP-induced EAU in B10.RIII mice exhibited two distinct patterns of disease depending on clinical scores developed after onset: severe monophasic with extensive destruction of the retina and rapid loss of visual signal, or lower grade with a prolonged chronic phase culminating after several months in retinal degeneration and loss of vision. R161H and AIRE−/− mice spontaneously developed chronic progressive inflammation; visual function declined gradually as retinal degeneration developed. Spontaneous uveitis in R161H mice was characterized by persistent cellular infiltrates and lymphoid aggregation, whereas AIRE−/− mice characteristically developed multi-focal infiltrates and severe choroidal inflammation. These data demonstrate variability and unique distinguishing features in the different models of uveitis, suggesting that each one can represent distinct aspects of uveitis in humans. PMID:24015215

  3. Metacaspase-binding peptide inhibits heat shock-induced death in Leishmania (L.) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Peña, Mauricio S; Cabral, Guilherme C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Perez, Katia R; Stolf, Beatriz S

    2017-03-02

    Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis is an important agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. This parasite faces cell death in some situations during transmission to the vertebrate host, and this process seems to be dependent on the activity of metacaspase (MCA), an enzyme bearing trypsin-like activity present in protozoans, plants and fungi. In fact, the association between MCA expression and cell death induced by different stimuli has been demonstrated for several Leishmania species. Regulators and natural substrates of MCA are poorly known. To fulfill this gap, we have employed phage display over recombinant L. (L.) amazonensis MCA to identify peptides that could interact with the enzyme and modulate its activity. Four peptides were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to MCA and interfere with its activity. One of these peptides, similar to ecotin-like ISP3 of L. (L.) major, decreases trypsin-like activity of promastigotes under heat shock, and significantly decreases parasite heat shock-induced death. These findings indicate that peptide ligands identified by phage display affect trypsin-like activity and parasite death, and that an endogenous peptidase inhibitor is a possible natural regulator of the enzyme.

  4. The role of interstitial binding in radiation induced segregation in W-Re alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaee, Leili; Marian, Jaime; Erhart, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Due to their high strength and advantageous high-temperature properties, tungsten-based alloys are being considered as plasma-facing candidate materials in fusion devices. Under neutron irradiation, rhenium, which is produced by nuclear transmutation, has been found to precipitate in elongated precipitates forming thermodynamic intermetallic phases at concentrations well below the solubility limit. Recent measurements have shown that Re precipitation can lead to substantial hardening, which may have a detrimental effect on the fracture toughness of W alloys. This puzzle of sub-solubility precipitation points to the role played by irradiation induced defects, specifically mixed solute-W interstitials. Here, using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we study the energetics of mixed interstitial defects in W-Re, W-V, and W-Ti alloys, as well as the heat of mixing for each substitutional solute. We find that mixed interstitials in all systems are strongly attracted to each other with binding energies of -2.4 to -3.2 eV and form interstitial pairs that are aligned along parallel first-neighbor <111 > strings. Low barriers for defect translation and rotation enable defect agglomeration and alignment even at moderate temperatures. We propose that these elongated agglomerates of mixed-interstitials may act as precursors for the formation of needle-shaped intermetallic precipitates. This interstitial-based mechanism is not limited to radiation induced segregation and precipitation in W-Re alloys but is also applicable to other body-centered cubic alloys.

  5. A novel L-fucose-binding lectin from Fenneropenaeus indicus induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Biji; Ghosh, Krishna; Yadav, Nitin; Kanade, Santosh R

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are omnipresent in almost all life forms, being the proteins which specifically bind to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface; they have been explored for their anti-tumour activities. In this study, we purified a fucose specific-lectin (IFL) from Fenneropenaeus indicus haemolymph using fucose-affinity column and characterized for its haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, dependency on cations and cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The lectin showed non-specificity against human erythrocytes. It was a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin which remained stable over wide pH and temperature ranges. The lectin showed effective dose dependent cytotoxicity against different human cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as evidenced by DNA ladder assay and PARP cleavage in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, an increased p21 level corresponding to cyclin D downregulation in response to IFL treatment was observed which might work as probable factors to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. Therefore, we report a novel lectin from the prawn haemolymph with high specificity for L-fucose and antiproliferative towards human cancer cells. However, further establishment of the modus operandi of this lectin is required to enable its biotechnological applications.

  6. DNA and redox state induced conformational changes in the DNA-binding domain of the Myb oncoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Myrset, A H; Bostad, A; Jamin, N; Lirsac, P N; Toma, F; Gabrielsen, O S

    1993-01-01

    The DNA-binding domain of the oncoprotein Myb comprises three imperfect repeats, R1, R2 and R3. Only R2 and R3 are required for sequence-specific DNA-binding. Both are assumed to contain helix-turn-helix (HTH)-related motifs, but multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy revealed a disordered structure in R2 where the second HTH helix was predicted [Jamin et al. (1993) Eur. J. Biochem., 216, 147-154]. We propose that the disordered region folds into a 'recognition' helix and generates a full HTH-related motif upon binding to DNA. This would move Cys43 into the hydrophobic core of R2. We observed that Cys43 was accessible to N-ethylmaleimide alkylation in the free protein, but inaccessible in the DNA complex. Mutant proteins with charged (C43D) or polar (C43S) side chains in position 43 bound DNA with reduced affinity, while hydrophobic replacements (C43A, C43V and C43I) gave unaltered or improved DNA-binding. Specific DNA-binding enhanced protease resistance dramatically. Fluorescence emission spectra and quenching experiments supported a DNA-induced conformational change. Moreover, reversible oxidation of Cys43 had an effect similar to the inactivating C43D mutation. The highly oxidizable Cys43 could function as a molecular sensor for a redox regulatory mechanism turning specific DNA-binding on or off by controlling the DNA-induced conformational change in R2. Images PMID:8223472

  7. Antibiotics that bind to the A site of the large ribosomal subunit can induce mRNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Ermolenko, Dmitri N; Cornish, Peter V; Ha, Taekjip; Noller, Harry F

    2013-02-01

    In the absence of elongation factor EF-G, ribosomes undergo spontaneous, thermally driven fluctuation between the pre-translocation (classical) and intermediate (hybrid) states of translocation. These fluctuations do not result in productive mRNA translocation. Extending previous findings that the antibiotic sparsomycin induces translocation, we identify additional peptidyl transferase inhibitors that trigger productive mRNA translocation. We find that antibiotics that bind the peptidyl transferase A site induce mRNA translocation, whereas those that do not occupy the A site fail to induce translocation. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that translocation-inducing antibiotics do not accelerate intersubunit rotation, but act solely by converting the intrinsic, thermally driven dynamics of the ribosome into translocation. Our results support the idea that the ribosome is a Brownian ratchet machine, whose intrinsic dynamics can be rectified into unidirectional translocation by ligand binding.

  8. Reduction of GABA/sub B/ receptor binding induced by climbing fiber degeneration in the rat cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, K.; Fukuda, H.

    1985-07-22

    When the rat cerebellar climbing fibers degenerated, as induced by lesioning the inferior olive with 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP), GABA/sub B/ receptor binding determined with /sup 3/H-(+/-)baclofen was reduced in the cerebellum but not in the cerebral cortex of rats. Computer analysis of saturation data revealed two components of the binding sites, and indicated that decrease of the binding in the cerebellum was due to reduction in receptor density, mainly of the high-affinity sites, the B/sub max/ of which was reduced to one-third that in the control animals. In vitro treatment with 3-AP, of the membranes prepared from either the cerebellum or the cerebral cortex, induced no alteration in the binding sites, thereby indicating that the alteration of GABA/sub B/ sites induced by in vivo treatment with 3-AP is not due to a direct action of 3-AP on the receptor. GABA/sub A/ and benzodiazepine receptor binding labelled with /sup 3/H-muscimol and /sup 3/H-diazepam, respectively, in both of brain regions was not affected by destruction of the inferior olive. These results provide evidence that some of the GABA/sub B/ sites but neither GABA/sub A/ nor benzodiazepine receptors in the cerebellum are located at the climbing fiber terminals. 28 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Interferon gamma-induced human guanylate binding protein 1 inhibits mammary tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipnik, Karoline; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Gonin-Laurent, Nathalie; Kodajova, Petra; Petznek, Helga; Rungaldier, Stefanie; Astigiano, Simonetta; Ferrini, Silvano; Stürzl, Michael; Hohenadl, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has recently been implicated in cancer immunosurveillance. Among the most abundant proteins induced by IFN-gamma are guanylate binding proteins (GBPs), which belong to the superfamily of large GTPases and are widely expressed in various species. Here, we investigated whether the well-known human GBP-1 (hGBP-1), which has been shown to exert antiangiogenic activities and was described as a prognostic marker in colorectal carcinomas, may contribute to an IFN-gamma-mediated tumor defense. To this end, an IFN-independent, inducible hGBP-1 expression system was established in murine mammary carcinoma (TS/A) cells, which were then transplanted into syngeneic immune-competent Balb/c mice. Animals carrying TS/A cells that had been given doxycycline for induction of hGBP-1 expression revealed a significantly reduced tumor growth compared with mock-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of the respective tumors demonstrated a tightly regulated, high-level expression of hGBP-1. No signs of an enhanced immunosurveillance were observed by investigating the number of infiltrating B and T cells. However, hemoglobin levels as well as the number of proliferating tumor cells were shown to be significantly reduced in hGBP-1-expressing tumors. This finding corresponded to reduced amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) released by hGBP-1-expressing TS/A cells in vitro and reduced VEGF-A protein levels in the corresponding mammary tumors in vivo. The results suggest that hGBP-1 may contribute to IFN-gamma-mediated antitumorigenic activities by inhibiting paracrine effects of tumor cells on angiogenesis. Consequently, owing to these activities GBPs might be considered as potent members in an innate, IFN-gamma-induced antitumoral defense system.

  10. Ketogenic diet and fasting induce the expression of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein with time-dependent hypothermia in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Yamamoto, Saori; Uchida, Daisuke; Doi, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRBP) induced by cold stress modulates the molecular circadian clock in vitro. The present study examines the effect of a ketogenic diet (KD) and fasting on Cirbp expression in the mouse liver. Chronic KD administration induced time-dependent Cirbp expression with hypothermia in mice. The circadian expression of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Clock was phase-advanced and augmented in the liver of mice fed with a KD. Transient food deprivation also induced time-dependent Cirbp expression with hypothermia in mice. These findings suggest that hypothermia is involved in the increased expression of Cirbp under ketogenic or fasting conditions.

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of benzimidazole acridine derivatives as potential DNA-binding and apoptosis-inducing agents.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunmei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Qinsheng; Li, Lulu; Li, Xi; Chen, Changjun; Tan, Chunyan; Liu, Hongxia; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-04-15

    The discovery of new effective DNA-targeted antitumor agent is needed because of their clinical significance. As acridines can intercalate into DNA and benzimidazoles have the ability to bind in the DNA minor groove, a series of novel benzimidazole acridine derivatives were designed and synthesized to be new DNA-targeted compounds. MTT assay indicated that most of the synthesized compounds displayed good antiproliferative activity, among which compound 8l demonstrated the highest activity against both K562 and HepG-2 cells. Further experiments showed that 8l displayed good DNA-binding capability and inhibited topoisomerase I activity. Moreover, compound 8l could induce apoptosis in K562 cell lines through mitochondrial pathway. These data suggested that compound 8l might be potential as new DNA-binding and apoptosis-inducing antitumor agents.

  12. Guanylate-binding protein 5 is a marker of interferon-γ-induced classically activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Makita, Naoyuki; Ohnishi, Koji; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation is the main immunological process occurring during the development of several diseases, and the heterogeneity of macrophage activation or differentiation has been suggested to be involved in disease progression. In the present study, we attempted to identify molecules specifically expressed on human classically activated macrophages (M1) to investigate the significance of the M1-like phenotype in human diseases. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were differentiated into M1, M2a, M2b and M2c phenotypes, and also M1(−) (the M1 phenotype differentiated with interferon-γ) to eliminate the strong effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the gene expression profile. The gene expression profiles of those macrophage phenotypes were analyzed by a cDNA microarray analysis and were used for a bioinformatics examination to identify the markers of the M1 phenotype that are expressed in both M1 and M1(−). The gene expression profiles of murine macrophages were also evaluated. We identified guanylate-binding protein 5 (GBP5), which is associated nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-mediated inflammasome assembly in the M1 macrophages of both humans and mice. Notably, the expression of GBP5 protein was detected in cultured M1(−) as well as in M1 macrophages by western blotting, which means that GBP5 is a more generalized marker of the M1 phenotype compared with the M1 markers that can be induced by LPS stimulation. GBP5 is a useful candidate marker of the M1 phenotype. PMID:27990286

  13. Guanylate-binding protein 5 is a marker of interferon-γ-induced classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Makita, Naoyuki; Ohnishi, Koji; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Macrophage activation is the main immunological process occurring during the development of several diseases, and the heterogeneity of macrophage activation or differentiation has been suggested to be involved in disease progression. In the present study, we attempted to identify molecules specifically expressed on human classically activated macrophages (M1) to investigate the significance of the M1-like phenotype in human diseases. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were differentiated into M1, M2a, M2b and M2c phenotypes, and also M1(-) (the M1 phenotype differentiated with interferon-γ) to eliminate the strong effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the gene expression profile. The gene expression profiles of those macrophage phenotypes were analyzed by a cDNA microarray analysis and were used for a bioinformatics examination to identify the markers of the M1 phenotype that are expressed in both M1 and M1(-). The gene expression profiles of murine macrophages were also evaluated. We identified guanylate-binding protein 5 (GBP5), which is associated nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-mediated inflammasome assembly in the M1 macrophages of both humans and mice. Notably, the expression of GBP5 protein was detected in cultured M1(-) as well as in M1 macrophages by western blotting, which means that GBP5 is a more generalized marker of the M1 phenotype compared with the M1 markers that can be induced by LPS stimulation. GBP5 is a useful candidate marker of the M1 phenotype.

  14. Azadirachtin interacts with the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binding domain of its receptors and inhibits TNF-induced biological responses.

    PubMed

    Thoh, Maikho; Kumar, Pankaj; Nagarajaram, Hampathalu A; Manna, Sunil K

    2010-02-19

    The role of azadirachtin, an active component of a medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica), on TNF-induced cell signaling in human cell lines was investigated. Azadirachtin blocks TNF-induced activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and also expression of NF-kappaB-dependent genes such as adhesion molecules and cyclooxygenase 2. Azadirachtin inhibits the inhibitory subunit of NF-kappaB (IkappaB alpha) phosphorylation and thereby its degradation and RelA (p65) nuclear translocation. It blocks IkappaB alpha kinase (IKK) activity ex vivo, but not in vitro. Surprisingly, azadirachtin blocks NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in transfected cells with TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)2, TNF receptor-associated death domain (TRADD), IKK, or p65, but not with TNFR, suggesting its effect is at the TNFR level. Azadirachtin blocks binding of TNF, but not IL-1, IL-4, IL-8, or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with its respective receptors. Anti-TNFR antibody or TNF protects azadirachtin-mediated down-regulation of TNFRs. Further, in silico data suggest that azadirachtin strongly binds in the TNF binding site of TNFR. Overall, our data suggest that azadirachtin modulates cell surface TNFRs thereby decreasing TNF-induced biological responses. Thus, azadirachtin exerts an anti-inflammatory response by a novel pathway, which may be beneficial for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  15. Localization of the human mitogen-induced FTP-binding protein Gem to chromosome 8q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanopoulos, A.; Martin, R. de; Vanhove, B.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the localization of the human mitogen-induced FTP-binding protein Gem to human chromosome 8q22.3 using somatic cell hybrids. The article discusses some possible roles for the gene encoding human Gem. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  16. BaeR protein acts as an activator of nuclear factor-kappa B and Janus kinase 2 to induce inflammation in murine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Awji, Elias Gebru; Kim, Myung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2016-09-01

    BaeR, a response regulator protein, takes part in multidrug efflux, bacterial virulence activity, and other biological functions. Recently, BaeR was shown to induce inflammatory responses by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In this study, we investigated additional pathways used by BaeR to induce an inflammatory response. BaeR protein was purified from Salmonella enterica Paratyphi A and subcloned into a pPosKJ expression vector. RAW 264.7 cells were treated with BaeR, and RNA was extracted by TRIzol reagent for RT-PCR. Cytokine gene expression was analyzed by using the comparative cycle threshold method, while western blotting and ELISA were used to assess protein expression. We confirmed that BaeR activates nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), thereby inducing an inflammatory response and increases the production of interleukins (IL-)1β and IL-6. During this process, the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)-STAT1 signaling pathway was activated, resulting in an increase in the release of interferons I and II. Additionally, COX-2 was activated and its expression increased with time. In conclusion, BaeR induced an inflammatory response through activation of NF-κB in addition to the MAPKs. Furthermore, activation of the JAK2-STAT1 pathway and COX-2 facilitated the cytokine binding activity, suggesting an additional role for BaeR in the modulation of the immune system of the host and the virulence activity of the pathogen.

  17. Role of vitamin D-binding protein in isocyanate-induced occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Choi, Gil-Soon; Nam, Young-Hee; Kim, Joo-Hee; Hur, Gyu-Young; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Park, Sang Myun; Park, Hae-Sim

    2012-05-31

    The development of a serological marker for early diagnosis of isocyanate-induced occupational asthma (isocyanate-OA) may improve clinical outcome. Our previous proteomic study found that expression of vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) was upregulated in the patients with isocyanate-OA. In the present study, we evaluated the clinical relevance of VDBP as a serological marker in screening for isocyanate-OA among exposed workers and its role in the pathogenesis of isocyanate-OA. Three study groups including 61 patients with isocyanate-OA (group I), 180 asymptomatic exposed controls (AECs, group II), 58 unexposed healthy controls (NCs, group III) were enrolled in this study. The baseline serum VDBP level was significantly higher in group I compared with groups II and III. The sensitivity and specificity for predicting the phenotype of isocyanate-OA with VDBP were 69% and 81%, respectively. The group I subjects with high VDBP (≥311 μg/ml) had significantly lower PC(20) methacholine levels than did subjects with low VDBP. The in vitro studies showed that TDI suppressed the uptake of VDBP into RLE-6TN cells, which was mediated by the downregulation of megalin, an endocytic receptor of the 25-hydroxycholecalciferol-VDBP complex. Furthermore, toluene diisocyanate (TDI) increased VEGF production and secretion from this epithelial cells by suppression of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)] production. The findings of this study suggest that the serum VDBP level may be used as a serological marker for the detection of isocyanate-OA among workers exposed to isocyanate. The TDI-induced VEGF production/ secretion was reversed by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) treatment, which may provide a potential therapeutic strategy for patients with isocyanate-OA.

  18. Autophagy restricts Chlamydia trachomatis growth in human macrophages via IFNG-inducible guanylate binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Al-Zeer, Munir A; Al-Younes, Hesham M; Lauster, Daniel; Abu Lubad, Mohammad; Meyer, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    Interferon γ (IFNG) is a key host response regulator of intracellular pathogen replication, including that of Chlamydia spp The antichlamydial functions of IFNG manifest in a strictly host, cell-type and chlamydial strain dependent manner. It has been recently shown that the IFNG-inducible family of immunity-related GTPases (IRG) proteins plays a key role in the defense against nonhost adapted chlamydia strains in murine epithelial cells. In humans, IFN-inducible guanylate binding proteins (hGBPs) have been shown to potentiate the antichlamydial effect of IFNG; however, how hGBPs regulate this property of IFNG is unknown. In this study, we identified hGBP1/2 as important resistance factors against C. trachomatis infection in IFNG-stimulated human macrophages. Exogenous IFNG reduced chlamydial infectivity by 50 percent in wild-type cells, whereas shRNA hGBP1/2 knockdown macrophages fully supported chlamydial growth in the presence of exogenous IFNG. hGBP1/2 were recruited to bacterial inclusions in human macrophages upon stimulation with IFNG, which triggered rerouting of the typically nonfusogenic bacterial inclusions for lysosomal degradation. Inhibition of lysosomal activity and autophagy impaired the IFNG-mediated elimination of inclusions. Thus, hGBP1/2 are critical effectors of antichlamydial IFNG responses in human macrophages. Through their capacity to remodel classically nonfusogenic chlamydial inclusions and stimulate fusion with autophagosomes, hGBP1/2 disable a major chlamydial virulence mechanism and contribute to IFNG-mediated pathogen clearance.

  19. Assessment of altered binding specificity of bacteriophage for ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongjin; Jo, Ara; Ding, Tian; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Ahn, Juhee

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a new effort toward understanding the interaction mechanisms between antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and phages. The antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase activity, bacterial motility, gene expression, and lytic activity were evaluated in ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium (ASST(CIP)) and ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant S. Typhimurium (ARST(CIP)), which were compared to the wild-type strains (ASST(WT) and ARST(WT)). The MIC values of ampicillin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline were significantly increased to > 512, 16, 16, and 256 μg/ml, respectively, in the ARST(CIP). The lowest and highest extracellular lactamase activities were observed in ASST(WT) (6.85 μmol/min/ml) and ARST(CIP) (48.83 μmol/min/ml), respectively. The acrA, lpfE, and hilA genes were significantly upregulated by more than tenfold in both ASST(CIP) and ARST(CIP). The induction of multiple antibiotic resistance resulted from the increased efflux pump activity (AcrAB-TolC). The highest phage adsorption rates were more than 95 % for ASST(WT), ASST(CIP), and ARST(WT), while the lowest adsorption rate was 52 % for ARST(CIP) at 15 min of infection. The least lytic activity of phage was 20 % against the ARST(CIP), followed by ASST(CIP) (30 %). The adsorption rate of phage against ARST(CIP) was 52 % at 15 min of infection, which resulted in the decrease in lytic activity (12 %). Understanding the interaction of phage and bacteria is essential for the practical application of phage to control and detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The results provide useful information for understanding the binding specificity of phages for multiple antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  20. Oxidation-induced Structural Changes of Ceruloplasmin Foster NGR Motif Deamidation That Promotes Integrin Binding and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barbariga, Marco; Curnis, Flavio; Spitaleri, Andrea; Andolfo, Annapaola; Zucchelli, Chiara; Lazzaro, Massimo; Magnani, Giuseppe; Musco, Giovanna; Corti, Angelo; Alessio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine deamidation occurs spontaneously in proteins during aging; deamidation of Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) sites can lead to the formation of isoAsp-Gly-Arg (isoDGR), a motif that can recognize the RGD-binding site of integrins. Ceruloplasmin (Cp), a ferroxidase present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), contains two NGR sites in its sequence: one exposed on the protein surface (568NGR) and the other buried in the tertiary structure (962NGR). Considering that Cp can undergo oxidative modifications in the CSF of neurodegenerative diseases, we investigated the effect of oxidation on the deamidation of both NGR motifs and, consequently, on the acquisition of integrin binding properties. We observed that the exposed 568NGR site can deamidate under conditions mimicking accelerated Asn aging. In contrast, the hidden 962NGR site can deamidate exclusively when aging occurs under oxidative conditions, suggesting that oxidation-induced structural changes foster deamidation at this site. NGR deamidation in Cp was associated with gain of integrin-binding function, intracellular signaling, and cell pro-adhesive activity. Finally, Cp aging in the CSF from Alzheimer disease patients, but not in control CSF, causes Cp deamidation with gain of integrin-binding function, suggesting that this transition might also occur in pathological conditions. In conclusion, both Cp NGR sites can deamidate during aging under oxidative conditions, likely as a consequence of oxidative-induced structural changes, thereby promoting a gain of function in integrin binding, signaling, and cell adhesion. PMID:24366863

  1. Temperature regulates splicing efficiency of the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein gene Cirbp

    PubMed Central

    Gotic, Ivana; Omidi, Saeed; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Molina, Nacho; Naef, Felix; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, body temperature fluctuates diurnally around a mean value of 36°C–37°C. Despite the small differences between minimal and maximal values, body temperature rhythms can drive robust cycles in gene expression in cultured cells and, likely, animals. Here we studied the mechanisms responsible for the temperature-dependent expression of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRBP). In NIH3T3 fibroblasts exposed to simulated mouse body temperature cycles, Cirbp mRNA oscillates about threefold in abundance, as it does in mouse livers. This daily mRNA accumulation cycle is directly controlled by temperature oscillations and does not depend on the cells’ circadian clocks. Here we show that the temperature-dependent accumulation of Cirbp mRNA is controlled primarily by the regulation of splicing efficiency, defined as the fraction of Cirbp pre-mRNA processed into mature mRNA. As revealed by genome-wide “approach to steady-state” kinetics, this post-transcriptional mechanism is widespread in the temperature-dependent control of gene expression. PMID:27633015

  2. Guanylate Binding Protein (GBP) 5 Is an Interferon-Inducible Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Christian; Hotter, Dominik; Gawanbacht, Ali; McLaren, Paul J; Kluge, Silvia F; Stürzel, Christina M; Mack, Katharina; Reith, Elisabeth; Engelhart, Susanne; Ciuffi, Angela; Hornung, Veit; Sauter, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-04-13

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are an interferon (IFN)-inducible subfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with well-established activity against intracellular bacteria and parasites. Here we show that GBP5 potently restricts HIV-1 and other retroviruses. GBP5 is expressed in the primary target cells of HIV-1, where it impairs viral infectivity by interfering with the processing and virion incorporation of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). GBP5 levels in macrophages determine and inversely correlate with infectious HIV-1 yield over several orders of magnitude, which may explain the high donor variability in macrophage susceptibility to HIV. Antiviral activity requires Golgi localization of GBP5, but not its GTPase activity. Start codon mutations in the accessory vpu gene from macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains conferred partial resistance to GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression. Our results identify GBP5 as an antiviral effector of the IFN response and may explain the increased frequency of defective vpu genes in primary HIV-1 strains.

  3. Dynamic Local Polymorphisms in the Gbx1 Homeodomain Induced by DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The Gastrulation Brain Homeobox 1 (Gbx1) gene encodes the Gbx1 homeodomain that targets TAATTA motifs in dsDNA. Residues Glu17 and Arg52 in Gbx1 form a salt bridge, which is preserved in crystal structures and MD simulations of homologous homeodomain–DNA complexes. In contrast, our NMR studies show that DNA-binding to Gbx1 induces dynamic local polymorphisms, which include breaking of the Glu17–Arg52 salt bridge. To study this interaction, we produced a variant with Glu17Arg and Arg52Glu mutations, which exhibited the same fold as the wild-type protein, but a two-fold reduction in affinity for dsDNA. Analysis of the NMR structures of the Gbx1 homeodomain in the free form, the Gbx1[E17R,R52E] variant, and a Gbx1 homeodomain–DNA complex showed that stabilizing interactions of the Arg52 side chain with the DNA backbone are facilitated by transient breakage of the Glu17–Arg52 salt bridge in the DNA-bound Gbx1. PMID:27396829

  4. Genetic ablation of the fatty acid binding protein FABP5 suppresses HER2-induced mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Liraz; Lobo, Glenn; Doud, Mary Kathryn; von Lintig, Johannes; Seachrist, Darcie; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Noy, Noa

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid binding protein FABP5 shuttles ligands from the cytosol to the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ (encoded for by Pparδ), thereby enhancing the transcriptional activity of the receptor. This FABP5/PPARδ pathway is critical for induction of proliferation of breast carcinoma cells by activated EGFR. In this study, we show that FABP5 is highly upregulated in human breast cancers and we provide genetic evidence of the pathophysiological significance of FABP5 in mammary tumorigenesis. Ectopic expression of FABP5 was found to be oncogenic in 3T3 fibroblasts where it augmented the ability of PPARδ to enhance cell proliferation, migration and invasion. To determine whether FABP5 was essential for EGFR-induced mammary tumor growth, we interbred FABP5-null mice with MMTV-ErbB2/HER2 oncomice which spontaneously develop mammary tumors. FABP5 ablation relieved activation of EGFR downstream effector signals, decreased expression of PPARδ target genes that drive cell proliferation, and suppressed mammary tumor development. Our findings establish that FABP5 is critical for mammary tumor development, rationalizing the development of FABP5 inhibitors as novel anticarcinogenic drugs. PMID:23722546

  5. Uveitis in horses induced by interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein is similar to the spontaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Deeg, Cornelia A; Thurau, Stephan R; Gerhards, Hartmut; Ehrenhofer, Marion; Wildner, Gerhild; Kaspers, Bernd

    2002-09-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is an inflammatory eye disease with high similarity to uveitis in man. It is the only spontaneous animal model for uveitis and the most frequent eye disease in horses affecting up to 10% of the population. To further investigate the pathophysiology of ERU we now report the establishment of an inducible uveitis model in horses. An ERU-like disease was elicited in seven out of seven horses by injection of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) in complete Freund's adjuvant. Control horses did not develop uveitis. The disease model is characterized by a highly reproducible disease course and recurrent episodes with an identical time course elicited in all horses by repeated IRBP injections. The histology revealed the formation of lymphoid follicle-like structures in the eyes and an intraocular infiltration dominated by CD3(+) lymphocytes, morphological patterns typical for the spontaneous disease. Antigen-specific T cell proliferation of PBL was monitored prior to clinical uveitis and during disease episodes. An initial T cell response to IRBP-derived peptides was followed by epitope spreading to S-antigen-derived peptides in response to subsequent immunizations. Thus, horse experimental uveitis represents a valuable disease model for comparative studies with the spontaneous disease and the investigation of immunomodulatory therapeutic approaches after onset of the disease.

  6. Bifunctional designed peptides induce mineralization and binding to TiO2.

    PubMed

    Gitelman, Anna; Rapaport, Hanna

    2014-04-29

    A limitation of titanium implants is the rather poor bonding between the metal and the surrounding tissue. In this research, we aimed at developing functional peptides in the form of monomolecular coatings intended to improve adhesion between the native oxide of the metal (TiO2) and the calcium-phosphate mineralization layer with which it is in contact. Accordingly, a bifunctional peptide with a β-strand motif assumed to strongly bind to the oxide through two phosphorylated serine residues, both situated on the same face of the strand, was designed. The β-strand motif was extended by a mineralization "tail" composed of consecutive acidic amino acids capable of adsorbing calcium ions. This peptide was studied together with two additional control peptides, one serving to elucidate the role of the β-strand in stabilizing bonding with the oxide and the other demonstrating the ability of the tail to induce mineralization. The strong adsorption of the three peptides to the oxide surface was revealed by HPLC. That peptide presenting the mineralization tail showed the highest levels of adsorbed calcium and phosphate ions, as well as the largest area of cellular adherence, demonstrating its potential advantages for use with titanium implants in bone tissue.

  7. Characterization of a highly negative and labile binding protein induced in Euglena gracilis by cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Gingrich, D.J.; Weber, D.N.; Shaw, C.F.; Garvey, J.S.; Petering, D.H.

    1986-03-01

    The physiochemical properties and physiological significance of the cadmium-binding protein (CdBP) of the algae Euglena gracilis have been studied. Following in vivo exposure of cells to 0.4 or 1.3 ..mu..g/mL of Cd/sup 2 +/, all the cytosolic Cd is bound to high molecular weight species. At 4.7 ..mu..g/mL, appreciable CdBP has formed in cells grown under illumination or in the dark. The large pool of very low molecular weight zinc species previously reported is increased when cells are exposed to high cadmium levels. Two distinct species, BP-1 and BP-2 are resolved by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex. Unusually high conductivities are required to displace them, indicating that they are very negatively charged proteins at pH 8.6. The pH for half-titration of bound Cd/sup 2 +/ is between 5 and 6. Neither form of the CdBP cross-reacts with antibodies to rat liver metallothionein (MT) antibodies. The structural, chemical, and functional differences between the Euglena CdBPs and mammalian MTs are discussed. When cells are exposed to high levels of Cu, a CuBP is induced, and the very low molecular weight zinc band is depleted.

  8. Key Role of the Adenylate Moiety and Integrity of the Adenylate-Binding Site for the NAD(+)/H Binding to Mitochondrial Apoptosis-Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Luca; Calogero, Alessandra Maria; Pandini, Vittorio; Vanoni, Maria Antonietta; Sevrioukova, Irina F; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a mitochondrial flavoprotein with pro-life and pro-death activities, which plays critical roles in mitochondrial energy metabolism and caspase-independent apoptosis. Defects in AIF structure or expression can cause mitochondrial abnormalities leading to mitochondrial defects and neurodegeneration. The mechanism of AIF-induced apoptosis was extensively investigated, whereas the mitochondrial function of AIF is poorly understood. A unique feature of AIF is the ability to form a tight, air-stable charge-transfer (CT) complex upon reaction with NADH and to undergo a conformational switch leading to dimerization, proposed to be important for its vital and lethal functions. Although some aspects of interaction of AIF with NAD(+)/H have been analyzed, its precise mechanism is not fully understood. We investigated how the oxidized and photoreduced wild-type and G307A and -E variants of murine AIF associate with NAD(+)/H and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN(+)/H) to determine the role of the adenylate moiety in the binding process. Our results indicate that (i) the adenylate moiety of NAD(+)/H is crucial for the association with AIF and for the subsequent structural reorganization of the complex, but not for protein dimerization, (ii) FAD reduction rather than binding of NAD(+)/H to AIF initiates conformational rearrangement, and (iii) alteration of the adenylate-binding site by the G307E (equivalent to a pathological G308E mutation in human AIF) or G307A replacements decrease the affinity and association rate of NAD(+)/H, which, in turn, perturbs CT complex formation and protein dimerization but has no influence on the conformational switch in the regulatory peptide.

  9. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  10. Binding of amyloid beta peptide to beta2 adrenergic receptor induces PKA-dependent AMPA receptor hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Govindaiah, G; Liu, Ruijie; De Arcangelis, Vania; Cox, Charles L; Xiang, Yang K

    2010-09-01

    Progressive decrease in neuronal function is an established feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide induces acute increase in spontaneous synaptic activity accompanied by neurotoxicity, and Abeta induces excitotoxic neuronal death by increasing calcium influx mediated by hyperactive alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptors. An in vivo study has revealed subpopulations of hyperactive neurons near Abeta plaques in mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that can be normalized by an AMPA receptor antagonist. In the present study, we aim to determine whether soluble Abeta acutely induces hyperactivity of AMPA receptors by a mechanism involving beta(2) adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR). We found that the soluble Abeta binds to beta(2)AR, and the extracellular N terminus of beta(2)AR is critical for the binding. The binding is required to induce G-protein/cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, which controls PKA-dependent phosphorylation of GluR1 and beta(2)AR, and AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). beta(2)AR and GluR1 also form a complex comprising postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), PKA and its anchor AKAP150, and protein phosphotase 2A (PP2A). Both the third intracellular (i3) loop and C terminus of beta(2)AR are required for the beta(2)AR/AMPA receptor complex. Abeta acutely induces PKA phosphorylation of GluR1 in the complex without affecting the association between two receptors. The present study reveals that non-neurotransmitter Abeta has a binding capacity to beta(2)AR and induces PKA-dependent hyperactivity in AMPA receptors.

  11. Interleukin-27-Mediated Suppression of Human Th17 Cells Is Associated with Activation of STAT1 and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that interleukin (IL)-27, a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines, antagonizes pathological Th17 effector cell responses. Relatively little is known about the cytokines that regulate human Th17 cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-27 on the differentiation of human Th17 cells and on committed memory Th17 cells. We demonstrate that IL-27 suppresses the development of human Th17 cells by downregulating retinoid orphan nuclear receptor C expression and that this inhibition is associated with the induction of the intracellular signaling factors STAT1 and induction of the suppressor of cytokine signaling protein 1. The IL-27-mediated inhibition of IL-17 is independent of IL-10. We show that IL-27 inhibits differentiation of naïve T cells into IL-17+ T cells under different Th17 polarizing conditions. IL-27 suppresses other Th17 subset cytokines such as IL-22 and IL-21 but not tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, we also show that IL-27 inhibits IL-17 production by committed Th17 memory cells, which is independent of IL-10. These studies show that IL-27 negatively regulates both the developing and committed human Th17 responses and therefore may be a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of Th17-mediated diseases. PMID:21235411

  12. Identification of Functional Regulatory Residues of the β -Lactam Inducible Penicillin Binding Protein in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mbah, Andreas N; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to methicillin by Staphylococcus aureus is a persistent clinical problem worldwide. A mechanism for resistance has been proposed in which methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates acquired a new protein called β -lactam inducible penicillin binding protein (PBP-2'). The PBP-2' functions by substituting other penicillin binding proteins which have been inhibited by β -lactam antibiotics. Presently, there is no structural and regulatory information on PBP-2' protein. We conducted a complete structural and functional regulatory analysis of PBP-2' protein. Our analysis revealed that the PBP-2' is very stable with more hydrophilic amino acids expressing antigenic sites. PBP-2' has three striking regulatory points constituted by first penicillin binding site at Ser25, second penicillin binding site at Ser405, and finally a single metallic ligand binding site at Glu657 which binds to Zn(2+) ions. This report highlights structural features of PBP-2' that can serve as targets for developing new chemotherapeutic agents and conducting site direct mutagenesis experiments.

  13. FBS or BSA Inhibits EGCG Induced Cell Death through Covalent Binding and the Reduction of Intracellular ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Xu, Yu-Ying; Sun, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Mo-Han; Zheng, Yi-Fan; Shen, Han-Ming; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Previously we have shown that (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) can induce nonapoptotic cell death in human hepatoma HepG2 cells only under serum-free condition. However, the underlying mechanism for serum in determining the cell fate remains to be answered. The effects of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and its major component bovine serum albumin (BSA) on EGCG-induced cell death were investigated in this study. It was found that BSA, just like FBS, can protect cells from EGCG-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Detailed analysis revealed that both FBS and BSA inhibited generation of ROS to protect against toxicity of EGCG. Furthermore, EGCG was shown to bind to certain cellular proteins including caspase-3, PARP, and α-tubulin, but not LC3 nor β-actin, which formed EGCG-protein complexes that were inseparable by SDS-gel. On the other hand, addition of FBS or BSA to culture medium can block the binding of EGCG to these proteins. In silico docking analysis results suggested that BSA had a stronger affinity to EGCG than the other proteins. Taken together, these data indicated that the protective effect of FBS and BSA against EGCG-induced cell death could be due to (1) the decreased generation of ROS and (2) the competitive binding of BSA to EGCG. PMID:27830147

  14. The frontline antibiotic vancomycin induces a zinc starvation response in bacteria by binding to Zn(II)

    PubMed Central

    Zarkan, Ashraf; Macklyne, Heather-Rose; Truman, Andrew W.; Hesketh, Andrew R.; Hong, Hee-Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin is a front-line antibiotic used for the treatment of nosocomial infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Despite its clinical importance the global effects of vancomycin exposure on bacterial physiology are poorly understood. In a previous transcriptomic analysis we identified a number of Zur regulon genes which were highly but transiently up-regulated by vancomycin in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, we show that vancomycin also induces similar zinc homeostasis systems in a range of other bacteria and demonstrate that vancomycin binds to Zn(II) in vitro. This implies that vancomycin treatment sequesters zinc from bacterial cells thereby triggering a Zur-dependent zinc starvation response. The Kd value of the binding between vancomycin and Zn(II) was calculated using a novel fluorometric assay, and NMR was used to identify the binding site. These findings highlight a new biologically relevant aspect of the chemical property of vancomycin as a zinc chelator. PMID:26797186

  15. Autoantigenic targets of B-cell receptors derived from chronic lymphocytic leukemias bind to and induce proliferation of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Carsten; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Kemele, Maria; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Bühler, Andreas; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-06-06

    Antigenic targets of the B-cell receptor (BCR) derived from malignant cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) might play a role in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm. We screened human tissue-derived protein macroarrays with antigen-binding fragments derived from 47 consecutive cases of CLL. An autoantigenic target was identified for 12/47 (25.5%) of the cases, with 3 autoantigens being the target of the BCRs from 2 patients each. Recombinantly expressed autoantigens bound specifically to the CLL cells from which the BCR used for the identification of the respective autoantigen was derived. Moreover, binding of the autoantigen to the respective leukemic cells induced a specific activation and proliferation of these cells. In conclusion, autoantigens are frequent targets of CLL-BCRs. Their specific binding to and induction of proliferation in the respective leukemic cells provide the most convincing evidence to date for the long-time hypothesized role of autoantigens in the pathogenesis of CLL.

  16. [Cold inducible RNA-binding protein inhibits hippocampal neuronal apoptosis under hypothermia by regulating redox system].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Hui; Zhang, Xue; Meng, Yu; Li, Chang-Sheng; Ji, Hong; Yang, Huan-Min; Li, Shi-Ze

    2015-08-25

    In this study, we intend to confirm our hypothesis that cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) can inhibit neuronal apoptosis through suppressing the formation of oxygen free radicals under hypothermia. Primary rat hippocampal neurons were isolated and cultured in vitro, and were divided into five groups: (1) normal control group (37 °C), (2) cells infected by empty viral vector group, (3) CIRP over-expressed group, (4) CIRP knock-down group, and (5) hypothermia control group. Cells in groups 2-5 were cultured under 32 °C, 5% CO2. Apoptosis of hippocampal neurons were detected by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and flow cytometry; Expression of CIRP was determined by Western blot; Redox-related parameters (T-AOC, GSH-Px, SOD, MDA) were detected by ELISA kits. Results showed that CIRP expression levels were significantly increased (P < 0.01) and the apoptotic rates were significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in hypothermia control group and CIRP over-expressed group when compared with normal control group. On the other hand, the apoptotic rate was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in CIRP knock-down group compared with that in hypothermia control group. The levels of redox parameters in hypothermia control group and CIRP over-expressed group were significantly changed in comparison with those in normal control group, CIRP knock-down group and empty viral vector infected group, respectively (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). These results suggest that up-regulation of CIRP by hypothermia treatment can protect the neuron from apoptosis through suppressing the formation of oxygen free radicals.

  17. Theoretical studies on the binding of rhenium(I) complexes to inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Bruno L; Moreira, Irina S; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ramos, Maria J; Santos, Isabel; Correia, João D G

    2013-09-01

    Considering our interest in the design of innovative radiometal-based complexes for in vivo imaging of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), we have recently introduced a set of M(CO)3-complexes (M=(99m)Tc, Re) containing a pendant N(ω)-NO2-L-arginine moiety, a known inhibitor of the enzyme. Enzymatic assays with purified inducible NOS have shown that the non-radioactive surrogates with 3-(Re1; Ki=84 μM) or 6-carbon linkers (Re2; Ki=6 μM) are stronger inhibitors than the respective metal-free conjugates L1 (Ki=178 μM) and L2 (Ki=36 μM), with Re2 displaying the highest inhibitory potency. Aiming to rationalize the experimental results we have performed a molecular docking study combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations. The higher inhibitory potency of Re2 arises from the stronger electrostatic interactions observed between the "Re(CO)3" core and the residues Arg260 and Arg382. This interaction is only possible due to the higher flexibility of its C6-carbon spacer, which links the N(ω)-NO2-L-arginine moiety and the "Re(CO)3" organometallic core. Furthermore, FEP calculations were carried out and the resultant relative binding energies (ΔΔGbind(calc)=0.690±0.028 kcal/mol,Re1/L1 and 1.825±0.318 kcal/mol, Re2/L2) are in accordance with the experimental results (ΔΔGbind(exp)=0.461±0.009 kcal/mol,Re1/L1 and 1.129±0.210 kcal/mol, Re2/L2); there is an energetic penalty for the transformation of the Re complexes into the ligands and this penalization is higher for the pair Re2/L2.

  18. When Does Chemical Elaboration Induce a Ligand To Change Its Binding Mode?

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Shipra; Karanicolas, John

    2017-01-12

    Traditional hit-to-lead optimization assumes that upon elaboration of chemical structure, the ligand retains its binding mode relative to the receptor. Here, we build a large-scale collection of related ligand pairs solved in complex with the same protein partner: we find that for 41 of 297 pairs (14%), the binding mode changes upon elaboration of the smaller ligand. While certain ligand physiochemical properties predispose changes in binding mode, particularly those properties that define fragments, simple structure-based modeling proves far more effective for identifying substitutions that alter the binding mode. Some ligand pairs change binding mode because the added substituent would irreconcilably conflict with the receptor in the original pose, whereas others change because the added substituent enables new, stronger interactions that are available only in a different pose. Scaffolds that can engage their target using alternate poses may enable productive structure-based optimization along multiple divergent pathways.

  19. The bent conformation of poly(A)-binding protein induced by RNA-binding is required for its translational activation function

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ka Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Gu, Sohyun; Kim, Eunah; An, Sihyeon; Kwon, Junyoung; Jang, Sung Key

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A recent study revealed that poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) bound to poly(A) RNA exhibits a sharply bent configuration at the linker region between RNA-recognition motif 2 (RRM2) and RRM3, whereas free PABP exhibits a highly flexible linear configuration. However, the physiological role of the bent structure of mRNA-bound PABP remains unknown. We investigated a role of the bent structure of PABP by constructing a PABP variant that fails to form the poly(A)-dependent bent structure but maintains its poly(A)-binding activity. We found that the bent structure of PABP/poly(A) complex is required for PABP's efficient interaction with eIF4G and eIF4G/eIF4E complex. Moreover, the mutant PABP had compromised translation activation function and failed to augment the formation of 80S translation initiation complex in an in vitro translation system. These results suggest that the bent conformation of PABP, which is induced by the interaction with 3′ poly(A) tail, mediates poly(A)-dependent translation by facilitating the interaction with eIF4G and the eIF4G/eIF4E complex. The preferential binding of the eIF4G/eIF4E complex to the bent PABP/poly(A) complex seems to be a mechanism discriminating the mRNA-bound PABPs participating in translation from the idling mRNA-unbound PABPs. PMID:28095120

  20. Accessibility of sulfhydryl residues induced by cytochalasin B binding and conformational dynamics in the human erythrocyte glucose transporter.

    PubMed

    Pinkofsky, H B; Jung, C Y

    1985-07-01

    Studies with intact cells have implicated essential sulfhydryl groups in the carrier-mediated glucose transport of human erythrocytes. In an attempt to identify and characterize such essential sulfhydryl residues we have studied the interaction of p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) with a purified glucose transporter preparation (band 4.5) from human erythrocytes, in the presence and absence of its ligands, and the effects of this interaction on the binding of cytochalasin B (CB) to the transporter. At least 3 mol of PCMB reacted per mol of this preparation. A portion of the reaction was significantly enhanced in the presence of cytochalasin B. This enhancement was a saturable function of CB concentration, and was half-maximal at a CB concentration equal to the dissociation constant for the CB binding to the preparation. This CB-sensitive, PCMB reaction product comigrated with the band 4.5 on lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An excess of D-glucose did not affect the PCMB reaction by itself in the absence of CB, but totally abolished the CB-induced enhancement of the PCMB reaction. PCMB inhibited the CB binding activity of the transporter preparation, and this inhibition was also enhanced in the presence of CB. These results suggest that CB binding perturbs the conformational dynamics of the glucose transporter resulting in an exposure of at least two sulfhydryl residues to PCMB reaction, and that some of these CB-sensitive sulfhydryl groups are essential for CB binding to the transporter.

  1. Conformational Selection and Induced Fit Mechanisms in the Binding of an Anticancer Drug to the c-Src Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morando, Maria Agnese; Saladino, Giorgio; D’Amelio, Nicola; Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; Lovera, Silvia; Lelli, Moreno; López-Méndez, Blanca; Marenchino, Marco; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the conformational changes associated with the binding of small ligands to their biological targets is a fascinating and meaningful question in chemistry, biology and drug discovery. One of the most studied and important is the so-called “DFG-flip” of tyrosine kinases. The conserved three amino-acid DFG motif undergoes an “in to out” movement resulting in a particular inactive conformation to which “type II” kinase inhibitors, such as the anti-cancer drug Imatinib, bind. Despite many studies, the details of this prototypical conformational change are still debated. Here we combine various NMR experiments and surface plasmon resonance with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to shed light into the conformational dynamics associated with the binding of Imatinib to the proto-oncogene c-Src. We find that both conformational selection and induced fit play a role in the binding mechanism, reconciling opposing views held in the literature. Moreover, an external binding pose and local unfolding (cracking) of the aG helix are observed. PMID:27087366

  2. Screening for Small Molecules That Disrupt IAP-Caspases Binding to Activate Caspases and Induce Apoptosis in Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved 0950-9232/05 $30.00 www.nature.com/onc ORIGINAL PAPER A small molecule Smac-mimic compound induces apoptosis ...409-411. Alnemri ES. (2001). Nature , 410, 112-116. Hengartner MO. (2000). Nature , 407, 770-776. Sun C, Cai M, Gunasekera AH, Meadows RP, Wang H, Chen...AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0614 TITLE: Screening for Small Molecules that Disrupt IAP-Caspases Binding to Activate Caspases and Induce Apoptosis in

  3. On the induced-fit mechanism of substrate-enzyme binding structures of nylon-oligomer hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Baba, Takeshi; Harada, Ryuhei; Nakano, Masayoshi; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2014-06-15

    We present a detailed computational investigation of the induced-fit motion in a nylon-oligomer hydrolase (NylB) upon substrate binding. To this aim, we resort on the recently introduced parallel cascade selection molecular dynamics approach, allowing for an accelerated access to the set of conformational changes from an open- to a closed-state structure to form the enzyme-substrate complex in a specific induce-fit mechanism. The structural investigation is quantitatively complemented by free energy analyses within the umbrella sampling algorithm accompanied by weighted histogram analysis. We find that the stabilization free energy is about 1.4 kcal/mol, whereas the highest free energy barrier to be overcome is about 2.3 kcal/mol. Conversely, the energetic contribution for the substrate binding is about 20 kcal/mol, as estimated from Generalized Born/Surface Area. This means that the open-close induced-fit motion could occur frequently once the substrate binds to the open state of NylB.

  4. Genetic control of interferon action: mouse strain distribution and inheritance of an induced protein with guanylate-binding property.

    PubMed

    Staeheli, P; Prochazka, M; Steigmeier, P A; Haller, O

    1984-08-01

    Interferons (IFNs) induce in responsive cells the synthesis of various proteins including a set with high binding affinities to guanylates. These guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were analyzed in cells from 46 inbred mouse strains using GMP-agarose affinity chromatography. In cells of 11 strains, including A/J, BALB/cJ, and C3H/HeJ, type I and II IFNs induced the synthesis of a major GBP of Mr 65,000, designated here GBP-1, and of at least three minor GBPs. In contrast, cells of the remaining 35 strains, including DBA/2J, C57BL/6J, and A2G, failed to synthesize GBP-1 in response to both types of IFNs. Induction of the minor GBPs was comparable in cells of both groups of mice, confirming that they were all responsive to IFNs. Analysis of F1, F2, and BC1 offspring of crosses between GBP-1 inducible (A/J) and noninducible (DBA/2J or A2G) strains showed that inducibility of GBP-1 was inherited as a single autosomal gene. The symbol Gbp-1 is proposed for this locus, designated Gbp-1a for the allele causing inducibility and Gbp-1b for the other allele.

  5. Depletion of (/sup 3/H)methyltrienolone cytosol binding in glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy (42001)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurowski, T.T.; Capaccio, J.A.; Chatterton, R.T. Jr.; Hickson, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine cytosol binding properties of (/sup 3/H)methyltrienolone, a synthetic androgen, in comparison with (/sup 3/)dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, under conditions of glucocorticoid excess in skeletal muscle. Male hypophysectomized rats received either seven daily subcutaneous injections of cortisone acetate (CA) (100 mg x kg/sup -1/ body wt) or the vehicle, 1% carboxymethyl cellulose. Following treatment, both (/sup 3/H)dexamethansone and (/sup 3/H)methyltrienolone-receptor concentrations were decreased from those in vehicle-treated rats by more than 90 and 80%, respectively, in CA-treated animals. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)methyltrienolone binding in muscles of vehicle-treated animals became nonlinear at high concentrations of labeled ligand and were reanalyzed by a two-component binding model. The lower affinity, higher capacity component, which was attributed to binding of methyltrienolone to a dexamethasone component, which was attributed to binding of methyltrienolone to a dexamethasone component, disappeared in muscles of CA-treated rats and Scatchard plots were linear. Receptor concentrations of the higher affinity lower capacity methyltrienolone component were similar in muscles of vehicle-treated and CA-treated groups. From competition studies, the high relative specificities of glucocorticoids for (/sup 3/H)methyltrienolone binding in muscles of vehicle-treated animals were markedly reduced by CA treatment. In addition, the binding specificity data also showed strong competition by progesterone and methyltrienolone for (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding and estradiol-17..beta.. for (/sup 3/H)methyltrienolone binding.

  6. cis-acting sequences required for inducible interleukin-2 enhancer function bind a novel Ets-related protein, Elf-1.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C B; Wang, C Y; Ho, I C; Bohjanen, P R; Petryniak, B; June, C H; Miesfeldt, S; Zhang, L; Nabel, G J; Karpinski, B

    1992-01-01

    The recent definition of a consensus DNA binding sequence for the Ets family of transcription factors has allowed the identification of potential Ets binding sites in the promoters and enhancers of many inducible T-cell genes. In the studies described in this report, we have identified two potential Ets binding sites, EBS1 and EBS2, which are conserved in both the human and murine interleukin-2 enhancers. Within the human enhancer, these two sites are located within the previously defined DNase I footprints, NFAT-1 and NFIL-2B, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift and methylation interference analyses demonstrated that EBS1 and EBS2 are essential for the formation of the NFAT-1 and NFIL-2B nuclear protein complexes. Furthermore, in vitro mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that inducible interleukin-2 enhancer function requires the presence of either EBS1 or EBS2. Two well-characterized Ets family members, Ets-1 and Ets-2, are reciprocally expressed during T-cell activation. Surprisingly, however, neither of these proteins bound in vitro to EBS1 or EBS2. We therefore screened a T-cell cDNA library under low-stringency conditions with a probe from the DNA binding domain of Ets-1 and isolated a novel Ets family member, Elf-1. Elf-1 contains a DNA binding domain that is nearly identical to that of E74, the ecdysone-inducible Drosophila transcription factor required for metamorphosis (hence the name Elf-1, for E74-like factor 1). Elf-1 bound specifically to both EBS1 and EBS2 in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. It also bound to the purine-rich CD3R element from the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 long terminal repeat, which is required for inducible virus expression in response to signalling through the T-cell receptor. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiple Ets family members with apparently distinct DNA binding specificities regulate differential gene expression in resting and activated T cells. Images PMID:1545787

  7. MTI-101 (cyclized HYD1) binds a CD44 containing complex and induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Anthony W; Jain, Priyesh; Nair, Rajesh R; Emmons, Michael F; Argilagos, Raul F; Koomen, John M; McLaughlin, Mark L; Hazlehurst, Lori A

    2013-11-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that treatment with the d-amino acid containing peptide HYD1 induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma cell lines. Because of the intriguing biological activity and promising in vivo activity of HYD1, we pursued strategies for increasing the therapeutic efficacy of the linear peptide. These efforts led to a cyclized peptidomimetic, MTI-101, with increased in vitro activity and robust in vivo activity as a single agent using two myeloma models that consider the bone marrow microenvironment. MTI-101 treatment similar to HYD1 induced reactive oxygen species, depleted ATP levels, and failed to activate caspase-3. Moreover, MTI-101 is cross-resistant in H929 cells selected for acquired resistance to HYD1. Here, we pursued an unbiased chemical biology approach using biotinylated peptide affinity purification and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis to identify binding partners of MTI-101. Using this approach, CD44 was identified as a predominant binding partner. Reducing the expression of CD44 was sufficient to induce cell death in multiple myeloma cell lines, indicating that multiple myeloma cells require CD44 expression for survival. Ectopic expression of CD44s correlated with increased binding of the FAM-conjugated peptide. However, ectopic expression of CD44s was not sufficient to increase the sensitivity to MTI-101-induced cell death. Mechanistically, we show that MTI-101-induced cell death occurs via a Rip1-, Rip3-, or Drp1-dependent and -independent pathway. Finally, we show that MTI-101 has robust activity as a single agent in the SCID-Hu bone implant and 5TGM1 in vivo model of multiple myeloma.

  8. MTI-101 (cyclized HYD1) binds a CD44 containing complex and induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gebhard, Anthony W.; Jain, Priyesh; Nair, Rajesh R.; Emmons, Michael F.; Argilagos, Raul F.; Koomen, John M.; McLaughlin, Mark L.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that treatment with the d-amino acid containing peptide HYD1 induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines. Due to the intriguing biological activity and promising in vivo activity of HYD1, we pursued strategies for increasing the therapeutic efficacy of the linear peptide. These efforts led to a cyclized peptidomimetic, MTI-101, with increased in vitro activity and robust in vivo activity as single agent using two myeloma models that consider the bone marrow microenvironment. MTI-101 treatment similar to HYD1 induced reactive oxygen species, depleted ATP levels and failed to activate caspase 3. Moreover, MTI-101 is cross-resistant in H929 cells selected for acquired resistance to HYD1. Here, we pursued an unbiased chemical biology approach using biotinylated peptide affinity purification and LC-MS/MS analysis to identify binding partners of MTI-101. Using this approach CD44 was identified as a predominant binding partner. Reducing the expression of CD44 was sufficient to induce cell death in MM cell lines, indicating that MM cells require CD44 expression for survival. Ectopic expression of CD44s correlated with increased binding of the FAM-conjugated peptide. However ectopic expression of CD44s was not sufficient to increase the sensitivity to MTI-101 induced cell death. Mechanistically, we show that MTI-101 induced cell death occurs via a Rip1, Rip3 or Drp1 dependent and independent pathway. Finally, we show that MTI-101 has robust activity as a single agent in the SCID-Hu bone implant and 5TGM1 in vivo model of multiple myeloma. PMID:24048737

  9. The platelet fibrinogen receptor: an immunogold-surface replica study of agonist-induced ligand binding and receptor clustering

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to its receptor, a heterodimer consisting of the plasma-membrane glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa. Although the GPIIb-IIIa complex is present on the surface of unstimulated platelets, it binds fibrinogen only after platelet activation. We have used an immunogold-surface replica technique to study the distribution of GPIIb-IIIa and bound fibrinogen over broad areas of surface membranes in unstimulated, as well as thrombin-activated and ADP-activated human platelets. We found that the immunogold-labeled GPIIb-IIIa was monodispersed over the surface of unstimulated platelets, although the cell surface lacked immunoreactive fibrinogen. On thrombin-stimulated platelets, approximately 65% of the GPIIb-IIIa molecules were in clusters within the plane of the membrane. Fibrinogen, which had been released from the alpha-granules of these cells, bound to GPIIb-IIIa on the cell surface and was similarly clustered. To determine whether the receptors clustered before ligand binding, or as a consequence thereof, we studied the surface distribution of GPIIb-IIIa after stimulation with ADP, which causes activation of the fibrinogen receptor function of GPIIb-IIIa without inducing the release of fibrinogen. In the absence of added fibrinogen, the unoccupied, yet binding-competent receptors on ADP-stimulated platelets were monodispersed. The addition of fibrinogen caused the GPIIb-IIIa molecules to cluster on the cell surface. Clustering was also induced by the addition of the GPIIb-IIIa-binding domains of fibrinogen, namely the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser on the alpha-chain or the gamma-chain decapeptide gamma 402-411. These results show that receptor occupancy causes clustering of GPIIb-IIIa in activated platelets. PMID:3584243

  10. A platinum complex that binds non-covalently to DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Mendoza, Oscar; Duarte, Alexandra A; Mann, David J; Vilar, Ramon

    2013-05-01

    Cisplatin and some of its derivatives have been shown to be very successful anticancer agents. Their main mode of action has been proposed to be via covalent binding to DNA. However, one of the limitations of these drugs is their poor activity against some tumours due to intrinsic or acquired resistance. Therefore, there is interest in developing complexes with different binding modes and mode of action. Herein we present a novel platinum(ii)-terpyridine complex (1) which interacts non-covalently with DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin. The interaction of this complex with DNA was studied by UV/Vis spectroscopic titrations, fluorescent indicator displacement (FID) assays and circular dichroism (CD) titrations. In addition, computational docking studies were carried out with the aim of establishing the complex's binding mode. These experimental and computational studies showed the complex to have an affinity constant for DNA of ∼10(4) M(-1), a theoretical free energy of binding of -10.83 kcal mol(-1) and selectivity for the minor groove of DNA. Long-term studies indicated that 1 did not covalently bind (or nick) DNA. The cancer cell antiproliferative properties of this platinum(ii) complex were probed in vitro against human and murine cell lines. Encouragingly the platinum(ii) complex displayed selective toxicity for the cancerous (U2OS and SH-SY5Y) and proliferating NIH 3T3 cell lines. Further cell based studies were carried out to establish the mode of action. Cellular uptake studies demonstrated that the complex is able to penetrate the cell membrane and localize to the nucleus, implying that genomic DNA could be a cellular target. Detailed immunoblotting studies in combination with DNA-flow cytometry showed that the platinum(ii) complex induced cell death in a manner consistent with necrosis.

  11. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  12. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  13. PrP antibody binding-induced epitope modulation evokes immunocooperativity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Binggong; Miller, Michael W; Bulgin, Marie S; Sorenson-Melson, Sharon; Balachandran, Aru; Chiu, Allen; Rubenstein, Richard

    2008-12-15

    We have characterized the antibody-antigen binding events of the prion protein (PrP) utilizing three new PrP-specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). The degree of immunoreactivity was dependent on the denaturation treatment with the combination of heat and SDS resulting in the highest levels of epitope accessibility and antibody binding. Interestingly however, this harsh denaturation treatment was not sufficient to completely and irreversibly abolish protein conformation. The Mabs differed in their PrP epitopes with Mab 08-1/11F12 binding in the region of PrP(93-122), Mab 08-1/8E9 reacting to PrP(155-200) and Mab 08-1/5D6 directed to an undefined conformational epitope. Using normal and infected brains from hamsters, sheep and deer, we demonstrate that the binding of PrP to one Mab triggers PrP epitope unmasking, which enhances the binding of a second Mab. This phenomenon, termed positive immunocooperativity, is specific regarding epitope and the sequence of binding events. Positive immunocooperativity will likely increase immunoassay sensitivity since assay conditions for PrP(Sc) detection does not require protease digestion.

  14. PrP Antibody Binding-Induced Epitope Modulation Evokes Immunocooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Binggong; Miller, Michael W.; Bulgin, Marie S.; Sorenson-Melson, Sharon; Balachandran, Aru; Chiu, Allen; Rubenstein, Richard

    2008-01-01

    We have characterized the antibody-antigen binding events of the prion protein (PrP) utilizing three new PrP-specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). The degree of immunoreactivity was dependent on the denaturation treatment with the combination of heat and SDS resulting in the highest levels of epitope accessibility and antibody binding. Interestingly however, this harsh denaturation treatment was not sufficient to completely and irreversibly abolish protein conformation. The Mabs differed in their PrP epitopes with Mab 08-1/11F12 binding in the region of PrP93–122, Mab 08-1/8E9 reacting to PrP155–200 and Mab 08-1/5D6 directed to an undefined conformational epitope. Using normal and infected brains from hamsters, sheep and deer, we demonstrate that the binding of PrP to one Mab triggers PrP epitope unmasking, which enhances the binding of a second Mab. This phenomenon, termed positive immunocooperativity, is specific regarding epitope and the sequence of binding events. Positive immunocooperativity will likely increase immunoassay sensitivity since assay conditions for PrPSc detection does not require protease digestion. PMID:18977037

  15. DNA binding of Jun and Fos bZip domains: homodimers and heterodimers induce a DNA conformational change in solution.

    PubMed Central

    John, M; Leppik, R; Busch, S J; Granger-Schnarr, M; Schnarr, M

    1996-01-01

    We constructed plasmids encoding the sequences for the bZip modules of c-Jun and c-Fos which could then be expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. The purified bZip modules were tested for their binding capacities of synthetic oligonucleotides containing either TRE or CRE recognition sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and circular dichroism (CD). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that bZip Jun homodimers and bZip Jun/Fos heterodimers bind a collagenase-like TRE (CTGACTCAT) with dissociation constants of respectively 1.4 x 10(-7) M and 5 x 10(-8) M. As reported earlier [Patel et al. (1990) Nature 347, 572-575], DNA binding induces a marked change of the protein structure. However, we found that the DNA also undergoes a conformational change. This is most clearly seen with small oligonucleotides of 13 or 14 bp harboring respectively a TRE (TGACTCA) or a CRE (TGACGTCA) sequence. In this case, the positive DNA CD signal at 280 nm increases almost two-fold with a concomitant blue-shift of 3-4 nm. Within experimental error the same spectral changes are observed for TRE and CRE containing DNA fragments. The spectral changes observed with a non-specific DNA fragment are weaker and the signal of free DNA is recovered upon addition of much smaller salt concentrations than required for a specific DNA fragment. Surprisingly the spectral changes induced by Jun/Jun homodimers are not identical to those induced by Jun/Fos heterodimers. However, in both cases the increase of the positive CD band and the concomitant blue shift would be compatible with a B to A-transition of part of the binding site or a DNA conformation intermediate between the canonical A and B structures. PMID:8948639

  16. Thrombin inhibits tumor cell growth in association with up-regulation of p21(waf/cip1) and caspases via a p53-independent, STAT-1-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y Q; Li, J J; Karpatkin, S

    2000-03-03

    Thrombin, a multifunctional protein, has been found to be involved in cellular mitogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis, in addition to its well known effects on the initiation of platelet aggregation and secretion and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin to form blood clots. These properties of thrombin rely on its action as a serine protease, which cleaves the N-terminal region of a 7-transmembrane G protein receptor (protease-activated receptor, PAR-1), thus exposing a tethered end hexapeptide sequence capable of activating its receptor. Little is known about its effect on genes that regulate the cell cycle. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible mechanisms by which thrombin regulates tumor cell growth in several tumor cell lines: human CHRF megakaryocyte, DU145 prostate, MDAMB231 and MCF7 breast, U3A fibrosarcoma, and 2 murine fibroblast cell lines, MEFp53(-/-) and CD STAT(-/-). We have found that thrombin under the conditions of culture employed inhibits cell growth by both up-regulation of p21(waf/cip1) and induction of caspases via its PAR-1 receptor. The increased expression of p21(waf/cip1) by thrombin was p53 independent, STAT1 dependent, and protein synthesis independent. This was associated with tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT1, and nuclear translocation of STAT1. Induction of apoptosis is also PAR-1-specific, STAT1-dependent, and associated with up-regulation of caspases 1, 2, and 3. Our study establishes, for the first time, a link between PAR-1 receptor activation with the STAT signal pathway, which leads to cell cycle control and apoptosis. This observation broadens our understanding of the mechanism of PAR-1 activation and its effect on cell growth, and could possibly lead to therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer.

  17. Mutation-induced loop opening and energetics for binding of tamiflu to influenza N8 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-05-31

    Tamiflu, also known as oseltamivir (OTV), binds to influenza A neuraminidase (H5N1) with very high affinity (0.32 nM). However, this inhibitor binds to other neuraminidases as well. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the mechanism underlying the binding of oseltamivir to N8 neuraminidase (NA) in "open" and "closed" conformations of the 150-loop through molecular dynamics simulations and the popular and well established molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann (MM-PBSA) free energy calculation method. Whereas the closed conformation is stable for wild type N8, it transforms into the open conformation for the mutants Y252H, H274Y, and R292K, indicating that bound to oseltamivir these mutants are preferentially in the open conformation. Our calculations show that the binding of wild type oseltamivir to the closed conformation of N8 neuraminidase is energetically favored compared to the binding to the open conformation. We observe water mediated binding of oseltamivir to the N8 neuraminidase in both conformations which is not seen in the case of binding of the same drug to the H5N1 neuraminidase. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the mechanisms underlying the binding and changes in affinity due to mutations. Considering the mutant N8 variants in the open conformation adopted during the simulations, we observe a significant loss in the size of the total binding free energy for the N8(Y252H)-OTV, N8(H274Y)-OTV, and N8(R292K)-OTV complexes compared to N8(WT)-OTV, mainly due to the decrease in the size of the intermolecular electrostatic energy. For R292K, an unfavorable shift in the van der Waals interactions also contributes to the drug resistance. The mutations cause a significant expansion in the active site cavity, increasing its solvent accessible surface compared to the crystal structures of both the open and closed conformations. Our study underscores the need to consider dynamics in rationalizing the

  18. The binding capability of plasma phospholipid transfer protein, but not HDL pool size, is critical to repress LPS induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Cui, Yingjie; Zhao, Yanan; Liu, Shuai; Song, Guohua; Jiao, Peng; Li, Bin; Luo, Tian; Guo, Shoudong; Zhang, Xiangjian; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Qin, Shucun

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) participates in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Increased plasma PLTP activity was observed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered acute inflammatory diseases. This study aimed to determine the exact role of PLTP in LPS induced inflammation. HDL pool size was shrunk both in PLTP deficient mice (PLTP−/−) and PLTP transgenic mice (PLTP-Tg). PLTP displayed a strong protective effect on lethal endotoxemia in mice survival study. Furthermore, after LPS stimulation, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines were increased in bone marrow derived macrophage (BMDM) from PLTP−/−, while decreased in BMDM from PLTP-Tg compared with BMDM from wild-type mice (WT). Moreover, LPS induced nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) activation was enhanced in PLTP−/− BMDM or PLTP knockdown RAW264.7. Conversely, PLTP overexpression countered the NFκB activation in LPS challenged BMDM. Additionally, the activation of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) induced by LPS showed no alteration in PLTP−/− BMDM. Finally, PLTP could bind to LPS, attenuate the pro-inflammatory effects of LPS, and improve the cell viability in vitro. To sum up, these findings elucidated that PLTP repressed LPS induced inflammation due to extracellular LPS binding capability, and the protective effects were not related to HDL pool size in mice. PMID:26857615

  19. FBI-1, a factor that binds to the HIV-1 inducer of short transcripts (IST), is a POZ domain protein.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D J; Pendergrast, P S; Stavropoulos, P; Colmenares, S U; Kobayashi, R; Hernandez, N

    1999-03-01

    The HIV-1 promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of transcripts, short, non-polyadenylated transcripts and full-length, polyadenylated transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts is activated by a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts or IST, located downstream of the HIV-1 transcriptional start site, while the synthesis of full-length transcripts is activated by the viral activator Tat. Tat binds to the RNA element TAR, which is encoded largely between the two IST half-elements. Upon activation by Tat, the synthesis of short RNAs is repressed. We have previously purified a factor called FBI-1 (for factor that binds to IST) whose binding to wild-type and mutated ISTs correlated well with the abilities of these ISTs to direct the synthesis of short transcripts. Here, we report the cloning of cDNAs encoding FBI-1. FBI-1 contains a POZ domain at its N-terminus and four Krüppel-type zinc fingers at its C-terminus. The C-terminus is sufficient for specific binding, and FBI-1 can form homomers through its POZ domain and, in vivo, through its zinc finger domain as well. In addition, FBI-1 associates with Tat, suggesting that repression of the short transcripts by Tat may be mediated through interactions between the two factors.

  20. Cellular Concentrations of DDB2 Regulate Dynamic Binding of DDB1 at UV-Induced DNA Damage▿

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Sergey; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; Pines, Alex; Geverts, Bart; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Lans, Hannes; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the principal pathway for counteracting cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of UV irradiation. To provide insight into the in vivo regulation of the DNA damage recognition step of global genome NER (GG-NER), we constructed cell lines expressing fluorescently tagged damaged DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1). DDB1 is a core subunit of a number of cullin 4-RING ubiquitin ligase complexes. UV-activated DDB1-DDB2-CUL4A-ROC1 ubiquitin ligase participates in the initiation of GG-NER and triggers the UV-dependent degradation of its subunit DDB2. We found that DDB1 rapidly accumulates on DNA damage sites. However, its binding to damaged DNA is not static, since DDB1 constantly dissociates from and binds to DNA lesions. DDB2, but not CUL4A, was indispensable for binding of DDB1 to DNA damage sites. The residence time of DDB1 on the damage site is independent of the main damage-recognizing protein of GG-NER, XPC, as well as of UV-induced proteolysis of DDB2. The amount of DDB1 that is temporally immobilized on damaged DNA critically depends on DDB2 levels in the cell. We propose a model in which UV-dependent degradation of DDB2 is important for the release of DDB1 from continuous association to unrepaired DNA and makes DDB1 available for its other DNA damage response functions. PMID:18936169

  1. Zinc Induces Dimerization of the Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecule That Leads to Cooperative Binding to a Superantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Li,H.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Eislele, L.; Mourad, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dimerization of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the MHC biological function. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing specific T cell receptor V{beta} elements. Here we have used structural, sedimentation, and surface plasmon resonance detection approaches to investigate the molecular interactions between MAM and the class II MHC molecule HLA-DR1 in the context of a hemagglutinin peptide-(306-318) (HA). Our results revealed that zinc ion can efficiently induce the dimerization of the HLA-DR1/HA complex. Because the crystal structure of the MAM/HLA-DR1/hemagglutinin complex in the presence of EDTA is nearly identical to the structure of the complex crystallized in the presence of zinc ion, Zn{sup 2+} is evidently not directly involved in the binding between MAM and HLA-DR1. Sedimentation and surface plasmon resonance studies further revealed that MAM binds the HLA-DR1/HA complex with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry, in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. However, in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, a dimerized MAM/HLA-DR1/HA complex can arise through the Zn{sup 2+}-induced DR1 dimer. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, cooperative binding of MAM to the DR1 dimer was also observed.

  2. Increased /sup 3/H-spiperone binding sites in mesolimbic area related to methamphetamine-induced behavioral hypersensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, K.; Sato, M.; Otsuki, S.

    1982-02-01

    The specific /sup 3/H-spiperone binding to membrane homogenates of the striatum, mesolimbic area, and frontal cortex was examined in two groups of rats pretreated once daily with saline or 4 mg/kg of methamphetamine (MAP) for 14 days. At 7 days following cessation of chronic pretreatment, all rats received an injection of 4 mg/kg of MAP and were decapitated 1 hr after the injection. In the chronic saline-pretreatment group, the single administration of MAP induced significant changes in the number (Bmax) of specific /sup 3/H-spiperone binding sites (a decrease in the striatum and an increase in the mesolimbic area and frontal cortex), but no significant changes in the affinity (KD) in any brain area. The chronic MAP pretreatment markedly augmented the changes in Bmax in the striatum and mesolimbic area. The increase in specific /sup 3/H-spiperone binding sites in the mesolimbic area is discussed in relation to MAP-induced behavioral hypersensitivity.

  3. Histatin 5 binds to Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinin B (HagB) and alters HagB-induced chemokine responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgwardt, Derek S.; Martin, Aaron D.; van Hemert, Jonathan R.; Yang, Jianyi; Fischer, Carol L.; Recker, Erica N.; Nair, Prashant R.; Vidva, Robinson; Chandrashekaraiah, Shwetha; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Drake, David; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Vali, Shireen; Zhang, Yang; Brogden, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Histatins are human salivary gland peptides with anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we hypothesized that histatin 5 binds to Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinin B (HagB) and attenuates HagB-induced chemokine responses in human myeloid dendritic cells. Histatin 5 bound to immobilized HagB in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy-based biosensor system. SPR spectroscopy kinetic and equilibrium analyses, protein microarray studies, and I-TASSER structural modeling studies all demonstrated two histatin 5 binding sites on HagB. One site had a stronger affinity with a KD1 of 1.9 μM and one site had a weaker affinity with a KD2 of 60.0 μM. Binding has biological implications and predictive modeling studies and exposure of dendritic cells both demonstrated that 20.0 μM histatin 5 attenuated (p < 0.05) 0.02 μM HagB-induced CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, and TNFα responses. Thus histatin 5 is capable of attenuating chemokine responses, which may help control oral inflammation.

  4. Saturated palmitic acid induces myocardial inflammatory injuries through direct binding to TLR4 accessory protein MD2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Qian, Yuanyuan; Fang, Qilu; Zhong, Peng; Li, Weixin; Wang, Lintao; Fu, Weitao; Zhang, Yali; Xu, Zheng; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2017-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for a number of diseases including cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. Excess saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in obesity play a significant role in cardiovascular diseases by activating innate immunity responses. However, the mechanisms by which SFAs activate the innate immune system are not fully known. Here we report that palmitic acid (PA), the most abundant circulating SFA, induces myocardial inflammatory injury through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) accessory protein MD2 in mouse and cell culture experimental models. Md2 knockout mice are protected against PA- and high-fat diet-induced myocardial injury. Studies of cell surface binding, cell-free protein–protein interactions and molecular docking simulations indicate that PA directly binds to MD2, supporting a mechanism by which PA activates TLR4 and downstream inflammatory responses. We conclude that PA is a crucial contributor to obesity-associated myocardial injury, which is likely regulated via its direct binding to MD2. PMID:28045026

  5. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein induces p19(Ink4d) expression and inhibits the proliferation of H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shankung; Wang, Ming Jen; Tseng, Kuo-Yun

    2013-01-01

    The expression of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) is up-regulated in many types of cancer. Here, we studied the role of PTB in the growth of non small cell lung cancer cells. Data showed that PTB overexpression inhibited the growth of H1299 cells at least by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analyses showed that PTB overexpression in H1299 cells specifically induced the expression of p19(Ink4d), an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4. Repression of p19(Ink4d) expression partially rescued PTB-caused proliferation inhibition. PTB overexpression also inhibited the growth and induced the expression of p19(Ink4d) mRNA in A549 cells. However, Western blot analyses failed to detect the presence of p19(Ink4d) protein in A549 cells. To address how PTB induced p19(Ink4d) in H1299 cells, we showed that PTB might up-regulate the activity of p19(Ink4d) gene (CDKN2D) promoter. Besides, PTB lacking the RNA recognition motif 3 (RRM3) was less effective in growth inhibition and p19(Ink4d) induction, suggesting that RNA-binding activity of PTB plays an important role in p19(Ink4d) induction. However, immunoprecipitation of ribonuclearprotein complexes plus quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that PTB might not bind p19(Ink4d) mRNA, suggesting that PTB overexpression might trigger the other RNA-binding protein(s) to bind p19(Ink4d) mRNA. Subsequently, RNA electrophoretic mobility-shift assays revealed a 300-base segment (designated as B2) within the 3'UTR of p19(Ink4d) mRNA, with which the cytoplasmic lysates of PTB-overexpressing cells formed more prominent complexes than did control cell lysates. Insertion of B2 into a reporter construct increased the expression of the chimeric luciferase transcripts in transfected PTB-overexpressing cells but not in control cells; conversely, overexpression of B2-containing reporter construct in PTB-overexpressing cells abolished the induction of p19(Ink4d) mRNA. In sum, we have shown that

  6. Tuning the Binding Affinities and Reversion Kinetics of a Light Inducible Dimer Allows Control of Transmembrane Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Seth P; Hallett, Ryan A; Bourke, Ashley M; Bear, James E; Kennedy, Matthew J; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-09-20

    Inducible dimers are powerful tools for controlling biological processes through colocalizing signaling molecules. To be effective, an inducible system should have a dissociation constant in the "off" state that is greater (i.e., weaker affinity) than the concentrations of the molecules that are being controlled, and in the "on" state a dissociation constant that is less (i.e., stronger affinity) than the relevant protein concentrations. Here, we reengineer the interaction between the light inducible dimer, iLID, and its binding partner SspB, to better control proteins present at high effective concentrations (5-100 μM). iLID contains a light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domain that undergoes a conformational change upon activation with blue light and exposes a peptide motif, ssrA, that binds to SspB. The new variant of the dimer system contains a single SspB point mutation (A58V), and displays a 42-fold change in binding affinity when activated with blue light (from 3 ± 2 μM to 125 ± 40 μM) and allows for light-activated colocalization of transmembrane proteins in neurons, where a higher affinity switch (0.8-47 μM) was less effective because more colocalization was seen in the dark. Additionally, with a point mutation in the LOV domain (N414L), we lengthened the reversion half-life of iLID. This expanded suite of light induced dimers increases the variety of cellular pathways that can be targeted with light.

  7. Alteration of methotrexate binding to human serum albumin induced by oxidative stress. Spectroscopic comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Równicka-Zubik, J.

    2016-01-01

    Changes of oxidative modified albumin conformation by comparison of non-modified (HSA) and modified (oHSA) human serum albumin absorption spectra, Red Edge Excitation Shift (REES) effect and fluorescence synchronous spectra were investigated. Studies of absorption spectra indicated that changes in the value of absorbance associated with spectral changes in the region from 200 to 250 nm involve structural alterations related to variations in peptide backbone conformation. Analysis of the REES effect allowed for the observation of changes caused by oxidation in the region of the hydrophobic pocket containing the tryptophanyl residue. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed changes of the position of the tryptophanyl and tyrosil residues fluorescent band. Effect of oxidative stress on binding of methotrexate (MTX) was investigated by spectrofluorescence, UV-VIS and 1HNMR spectroscopy. MTX caused the fluorescence quenching of non-modified (HSA) and modified (oHSA) human serum albumin molecule. The values of binding constants, Hill's coefficients and a number of binding sites in the protein molecule in the high affinity binding site were calculated for the binary MTX-HSA and MTX-oHSA systems. For these systems, qualitative analysis in the low affinity binding sites was performed with the use of the 1HNMR technique.

  8. Progesterone receptor induces bcl-x expression through intragenic binding sites favoring RNA polymerase II elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, Paola Y.; Nacht, A. Silvina; Alló, Mariano; Rocha-Viegas, Luciana; Ballaré, Cecilia; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Zaurin, Roser; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.; Beato, Miguel; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Pecci, Adali

    2013-01-01

    Steroid receptors were classically described for regulating transcription by binding to target gene promoters. However, genome-wide studies reveal that steroid receptors-binding sites are mainly located at intragenic regions. To determine the role of these sites, we examined the effect of progestins on the transcription of the bcl-x gene, where only intragenic progesterone receptor-binding sites (PRbs) were identified. We found that in response to hormone treatment, the PR is recruited to these sites along with two histone acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein (CBP) and GCN5, leading to an increase in histone H3 and H4 acetylation and to the binding of the SWI/SNF complex. Concomitant, a more relaxed chromatin was detected along bcl-x gene mainly in the regions surrounding the intragenic PRbs. PR also mediated the recruitment of the positive elongation factor pTEFb, favoring RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation activity. Together these events promoted the re-distribution of the active Pol II toward the 3′-end of the gene and a decrease in the ratio between proximal and distal transcription. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which PR regulates gene expression by facilitating the proper passage of the polymerase along hormone-dependent genes. PMID:23640331

  9. Benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist-induced kindling of rats alters learning and glutamate binding.

    PubMed

    Rössler, A S; Schröder, H; Dodd, R H; Chapouthier, G; Grecksch, G

    2000-09-01

    Kindling, recognized as a model of epilepsy, can be obtained by applications of repeated nonconvulsive stimulations that finally lead to generalized seizures. Epileptics often show cognitive impairments. The present work analyzed the learning performance of male Wistar rats kindled with a convulsant inverse agonist of the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex, methyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCM). This compound is also known to have an action on learning processes. It was thus interesting to verify if beta-CCM kindling had the same impairing action on learning as other kindling agents, such as pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). A two-way active-avoidance shuttle-box learning task was chosen, because a deficit was found after PTZ kindling in this learning model. On the other hand, hippocampal glutamate binding, has previously been shown to be modified by both seizures and learning. Thus, the level of glutamate binding was also measured in the present study. Results showed that fully kindled rats had poorer learning performance after the third day of test than controls or not fully kindled animals. L-[3H] glutamate binding to hippocampal membrane fractions of the fully kindled animals was significantly higher when compared with controls, whereas L-[3H] glutamate binding of not fully kindled subjects did not differ from that of controls. Neuronal plasticity changes are a possible explanation for the correlation between kindling, learning deficits, and increased glutamate binding.

  10. Voltage-induced inhibition of antigen-antibody binding at conducting optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Liron, Zvi; Tender, Leonard M; Golden, Joel P; Ligler, Frances S

    2002-06-01

    Optical waveguides coated with electrically conducting indium-tin oxide (ITO) are demonstrated here as a new class of substrate for fluorescent immunosensors. These waveguides combine electrochemical control with evanescent excitation and image-based detection. Presented here are preliminary results utilizing these waveguides that demonstrate influence of waveguide voltage on antigen binding. Specifically, waveguide surfaces were bisected into electrically addressable halves, anti-ovalbumin immobilized in patterns on their surfaces, and a 1.3 V bias applied between waveguide halves in the presence of Cy5-labeled ovalbumin in 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 150 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20. Fluorescence imaging indicated that binding of the antigen to positively biased waveguide halves was inhibited nearly 10-fold compared with negatively biased waveguide halves and unbiased controls. Furthermore, it is shown that ovalbumin binding to positively biased waveguide regions is regenerated after removal of applied voltage. These results suggest that electrochemical control of immunosensor substrates can be used as a possible strategy toward minimizing cross-reactive binding and/or nonspecific adsorption, immunosensor regeneration, and controlled binding.

  11. CCAAT/Enhancer binding protein β induces motility and invasion of glioblastoma cells through transcriptional regulation of the calcium binding protein S100A4

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Morante, Diana; Morales-Garcia, Jose A.; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that decreased expression of CCAAT/Enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells and diminishes their transformation capacity and migration. In agreement with this, we showed that C/EBPβ depletion decreases the mRNA levels of different genes involved in metastasis and invasion. Among these, we found S100 calcium binding protein A4 (S100A4) to be almost undetectable in glioblastoma cells deficient in C/EBPβ. Here, we have evaluated the possible role of S100A4 in the observed effects of C/EBPβ in glioblastoma cells and the mechanism through which S100A4 levels are controlled by C/EBPβ. Our results show that C/EBPβ suppression significantly reduced the levels of S100A4 in murine GL261 and human T98G glioblastoma cells. By employing an S100A4-promoter reporter, we observed a significant induction in the transcriptional activation of the S100A4 gene by C/EBPβ. Furthermore, overexpression of S100A4 in C/EBPβ-depleted glioblastoma cells reverses the enhanced migration and motility induced by this transcription factor. Our data also point to a role of S100A4 in glioblastoma cell invasion and suggest that the C/EBPβ gene controls the invasive potential of GL261 and T98G cells through direct regulation of S100A4. Finally, this study indicates a role of C/EBPβ on the maintenance of the stem cell population present in GL261 glioblastoma cells. PMID:25738360

  12. Molecular basis for the Cu2+ binding-induced destabilization of beta2-microglobulin revealed by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nan-Jie; Yan, Lisa; Singh, Deepak; Cieplak, Piotr

    2006-06-01

    According to experimental data, binding of the Cu(2+) ions destabilizes the native state of beta2-microglobulin (beta2m). The partial unfolding of the protein was generally considered an early step toward fibril formation in dialysis-related amyloidosis. Recent NMR studies have suggested that the destabilization of the protein might be achieved through increased flexibility upon Cu(2+) binding. However, the molecular mechanism of destabilization due to Cu(2+), its role in amyloid formation, and the relative contributions of different potential copper-binding sites remain unclear. To elucidate the effect of ion ligation at atomic detail, a series of molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on apo- and Cu(2+)-beta2m systems in explicit aqueous solutions, with varying numbers of bound ions. Simulations at elevated temperatures (360 K) provide detailed pictures for the process of Cu(2+)-binding-induced destabilization of the native structure at the nanosecond timescale, which are in agreement with experiments. Conformational transitions toward partially unfolded states were observed in protein solutions containing bound copper ions at His-31 and His-51, which is marked by an increase in the protein vibrational entropy, with TDeltaS(vibr) ranging from 30 to 69 kcal/mol. The binding of Cu(2+) perturbs the secondary structure and the hydrogen bonding pattern disrupts the native hydrophobic contacts in the neighboring segments, which include the beta-strand D2 and part of the beta-strand E, B, and C and results in greater exposure of the D-E loop and the B-C loop to the water environment. Analysis of the MD trajectories suggests that the changes in the hydrophobic environment near the copper-binding sites lower the barrier of conformational transition and stabilize the more disordered conformation. The results also indicate that the binding of Cu(2+) at His-13 has little effect on the conformational stability, whereas the copper-binding site His-31, and to a lesser

  13. The activation and differential signalling of the growth hormone receptor induced by pGH or anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Lan, Hainan; Liu, Huimin; Fu, Zhiling; Yang, Yanhong; Han, Weiwei; Guo, Feng; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jingsheng; Zheng, Xin

    2013-08-25

    In this report, we have developed a panel of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies to pGH by immunising BALB/c mice with a purified monoclonal anti-pGH antibody (1A3), among which one mAb, termed CG-8F, was selected for further characterisation. We found that CG-8F behaved as a typical Ab2β, not only conformationally competing with pGH for 1A3 but also exhibiting recognition for GHR in a rat hepatocyte model. We next examined the resulting signal transduction pathways triggered by this antibody in rat hepatocytes and found that both pGH and CG-8F could trigger the JAK2-STAT1/3/5-mediated signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, the phosphorylation kinetics of pSTAT1/3/5 induced by either pGH or CG-8F were remarkably similar in the dose-response and time course rat hepatocyte experiments. In contrast, only pGH, but not CG-8F, was capable of inducing ERK phosphorylation. Further experimental studies indicated that the two functional binding sites on CG-8F are required for GHR activation. This study partially reveals the mechanism of action of GH anti-idiotypic antibodies and also indicates that monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies represent an effective way to produce GH mimics, suggesting that it is possible to produce signal-specific cytokine agonists using an anti-idiotypic antibody approach.

  14. The metalloid arsenite induces nuclear export of Id3 possibly via binding to the N-terminal cysteine residues

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Sugai, Manabu; Mori, Kentaro; Yokota, Yoshifumi

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Sodium arsenite induces cytoplasmic accumulation of Id3. •Arsenite binds to closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3. •N-terminal cysteines are essential for arsenite-induced nuclear export of Id3. •Nuclear export of Id3 counteracts its transcriptional repression activity. -- Abstract: Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and appropriate subcellular localization of the Id proteins is important for their functions. We previously identified distinct functional nuclear export signals (NESs) in Id1 and Id2, but no active NES has been reported in Id3. In this study, we found that treatment with the stress-inducing metalloid arsenite led to the accumulation of GFP-tagged Id3 in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic accumulation was impaired by a mutation in the Id3 NES-like sequence resembling the Id1 NES, located at the end of the HLH domain. It was also blocked by co-treatment with the CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB), but not with the inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Importantly, we showed that the closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3 interacted with the arsenic derivative phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and were essential for the arsenite-induced cytoplasmic accumulation, suggesting that arsenite induces the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of Id3 via binding to the N-terminal cysteines. Finally, we demonstrated that Id3 significantly repressed arsenite-stimulated transcription of the immediate-early gene Egr-1 and that this repression activity was inversely correlated with the arsenite-induced nuclear export. Our results imply that Id3 may be involved in the biological action of arsenite.

  15. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-3 suppresses Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of nitric oxide and interleukin-1β in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Young; Choe, So-Hui; Hyeon, Jin-Yi; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2015-10-05

    This study was performed to analyze the effect of carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule-3 (CORM-3) in alleviating the production of proinflammatory mediators in macrophages treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen associated with periodontal disease, and its possible mechanisms of action. LPS was isolated using the hot phenol-water method. Culture supernatants were assayed for nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR, and protein expression by immunoblotting. DNA-binding activities of NF-κB subunits were determined using an ELISA-based kit. CORM-3 suppressed the production of inducible NO synthase (iNOS)-derived NO and IL-1β at both gene transcription and translation levels in P. intermedia LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. CORM-3 enhanced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cells stimulated with P. intermedia LPS, and inhibition of HO-1 activity by SnPP notably reversed the suppressive effect of CORM-3 on LPS-induced production of NO. LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK was not affected by CORM-3. CORM-3 did not influence P. intermedia LPS-induced degradation of IκB-α. Instead, nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and p50 subunits was blocked by CORM-3 in LPS-treated cells. In addition, CORM-3 reduced LPS-induced p65 and p50 binding to DNA. Besides, CORM-3 significantly suppressed P. intermedia LPS-induced phosphorylation of STAT1. Overall, this study indicates that CORM-3 suppresses the production of NO and IL-1β in P. intermedia LPS-activated murine macrophages via HO-1 induction and inhibition of NF-κB and STAT1 pathways. The modulation of host inflammatory response by CORM-3 would be an attractive therapeutic approach to attenuate the progression of periodontal disease.

  16. Direct observation of binding stress-induced crystalline orientation change in piezoelectric plate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined the mechanism of the detection resonance frequency shift, Δf/f, of a 1370 μm long and 537 μm wide [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.65[PbTiO3]0.35 (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensor (PEPS) made of a 8-μm thick PMN-PT freestanding film. The Δf/f of the PEPS was monitored in a three-step binding model detections of (1) binding of maleimide-activated biotin to the sulfhydryl on the PEPS surface followed by (2) binding of streptavidin to the bound biotin and (3) subsequent binding of biotinylated probe deoxyribonucleic acid to the bound streptavidin. We used a PMN-PT surrogate made of the same 8-μm thick PMN-PT freestanding film that the PEPS was made of but was about 1 cm in length and width to carry out crystalline orientation study using X-ray diffraction (XRD) scan around the (002)/(200) peaks after each of the binding steps. The result of the XRD studies indicated that each binding step caused the crystalline orientation of the PMN-PT thin layer to switch from the vertical (002) orientation to the horizontal (200) orientation, and most of the PEPS detection Δf/f was due to the change in the lateral Young's modulus of the PMN-PT thin layer as a result of the crystalline orientation change.

  17. Exploring the capabilities of TDDFT calculations to explain the induced chirality upon a binding process: A simple case, 3-carboxycoumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlan, Aurica; Hillebrand, Mihaela

    2013-03-01

    The induced circular dichroism (ICD) spectra of 3-carboxycoumarin recorded at pH 7.4 in the presence of human and bovine serum albumins were used in correlation with theoretical (TDDFT) calculations to obtain the binding constants and information on the conformational changes of the ligand in the binding site. As it was shown that for the carboxylic acids or the carboxylate ions, the asymmetry element correlated with the occurrence of the ICD band in the presence of proteins is the torsion (τ) of the COOH (COO-) group in respect with the planar π system, TDDFT calculations were performed considering all the geometries characterized by 0 ⩽ |τ| ⩽ 90 deg. The simulated circular dichroism spectrum shows that the sequence of the signs and positions of the bands are correctly predicted as compared to the experimental ICD spectrum for a torsion of the carboxylate group in the range of 60-70 deg.

  18. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cinti, Alessandro; Le Sage, Valerie; Ghanem, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules (SGs) are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se) induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4EBP1). In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms. PMID:27025252

  19. A putative GTP binding protein homologous to interferon-inducible Mx proteins performs an essential function in yeast protein sorting.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J H; Raymond, C K; Gilbert, T; O'Hara, P J; Stevens, T H

    1990-06-15

    Members of the Mx protein family promote interferon-inducible resistance to viral infection in mammals and act by unknown mechanisms. We identified an Mx-like protein in yeast and present genetic evidence for its cellular function. This protein, the VPS1 product, is essential for vacuolar protein sorting, normal organization of intracellular membranes, and growth at high temperature, implying that Mx-like proteins are engaged in fundamental cellular processes in eukaryotes. Vps1p contains a tripartite GTP binding motif, which suggests that binding to GTP is essential to its role in protein sorting. Vps1p-specific antibody labels punctate cytoplasmic structures that condense to larger structures in a Golgi-accumulating sec7 mutant; thus, Vps1p may associate with an intermediate organelle of the secretory pathway.

  20. Galectin-8 binds specific beta1 integrins and induces polarized spreading highlighted by asymmetric lamellipodia in Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    Cárcamo, Claudia; Pardo, Evelyn; Oyanadel, Claudia; Bravo-Zehnder, Marcela; Bull, Paulina; Cáceres, Mónica; Martínez, Jorge; Massardo, Loreto; Jacobelli, Sergio; González, Alfonso; Soza, Andrea

    2006-02-15

    Integrin-mediated encounters of T cells with extracellular cues lead these cells to adhere to a variety of substrates and acquire a spread phenotype needed for their tissue incursions. We studied the effects of galectin-8 (Gal-8), a beta-galactoside binding lectin, on Jurkat T cells. Immobilized Gal-8 bound alpha1beta1, alpha3beta1 and alpha5beta1 but not alpha2beta1 and alpha4beta1 and adhered these cells with similar kinetics to immobilized fibronectin (FN). Function-blocking experiments with monoclonal anti-integrin antibodies suggested that alpha5beta1 is the main mediator of cell adhesion to this lectin. Gal-8, but not FN, induced extensive cell spreading frequently leading to a polarized phenotype characterized by an asymmetric lamellipodial protrusion. These morphological changes involved actin cytoskeletal rearrangements controlled by PI3K, Rac-1 and ERK1/2 activity. Gal-8-induced Rac-1 activation and binding to alpha1 and alpha5 integrins have not been described in any other cellular system. Strikingly, Gal-8 was also a strong stimulus on Jurkat cells in suspension, triggering ERK1/2 activation that in most adherent cells is instead dependent on cell attachment. In addition, we found that patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototypic autoimmune disorder, produce Gal-8 autoantibodies that impede both its binding to integrins and cell adhesion. These are the first function-blocking autoantibodies reported for a member of the galectin family. These results indicate that Gal-8 constitutes a novel extracellular stimulus for T cells, able to bind specific beta1 integrins and to trigger signaling pathways conducive to cell spreading. Gal-8 could modulate a wide range of T cell-driven immune processes that eventually become altered in autoimmune disorders.

  1. Unusually strong binding to the DNA minor groove by a highly twisted benzimidazole diphenylether: induced fit and bound water.

    PubMed

    Tanious, Farial A; Laine, William; Peixoto, Paul; Bailly, Christian; Goodwin, Kristie D; Lewis, Mark A; Long, Eric C; Georgiadis, Millie M; Tidwell, Richard R; Wilson, W David

    2007-06-12

    RT29 is a dicationic diamidine derivative that does not obey the classical "rules" for shape and functional group placement that are expected to result in strong binding and specific recognition of the DNA minor groove. The compound contains a benzimidazole diphenyl ether core that is flanked by the amidine cations. The diphenyl ether is highly twisted and gives the entire compound too much curvature to fit well to the shape of the minor groove. DNase I footprinting, fluorescence intercalator displacement studies, and circular dichroism spectra, however, indicate that the compound is an AT specific minor groove binding agent. Even more surprisingly, quantitative biosensor-surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetric results indicate that the compound binds with exceptional strength to certain AT sequences in DNA with a large negative enthalpy of binding. Crystallographic results for the DNA complex of RT29 compared to calculated results for the free compound show that the compound undergoes significant conformational changes to enhance its minor groove interactions. In addition, a water molecule is incorporated directly into the complex to complete the compound-DNA interface, and it forms an essential link between the compound and base pair edges at the floor of the minor groove. The calculated DeltaCp value for complex formation is substantially less than the experimentally observed value, which supports the idea of water being an intrinsic part of the complex with a major contribution to the DeltaCp value. Both the induced fit conformational changes of the compound and the bound water are essential for strong binding to DNA by RT29.

  2. Fibronectin inhibits cytokine production induced by CpG DNA in macrophages without direct binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Yasuda, Sachiyo; Toyota, Hiroyasu; Kiyota, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2012-10-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is known to have four DNA-binding domains although their physiological significance is unknown. Primary murine peritoneal macrophages have been shown to exhibit markedly lower responsiveness to CpG motif-replete plasmid DNA (pDNA), Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) ligand, compared with murine macrophage-like cell lines. The present study was conducted to examine whether FN having DNA-binding domains is involved in this phenomenon. The expression of FN was significantly higher in primary macrophages than in a macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7, suggesting that abundant FN might suppress the responsiveness in the primary macrophages. However, electrophoretic analysis revealed that FN did not bind to pDNA in the presence of a physiological concentration of divalent cations. Surprisingly, marked tumor necrosis factor - (TNF-)α production from murine macrophages upon CpG DNA stimulation was significantly reduced by exogenously added FN in a concentration-dependent manner but not by BSA, laminin or collagen. FN did not affect apparent pDNA uptake by the cells. Moreover, FN reduced TNF-α production induced by polyI:C (TLR3 ligand), and imiquimod (TLR7 ligand), but not by LPS (TLR4 ligand), or a non-CpG pDNA/cationic liposome complex. The confocal microscopic study showed that pDNA was co-localized with FN in the same intracellular compartment in RAW264.7, suggesting that FN inhibits cytokine signal transduction in the endosomal/lysosomal compartment. Taken together, the results of the present study has revealed, for the first time, a novel effect of FN whereby the glycoprotein modulates cytokine signal transduction via CpG-DNA/TLR9 interaction in macrophages without direct binding to DNA through its putative DNA-binding domains.

  3. Role of guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) in vasopressin-induced responses of a vascular smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nambi, P.; Aiyar, N.; Whitman, M.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A-10) carry vascular V1 vasopressin receptors. In these cells, vasopressin inhibits isoproterenol-induced cAMP accumulation and stimulates phosphatidylinositol turnover and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Pretreatment of the cells with phorbol esters resulted in inhibition of the vasopressin-induced responses. The inactive phorbol ester aPDD was ineffective. These data suggested that phorbol ester might cause phosphorylation of the vasopressin receptor and/or coupling protein(s). Here, they studied the role of guanine nucleotide binding proteins by employing the novel radiolabeled vasopressin antagonist (/sup 3/H)-SKF 101926. In competition experiments with cell membranes, Gpp(NH)p shifted the vasopressin curve to the right indicating decreased agonist affinity. Phorbol ester pretreatment abolished the Gpp(NH)p effect. Pretreatment of the cells with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of vasopressin-induced phosphatidyinositol turnover. NEM also abolished the decrease in agonist affinity caused by Gpp(NH)p. These data showed that NEM and phorbol ester pretreatment of smooth muscle cells functionally uncoupled the vasopressin receptors and suggested that vasopressin V1 receptor responses are mediated through guanine nucleotide binding protein(s).

  4. Induced binding of proteins by ammonium sulfate in affinity and ion-exchange column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ejima, Daisuke; Kita, Yoshiko; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Tokunaga, Masao

    2007-04-10

    In general, proteins bind to affinity or ion-exchange columns at low salt concentrations, and the bound proteins are eluted by raising the salt concentration, changing the solvent pH, or adding competing ligands. Blue-Sepharose is often used to remove bovine serum albumin (BSA) from samples, but when we applied BSA to Blue-Sepharose in 20 mM phosphate, pH 7.0, 50%-60% of the protein flowed through the column; however, complete binding of BSA was achieved by the addition of 2 M ammonium sulfate (AS) to the column equilibration buffer and the sample. The bound protein was eluted by decreasing the AS concentration or by adding 1 M NaCl or arginine. AS at high concentrations resulted in binding of BSA even to an ion-exchange column, Q-Sepharose, at pH 7.0. Thus, although moderate salt concentrations elute proteins from Blue-Sepharose or ion-exchange columns, proteins can be bound to these columns under extreme salting-out conditions. Similar enhanced binding of proteins by AS was observed with an ATP-affinity column.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum ligand binding to erythrocytes induce alterations in deformability essential for invasion

    PubMed Central

    Sisquella, Xavier; Nebl, Thomas; Thompson, Jennifer K; Whitehead, Lachlan; Malpede, Brian M; Salinas, Nichole D; Rogers, Kelly; Tolia, Niraj H; Fleig, Andrea; O’Neill, Joseph; Tham, Wai-Hong; David Horgen, F; Cowman, Alan F

    2017-01-01

    The most lethal form of malaria in humans is caused by Plasmodium falciparum. These parasites invade erythrocytes, a complex process involving multiple ligand-receptor interactions. The parasite makes initial contact with the erythrocyte followed by dramatic deformations linked to the function of the Erythrocyte binding antigen family and P. falciparum reticulocyte binding-like families. We show EBA-175 mediates substantial changes in the deformability of erythrocytes by binding to glycophorin A and activating a phosphorylation cascade that includes erythrocyte cytoskeletal proteins resulting in changes in the viscoelastic properties of the host cell. TRPM7 kinase inhibitors FTY720 and waixenicin A block the changes in the deformability of erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion by directly inhibiting the phosphorylation cascade. Therefore, binding of P. falciparum parasites to the erythrocyte directly activate a signaling pathway through a phosphorylation cascade and this alters the viscoelastic properties of the host membrane conditioning it for successful invasion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21083.001 PMID:28226242

  6. Heat-induced alterations in cashew allergen solubility and IgE binding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cashew nuts are included in a group of 8 foods that commonly cause food allergies. IgE binding to allergens within the nuts can cause allergic reactions that can be severe. Foods containing cashew nuts must be labeled to prevent accidental exposure to people who suffer from allergy to cashew nuts....

  7. NCX 4040, a nitric oxide-donating aspirin derivative, inhibits Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of proinflammatory mediators in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Young; Choe, So-Hui; Hyeon, Jin-Yi; Park, Hae Ryoun; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2015-12-05

    In this study, the effects and underlying mechanisms of NCX 4040, a nitric oxide (NO)-donating aspirin derivative, on the production of proinflammatory mediators were examined using murine macrophages exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in the etiology of periodontal disease. NCX 4040 significantly reduced P. intermedia LPS-induced production of inducible NO synthase (iNOS)-derived NO, IL-1β and IL-6 as well as their mRNA expression in RAW264.7 cells. Notably, NCX 4040 was much more effective than the parental compound aspirin in reducing LPS-induced production of inflammatory mediators. NCX 4040 induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in cells treated with P. intermedia LPS, and the suppressive effect of NCX 4040 on LPS-induced NO production was significantly reversed by SnPP, a competitive HO-1 inhibitor. NCX 4040 did not influence LPS-induced phosphorylation of JNK and p38. IκB-α degradation as well as nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activities of NF-κB p65 and p50 subunits induced by P. intermedia LPS were significantly reduced by NCX 4040. Besides, LPS-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 was significantly down-regulated by NCX 4040. Further, NCX 4040 elevated the SOCS1 mRNA in cells stimulated with LPS. This study indicates that NCX 4040 inhibits P. intermedia LPS-induced production of NO, IL-1β and IL-6 in murine macrophages through anti-inflammatory HO-1 induction and suppression of NF-κB, STAT1 and STAT3 activation, which is associated with the activation of SOCS1 signaling. NCX 4040 could potentially be a promising tool in the treatment of periodontal disease, although further studies are required to verify this.

  8. Change of the binding mode of the DNA/proflavine system induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    García, Begoña; Leal, José M; Ruiz, Rebeca; Biver, Tarita; Secco, Fernando; Venturini, M

    2010-07-01

    The equilibria and kinetics of the binding of proflavine to poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) and poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) were investigated in ethanol/water mixtures using spectrophotometric, circular dichroism, viscometric, and T-jump methods. All methods concur in showing that two modes of interaction are operative: intercalation and surface binding. The latter mode is favored by increasing ethanol and/or the proflavine content. Both static and kinetic experiments show that, concerning the poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC)/proflavine system, intercalation largely prevails up to 20% EtOH. For higher EtOH levels surface binding becomes dominant. Concerning the poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT)/proflavine system, melting experiments show that addition of proflavine stabilizes the double stranded structure, but the effect is reduced in the presence of EtOH. The DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees values of the melting process, measured at different concentrations of added proflavine, are linearly correlated, revealing the presence of the enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon (EEC). The nonmonotonicity of the "entropic term" of the EEC reveals the transition between the two binding modes. T-jump experiments show two relaxation effects, but at the highest levels of EtOH (>25%) the kinetic curves become monophasic, confirming the prevalence of the surface complex. A branched mechanism is proposed where diffusion controlled formation of a precursor complex occurs in the early stage of the binding process. This evolves toward the surface and/or the intercalated complex according to two rate-determining parallel steps. CD spectra suggest that, in the surface complex, proflavine is bound to DNA in the form of an aggregate.

  9. Brain Mitochondrial Subproteome of Rpn10-Binding Proteins and Its Changes Induced by the Neurotoxin MPTP and the Neuroprotector Isatin.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, A E; Buneeva, O A; Kopylov, A T; Tikhonova, O V; Medvedeva, M V; Nerobkova, L N; Kapitsa, I G; Zgoda, V G

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in molecular mechanisms of neuroplasticity, adaptive changes of the brain that occur in the structure and function of its cells in response to altered physiological conditions or development of pathological disorders. Mitochondria are a crucial target for actions of neurotoxins, causing symptoms of Parkinson's disease in various experimental animal models, and also neuroprotectors. Good evidence exists in the literature that mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) influences functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS) responsible for selective proteolytic degradation of proteins from various intracellular compartments (including mitochondria), and neuroprotective effects of certain antiparkinsonian agents (monoamine oxidase inhibitors) may be associated with their effects on UPS. The 19S proteasomal Rpn10 subunit is considered as a ubiquitin receptor responsible for delivery of ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome proteolytic machinery. In this study, we investigated proteomic profiles of mouse brain mitochondrial Rpn10-binding proteins, brain monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) activity, and their changes induced by a single-dose administration of the neurotoxin MPTP and the neuroprotector isatin. Administration of isatin to mice prevented MPTP-induced inactivation of MAO B and influenced the profile of brain mitochondrial Rpn10-binding proteins, in which two pools of proteins were clearly recognized. The constitutive pool was insensitive to neurotoxic/neuroprotective treatments, while the variable pool was specifically influenced by MPTP and the neuroprotector isatin. Taking into consideration that the neuroprotective dose of isatin used in this study can result in brain isatin concentrations that are proapoptotic for cells in vitro, the altered repertoire of mitochondrial Rpn10-binding proteins may thus represent a part of a switch mechanism from targeted

  10. Myeloid depletion of SOCS3 enhances LPS-induced acute lung injury through CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunguang; Ward, Peter A.; Wang, Ximo; Gao, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    Although uncontrolled inflammatory response plays a central role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI), the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the development of this disorder remain poorly understood. SOCS3 is an important negative regulator of IL-6-type cytokine signaling. SOCS3 is induced in lung during LPS-induced lung injury, suggesting that generation of SOCS3 may represent a regulatory product during ALI. In the current study, we created mice lacking SOCS3 expression in macrophages and neutrophils (LysM-cre SOCS3fl/fl). We evaluated the lung inflammatory response to LPS in both LysM-cre SOCS3fl/fl mice and the wild-type (WT) mice (SOCS3fl/fl). LysM-cre SOCS3fl/fl mice displayed significant increase of the lung permeability index (lung vascular leak of albumin), neutrophils, lung neutrophil accumulation (myeloperoxidase activity), and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in bronchial alveolar lavage fluids compared to WT mice. These phenotypes were consistent with morphological evaluation of lung, which showed enhanced inflammatory cell influx and intra-alveolar hemorrhage. We further identify the transcription factor, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) δ as a critical downstream target of SOCS3 in LPS-induced ALI. These results indicate that SOCS3 has a protective role in LPS-induced ALI by suppressing C/EBPδ activity in the lung. Elucidating the function of SOCS3 would represent prospective targets for a new generation of drugs needed to treat ALI.—Yan, C., Ward, P. A., Wang, X., Gao, H. Myeloid depletion of SOCS3 enhances LPS-induced acute lung injury through CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ pathway. PMID:23585399

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy of topotecan-DNA complexes: Binding to DNA induces topotecan dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalov, K. E.; Strel'Tsov, S. A.; Ermishov, M. A.; Grokhovskii, S. L.; Zhuze, A. L.; Ustinova, O. A.; Sukhanova, A. V.; Nabiev, I. R.; Oleinikov, V. A.

    2002-09-01

    The interaction of topotecan (TPT), antitumor inhibitor of human DNA topoisomerase I, with calf thymus DNA was studied by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The SERS spectra of TPT are found to depend on its concentration in solution, which is associated with the dimerization of TPT. The spectral signatures of dimerization are identified. It is shown that binding to DNA induces the formation of TPT dimers. The formation of DNA-TPT-TPT-DNA complexes is considered as one of the possible mechanisms of human DNA topoisomerase I inhibition.

  12. Deciphering the mechanisms of binding induced folding at nearly atomic resolution: The Φ value analysis applied to IDPs

    PubMed Central

    Gianni, Stefano; Dogan, Jakob; Jemth, Per

    2014-01-01

    The Φ value analysis is a method to analyze the structure of metastable states in reaction pathways. Such a methodology is based on the quantitative analysis of the effect of point mutations on the kinetics and thermodynamics of the probed reaction. The Φ value analysis is routinely used in protein folding studies and is potentially an extremely powerful tool to analyze the mechanism of binding induced folding of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this review we recapitulate the key equations and experimental advices to perform the Φ value analysis in the perspective of the possible caveats arising in intrinsically disordered systems. Finally, we briefly discuss some few examples already available in the literature.

  13. Phosphatidylserine-induced factor Xa dimerization and binding to factor Va are competing processes in solution.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rinku; Koklic, Tilen; Rezaie, Alireza R; Lentz, Barry R

    2013-01-08

    A soluble, short chain phosphatidylserine, 1,2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (C6PS), binds to discrete sites on FXa, FVa, and prothrombin to alter their conformations, to promote FXa dimerization (K(d) ~ 14 nM), and to enhance both the catalytic activity of FXa and the cofactor activity of FVa. In the presence of calcium, C6PS binds to two sites on FXa, one in the epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) domain and one in the catalytic domain; the latter interaction is sensitive to Na(+) binding and probably represents a protein recognition site. Here we ask whether dimerization of FXa and its binding to FVa in the presence of C6PS are competitive processes. We monitored FXa activity at 5, 20, and 50 nM FXa while titrating with FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS and 3 or 5 mM Ca(2+) to show that the apparent K(d) of FVa-FXa interaction increased with an increase in FXa concentration at 5 mM Ca(2+), but the K(d) was only slightly affected at 3 mM Ca(2+). A mixture of 50 nM FXa and 50 nM FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS yielded both Xa homodimers and Xa·Va heterodimers, but no FXa dimers bound to FVa. A mutant FXa (R165A) that has reduced prothrombinase activity showed both weakened dimerization (K(d) ~ 147 nM) and weakened FVa binding (apparent K(d) values of 58, 92, and 128 nM for 5, 20, and 50 nM R165A FXa, respectively). Native gel electrophoresis showed that the GLA-EGF(NC) fragment of FXa (lacking the catalytic domain) neither dimerized nor formed a complex with FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS and 5 mM Ca(2+). Our results demonstrate that the dimerization site and FVa-binding site are both located in the catalytic domain of FXa and that these sites are linked thermodynamically.

  14. Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa reverses acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis through blocking sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 maturation.

    PubMed

    Lian, Li-Hua; Wu, Yan-Ling; Song, Shun-Zong; Wan, Ying; Xie, Wen-Xue; Li, Xin; Bai, Ting; Ouyang, Bing-Qing; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2010-12-22

    This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effects of Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) on acute alcohol-induced fatty liver. Mice were treated with ethanol (5 g/kg of body weight) by gavage every 12 h for a total of three doses to induce acute fatty liver. Methanol extract of GM (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) or silymarin (100 mg/kg) was gavaged simultaneously with ethanol for three doses. GM administration significantly reduced the increases in serum ALT and AST levels, the serum and hepatic triglyceride levels, at 4 h after the last ethanol administration. GM was also found to prevent ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and necrosis, as indicated by liver histopathological studies. Additionally, GM suppressed the elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, restored the glutathione (GSH) levels, and enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities. The concurrent administration of GM efficaciously abrogated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction. Moreover, GM significantly reduced the nuclear translocation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (nSREBP-1) in ethanol-treated mice. These data indicated that GM possessed the ability to prevent ethanol-induced acute liver steatosis, possibly through blocking CYP2E1-mediated free radical scavenging effects and SREBP-1-regulated fatty acid synthesis. Especially, GM may be developed as a potential therapeutic candidate for ethanol-induced oxidative damage in liver.

  15. Postsynaptic location of acrylamide-induced modulation of striatal /sup 3/H-spiroperidol binding

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.S.; Tilson, H.A.; Agrawal, A.K.; Karoum, F.; Bondy, S.C.

    1982-07-01

    The striata of rats were unilaterally lesioned with kainic acid. After two weeks, rats were exposed to 10 doses of acrylamide (20 mg/kg body weight/dose) over two weeks. Binding of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol to membranes prepared from unoperated striata, was elevated in acrylamide-exposed rats relative to undosed controls. This differential was not apparent when binding was compared in membranes from kainate-treated striata of acrylamide-treated and untreated rats. A parallel acrylamide treatment of unoperated rats had no significant effect on striatal levels of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid suggesting that this neurotoxicant failed to affect the presynaptic events of the dopamine system. Thus, the alterations of the striatal dopamine receptor caused by acrylamide, that have been previously reported, appear to be confined to postsynaptic sites.

  16. Atomic scale calculations of tungsten surface binding energy and beryllium-induced tungsten sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    Tungsten surface binding energy is calculated using classical molecular dynamic simulations with three many-body potentials. We present the consistency in tungsten sputtering yield by beryllium bombardment between molecular dynamic LAMMPS code and binary collision approximation ITMC code using the new surface binding energy (11.75 eV). The commonly used heat of sublimation value (8.68 eV) could lead to overestimated sputtering yield results. The analysis of the sputtered tungsten angular distributions show that molecular dynamic accurately reproduced the [1 1 1] most prominent preferential ejection directions in bcc tungsten, while the distinct shapes by typical MC codes such as ITMC code is caused by the treatment of amorphous target. The ITMC calculated emitted tungsten energy profile matches the Thompson energy spectrum, while the molecular dynamic results generally follow the Falcone energy spectrum.

  17. Estrogen Receptor Alpha Binding to ERE is Required for Full Tlr7- and Tlr9-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Melissa A; Wirth, Jena R; Naga, Osama; Eudaly, Jackie; Gilkeson, Gary S

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that a maximum innate inflammatory response induced by stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3, 7 and 9 requires ERα, but does not require estrogen in multiple cell types from both control and lupus-prone mice. Given the estrogen-independence, we hypothesized that ERα mediates TLR signaling by tethering to, and enhancing, the activity of downstream transcription factors such as NFκB, rather than acting classically by binding EREs on target genes. To investigate the mechanism of ERα impact on TLR signaling, we utilized mice with a knock-in ERα mutant that is unable to bind ERE. After stimulation with TLR ligands, both ex vivo spleen cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) isolated from mutant ERα (“KIKO”) mice produced significantly less IL-6 compared with cells from wild-type (WT) littermates. These results suggest that ERα modulation of TLR signaling does indeed require ERE binding for its effect on the innate immune response. PMID:25061615

  18. Estrogen Receptor Alpha Binding to ERE is Required for Full Tlr7- and Tlr9-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Melissa A; Wirth, Jena R; Naga, Osama; Eudaly, Jackie; Gilkeson, Gary S

    2014-01-20

    We previously found that a maximum innate inflammatory response induced by stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3, 7 and 9 requires ERα, but does not require estrogen in multiple cell types from both control and lupus-prone mice. Given the estrogen-independence, we hypothesized that ERα mediates TLR signaling by tethering to, and enhancing, the activity of downstream transcription factors such as NFκB, rather than acting classically by binding EREs on target genes. To investigate the mechanism of ERα impact on TLR signaling, we utilized mice with a knock-in ERα mutant that is unable to bind ERE. After stimulation with TLR ligands, both ex vivo spleen cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) isolated from mutant ERα ("KIKO") mice produced significantly less IL-6 compared with cells from wild-type (WT) littermates. These results suggest that ERα modulation of TLR signaling does indeed require ERE binding for its effect on the innate immune response.

  19. The Ability of Pandemic Influenza Virus Hemagglutinins to Induce Lower Respiratory Pathology is Associated with Decreased Surfactant Protein D Binding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Kash, John C.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Jagger, Brett W.; Lau, Yuk-Fai; Sheng, Zhong-Mei; Crouch, Erika C.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2011-01-01

    Pandemic influenza viral infections have been associated with viral pneumonia. Chimeric influenza viruses with the hemagglutinin segment of the 1918, 1957, 1968 or 2009 pandemic influenza viruses in the context of a seasonal H1N1 influenza genome were constructed to analyze the role of hemagglutinin (HA) in pathogenesis and cell tropism in a mouse model. We also explored whether there was an association between the ability of lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) to bind to the HA and the ability of the corresponding chimeric virus to infect bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells of the lower respiratory tract. Viruses expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic viruses were associated with significant pathology in the lower respiratory tract, including acute inflammation, and showed low binding activity for SP-D. In contrast, the virus expressing the HA of a seasonal influenza strain induced only mild disease with little lung pathology in infected mice and exhibited strong in vitro binding to SP-D. PMID:21334038

  20. Antiestrogen-binding site ligands induce autophagy in myeloma cells that proceeds through alteration of cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sola, Brigitte; Poirot, Marc; de Medina, Philippe; Bustany, Sophie; Marsaud, Véronique; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Renoir, Jack-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy characterized by the accumulation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite extensive efforts to design drugs targeting tumoral cells and their microenvironment, MM remains an incurable disease for which new therapeutic strategies are needed. We demonstrated here that antiestrogens (AEs) belonging to selective estrogen receptor modulators family induce a caspase-dependent apoptosis and trigger a protective autophagy. Autophagy was recognized by monodansylcadaverin staining, detection of autophagosomes by electronic microscopy, and detection of the cleaved form of the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3. Moreover, autophagy was inhibited by drugs such as bafilomycin A1 and 3-methyladenosine. Autophagy was mediated by the binding of AEs to a class of receptors called the antiestrogen binding site (AEBS) different from the classical estrogen nuclear receptors. The binding of specific ligands to the AEBS was accompanied by alteration of cholesterol metabolism and in particular accumulation of sterols: zymostenol or desmosterol depending on the ligand. This was due to the inhibition of the cholesterol-5,6-epoxide hydrolase activity borne by the AEBS. We further showed that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway mediated autophagy signaling. Moreover, AEBS ligands restored sensitivity to dexamethasone in resistant MM cells. Since we showed previously that AEs arrest MM tumor growth in xenografted mice, we propose that AEBS ligands may have a potent antimyeloma activity alone or in combination with drugs used in clinic. PMID:23978789

  1. Sugar binding induces the same global conformational change in purified LacY as in the native bacterial membrane.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yiling; Kaback, H Ronald

    2010-05-25

    Many independent lines of evidence indicate that the lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) is highly dynamic and that sugar binding causes closing of a large inward-facing cavity with opening of a wide outward-facing hydrophilic cavity. Therefore, lactose/H(+) symport catalyzed by LacY very likely involves a global conformational change that allows alternating access of single sugar- and H(+)-binding sites to either side of the membrane (the alternating access model). The x-ray crystal structures of LacY, as well as the majority of spectroscopic studies, use purified protein in detergent micelles. By using site-directed alkylation, we now demonstrate that sugar binding induces virtually the same global conformational change in LacY whether the protein is in the native bacterial membrane or is solubilized and purified in detergent. The results also indicate that the x-ray crystal structure reflects the structure of wild-type LacY in the native membrane in the absence of sugar.

  2. Structural Constraints of Vaccine-Induced Tier-2 Autologous HIV Neutralizing Antibodies Targeting the Receptor-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Todd; Fera, Daniela; Bhiman, Jinal; Eslamizar, Leila; Lu, Xiaozhi; Anasti, Kara; Zhang, Ruijung; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Bowman, Cindy M; Stolarchuk, Christina; Lloyd, Krissey E; Parks, Robert; Eaton, Amanda; Foulger, Andrew; Nie, Xiaoyan; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Barnett, Susan; Kelsoe, Garnett; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Montefiori, David C; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Morris, Lynn; Santra, Sampa; Harrison, Stephen C; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-01-05

    Antibodies that neutralize autologous transmitted/founder (TF) HIV occur in most HIV-infected individuals and can evolve to neutralization breadth. Autologous neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against neutralization-resistant (Tier-2) viruses are rarely induced by vaccination. Whereas broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb)-HIV-Envelope structures have been defined, the structures of autologous nAbs have not. Here, we show that immunization with TF mutant Envs gp140 oligomers induced high-titer, V5-dependent plasma neutralization for a Tier-2 autologous TF evolved mutant virus. Structural analysis of autologous nAb DH427 revealed binding to V5, demonstrating the source of narrow nAb specificity and explaining the failure to acquire breadth. Thus, oligomeric TF Envs can elicit autologous nAbs to Tier-2 HIVs, but induction of bnAbs will require targeting of precursors of B cell lineages that can mature to heterologous neutralization.

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis YtgA is an iron-binding periplasmic protein induced by iron restriction

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J. D.; Sal, M. S.; Schell, M.; Whittimore, J. D.; Raulston, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium that is the causative agent of common sexually transmitted diseases and the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. It has been observed that YtgA (CT067) is very immunogenic in patients with chlamydial genital infections. Homology analyses suggested that YtgA is a soluble periplasmic protein and a component of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system for metals such as iron. Since little is known about iron transport in C. trachomatis, biochemical assays were used to determine the potential role of YtgA in iron acquisition. 59Fe binding and competition studies revealed that YtgA preferentially binds iron over nickel, zinc or manganese. Western blot and densitometry techniques showed that YtgA concentrations specifically increased 3–5-fold in C. trachomatis, when cultured under iron-starvation conditions rather than under general stress conditions, such as exposure to penicillin. Finally, immuno-transmission electron microscopy provided evidence that YtgA is more concentrated in C. trachomatis during iron restriction, supporting a possible role for YtgA as a component of an ABC transporter. PMID:19556290

  4. Functional and structural changes of human erythrocyte catalase induced by cimetidine: proposed model of binding.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Jahngirvand, Mahboubeh; Almasirad, Ali; Mousavi, Zahra; Masoud, Masoudeh; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza

    2015-06-01

    In erythrocyte, catalase plays an important role to protect cells from hydrogen peroxide toxicity. Hydrogen peroxide is a byproduct compound which is produced during metabolic pathway of cells. Cimetidine, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, is used for gastrointestinal tract diseases and prevents the extra release of gastric acid. In this study, the effect of cimetidine on the activity of human erythrocyte catalase was investigated. Erythrocytes were broken by hypotonic solution. The supernatant was used for catalase assay and kinetics study. Lineweaver-Burk plot was performed to determine the type of inhibition. The kinetics data revealed that cimetidine inhibited the catalase activity by mixed inhibition. The IC50 (1.54 μM) and Ki (0.45 μM) values of cimetidine determined that the drug was bound to the enzyme with high affinity. Circular dichroism and fluorescence measurement showed that the binding of cimetidine to the enzyme affected the content of secondary structure of the enzyme as well as its conformational changes. Docking studies were carried out to detect the site in which the drug was bound to the enzyme. Molecular modeling and energy calculation of the binding showed that the cyanoguanidine group of the drug connected to Asp59 via two hydrogen bonds, while the imidazole group of the drug interacted with Phe64 in the enzyme by a hydrophobic interaction. In conclusion, cimetidine could bind to human erythrocyte catalase, and its interaction caused functional and conformational changes in the enzyme.

  5. Brain beta-adrenergic receptor binding in rats with obesity induced by a beef tallow diet.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Suzuki, M

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that compared with safflower oil diet, feeding a beef tallow diet leads to a greater accumulation of body fat by reducing sympathetic activities. The present study examined the effects of dietary fats consisting of different fatty acids on alpha1- and beta-adrenergic receptor binding in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were meal-fed isoenergetic diets based on safflower oil (rich in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids) or beef tallow (rich in saturated fatty acids) for 8 weeks. Binding affinities of the beta-adrenergic receptor in the hypothalamus and cortex were significantly lower in the beef tallow diet group, but those of the alpha1-receptor did not differ between the two groups. The polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid (P/S) ratio and fluidities of plasma membranes in the hypothalamus and cortex were lower in the beef tallow diet group than in the safflower oil diet group. These results suggest that the beef tallow diet decreases membrane fluidity by altering the fatty acid composition of plasma membranes in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of rat. Consequently, beta-adrenergic receptor binding affinities in the brain were lower in rats fed the beef tallow diet than in rats fed the safflower oil diet. We recognized that there is possible link between the membrane fluidity and the changes in affinity of beta-adrenoceptors in rat brain.

  6. Engineered binding to erythrocytes induces immunological tolerance to E. coli asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Kristen M.; Kontos, Stephan; Diaceri, Giacomo; Henry, Hugues; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific immune responses to protein drugs can hinder efficacy and compromise safety because of drug neutralization and secondary clinical complications. We report a tolerance induction strategy to prevent antigen-specific humoral immune responses to therapeutic proteins. Our modular, biomolecular approach involves engineering tolerizing variants of proteins such that they bind erythrocytes in vivo upon injection, on the basis of the premise that aged erythrocytes and the payloads they carry are cleared tolerogenically, driving the deletion of antigen-specific T cells. We demonstrate that binding the clinical therapeutic enzyme Escherichia coli l-asparaginase to erythrocytes in situ antigen-specifically abrogates development of antibody titers by >1000-fold and extends the pharmacodynamic effect of the drug 10-fold in mice. Additionally, a single pretreatment dose of erythrocyte-binding asparaginase tolerized mice to multiple subsequent doses of the wild-type enzyme. This strategy for reducing antigen-specific humoral responses may enable more effective and safer treatment with therapeutic proteins and drug candidates that are hampered by immunogenicity. PMID:26601215

  7. Water-Hydrogel Binding Affinity Modulates Freeze-Drying-Induced Micropore Architecture and Skeletal Myotube Formation.

    PubMed

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Marshall, Nicholas; Clay, Nicholas; Chen, Jinrong; Mahmassani, Ziad; Boppart, Marni; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-08-10

    Freeze-dried hydrogels are increasingly used to create 3D interconnected micropores that facilitate biomolecular and cellular transports. However, freeze-drying is often plagued by variance in micropore architecture based on polymer choice. We hypothesized that water-polymer binding affinity plays a significant role in sizes and numbers of micropores formed through freeze-drying, influencing cell-derived tissue quality. Poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels with alginate methacrylate (AM) were used due to AM's higher binding affinity for water than PEGDA. PEGDA-AM hydrogels with larger AM concentrations resulted in larger sizes and numbers of micropores than pure PEGDA hydrogels, attributed to the increased mass of water binding to the PEGDA-AM gel. Skeletal myoblasts loaded in microporous PEGDA-AM hydrogels were active to produce 3D muscle-like tissue, while those loaded in pure PEGDA gels were localized on the gel surface. We propose that this study will be broadly useful in designing and improving the performance of various microporous gels.

  8. OSTEOPONTIN BINDING TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE LOWERS TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-α AND PREVENTS EARLY ALCOHOL-INDUCED LIVER INJURY IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiaodong; Leung, Tung-Ming; Arriazu, Elena; Lu, Yongke; Urtasun, Raquel; Christensen, Brian; Fiel, Maria Isabel; Mochida, Satoshi; Sørensen, Esben S.; Nieto, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Although osteopontin (OPN) is induced in alcoholic patients, its role in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains unclear. Increased translocation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the gut is key for the onset of ALD since it promotes macrophage infiltration and activation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production and liver injury. Since OPN is protective for the intestinal mucosa, we postulated that enhancing OPN expression in the liver and consequently in the blood and/or in the gut could protect from early alcohol-induced liver injury. Results: Wild-type (WT), OPN knockout (Opn−/−) and transgenic mice overexpressing OPN in hepatocytes (OpnHEP Tg) were chronically fed either the control or the ethanol Lieber-DeCarli diet. Ethanol increased hepatic, plasma, biliary and fecal OPN more in OpnHEP Tg than in WT mice. Steatosis was lesser in ethanol-treated OpnHEP Tg mice as shown by decreased liver-to-body weight ratio, hepatic triglycerides, the steatosis score, oil red-O staining and lipid peroxidation. There was also less inflammation and liver injury as demonstrated by lower ALT activity, hepatocyte ballooning degeneration, LPS levels, the inflammation score and the number of macrophages and TNFα+ cells. To establish if OPN could limit LPS availability and its noxious effects in the liver, binding studies were performed. OPN showed affinity for LPS and the binding prevented macrophage activation, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation and TNFα production. Treatment with milk OPN (m-OPN) blocked LPS translocation in vivo and protected from early alcohol-induced liver injury. Conclusion: Natural induction plus forced overexpression of OPN in the liver and treatment with m-OPN protect from early alcohol-induced liver injury by blocking the gut-derived LPS and TNFα effects in the liver. PMID:24214181

  9. A galactose-binding lectin isolated from Aplysia kurodai (sea hare) eggs inhibits streptolysin-induced hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Watanabe, Miharu; Ishizaki, Naoto; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kawakami, Yasushi; Suzuki, Jun; Dogasaki, Chikaku; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujii, Yuki; Iriko, Hideyuki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-05

    A specific galactose-binding lectin was shown to inhibit the hemolytic effect of streptolysin O (SLO), an exotoxin produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Commercially available lectins that recognize N-acetyllactosamine (ECA), T-antigen (PNA), and Tn-antigen (ABA) agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, but had no effect on SLO-induced hemolysis. In contrast, SLO-induced hemolysis was inhibited by AKL, a lectin purified from sea hare (Aplysia kurodai) eggs that recognizes α-galactoside oligosaccharides. This inhibitory effect was blocked by the co-presence of d-galactose, which binds to AKL. A possible explanation for these findings is that cholesterol-enriched microdomains containing glycosphingolipids in the erythrocyte membrane become occupied by tightly stacked lectin molecules, blocking the interaction between cholesterol and SLO that would otherwise result in penetration of the membrane. Growth of S. pyogenes was inhibited by lectins from a marine invertebrate (AKL) and a mushroom (ABA), but was promoted by a plant lectin (ECA). Both these inhibitory and promoting effects were blocked by co-presence of galactose in the culture medium. Our findings demonstrate the importance of glycans and lectins in regulating mechanisms of toxicity, creation of pores in the target cell membrane, and bacterial growth.

  10. Phosphorylation of Ser8 promotes zinc-induced dimerization of the amyloid-β metal-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Alexandra A; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Indeykina, Maria I; Popov, Igor A; Zhokhov, Sergey S; Golovin, Andrey V; Polshakov, Vladimir I; Kozin, Sergey A; Nudler, Evgeny; Makarov, Alexander A

    2014-10-01

    Zinc-induced aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently it was shown that phosphorylation of Aβ at Ser8 promotes the formation of toxic aggregates. In this work, we have studied the impact of Ser8 phosphorylation on the mode of zinc interaction with the Aβ metal-binding domain 1-16 using isothermal titration calorimetry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. We have discovered a novel zinc binding site ((6)HDpS(8)) in the phosphorylated peptide, in which the zinc ion is coordinated by the imidazole ring of His6, the phosphate group attached to Ser8 and a backbone carbonyl group of His6 or Asp7. Interaction of the zinc ion with this site involves His6, thereby withdrawing it from the interaction pattern observed in the non-modified peptide. This event was found to stimulate dimerization of peptide chains through the (11)EVHH(14) site, where the zinc ion is coordinated by the two pairs of Glu11 and His14 in the two peptide subunits. The proposed molecular mechanism of zinc-induced dimerization could contribute to the understanding of initiation of pathological Aβ aggregation, and the (11)EVHH(14) tetrapeptide can be considered as a promising drug target for the prevention of amyloidogenesis.

  11. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-08-14

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome.

  12. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome. PMID:26140926

  13. Meis1 promotes poly (rC)-binding protein 2 expression and inhibits angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunjiao; Si, Yi; Ma, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) is currently reported to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy. However, how PCBP2 is regulated at transcriptional level remains unknown. Here, we show that Meis1, a PBX1-related homeobox gene, binds to PCBP2 promoter and promotes its transcription. In human failing heart tissues and murine hypertrophic heart tissues, the mRNA and protein levels of Meis1 are markedly downregulated, and the level of Meis1 significantly correlates with levels of Nppa, Myh7, and PCBP2. In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, angiotensin II (Ang II) treatment induces hypertrophic growth of the cells (increase in cell size, enhanced protein synthesis, and hyperexpression of hypertrophic fetal genes), which are significantly inhibited by Meis1 overexpression or promoted by Meis1 knockdown. Meis1 also reduces Ang II-induced activation of Akt-mTOR pathway. Finally, we show that PCBP2 overexpression rescues the Meis1 effects of Akt-mTOR pathway and hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. © 2015 IUBMB Life, 68(1):13-22, 2016.

  14. Pheromone-induced morphogenesis and gradient tracking are dependent on the MAPK Fus3 binding to Gα

    PubMed Central

    Errede, Beverly; Vered, Lior; Ford, Eintou; Pena, Matthew I.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways control many cellular processes, including differentiation and proliferation. These pathways commonly activate MAPK isoforms that have redundant or overlapping function. However, recent studies have revealed circumstances in which MAPK isoforms have specialized, nonoverlapping roles in differentiation. The mechanisms that underlie this specialization are not well understood. To address this question, we sought to establish regulatory mechanisms that are unique to the MAPK Fus3 in pheromone-induced mating and chemotropic fate transitions of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our investigations reveal a previously unappreciated role for inactive Fus3 as a potent negative regulator of pheromone-induced chemotropism. We show that this inhibitory role is dependent on inactive Fus3 binding to the α-subunit of the heterotrimeric G-protein. Further analysis revealed that the binding of catalytically active Fus3 to the G-protein is required for gradient tracking and serves to suppress cell-to-cell variability between mating and chemotropic fates in a population of pheromone-responding cells. PMID:26179918

  15. Kinetics of CO binding to the haem domain of murine inducible nitric oxide synthase: differential effects of haem domain ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, T H; Gutierrez, A F; Alderton, W K; Lian , L; Scrutton, N S

    2001-01-01

    The binding of CO to the murine inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) oxygenase domain has been studied by laser flash photolysis. The effect of the (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH(4)) cofactor L-arginine and several Type I L-arginine analogues/ligands on the rates of CO rebinding has been evaluated. The presence of BH(4) in the iNOS active site has little effect on the rebinding of protein-caged haem-CO pairs (geminate recombination), but decreases the bimolecular association rates 2-fold. Addition of L-arginine to the BH(4)-bound complex completely abolishes geminate recombination and results in a further 80-fold decrease in the overall rate of bimolecular association. Three of the Type I ligands, S-ethylisothiourea, L-canavanine and 2,5-lutidine, displaced the CO from the haem iron upon addition to the iNOS oxygenase domain. The Type I ligands significantly decreased the rate of bimolecular binding of CO to the haem iron after photolysis. Most of these ligands also completely abolished geminate recombination. These results are consistent with a relatively open distal pocket that allows CO to bind unhindered in the active site of murine iNOS in the absence of L-arginine or BH(4). In the presence of BH(4) and L-arginine, however, the enzyme adopts a more closed structure that can greatly reduce ligand access to the haem iron. These observations are discussed in terms of the known structure of iNOS haem domain and solution studies of ligand binding in iNOS and neuronal NOS isoenzymes. PMID:11485568

  16. Myogenin induces the myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor MEF-2 independently of other muscle-specific gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Cserjesi, P; Olson, E N

    1991-01-01

    The myocyte-specific enhancer-binding factor MEF-2 is a nuclear factor that interacts with a conserved element in the muscle creatine kinase and myosin light-chain 1/3 enhancers (L. A. Gossett, D. J. Kelvin, E. A. Sternberg, and E. N. Olson, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:5022-5033, 1989). We show in this study that MEF-2 is regulated by the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin and that mitogenic signals block this regulatory interaction. Induction of MEF-2 by myogenin occurs in transfected 10T1/2 cells that have been converted to myoblasts by myogenin, as well as in CV-1 kidney cells that do not activate the myogenic program in response to myogenin. Through mutagenesis of the MEF-2 site, we further defined the binding site requirements for MEF-2 and identified potential MEF-2 sites within numerous muscle-specific regulatory regions. The MEF-2 site was also found to bind a ubiquitous nuclear factor whose binding specificity was similar to but distinct from that of MEF-2. Our results reveal that MEF-2 is controlled, either directly or indirectly, by a myogenin-dependent regulatory pathway and suggest that growth factor signals suppress MEF-2 expression through repression of myogenin expression or activity. The ability of myogenin to induce MEF-2 activity in CV-1 cells, which do not activate downstream genes associated with terminal differentiation, also demonstrates that myogenin retains limited function within cell types that are nonpermissive for myogenesis and suggests that MEF-2 is regulated independently of other muscle-specific genes. Images PMID:1656214

  17. Renal L-type fatty acid-binding protein mediates the bezafibrate reduction of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Negishi, K; Noiri, E; Maeda, R; Portilla, D; Sugaya, T; Fujita, T

    2008-06-01

    Fibrates, the PPAR alpha ligand-like compounds increase the expression of proximal tubule liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) and significantly decrease cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. To study whether the bezafibrate-mediated upregulation of renal L-FABP was involved in this cytoprotective effect we treated transgenic mice of PPAR agonists inducible human L-FABP expression with cisplatin in the presence or absence of bezafibrate. Blood urea nitrogen was unchanged in the first day but increased 3 days after cisplatin. While urinary L-FABP increased over 100-fold 1 day after cisplatin treatment in the transgenic mice it was significantly reduced when these transgenic mice were pretreated with bezafibrate. Cisplatin-induced renal necrosis and apoptosis were significantly reduced in bezafibrate pretreated transgenic mice and this correlated with decreased accumulation of lipid and lipid peroxidation products. Immunohistochemical analysis of kidney tissue of bezafibrate-cisplatin-treated transgenic mice showed preservation of cytoplasmic L-FABP in the proximal tubule, but this was reduced in transgenic mice treated only with cisplatin. L-FABP mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in bezafibrate-cisplatin-treated transgenic mice when compared to mice not fibrate treated. Our study shows that the bezafibrate-mediated upregulation of proximal tubule L-FABP plays a pivotal role in the reduction of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

  18. Angiotensin II induces kidney inflammatory injury and fibrosis through binding to myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD2)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Weixin; Han, Jibo; Zou, Chunpeng; Huang, Weijian; Yu, Weihui; Shan, Xiaoou; Lum, Hazel; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that angiotensin II (Ang II), a potent biologically active product of RAS, is a key regulator of renal inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II induces renal inflammatory injury and fibrosis through interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD2), the accessory protein of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) of the immune system. Results indicated that in MD2−/− mice, the Ang II-induced renal fibrosis, inflammation and kidney dysfunction were significantly reduced compared to control Ang II-infused wild-type mice. Similarly, in the presence of small molecule MD2 specific inhibitor L6H21 or siRNA-MD2, the Ang II-induced increases of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory molecules were prevented in tubular NRK-52E cells. MD2 blockade also inhibited activation of NF-κB and ERK. Moreover, MD2 blockade prevented the Ang II-stimulated formation of the MD2/TLR4/MyD88 signaling complex, as well as the increased surface binding of Ang II in NRK-52E cells. In addition, Ang II directly bound recombinant MD2 protein, rather than TLR4 protein. We conclude that MD2 is a significant contributor in the Ang II-induced kidney inflammatory injury in chronic renal diseases. Furthermore, MD2 inhibition could be a new and important therapeutic strategy for preventing progression of chronic renal diseases. PMID:28322341

  19. Kinetics of Ligand-Receptor Interaction Reveals an Induced-Fit Mode of Binding in a Cyclic Nucleotide-Activated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Peuker, Sebastian; Cukkemane, Abhishek; Held, Martin; Noé, Frank; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Seifert, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Many receptors and ion channels are activated by ligands. One key question concerns the binding mechanism. Does the ligand induce conformational changes in the protein via the induced-fit mechanism? Or does the protein preexist as an ensemble of conformers and the ligand selects the most complementary one, via the conformational selection mechanism? Here, we study ligand binding of a tetrameric cyclic nucleotide-gated channel from Mesorhizobium loti and of its monomeric binding domain (CNBD) using rapid mixing, mutagenesis, and structure-based computational biology. Association rate constants of ∼107 M−1 s−1 are compatible with diffusion-limited binding. Ligand binding to the full-length CNG channel and the isolated CNBD differ, revealing allosteric control of the CNBD by the effector domain. Finally, mutagenesis of allosteric residues affects only the dissociation rate constant, suggesting that binding follows the induced-fit mechanism. This study illustrates the strength of combining mutational, kinetic, and computational approaches to unravel important mechanistic features of ligand binding. PMID:23332059

  20. uPA Binding to PAI-1 Induces Corneal Myofibroblast Differentiation on Vitronectin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Ly, Christine M.; Ko, Chun-Ying; Meyers, Erin E.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Bernstein, Audrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Vitronectin (VN) in provisional extracellular matrix (ECM) promotes cell migration. Fibrotic ECM also includes VN and, paradoxically, strongly adherent myofibroblasts (Mfs). Because fibrotic Mfs secrete elevated amounts of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), we tested whether increased extracellular uPA promotes the persistence of Mfs on VN. Methods. Primary human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were cultured in supplemented serum-free medium on VN or collagen (CL) with 1ng/mL transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). Adherent cells were quantified using crystal violet. Protein expression was measured by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Transfection of short interfering RNAs was performed by nucleofection. Mfs were identified by α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) stress fibers. Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) levels were quantified by ELISA. Results. TGFβ1-treated HCFs secreted PAI-1 (0.5uM) that bound to VN, competing with αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin/VN binding, thus promoting cell detachment from VN. However, addition of uPA to cells on VN increased Mf differentiation (9.7-fold), cell-adhesion (2.2-fold), and binding by the VN integrins αvβ3 and -β5 (2.2-fold). Plasmin activity was not involved in promoting these changes, as treatment with the plasmin inhibitor aprotinin had no effect. A dominant negative PAI-1 mutant (PAI-1R) that binds to VN but does not inhibit uPA prevented the increase in uPA-stimulated cell adhesion and reduced uPA-stimulated integrin αvβ3/αvβ5 binding to VN by 73%. Conclusions. uPA induction of TGFβ1-dependent Mf differentiation on VN supports the hypothesis that elevated secretion of uPA in fibrotic tissue may promote cell adhesion and the persistence of Mfs. By blocking uPA-stimulated cell adhesion, PAI-1R may be a useful agent in combating corneal scarring. PMID:22700714

  1. Sub-inhibitory tigecycline concentrations induce extracellular matrix binding protein Embp dependent Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Julian; Henke, Hanae A; Hector, Nina; Both, Anna; Christner, Martin; Büttner, Henning; Kaplan, Jeffery B; Rohde, Holger

    2016-09-01

    Biofilm-associated Staphylococcus epidermidis implant infections are notoriously reluctant to antibiotic treatment. Here we studied the effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, oxacillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid and tigecycline on S. epidermidis 1585 biofilm formation, expression of extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp) and potential implications for S. epidermidis - macrophage interactions. Penicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid had no biofilm augmenting effect at any of the concentrations tested. In contrast, at sub-inhibitory concentrations tigecycline and oxacillin exhibited significant biofilm inducing activity. In S. epidermidis 1585, SarA is a negative regulator of giant 1 MDa Embp, and down regulation of sarA induces Embp-dependent assembly of a multi-layered biofilm architecture. Dot blot immune assays, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and qPCR showed that under biofilm inducing conditions, tigecycline augmented embp expression compared to the control grown without antibiotics. Conversely, expression of regulator sarA was suppressed, suggesting that tigecycline exerts its effects on embp expression through SarA. Tigecycline failed to induce biofilm formation in embp transposon mutant 1585-M135, proving that under these conditions Embp up-regulation is necessary for biofilm accumulation. As a functional consequence, tigecycline induced biofilm formation significantly impaired the up-take of S. epidermidis by mouse macrophage-like cell line J774A.1. Our data provide novel evidence for the molecular basis of antibiotic induced biofilm formation, a phenotype associated with inherently increased antimicrobial tolerance. While this could explain failure of antimicrobial therapies, persistence of S. epidermidis infections in the presence of sub-inhibitory antimicrobials is additionally propelled by biofilm-related impairment of macrophage-mediated pathogen eradication.

  2. Arctigenin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression in RAW264.7 cells through suppressing JAK-STAT signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xianjuan; Qi, Shimei; Dai, Wuxing; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2011-08-01

    Arctigenin has been demonstrated to have an anti-inflammatory function, but the precise mechanisms of its action remain to be fully defined. In the present study, we determined the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of proinflammatory mediators and the underlying mechanisms involved in RAW264.7 cells. Our results indicated that arctigenin exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting ROS-dependent STAT signaling through its antioxidant activity. Arctigenin also significantly reduced the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT 3 as well as JAK2 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. The inhibitions of STAT1 and STAT 3 by arctigenin prevented their translocation to the nucleus and consequently inhibited expression of iNOS, thereby suppressing the expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1, whose promoters contain STAT-binding elements. However, COX-2 expression was slightly inhibited at higher drug concentrations (50 μM). Our data demonstrate that arctigenin inhibits iNOS expression via suppressing JAK-STAT signaling pathway in macrophages.

  3. In vitro selection of shape-changing DNA nanostructures capable of binding-induced cargo release.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Soo; Plakos, Kory; Xiao, Yi; Eisenstein, Michael; Soh, H Tom

    2013-11-26

    Many biological systems employ allosteric regulatory mechanisms, which offer a powerful means of directly linking a specific binding event to a wide spectrum of molecular functionalities. There is considerable interest in generating synthetic allosteric regulators that can perform useful molecular functions for applications in diagnostics, imaging and targeted therapies, but generating such molecules through either rational design or directed evolution has proven exceptionally challenging. To address this need, we present an in vitro selection strategy for generating conformation-switching DNA nanostructures that selectively release a small-molecule payload in response to binding of a specific trigger molecule. As an exemplar, we have generated a DNA nanostructure that hybridizes with a separate 'cargo strand' containing an abasic site. This abasic site stably sequesters a fluorescent cargo molecule in an inactive state until the DNA nanostructure encounters an ATP trigger molecule. This ATP trigger causes the nanostructure to release the cargo strand, thereby liberating the fluorescent payload and generating a detectable fluorescent readout. Our DNA nanostructure is highly sensitive, with an EC50 of 30 μM, and highly specific, releasing its payload in response to ATP but not to other chemically similar nucleotide triphosphates. We believe that this selection approach could be generalized to generate synthetic nanostructures capable of selective and controlled release of other small-molecule cargos in response to a variety of triggers, for both research and clinical applications.

  4. Subtle conformational changes induced in major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Chervonsky, A V; Medzhitov, R M; Denzin, L K; Barlow, A K; Rudensky, A Y; Janeway, C A

    1998-08-18

    Intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is characterized by passage through specialized endocytic compartment(s) where antigenic peptides replace invariant chain fragments in the presence of the DM protein. These changes are accompanied by structural transitions of the MHC molecules that can be visualized by formation of compact SDS-resistant dimers, by changes in binding of mAbs, and by changes in T cell responses. We have observed that a mAb (25-9-17) that is capable of staining I-Ab on the surface of normal B cells failed to interact with I-Ab complexes with a peptide derived from the Ealpha chain of the I-E molecule but bound a similar covalent complex of I-Ab with the class II binding fragment (class II-associated invariant chain peptides) of the invariant chain. Moreover, 25-9-17 blocked activation of several I-Ab-reactive T cell hybridomas but failed to block others, suggesting that numerous I-Ab-peptide complexes acquire the 25-9-17(+) or 25-9-17(-) conformation. Alloreactive T cells were also able to discriminate peptide-dependent variants of MHC class II molecules. Thus, peptides impose subtle structural transitions upon MHC class II molecules that affect T cell recognition and may thus be critical for T cell selection and autiommunity.

  5. In Vitro Selection of Shape-Changing DNA Nanostructures Capable of Binding-Induced Cargo Release

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung Soo; Plakos, Kory; Xiao, Yi; Eisenstein, Michael; Soh, Hyongsok Tom

    2014-01-01

    Many biological systems employ allosteric regulatory mechanisms, which offer a powerful means of directly linking a specific binding event to a wide spectrum of molecular functionalities. There is considerable interest in generating synthetic allosteric regulators that can perform useful molecular functions for applications in diagnostics, imaging and targeted therapies, but generating such molecules through either rational design or directed evolution has proven exceptionally challenging. To address this need, we present an in vitro selection strategy for generating conformation-switching DNA nanostructures that selectively release a small-molecule payload in response to binding of a specific trigger molecule. As an exemplar, we have generated a DNA nanostructure that hybridizes with a separate ‘cargo strand’ containing an abasic site. This abasic site stably sequesters a fluorescent cargo molecule in an inactive state until the DNA nanostructure encounters an ATP trigger molecule. This ATP trigger causes the nanostructure to release the cargo strand, thereby liberating the fluorescent payload and generating a detectable fluorescent readout. Our DNA nanostructure is highly sensitive, with an EC50 of 30 μM, and highly specific, releasing its payload in response to ATP but not to other chemically similar nucleotide triphosphates. We believe that this selection approach could be generalized to generate synthetic nanostructures capable of selective and controlled release of other small-molecule cargos in response to a variety of triggers, for both research and clinical applications. PMID:24168267

  6. Molecular and expression analysis of an interferon-gamma-inducible guanylate-binding protein from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Robertsen, Børre; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Chris; Leong, Jo-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are some of the most abundant proteins accumulating in mammalian cells in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). GBPs have been suggested to function in antiviral activity, macrophage activation, fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and invasiveness. Here we confirm that IFN-gamma-inducible GBP also exist in fish. A 2 kb GBP cDNA was cloned from head kidney of rainbow trout treated with an IFN-inducing compound. The open reading frame predicts a 635 amino acid protein (rbtGBP) of 72.7 kDa possessing a tripartite GTP binding motif and a secondary structure similar to human GBP1. Like most mammalian GBPs, rbtGBP possesses an isoprenylation motif at the C-terminal end. The overall amino acid sequence identity between rbtGBP and mammalian GBPs is only 41-47%, however. The rainbow trout macrophage cell line RTS11 showed a dose-dependent increase in rbtGBP transcripts in response to IFN-gamma after 6h of stimulation, with rbtGBP being undetectable in non-treated RTS11 cells. Moreover, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) induced increased GBP transcript levels in RTS11 and RTG2 cells after 4-6 h of stimulation, and in head kidney and liver of live fish after 24 h. These studies suggest that rbtGBP is an early response gene in rainbow trout, which may have similar functions in IFN-gamma mediated responses as mammalian GBPs.

  7. Early growth response-1 protein is induced by JC virus infection and binds and regulates the JC virus promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Romagnoli, Luca; Sariyer, Ilker K.; Tung, Jacqueline; Feliciano, Mariha; Sawaya, Bassel E.; Del Valle, Luis; Ferrante, Pasquale; Khalili, Kamel; Safak, Mahmut; White, Martyn K.

    2008-06-05

    JC virus (JCV) is a human polyomavirus that can emerge from a latent state to cause the cytolytic destruction of oligodendrocytes in the brain resulting in the fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Previous studies described a cis-acting transcriptional regulatory element in the JCV non-coding control region (NCCR) that is involved in the response of JCV to cytokines. This consists of a 23 base pair GGA/C rich sequence (GRS) near the replication origin (5112 to + 4) that contains potential binding sites for Sp1 and Egr-1. Gel shift analysis showed that Egr-1, but not Sp1, bound to GRS. Evidence is presented that the GRS gel shift seen on cellular stimulation is due to Egr-1. Thus, TPA-induced GRS gel shift could be blocked by antibody to Egr-1. Further, the TPA-induced GRS DNA/protein complex was isolated and found to contain Egr-1 by Western blot. No other Egr-1 sites were found in the JCV NCCR. Functionally, Egr-1 was found to stimulate transcription of JCV late promoter but not early promoter reporter constructs. Mutation of the Egr-1 site abrogated Egr-1 binding and virus with the mutated Egr-1 site showed markedly reduced VP1 expression and DNA replication. Infection of primary astrocytes by wild-type JCV induced Egr-1 nuclear expression that was maximal at 5-10 days post-infection. Finally, upregulation of Egr-1 was detected in PML by immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that Egr-1 induction may be important in the life cycle of JCV and PML pathogenesis.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoids: genistein, kaempferol, quercetin, and daidzein inhibit STAT-1 and NF-kappaB activations, whereas flavone, isorhamnetin, naringenin, and pelargonidin inhibit only NF-kappaB activation along with their inhibitory effect on iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Mari; Nieminen, Riina; Vuorela, Pia; Heinonen, Marina; Moilanen, Eeva

    2007-01-01

    In inflammation, bacterial products and proinflammatory cytokines induce the formation of large amounts of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and compounds that inhibit NO production have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we systematically investigated the effects of 36 naturally occurring flavonoids and related compounds on NO production in macrophages exposed to an inflammatory stimulus (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), and evaluated the mechanisms of action of the effective compounds. Flavone, the isoflavones daidzein and genistein, the flavonols isorhamnetin, kaempferol and quercetin, the flavanone naringenin, and the anthocyanin pelargonidin inhibited iNOS protein and mRNA expression and also NO production in a dose-dependent manner. All eight active compounds inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), which is a significant transcription factor for iNOS. Genistein, kaempferol, quercetin, and daidzein also inhibited the activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1), another important transcription factor for iNOS. The present study characterises the effects and mechanisms of naturally occurring phenolic compounds on iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages. The results partially explain the pharmacological efficacy of flavonoids as anti-inflammatory compounds.

  9. Binding-induced Stabilization and Assembly of the Phage P22 Tail Accessory Factor gp4

    SciTech Connect

    Olia,A.; Al-Bassam, J.; Winn-Stapley, D.; Joss, L.; Casjens, S.; Cingolani, G.

    2006-01-01

    To infect and replicate, bacteriophage P22 injects its 43 kbp genome across the cell wall of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The attachment of phage P22 to the host cell as well as the injection of the viral DNA into the host is mediated by the virion's tail complex. This 2.8 MDa molecular machine is formed by five proteins, which include the portal protein gp1, the adhesion tailspike protein gp9, and three tail accessory factors: gp4, gp10, gp26. We have isolated the tail accessory factor gp4 and characterized its structure and binding interactions with portal protein. Interestingly, gp4 exists in solution as a monomer, which displays an exceedingly low structural stability (T{sub m} 34 {sup o}C). Unfolded gp4 is prone to aggregation within a narrow range of temperatures both in vitro and in Salmonella extracts. In the virion the thermal unfolding of gp4 is prevented by the interaction with the dodecameric portal protein, which stabilizes the structure of gp4 and suppresses unfolded gp4 from irreversibly aggregating in the Salmonella milieu. The structural stabilization of gp4 is accompanied by the concomitant oligomerization of the protein to form a ring of 12 subunits bound to the lower end of the portal ring. The interaction of gp4 with portal protein is complex and likely involves the distinct binding of two non-equivalent sets of six gp4 proteins. Binding of the first set of six gp4 equivalents to dodecameric portal protein yields a gp(1){sub 12}:gp(4){sub 6} assembly intermediate, which is stably populated at 30 {sup o}C and can be resolved by native gel electrophoresis. The final product of the assembly reaction is a bi-dodecameric gp(1){sub 12}:gp(4){sub 12} complex, which appears hollow by electron microscopy, suggesting that gp4 does not physically plug the DNA entry/exit channel, but acts as a structural adaptor for the other tail accessory factors: gp10 and gp26.

  10. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  11. Maturation of shark single-domain (IgNAR) antibodies: evidence for induced-fit binding.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, Robyn L; Dooley, Helen; Verdino, Petra; Flajnik, Martin F; Wilson, Ian A

    2007-03-23

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  12. Serum retinol-binding protein-induced endothelial inflammation is mediated through the activation of toll-like receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mei; Martin, Ashley; Hays, Franklin; Johnson, Jennifer; Farjo, Rafal A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Elevation of serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) induces inflammation in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) via a retinol-independent mechanism; thus, it may play a causative role in the development and progression of vascular lesions in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since HRECs do not express the classical RBP4 receptor, stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 (STRA6), this study focuses on identifying the endothelial cell receptor and signaling that mediate RBP4-induced inflammation. Methods HRECs were treated with a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small molecule inhibitor (Cli95, also known as TAK-242), TLR4 neutralizing antibody, or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors before treatment with purified recombinant RBP4. The HREC inflammatory response was quantified by in vitro leukostasis assays, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To understand how the serum binding partner for RBP4, transthyretin (TTR), may affect RBP4 activity, we also measured RBP4 and TTR levels in serum and retinal lysates from RBP4-Tg and wild-type mice. Results TLR4 inhibition significantly reduced RBP4-induced expression of pro-inflammatory proteins and in vitro leukostasis. RBP4 treatment significantly increased phosphoactivation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK). The p38 inhibitor (SB203580) attenuated RBP4-stimulated vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) production, while the JNK inhibitor (SP600125) reduced RBP4-stimulated sICAM-1, endothelial cell selectin (E-selectin), and MCP-1 production. The MAPK inhibitors only showed partial (50–70%) suppression of the RBP4-stimulated proinflammatory response. Moreover, TLR4 inhibition did not decrease RBP4-induced MAPK phosphoactivation, suggesting that RBP4-mediated MAPK activation is TLR4 independent and occurs through a secondary unknown

  13. Biophysical Studies of the Induced Dimerization of Human VEGF Receptor 1 Binding Domain by Divalent Metals Competing with VEGF-A

    PubMed Central

    Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Broussy, Sylvain; Coric, Pascale; Seijo, Bili; Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Gautier, Benoit; Liu, Wang-Quing; Huguenot, Florent; Inguimbert, Nicolas; Bouaziz, Serge; Vidal, Michel; Broutin, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is tightly regulated through the binding of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) to their receptors (VEGFRs). In this context, we showed that human VEGFR1 domain 2 crystallizes in the presence of Zn2+, Co2+ or Cu2+ as a dimer that forms via metal-ion interactions and interlocked hydrophobic surfaces. SAXS, NMR and size exclusion chromatography analyses confirm the formation of this dimer in solution in the presence of Co2+, Cd2+ or Cu2+. Since the metal-induced dimerization masks the VEGFs binding surface, we investigated the ability of metal ions to displace the VEGF-A binding to hVEGFR1: using a competition assay, we evidenced that the metals displaced the VEGF-A binding to hVEGFR1 extracellular domain binding at micromolar level. PMID:27942001

  14. Effects of oral contraceptives, or lanosterol, on ADP-induced aggregation and binding of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen to rat platelets

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, L.; Toor, B.; McGregor, J.L.; Renaud, S.; Clemetson, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The aggregation to ADP and the binding of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen to platelets from rats treated with oral contraceptives or normal platelets treated in vitro with lanosterol were compared to their respective controls. Both types of platelets showed a significant increase in ADP-induced aggregation and in binding of fibrinogen, indicating that the effect of oral contraceptives could be partly due to increased levels of lanosterol in platelet membrane.

  15. CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein β Mediates the Killing of Toxoplasma gondii by Inducing Autophagy in Nonhematopoietic Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanhui; Zhao, Na; An, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xichen

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy is a main defense strategy by which infected host cells can virtually induce the killing of parasite, including Toxoplasma gondii. However, the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy in T. gondii-infected nonhematopoietic cells are still unknown. Emerging evidence indicates that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP β) is associated with the regulation of autophagy. Herein, we hypothesized that C/EBP β plays roles in inducing autophagy in nonhematopoietic cells. Expression of C/EBP β was aberrantly regulated in endothelial cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells challenged by T. gondii. Inhibition of C/EBP β reduced the killing of T. gondii in nonhematopoietic cells, whereas C/EBP β overexpression resulted in the enhancement of killing of T. gondii as well as the increase in autophagy in infected cells. Furthermore, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation was found to be reduced by C/EBP β overexpression, but increased by C/EBP β inhibition. The increase in T. gondii killing induced by C/EBP β overexpression was blocked by the mTOR activator phosphatidic acid and was increased by the inhibitor AZD8055. In conclusion, we demonstrate that C/EBP β expression is increased in nonhematopoietic cells infected by T. gondii, resulting in the activation of autophagy in host cells by inhibiting mTOR pathway.

  16. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor, a v-Jun target gene, induces oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu-ling; Bottoli, Ivan; Goller, Martin; Vogt, Peter K.

    1999-01-01

    Jun is a transcription factor belonging to the activator protein 1 family. A mutated version of Jun (v-Jun) transduced by the avian retrovirus ASV17 induces oncogenic transformation in avian cell cultures and sarcomas in young galliform birds. The oncogenicity of Jun probably results from transcriptional deregulation of v-Jun-responsive target genes. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a growth-related v-Jun target, a homolog of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF). HB-EGF is strongly expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) transformed by v-Jun. HB-EGF expression is not detectable or is marginal in nontransformed CEF. Using a hormone-inducible Jun-estrogen receptor chimera, we found that HB-EGF expression is correlated with v-Jun activity. In this system, induction of v-Jun is followed within 1 hr by elevated levels of HB-EGF. In CEF infected with various Jun mutants, HB-EGF expression is correlated with the oncogenic potency of the mutant. Constitutive expression of HB-EGF conveys to CEF the ability to grow in soft agar and to form multilayered foci of transformed cells on a solid substrate. These observations suggest that HB-EGF is an effector of Jun-induced oncogenic transformation. PMID:10318950

  17. Interferon-γ-induced p27KIP1 binds to and targets MYC for proteasome-mediated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Siti Mariam; Frings, Oliver; Fahlén, Sara; Nilsson, Helén; Goodwin, Jacob; von der Lehr, Natalie; Su, Yingtao; Lüscher, Bernhard; Castell, Alina; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The Myc oncoprotein is tightly regulated at multiple levels including ubiquitin-mediated protein turnover. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation of Myc at Ser-62 pharmacologically or through interferon (IFN)-γ-induced expression of p27Kip1 (p27) repressed Myc's activity to suppress cellular senescence and differentiation. In this study we identified an additional activity of p27 to interfere with Myc independent of Ser-62 phosphorylation. p27 is required and sufficient for IFN-γ-induced turnover of Myc. p27 interacted with Myc in the nucleus involving the C-termini of the two proteins, including Myc box 4 of Myc. The C-terminus but not the Cdk2 binding fragment of p27 was sufficient for inducing Myc degradation. Protein expression data of The Cancer Genome Atlas breast invasive carcinoma set revealed significantly lower Myc protein levels in tumors with highly expressed p27 lacking phosphorylation at Thr-157 - a marker for active p27 localized in the nucleus. Further, these conditions correlated with favorable tumor stage and patient outcome. This novel regulation of Myc by IFN-γ/p27KIP1 potentially offers new possibilities for therapeutic intervention in tumors with deregulated Myc. PMID:26701207

  18. Guanyl nucleotide interactions with dopaminergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol in human caudate and putamen: guanyl nucleotides enhance ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and cause an apparent loss of high affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Andorn, A.C.; Bacon, B.R.; Nguyen-Hunh, A.T.; Parlato, S.J.; Stitts, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    The human caudate and putamen contain two high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Both of these affinity states exhibit dopaminergic selectivity. Ascorbic acid, at 0.1 mM, induces a slow loss of the low affinity component of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding in these tissues. The addition of guanyl nucleotides to the ascorbate produces a more rapid loss of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding which includes a loss of the highest affinity state for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Ascorbate induces lipid peroxidation in human caudate and putamen, an effect that is further enhanced by guanyl and inosine nucleotides. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides have no effect on (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding but do decrease the affinity of dopamine at each affinity state greater than 60-fold. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides apparently decrease agonist affinity at human brain dopamine2-binding sites without causing an interconversion of agonist affinity states.

  19. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  20. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines.

  1. Promoter analysis of intestinal genes induced during iron-deprivation reveals enrichment of conserved SP1-like binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James F; Hu, Zihua

    2007-01-01

    Background Iron-deficiency leads to the induction of genes related to intestinal iron absorption and homeostasis. By analyzing a large GeneChip® dataset from the rat intestine, we identified a large cluster of 228 genes that was induced by iron-deprivation. Only 2 of these genes contained 3' iron-response elements, suggesting that other regulation including transcriptional may be involved. We therefore utilized computational methods to test the hypothesis that some of the genes within this large up-regulated cluster are co-ordinately regulated by common transcriptional mechanisms. We thus identified promoters from the up-regulated gene cluster from rat, mouse and human, and performed enrichment analyses with the Clover program and the TRANSFAC database. Results Surprisingly, we found a strong statistical enrichment for SP1 binding sites in our experimental promoters as compared to background sequences. As the TRANSFAC database cannot distinguish among SP/KLF family members, many of which bind similar GC-rich DNA sequences, we surmise that SP1 or an SP1-like factor could be involved in this response. In fact, we detected induction of SP6/KLF14 in the GeneChip® studies, and confirmed it by real-time PCR. Additional computational analyses suggested that an SP1-like factor may function synergistically with a FOX TF to regulate a subset of these genes. Furthermore, analysis of promoter sequences identified many genes with multiple, conserved SP1 and FOX binding sites, the relative location of which within orthologous promoters was highly conserved. Conclusion SP1 or a closely related factor may play a primary role in the genetic response to iron-deficiency in the mammalian intestine. PMID:18005439

  2. Complement deposition induced by binding of anti-contactin-1 auto-antibodies is modified by immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Appeltshauser, Luise; Weishaupt, Andreas; Sommer, Claudia; Doppler, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies associated with auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins like contactin-1 are reported to respond poorly to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). A reason might be that IVIG interacts with the complement pathway and these auto-antibodies often belong to the IgG4 subclass that does not activate complement. However, some patients do show a response to IVIG, especially at the beginning of the disease. This corresponds with the finding of coexisting IgG subclasses IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3. We therefore aimed to investigate complement deposition and activation by samples of three patients with anti-contactin-1 IgG auto-antibodies of different subclasses as a potential predictor for response to IVIG. Complement deposition and activation was measured by cell binding and ELISA based assays, and the effect of IVIG on complement deposition was assessed by addition of different concentrations of IVIG. Binding of anti-contactin-1 auto-antibodies of all three patients induced complement deposition and activation with the strongest effect shown by the serum of a patient with predominance of IgG3 auto-antibodies. IVIG led to a reduction of complement deposition in a dose-dependent manner, but did not reduce binding of auto-antibodies to contactin-1. We conclude that complement deposition may contribute to the pathophysiology of anti-contactin-1 associated neuropathy, particularly in patients with predominance of the IgG3 subclass. The proportion of different auto-antibody subclasses may be a predictor for the response to IVIG in patients with auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins.

  3. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and -2 binding sites in hypoxic human macrophages alternatively activated by IL-10.

    PubMed

    Tausendschön, Michaela; Rehli, Michael; Dehne, Nathalie; Schmidl, Christian; Döring, Claudia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Brüne, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ) often accumulate in hypoxic areas, where they significantly influence disease progression. Anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, generate alternatively activated macrophages that support tumor growth. To understand how alternative activation affects the transcriptional profile of hypoxic macrophages, we globally mapped binding sites of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages prestimulated with IL-10. 713 HIF-1 and 795 HIF-2 binding sites were identified under hypoxia. Pretreatment with IL-10 altered the binding pattern, with 120 new HIF-1 and 188 new HIF-2 binding sites emerging. HIF-1 binding was most prominent in promoters, while HIF-2 binding was more abundant in enhancer regions. Comparison of ChIP-seq data obtained in other cells revealed a highly cell type specific binding of HIF. In MΦ HIF binding occurred preferentially in already active enhancers or promoters. To assess the roles of HIF on gene expression, primary human macrophages were treated with siRNA against HIF-1α or HIF-2α, followed by genome-wide gene expression analysis. Comparing mRNA expression to the HIF binding profile revealed a significant enrichment of hypoxia-inducible genes previously identified by ChIP-seq. Analysis of gene expression under hypoxia alone and hypoxia/IL-10 showed the enhanced induction of a set of genes including PLOD2 and SLC2A3, while another group including KDM3A and ADM remained unaffected or was reduced by IL-10. Taken together IL-10 influences the DNA binding pattern of HIF and the level of gene induction.

  4. The transcription factors ATF-1 and CREB-1 bind constitutively to the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) DNA recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Kvietikova, I; Wenger, R H; Marti, H H; Gassmann, M

    1995-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was first described as a DNA binding activity that specifically recognizes an 8 bp motif known to be essential for hypoxia-inducible erythropoietin gene transcription. Subsequently HIF-1 activity has also been found in cell lines which do not express erythropoietin, suggesting that HIF-1 is part of a widespread oxygen sensing mechanism. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays HIF-1 DNA binding activity is only detectable in nuclear extracts of cells cultivated in a low oxygen atmosphere. In addition to HIF-1, a constitutive DNA binding activity also specifically binds the HIF1 probe. Here we report that CRE and AP1 oligonucleotides efficiently competed for binding of the HIF1 probe to this constitutive factor, whereas HIF-1 activity itself remained unaffected. Monoclonal antibodies raised against the CRE binding factors ATF-1 and CREB-1 supershifted the constitutive factors ATF-1 and CREB-1 supershifted the constitutive factor, while Jun and Fos family members, which constitute the AP-1 factor, were immunologically undetectable. Recombinant ATF-1 and CREB-1 proteins bound HIF1 probes either as homodimers or as heterodimers, indicating a new binding specificity for ATF-1/CREB-1. Finally, reporter gene assays in HeLa cells treated with either a cAMP analogue or a phorbol ester suggest that the PKA, but not the PKC signalling pathway is involved in oxygen sensing. Images PMID:8524640

  5. In vitro DNA binding of the archaeal protein Sso7d induces negative supercoiling at temperatures typical for thermophilic growth.

    PubMed Central

    López-García, P; Knapp, S; Ladenstein, R; Forterre, P

    1998-01-01

    The topological state of DNA in hyperthermophilic archaea appears to correspond to a linking excess in comparison with DNA in mesophilic organisms. Since DNA binding proteins often contribute to the control of DNA topology by affecting DNA geometry in the presence of DNA topoisomerases, we tested whether the histone-like protein Sso7d from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus alters DNA conformation. In ligase-mediated supercoiling assays carried out at 37, 60, 70, 80 and 90 degrees C we found that DNA binding of increasing amounts of Sso7d led to a progressive decrease in plasmid linking number (Lk), producing negative supercoiling. Identical unwinding effects were observed when recombinant non-methylated Sso7d was used. For a given Sso7d concentration the DNA unwinding induced was augmented with increasing temperature. However, after correction for the overwinding effect of high temperature on DNA, plasmids ligated at 60-90 degrees C exhibited similar sigma values at the highest Sso7d concentrations assayed. These results suggest that Sso7d may play a compensatory role in vivo by counteracting the overwinding effect of high temperature on DNA. Additionally, Sso7d unwinding could be involved in the topological changes observed during thermal stress (heat and cold shock), playing an analogous role in crenarchaeal cells to that proposed for HU in bacteria. PMID:9580681

  6. Targeting the GPIbα Binding Site of Thrombin To Simultaneously Induce Dual Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Exosite 2 of human thrombin contributes to two opposing pathways, the anticoagulant pathway and the platelet aggregation pathway. We reasoned that an exosite 2 directed allosteric thrombin inhibitor should simultaneously induce anticoagulant and antiplatelet effects. To assess this, we synthesized SbO4L based on the sulfated tyrosine-containing sequence of GPIbα. SbO4L was synthesized in three simple steps in high yield and found to be a highly selective, direct inhibitor of thrombin. Michelis–Menten kinetic studies indicated a noncompetitive mechanism of inhibition. Competitive inhibition studies suggested ideal competition with heparin and glycoprotein Ibα, as predicted. Studies with site-directed mutants of thrombin indicated that SbO4L binds to Arg233, Lys235, and Lys236 of exosite 2. SbO4L prevented thrombin-mediated platelet activation and aggregation as expected on the basis of competition with GPIbα. SbO4L presents a novel paradigm of simultaneous dual anticoagulant and antiplatelet effects achieved through the GPIbα binding site of thrombin. PMID:24635452

  7. Thyroid-induced alterations in myocardial sodium-potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase, monovalent cation active transport, and cardiac glycoside binding.

    PubMed Central

    Curfman, G D; Crowley, T J; Smith, T W

    1977-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on guinea pig myocardial NaK-ATPase activity, transmembrane monovalent cation active transport, and cardiac glycoside binding were were examined. NaK-ATPase activities of left atrial and left ventricular homogenates of control and triiodothyronine (T3)-treated animals were determined, and compared to activities of skeletal muscle and liver. T3 administration was associated with a significant increase of 18% in left atrial and left ventricular NaK-ATPase specific activities. This increment was less than that noted in skeletal muscle (+42%) and liver (+30%). To determine if enhanced NaK-ATPase activity was accompanied by increased monovalent cation active transport, in vitro 86Rb+ uptake by left atrial strips and hemidiaphragms was measured. Transition from the euthyroid to the hyperthyroid state resulted in a 68% increase in active 86Rb+ uptake by left atrium, and a 62% increase in active uptake by diaphragm. Passive 86Rb+ uptake was not affected in either tissue. Ouabain binding by atrial and ventricular homogenates of T3-treated animals was increased by 19 and 17%, respectively, compared to controls, in close agreement with thyroid-induced increments in NaK-ATPase activiey. Taken together, these results are consistent with enhanced myocardial NaK-ATPase activity and monovalent cation activt transport due to an increase in the number of functional enzyme complexes. PMID:138689

  8. Binding of steroids in nuclear extracts and cytosol of rat pituitary and estrogen-induced pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Weisenberg, L S; Piroli, G; Heller, C L; De Nicola, A F

    1987-12-01

    We have determined binding sites for estrogen, progestin, androgen and glucocorticoid in anterior pituitaries from Sprague-Dawley rats, a strain with low estrogen sensitivity, and in diethylstilbestrol-induced pituitary tumors in Fischer 344 rats, a strain with high estrogen sensitivity. Binding sites differ in their quantity and subcellular distribution. Cytosolic sites for [3H]estradiol in normal pituitaries from untreated rats were high prevailing over sites for other hormones, but they were depleted in the tumors due to their retention in nuclei under the influence of estrogen. Unoccupied nuclear sites for estrogen in normal glands also prevailed over sites for other steroids, and were similar to those in tumors. Second, the progestin site labeled with [3H]R 5020 was concentrated 5.7-fold in cytosol and 8.5-fold in nuclei of the tumors over the values found in glands from normal males estrogenized for 3 days. Third, glucocorticoid receptors labeled with [3H]dexamethasone were predominantly cytosolic in normal glands, but very low in cytosol and more evident in nuclear extracts from the tumors, the reverse of the profile found in normal pituitaries. Last, limited and comparable amounts of androgen receptors were measured in the subcellular fractions of both tissues. It is suggested that the subcellular distribution of some steroid receptors may be controlled in part by the cell population of the tissue and its degree of genetic activity.

  9. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Song-induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein in the songbird brain.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, H; Wada, K; Maekawa, M; Watsuji, T; Hagiwara, M

    1999-05-15

    We have investigated the participation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the response of the songbird brain to a natural auditory stimulus, a conspecific song. The cells in the two song control nuclei, the higher vocal center (HVC) and area X of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), were intensely stained with an anti-CREB monoclonal antibody. Double-labeling studies showed that CREB immunoreactivity was detected only in area X-projecting neurons in the HVC. The cloned CREB cDNA from zebra finches (zCREB) is highly homologous to mammalian delta CREB. Phosphorylation of zCREB at Ser119 in area X-projecting HVC neurons was induced by hearing tape-recorded conspecific songs of zebra finches, but not by birdsongs of another species or white noise. These results raise the possibility that zCREB plays a crucial role in the sensory process of song learning.

  11. Binding-induced Folding of Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-like Protein on the Mycobacterium Proteasomal ATPase Targets Substrates for Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    T Wang; K Heran Darwin; H Li

    2011-12-31

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses a proteasome system that is analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and is required for pathogenesis. However, the bacterial analog of ubiquitin, prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), is an intrinsically disordered protein that bears little sequence or structural resemblance to the highly structured ubiquitin. Thus, it was unknown how pupylated proteins were recruited to the proteasome. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase (Mpa) has three pairs of tentacle-like coiled coils that recognize Pup. Mpa bound unstructured Pup through hydrophobic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of an {alpha}-helix in Pup. Our work describes a binding-induced folding recognition mechanism in the Pup-proteasome system that differs mechanistically from substrate recognition in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This key difference between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems could be exploited for the development of a small molecule-based treatment for tuberculosis.

  12. Binding-induced folding of prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein on the mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase targets substrates for degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Li, H.; Darwin, K. H.

    2010-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses a proteasome system that is analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and is required for pathogenesis. However, the bacterial analog of ubiquitin, prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), is an intrinsically disordered protein that bears little sequence or structural resemblance to the highly structured ubiquitin. Thus, it was unknown how pupylated proteins were recruited to the proteasome. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase (Mpa) has three pairs of tentacle-like coiled coils that recognize Pup. Mpa bound unstructured Pup through hydrophobic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of an {alpha}-helix in Pup. Our work describes a binding-induced folding recognition mechanism in the Pup-proteasome system that differs mechanistically from substrate recognition in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This key difference between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems could be exploited for the development of a small molecule-based treatment for tuberculosis.

  13. A poxvirus-encoded semaphorin induces cytokine production from monocytes and binds to a novel cellular semaphorin receptor, VESPR.

    PubMed

    Comeau, M R; Johnson, R; DuBose, R F; Petersen, M; Gearing, P; VandenBos, T; Park, L; Farrah, T; Buller, R M; Cohen, J I; Strockbine, L D; Rauch, C; Spriggs, M K

    1998-04-01

    The vaccinia virus A39R protein is a member of the semaphorin family. A39R.Fc protein was used to affinity purify an A39R receptor from a human B cell line. Tandem mass spectrometry of receptor peptides yielded partial amino acid sequences that allowed the identification of corresponding cDNA clones. Sequence analysis of this receptor indicated that it is a novel member of the plexin family and identified a semaphorin-like domain within this family, thus suggesting an evolutionary relationship between receptor and ligand. A39R up-regulated ICAM-1 on, and induced cytokine production from, human monocytes. These data, then, describe a receptor for an immunologically active semaphorin and suggest that it may serve as a prototype for other plexin-semaphorin binding pairs.

  14. Guanylate-binding proteins promote AIM2 inflammasome activation during Francisella novicida infection by inducing cytosolic bacteriolysis and DNA release

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Roland F.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Anton, Leonie; Rühl, Sebastian; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Dick, Mathias S.; Kistner, Anne; Rigard, Mélanie; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Henry, Thomas; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The AIM2 inflammasome detects double-stranded DNA in the cytosol and induces caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis as well as release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. AIM2 is critical for host defense against DNA viruses and bacteria that replicate in the cytosol, such as Francisella novicida. AIM2 activation by F. novicida requires bacteriolysis, yet whether this process is accidental or a host-driven immune mechanism remained unclear. Using siRNA screening for nearly 500 interferon-stimulated genes, we identified guanylate-binding proteins GBP2 and GBP5 as key AIM2 activators during F. novicida infection. Their prominent role was validated in vitro and in a mouse model of tularemia. Mechanistically, these two GBPs target cytosolic F. novicida and promote bacteriolysis. Thus, besides their role in host defense against vacuolar pathogens, GBPs also facilitate the presentation of ligands by directly attacking cytosolic bacteria. PMID:25774716

  15. G-quadruplex induced chirality of methylazacalix[6]pyridine via unprecedented binding stoichiometry: en route to multiplex controlled molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ai-Jiao; Shen, Meng-Jie; Xiang, Jun-Feng; Zhang, En-Xuan; Li, Qian; Sun, Hong-Xia; Wang, Li-Xia; Xu, Guang-Zhi; Tang, Ya-Lin; Xu, Li-Jin; Gong, Han-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    Nucleic acid based molecular device is a developing research field which attracts great interests in material for building machinelike nanodevices. G-quadruplex, as a new type of DNA secondary structures, can be harnessed to construct molecular device owing to its rich structural polymorphism. Herein, we developed a switching system based on G-quadruplexes and methylazacalix[6]pyridine (MACP6). The induced circular dichroism (CD) signal of MACP6 was used to monitor the switch controlled by temperature or pH value. Furthermore, the CD titration, Job-plot, variable temperature CD and 1H-NMR experiments not only confirmed the binding mode between MACP6 and G-quadruplex, but also explained the difference switching effect of MACP6 and various G-quadruplexes. The established strategy has the potential to be used as the chiral probe for specific G-quadruplex recognition.

  16. Diving into the Water: Inducible Binding Conformations for BRD4, TAF1(2), BRD9, and CECR2 Bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Terry D; Tsui, Vickie; Flynn, E Megan; Wang, Shumei; Taylor, Alexander M; Côté, Alexandre; Audia, James E; Beresini, Maureen H; Burdick, Daniel J; Cummings, Richard; Dakin, Les A; Duplessis, Martin; Good, Andrew C; Hewitt, Michael C; Huang, Hon-Ren; Jayaram, Hariharan; Kiefer, James R; Jiang, Ying; Murray, Jeremy; Nasveschuk, Christopher G; Pardo, Eneida; Poy, Florence; Romero, F Anthony; Tang, Yong; Wang, Jian; Xu, Zhaowu; Zawadzke, Laura E; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Albrecht, Brian K; Magnuson, Steven R; Bellon, Steve; Cochran, Andrea G

    2016-06-09

    The biological role played by non-BET bromodomains remains poorly understood, and it is therefore imperative to identify potent and highly selective inhibitors to effectively explore the biology of individual bromodomain proteins. A ligand-efficient nonselective bromodomain inhibitor was identified from a 6-methyl pyrrolopyridone fragment. Small hydrophobic substituents replacing the N-methyl group were designed directing toward the conserved bromodomain water pocket, and two distinct binding conformations were then observed. The substituents either directly displaced and rearranged the conserved solvent network, as in BRD4(1) and TAF1(2), or induced a narrow hydrophobic channel adjacent to the lipophilic shelf, as in BRD9 and CECR2. The preference of distinct substituents for individual bromodomains provided selectivity handles useful for future lead optimization efforts for selective BRD9, CECR2, and TAF1(2) inhibitors.

  17. Polyhydroxyfullerene Binds Cadmium Ions and Alleviates Metal-Induced Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Arunava; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Seena, Sahadevan; Pascoal, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    The water-soluble polyhydroxyfullerene (PHF) is a functionalized carbon nanomaterial with several industrial and commercial applications. There have been controversial reports on the toxicity and/or antioxidant properties of fullerenes and their derivatives. Conversely, metals have been recognized as toxic mainly due to their ability to induce oxidative stress in living organisms. We investigated the interactive effects of PHF and cadmium ions (Cd) on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by exposing cells to Cd (≤5 mg liter−1) in the absence or presence of PHF (≤500 mg liter−1) at different pHs (5.8 to 6.8). In the absence of Cd, PHF stimulated yeast growth up to 10.4%. Cd inhibited growth up to 79.7%, induced intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and promoted plasma membrane disruption in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. The negative effects of Cd on growth were attenuated by the presence of PHF, and maximum growth recovery (53.8%) was obtained at the highest PHF concentration and pH. The coexposure to Cd and PHF decreased ROS accumulation up to 36.7% and membrane disruption up to 30.7% in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. Two mechanisms helped to explain the role of PHF in alleviating Cd toxicity to yeasts: PHF decreased Cd-induced oxidative stress and bound significant amounts of Cd in the extracellular medium, reducing its bioavailability to the cells. PMID:25038095

  18. Binding induced colocalization activated hybridization chain reaction on the surface of magnetic nanobead for sensitive detection of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunjing; Hou, Zhun; Jiang, Wei; Sang, Lihong; Wang, Lei

    2016-12-15

    Herein, a sensitive and enzyme-free assay for adenosine detection has been developed on the basis of binding induced colocalization activated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) strategy on the surface of magnetic nanobead. First, the recognition probe was fabricated and divided into two parts: the Apt-1 that composed a part of adenosine aptamer and toehold domain, and the Apt-2 that consisted of another part of adenosine aptamer and branch migration domain. The Apt-1 was immobilized on a streptavidin-magnetic nanobead (streptavidin-MNBs) that played the roles of enrichment and separation. Then the recognition event of adenosine could bring the two parts of aptamer together and induce the colocalization of toehold domain and branch migration domain, which could serve as an integrated initiator to trigger the HCR, producing a long nicked double-stranded polymer. Finally, the intercalating dye SYBR Green I was inserted into the polymer, generating an enhanced fluorescence signal. In this strategy, the initiator was divided into two parts and could be suppressed effectively in the absence of adenosine. Utilizing the separated function, the spontaneous hybridization of H1 and H2 could be avoided, and a low background could be acquired. Moreover, through the double amplification of HCR and multimolecules binding of SYBR Green I, highly sensitive and enzyme-free detection were achieved. The detection limit for adenosine detection was 2.0×10(-7)mol/L, which was comparable or superior to the previous aptasensors. Importantly, adenosine analysis in human urines has been performed, and this strategy could significantly distinguish the adenosine content in normal human urines and cancer patient urines, suggesting that this proposed assay will become a reliable and sensitive adenosine detection method in early clinical diagnosis and medical research.

  19. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan; Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-11-15

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  20. Phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 induces PACS-1 binding of nephrocystin and targeting to cilia

    PubMed Central

    Schermer, Bernhard; Höpker, Katja; Omran, Heymut; Ghenoiu, Cristina; Fliegauf, Manfred; Fekete, Andrea; Horvath, Judit; Köttgen, Michael; Hackl, Matthias; Zschiedrich, Stefan; Huber, Tobias B; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Blaukat, Andree; Walz, Gerd; Benzing, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in proteins localized to cilia and basal bodies have been implicated in a growing number of human diseases. Access of these proteins to the ciliary compartment requires targeting to the base of the cilia. However, the mechanisms involved in transport of cilia proteins to this transitional zone are elusive. Here we show that nephrocystin, a ciliary protein mutated in the most prevalent form of cystic kidney disease in childhood, is expressed in respiratory epithelial cells and accumulates at the base of cilia, overlapping with markers of the basal body area and the transition zone. Nephrocystin interacts with the phosphofurin acidic cluster sorting protein (PACS)-1. Casein kinase 2 (CK2)-mediated phosphorylation of three critical serine residues within a cluster of acidic amino acids in nephrocystin mediates PACS-1 binding, and is essential for colocalization of nephrocystin with PACS-1 at the base of cilia. Inhibition of CK2 activity abrogates this interaction and results in the loss of correct nephrocystin targeting. These data suggest that CK2-dependent transport processes represent a novel pathway of targeting proteins to the cilia. PMID:16308564

  1. A Tubulin Binding Peptide Targets Glioma Cells Disrupting Their Microtubules, Blocking Migration, and Inducing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Berges, Raphael; Balzeau, Julien; Peterson, Alan C; Eyer, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment regimes, glioma remains a largely fatal disease. Current treatment limitations are attributed to the precarious locations within the brain where such tumors grow, their highly infiltrative nature precluding complete resection and lack of specificity among agents capable of attenuating their growth. Here, we show that in vitro, glioma cells of diverse origins internalize a peptide encompassing a tubulin-binding site (TBS) on the neurofilament light protein. The internalized peptide disrupts the microtubule network, inhibits migration and proliferation, and leads to apoptosis. Using an intracerebral transplant model, we show that most, if not all, of these responses to peptide exposure also occur in vivo. Notably, a single intratumor injection significantly attenuates tumor growth, while neither peptide uptake nor downstream consequences are observed elsewhere in the host nervous system. Such preferential uptake suggests that the peptide may have potential as a primary or supplementary glioblastoma treatment modality by exploiting its autonomous microtubule-disrupting activity or engaging its capacity to selectively target glioma cells with other cell-disrupting cargos. PMID:22491214

  2. Rational optimization of conformational effects induced by hydrocarbon staples in peptides and their binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lama, Dilraj; Quah, Soo T; Verma, Chandra S; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Beuerman, Roger W; Lane, David P; Brown, Christopher J

    2013-12-13

    eIF4E is frequently over-expressed in different cancers and causes increased translation of oncogenic proteins via deregulated cap-dependent translation. Inhibitors of the eIF4E:eIF4G interactions represent an approach that would normalize cap-dependent translation. Stapled peptides represent an emerging class of therapeutics that can target protein: protein interactions. We present here molecular dynamics simulations for a set of rationally designed stapled peptides in solution and in complex with eIF4E, supported with biophysical and crystallographic data. Clustering of the simulated structures revealed the favoured conformational states of the stapled peptides in their bound or free forms in solution. Identifying these populations has allowed us to design peptides with improved affinities by introducing mutations into the peptide sequence to alter their conformational distributions. These studies emphasise the effects that engineered mutations have on the conformations of free and bound peptides, and illustrate that both states must be considered in efforts to attain high affinity binding.

  3. Rational Optimization of Conformational Effects Induced By Hydrocarbon Staples in Peptides and their Binding Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Dilraj; Quah, Soo T.; Verma, Chandra S.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Beuerman, Roger W.; Lane, David P.; Brown, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    eIF4E is frequently over-expressed in different cancers and causes increased translation of oncogenic proteins via deregulated cap-dependent translation. Inhibitors of the eIF4E:eIF4G interactions represent an approach that would normalize cap-dependent translation. Stapled peptides represent an emerging class of therapeutics that can target protein: protein interactions. We present here molecular dynamics simulations for a set of rationally designed stapled peptides in solution and in complex with eIF4E, supported with biophysical and crystallographic data. Clustering of the simulated structures revealed the favoured conformational states of the stapled peptides in their bound or free forms in solution. Identifying these populations has allowed us to design peptides with improved affinities by introducing mutations into the peptide sequence to alter their conformational distributions. These studies emphasise the effects that engineered mutations have on the conformations of free and bound peptides, and illustrate that both states must be considered in efforts to attain high affinity binding.

  4. Dynamic interactions between a membrane binding protein and lipids induce fluctuating diffusivity

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Kalli, Antreas C.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains are membrane-binding lipid recognition proteins that interact with phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) molecules in eukaryotic cell membranes. Diffusion of PH domains plays a critical role in biological reactions on membrane surfaces. Although diffusivity can be estimated by long-time measurements, it lacks information on the short-time diffusive nature. We reveal two diffusive properties of a PH domain bound to the surface of a PIP-containing membrane using molecular dynamics simulations. One is fractional Brownian motion, attributed to the motion of the lipids with which the PH domain interacts. The other is temporally fluctuating diffusivity; that is, the short-time diffusivity of the bound protein changes substantially with time. Moreover, the diffusivity for short-time measurements is intrinsically different from that for long-time measurements. This fluctuating diffusivity results from dynamic changes in interactions between the PH domain and PIP molecules. Our results provide evidence that the complexity of protein-lipid interactions plays a crucial role in the diffusion of proteins on biological membrane surfaces. Changes in the diffusivity of PH domains and related membrane-bound proteins may in turn contribute to the formation/dissolution of protein complexes in membranes. PMID:28116358

  5. Retinol binding proteinuria and phosphaturia: markers of paracetamol-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Florkowski, C M; Jones, A F; Guy, J M; Husband, D J; Stevens, J

    1994-07-01

    The occurrence of hypophosphataemia in paracetamol overdose suggests that nephrotoxicity is common, impaired renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate indicating renal damage. To investigate the potential nephrotoxicity of paracetamol, we studied 148 consecutive patients with paracetamol overdose. Serial clinical and biochemical measurements were made, and a fasting overnight urine collection was obtained for creatinine (Cr), phosphate and retinol-binding protein (RBP) determination. Renal threshold phosphate concentration (TmPO4/GFR) was determined from urinary parameters by an established nomogram. The degree of hypophosphataemia correlated with the severity of overdose, and with TmPO4/GFR. The median RBP/Cr ratio was higher in those patients exhibiting biochemical hepatotoxicity compared with those without hepatotoxicity, in whom median RBP/Cr was not significantly higher than controls. Within the group of patients showing biochemical hepatotoxicity, there was a correlation between log RBP/Cr and TmPO4/GFR. RBP/Cr ratio is a less sensitive marker of renal tubular toxicity than phosphaturia in these patients, and may indicate a different mechanism of toxicity.

  6. Oxygen radicals induce human endothelial cells to express GMP-140 and bind neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The initial step in extravasation of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]) to the extravascular space is adherence to the endothelium. We examined the effect of oxidants on this process by treating human endothelial cells with H2O2, t-butylhydroperoxide, or menadione. This resulted in a surface adhesive for PMN between 1 and 4 h after exposure. The oxidants needed to be present only for a brief period at the initiation of the assay. Adhesion was an endothelial cell- dependent process that did not require an active response from the PMN. The adhesive molecule was not platelet-activating factor, which mediates PMN adherence when endothelial cells are briefly exposed to higher concentrations of H2O2 (Lewis, M. S., R. E. Whatley, P. Cain, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, and G. A. Zimmerman. 1988. J. Clin. Invest. 82:2045-2055), nor was it ELAM-1, an adhesive glycoprotein induced by cytokines. Oxidant-induced adhesion did not require protein synthesis, was inhibited by antioxidants, and, when peroxides were the oxidants, was inhibited by intracellular iron chelators. Granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140) is a membrane-associated glycoprotein that can be translocated from its intracellular storage pool to the surface of endothelial cells where it acts as a ligand for PMN adhesion (Geng, J.-G., M. P. Bevilacqua, K. L. Moore, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, J. M. Kim, G. A. Bliss, G. A. Zimmerman, and R. P. McEver. 1990. Nature (Lond). 343:757-760). We found that endothelial cells exposed to oxidants expressed GMP-140 on their surface, and that an mAb against GMP-140 or solubilized GMP-140 completely blocked PMN adherence to oxidant-treated endothelial cells. Thus, exposure of endothelial cells to oxygen radicals induces the prolonged expression of GMP-140 on the cell surface, which results in enhanced PMN adherence. PMID:1704376

  7. Vaccinia Virus Protein C6 Inhibits Type I IFN Signalling in the Nucleus and Binds to the Transactivation Domain of STAT2

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Jennifer H.; Sumner, Rebecca P.; Lu, Yongxu

    2016-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) response is a crucial innate immune signalling pathway required for defense against viral infection. Accordingly, the great majority of mammalian viruses possess means to inhibit this important host immune response. Here we show that vaccinia virus (VACV) strain Western Reserve protein C6, is a dual function protein that inhibits the cellular response to type I IFNs in addition to its published function as an inhibitor of IRF-3 activation, thereby restricting type I IFN production from infected cells. Ectopic expression of C6 inhibits the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) in response to IFNα treatment at both the mRNA and protein level. C6 inhibits the IFNα-induced Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signalling pathway at a late stage, downstream of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding of the interferon stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) complex to the interferon stimulated response element (ISRE). Mechanistically, C6 associates with the transactivation domain of STAT2 and this might explain how C6 inhibits the type I IFN signalling very late in the pathway. During virus infection C6 reduces ISRE-dependent gene expression despite the presence of the viral protein phosphatase VH1 that dephosphorylates STAT1 and STAT2. The ability of a cytoplasmic replicating virus to dampen the immune response within the nucleus, and the ability of viral immunomodulators such as C6 to inhibit multiple stages of the innate immune response by distinct mechanisms, emphasizes the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and viral immune evasion. PMID:27907166

  8. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Yang; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  9. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins: mapping of the murine Gbp-1 locus to chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, M; Staeheli, P; Holmes, R S; Haller, O

    1985-09-01

    GBP-1 is the predominant species of a family of guanylate-binding proteins synthesized in mouse cells in response to interferons (IFNs) alpha, beta, or gamma. IFN inducibility of this 65,000-Da protein is controlled by alleles at a single autosomal locus, Gbp-1, with allele a encoding inducibility and allele b noninducibility. Here, we present evidence suggesting that both alleles occur in outbred populations of wild mice. Using recombinant inbred strains and classical linkage analysis of offspring of two-point and three-point backcrosses we demonstrate that Gbp-1 is linked to Adh-3 (encoding alcohol dehydrogenase C2) and VaJ (varitintwaddler-Jackson) located on the distal part of chromosome 3. The relevant recombination frequencies (RFs) (+/- SE) were 3.5 (+/- 1.1) and 11.7 (+/- 2.8)%, respectively. We further show that strain B6.C-H-23c/By(HW 53), congenic for a small segment of chromosome 3, carries the BALB/c alleles at both the Gbp-1 and the Adh-3 locus and not the alleles of the B6 background strain confirming the chromosomal location and close linkage of the two loci.

  10. Conservation analysis predicts in vivo occupancy of glucocorticoid receptor-binding sequences at glucocorticoid-induced genes.

    PubMed

    So, Alex Yick-Lun; Cooper, Samantha B; Feldman, Brian J; Manuchehri, Mitra; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2008-04-15

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) interacts with specific GR-binding sequences (GBSs) at glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) to orchestrate transcriptional networks. Although the sequences of the GBSs are highly variable among different GREs, the precise sequence within an individual GRE is highly conserved. In this study, we examined whether sequence conservation of sites resembling GBSs is sufficient to predict GR occupancy of GREs at genes responsive to glucocorticoids. Indeed, we found that the level of conservation of these sites at genes up-regulated by glucocorticoids in mouse C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem-like cells correlated directly with the extent of occupancy by GR. In striking contrast, we failed to observe GR occupancy of GBSs at genes repressed by glucocorticoids, despite the occurrence of these sites at a frequency similar to that of the induced genes. Thus, GR occupancy of the GBS motif correlates with induction but not repression, and GBS conservation alone is sufficient to predict GR occupancy and GRE function at induced genes.

  11. Reduced calcium binding protein immunoreactivity induced by electroconvulsive shock indicates neuronal hyperactivity, not neuronal death or deactivation.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-E; Kwak, S-E; Kim, D-S; Won, M H; Kwon, O-S; Choi, S-Y; Kang, T-C

    2006-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CBPs), such as parvalbumin and calbindin D-28k, are useful markers of specific neuronal types in the CNS. In recent studies, expression of CBPs may be indicative of a deactivated neuronal state, particularly epilepsy. However, it is controversial whether altered expression of CBPs in the hippocampus practically indicate neuronal activity. Therefore, the present study was performed to investigate the extent of profiles of expression of CBPs in the rat hippocampus affected by several episodes induced by electroconvulsive shock. In the present study, following electroconvulsive shock expression of CBPs were reduced in the hippocampus in a stimulus-dependent manner, and recovered to the control level at 6 h after electroconvulsive shock. However, paired-pulse responses of the dentate gyrus were transiently impaired by electroconvulsive shock, and immediately normalized to baseline value. In addition, effects of electroconvulsive shock on expression of CBPs and paired-pulse responses were prevented by pretreatment of vigabatrin. These findings suggest that reduced expression of CBPs induced by seizure activity may be indicative of hyperactivity of CBP positive neurons, which is a practical consequence of the abnormal discharge, and that they may play an important role in regulating seizure activity.

  12. NEIL1 responds and binds to psoralen-induced DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Daniel R; Paramasivam, Manikandan; Baldwin, Jakita; Huang, Jing; Vyjayanti, Vaddadi N; Seidman, Michael M; Wilson, David M

    2013-05-03

    Recent evidence suggests a role for base excision repair (BER) proteins in the response to DNA interstrand crosslinks, which block replication and transcription, and lead to cell death and genetic instability. Employing fluorescently tagged fusion proteins and laser microirradiation coupled with confocal microscopy, we observed that the endonuclease VIII-like DNA glycosylase, NEIL1, accumulates at sites of oxidative DNA damage, as well as trioxsalen (psoralen)-induced DNA interstrand crosslinks, but not to angelicin monoadducts. While recruitment to the oxidative DNA lesions was abrogated by the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine, this treatment did not alter the accumulation of NEIL1 at sites of interstrand crosslinks, suggesting distinct recognition mechanisms. Consistent with this conclusion, recruitment of the NEIL1 population variants, G83D, C136R, and E181K, to oxidative DNA damage and psoralen-induced interstrand crosslinks was differentially affected by the mutation. NEIL1 recruitment to psoralen crosslinks was independent of the nucleotide excision repair recognition factor, XPC. Knockdown of NEIL1 in LN428 glioblastoma cells resulted in enhanced recruitment of XPC, a more rapid removal of digoxigenin-tagged psoralen adducts, and decreased cellular sensitivity to trioxsalen plus UVA, implying that NEIL1 and BER may interfere with normal cellular processing of interstrand crosslinks. While exhibiting no enzymatic activity, purified NEIL1 protein bound stably to psoralen interstrand crosslink-containing synthetic oligonucleotide substrates in vitro. Our results indicate that NEIL1 recognizes specifically and distinctly interstrand crosslinks in DNA, and can obstruct the efficient removal of lethal crosslink adducts.

  13. NEIL1 Responds and Binds to Psoralen-induced DNA Interstrand Crosslinks*

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Daniel R.; Paramasivam, Manikandan; Baldwin, Jakita; Huang, Jing; Vyjayanti, Vaddadi N.; Seidman, Michael M.; Wilson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a role for base excision repair (BER) proteins in the response to DNA interstrand crosslinks, which block replication and transcription, and lead to cell death and genetic instability. Employing fluorescently tagged fusion proteins and laser microirradiation coupled with confocal microscopy, we observed that the endonuclease VIII-like DNA glycosylase, NEIL1, accumulates at sites of oxidative DNA damage, as well as trioxsalen (psoralen)-induced DNA interstrand crosslinks, but not to angelicin monoadducts. While recruitment to the oxidative DNA lesions was abrogated by the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine, this treatment did not alter the accumulation of NEIL1 at sites of interstrand crosslinks, suggesting distinct recognition mechanisms. Consistent with this conclusion, recruitment of the NEIL1 population variants, G83D, C136R, and E181K, to oxidative DNA damage and psoralen-induced interstrand crosslinks was differentially affected by the mutation. NEIL1 recruitment to psoralen crosslinks was independent of the nucleotide excision repair recognition factor, XPC. Knockdown of NEIL1 in LN428 glioblastoma cells resulted in enhanced recruitment of XPC, a more rapid removal of digoxigenin-tagged psoralen adducts, and decreased cellular sensitivity to trioxsalen plus UVA, implying that NEIL1 and BER may interfere with normal cellular processing of interstrand crosslinks. While exhibiting no enzymatic activity, purified NEIL1 protein bound stably to psoralen interstrand crosslink-containing synthetic oligonucleotide substrates in vitro. Our results indicate that NEIL1 recognizes specifically and distinctly interstrand crosslinks in DNA, and can obstruct the efficient removal of lethal crosslink adducts. PMID:23508956

  14. Two types of antibodies are induced by vaccination with A/California/2009 pdm virus: binding near the sialic acid-binding pocket and neutralizing both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Nobuko; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Many people have a history of catching the flu several times during childhood but no additional flu in adulthood, even without vaccination. We analyzed the total repertoire of antibodies (Abs) against influenza A group 1 viruses induced in such a flu-resistant person after vaccination with 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. They were classified into two types, with no exceptions. The first type, the products of B cells newly induced through vaccination, binds near the sialic acid-binding pocket. The second type, the products of long-lived memory B cells established before vaccination, utilizes the 1-69 VH gene, binds to the stem of HA, and neutralizes both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses with few exceptions. These observations indicate that the sialic acid-binding pocket and its surrounding region are immunogenically very potent and majority of the B cells whose growth is newly induced by vaccination produce Abs that recognize these regions. However, they play a role in protection against influenza virus infection for a short period since variant viruses that have acquired resistance to these Abs become dominant. On the other hand, although the stem of HA is immunogenically not potent, the second type of B cells eventually becomes dominant. Thus, a selection system should function in forming the repertoire of long-lived memory B cells and the stability of the epitope would greatly affect the fate of the memory cells. Acquisition of the ability to produce Abs that bind to the stable epitope could be a major factor of flu resistance.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5) mediates methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neuron apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongfang; Xu, Jingtao; Le, Cuiyun; Huang, Enping; Liu, Chao; Qiu, Pingming; Lin, Zhoumeng; Xie, Wei-Bing; Wang, Huijun

    2014-11-04

    Overexposure to methamphetamine (METH), a psychoactive drug, induces a variety of adverse effects to the nervous system, including apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5), a member of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, is a pro-apoptotic factor that plays important roles in neuronal apoptosis. To test the hypothesis that IGFBP5 can mediate METH-induced neuronal apoptosis, we examined IGFBP5 mRNA and protein expression changes in PC12 cells exposed to METH (3.0mM) for 24h and in the striatum of rats following 15 mg/kg × 8 intraperitoneal injections of METH at 12h interval. We also checked the effect on neuronal apoptosis after silencing IGFBP5 expression with TUNEL staining and flow cytometry; Western blot was used for detecting the expression of apoptotic markers active-caspase3 and PARP. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying IGFBP5-mediated neuronal apoptosis, we determined the release of cytochrome c (cyto c), an apoptogenic factor, from the mitochondria after METH treatment with or without IGFBP5 knockdown. Our results showed that IGFBP5 expression was increased significantly after METH exposure in PC12 cells and in the METH-treated rats' striatum. Further, METH-exposed PC12 cells exhibited higher apoptosis-positive cell number and activity of caspase3 and PARP compared with control cells, while these changes can be blocked by silencing IGFBP5 expression. In addition, a significant increase of cyto c release from mitochondria after METH exposure was observed and it was inhibited after silencing IGFBP5 expression in PC12 cells. These results indicate that IGFBP5 plays key roles in METH-induced neuronal apoptosis and may be a potential gene target for therapeutics in METH-caused neurotoxicity.

  16. Ligand Binding and Calcium Influx Induce Distinct Ectodomain/γ-Secretase-processing Pathways of EphB2 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Litterst, Claudia; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Shioi, Junichi; Ghersi, Enrico; Wisniewski, Thomas; Wang, Rong; Ludwig, Andreas; Robakis, Nikolaos K.

    2007-01-01

    Binding of EphB receptors to ephrinB ligands on the surface of adjacent cells initiates signaling cascades that regulate angiogenesis, axonal guidance, and neuronal plasticity. These functions require processing of EphB receptors and removal of EphB-ephrinB complexes from the cell surface, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we show that the ectodomain of EphB2 receptor is released to extracellular space following cleavage after EphB2 residue 543. The remaining membrane-associated fragment is cleaved by the presenilin-dependent γ-secretase activity after EphB2 residue 569 releasing an intracellular peptide that contains the cytoplasmic domain of EphB2. This cleavage is inhibited by presenilin 1 familial Alzheimer disease mutations. Processing of EphB2 receptor depends on specific treatments: ephrinB ligand-induced processing requires endocytosis, and the ectodomain cleavage is sensitive to peptide inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Leu-leucinal but insensitive to metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. The ligand-induced processing takes place in endosomes and involves the rapid degradation of the extracellular EphB2. EphrinB ligand stimulates ubiquitination of EphB2 receptor. Calcium influx- and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced processing of EphB2 is inhibited by GM6001 and ADAM10 inhibitors but not by N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Leu-leucinal. This processing requires no endocytosis and promotes rapid shedding of extracellular EphB2, indicating that it takes place at the plasma membrane. Our data identify novel cleavages and modifications of EphB2 receptor and indicate that specific conditions determine the proteolytic systems and subcellular sites involved in the processing of this receptor. PMID:17428795

  17. Doubly Spliced RNA of Hepatitis B Virus Suppresses Viral Transcription via TATA-Binding Protein and Induces Stress Granule Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Chong, Chin-Liew; Chou, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Wang, Yi-Ling; Wang, Shao-Win; Chen, Mong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The risk of liver cancer in patients infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and their clinical response to interferon alpha therapy vary based on the HBV genotype. The mechanisms underlying these differences in HBV pathogenesis remain unclear. In HepG2 cells transfected with a mutant HBVG2335A expression plasmid that does not transcribe the 2.2-kb doubly spliced RNA (2.2DS-RNA) expressed by wild-type HBV genotype A, the level of HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) was higher than that in cells transfected with an HBV genotype A expression plasmid. By using cotransfection with HBV genotype D and 2.2DS-RNA expression plasmids, we found that a reduction of pgRNA was observed in the cells even in the presence of small amounts of the 2.2DS-RNA plasmid. Moreover, ectopic expression of 2.2DS-RNA in the HBV-producing cell line 1.3ES2 reduced the expression of pgRNA. Further analysis showed that exogenously transcribed 2.2DS-RNA inhibited a reconstituted transcription in vitro. In Huh7 cells ectopically expressing 2.2DS-RNA, RNA immunoprecipitation revealed that 2.2DS-RNA interacted with the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and that nucleotides 432 to 832 of 2.2DS-RNA were required for efficient TBP binding. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that 2.2DS-RNA colocalized with cytoplasmic TBP and the stress granule components, G3BP and poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), in Huh7 cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that 2.2DS-RNA acts as a repressor of HBV transcription through an interaction with TBP that induces stress granule formation. The expression of 2.2DS-RNA may be one of the viral factors involved in viral replication, which may underlie differences in clinical outcomes of liver disease and responses to interferon alpha therapy between patients infected with different HBV genotypes. IMPORTANCE Patients infected with certain genotypes of HBV have a lower risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and exhibit a more favorable response to antiviral therapy than patients

  18. Herpes simplex virus type 1-induced hemagglutination: glycoprotein C mediates virus binding to erythrocyte surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Trybala, E; Svennerholm, B; Bergström, T; Olofsson, S; Jeansson, S; Goodman, J L

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can cause agglutination of murine erythrocytes (E. Trybala, Z. Larski, and J. Wisniewski, Arch. Virol. 113:89-94, 1990). We now demonstrate that the mechanism of this hemagglutination is glycoprotein C-mediated binding of virus to heparan sulfate moieties at the surface of erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was found to be a common property of all gC-expressing laboratory strains and clinical isolates of HSV-1 tested. Mutants of HSV-1 deficient in glycoprotein C caused no specific hemagglutination, whereas their derivatives transfected with a functional gC-1 gene, thus reconstituting gC expression, regained full hemagglutinating activity. Hemagglutination activity was inhibited by antibodies against gC-1 but not by antibodies with specificity for glycoproteins gB, gD, or gE or by murine antiserum raised against the MP strain of HSV-1, which is gC deficient. Finally, purified gC-1 protein, like whole HSV-1 virions, showed high hemagglutinating activity which was inhibited by heparan sulfate and/or heparin and was completely prevented by pretreatment of erythrocytes with heparitinase, providing evidence that gC-1 mediates hemagglutination by binding to heparan sulfate at the cell surface. Thus, HSV-1-induced hemagglutination is gC-1 dependent and resembles the recently proposed mechanism by which HSV-1 attaches to surface heparans on susceptible cells, providing a simple model for initial events in the virus-cell interaction. Images PMID:8382294

  19. In vivo ketamine-induced changes in [11C]ABP688 binding to metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; DellaGioia, Nicole; Bloch, Michael; Sanacora, Gerard; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Abdallah, Chadi; Yang, Jie; Wen, Ruofeng; Mann, J. John; Krystal, John H.; Parsey, Ramin V.; Carson, Richard E.; Esterlis, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Background At subanesthetic doses, ketamine, an N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist, increases glutamate release. Here, we imaged the acute effect of ketamine on brain metabotropic glutamatergic receptors subtype 5 (mGluR5) with a high affinity PET ligand [11C]ABP688 ((E)-3-((6-methylpyridin-2-yl)ethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-O-11C-methyl-oxime), a negative allosteric modulator of mGluR5. Methods Ten healthy nonsmoking human volunteers (34±13 years old) received two [11C]ABP688 PET scans on the same day – before (scan 1) and during i.v. ketamine administration (0.23mg/kg over 1min, then 0.58mg/kg over 1h; scan 2). PET data were acquired for 90 min immediately following [11C]ABP688 bolus injection. Input functions were obtained through arterial blood sampling with metabolite analysis. Results A significant reduction in [11C]ABP688 volume of distribution (VT) was observed in scan 2 relative to scan 1 of 21.3 ± 21.4%, on average, in the anterior cingulate, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital prefrontal cortex, ventral striatum, parietal lobe, dorsal putamen, dorsal caudate, amygdala, and hippocampus. There was a significant increase in measurements of dissociative state after ketamine initiation (p<0.05) that resolved after completion of the scan. Discussion This study provides first evidence that ketamine administration decreases [11C]ABP688 binding in vivo in human subjects. Results suggest that [11C]ABP688 binding is sensitive to ketamine-induced effects, although the high individual variation in ketamine response requires further examination. PMID:25156701

  20. ONCOSTATIN M BINDS TO EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX IN A BIOACTIVE CONFORMATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR INFLAMMATION AND METASTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Randall; Martin, Bryan; Mellor, Liliana; Jacob, Reed B.; Tawara, Ken; McDougal, Owen M.; Oxford, Julia Thom; Jorcyk, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is an interleukin-6-like inflammatory cytokine reported to play a role in a number of pathological processes including cancer. Full-length OSM is expressed as a 26 kDa protein that can be proteolytically processed into 24 kDa and 22 kDa forms via removal of C-terminal peptides. In this study, we examined both the ability of OSM to bind to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the activity of immobilized OSM on human breast carcinoma cells. OSM was observed to bind to ECM proteins collagen types I and XI, laminin, and fibronectin in a pH-dependent fashion, suggesting a role for electrostatic bonds that involves charged amino acids of both the ECM and OSM. The C-terminal extensions of 24 kDa and 26 kDa OSM, which contains six and thirteen basic amino acids, respectively, enhanced electrostatic binding to ECM at pH 6.5–7.5 when compared to 22 kDa OSM. The highest levels of OSM binding to ECM, though, were observed at acidic pH 5.5, where all forms of OSM bound to ECM proteins to a similar extent. This indicates additional electrostatic binding properties independent of the OSM C-terminal extensions. The reducing agent dithiothreitol also inhibited the binding of OSM to ECM suggesting a role for disulfide bonds in OSM immobilization. OSM immobilized to ECM was protected from cleavage by tumor-associated proteases and maintained activity following incubation at acidic pH for extended periods of time. Importantly, immobilized OSM remained biologically active and was able to induce and sustain the phosphorylation of STAT3 in T47D and ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cells over prolonged periods, as well as increase levels of STAT1 and STAT3 protein expression. Immobilized OSM also induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated morphological changes in T47D cells. Taken together, these data indicate that OSM binds to ECM in a bioactive state that may have important implications for the development of chronic inflammation and tumor metastasis. PMID

  1. Serotonin-induced muscle contraction in rat stomach fundus is mediated by a G alpha z-like guanine nucleotide binding protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Y; Eberle-Wang, K; Simansky, K J; Friedman, E

    1993-11-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) potently contracts the fundus of the rat stomach; however, the associated transduction pathway has not been described fully. Experiments were performed in an attempt to gain insight into the coupling mechanism associated with this fundal 5-HT receptor. 5-HT-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding to a protein which was recognized by anti-G alpha Z antiserum in a Mg(++)-dependent fashion. 5-HT increased [35S]GTP gamma S binding in the fundus, but not in the corpus of the rat stomach. 5-HT also enhanced the binding of [alpha-32P]GTP to the fundal protein and increased the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP in fundal membranes. The fundal protein which binds GTP is 25 to 29 kDa in size whereas the brain G alpha Z protein which is recognized by the anti-G alpha Z antibody is a 41 kDa protein. Mixing experiments revealed that the fundal guanine nucleotide binding protein does not appear to be a proteolytic product of the 41 kDa G alpha Z protein. Activating protein kinase C with phorbol-12-myristate, 13-acetate induced a concentration-dependent, noncompetitive inhibition of [35S]GTP gamma S binding to the fundal protein, and of 5-HT-induced contraction of fundal strips. Phorbol-12-myristate, 13-acetate did not alter carbachol- or KCl-mediated fundus contraction. Furthermore, the activation of [35S]GTP gamma S binding by serotonergic agonists and its inhibition by pharmacological antagonists corresponded to the known actions of these agents on contraction of fundal muscle. The results provide evidence that the 5-HT receptor in the rat stomach fundus is coupled directly or indirectly to a G alpha z-like protein which may mediate 5-HT-induced contraction in this tissue.

  2. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of the Human Mu-Opioid Receptor (MOR) by Morphine-Induced RNA Binding Proteins hnRNP K and PCBP1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyu Young; Choi, Hack Sun; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) protein is controlled by extensive transcriptional and post-transcriptional processing. MOR gene expression has previously been shown to be altered by a post-transcriptional mechanism involving the MOR mRNA untranslated region (UTR). Here, we demonstrate for the first time the role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleic acids (hnRNA)-binding protein (hnRNP) K and poly(C)-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) as post-transcriptional inducers in MOR gene regulation. In the absence of morphine, a significant level of MOR mRNA is sustained in its resting state and partitions in the translationally inactive polysomal fraction. Morphine stimulation activates the downstream targets hnRNP K and PCPB1 and induces partitioning of the MOR mRNA to the translationally active fraction. Using reporter and ligand binding assays, as well as RNA EMSA, we reveal potential RNP binding sites located in the 5′-untranslated region of human MOR mRNA. In addition, we also found that morphine-induced RNPs could regulate MOR expression. Our results establish the role of hnRNP K and PCPB1 in the translational control of morphine-induced MOR expression in human neuroblastoma (NMB) cells as well as cells stably expressing MOR (NMB1). PMID:27292014

  3. Resveratrol induces apoptosis by directly targeting Ras-GTPase activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1)

    PubMed Central

    Oi, Naomi; Yuan, Jian; Malakhova, Margarita; Luo, Kuntian; Li, Yunhui; Ryu, Joohyun; Zhang, Lei; Bode, Ann M.; Xu, Zengguang; Li, Yan; Lou, Zhenkun; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol possesses a strong anticancer activity exhibited as the induction of apoptosis through p53 activation. However, the molecular mechanism and direct target(s) of resveratrol-induced p53 activation remain elusive. Here, the Ras-GTPase activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1) was identified as a potential target of resveratrol, and in vitro binding assay results using resveratrol (RSVL)-conjugated Sepharose 4B beads confirmed their direct binding. Depletion of G3BP1 significantly diminishes resveratrol-induced p53 expression and apoptosis. We also found that G3BP1 negatively regulates p53 expression by interacting with ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10), a deubiquitinating enzyme of p53. Disruption of the interaction of p53 with USP10 by G3BP1 interference leads to suppression of p53 deubiquitination. Resveratrol, on the other hand, directly binds to G3BP1 and prevents the G3BP1/USP10 interaction, resulting in enhanced USP10-mediated deubiquitination of p53 and consequently increased p53 expression. These findings disclose a novel mechanism of resveratrol-induced p53 activation and resveratrol-induced apoptosis by direct targeting of G3BP1. PMID:24998844

  4. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of the Human Mu-Opioid Receptor (MOR) by Morphine-Induced RNA Binding Proteins hnRNP K and PCBP1.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyu Young; Choi, Hack Sun; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H

    2017-03-01

    Expression of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) protein is controlled by extensive transcriptional and post-transcriptional processing. MOR gene expression has previously been shown to be altered by a post-transcriptional mechanism involving the MOR mRNA untranslated region (UTR). Here, we demonstrate for the first time the role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleic acids (hnRNA)-binding protein (hnRNP) K and poly(C)-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) as post-transcriptional inducers in MOR gene regulation. In the absence of morphine, a significant level of MOR mRNA is sustained in its resting state and partitions in the translationally inactive polysomal fraction. Morphine stimulation activates the downstream targets hnRNP K and PCPB1 and induces partitioning of the MOR mRNA to the translationally active fraction. Using reporter and ligand binding assays, as well as RNA EMSA, we reveal potential RNP binding sites located in the 5'-untranslated region of human MOR mRNA. In addition, we also found that morphine-induced RNPs could regulate MOR expression. Our results establish the role of hnRNP K and PCPB1 in the translational control of morphine-induced MOR expression in human neuroblastoma (NMB) cells as well as cells stably expressing MOR (NMB1). J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 576-584, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Vibrio cholerae Classical TcpA Amino Acid Sequence Induces Protective Antibody That Binds an Area Hypothesized To Be Important for Toxin-Coregulated Pilus Structure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ronald K.; Kirn, Thomas J.; Meeks, Michael D.; Wade, Terri K.; Wade, William F.

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that has been associated with cholera pandemics since the early 1800s. Whole-cell, killed, and live-attenuated oral cholera vaccines are in use. We and others have focused on the development of a subunit cholera vaccine that features standardized epitopes from various V. cholerae macromolecules that are known to induce protective antibody responses. TcpA protein is assembled into toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), a type IVb pilus required for V. cholerae colonization, and thus is a strong candidate for a cholera subunit vaccine. Polypeptides (24 to 26 amino acids) in TcpA that can induce protective antibody responses have been reported, but further characterization of their amino acid targets relative to tertiary or quaternary TCP structures has not been done. We report a refinement of the TcpA sequences that can induce protective antibody. One sequence, TcpA 15 (residues 170 to 183), induces antibodies that bind linear TcpA in a Western blot as well as weakly bind soluble TcpA in solution. These antibodies bind assembled pili at high density and provide 80 to 100% protection in the infant mouse protection assay. This is in sharp contrast to other anti-TcpA peptide sera (TcpA 11, TcpA 13, and TcpA 17) that bind very strongly in Western blot and solution assays yet do not provide protection or effectively bind TCP, as evidenced by immunoelectron microscopy. The sequences of TcpA 15 that induce protective antibody were localized on a model of assembled TCP. These sequences are centered on a site that is predicted to be important for TCP structure. PMID:15385509

  6. Airway epithelial inflammation-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ store expansion is mediated by X-box binding protein-1.

    PubMed

    Martino, Mary E B; Olsen, John C; Fulcher, Nanette B; Wolfgang, Matthew C; O'Neal, Wanda K; Ribeiro, Carla M P

    2009-05-29

    Inflamed cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelia (HBE), or normal HBE exposed to supernatant from mucopurulent material (SMM) from CF airways, exhibit endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/Ca(2+) store expansion and amplified Ca(2+)-mediated inflammation. HBE inflammation triggers an unfolded protein response (UPR) coupled to mRNA splicing of X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1). Because spliced XBP-1 (XBP-1s) promotes ER expansion in other cellular models, we hypothesized that XBP-1s is responsible for the ER/Ca(2+) store expansion in inflamed HBE. XBP-1s was increased in freshly isolated infected/inflamed CF in comparison with normal HBE. The link between airway epithelial inflammation, XBP-1s, and ER/Ca(2+) store expansion was then addressed in murine airways challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa-challenged mice exhibited airway epithelial ER/Ca(2+) store expansion, which correlated with airway inflammation. P. aeruginosa-induced airway inflammation triggered XBP-1s in ER stress-activated indicator (ERAI) mice. To evaluate the functional role of XBP-1s in airway inflammation linked to ER/Ca(2+) store expansion, control, XBP-1s, or dominant negative XBP-1 (DN-XBP-1) stably expressing 16HBE14o(-) cell lines were used. Studies with cells transfected with an unfolded protein response element (UPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid confirmed that the UPRE was activated or inhibited by expression of XBP-1s or DN-XBP-1, respectively. Expression of XBP-1s induced ER/Ca(2+) store expansion and potentiated bradykinin-increased interleukin (IL)-8 secretion, whereas expression of DN-XBP-1 inhibited bradykinin-dependent IL-8 secretion. In addition, expression of DN-XBP-1 blunted SMM-induced ER/Ca(2+) store expansion and SMM-induced IL-8 secretion. These findings suggest that, in inflamed HBE, XBP-1s is responsible for the ER/Ca(2+) store expansion that confers amplification of Ca(2+)-dependent inflammatory responses.

  7. Novel Comparative Pattern Count Analysis Reveals a Chronic Ethanol-Induced Dynamic Shift in Immediate Early NF-κB Genome-wide Promoter Binding During Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Patra, Biswanath; Hoek, Jan B; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-01-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a clinically important process that is impaired by adaptation to chronic alcohol intake. We focused on the initial time points following partial hepatectomy (PHx) to analyze genome-wide binding activity of NF-κB, a key immediate early regulator. We investigated the effect of chronic alcohol intake on immediate early NF-κB genome-wide localization, in the adapted state as well as in response to partial hepatectomy, using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by promoter microarray analysis. We found many ethanol-specific NF-κB binding target promoters in the ethanol-adapted state, corresponding to regulation of biosynthetic processes, oxidation-reduction and apoptosis. Partial hepatectomy induced a diet-independent shift in NF-κB binding loci relative to the transcription start sites. We employed a novel pattern count analysis to exhaustively enumerate and compare the number of promoters corresponding t