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Sample records for inducible transcript mimicking

  1. Tunable Transmission-Line Metamaterials Mimicking Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, T. H.; Han, H. P.

    2016-11-01

    Tunable transmission-line (TL) metamaterials mimicking electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) have been studied. Firstly, two types of tunable TL EIT-like metamaterial, based on the double split-ring resonator (DSRR) and single split-ring resonator (SSRR), were fabricated and their transmission properties carefully compared. The results showed that the transmittance maximum was almost invariable with shift of the transparency window for the tunable DSRR-based TL EIT-like metamaterial, but for the tunable SSRR-based TL EIT-like metamaterial, the transmittance maximum gradually diminished with shift of the transparency window toward the center of the absorption band. Moreover, the reason for these different transmission properties was explored, revealing that the reduction of the transmittance maximum of the transparency window for the tunable SSRR-based TL EIT-like metamaterial is mainly due to energy loss caused by the resistance of the loaded varactor diodes.

  2. Tunable Transmission-Line Metamaterials Mimicking Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, T. H.; Han, H. P.

    2016-08-01

    Tunable transmission-line (TL) metamaterials mimicking electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) have been studied. Firstly, two types of tunable TL EIT-like metamaterial, based on the double split-ring resonator (DSRR) and single split-ring resonator (SSRR), were fabricated and their transmission properties carefully compared. The results showed that the transmittance maximum was almost invariable with shift of the transparency window for the tunable DSRR-based TL EIT-like metamaterial, but for the tunable SSRR-based TL EIT-like metamaterial, the transmittance maximum gradually diminished with shift of the transparency window toward the center of the absorption band. Moreover, the reason for these different transmission properties was explored, revealing that the reduction of the transmittance maximum of the transparency window for the tunable SSRR-based TL EIT-like metamaterial is mainly due to energy loss caused by the resistance of the loaded varactor diodes.

  3. Organelle-mimicking liposome dissociates G-quadruplexes and facilitates transcription

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Smritimoy; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Important biological reactions involving nucleic acids occur near the surface of membranes such as the nuclear membrane (NM) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, the interactions between biomembranes and nucleic acids are poorly understood. We report here that transcription was facilitated in solution with liposomes, which mimic a biomembrane surface, relative to the reaction in a homogeneous aqueous solution when the template was able to form a G-quadruplex. The G-quadruplex is known to be an inhibitor of transcription, but the stability of the G-quadruplex was decreased at the liposome surface because of unfavourable enthalpy. The destabilization of the G-quadruplex was greater at the surface of NM- and ER-mimicking liposomes than at the surfaces of liposomes designed to mimic other organelles. Thermodynamic analyses revealed that the G-rich oligonucleotides adopted an extended structure at the liposome surface, whereas in solution the compact G-quadruplex was formed. Our data suggest that changes in structure and stability of nucleic acids regulate biological reactions at membrane surfaces. PMID:25336617

  4. Notch signaling represses hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts under cobalt-mimicked hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    LI, CHEN-TIAN; LIU, JIAN-XIU; YU, BO; LIU, RUI; DONG, CHAO; LI, SONG-JIAN

    2016-01-01

    The modification of Wnt and Notch signaling pathways by hypoxia, and its association with osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis remain to be fully elucidated. To investigate Wnt-Notch crosstalk, and its role in hypoxia-induced osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis regulation, the present study investigated the effects of cobalt-mimicked hypoxia on the mouse pre-osteoblast-like cell line, MC3T3-E1, when the Notch signals were repressed using a γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. The data showed that the cobalt-mimicked hypoxia suppressed cell proliferation under normal conditions, but increased cell proliferation under conditions of Notch repression, in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that the cobalt treatment increased the levels of activated β-catenin protein and the expression levels of the target genes, axis inhibition protein 2 and myelocytomatosis oncogene, under DAPT-induced Notch repression. However, no significant changes were found in the expression levels of the Notch intracellular domain protein or the Notch target gene, hes1. In a β-catenin gene-knockdown experiment, the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 cells under hypoxia were decreased by DAPT treatment, and knockdown of the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) suppressed the cobalt-induced increase in Wnt target gene levels. No significant difference in cell proliferation rate was found following DAPT treatment when the expression of HIF-1α was knocked down. The results of the present study showed the opposing effects of Wnt and Notch signaling under cobalt-mimicked hypoxia, which were partially regulated by HIF-1α, The results also showed that osteoblast proliferation was dependent on Wnt-Notch signal crosstalk. PMID:27220406

  5. Myc Depletion Induces a Pluripotent Dormant State Mimicking Diapause

    PubMed Central

    Scognamiglio, Roberta; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Thier, Marc Christian; Altamura, Sandro; Reyes, Alejandro; Prendergast, Áine M.; Baumgärtner, Daniel; Carnevalli, Larissa S.; Atzberger, Ann; Haas, Simon; von Paleske, Lisa; Boroviak, Thorsten; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Essers, Marieke A.G.; Kloz, Ulrich; Eisenman, Robert N.; Edenhofer, Frank; Bertone, Paul; Huber, Wolfgang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Smith, Austin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are maintained in a naive ground state of pluripotency in the presence of MEK and GSK3 inhibitors. Here, we show that ground-state ESCs express low Myc levels. Deletion of both c-myc and N-myc (dKO) or pharmacological inhibition of Myc activity strongly decreases transcription, splicing, and protein synthesis, leading to proliferation arrest. This process is reversible and occurs without affecting pluripotency, suggesting that Myc-depleted stem cells enter a state of dormancy similar to embryonic diapause. Indeed, c-Myc is depleted in diapaused blastocysts, and the differential expression signatures of dKO ESCs and diapaused epiblasts are remarkably similar. Following Myc inhibition, pre-implantation blastocysts enter biosynthetic dormancy but can progress through their normal developmental program after transfer into pseudo-pregnant recipients. Our study shows that Myc controls the biosynthetic machinery of stem cells without affecting their potency, thus regulating their entry and exit from the dormant state. PMID:26871632

  6. Myc Depletion Induces a Pluripotent Dormant State Mimicking Diapause.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Roberta; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Thier, Marc Christian; Altamura, Sandro; Reyes, Alejandro; Prendergast, Áine M; Baumgärtner, Daniel; Carnevalli, Larissa S; Atzberger, Ann; Haas, Simon; von Paleske, Lisa; Boroviak, Thorsten; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Essers, Marieke A G; Kloz, Ulrich; Eisenman, Robert N; Edenhofer, Frank; Bertone, Paul; Huber, Wolfgang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Smith, Austin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2016-02-11

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are maintained in a naive ground state of pluripotency in the presence of MEK and GSK3 inhibitors. Here, we show that ground-state ESCs express low Myc levels. Deletion of both c-myc and N-myc (dKO) or pharmacological inhibition of Myc activity strongly decreases transcription, splicing, and protein synthesis, leading to proliferation arrest. This process is reversible and occurs without affecting pluripotency, suggesting that Myc-depleted stem cells enter a state of dormancy similar to embryonic diapause. Indeed, c-Myc is depleted in diapaused blastocysts, and the differential expression signatures of dKO ESCs and diapaused epiblasts are remarkably similar. Following Myc inhibition, pre-implantation blastocysts enter biosynthetic dormancy but can progress through their normal developmental program after transfer into pseudo-pregnant recipients. Our study shows that Myc controls the biosynthetic machinery of stem cells without affecting their potency, thus regulating their entry and exit from the dormant state. PMID:26871632

  7. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  8. Pulmonary mass and multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung neoplasm as amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, J L.; García-Nieto, J C.; Ballesta, F; Prieto, E; Villanueva, M A.; Gallardo, J

    2001-07-01

    Amiodarone is an effective anti-arrhythmic agent. However, during long-term therapy, patients can develop severe adverse pulmonary reactions that are potentially life-threatening. A case of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity is presented in a 78-year-old woman. She developed dyspnea and a pulmonary mass with associated multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung cancer following 5 years of treatment with amiodarone for atrial fibrillation. After drug withdrawal, and without any additional treatment, clinical and radiological improvement was observed, and radiological findings resolved completely within 6 months.

  9. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  10. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  11. Mimicking cataract-induced visual dysfunction by means of protein denaturation in egg albumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandracchia, B.; Finizio, A.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    As the world's population ages, cataract-induced visual dysfunction and blindness is on the increase. This is a significant global problem. The most common symptoms of cataracts are glared and blurred vision. Usually, people with cataract have trouble seeing and reading at distance or in low light and also their color perception is altered. Furthermore, cataract is a sneaky disease as it is usually a very slow but progressive process, which creates adaptation so that patients find it difficult to recognize. All this can be very difficult to explain, so we built and tested an optical device to help doctors giving comprehensive answers to the patients' symptoms. This device allows visualizing how cataract impairs vision mimicking the optical degradation of the crystalline related cataracts. This can be a valuable optical tool for medical education as well as to provide a method to illustrate the patients how cataract progression process will affect their vision.

  12. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct are induced to express chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) following exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation, {gamma} rays, neutrons, and others. In this report, the authors demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evidence in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Other agents which caused no cell killing (such as heat-shock for up to 2 h, treatment with metronidazole, exposure to sunlight, vitamin C treatment, and others) had no effect on HIV-LTR induction. These results suggest that HIV transcription is induced as a consequence of the turn on of a cellular death or apoptotic pathway.

  13. Optical tracking of acoustic radiation force impulse-induced dynamics in a tissue-mimicking phantom

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Streeter, Jason E.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Optical tracking was utilized to investigate the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)-induced response, generated by a 5-MHz piston transducer, in a translucent tissue-mimicking phantom. Suspended 10-μm microspheres were tracked axially and laterally at multiple locations throughout the field of view of an optical microscope with 0.5-μm displacement resolution, in both dimensions, and at frame rates of up to 36 kHz. Induced dynamics were successfully captured before, during, and after the ARFI excitation at depths of up to 4.8 mm from the phantom’s proximal boundary. Results are presented for tracked axial and lateral displacements resulting from on-axis and off-axis (i.e., shear wave) acquisitions; these results are compared to matched finite element method modeling and independent ultrasonically based empirical results and yielded reasonable agreement in most cases. A shear wave reflection, generated by the proximal boundary, consistently produced an artifact in tracked displacement data later in time (i.e., after the initial ARFI-induced displacement peak). This tracking method provides high-frame-rate, two-dimensional tracking data and thus could prove useful in the investigation of complex ARFI-induced dynamics in controlled experimental settings. PMID:19894849

  14. Role of platinum DNA damage-induced transcriptional inhibition in chemotherapy-induced neuronal atrophy and peripheral neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Johnson J; Ip, Virginia; Jamieson, Stephen M F; McKeage, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause peripheral neurotoxicity by damaging sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. The roles of platinum DNA binding, transcription inhibition and altered cell size were investigated in primary cultures of rat DRG cells. Click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging of RNA-incorporated 5-ethynyluridine showed high, but wide ranging, global levels of transcription in individual neurons that correlated with their cell body size. Treatment with platinum drugs reduced neuronal transcription and cell body size to an extent that corresponded to the amount of preceding platinum DNA binding, but without any loss of neuronal cells. The effects of platinum drugs on neuronal transcription and cell body size were inhibited by blocking platinum DNA binding with sodium thiosulfate, and mimicked by treatment with a model transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D. In vivo oxaliplatin treatment depleted the total RNA content of DRG tissue concurrently with altering DRG neuronal size. These findings point to a mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. DRG neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this mechanism of toxicity because of their requirements for high basal levels of global transcriptional activity. Findings point to a new stepwise mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. Dorsal root ganglion neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this neurotoxicity because of their high global transcriptional outputs, demonstrated in this study by click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging.

  15. Oxaliplatin-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, JUNG-HYE; WON, YOUNG-WOONG; KIM, HYUN SUNG; OH, YOUNG-HA; LIM, SANGHYEOK; KIM, HAN-JOON

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer; however, it may cause liver injury, particularly sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). Although SOS does not usually present with focal lesions on radiological images, the present study describes the case of a 22-year-old woman with oxaliplatin-induced SOS mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver. An abdominal computed tomography revealed a novel 1 cm, low-density lesion in segment 1 of the liver following the administration of the fourth round of oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer. Since the lesion was indistinguishable from metastasis, even with detailed imaging studies, including magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography, an isolated caudate lobectomy was planned. The cut surface of the resected liver showed a localized reddish congested lesion measuring 1.4 cm in diameter. The adjacent hepatic parenchyma also demonstrated diffuse sinusoidal congestion with a nutmeg-like appearance. Histologically, the lesion exhibited severe sinusoidal congestion with peliosis hepatis-like features. The widened sinusoidal space was outlined by markedly attenuated hepatic cords and filled with erythrocytes. The final diagnosis was oxaliplatin-induced SOS. The patient recovered completely and was relapse-free at the time of writing. PMID:27073565

  16. Bupivacaine induced cardiac toxicity mimicking an acute non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ho Yoel; Kim, Jang-Young; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Yoon, Junghan; Yoo, Byung-Su; Choe, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2007-04-30

    Bupivacaine is widely used as a local anesthetic. Central nervous system (CNS) and cardiovascular toxicity are well known side effects. However, there has been no report of bupivacaine-induced myocardial injury. We present a case of bupivacaine cardiac toxicity mimicking an acute non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, which was eventually diagnosed as bupivacaine-induced cardiac toxicity without CNS toxicity. As soon as a healthy young woman at a private clinic was given a spinal anesthesia of 6mg bupivacaine for hemorrhoidectomy, she developed arrhythmia and hypotension. She was transferred to our emergency room. There was an accelerated idioventricular rhythm with ST segment depression on electrocardiogram, coarse breathing sounds with rales on whole lung field and a butterfly sign on the chest radiograph. 2D transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed reduced left ventricle systolic ejection fraction (approximately 27%). There was regional wall motion abnormality of the left ventricle on 2D TTE and the cardiac marker was increased. We diagnosed the patient as having acute non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction but her impaired cardiac function improved gradually. On the seventh day from admission, there was a complete spontaneous recovery of cardiac function, and coronary angiography revealed a normal coronary artery. Therefore, we firmly believe that bupivacaine directly injures the cardiac cell.

  17. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Protection against West Nile Virus Infection in Mice after Inoculation with Type I Interferon-Inducing RNA Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Escribano-Romero, Estela; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Sobrino, Francisco; Borrego, Belén; Sáiz, Margarita; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurovirulent single stranded RNA mosquito-borne flavivirus, whose main natural hosts are birds, but it also infects humans and horses. Nowadays, no human vaccine is commercially available and clinical treatment is only supportive. Recently, it has been shown that RNA transcripts, mimicking structural domains in the non-coding regions (NCRs) of the foot-and mouth disease virus (FMDV) induce a potent IFN response and antiviral activity in transfected cultured cells, and also reduced mice susceptibility to FMDV. By using different transcripts combinations, administration schedules, and infecting routes and doses, we have demonstrated that these FMDV RNA transcripts protect suckling and adult mice against lethal challenge with WNV. The protective activity induced by the transcripts was systemic and dependent on the infection route and dose. These results confirm the antiviral potential of these synthetic RNAs for fighting viruses of different families relevant for human and animal health. PMID:23166685

  19. Gemcitabine-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome mimicking scleroderma renal crisis presenting with Raynaud's phenomenon, positive antinuclear antibodies and hypertensive emergency.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Keisuke; Nobata, Hironobu; Kawai, Hirohisa; Wakamatsu, Ryo; Miura, Naoto; Banno, Shogo; Imai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman who received gemcitabine for advanced gallbladder cancer developed an impaired renal function, thrombocytopenia, Raynaud's phenomenon, digital ischemic changes, a high antinuclear antibody titer and hypertensive emergency that mimicked a scleroderma renal crisis. A kidney biopsy specimen demonstrated onion-skin lesions in the arterioles and small arteries along with ischemic changes in the glomeruli, compatible with a diagnosis of hypertensive emergency (malignant hypertension). The intravenous administration of a calcium channel blocker, the oral administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor blocker and the transfusion of fresh frozen plasma were effective for treating the thrombocytopenia and progressive kidney dysfunction. Gemcitabine induces hemolytic uremic syndrome with accelerated hypertension and Raynaud's phenomenon, mimicking scleroderma renal crisis.

  20. Pathogen-Mimicking Polymeric Nanoparticles based on Dopamine Polymerization as Vaccines Adjuvants Induce Robust Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Yang, Tingyuan; Fan, Qingze; Wang, Lianyan; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    Aiming to enhance the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines, a novel antigen delivery and adjuvant system based on dopamine polymerization on the surface of poly(D,L-lactic-glycolic-acid) nanoparticles (NPs) with multiple mechanisms of immunity enhancement is developed. The mussel-inspired biomimetic polydopamine (pD) not only serves as a coating to NPs but also functionalizes NP surfaces. The method is facile and mild including simple incubation of the preformed NPs in the weak alkaline dopamine solution, and incorporation of hepatitis B surface antigen and TLR9 agonist unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motif with the pD surface. The as-constructed NPs possess pathogen-mimicking manners owing to their size, shape, and surface molecular immune-activating properties given by CpG. The biocompatibility and biosafety of these pathogen-mimicking NPs are confirmed using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Pathogen-mimicking NPs hold great potential as vaccine delivery and adjuvant system due to their ability to: 1) enhance cytokine secretion and immune cell recruitment at the injection site; 2) significantly activate and maturate dendritic cells; 3) induce stronger humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. Furthermore, this simple and versatile dopamine polymerization method can be applicable to endow NPs with characteristics to mimic pathogen structure and function, and manipulate NPs for the generation of efficacious vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26849717

  1. Molecular basis of transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Da, Lintai; Plouffe, Steven W.; Chong, Jenny; Kool, Eric; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high transcriptional fidelity is essential for life. Some DNA lesions lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis. In particular, we will focus on the three key checkpoint steps of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity: insertion (specific nucleotide selection and incorporation), extension (differentiation of RNA transcript extension of a matched over mismatched 3'-RNA terminus), and proofreading (preferential removal of misincorporated nucleotides from the 3'-RNA end). We will also discuss some novel insights into the molecular basis and chemical perspectives of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity through structural, computational, and chemical biology approaches. PMID:24767259

  2. Transcription factors interfering with dedifferentiation induce cell type-specific transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hikichi, Takafusa; Matoba, Ryo; Ikeda, Takashi; Watanabe, Akira; Yamamoto, Takuya; Yoshitake, Satoko; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Kimura, Takayuki; Kamon, Masayoshi; Shimura, Mari; Kawakami, Koichi; Okuda, Akihiko; Okochi, Hitoshi; Inoue, Takafumi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Masui, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are able to regulate differentiation-related processes, including dedifferentiation and direct conversion, through the regulation of cell type-specific transcriptional profiles. However, the functional interactions between the TFs regulating different transcriptional profiles are not well understood. Here, we show that the TFs capable of inducing cell type-specific transcriptional profiles prevent the dedifferentiation induced by TFs for pluripotency. Of the large number of TFs expressed in a neural-lineage cell line, we identified a subset of TFs that, when overexpressed, strongly interfered with the dedifferentiation triggered by the procedure to generate induced pluripotent stem cells. This interference occurred through a maintenance mechanism of the cell type-specific transcriptional profile. Strikingly, the maintenance activity of the interfering TF set was strong enough to induce the cell line-specific transcriptional profile when overexpressed in a heterologous cell type. In addition, the TFs that interfered with dedifferentiation in hepatic-lineage cells involved TFs with known induction activity for hepatic-lineage cells. Our results suggest that dedifferentiation suppresses a cell type-specific transcriptional profile, which is primarily maintained by a small subset of TFs capable of inducing direct conversion. We anticipate that this functional correlation might be applicable in various cell types and might facilitate the identification of TFs with induction activity in efforts to understand differentiation. PMID:23550161

  3. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    PubMed

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-01

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  4. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  5. Mimicking the Fenton reaction-induced wood decay by fungi for pretreatment of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Park, Hyun Min; Park, Yong-Cheol; Park, Kyungmoon; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the Fenton reaction, which is naturally used by fungi for wood decay, was employed to pretreat rice straw and increase the enzymatic digestibility for the saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass. Using an optimized Fenton's reagent (FeCl3 and H2O2) for pretreatment, an enzymatic digestibility that was 93.2% of the theoretical glucose yield was obtained. This is the first report of the application of the Fenton reaction to lignocellulose pretreatment at a moderate temperature (i.e., 25°C) and with a relatively high loading of biomass (i.e., 10% (w/v)). Substantial improvement in the process economics of cellulosic fuel and chemical production can be achieved by replacing the conventional pretreatment with this Fenton-mimicking process.

  6. Burn-induced subepicardial injury in frog heart: a simple model mimicking ST segment changes in ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    KAZAMA, Itsuro

    2015-01-01

    To mimic ischemic heart disease in humans, several animal models have been created, mainly in rodents by surgically ligating their coronary arteries. In the present study, by simply inducing burn injuries on the bullfrog heart, we reproduced abnormal ST segment changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), mimicking those observed in ischemic heart disease, such as acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. The “currents of injury” created by a voltage gradient between the intact and damaged areas of the myocardium, negatively deflected the ECG vector during the diastolic phase, making the ST segment appear elevated during the systolic phase. This frog model of heart injury would be suitable to explain the mechanisms of ST segment changes observed in ischemic heart disease. PMID:26346747

  7. Class I Lysine Deacetylases Facilitate Glucocorticoid-induced Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Vineela; Patrick, Nina M.; Mathieu, Wana; Jaime-Frias, Rosa; Pookhao, Naruekamol; An, Lingling; Smith, Catharine L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors use lysine acetyltransferases and lysine deacetylases (KDACs) in regulating transcription through histone acetylation. Lysine acetyltransferases interact with steroid receptors upon binding of an agonist and are recruited to target genes. KDACs have been shown to interact with steroid receptors upon binding to an antagonist. We have shown previously that KDAC inhibitors (KDACis) potently repress the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter through transcriptional mechanisms and impair the ability of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to activate it, suggesting that KDACs can play a positive role in GR transactivation. In the current study, we extended this analysis to the entire GR transcriptome and found that the KDACi valproic acid impairs the ability of agonist-bound GR to activate about 50% of its target genes. This inhibition is largely due to impaired transcription rather than defective GR processing and was also observed using a structurally distinct KDACi. Depletion of KDAC1 expression mimicked the effects of KDACi in over half of the genes found to be impaired in GR transactivation. Simultaneous depletion of KDACs 1 and 2 caused full or partial impairment of several more GR target genes. Altogether we found that Class I KDAC activity facilitates GR-mediated activation at a sizable fraction of GR-activated target genes and that KDAC1 alone or in coordination with KDAC2 is required for efficient GR transactivation at many of these target genes. Finally, our work demonstrates that KDACi exposure has a significant impact on GR signaling and thus has ramifications for the clinical use of these drugs. PMID:23946490

  8. Radiation-induced anaplastic ependymoma mimicking a skull base meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SPALLONE, ALDO; MARCHIONE, PASQUALE; DI CAPUA, MARIO; BELVISI, DANIELE

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with headache, dizziness and vomiting due to a an ovoid mass in the left pre-bulbar cistern, apparently arising from the lower clivus and the foramen magnum. The clinical history revealed the subtotal removal of a right cerebellar low-grade glioma 15 years previously and subsequent conventional 60-Gy radiotherapy. Notably, following gross total resection, histopathological examination showed microscopic features that resulted in a diagnosis of anaplastic ependymoma. The patient underwent surgery to remove the mass and post-operative chemotherapy with temozolomide. A progressive improvement of neurological signs and symptoms was observed during the postoperative course. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient was free from clinical and radiological recurrence. The unusual features of this rare secondary brain tumor were the extrassial location in the posterior fossa, the unusual age-associated location of the histological subtype and the fact that it closely mimicked a skull-base meningioma. PMID:26893630

  9. Nivolumab-induced chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy mimicking rapid-onset Guillain-Barré syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Yanagiha, Kumi; Hirabayashi, Takumi; Ishii, Akiko; Okune, Mari; Inoue, Sae; Sekine, Ikuo; Tamaoka, Akira; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-09-01

    Nivolumab, an anti-programmed death-1-specific monoclonal antibody, has demonstrated a durable response and effect on overall survival and has become one of the standard treatments for patients with advanced melanoma. Reported herein is a case of nivolumab-induced chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, in which an 85-year-old woman with stage IV melanoma developed grade 1 paresthesia 2 weeks after the initial dose of nivolumab was administered. With continued treatment, the neurological deficiency deteriorated rapidly, mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome, causing such a dramatic decrease in her activities of daily living that she could no longer function in daily life. Thus, nivolumab treatment was discontinued. A course of intravenous immunoglobulin infusion yielded a dramatic clinical improvement; in particular, improved motor control was observed within a few days. Her initial presentation was suggestive of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, a subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome; however, the good response to steroids and exacerbation 8 weeks after the onset were suggestive of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy induced by nivolumab. This is the first case of Guillain-Barré syndrome-like autoimmune polyradiculoneuropathy induced by programmed death-1/programmed death-ligand 1 inhibitors. Although neurological adverse events related to nivolumab are rare, they can become severe, requiring early diagnosis and intervention. Intravenous immunoglobulin may be considered as an effective initial treatment for patients who develop acute autoimmune nervous system disorders due to nivolumab.

  10. Transcription induces gyration of the DNA template in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, N; Bossi, L

    1988-01-01

    We show that transcription modulation of a plasmid sequence in exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells leads to a rapid change in the linking number of plasmid DNA. Activation of transcription is accompanied by an increase in the plasmid's level of negative supercoiling. The added superhelical turns, whose number is proportional to the strength of the promoter and to the length of the transcript, are promptly removed when transcription is turned off. The transcription-induced increase of template supercoiling can still be detected in the presence of an inhibitor of ATP-dependent DNA gyrase [DNA topoisomerase (ATP-hydrolyzing), EC 5.99.1.3]. Altogether, our results indicate that, in addition to being under a general control, DNA superhelicity can be modulated locally in response to the topological perturbations associated with DNA tracking processes. We discuss a model in which supercoiling changes are produced by differential swiveling activities on the opposite sides of a transcriptional flow during transcriptional modulation. Images PMID:2849103

  11. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Trigger Hypoxia-Induced Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, N. S.; Maltepe, E.; Goldwasser, E.; Mathieu, C. E.; Simon, M. C.; Schumacker, P. T.

    1998-09-01

    Transcriptional activation of erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, and vascular endothelial growth factor occurs during hypoxia or in response to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in Hep3B cells. However, neither the mechanism of cellular O2 sensing nor that of cobalt is fully understood. We tested whether mitochondria act as O2 sensors during hypoxia and whether hypoxia and cobalt activate transcription by increasing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results show (i) wild-type Hep3B cells increase ROS generation during hypoxia (1.5% O2) or CoCl2 incubation, (ii) Hep3B cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA (ρ 0 cells) fail to respire, fail to activate mRNA for erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, or vascular endothelial growth factor during hypoxia, and fail to increase ROS generation during hypoxia; (iii) ρ 0 cells increase ROS generation in response to CoCl2 and retain the ability to induce expression of these genes; and (iv) the antioxidants pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and ebselen abolish transcriptional activation of these genes during hypoxia or CoCl2 in wild-type cells, and abolish the response to CoCl2 in ρ 0 cells. Thus, hypoxia activates transcription via a mitochondria-dependent signaling process involving increased ROS, whereas CoCl2 activates transcription by stimulating ROS generation via a mitochondria-independent mechanism.

  12. Xanthogranulomatous pseudotumor of stomach induced by perforated peptic ulcer mimicking a stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Chen, Yung-Fang; Ho, Yung-Jen; Yang, Mei-Due; Shen, Wu-Chung

    2006-10-01

    Perforation is a serious complication of peptic ulcer disease occurring in 5% of such patients. Occasionally, the perforation may be sealed off by the omentum or the adjacent organs. Sealed perforated ulcer with pseudotumor formation is very rarely encountered. Here we present a case of gastric pseudotumor induced by perforation of a peptic ulcer. The imaging features in a barium sulfate study and computed tomography mimic an intramural tumor of the stomach.

  13. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Panozzo, J.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct`, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {Gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  14. Selenomethionine Induced Transcriptional Programs in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Brooks, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We determined the effects of selenomethionine, the major organic selenium containing compound found in the diet and the form of selenium being used in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, on prostate cancer cells. Materials and Methods We assessed global transcript profiles of selenomethionine treated LNCaP using cDNA microarrays and compared them to those of cells treated with methylselenic acid, a direct precursor of methylselenol, which is the active form of selenium in vivo. Results After treatment with selenomethionine 2,336 unique genes showed expression changes of at least 1.5-fold in at least 3 time points during 48 hours and 366 unique transcripts differed significantly between selenomethionine and methylselenic acid treated LNCaP. Approximately half of the 76 cell cycle regulated genes affected by selenomethionine were down-regulated and enriched for genes associated with the G2/M phase. Flow cytometry analysis showed that selenomethionine induced G2/M arrest in LNCaP at low concentrations. Selenomethionine also affected expression levels of 35 known androgen responsive genes and 18 of these transcripts showed changes that were the inverse of those seen after androgen stimulation. At high concentrations selenomethionine decreased prostate specific antigen promoter driven luciferase expression. Conclusions Selenomethionine modulates transcript levels of genes involved in a number of biological processes, including cell cycle/apoptosis androgen signaling, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Although the pathways affected paralleled in many ways those that are modulated by methylselenic acid, distinct differences in transcript patterns and effects on cell cycle regulation suggest that different selenium compounds could exert unique effects in prostate cells. PMID:17222674

  15. Voriconazole-induced periostitis causing arthralgias mimicking a flare of granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Gladue, Heather S; Fox, David A

    2013-12-01

    We describe a case of voriconazole-induced periostitis that occurred in a 68-year-old woman with granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Our patient presented with months of severe hip pain limiting her daily activities, which was initially felt to be a flare of her granulomatosis with polyangiitis. However, upon further review, she had an elevated alkaline phosphatase and periostitis on her hip radiograph; voriconazole was held, and within 2 days she had marked improvement in her pain. Although this clinical syndrome is well documented in transplant patients, it is a rare complication in patients with autoimmune disorders. However, it is important because it may cause severe arthralgias that can mimic a flare of rheumatic diseases.

  16. In-vitro investigations on laser-induced smoke generation mimicking the laparoscopic laser surgery purposes.

    PubMed

    Khoder, Wael Y; Stief, Christian G; Fiedler, Sebastian; Pongratz, Thomas; Beyer, Wolfgang; Hennig, Georg; Rühm, Adrian; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-09-01

    Intraoperative smoke-generation limits the quality of vision during laparoscopic/endoscopic laser-assisted surgeries. The current study aimed at the evaluation of factors affecting this phenomenon. As a first step, a suitable experimental setup and a test tissue model were established for this investigation. The experimental setup is composed of a specific sample container, a laser therapy component suitable for the ablation of model tissue at different treatment wavelengths (λ = 980 nm, 1350 nm, 1470 nm), a suction unit providing continuous smoke extraction, and a detection unit for smoke quantification via detection of light (λ = 633 nm) scattered from smoke particles. The ablation rate (AR) was calculated by dividing the ablated volume by the ablation time (60 sec). The laser-induced scattering signal intensity of the smoke (SI) was determined from time-charts of the signal intensity as a measure for vision, in addition a delay-time tdelay could be derived defining the onset of SI after the laser was switched on. The ratio SI/AR is used as a measure for smoke generation in relation to the ablation rate. Additionally the light transmission of the tissue samples was used to estimate their optical properties. In this set-up, smoke generation using λ = 980 nm as ablation laser wavelength was detected after a delay-time tdelay = (121.6 ± 24.8) sec which is significantly longer compared to the wavelengths λ = 1350 nm with tdelay = (89.8 ± 19.3) sec and λ = 1470 nm with tdelay = (24.7 ± 5.4) sec. Thus, the delay Experimental set-up consisting of sample container, laser therapy component, suction unit and scattered-light detection compartment. time is wavelength-dependent. The SI/AR ratio was significantly different (p < 0.001) for 1470 nm irradiation compared to 980 nm irradiation [SI/AR(1470) = (11.8 ± 2.6) · 10(3) vs. SI/AR(980) = (8.6 ± 2.0) · 10(3) ]. The ablation crater for 980 nm irradiation was comparable with 1470 nm irradiation, but the

  17. Chemical inducers and transcriptional markers of oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Lara; Foucault, Isabelle; Sagot, Yves; Bernasconi, Lilia; Duval, François; Alliod, Chantal; Frossard, Marie-José; Pescini Gobert, Rosanna; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Salvat, Catherine; Nichols, Anthony; Pouly, Sandrine; Rommel, Christian; Roach, Arthur; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2010-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes generate and maintain myelin, which is essential for axonal function and protection of the mammalian central nervous system. To advance our molecular understanding of differentiation by these cells, we screened libraries of pharmacologically active compounds and identified inducers of differentiation of Oli-neu, a stable cell line of mouse oligodendrocyte precursors (OPCs). We identified four broad classes of inducers, namely, forskolin/cAMP (protein kinase A activators), steroids (glucocorticoids and retinoic acid), ErbB2 inhibitors, and nucleoside analogs, and confirmed the activity of these compounds on rat primary oligodendrocyte precursors and mixed cortical cultures. We also analyzed transcriptional responses in the chemically induced mouse and rat OPC differentiation processes and compared these with earlier studies. We confirm the view that ErbB2 is a natural signaling component that is required for OPC proliferation, whereas ErbB2 inhibition or genetic knockdown results in OPC differentiation.

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection-induced tissue and bone transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Meka, Archana; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Sathishkumar, Sabapathi; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Verma, Raj K.; Wallet, Shannon M.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Boyce, Brendan F.; Handfield, Martin; Lamont, Richard J.; Baker, Henry V.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Lakshmyya, Kesavalu N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Porphyromonas gingivalis has been associated with subgingival biofilms in adult periodontitis. However, the molecular mechanisms of its contribution to chronic gingival inflammation and loss of periodontal structural integrity remain unclear. The objectives of this investigation were to examine changes in the host transcriptional profiles during a P. gingivalis infection using a murine calvarial model of inflammation and bone resorption. Methods P. gingivalis FDC 381 was injected into the subcutaneous soft tissue over the calvaria of BALB/c mice for 3 days, after which the soft tissues and calvarial bones were excised. RNA was isolated from infected soft tissues and calvarial bones and analyzed for transcript profiles using Murine GeneChip® arrays to provide a molecular profile of the events that occur following infection of these tissues. Results After P. gingivalis infection, 5517 and 1900 probe sets in the infected soft tissues and calvarial bone, respectively, were differentially expressed (P ≤ 0.05) and up-regulated. Biological pathways significantly impacted by P. gingivalis infection in tissues and calvarial bone included cell adhesion (immune system) molecules, Toll-like receptors, B cell receptor signaling, TGF-β cytokine family receptor signaling, and MHC class II antigen processing pathways resulting in proinflammatory, chemotactic effects, T cell stimulation, and down regulation of antiviral and T cell chemotactic effects. P. gingivalis-induced inflammation activated osteoclasts, leading to local bone resorption. Conclusion This is the first in vivo evidence that localized P. gingivalis infection differentially induces transcription of a broad array of host genes that differed between inflamed soft tissues and calvarial bone. PMID:20331794

  19. Oxytocin Regulates Stress-Induced Crf Gene Transcription through CREB-Regulated Transcription Coactivator 3

    PubMed Central

    Jurek, Benjamin; Slattery, David A.; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Liu, Ying; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Aguilera, Greti; van den Burg, Erwin H.

    2015-01-01

    The major regulator of the neuroendocrine stress response in the brain is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), whose transcription is controlled by CREB and its cofactors CRTC2/3 (TORC2/3). Phosphorylated CRTCs are sequestered in the cytoplasm, but rapidly dephosphorylated and translocated into the nucleus following a stressful stimulus. As the stress response is attenuated by oxytocin (OT), we tested whether OT interferes with CRTC translocation and, thereby, Crf expression. OT (1 nmol, i.c.v.) delayed the stress-induced increase of nuclear CRTC3 and Crf hnRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus of male rats and mice, but did not affect either parameter in the absence of the stressor. The increase in Crf hnRNA levels at later time points was parallel to elevated nuclear CRTC2/3 levels. A direct effect of Thr4 Gly7-OT (TGOT) on CRTC3 translocation and Crf expression was found in rat primary hypothalamic neurons, amygdaloid (Ar-5), hypothalamic (H32), and human neuroblastoma (Be(2)M17) cell lines. CRTC3, but not CRCT2, knockdown using siRNA in Be(2)M17 cells prevented the effect of TGOT on Crf hnRNA levels. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that TGOT reduced CRTC3, but not CRTC2, binding to the Crf promoter after 10 min of forskolin stimulation. Together, the results indicate that OT modulates CRTC3 translocation, the binding of CRTC3 to the Crf promoter and, ultimately, transcription of the Crf gene. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neuropeptide oxytocin has been proposed to reduce hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation during stress. The underlying mechanisms are, however, elusive. In this study we show that activation of the oxytocin receptor in the paraventricular nucleus delays transcription of the gene encoding corticotropin releasing factor (Crf), the main regulator of the stress response. It does so by sequestering the coactivator of the transcription factor CREB, CRTC3, in the cytosol, resulting in reduced binding of CRTC3 to the Crf

  20. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  1. Multiple hormone-inducible enhancers as mediators of differential transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Toohey, M G; Morley, K L; Peterson, D O

    1986-01-01

    Sets of genes under a common regulatory control in a given cell type are often differentially transcribed. The possibility that this differential transcription can be modulated by the number or strength of cis-acting regulatory sequences associated with a given gene was tested by using the glucocorticoid-responsive enhancer element associated with the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. Results indicate that differential levels of hormone-inducible gene expression can be modulated in an additive way by the number of glucocorticoid-responsive enhancers associated with this promoter. Realization of these effects shows little preference for position of the additional elements with respect to the promoter. When sequences that bind the glucocorticoid receptor in vitro with somewhat lower affinity than the enhancer were tested, these additive effects were not detected. The results support that differential transcription of genes subject to a common regulatory control can be mediated, at least in part, by the number or strength of their associated cis-acting regulatory sequences. Images PMID:3025659

  2. Transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms of cellular reprogramming to induced pluripotency.

    PubMed

    van den Hurk, Mark; Kenis, Gunter; Bardy, Cedric; van den Hove, Daniel L; Gage, Fred H; Steinbusch, Harry W; Rutten, Bart P

    2016-08-01

    Enforced ectopic expression of a cocktail of pluripotency-associated genes such as Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The remarkable proliferation ability of iPSCs and their aptitude to redifferentiate into any cell lineage makes these cells a promising tool for generating a variety of human tissue in vitro. Yet, pluripotency induction is an inefficient process, as cells undergoing reprogramming need to overcome developmentally imposed epigenetic barriers. Recent work has shed new light on the molecular mechanisms that drive the reprogramming of somatic cells to iPSCs. Here, we present current knowledge on the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of pluripotency induction and discuss how variability in epigenetic states impacts iPSCs' inherent biological properties. PMID:27419933

  3. Charcoal-induced granuloma that mimicked a nodal metastasis on ultrasonography and FDG-PET/CT after neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Woo; Moon, Won-Jin; Choi, Nami; Roh, Hong Gee; Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Na Ra; Moon, Sung Gyu; Chung, Hyun Woo; Lim, So Dug; Yang, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Charcoal can be used for preoperative localization of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck. Charcoal remains stable without causing foreign body reactions during as hort period. However, foreign body reactions may develop if charcoal is left in situ for more than 6 months. We reported a case of charcoal granuloma mimicking local recurrence on fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography and ultrasonography in a 47-year-old woman who had cervical lymph node dissection due to metastatic invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

  4. Transcriptional comparison of human induced and primary midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ninuo; Zhang, Pengbo; Fang, Fang; Wang, Zhengyuan; Rothstein, Megan; Angulo, Benjamin; Chiang, Rosaria; Taylor, James; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of induced dopaminergic (iDA) neurons may provide a significant step forward towards cell replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD). To study and compare transcriptional programs of induced cells versus primary DA neurons is a preliminary step towards characterizing human iDA neurons. We have optimized a protocol to efficiently generate iDA neurons from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We then sequenced the transcriptomes of iDA neurons derived from 6 different hPSC lines and compared them to that of primary midbrain (mDA) neurons. We identified a small subset of genes with altered expression in derived iDA neurons from patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). We also observed that iDA neurons differ significantly from primary mDA neurons in global gene expression, especially in genes related to neuron maturation level. Results suggest iDA neurons from patient iPSCs could be useful for basic and translational studies, including in vitro modeling of PD. However, further refinement of methods of induction and maturation of neurons may better recapitulate full development of mDA neurons from hPSCs. PMID:26842779

  5. Mutually exclusive sense–antisense transcription at FLC facilitates environmentally induced gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Stefanie; Duncan, Susan; Dean, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription through genic regions is pervasive in most genomes; however, its functional significance is still unclear. We are studying the role of antisense transcripts (COOLAIR) in the cold-induced, epigenetic silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a regulator of the transition to reproduction. Here we use single-molecule RNA FISH to address the mechanistic relationship of FLC and COOLAIR transcription at the cellular level. We demonstrate that while sense and antisense transcripts can co-occur in the same cell they are mutually exclusive at individual loci. Cold strongly upregulates COOLAIR transcription in an increased number of cells and through the mutually exclusive relationship facilitates shutdown of sense FLC transcription in cis. COOLAIR transcripts form dense clouds at each locus, acting to influence FLC transcription through changed H3K36me3 dynamics. These results may have general implications for other loci showing both sense and antisense transcription. PMID:27713408

  6. Transcription Errors Induce Proteotoxic Stress and Shorten Cellular Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Vermulst, Marc; Denney, Ashley S.; Lang, Michael J.; Hung, Chao-Wei; Moore, Stephanie; Mosely, M. Arthur; Thompson, J. Will; Madden, Victoria; Gauer, Jacob; Wolfe, Katie J.; Summers, Daniel W.; Schleit, Jennifer; Sutphin, George L.; Haroon, Suraiya; Holczbauer, Agnes; Caine, Joanne; Jorgenson, James; Cyr, Douglas; Kaeberlein, Matt; Strathern, Jeffrey N.; Duncan, Mara C.; Erie, Dorothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription errors occur in all living cells; however, it is unknown how these errors affect cellular health. To answer this question, we monitored yeast cells that were genetically engineered to display error-prone transcription. We discovered that these cells suffer from a profound loss in proteostasis, which sensitizes them to the expression of genes that are associated with protein-folding diseases in humans; thus, transcription errors represent a new molecular mechanism by which cells can acquire disease. We further found that the error rate of transcription increases as cells age, suggesting that transcription errors affect proteostasis particularly in aging cells. Accordingly, transcription errors accelerate the aggregation of a peptide that is implicated in Alzheimer’s disease, and shorten the lifespan of cells. These experiments reveal a novel, basic biological process that directly affects cellular health and aging. PMID:26304740

  7. Transcription-dependent cytosine deamination is a novel mechanism in ultraviolet light-induced mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Giel; Calléja, Fabienne; Besaratinia, Ahmad; Vrieling, Harry; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Mullenders, Leon H F; Jansen, Jacob G; de Wind, Niels

    2010-01-26

    Skin cancer is the most ubiquitous cancer type in the Caucasian population, and its incidence is increasing rapidly [1]. Transcribed proliferation-related genes in dermal stem cells are targets for the induction of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced mutations that drive carcinogenesis. We have recently found that transcription of a gene increases its mutability by UV in mammalian stem cells, suggesting a role of transcription in skin carcinogenesis [2]. Here we show that transcription-associated UV-induced nucleotide substitutions are caused by increased deamination of cytosines to uracil within photolesions at the transcribed strand, presumably at sites of stalled transcription complexes. Additionally, via an independent mechanism, transcription of UV-damaged DNA induces the generation of intragenic deletions. We demonstrate that transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) provides protection against both classes of transcription-associated mutagenesis. Combined, these results unveil the existence of two mutagenic pathways operating specifically at the transcribed DNA strand of active genes. Moreover, these results uncover a novel role for TC-NER in the suppression of UV-induced genome aberrations and provide a rationale for the efficient induction of apoptosis by stalled transcription complexes. PMID:20045328

  8. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  9. Induced tubulin synthesis is caused by induced gene transcription in Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Seyfert, H.M.; Kohle, D.; Jenovai, S. )

    1987-07-01

    Tubulin synthesis and tubulin mRNA concentrations increase to variable extents during ciliary regeneration in the ciliate Tetrahymena. Experiments described here were carried out to determine whether the increased tubulin mRNa concentrations are due to induced transcription of tubulin genes or to stabilization of tubulin mRNA. In vivo labeling experiments with ({sup 3}H)uridine and in vitro transcription assays suggest that under conditions of increased protein and tubulin synthesis the rate of transcription is enhanced. Hybridization assays of in vitro transcribed RNA also demonstrate qualitatively that the tubulin genes are transcribed at higher rates when tubulin synthesis is stimulated during ciliary regeneration. This observation is supported by measurements of the half-life of tubulin mRNA molecules in nondeciliated cells: This is approximately 2 h. Since the concentration of tubulin mRNA in cells engaged in cilia regeneration increases from 5 to 19-fold during the first hour of the regeneration period, even a complete stabilization of the tubulin mRNA molecules could not account for an increase in tubulin mRNA concentration of this magnitude.

  10. Protection against Rift Valley fever virus infection in mice upon administration of interferon-inducing RNA transcripts from the FMDV genome.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Gema; Rodríguez-Pulido, Miguel; López-Gil, Elena; Sobrino, Francisco; Borrego, Belén; Sáiz, Margarita; Brun, Alejandro

    2014-09-01

    In this work we have addressed the effect of synthetic, non-infectious, RNA transcripts, mimicking structural domains of the non-coding regions (NCRs) of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome on the infection of mice with Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Groups of 5 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 200 μg of synthetic RNA resembling the 5'-terminal S region, the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) or the 3'-NCR of the FMDV genome. RNA inoculation was performed 24h before (-24 h), 24 h after (+24 h) or simultaneously to the challenge with a lethal dose of RVFV. Administration of the IRES RNA afforded higher survival rates than administration of S or 3'NCR transcripts either at -24h or +24h after challenge. In contrast, when RNA inoculation and viral challenge were performed simultaneously, all mice survived in both IRES- and 3'NCR-inoculated groups, with an 80% survival in mice receiving the S RNA. Among survivors, a complete correlation between significant anti-RVFV circulating antibody titers and resistance to a second lethal challenge with the virus was observed, supporting a limited viral replication in the RNA-inoculated animals upon the first challenge. All three RNA transcripts were able to induce the production of systemic antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data show that triggering of intracellular pathogen sensing pathways constitutes a promising approach towards development of novel RVF preventive or therapeutic strategies. PMID:24973761

  11. Dendritic Cells Transfected with scFv from Mab 7.B12 Mimicking Original Antigen gp43 Induces Protection against Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Karen S.; Maranhão, Andrea Q.; Garcia, Maria C. C.; Brígido, Marcelo M.; Santos, Suelen S.; Lopes, José D.; Almeida, Sandro R.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), endemic in Latin America, is a progressive systemic mycosis caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (P. brasiliensis), which primarily attacks lung tissue. Dendritic cells (DCs) are able to initiate a response in naïve T cells, and they also participate in Th-cell education. Furthermore, these cells have been used for therapy in several disease models. Here we transfected DCs with a plasmid (pMAC/PS-scFv) encoding a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an anti-Id antibody that is capable of mimicking gp43, the main antigenic component of P. brasiliensis. First, Balb/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with pMAC/PS-scFv and, after seven days, scFv protein was presented to the regional lymph nodes cells. Moreover, we showed that the DCs transfected with scFv were capable of efficiently activating proliferation of total lymph node cells and inducing a decrease in lung infection. Therefore, our results suggested that the use of scFv-transfected DCs may be a promising therapy in the paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) model. PMID:21249212

  12. FoxO1 Deacetylation Regulates Thyroid Hormone-induced Transcription of Key Hepatic Gluconeogenic Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ−/−) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status. PMID:23995837

  13. Genistein reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 transcription but not urokinase expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Hinsbergh, V W; Vermeer, M; Koolwijk, P; Grimbergen, J; Kooistra, T

    1994-11-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor PAI-1 is markedly elevated in vivo and in vitro upon exposure to the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Here we report that the isoflavone compound genistein prevents the increase in synthesis of PAI-1 induced by these inflammatory mediators in human endothelial cells in vitro, and partially reduces the basal PAI-1 production by these cells. These effects of genistein were accompanied by a decrease in PAI-1 mRNA and in a suppression of the PAI-1 transcription rate as shown by run-on assay. A specific action of genistein, probably by inhibiting a tyrosine protein kinase, is likely, because the structural genistein analogue daidzein, which has a low tyrosine protein kinase inhibitor activity, did not inhibit PAI-1 synthesis. Vanadate, a tyrosine protein phosphatase inhibitor, increased PAI-1 production. The effect of genistein on PAI-1 synthesis was rather selective. Herbimycin A also reduced PAI-1 synthesis, but several other tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors, namely tyrphostin A47, methyl-2,5-dihydroxy-cinnamate, and compound 5, were unable to do so. All these tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors reduced basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation in endothelial cells. This indicates that the effect of genistein on PAI-1 transcription proceeds independently of its effect on mitogenesis. In contrast to TNF-alpha-induced PAI-1 production, the transcription and synthesis of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) was not inhibited by genistein. A TNF-alpha-mutant (Trp32Thr86TNF alpha) that specifically recognizes the 55-kD TNF-receptor, mimicked the effects of TNF alpha on both PAI-1 and u-PA. Because genistein affected PAI-1, but not u-PA induced by this mutant, involvement of different TNF-receptors cannot underlie the difference in the effects of genistein on PAI-1 and u-PA synthesis. Because genistein also

  14. Multiple sclerosis patient-derived CSF induces transcriptional changes in proliferating oligodendrocyte progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Jeffery D.; Vidaurre, Oscar G.; Zhang, Fan; Riffo-Campos, Ángela L.; Castillo, Josefa; Casanova, Bonaventura; Casaccia, Patrizia; Lopez-Rodas, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebrospinal fluid is in contact with brain parenchyma and ventricles, and its composition might influence the cellular physiology of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) thereby contributing to disease pathogenesis. OBJECTIVE To identify the transcriptional changes that distinguish the transcriptional response induced in proliferating rat OPCs upon exposure to CSF from PPMS or RRMS patients and other neurological controls. METHODS We performed gene microarray analysis of OPCs exposed to CSF from neurological controls, or definitive RRMS or PPMS disease course. Results were confirmed by qRT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot of cultured cells and validated in human brain specimens. RESULTS We identified common and unique genes for each treatment group. Exposure to CSF from PPMS uniquely induced branching of cultured progenitors and related transcriptional changes, including up-regulation (p < 0.05) of the adhesion molecule GALECTIN-3/Lgals3, which was also detected at the protein level in brain specimens from PPMS patients. However it also resulted in discordant patterns of gene expression when compared with the transcriptional program of oligodendrocyte differentiation during development. CONCLUSIONS Despite evidence of morphological differentiation induced by exposure to CSF of PPMS patients, the overall transcriptional response elicited in cultured OPCs was consistent with the activation of an aberrant transcriptional program. PMID:25948622

  15. Enhancement of the inducible NO synthase activation by retinoic acid is mimicked by RARalpha agonist in vivo.

    PubMed

    Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Devaux, Yvan; Latger-Cannard, Véronique; Grosjean, Sandrine; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Zannad, Faiez; Meistelman, Claude; Mertes, Paul-Michel; Longrois, Dan

    2002-09-01

    We have previously shown that all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, enhances the activation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) pathway, a component of innate immunity, in rats in vivo. We investigated the relative contribution of retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RARalpha) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) to NOS II activation triggered by LPS. Five-day supplementation with 10 mg/kg of either atRA or the RARalpha selective agonist Ro-40-6055, but not with 10 mg/kg of the pan-RXR agonist Ro-25-7386, enhanced the LPS-induced NOS II mRNA, protein expression in liver, and plasma nitrite/nitrate concentration. Both atRA and the RARalpha agonist (but not the RXR agonist) increased the number of peripheral T helper lymphocytes and plasma interferon-gamma concentration. Synergism between retinoids and LPS on NOS II activation within an organ coincided with synergism on interferon regulatory factor-1 mRNA expression but not with the level of expression of the RARalpha protein. These results suggest that, in vivo, atRA activates NOS II through RARalpha and contributes to characterizing the complex effect of retinoids on the host inflammatory/immune response.

  16. Butyrate-induced changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin cannot be correlated with transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect

    Birren, B.W.; Taplitz, S.J.; Herschman, H.R.

    1987-11-01

    The authors examined in the H4IIE rat heptoma cell line the relationship between butyrate-induced changes in the nuclease sensitivity of chromatin and changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. The butyrate-inducible metallothionein I (MT-I) gene underwent a dramatic increase in DNase I sensitivity after 3 h of butyrate treatment. However, genes not transcribed in H4IIE cells underwent the same changes in DNase I sensitivity. Thus, butyrate-induced increases in DNase I sensitivity are not sufficient for the transcriptional activation of a gene. Butyrate treatment has also been reported to alter the sensitivity of sequence to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) in a manner reflecting their tissue-specific expression. Butyrate exposure caused increased digestion of the MT-I gene by MNase. However, butyrate-induced MNase sensitivity also occurred for genes which are neither transcribed in untreated cells nor butyrate inducible. Moreover, cadmium, a potent transcriptional activator of the MT-I gene, does not alter the sensitivity of the MT-I gene to MNase. Thus, the butyrate-induced alterations in MNase sensitivity are neither sufficient for, necessary for, nor indicative of transcriptional activation.

  17. Antagonistic effects of abscisic acid and jasmonates on salt stress-inducible transcripts in rice roots.

    PubMed Central

    Moons, A; Prinsen, E; Bauw, G; Van Montagu, M

    1997-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonates have been implicated in responses to water deficit and wounding. We compared the molecular and physiological effects of jasmonic acid (JA) (< or = 10 microM), ABA, and salt stress in roots of rice. JA markedly induced a cationic peroxidase, two novel 32- and 28-kD proteins, acidic PR-1 and PR-10 pathogenesis-related proteins, and the salt stress-responsive SalT protein in roots. Most JA-responsive proteins (JIPs) from roots also accumulated when plants were subjected to salt stress. None of the JIPs accumulated when plants were treated with ABA. JA did not induce an ABA-responsive group 3 late-embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein. Salt stress and ABA but not JA induced oslea3 transcript accumulation. By contrast, JA, ABA, and salt stress induced transcript accumulation of salT and osdrr, which encodes a rice PR-10 protein. However, ABA also negatively affected salT transcript accumulation, whereas JA negatively affected ABA-induced oslea3 transcript levels. Endogenous root ABA and methyl jasmonate levels showed a differential increase with the dose and the duration of salt stress. The results indicate that ABA and jasmonates antagonistically regulated the expression of salt stress-inducible proteins associated with water deficit or defense responses. PMID:9437865

  18. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Ryohei; Cui, Zheng-Guo; Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko; Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  19. An RNA virus-encoded zinc-finger protein acts as a plant transcription factor and induces a regulator of cell size and proliferation in two tobacco species.

    PubMed

    Lukhovitskaya, Nina I; Solovieva, Anna D; Boddeti, Santosh K; Thaduri, Srinivas; Solovyev, Andrey G; Savenkov, Eugene I

    2013-03-01

    Plant viruses cause a variety of diseases in susceptible hosts. The disease symptoms often include leaf malformations and other developmental abnormalities, suggesting that viruses can affect plant development. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying virus interference with plant morphogenesis. Here, we show that a C-4 type zinc-finger (ZF) protein, p12, encoded by a carlavirus (chrysanthemum virus B) can induce cell proliferation, which results in hyperplasia and severe leaf malformation. We demonstrate that the p12 protein activates expression of a regulator of cell size and proliferation, designated upp-L (upregulated by p12), which encodes a transcription factor of the basic/helix-loop-helix family sufficient to cause hyperplasia. The induction of upp-L requires translocation of the p12 protein into the nucleus and ZF-dependent specific interaction with the conserved regulatory region in the upp-L promoter. Our results establish the role of the p12 protein in modulation of host cell morphogenesis. It is likely that other members of the conserved C-4 type ZF family of viral proteins instigate reprogramming of plant development by mimicking eukaryotic transcriptional activators.

  20. Hypoxia induces a novel signature of chromatin modifications and global repression of transcription.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amber Buescher; Denko, Nicholas; Barton, Michelle Craig

    2008-04-01

    Tumor cells respond to the harsh hypoxic microenvironment, in part, by transcriptional regulation of specific target genes. We found that hypoxia-mediated activation of selected genes occurs amidst widespread repression of transcription that is neither cell type-specific nor HIF-1-dependent. Despite overall repression, hypoxia induces a pool of histone modifications typically associated with transcriptional activation or repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that this global mixture of hypoxia-modified histones is sorted in a gene-specific manner to correlate with transcriptional response to hypoxia. Exceptions to this were unexpected increases in H3K4me3 levels, typically associated with transcriptional activation, and decreased H3K27me3 levels, generally a marker of transcriptional silencing, at core promoters of both hypoxia-activated and -repressed genes. These data suggest that a novel signature of chromatin modifications is induced under hypoxic stress, which may play a role in gene regulatory switches active in proliferating tumor cells undergoing cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation.

  1. Hypoxia induces a novel signature of chromatin modifications and global repression of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amber Buescher; Denko, Nicholas; Barton, Michelle Craig

    2008-01-01

    Tumor cells respond to the harsh hypoxic microenvironment, in part, by transcriptional regulation of specific target genes. We found that hypoxia-mediated activation of selected genes occurs amidst widespread repression of transcription that is neither cell type-specific nor HIF-1-dependent. Despite overall repression, hypoxia induces a pool of histone modifications typically associated with transcriptional activation or repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that this global mixture of hypoxia-modified histones is sorted in a gene-specific manner to correlate with transcriptional response to hypoxia. Exceptions to this were unexpected increases in H3K4me3 levels, typically associated with transcriptional activation, and decreased H3K27me3 levels, generally a marker of transcriptional silencing, at core promoters of both hypoxia-activated and -repressed genes. These data suggest that a novel signature of chromatin modifications is induced under hypoxic stress, which may play a role in gene regulatory switches active in proliferating tumor cells undergoing cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:18294659

  2. Acetylation of RNA Polymerase II Regulates Growth-Factor-Induced Gene Transcription in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S.; Capra, John A.; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A.; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G.; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes. PMID:24207025

  3. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; Imam, Saheed; Carter, Warren; Bilgin, Damla D.; Yohn, Christopher B.; Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J.; Orellana, Monica V.; Price, Nathan D.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 min that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid accumulation

  4. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; Imam, Saheed; Carter, Warren; Bilgin, Damla D.; Yohn, Christopher B.; Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J.; Orellana, Monica V.; et al

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 minmore » that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid

  5. Transcriptional coactivator p300 regulates glucose-induced gene expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shali; Feng, Biao; George, Biju; Chakrabarti, Rana; Chen, Megan; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Sustained hyperglycemia in diabetes causes alteration of a large number of transcription factors and mRNA transcripts, leading to tissue damage. We investigated whether p300, a transcriptional coactivator with histone acetyl transferase activity, regulates glucose-induced activation of transcription factors and subsequent upregulation of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were incubated in varied glucose concentrations and were studied after p300 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, p300 overexpression, or incubation with the p300 inhibitor curcumin. Histone H2AX phosphorylation and lysine acetylation were examined for oxidative DNA damage and p300 activation. Screening for transcription factors was performed with the Luminex system. Alterations of selected transcription factors were validated. mRNA expression of p300, endothelin-1 (ET-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibronectin (FN) and its splice variant EDB(+)FN and FN protein production were analyzed. HUVECs in 25 mmol/l glucose showed increased p300 production accompanied by increased binding of p300 to ET-1 and FN promoters, augmented histone acetylation, H2AX phosphorylation, activation of multiple transcription factors, and increased mRNA expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins. p300 overexpression showed a glucose-like effect on the mRNA expression of ET-1, VEGF, and FN. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated p300 blockade or chemical inhibitor of p300 prevented such glucose-induced changes. Similar mRNA upregulation was also seen in the organ culture of vascular tissues, which was prevented by p300 siRNA transfection. Data from these studies suggest that glucose-induced p300 upregulation is an important upstream epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins in endothelial cells and is a potential therapeutic target for diabetic complications.

  6. Wound Induced Tanscriptional Regulation of Benzylisoquinoline Pathway and Characterization of Wound Inducible PsWRKY Transcription Factor from Papaver somniferum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Seema; Phukan, Ujjal J.; Gupta, M. M.; Shanker, Karuna; Shukla, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Wounding is required to be made in the walls of the green seed pod of Opium poppy prior exudation of latex. To withstand this kind of trauma plants regulate expression of some metabolites through an induced transcript level. 167 unique wound-inducible ESTs were identified by a repetitive round of cDNA subtraction after 5 hours of wounding in Papaver somniferum seedlings. Further repetitive reverse northern analysis of these ESTs revealed 80 transcripts showing more than two fold induction, validated through semi-quantitative RT-PCR & real time expression analysis. One of the major classified categories among identified ESTs belonged to benzylisoquinoline transcripts. Tissue specific metabolite analysis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) in response to wounding revealed increased accumulation of narcotine and papaverine. Promoter analysis of seven transcripts of BIAs pathway showed the presence of W-box cis-element with the consensus sequence of TGAC, which is the proposed binding site for WRKY type transcription factors. One of the Wound inducible ‘WRKY’ EST isolated from our subtracted library was made full-length and named as ‘PsWRKY’. Bacterially expressed PsWRKY interacted with the W-box element having consensus sequence TTGACT/C present in the promoter region of BIAs biosynthetic pathway genes. PsWRKY further activated the TYDC promoter in yeast and transiently in tobacco BY2 cells. Preferential expression of PsWRKY in straw and capsule and its interaction with consensus W-box element present in BIAs pathway gene transcripts suggest its possible involvement in the wound induced regulation of BIAs pathway. PMID:23382823

  7. Wound induced tanscriptional regulation of benzylisoquinoline pathway and characterization of wound inducible PsWRKY transcription factor from Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sonal; Triptahi, Vineeta; Singh, Seema; Phukan, Ujjal J; Gupta, M M; Shanker, Karuna; Shukla, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Wounding is required to be made in the walls of the green seed pod of Opium poppy prior exudation of latex. To withstand this kind of trauma plants regulate expression of some metabolites through an induced transcript level. 167 unique wound-inducible ESTs were identified by a repetitive round of cDNA subtraction after 5 hours of wounding in Papaver somniferum seedlings. Further repetitive reverse northern analysis of these ESTs revealed 80 transcripts showing more than two fold induction, validated through semi-quantitative RT-PCR & real time expression analysis. One of the major classified categories among identified ESTs belonged to benzylisoquinoline transcripts. Tissue specific metabolite analysis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) in response to wounding revealed increased accumulation of narcotine and papaverine. Promoter analysis of seven transcripts of BIAs pathway showed the presence of W-box cis-element with the consensus sequence of TGAC, which is the proposed binding site for WRKY type transcription factors. One of the Wound inducible 'WRKY' EST isolated from our subtracted library was made full-length and named as 'PsWRKY'. Bacterially expressed PsWRKY interacted with the W-box element having consensus sequence TTGACT/C present in the promoter region of BIAs biosynthetic pathway genes. PsWRKY further activated the TYDC promoter in yeast and transiently in tobacco BY2 cells. Preferential expression of PsWRKY in straw and capsule and its interaction with consensus W-box element present in BIAs pathway gene transcripts suggest its possible involvement in the wound induced regulation of BIAs pathway.

  8. Effect of aminoguanidine on lipopolysaccharide-induced changes in rat liver transporters and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kimiko; Nakajima, Miki; Hoshi, Yoshiyuki; Saso, Naomi; Kato, Satoko; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Sato, Hitoshi

    2008-03-01

    To determine the role of nitric oxide (NO) in rat liver transporter regulation, we investigated whether NO mediates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in transporters and their transcription factor expression using aminoguanidine (AG), an inhibitor of induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We confirmed that LPS decreased mRNA levels for Ntcp, Oatp1, Oatp2, Oatp4, Oct1, Mrp2, Mdr1a and increased those for Mdr1b at 16 h after administration. AG attenuated these decreases for Ntcp, Oatp1 and Oatp4 (retinoid X receptor (RXR)alpha- and hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)4alpha-dependent genes) and increase for Mdr1b (nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB-dependent gene). Concomitantly, it suppressed LPS-induced NF-kappaB-dependent gene transcription, such as those for proinflammatory cytokines (cytokines; tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6) and iNOS, and also suppressed IL-1beta release from Kupffer cells (KCs) at post-translational levels, but had little effect on the LPS-induced decreases in RXRalpha and HNF4alpha transcriptional activities. These findings indicate that hepatocytes were stimulated directly by LPS, which lead to the activation of NF-kappaB and reduction of RXRalpha and HNF4alpha transcriptional activities as early responses, and indirectly by cytokines and NO released from KCs via activation of NF-kappaB by LPS as delayed responses. We conclude that AG, which suppresses LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation in both hepatocytes and KCs and then the release of cytokines and NO from KCs, attenuates LPS-induced changes of Ntcp, Oatp1, Oatp4 and Mdr1b transcription in hepatocytes. The roles of cytokines and NO could not be distinguished, however. Further in vitro study is needed to clarify the role of NO in transporter regulation. PMID:18310902

  9. A nitrate-inducible GARP family gene encodes an auto-repressible transcriptional repressor in rice.

    PubMed

    Sawaki, Naoya; Tsujimoto, Ryoma; Shigyo, Mikao; Konishi, Mineko; Toki, Seiichi; Fujiwara, Toru; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen is the most important macronutrient in plants and its supply induces responses in gene expression, metabolism and developmental processes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrogen responses remain poorly understood. Here we show that the supply of nitrate but not ammonium immediately induces the expression of a transcriptional repressor gene in rice, designated NIGT1 (Nitrate-Inducible, GARP-type Transcriptional Repressor 1). The results of DNA-binding site selection experiments and electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that NIGT1 binds to DNA containing either of two consensus sequences, GAATC or GAATATTC. In transient reporter assays, NIGT1 was found to repress transcription from the promoters containing the identified NIGT1-binding sequences in vivo. Furthermore, NIGT1 repressed the activity of its own promoter, suggesting an autorepression mechanism. Consistently, nitrate-induced NIGT1 expression was found to be down-regulated after a transient peak during nitrate treatment, and the nitrate-induced expression of NIGT1 decreased in transgenic rice plants in which this gene was constitutively overexpressed. Furthermore, the chlorophyll content that could be a marker of nitrogen utilization was found to be decreased in NIGT1 overexpressors of rice grown with nitrate medium but not with ammonium medium. Thus, we propose NIGT1 as a nitrate-inducible and autorepressible transcriptional repressor that may play a role in the nitrogen response in rice. Taken together with the fact that the NIGT1-binding sites are conserved in promoter sequences of Arabidopsis NIGT1 homologs, our findings imply the presence of a time-dependent complex system for nitrate-responsive transcriptional regulation that is conserved in both monocots and dicots.

  10. Transcriptional and Metabolic Analysis of Senescence Induced by Preventing Pollination in Maize1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, Rajandeep S.; Childs, Kevin L.; Santoro, Nicholas; Foster, Cliff E.; Buell, C. Robin; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional and metabolic changes were evaluated during senescence induced by preventing pollination in the B73 genotype of maize (Zea mays). Accumulation of free glucose and starch and loss of chlorophyll in leaf was manifested early at 12 d after anthesis (DAA), while global transcriptional and phenotypic changes were evident only at 24 DAA. Internodes exhibited major transcriptomic changes only at 30 DAA. Overlaying expression data onto metabolic pathways revealed involvement of many novel pathways, including those involved in cell wall biosynthesis. To investigate the overlap between induced and natural senescence, transcriptional data from induced senescence in maize was compared with that reported for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) undergoing natural and sugar-induced senescence. Notable similarities with natural senescence in Arabidopsis included up-regulation of senescence-associated genes (SAGs), ethylene and jasmonic acid biosynthetic genes, APETALA2, ethylene-responsive element binding protein, and no apical meristem transcription factors. However, differences from natural senescence were highlighted by unaltered expression of a subset of the SAGs, and cytokinin, abscisic acid, and salicylic acid biosynthesis genes. Key genes up-regulated during sugar-induced senescence in Arabidopsis, including a cysteine protease (SAG12) and three flavonoid biosynthesis genes (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1 (PAP1), PAP2, and LEUCOANTHOCYANIDIN DIOXYGENASE), were also induced, suggesting similarities in senescence induced by pollination prevention and sugar application. Coexpression analysis revealed networks involving known senescence-related genes and novel candidates; 82 of these were shared between leaf and internode networks, highlighting similarities in induced senescence in these tissues. Insights from this study will be valuable in systems biology of senescence in maize and other grasses. PMID:22732243

  11. Transcriptional and metabolic analysis of senescence induced by preventing pollination in maize.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Rajandeep S; Childs, Kevin L; Santoro, Nicholas; Foster, Cliff E; Buell, C Robin; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M

    2012-08-01

    Transcriptional and metabolic changes were evaluated during senescence induced by preventing pollination in the B73 genotype of maize (Zea mays). Accumulation of free glucose and starch and loss of chlorophyll in leaf was manifested early at 12 d after anthesis (DAA), while global transcriptional and phenotypic changes were evident only at 24 DAA. Internodes exhibited major transcriptomic changes only at 30 DAA. Overlaying expression data onto metabolic pathways revealed involvement of many novel pathways, including those involved in cell wall biosynthesis. To investigate the overlap between induced and natural senescence, transcriptional data from induced senescence in maize was compared with that reported for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) undergoing natural and sugar-induced senescence. Notable similarities with natural senescence in Arabidopsis included up-regulation of senescence-associated genes (SAGs), ethylene and jasmonic acid biosynthetic genes, APETALA2, ethylene-responsive element binding protein, and no apical meristem transcription factors. However, differences from natural senescence were highlighted by unaltered expression of a subset of the SAGs, and cytokinin, abscisic acid, and salicylic acid biosynthesis genes. Key genes up-regulated during sugar-induced senescence in Arabidopsis, including a cysteine protease (SAG12) and three flavonoid biosynthesis genes (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1 (PAP1), PAP2, and LEUCOANTHOCYANIDIN DIOXYGENASE), were also induced, suggesting similarities in senescence induced by pollination prevention and sugar application. Coexpression analysis revealed networks involving known senescence-related genes and novel candidates; 82 of these were shared between leaf and internode networks, highlighting similarities in induced senescence in these tissues. Insights from this study will be valuable in systems biology of senescence in maize and other grasses.

  12. BROMATE-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES IN LONG-EVANS RAT KIDNEYS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Bromate-Induced Transcriptional Changes in Long-Evans Rat Kidneys.

    Ozone disinfection of surface waters containing bromide ion (Br-) results in the oxidation of bromide to bromate, which can be found in finished drinking water as a by-product. Potassium bromate (KBrO3)...

  13. Caspase 1 deficiency reduces inflammation-induced brain transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mastronardi, Claudio; Whelan, Fiona; Yildiz, Ozlem A.; Hannestad, Jonas; Elashoff, David; McCann, Samuel M.; Licinio, Julio; Wong, Ma-Li

    2007-01-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life-threatening medical condition characterized by a severe and generalized inflammatory state that can lead to multiple organ failure and shock. The CNS regulates many features of SIRS such as fever, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine responses. Central and systemic manifestations of SIRS can be induced by LPS or IL-1β administration. The crucial role of IL-1β in inflammation has been further highlighted by studies of mice lacking caspase 1 (casp1, also known as IL-1β convertase), a protease that cleaves pro-IL-1β into mature IL-1β. Indeed, casp1 knockout (casp1−/−) mice survive lethal doses of LPS. The key role of IL-1β in sickness behavior and its de novo expression in the CNS during inflammation led us to test the hypothesis that IL-1β plays a major role modulating the brain transcriptome during SIRS. We show a gene–environment effect caused by LPS administration in casp1−/− mice. During SIRS, the expression of several genes, such as chemokines, GTPases, the metalloprotease ADAMTS1, IL-1RA, the inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2, was differentially increased in casp1−/− mice. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the molecular changes that take place within the CNS during sepsis and SIRS and the development of new therapies for these serious conditions. Our results indicate that those genes may also play a role in several neuropsychiatric conditions in which inflammation has been implicated and indicate that casp1 might be a potential therapeutic target for such disorders. PMID:17409187

  14. IKK{epsilon} modulates RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu Tianshuang; Liao Suiling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-12-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical I{kappa}B kinase (IKK){epsilon} in modulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKK{epsilon} activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKK{epsilon} results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKK{epsilon} regulates viral-induced cellular signaling.

  15. Cation-Induced Transcriptional Regulation of the dlt Operon of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Koprivnjak, Tomaz; Mlakar, Vid; Swanson, Lindsey; Fournier, Benedicte; Peschel, Andreas; Weiss, Jerrold P.

    2006-01-01

    Lipoteichoic and wall teichoic acids (TA) are highly anionic cell envelope-associated polymers containing repeating polyglycerol/ribitol phosphate moieties. Substitution of TA with d-alanine is important for modulation of many cell envelope-dependent processes, such as activity of autolytic enzymes, binding of divalent cations, and susceptibility to innate host defenses. d-Alanylation of TA is diminished when bacteria are grown in medium containing increased NaCl concentrations, but the effects of increased salt concentration on expression of the dlt operon encoding proteins mediating d-alanylation of TA are unknown. We demonstrate that Staphylococcus aureus transcriptionally represses dlt expression in response to high concentrations of Na+ and moderate concentrations of Mg2+ and Ca2+ but not sucrose. Changes in dlt mRNA are induced within 15 min and sustained for several generations of growth. Mg2+-induced dlt repression depends on the ArlSR two-component system. Northern blotting, reverse transcription-PCR, and SMART-RACE analyses suggest that the dlt transcript begins 250 bp upstream of the dltA start codon and includes an open reading frame immediately upstream of dltA. Chloramphenicol transacetylase transcriptional fusions indicate that a region encompassing the 171 to 325 bp upstream of dltA is required for expression and Mg2+-induced repression of the dlt operon in S. aureus. PMID:16672616

  16. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-10-09

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal {alpha}-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.

  17. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  18. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-10-01

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal alpha-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression. PMID:19654000

  19. Ribavirin-induced intracellular GTP depletion activates transcription elongation in coagulation factor VII gene expression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsuo; Miyawaki, Yuhri; Okuyama, Eriko; Murata, Moe; Ando, Yumi; Kato, Io; Takagi, Yuki; Takagi, Akira; Murate, Takashi; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2013-01-01

    Coagulation FVII (Factor VII) is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein synthesized in hepatocytes. It was reported previously that FVII gene (F7) expression was up-regulated by ribavirin treatment in hepatitis C virus-infected haemophilia patients; however, its precise mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of ribavirin-induced up-regulation of F7 expression in HepG2 (human hepatoma cell line). We found that intracellular GTP depletion by ribavirin as well as other IMPDH (inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase) inhibitors, such as mycophenolic acid and 6-mercaptopurine, up-regulated F7 expression. FVII mRNA transcription was mainly enhanced by accelerated transcription elongation, which was mediated by the P-TEFb (positive-transcription elongation factor b) complex, rather than by promoter activation. Ribavirin unregulated ELL (eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukaemia) 3 mRNA expression before F7 up-regulation. We observed that ribavirin enhanced ELL3 recruitment to F7, whereas knockdown of ELL3 diminished ribavirin-induced FVII mRNA up-regulation. Ribavirin also enhanced recruitment of CDK9 (cyclin-dependent kinase 9) and AFF4 to F7. These data suggest that ribavirin-induced intracellular GTP depletion recruits a super elongation complex containing P-TEFb, AFF4 and ELL3, to F7, and modulates FVII mRNA transcription elongation. Collectively, we have elucidated a basal mechanism for ribavirin-induced FVII mRNA up-regulation by acceleration of transcription elongation, which may be crucial in understanding its pleiotropic functions in vivo.

  20. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks.

  1. Triptolide Induced Transcriptional Arrest is Associated with Changes in Nuclear Sub-Structure

    PubMed Central

    Leuenroth, Stephanie J.; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    Triptolide, an active component of the medicinal herb, lei gong teng, is a potent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory therapeutic. It potently inhibits NFκB transcriptional activation subsequent to DNA binding, although a precise mechanism is as yet unknown. Here, we report that triptolide also induces distinct nuclear sub-structural changes in HeLa cells. These changes in the nucleolus and nuclear speckles are reversible and dependent on both time and concentration. Furthermore, nuclear changes occurred within hours of triptolide treatment and were calcium and caspase independent. Rounding of nuclear speckles, an indication of transcriptional arrest was evident and was associated with a decrease in RNA Polymerase II CTD Ser2 phosphorylation. Additionally, the nucleolus disassembled and RNA Pol I activity declined subsequent to RNA Pol II inhibition. We therefore conclude that triptolide causes global transcriptional arrest as evidenced by inactivity of RNA polymerases I and II and the subsequent alteration in nuclear sub-structure. PMID:18593926

  2. Osmotically-induced genes are controlled by the transcription factor TonEBP in cultured cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Paola; Chiong, Mario; Volkwein, Karen; Moraga, Francisco; Ocaranza, María Paz; Jalil, Jorge E; Lim, Sun Woo; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kwon, H Moo; Lavandero, Sergio

    2008-07-25

    Changes in cardiac osmolarity occur in myocardial infarction. Osmoregulatory mechanisms may, therefore, play a crucial role in cardiomyocyte survival. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is a key transcription factor participating in the adaptation of cells to increases in tonicity. However, it is unknown whether cardiac TonEBP is activated by tonicity. Hypertonicity activated transcriptional activity of TonEBP, increased the amounts of both TonEBP mRNA and protein, and induced both the mRNA and protein of TonEBP target genes (aldose reductase and heat shock protein-70). Hypotonicity decreased the amount of TonEBP protein indicating bidirectional osmoregulation of this transcription factor. Adenoviral expression of a dominant negative TonEBP suppressed the hypertonicity-dependent increase of aldose reductase protein. These results indicated that TonEBP controls osmoregulatory mechanisms in cardiomyocytes. PMID:18502201

  3. Osmotically- induced genes are controlled by the transcription factor TonEBP in cultured cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Paola; Chiong, Mario; Volkwein, Karen; Moraga, Francisco; Ocaranza, María Paz; Jalil, Jorge E.; Lim, Sun Woo; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kwon, H. Moo; Lavandero, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Changes in cardiac osmolarity occur in myocardial infarction. Osmoregulatory mechanisms may, therefore, play a crucial role in cardiomyocyte survival. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is a key transcription factor participating in the adaptation of cells to increases in tonicity. However, it is unknown whether cardiac TonEBP is activated by tonicity. Hypertonicity activated transcriptional activity of TonEBP, increased the amounts of both TonEBP mRNA and protein, and induced both the mRNA and protein of TonEBP target genes (aldose reductase and heat shock protein-70). Hypotonicity decreased the amount of TonEBP protein indicating bidirectional osmoregulation of this transcription factor. Adenoviral expression of a dominant negative TonEBP suppressed the hypertonicity-dependent increase of aldose reductase protein. These results indicated that TonEBP controls osmoregulatory mechanisms in cardiomyocytes. PMID:18502201

  4. Transcription inhibitors prevent amnesia induced by NMDA antagonist-mediated impairment of memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Vladimir P; Solntseva, Svetlana V; Shevelkin, Alexey V

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies report that long-term memory retrieval can induce memory reconsolidation, and impairment of this reconsolidation might lead to amnesia. Previously, we found that reconsolidation of a conditioned food aversion memory could be disrupted by translation inhibitors for up to 3 h following a reconsolidation event, thus inducing amnesia. We examined the role of transcription processes in the induction of amnesia in the land snail, Helix lucorum. It received N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist and transcription inhibitor 2 days after learning in a neutral context environment; it was then transferred to the learning context followed by reminder with conditioned food stimulus. NMDA receptor blockade, followed by a reminder session, impaired reconsolidation of an aversive memory. Simultaneous administration of an NMDA receptor antagonist and a transcription inhibitor prior to reminder of an aversive event prevented amnesia induction. In contrast, when a transcription inhibitor alone was injected prior to a reminder session, the blockade had no effect on memory. We found that transcription inhibition 0-6 h after amnesia induction suppressed memory loss, but this suppression was lost when inhibitors were administered 9 h after amnesia. Thus, amnesia is likely dependent on transcription processes within a 9-h time window. We can hypothesize that amnesia induction initiates synthesis of specific mRNAs and proteins; furthermore, these events occur within specific time-dependent windows. Our findings could prove useful for the analysis of amnesia formation and for the development of possible ways to prevent memory loss associated with various diseases and injuries in animals and humans. PMID:26742927

  5. Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S Induce Distinct Transcriptional Profiles in Differentiating Human Primary Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Jonathan G.; Gagné, Rémi; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; Boudreau, Adèle; Yauk, Carole L.; Atlas, Ella

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol S (BPS) is increasingly used as a replacement plasticizer for bisphenol A (BPA) but its effects on human health have not been thoroughly examined. Recent evidence indicates that both BPA and BPS induce adipogenesis, although the mechanisms leading to this effect are unclear. In an effort to identify common and distinct mechanisms of action in inducing adipogenesis, transcriptional profiles of differentiating human preadipocytes exposed to BPA or BPS were compared. Human subcutaneous primary preadipocytes were differentiated in the presence of either 25 μM BPA or BPS for 2 and 4 days. Poly-A RNA-sequencing was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Functional analysis of DEGs was undertaken in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. BPA-treatment resulted in 472 and 176 DEGs on days 2 and 4, respectively, affecting pathways such as liver X receptor (LXR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) activation, hepatic fibrosis and cholestasis. BPS-treatment resulted in 195 and 51 DEGs on days 2 and 4, respectively, revealing enrichment of genes associated with adipogenesis and lipid metabolism including the adipogenesis pathway and cholesterol biosynthesis. Interestingly, the transcription repressor N-CoR was identified as a negative upstream regulator in both BPA- and BPS-treated cells. This study presents the first comparison of BPA- and BPS-induced transcriptional profiles in human differentiating preadipocytes. While we previously showed that BPA and BPS both induce adipogenesis, the results from this study show that BPS affects adipose specific transcriptional changes earlier than BPA, and alters the expression of genes specifically related to adipogenesis and lipid metabolism. The findings provide insight into potential BPS and BPA-mediated mechanisms of action in inducing adipogenesis in human primary preadipocytes. PMID:27685785

  6. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Fat-Moon; Lien, Gi-Shih; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chen, Chia-Nan; Lu, Shao-Yu; Yan, Ming-De

    2013-01-01

    Activating transcription factor-(ATF-) 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002) is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG) derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK), and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug. PMID:24222778

  7. Identification of two juvenile hormone inducible transcription factors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Ueno, Chihiro; Nakamura, Yuki; Kinjoh, Terunori; Ito, Yuka; Shimura, Sachiko; Noda, Hiroaki; Imanishi, Shigeo; Mita, Kazuei; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kamimura, Manabu

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates many physiological processes in insects. However, the signal cascades in which JH is active have not yet been fully elucidated, particularly in comparison to another major hormone ecdysteroid. Here we identified two JH inducible transcription factors as candidate components of JH signaling pathways in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. DNA microarray analysis showed that expression of two transcription factor genes, E75 and Enhancer of split mβ (E(spl)mβ), was induced by juvenile hormone I (JH I) in NIAS-Bm-aff3 cells. Real time RT-PCR analysis confirmed that expression of four E75 isoforms (E75A, E75B, E75C and E75D) and E(spl)mβ was 3-8 times greater after JH I addition. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide did not suppress JH-induced expression of the genes, indicating that they were directly induced by JH. JH-induced expression of E75 and E(spl)mβ was also observed in four other B. mori cell lines and in larval hemocytes of final instar larvae. Notably, E75A expression was induced very strongly in larval hemocytes by topical application of the JH analog fenoxycarb; the level of induced expression was comparable to that produced by feeding larvae with 20-hydroxyecdysone. These results suggest that E75 and E(spl)mβ are general and direct target genes of JH and that the transcription factors encoded by these genes play important roles in JH signaling.

  8. Nuclear receptor-induced transcription is driven by spatially and timely restricted waves of ROS

    PubMed Central

    Perillo, Bruno; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Ombra, Maria Neve; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is governed by chromatin mainly through posttranslational modifications at the N-terminal tails of nucleosomal histone proteins. According to the histone code theory, peculiar sets of such modifications (marks) give rise to reproducible final effects on transcription and, very recently, a further level of complexity has been highlighted in binary switches between specific marks at adjacent residues. In particular, disappearance of dimethyl-lysine 9 in histone H3 is faced by phosphorylation of the following serine during activation of gene expression. Demethylation of lysine 9 by the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is a pre-requisite for addition of the phosphoryl mark to serine 10 and an essential step in the transcriptional control by estrogens. It generates a local burst of oxygen reactive species (ROS) that induce oxidation of nearby nucleotides and recruitment of repair enzymes with a consequent formation of single or double stranded nicks on DNA that modify chromatin flexibility in order to allow correct assembly of the transcriptional machinery.   We describe here the molecular mechanism by which members of the family of nuclear receptors prevent the potential damage to DNA during transcription of target genes elicited by the use of ROS to shape chromatin. The mechanism is based on the presence of phosphorylated serine 10 in histone H3 to prevent unbalanced DNA oxidation waves. We also discuss the opportunities raised by the use of voluntary derangement of this servo system to induce selective death in hormone-responsive transformed cells. PMID:25482200

  9. Abiotic and biotic stressors causing equivalent mortality induce highly variable transcriptional responses in the soybean aphid.

    PubMed

    Enders, Laramy S; Bickel, Ryan D; Brisson, Jennifer A; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M; Siegfried, Blair D; Zera, Anthony J; Miller, Nicholas J

    2015-02-01

    Environmental stress affects basic organismal functioning and can cause physiological, developmental, and reproductive impairment. However, in many nonmodel organisms, the core molecular stress response remains poorly characterized and the extent to which stress-induced transcriptional changes differ across qualitatively different stress types is largely unexplored. The current study examines the molecular stress response of the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) using RNA sequencing and compares transcriptional responses to multiple stressors (heat, starvation, and plant defenses) at a standardized stress level (27% adult mortality). Stress-induced transcriptional changes showed remarkable variation, with starvation, heat, and plant defensive stress altering the expression of 3985, 510, and 12 genes, respectively. Molecular responses showed little overlap across all three stressors. However, a common transcriptional stress response was identified under heat and starvation, involved with up-regulation of glycogen biosynthesis and molecular chaperones and down-regulation of bacterial endosymbiont cellular and insect cuticular components. Stressor-specific responses indicated heat affected expression of heat shock proteins and cuticular components, whereas starvation altered a diverse set of genes involved in primary metabolism, oxidative reductive processes, nucleosome and histone assembly, and the regulation of DNA repair and replication. Exposure to host plant defenses elicited the weakest response, of which half of the genes were of unknown function. This study highlights the need for standardizing stress levels when comparing across stress types and provides a basis for understanding the role of general vs. stressor specific molecular responses in aphids.

  10. cAMP inducibility of transcriptional repressor ICER in developing and mature human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bodor, J; Spetz, A L; Strominger, J L; Habener, J F

    1996-04-16

    Stimulation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation and effector functions of T cells. The ability of T cells to form high intracellular levels of cAMP is acquired during development in the human thymus and is retained by the majority of mature peripheral T lymphocytes. Here we show that elevated cAMP levels in T cells correlate with the expression of the potent transcriptional repressor ICER (inducible cAMP early repressor) previously described in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further, in transcriptional assays in vivo, ICER inhibits calcineurin-mediated expression of the interleukin 2 promoter as well as Tax-mediated transactivation of the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) promoter. Thus, the induction of ICER in T cells may play an important role in the cAMP-induced quiescence and the persistent latency of HTLV-I.

  11. Apo CIII gene transcription is regulated by a cytokine inducible NF-kappa B element.

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, P J; Torres-Rosado, A; Wolak, M L; Leff, T

    1994-01-01

    Overproduction of Apo CIII causes elevated plasma triglyceride levels in transgenic animals and is associated with hypertriglyceridemia in humans. The regulation of apo CIII production is likely to play an important role in controlling plasma triglyceride levels. As an initial step in determining the role of transcriptional regulation in the production of apo CIII and in triglyceride metabolism, we have begun to characterize the activity of specific transcriptional regulatory elements in the CIII promoter. In the current study, we have identified and characterized an NF-kappa B regulatory element located 150 nucleotides upstream from the transcriptional start site of the apo CIII gene. Purified NF-kappa B, as well as an NF-kappa B protein in HepG2 cell nuclear extracts, bound specifically to this sequence element. The hepatic protein was induced by phorbol ester (PMA), and reacted with antibodies to the p50 and p65 subunits of NF-kappa B. The NF-kappa B element conferred PMA and IL1-beta inducible transcriptional activity to a heterologous promoter/reporter construct when transfected into HepG2 cells. Analysis of the full length CIII promoter demonstrated that the inducible activity of the NF-kappa B element was suppressed by sequences in the apo CIII enhancer element located approximately 500 nucleotides upstream of the NF-kappa B binding site. A deletion removing the enhancer restored the PMA inducible activity of the NF-kappa B binding site. These results indicate that apo CIII gene expression is regulated by NF-kappa B, and suggest that apo CIII production may be modulated by cellular signals, like inflammatory cytokines, that activate NF-kB. Images PMID:8036173

  12. A phenotypic screening assay for modulators of huntingtin-induced transcriptional dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Lazzeroni, Giulia; Benicchi, Tiziana; Heitz, Freddy; Magnoni, Letizia; Diamanti, Daniela; Rossini, Lara; Massai, Luisa; Federico, Cesare; Fecke, Wolfgang; Caricasole, Andrea; La Rosa, Salvatore; Porcari, Valentina

    2013-10-01

    Huntington's Disease is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats encoding polyglutamine in the first exon of the huntingtin gene. N-terminal fragments containing polyglutamine (polyQ) sequences aggregate and can bind to cellular proteins, resulting in several pathophysiological consequences for affected neurons such as changes in gene transcription. One transcriptional pathway that has been implicated in HD pathogenesis is the CREB binding protein (CBP)/cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) pathway. We developed a phenotypic assay to screen for compounds that can reverse the transcriptional dysregulation of the pathway caused by induced mutated huntingtin protein (µHtt). 293/T-REx cells were stably co-transfected with an inducible full-length mutated huntingtin gene containing 138 glutamine repeats and with a reporter gene under control of the cAMP responsive element (CRE). One clone, which showed reversible inhibition of µHtt-induced reporter activity upon treatment with the neuroprotective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, was used for the development of a high-throughput phenotypic assay suitable for a primary screening campaign, which was performed on a library of 24,000 compounds. Several hit compounds were identified and validated further in a cell viability adenosine triphosphate assay. The assay has the potential for finding new drug candidates for the treatment of HD. PMID:23562876

  13. Liver lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guoxun

    2007-09-28

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) plays key roles in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis, and cataplerosis. Experiments were designed to examine the effects of endogenous lipid molecules from rat livers on the expression of PEPCK-C gene in primary rat hepatocytes. The lipid extracts prepared from livers of Zucker fatty, lean, and Wistar rats induced the expression levels of PEPCK-C transcripts. Insulin-mediated reduction of PEPCK-C gene expression was attenuated by the same treatment. The lipid extracts induced the relative luciferase activity of reporter gene constructs that contain a 2.2-kb 5' promoter fragment of PEPCK-C gene, but not the construct that contains only the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of its mRNA. The estimated half life of PEPCK-C transcripts in the presence of the lipid extract is the same as that in the absence of it. My results demonstrate for the first time that endogenous lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action in liver.

  14. Ethanol induced astaxanthin accumulation and transcriptional expression of carotenogenic genes in Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zewen; Liu, Zhiyong; Hou, Yuyong; Liu, Chenfeng; Gao, Feng; Zheng, Yubin; Chen, Fangjian

    2015-10-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the most promising natural sources of astaxanthin. However, inducing the accumulation process has become one of the primary obstacles in astaxanthin production. In this study, the effect of ethanol on astaxanthin accumulation was investigated. The results demonstrated that astaxanthin accumulation occurred with ethanol addition even under low-light conditions. The astaxanthin productivity could reach 11.26 mg L(-1) d(-1) at 3% (v/v) ethanol, which was 2.03 times of that of the control. The transcriptional expression patterns of eight carotenogenic genes were evaluated using real-time PCR. The results showed that ethanol greatly enhanced transcription of the isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerase genes (ipi-1 and ipi-2), which were responsible for isomerization reaction of IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). This finding suggests that ethanol induced astaxanthin biosynthesis was up-regulated mainly by ipi-1 and ipi-2 at transcriptional level, promoting isoprenoid synthesis and substrate supply to carotenoid formation. Thus ethanol has the potential to be used as an effective reagent to induce astaxanthin accumulation in H. pluvialis.

  15. Long-term climbing fibre activity induces transcription of microRNAs in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Barmack, Neal H; Qian, Zuyuan; Yakhnitsa, Vadim

    2014-09-26

    Synaptic activation of central neurons is often evoked by electrical stimulation leading to post-tetanic potentiation, long-term potentiation or long-term depression. Even a brief electrical tetanus can induce changes in as many as 100 proteins. Since climbing fibre activity is often associated with cerebellar behavioural plasticity, we used horizontal optokinetic stimulation (HOKS) to naturally increase synaptic input to floccular Purkinje cells in mice for hours, not minutes, and investigated how this activity influenced the transcription of microRNAs, small non-coding nucleotides that reduce transcripts of multiple, complementary mRNAs. A single microRNA can reduce the translation of as many as 30 proteins. HOKS evoked increases in 12 microRNA transcripts in floccular Purkinje cells. One of these microRNAs, miR335, increased 18-fold after 24 h of HOKS. After HOKS stopped, miR335 transcripts decayed with a time constant of approximately 2.5 h. HOKS evoked a 28-fold increase in pri-miR335 transcripts compared with an 18-fold increase in mature miR335 transcripts, confirming that climbing fibre-evoked increases in miR335 could be attributed to increases in transcription. We used three screens to identify potential mRNA targets for miR335 transcripts: (i) nucleotide complementarity, (ii) detection of increased mRNAs following microinjection of miR335 inhibitors into the cerebellum, and (iii) detection of decreased mRNAs following HOKS. Two genes, calbindin and 14-3-3-θ, passed these screens. Transfection of N2a cells with miR335 inhibitors or precursors inversely regulated 14-3-3-θ transcripts. Immunoprecipitation of 14-3-3-θ co-immunoprecipitated PKC-γ and GABAAγ2. Knockdown of either 14-3-3-θ or PKC-γ decreased the serine phosphorylation of GABAAγ2, suggesting that 14-3-3-θ and PKC-γ under the control of miR335 homeostatically regulate the phosphorylation and insertion of GABAAγ2 into the Purkinje cell post-synaptic membrane. PMID:25135969

  16. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-10-12

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers.

  17. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  18. Role of the Slug Transcription Factor in Chemically-Induced Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    von Maltzan, Kristine; Li, Yafan; Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Fischer, Susan M.; Kusewitt, Donna F.

    2016-01-01

    The Slug transcription factor plays an important role in ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced skin carcinogenesis, particularly in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurring during tumor progression. In the present studies, we investigated the role of Slug in two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis. Slug and the related transcription factor Snail were expressed at high levels in skin tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene application followed by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) treatment. TPA-induced transient elevation of Slug and Snail proteins in normal mouse epidermis and studies in Slug transgenic mice indicated that Slug modulates TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and cutaneous inflammation. Although Snail family factors have been linked to inflammation via interactions with the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathway, a pathway that also plays an important role in skin carcinogenesis, transient TPA induction of Slug and Snail appeared unrelated to COX-2 expression. In cultured human keratinocytes, TPA induced Snail mRNA expression while suppressing Slug expression, and this differential regulation was due specifically to activation of the TPA receptor. These studies show that Slug and Snail exhibit similar patterns of expression during both UVR and chemical skin carcinogenesis, that Slug and Snail can be differentially regulated under some conditions and that in vitro findings may not recapitulate in vivo results. PMID:26848699

  19. Transcription Factors OVOL1 and OVOL2 Induce the Mesenchymal to Epithelial Transition in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Hernan; Hernandez, James; Weidner, Savannah; McEachin, Richard C.; Fuller, David; Sud, Sudha; Schumann, Taibriana; Wilkinson, John E.; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Li, Hangwen; Maher, Christopher A.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Healy, Patrick N.; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Cell plasticity regulated by the balance between the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and the opposite program, EMT, is critical in the metastatic cascade. Several transcription factors (TFs) are known to regulate EMT, though the mechanisms of MET remain unclear. We demonstrate a novel function of two TFs, OVOL1 and OVOL2, as critical inducers of MET in human cancers. Our findings indicate that the OVOL-TFs control MET through a regulatory feedback loop with EMT-inducing TF ZEB1, and the regulation of mRNA splicing by inducing Epithelial Splicing Regulatory Protein 1 (ESRP1). Using mouse prostate tumor models we show that expression of OVOL-TFs in mesenchymal prostate cancer cells attenuates their metastatic potential. The role of OVOL-TFs as inducers of MET is further supported by expression analyses in 917 cancer cell lines, suggesting their role as crucial regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal cell plasticity in cancer. PMID:24124593

  20. Structurally Distinct Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Induce Differential Transcriptional Responses in Developing Zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Britton; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn V.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC-MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures.

  1. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC–MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. - Highlights: • Defined global mRNA expression

  2. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  3. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development. PMID:25681390

  4. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-02-13

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development.

  5. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H; Goodman, Myron F; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ∼ 5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer. PMID:26681117

  6. Co-transcriptional R-loops are the main cause of estrogen-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Caroline Townsend; Bocek, Michael; Crossley, Madzia P; Sollier, Julie; Sanz, Lionel A; Chédin, Frédéric; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2016-01-01

    The hormone estrogen (E2) binds the estrogen receptor to promote transcription of E2-responsive genes in the breast and other tissues. E2 also has links to genomic instability, and elevated E2 levels are tied to breast cancer. Here, we show that E2 stimulation causes a rapid, global increase in the formation of R-loops, co-transcriptional RNA-DNA products, which in some instances have been linked to DNA damage. We show that E2-dependent R-loop formation and breast cancer rearrangements are highly enriched at E2-responsive genomic loci and that E2 induces DNA replication-dependent double-strand breaks (DSBs). Strikingly, many DSBs that accumulate in response to E2 are R-loop dependent. Thus, R-loops resulting from the E2 transcriptional response are a significant source of DNA damage. This work reveals a novel mechanism by which E2 stimulation leads to genomic instability and highlights how transcriptional programs play an important role in shaping the genomic landscape of DNA damage susceptibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17548.001 PMID:27552054

  7. Early iron-deficiency-induced transcriptional changes in Arabidopsis roots as revealed by microarray analyses

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, Thomas J; Yang, Thomas JW; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Background Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient in plants and animals, and Fe deficiency results in decreased vitality and performance. Due to limited bio-availability of Fe, plants have evolved sophisticated adaptive alterations in development, biochemistry and metabolism that are mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. We have investigated the early transcriptional response to Fe deficiency in roots of the model plant Arabidopsis, using a hydroponic system that permitted removal of Fe from the nutrient solution within seconds and transferring large numbers of plants with little or no mechanical damage to the root systems. We feel that this experimental approach offers significant advantages over previous and recent DNA microarray investigations of the Fe-deficiency response by increasing the resolution of the temporal response and by decreasing non-Fe deficiency-induced transcriptional changes, which are common in microarray analyses. Results The expression of sixty genes were changed after 6 h of Fe deficiency and 65% of these were found to overlap with a group of seventy-nine genes that were altered after 24 h. A disproportionally high number of transcripts encoding ion transport proteins were found, which function to increase the Fe concentration and decrease the zinc (Zn) concentration in the cytosol. Analysis of global changes in gene expression revealed that changes in Fe availability were associated with the differential expression of genes that encode transporters with presumed function in uptake and distribution of transition metals other than Fe. It appeared that under conditions of Fe deficiency, the capacity for Zn uptake increased, most probably the result of low specificity of the Fe transporter IRT1 that was induced upon Fe deficiency. The transcriptional regulation of several Zn transports under Fe deficiency led presumably to the homeostatic regulation of the cytosolic concentration of Zn and of other transition metal ions such as Mn to

  8. c-Jun and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Functionally Cooperate in Hypoxia-Induced Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Alfranca, Arántzazu; Gutiérrez, M. Dolores; Vara, Alicia; Aragonés, Julián; Vidal, Felipe; Landázuri, Manuel O.

    2002-01-01

    Under low-oxygen conditions, cells develop an adaptive program that leads to the induction of several genes, which are transcriptionally regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). On the other hand, there are other factors which modulate the HIF-1-mediated induction of some genes by binding to cis-acting motifs present in their promoters. Here, we show that c-Jun functionally cooperates with HIF-1 transcriptional activity in different cell types. Interestingly, a dominant-negative mutant of c-Jun which lacks its transactivation domain partially inhibits HIF-1-mediated transcription. This cooperative effect is not due to an increase in the nuclear amount of the HIF-1α subunit, nor does it require direct binding of c-Jun to DNA. c-Jun and HIF-1α are able to associate in vivo but not in vitro, suggesting that this interaction involves the participation of additional proteins and/or a posttranslational modification of these factors. In this context, hypoxia induces phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser63 in endothelial cells. This process is involved in its cooperative effect, since specific blockade of the JNK pathway and mutation of c-Jun at Ser63 and Ser73 impair its functional cooperation with HIF-1. The functional interplay between c-Jun and HIF-1 provides a novel insight into the regulation of some genes, such as the one for VEGF, which is a key regulator of tumor angiogenesis. PMID:11739718

  9. Pokemon (FBI-1) interacts with Smad4 to repress TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Chuanfu; Mei, Zhu; Wang, Yue; Bi, Mingjun; Shan, Dapeng; Meredith, Alex; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2015-03-01

    Pokemon, an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ and Krüppel) family. Smad4, a key component of TGF-β pathway, plays an essential role in TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses. In this study, we show that Pokemon can interact directly with Smad4 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Pokemon decreases TGF-β-induced transcriptional activities, whereas knockdown of Pokemon increases these activities. Interestingly, Pokemon does not affect activation of Smad2/3, formation of Smads complex, or DNA binding activity of Smad4. TGF-β1 treatment increases the interaction between Pokemon and Smad4, and also enhances the recruitment of Pokemon to Smad4-DNA complex. In addition, we also find that Pokemon recruits HDAC1 to Smad4 complex but decreases the interaction between Smad4 and p300/CBP. Taken together, all these data suggest that Pokemon is a new partner of Smad4 and plays a negative role in TGF-β pathway. PMID:25514493

  10. A model of transcriptional and morphological changes during thyroid hormone-induced metamorphosis of the axolotl

    PubMed Central

    Page, Robert B.; Monaghan, James R.; Walker, John A.; Voss, S. Randal

    2009-01-01

    Anuran (frog) metamorphosis has long-served as a model of how thyroid hormones regulate post-embryonic development in vertebrates. However, comparatively little is known about urodele (salamander) metamorphosis. We conducted a detailed time-course study of induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that probed metamorphic changes in morphology and gene expression in the skin. Using morphometrics, quantitative PCR, histology, and in situ hybridization we demonstrate that the development of transcriptional markers is fundamental to the resolution of early metamorphic events in axolotls. We then use linear and piecewise linear models to identify a sequence of morphological and transcriptional changes that define larval to adult remodeling events throughout metamorphosis. In addition, we show that transcriptional biomarkers are expressed in specific larval and adult cell populations of the skin and that temporal changes in these biomarkers correlate with tissue remodeling. We compare our results with other studies of natural and induced metamorphosis in urodeles and highlight what appear to be conserved features between urodele and anuran metamorphosis. PMID:19275901

  11. Pokemon (FBI-1) interacts with Smad4 to repress TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Chuanfu; Mei, Zhu; Wang, Yue; Bi, Mingjun; Shan, Dapeng; Meredith, Alex; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2015-03-01

    Pokemon, an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ and Krüppel) family. Smad4, a key component of TGF-β pathway, plays an essential role in TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses. In this study, we show that Pokemon can interact directly with Smad4 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Pokemon decreases TGF-β-induced transcriptional activities, whereas knockdown of Pokemon increases these activities. Interestingly, Pokemon does not affect activation of Smad2/3, formation of Smads complex, or DNA binding activity of Smad4. TGF-β1 treatment increases the interaction between Pokemon and Smad4, and also enhances the recruitment of Pokemon to Smad4-DNA complex. In addition, we also find that Pokemon recruits HDAC1 to Smad4 complex but decreases the interaction between Smad4 and p300/CBP. Taken together, all these data suggest that Pokemon is a new partner of Smad4 and plays a negative role in TGF-β pathway.

  12. Transcriptional changes induced by in vivo exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Chironomus riparius (Diptera) aquatic larvae.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Martín, Raquel; Planelló, Rosario; Urien, Josune; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-12-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been extensively used worldwide as a pesticide and biocide and is frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In the present work, the toxicity of PCP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects following short- and long-term exposures were evaluated at the molecular level by analyzing changes in the transcriptional profile of different endocrine genes, as well as in genes involved in the stress response and detoxification. Interestingly, although no differences were found after 12- and 24-h treatments, at 96-h exposures PCP was able to induce significant increases in transcripts from the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the early ecdysone-inducible E74 gene, the estrogen-related receptor gene (ERR), the Hsp70 gene and the CYP4G gene. In contrast, the Hsp27 gene appeared to be downregulated, while the ultraspiracle gene (usp) (insect ortholog of the retinoid X receptor) was not altered in any of the conditions assayed. Moreover, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) activity was not affected. The results obtained show the ability of PCP to modulate transcription of different biomarker genes from important cellular metabolic activities, which could be useful in genomic approaches to monitoring. In particular, the significant upregulation of hormonal genes represents the first evidence at the genomic level of the potential endocrine disruptive effects of PCP on aquatic invertebrates.

  13. A model of transcriptional and morphological changes during thyroid hormone-induced metamorphosis of the axolotl.

    PubMed

    Page, Robert B; Monaghan, James R; Walker, John A; Voss, S Randal

    2009-06-01

    Anuran (frog) metamorphosis has long-served as a model of how thyroid hormones regulate post-embryonic development in vertebrates. However, comparatively little is known about urodele (salamander) metamorphosis. We conducted a detailed time-course study of induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that probed metamorphic changes in morphology and gene expression in the skin. Using morphometrics, quantitative PCR, histology, and in situ hybridization we demonstrate that the development of transcriptional markers is fundamental to the resolution of early metamorphic events in axolotls. We then use linear and piecewise linear models to identify a sequence of morphological and transcriptional changes that define larval to adult remodeling events throughout metamorphosis. In addition, we show that transcriptional biomarkers are expressed in specific larval and adult cell populations of the skin and that temporal changes in these biomarkers correlate with tissue remodeling. We compare our results with other studies of natural and induced metamorphosis in urodeles and highlight what appear to be conserved features between urodele and anuran metamorphosis.

  14. Transcriptional changes induced by in vivo exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Chironomus riparius (Diptera) aquatic larvae.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Martín, Raquel; Planelló, Rosario; Urien, Josune; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-12-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been extensively used worldwide as a pesticide and biocide and is frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In the present work, the toxicity of PCP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects following short- and long-term exposures were evaluated at the molecular level by analyzing changes in the transcriptional profile of different endocrine genes, as well as in genes involved in the stress response and detoxification. Interestingly, although no differences were found after 12- and 24-h treatments, at 96-h exposures PCP was able to induce significant increases in transcripts from the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the early ecdysone-inducible E74 gene, the estrogen-related receptor gene (ERR), the Hsp70 gene and the CYP4G gene. In contrast, the Hsp27 gene appeared to be downregulated, while the ultraspiracle gene (usp) (insect ortholog of the retinoid X receptor) was not altered in any of the conditions assayed. Moreover, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) activity was not affected. The results obtained show the ability of PCP to modulate transcription of different biomarker genes from important cellular metabolic activities, which could be useful in genomic approaches to monitoring. In particular, the significant upregulation of hormonal genes represents the first evidence at the genomic level of the potential endocrine disruptive effects of PCP on aquatic invertebrates. PMID:25306060

  15. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  16. Estrogen-induced apoptosis by inhibition of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1.

    PubMed Central

    Blobel, G A; Orkin, S H

    1996-01-01

    Steroid hormones regulate diverse biological functions, including programmed cell death (apoptosis). Although steroid receptors have been studied extensively, relatively little is known regarding the cellular targets through which apoptosis is triggered. We show here that the ligand-activated estrogen receptor (ER) induces apoptosis in an erythroid cell line by binding to, and consequently inhibiting the activity of, GATA-1, an erythroid transcription factor essential for the survival and maturation of erythroid precursor cells. GATA-1 inhibition is reflected in the downregulation of presumptive GATA-1 target genes. Constitutive overexpression of a GATA-binding protein resistant to the effects of the ER partially rescues ER-induced apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis by a mutant ER defective in binding to the estrogen response element but active in GATA-1 inhibition suggests that ER-mediated inhibition of GATA-1 is direct and does not require estrogen response element-dependent transcriptional activation. Thus, a lineage-restricted transcription factor, such as GATA-1, constitutes one cellular target through which steroid hormones may control apoptosis. As GATA-binding proteins are evolutionarily conserved, we speculate that members of the steroid receptor family may exert some of their diverse biological functions in different cellular contexts through interference with the function of GATA-binding proteins. PMID:8657144

  17. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive ana...

  18. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin). PMID:26662274

  19. Aspergillus flavus infection induces transcriptional and physical changes in developing maize kernels

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Andrea L.; Shu, Xiaomei; OBrian, Gregory R.; Nielsen, Dahlia M.; Woloshuk, Charles P.; Boston, Rebecca S.; Payne, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Maize kernels are susceptible to infection by the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus flavus. Infection results in reduction of grain quality and contamination of kernels with the highly carcinogenic mycotoxin, aflatoxin. To understanding host response to infection by the fungus, transcription of approximately 9000 maize genes were monitored during the host-pathogen interaction with a custom designed Affymetrix GeneChip® DNA array. More than 4000 maize genes were found differentially expressed at a FDR of 0.05. This included the up regulation of defense related genes and signaling pathways. Transcriptional changes also were observed in primary metabolism genes. Starch biosynthetic genes were down regulated during infection, while genes encoding maize hydrolytic enzymes, presumably involved in the degradation of host reserves, were up regulated. These data indicate that infection of the maize kernel by A. flavus induced metabolic changes in the kernel, including the production of a defense response, as well as a disruption in kernel development. PMID:25132833

  20. Human Trefoil Factor 3 induces the transcription of its own promoter through STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Wang, Liangxi; Zhou, Yifang; Mao, Xuefei; Deng, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Human trefoil factor 3 (hTFF3) is a small peptide of potential therapeutic value. The mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of hTFF3 remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the core functional elements for the self-induction action of hTFF3 and transcription factors. First, truncated promoters were constructed to identify the functional regions of the hTFF3 promoter. Next, point mutation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and gene overexpression experiments were performed to analyze the transcriptional binding sites responsible for the self-induced transcription of hTFF3. Our results revealed the −1450 bp to −1400 bp fragment of the hTFF3 promoter was the functional region for the self-induction action of hTFF3. Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that a STAT3 binding site is present in the −1417 bp to −1409 bp region. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenesis analysis determined that this STAT3 binding site was critical for the self-induction effect of hTFF3. ChIP experiments confirmed that STAT3 binds to the hTFF3 promoter. STAT3 overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that STAT3 enhanced the self-induction effect and the expression of hTFF3. This study confirmed that hTFF3 exhibits self-induction action, and that STAT3 is the key transcription factor to maintain the function of self-induction. PMID:27453253

  1. Amplification of TGFβ Induced ITGB6 Gene Transcription May Promote Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tatler, Amanda L; Goodwin, Amanda T; Gbolahan, Olumide; Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; John, Alison E; Clifford, Rachel L; Violette, Shelia M; Weinreb, Paul H; Parfrey, Helen; Wolters, Paul J; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating, progressive disease with poor survival rates and limited treatment options. Upregulation of αvβ6 integrins within the alveolar epithelial cells is a characteristic feature of IPF and correlates with poor patient survival. The pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 can upregulate αvβ6 integrin expression but the molecular mechanisms driving this effect have not previously been elucidated. We confirm that stimulation with exogenous TGFβ1 increases expression of the integrin β6 subunit gene (ITGB6) and αvβ6 integrin cell surface expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via transcriptional activation of the ITGB6 gene, but does not result from effects on ITGB6 mRNA stability. Basal expression of ITGB6 in, and αvβ6 integrins on, lung epithelial cells occurs via homeostatic αvβ6-mediated TGFβ1 activation in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and can be amplified by TGFβ1 activation. Fundamentally, we show for the first time that TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via canonical Smad signalling since dominant negative constructs directed against Smad3 and 4 inhibit ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, disruption of a Smad binding site at -798 in the ITGB6 promoter abolishes TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TGFβ1 stimulation of lung epithelial cells results in direct binding of Smad3, and Smad4, to the ITGB6 gene promoter within this region. Finally, using an adenoviral TGFβ1 over-expression model of pulmonary fibrosis we demonstrate that Smad3 is crucial for TGFβ1-induced αvβ6 integrin expression within the alveolar epithelium in vivo. Together, these data confirm that a homeostatic, autocrine loop of αvβ6 integrin activated TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 gene expression regulates epithelial basal αvβ6 integrin expression, and demonstrates that this occurs via Smad

  2. Amplification of TGFβ Induced ITGB6 Gene Transcription May Promote Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatler, Amanda L.; Goodwin, Amanda T.; Gbolahan, Olumide; Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; John, Alison E.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Violette, Shelia M.; Weinreb, Paul H.; Parfrey, Helen; Wolters, Paul J.; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating, progressive disease with poor survival rates and limited treatment options. Upregulation of αvβ6 integrins within the alveolar epithelial cells is a characteristic feature of IPF and correlates with poor patient survival. The pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 can upregulate αvβ6 integrin expression but the molecular mechanisms driving this effect have not previously been elucidated. We confirm that stimulation with exogenous TGFβ1 increases expression of the integrin β6 subunit gene (ITGB6) and αvβ6 integrin cell surface expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via transcriptional activation of the ITGB6 gene, but does not result from effects on ITGB6 mRNA stability. Basal expression of ITGB6 in, and αvβ6 integrins on, lung epithelial cells occurs via homeostatic αvβ6-mediated TGFβ1 activation in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and can be amplified by TGFβ1 activation. Fundamentally, we show for the first time that TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via canonical Smad signalling since dominant negative constructs directed against Smad3 and 4 inhibit ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, disruption of a Smad binding site at -798 in the ITGB6 promoter abolishes TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TGFβ1 stimulation of lung epithelial cells results in direct binding of Smad3, and Smad4, to the ITGB6 gene promoter within this region. Finally, using an adenoviral TGFβ1 over-expression model of pulmonary fibrosis we demonstrate that Smad3 is crucial for TGFβ1-induced αvβ6 integrin expression within the alveolar epithelium in vivo. Together, these data confirm that a homeostatic, autocrine loop of αvβ6 integrin activated TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 gene expression regulates epithelial basal αvβ6 integrin expression, and demonstrates that this occurs via Smad

  3. RNA sequencing analysis identifies novel spliced transcripts but does not indicate quantitative or qualitative changes of viral transcripts during progression of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus-induced tumours.

    PubMed

    Probst-Hunczek, Sonja; Jäger, Günter; Schneider, Markus; Notz, Ekaterina; Stubenrauch, Frank; Iftner, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Persistent infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can result in the development of cancer of the cervix uteri and other malignancies. The underlying molecular mechanisms leading to the progression of HPV-induced lesions are, however, not well understood. Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) induces papillomas in domestic rabbits which progress at a very high rate to cancer. Using this model, we compared the transcriptional patterns of CRPV in papillomas and carcinomas by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The most abundant transcripts can encode E7, short E6 and E1^E4, followed by full-length E6, E2, E1 and E9^E2C. In addition, we identified two rare, novel splice junctions 7810/3714 and 1751/3065 in both papillomas and carcinomas which have been described for other papillomaviruses. Neither RNA-seq nor quantitative real-time PCR-based assays identified qualitative or quantitative changes of viral transcription between papillomas and carcinomas. In summary, our analyses confirmed that papillomaviruses have highly similar transcriptional patterns, but they do not suggest that changes in these patterns contribute to the progression of CRPV-induced tumours. PMID:26297146

  4. Involvement of multiple transcription factors for metal-induced spy gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2008-01-20

    Bacteria are directly exposed to metals in environment. To maintain the intracellular metal homeostasis, Escherichia coli contain a number of gene regulation systems, each for response to a specific metal. A periplasmic protein Spy of E. coli was found to be induced upon short-exposure to copper ion in CpxAR-dependent manner. Transcription of the spy gene was also induced by long-exposure to zinc ion. This induction, however, depended on another two-component system BaeSR. Using DNase-I footprinting assay, we identified two BaeR-binding regions on the spy promoter with a direct repeat of the BaeR-box sequence, TCTNCANAA. The zinc-responsive BaeR-binding sites were separated from copper-responsive CpxR-binding site, implying that the spy promoter responds to two species of metal independently through different using sensor-response regulator systems. Since BaeSR-dependent zinc response requires longer time, the induction of spy gene transcription by external zinc may include multiple steps such as through sensing the zinc-induced envelope disorder by BaeSR.

  5. ATRA transcriptionally induces nSMase2 through CBP/p300-mediated histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher J; Shamseddine, Achraf A; Jacob, Joseph J; Khalife, Gabrielle; Burns, Tara A; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2016-05-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase2) is a key ceramide-producing enzyme in cellular stress responses. While many posttranslational regulators of nSMase2 are known, emerging evidence suggests a more protracted regulation of nSMase2 at the transcriptional level. Previously, we reported that nSMase2 is induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in MCF7 cells and implicated nSMase2 in ATRA-induced growth arrest. Here, we further investigated how ATRA regulates nSMase2. We find that ATRA regulates nSMase2 transcriptionally through the retinoic acid receptor-α, but this is independent of previously identified transcriptional regulators of nSMase2 (Sp1, Sp3, Runx2) and is not through increased promoter activity. Epigenetically, the nSMase2 gene is not repressively methylated in MCF7 cells. However, inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) with trichostatin A (TSA) induced nSMase2 comparably to ATRA; furthermore, combined ATRA and TSA treatment was not additive, suggesting ATRA regulates nSMase2 through direct modulation of histone acetylation. Confirming this, the histone acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein and p300 were required for ATRA induction of nSMase2. Finally, use of class-specific HDAC inhibitors suggested that HDAC4 and/or HDAC5 are negative regulators of nSMase2 expression. Collectively, these results identify a novel pathway of nSMase2 regulation and suggest that physiological or pharmacological modulation of histone acetylation can directly affect nSMase2 levels. PMID:27013100

  6. Glucocorticoid signaling drives epigenetic and transcription factors to induce key regulators of human parturition.

    PubMed

    Zannas, Anthony S; Chrousos, George P

    2015-10-27

    Glucocorticoids are thought to play an important role in parturition. Two recent articles by Di Stefano et al. in the Archives and Wang et al. in this issue of Science Signaling reveal novel mechanisms by which glucocorticoid signaling can drive the epigenetic and transcriptional machinery to induce molecules involved in parturition, including the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the autacoid hormone prostaglandin E2. These findings contribute to our understanding of how glucocorticoids may regulate human parturition.

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Tetrapyrrole Biosynthetic Genes Explains Abscisic Acid-Induced Heme Accumulation in the Unicellular Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a pivotal phytohormone that is synthesized in response to abiotic stresses and other environmental changes, induces various physiological responses. Heme, in its unbound form, has a positive signaling role in cell-cycle initiation in Cyanidioschyzon merolae. ABA induces heme accumulation, but also prevents cell-cycle initiation through the titration of the unbound heme by inducing the heme scavenging protein tryptophan-rich sensory protein-related protein O. In this study, we analyzed the accumulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthetic gene transcripts after the addition of ABA to the medium and found that transcripts of a ferrochelatase and a magnesium-chelatase subunit increased, while other examined transcripts decreased. Under the same conditions, the heme and magnesium-protoporphyrin IX contents increased, while the protoporphyrin IX content decreased. Thus, ABA may regulate the intracellular heme and other tetrapyrrole contents through the transcriptional regulation of biosynthetic genes.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Tetrapyrrole Biosynthetic Genes Explains Abscisic Acid-Induced Heme Accumulation in the Unicellular Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a pivotal phytohormone that is synthesized in response to abiotic stresses and other environmental changes, induces various physiological responses. Heme, in its unbound form, has a positive signaling role in cell-cycle initiation in Cyanidioschyzon merolae. ABA induces heme accumulation, but also prevents cell-cycle initiation through the titration of the unbound heme by inducing the heme scavenging protein tryptophan-rich sensory protein-related protein O. In this study, we analyzed the accumulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthetic gene transcripts after the addition of ABA to the medium and found that transcripts of a ferrochelatase and a magnesium-chelatase subunit increased, while other examined transcripts decreased. Under the same conditions, the heme and magnesium-protoporphyrin IX contents increased, while the protoporphyrin IX content decreased. Thus, ABA may regulate the intracellular heme and other tetrapyrrole contents through the transcriptional regulation of biosynthetic genes. PMID:27621743

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of Tetrapyrrole Biosynthetic Genes Explains Abscisic Acid-Induced Heme Accumulation in the Unicellular Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a pivotal phytohormone that is synthesized in response to abiotic stresses and other environmental changes, induces various physiological responses. Heme, in its unbound form, has a positive signaling role in cell-cycle initiation in Cyanidioschyzon merolae. ABA induces heme accumulation, but also prevents cell-cycle initiation through the titration of the unbound heme by inducing the heme scavenging protein tryptophan-rich sensory protein-related protein O. In this study, we analyzed the accumulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthetic gene transcripts after the addition of ABA to the medium and found that transcripts of a ferrochelatase and a magnesium-chelatase subunit increased, while other examined transcripts decreased. Under the same conditions, the heme and magnesium-protoporphyrin IX contents increased, while the protoporphyrin IX content decreased. Thus, ABA may regulate the intracellular heme and other tetrapyrrole contents through the transcriptional regulation of biosynthetic genes. PMID:27621743

  10. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2).

  11. Break-seq reveals hydroxyurea-induced chromosome fragility as a result of unscheduled conflict between DNA replication and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A.; McCulley, Andrew; Haarer, Brian; Arnak, Remigiusz

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication, checkpoint inactivation via a mec1 mutation leads to chromosome breakage at replication forks initiated from virtually all origins after transient exposure to hydroxyurea (HU), an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase. Here we sought to determine whether all replication forks containing single-stranded DNA gaps have equal probability of producing double-strand breaks (DSBs) when cells attempt to recover from HU exposure. We devised a new methodology, Break-seq, that combines our previously described DSB labeling with next generation sequencing to map chromosome breaks with improved sensitivity and resolution. We show that DSBs preferentially occur at genes transcriptionally induced by HU. Notably, different subsets of the HU-induced genes produced DSBs in MEC1 and mec1 cells as replication forks traversed a greater distance in MEC1 cells than in mec1 cells during recovery from HU. Specifically, while MEC1 cells exhibited chromosome breakage at stress-response transcription factors, mec1 cells predominantly suffered chromosome breakage at transporter genes, many of which are the substrates of those transcription factors. We propose that HU-induced chromosome fragility arises at higher frequency near HU-induced genes as a result of destabilized replication forks encountering transcription factor binding and/or the act of transcription. We further propose that replication inhibitors can induce unscheduled encounters between replication and transcription and give rise to distinct patterns of chromosome fragile sites. PMID:25609572

  12. Natural Antisense Transcript for Hyaluronan Synthase 2 (HAS2-AS1) Induces Transcription of HAS2 via Protein O-GlcNAcylation*

    PubMed Central

    Vigetti, Davide; Deleonibus, Sara; Moretto, Paola; Bowen, Timothy; Fischer, Jens W.; Grandoch, Maria; Oberhuber, Alexander; Love, Dona C.; Hanover, John A.; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Karousou, Eugenia; Viola, Manuela; D'Angelo, Maria Luisa; Hascall, Vincent C.; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the microenvironment organization within vascular walls are critical events in the pathogenesis of vascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Hyaluronan (HA) accumulation into artery walls supports vessel thickening and is involved in many cardiocirculatory diseases. Excessive cytosolic glucose can enter the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, increase UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) availability, and lead to modification of cytosolic proteins via O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide β-N-GlcNAc (O-GlcNAcylation) from UDP-GlcNAc by the enzyme O-GlcNAc transferase. As many cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins can be glycosylated by O-GlcNAc, we studied whether the expression of the HA synthases that synthesize HA could be controlled by O-GlcNAcylation in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Among the three HAS isoenzymes, only HAS2 mRNA increased after O-GlcNAcylation induced by glucosamine treatments or by inhibiting O-GlcNAc transferase with PUGNAC (O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene)amino-N-phenylcarbamate). We found that the natural antisense transcript of HAS2 (HAS2-AS1) was absolutely necessary to induce the transcription of the HAS2 gene. Moreover, we found that O-GlcNAcylation modulated HAS2-AS1 promoter activation by recruiting the NF-κB subunit p65, but not the HAS2 promoter, whereas HAS2-AS1 natural antisense transcript, working in cis, regulated HAS2 transcription by altering the chromatin structure around the HAS2 proximal promoter via O-GlcNAcylation and acetylation. These results indicate that HAS2 transcription can be finely regulated not only by recruiting transcription factors to the promoter as previously described but also by modulating chromatin accessibility by epigenetic modifications. PMID:25183006

  13. SUMOylation of the inducible (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex occurs on target promoters to limit transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Tempé, D; Vives, E; Brockly, F; Brooks, H; De Rossi, S; Piechaczyk, M; Bossis, G

    2014-02-13

    The inducible proto-oncogenic (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex binds 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-responsive elements (TRE) in its target genes. It is tightly controlled at multiple levels to avoid the deleterious effects of its inappropriate activation. In particular, SUMOylation represses its transactivation capacity in transient reporter assays using constitutively expressed proteins. This led to the presumption that (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation would be required to turn-off transcription of its target genes, as proposed for various transcription factors. Instead, thanks to the generation of an antibody specific for SUMO-modified c-Fos, we provide here direct evidence that SUMOylated c-Fos is present on a stably integrated reporter TPA-inducible promoter at the onset of transcriptional activation and colocalizes with RNA polymerase II within chromatin. Interestingly, (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation limits reporter gene induction, as well as the appearance of active transcription-specific histone marks on its promoter. Moreover, non-SUMOylatable mutant (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 dimers accumulate to higher levels on their target promoter, suggesting that SUMOylation might facilitate the release of (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 from promoters. Finally, activation of GADD153, an AP-1 target gene, is also associated with a rapid increase in SUMOylation at the level of its TRE and c-Fos SUMOylation dampens its induction by TPA. Taken together, our data suggest that SUMOylation could serve to buffer transcriptional activation of AP-1 target genes.

  14. Glutamate-induced octamer DNA binding and transcriptional control in cultured radial glia cells.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Cruz-Solís, Irma; Corona, Matilde; López-Colomé, Ana María; Ortega, Arturo

    2006-08-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, is critically involved in gene expression regulation in neurons and in glia cells. Neuron-glia interactions provide the framework for synaptic plasticity. Retinal and cerebellar radial glia cells surround glutamatergic excitatory synapses and sense synaptic activity through glutamate receptors expressed in their membranes. Several glutamate-dependent membrane to nuclei signaling cascades have been described in these cells. Octamer DNA binding factors, namely Oct-1 and Oct-2 recognize similar DNA sequences on regulatory regions, but their final transcriptional effect depends on several factors. By these means, different responses can be achieved in different cell types. Here, we describe a comparison between the glutamate-induced DNA binding of octamer factors and their functional activities in two important types of radial glia, retinal Müller and cerebellar Bergmann glial cells. While Oct-1 is expressed in both cell types and in both glutamate treatments results in an increase in Oct-1 DNA binding, this complex is capable of transactivating a reporter gene only in Müller glia cells. In contrast, Oct-2 expression is restricted to Bergmann glia cells in which glutamate treatment results in an augmentation of Oct-2 DNA binding complexes and the repression of kainate binding protein gene transcription. Our present findings demonstrate a differential role for Oct-1 and Oct-2 transcription factors in glial glutamate signaling, and further strengthen the notion of an important role for glial cells in glutamatergic transactions in the central nervous system.

  15. The Arabidopsis transcription factor ABIG1 relays ABA signaled growth inhibition and drought induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tie; Longhurst, Adam D; Talavera-Rauh, Franklin; Hokin, Samuel A; Barton, M Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Drought inhibits plant growth and can also induce premature senescence. Here we identify a transcription factor, ABA INSENSITIVE GROWTH 1 (ABIG1) required for abscisic acid (ABA) mediated growth inhibition, but not for stomatal closure. ABIG1 mRNA levels are increased both in response to drought and in response to ABA treatment. When treated with ABA, abig1 mutants remain greener and produce more leaves than comparable wild-type plants. When challenged with drought, abig1 mutants have fewer yellow, senesced leaves than wild-type. Induction of ABIG1 transcription mimics ABA treatment and regulates a set of genes implicated in stress responses. We propose a model in which drought acts through ABA to increase ABIG1 transcription which in turn restricts new shoot growth and promotes leaf senescence. The results have implications for plant breeding: the existence of a mutant that is both ABA resistant and drought resistant points to new strategies for isolating drought resistant genetic varieties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13768.001 PMID:27697148

  16. Activation of TORC1 transcriptional coactivator through MEKK1-induced phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Siu, Yeung-Tung; Ching, Yick-Pang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2008-11-01

    CREB is a prototypic bZIP transcription factor and a master regulator of glucose metabolism, synaptic plasticity, cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Transducers of regulated CREB activity (TORCs) are essential transcriptional coactivators of CREB and an important point of regulation on which various signals converge. In this study, we report on the activation of TORC1 through MEKK1-mediated phosphorylation. MEKK1 potently activated TORC1, and this activation was independent of downstream effectors MEK1/MEK2, ERK2, JNK, p38, protein kinase A, and calcineurin. MEKK1 induced phosphorylation of TORC1 both in vivo and in vitro. Expression of the catalytic domain of MEKK1 alone in cultured mammalian cells sufficiently caused phosphorylation and subsequent activation of TORC1. MEKK1 physically interacted with TORC1 and stimulated its nuclear translocation. An activation domain responsive to MEKK1 stimulation was mapped to amino acids 431-650 of TORC1. As a physiological activator of CREB, interleukin 1alpha triggered MEKK1-dependent phosphorylation of TORC1 and its consequent recruitment to the cAMP response elements in the interleukin 8 promoter. Taken together, our findings suggest a new mechanism for regulated activation of TORC1 transcriptional coactivator and CREB signaling.

  17. Regulation of Light-Induced Chloroplast Transcription and Translation in Eight-Day-Old Dark-Grown Barley Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    Plastid transcription and translation are light-activated in 8-day-old dark-grown barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings. Pretreatment of dark-grown seedlings with cycloheximide (inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis) abolished the activation of rbcL, psbA, and psaA-B transcription by light. In contrast, inhibition of plastid protein synthesis by chloramphenicol stimulated light-activated transcription of rbcL, psbA, and psaA-B. Light-induced transcription of the plastid genome occurred normally in the chlorophyll-deficient mutant xan-J64. These results suggest that although the light-induced activation of plastid transcription is modulated by cytoplasmic and organellar protein synthesis, transcriptional activation is not dependent on the absorption of light by protochlorophyllide or the attainment of photosynthetic competence. In addition, plastid translation increased dramatically when 8-day-old dark-grown seedlings were illuminated and activation was dependent on cytoplasmic protein synthesis. Blockage of light-activated plastid transcription by Tagetin treatment (inhibitor of plastid RNA polymerase) did not attenuate the activation of plastid translation by light. These results suggest that while light simultaneously activates plastid transcription and translation, the rapid burst in plastid protein synthesis is due mainly to cytoplasmic-derived changes that regulate the rate of translation of pre-existing mRNAs. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668391

  18. Stress-induced alterations in 5-HT1A receptor transcriptional modulators NUDR and Freud-1.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Kotarska, Katarzyna; Daigle, Mireille; Misztak, Paulina; Sowa-Kucma, Magdalena; Rafalo, Anna; Curzytek, Katarzyna; Kubera, Marta; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Nowak, Gabriel; Albert, Paul R

    2014-11-01

    The effect of stress on the mRNA and protein level of the 5-HT1A receptor and two of its key transcriptional modulators, NUDR and Freud-1, was examined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (Hp) using rodent models: olfactory bulbectomy (OB) and prenatal stress (PS) in male and female rats; chronic mild stress in male rats (CMS) and pregnancy stress. In PFC, CMS induced the most widespread changes, with significant reduction in both mRNA and protein levels of NUDR, 5-HT1A receptor and in Freud-1 mRNA; while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor and Freud-1 protein levels were also decreased. In male, but not female OB rats PFC Freud-1 and 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were reduced, while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor, Freud-1 and NUDR mRNA's but not protein were reduced. In PS rats PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein was reduced more in females than males; while in Hp Freud-1 protein was increased in females. In pregnancy stress, PFC NUDR, Freud-1 and 5-HT1A protein receptor levels were reduced, and in HP 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were also reduced; in HP only NUDR and Freud-1 mRNA levels were reduced. Overall, CMS and stress during pregnancy produced the most salient changes in 5-HT1A receptor and transcription factor expression, suggesting a primary role for altered transcription factor expression in chronic regulation of 5-HT1A receptor expression. By contrast, OB (in males) and PS (in females) produced gender-specific reductions in PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein levels, suggesting a role for post-transcriptional regulation. These and previous data suggest that chronic stress might be a key regulator of NUDR/Freud-1 gene expression.

  19. Identification and exploration of pollen tube small proteins encoded by pollination-induced transcripts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jong-Chin; Chang, Liang-Chi; Wang, Min-Long; Guo, Cian-Ling; Chung, Mei-Chu; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2011-09-01

    Pollination is composed of cell-cell communication and complicated signaling cascades that regulate pollen tube growth and guidance toward the ovules for double fertilization, and is critical for successful sexual reproduction. Exploring expression profiles of in vivo grown pollen tubes is important. Nevertheless, it is difficult to obtain accessible pollen tubes for profiling studies in most model plants. By taking advantage of the hollow styles of lily (Lilium longiflorum), in vivo pollen tubes harvested from pollinated styles which had been cut open were used here to study their protein and transcript profiles. Pollination quantitatively and qualitatively altered the total protein composition of elongating pollen tubes. cDNAs generated and amplified from total RNAs of 24 h in vivo grown and 12 h in vitro cultured pollen tubes were used for suppression subtractive hybridization analyses and preparation of home-made array chips. Microarray analyses conducted with different probe sets revealed 16 transcripts specifically present and/or enriched in in vivo pollen tubes. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and Northern blotting were applied to validate their unique pollination-induced expression features. Interestingly, several transcripts were simultaneously detected on the stylar transmitting tract epidermis, where in vivo pollen tubes tightly adhered during pollination. Their deduced amino acid sequences showed that most of them encoded small proteins and could be classified into several families. Transient assay revealed filament-like structures decorated by these proteins and one probably localized in the generative cell. These small peptides might be critical for pollen tube growth during pollination, and further exploration of their biological functions and mechanisms of action are of great interest.

  20. Global analysis of induced transcription factors and cofactors identifies Tfdp2 as an essential coregulator during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-06-01

    Key transcriptional regulators of terminal erythropoiesis, such as GATA-binding factor 1 (GATA1) and T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia protein 1 (TAL1), have been well characterized, but transcription factors and cofactors and their expression modulations have not yet been explored on a global scale. Here, we use global gene expression analysis to identify 28 transcription factors and 19 transcriptional cofactors induced during terminal erythroid differentiation whose promoters are enriched for binding by GATA1 and TAL1. Utilizing protein-protein interaction databases to identify cofactors for each transcription factor, we pinpoint several co-induced pairs, of which E2f2 and its cofactor transcription factor Dp-2 (Tfdp2) were the most highly induced. TFDP2 is a critical cofactor required for proper cell cycle control and gene expression. GATA1 and TAL1 are bound to the regulatory regions of Tfdp2 and upregulate its expression and knockdown of Tfdp2 results in significantly reduced rates of proliferation as well as reduced upregulation of many erythroid-important genes. Loss of Tfdp2 also globally inhibits the normal downregulation of many E2F2 target genes, including those that regulate the cell cycle, causing cells to accumulate in S phase and resulting in increased erythrocyte size. Our findings highlight the importance of TFDP2 in coupling the erythroid cell cycle with terminal differentiation and validate this study as a resource for future work on elucidating the role of diverse transcription factors and coregulators in erythropoiesis.

  1. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R.; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is a life threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain-barrier to upregulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino (NSA) mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. PMID:25692407

  2. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha mediates exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chinsomboon, Jessica; Ruas, Jorge; Gupta, Rana K; Thom, Robyn; Shoag, Jonathan; Rowe, Glenn C; Sawada, Naoki; Raghuram, Srilatha; Arany, Zoltan

    2009-12-15

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects 5 million people in the US and is the primary cause of limb amputations. Exercise remains the single best intervention for PAD, in part thought to be mediated by increases in capillary density. How exercise triggers angiogenesis is not known. PPARgamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha is a potent transcriptional co-activator that regulates oxidative metabolism in a variety of tissues. We show here that PGC-1alpha mediates exercise-induced angiogenesis. Voluntary exercise induced robust angiogenesis in mouse skeletal muscle. Mice lacking PGC-1alpha in skeletal muscle failed to increase capillary density in response to exercise. Exercise strongly induced expression of PGC-1alpha from an alternate promoter. The induction of PGC-1alpha depended on beta-adrenergic signaling. beta-adrenergic stimulation also induced a broad program of angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This induction required PGC-1alpha. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRalpha mediated the induction of VEGF by PGC-1alpha, and mice lacking ERRalpha also failed to increase vascular density after exercise. These data demonstrate that beta-adrenergic stimulation of a PGC-1alpha/ERRalpha/VEGF axis mediates exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

  3. The DNA replication and damage checkpoint pathways induce transcription by inhibition of the Crt1 repressor.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Zhou, Z; Elledge, S J

    1998-09-01

    We have identified the yeast CRT1 gene as an effector of the DNA damage and replication checkpoint pathway. CRT1 encodes a DNA-binding protein that recruits the general repressors Ssn6 and Tup1 to the promoters of damage-inducible genes. Derepression of the Crt1 regulon suppresses the lethality of mec1 and rad53 null alleles and is essential for cell viability during replicative stress. In response to DNA damage and replication blocks, Crt1 becomes hyperphosphorylated and no longer binds DNA, resulting in transcriptional induction. CRT1 is autoregulated and is itself induced by DNA damage, indicating the existence of a negative feedback pathway that facilitates return to the repressed state after elimination of damage. The inhibition of an autoregulatory repressor in response to DNA damage is a strategy conserved throughout prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolution.

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family.

    PubMed

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family

    PubMed Central

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family.

    PubMed

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  7. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  8. Functional dissection of a small anaerobically induced bZIP transcription factor from tomato.

    PubMed

    Sell, Simone; Hehl, Reinhard

    2004-11-01

    A small anaerobically induced tomato transcription factor was isolated from a subtractive library. This factor, designated ABZ1 (anaerobic basic leucine zipper), is anaerobically induced in fruits, leaves and roots and encodes a nuclear localized protein. ABZ1 shares close structural and sequence homology with the S-family of small basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors that are implicated in stress response. Nuclear localization of ABZ1 is mediated by the basic region and occurs under normoxic conditions. ABZ1 binds to G-box-like target sites as a dimer. Binding can be abolished by heterodimerization with a truncated protein retaining the leucine zipper but lacking the DNA binding domain. The protein binds in a sequence specific manner to the CaMV 35S promoter which is down regulated when ABZ1 is coexpressed. This correlates with the anaerobic down regulation of the 35S promoter in tomato and tobacco. These results may suggest that small bZIP proteins are involved in the negative regulation of gene expression under anaerobic conditions. PMID:15560794

  9. FBI-1, a factor that binds to the HIV-1 inducer of short transcripts (IST), is a POZ domain protein.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D J; Pendergrast, P S; Stavropoulos, P; Colmenares, S U; Kobayashi, R; Hernandez, N

    1999-03-01

    The HIV-1 promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of transcripts, short, non-polyadenylated transcripts and full-length, polyadenylated transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts is activated by a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts or IST, located downstream of the HIV-1 transcriptional start site, while the synthesis of full-length transcripts is activated by the viral activator Tat. Tat binds to the RNA element TAR, which is encoded largely between the two IST half-elements. Upon activation by Tat, the synthesis of short RNAs is repressed. We have previously purified a factor called FBI-1 (for factor that binds to IST) whose binding to wild-type and mutated ISTs correlated well with the abilities of these ISTs to direct the synthesis of short transcripts. Here, we report the cloning of cDNAs encoding FBI-1. FBI-1 contains a POZ domain at its N-terminus and four Krüppel-type zinc fingers at its C-terminus. The C-terminus is sufficient for specific binding, and FBI-1 can form homomers through its POZ domain and, in vivo, through its zinc finger domain as well. In addition, FBI-1 associates with Tat, suggesting that repression of the short transcripts by Tat may be mediated through interactions between the two factors.

  10. FBI-1, a factor that binds to the HIV-1 inducer of short transcripts (IST), is a POZ domain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, D J; Pendergrast, P S; Stavropoulos, P; Colmenares, S U; Kobayashi, R; Hernandez, N

    1999-01-01

    The HIV-1 promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of transcripts, short, non-polyadenylated transcripts and full-length, polyadenylated transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts is activated by a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts or IST, located downstream of the HIV-1 transcriptional start site, while the synthesis of full-length transcripts is activated by the viral activator Tat. Tat binds to the RNA element TAR, which is encoded largely between the two IST half-elements. Upon activation by Tat, the synthesis of short RNAs is repressed. We have previously purified a factor called FBI-1 (for factor that binds to IST) whose binding to wild-type and mutated ISTs correlated well with the abilities of these ISTs to direct the synthesis of short transcripts. Here, we report the cloning of cDNAs encoding FBI-1. FBI-1 contains a POZ domain at its N-terminus and four Krüppel-type zinc fingers at its C-terminus. The C-terminus is sufficient for specific binding, and FBI-1 can form homomers through its POZ domain and, in vivo, through its zinc finger domain as well. In addition, FBI-1 associates with Tat, suggesting that repression of the short transcripts by Tat may be mediated through interactions between the two factors. PMID:9973611

  11. Proteins bound at adjacent DNA elements act synergistically to regulate human proenkephalin cAMP inducible transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Comb, M; Mermod, N; Hyman, S E; Pearlberg, J; Ross, M E; Goodman, H M

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis of the endogenous opioid precursor, proenkephalin, is regulated by neurotransmitters and membrane depolarization. These events act through second messenger dependent signal transduction pathways via a short inducible DNA enhancer to regulate transcription of the proenkephalin gene. Two DNA elements located within this enhancer are essential for the transcriptional response to cAMP and phorbol ester. Inactivation of either element by mutation or by alteration of their stereospecific alignment eliminates inducible enhancer activity. The promoter distal element, ENKCRE-1, in the absence of a functional adjacent ENKCRE-2 element, has no inherent capacity to activate transcription. However, in the presence of a functional ENKCRE-2 element, this element synergistically augments cAMP and phorbol ester inducible transcription. The promoter proximal element, ENKCRE-2, is essential for both basal and regulated enhancer function. Four different protein factors found in HeLa cell nuclear extracts bind in vitro to the enhancer region. ENKTF-1, a novel enhancer binding protein, binds to the DNA region encompassing ENKCRE-1. The transcription factors AP-1 and AP-4 bind to overlapping sites spanning ENKCRE-2, and a fourth transcription factor, AP-2, binds to a site immediately downstream of ENKCRE-2. The binding of ENKTF-1 to mutant ENKCRE-1 sequences in vitro correlates with the in vivo inducibility of the mutant elements suggesting that ENKTF-1 acts in combination with factors that recognize the ENKCRE-2 domain to regulate cAMP inducible transcription. Together, the two DNA elements, ENKCRE-1 and ENKCRE-2 and the protein factors with which they interact, play a critical role in the transduction and reception of signals transmitted from cell surface receptors to the proenkephalin nuclear transcription complex. Images PMID:2850173

  12. 17A-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL-INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION QUANTIFIED IN LIVERS OF ADULT MALES, LARVAE, AND GILLS OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have applied a method for quantifying relative levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription to assess chemically-induced gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Synthetic oligonucleotides designed for the fathead minnow vitellogenin gene transcription (Vg) p...

  13. Mimicking human texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rikxoort, Eva M.; van den Broek, Egon L.; Schouten, Theo E.

    2005-03-01

    In an attempt to mimic human (colorful) texture classification by a clustering algorithm three lines of research have been encountered, in which as test set 180 texture images (both their color and gray-scale equivalent) were drawn from the OuTex and VisTex databases. First, a k-means algorithm was applied with three feature vectors, based on color/gray values, four texture features, and their combination. Second, 18 participants clustered the images using a newly developed card sorting program. The mutual agreement between the participants was 57% and 56% and between the algorithm and the participants it was 47% and 45%, for respectively color and gray-scale texture images. Third, in a benchmark, 30 participants judged the algorithms' clusters with gray-scale textures as more homogeneous then those with colored textures. However, a high interpersonal variability was present for both the color and the gray-scale clusters. So, despite the promising results, it is questionable whether average human texture classification can be mimicked (if it exists at all).

  14. Xanthomatous pleuritis mimicking mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Franklin R; Gourdin, Todd; Finley, James L; Downie, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent non-malignant exudative effusions remain a diagnostic and potentially management dilemma. Fluid characteristics frequently narrow the differential but fail to offer a definitive diagnosis. Medical thoracoscopy is well tolerated and allows direct visualization and biopsy of pleural processes under conscious sedation. Rarely, macroscopic appearance and even histology may be misleading. We present a case of xanthomatous pleuritis that mimicked early mesothelioma. Our patient was a 69-year-old female with a large left pleural effusion. Her medical history was significant for a recent small pericardial effusion without cardiac dysfunction. Thoracentesis revealed a non-malignant exudative effusion. Thoracoscopy demonstrated two foci of raised soft plaques with petechial hemorrhage and adhesions. Preliminary evaluation suggested chronic inflammation admixed with proliferating spindle cells and necrosis. The immunohistochemical phenotype of the spindle cells favored a spindle and epithelioid cell neoplasm, mesothelioma. Because of discord between pathologists, we repeated the thoracoscopy through the existing chest tube/thoracoscopy site. We acquired more tissue for special stains and outside review. Following extensive immunohistochemistry, the diagnosis of xanthomatous pleuritis was made. Our patient quickly recovered with steroid therapy and is without recurrence 18 months later. This case demonstrates the utility and nuances of medical thoracoscopy in a perplexing case of xanthomatous pleuritis. PMID:18223309

  15. The obesity-induced transcriptional regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates visceral fat endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Guifen; Kong, Hyerim Whang; Fang, Difeng; McCann, Maximilian; Yang, Xiuying; Du, Guanhua; Blüher, Matthias; Zhu, Jinfang; Liew, Chong Wee

    2016-01-01

    The intimate link between location of fat accumulation and metabolic disease risk and depot-specific differences is well established, but how these differences between depots are regulated at the molecular level remains largely unclear. Here we show that TRIP-Br2 mediates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced inflammatory responses in visceral fat. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that obesity-induced circulating factors upregulate TRIP-Br2 specifically in visceral fat via the ER stress pathway. We find that ablation of TRIP-Br2 ameliorates both chemical and physiological ER stress-induced inflammatory and acute phase response in adipocytes, leading to lower circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. Using promoter assays, as well as molecular and pharmacological experiments, we show that the transcription factor GATA3 is responsible for the ER stress-induced TRIP-Br2 expression in visceral fat. Taken together, our study identifies molecular regulators of inflammatory response in visceral fat that—given that these pathways are conserved in humans—might serve as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. PMID:27109496

  16. Transcription of interferon-stimulated genes is induced by adenovirus particles but is suppressed by E1A gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, N; Pine, R; Levy, D; Darnell, J E

    1988-01-01

    Interferon treatment of cell cultures results in the rapid transcriptional induction of a specific set of genes. In this paper we explore the effect of cellular infection by several adenoviruses, both wild type and mutant, on the expression of these genes. Infection with adenovirus induces the transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes in the absence of any protein synthesis. In fact, the inhibition of protein synthesis during a wild-type infection produces enhanced stimulation of transcription of these genes. Experiments with viral mutants indicate the ability to specifically suppress this transcription maps to the E1A gene. In addition, the E1A gene products are capable of suppressing the specific transcriptional induction of interferon-stimulated promoters during cotransfection experiments and therefore presumably during viral infection. The dual effect of adenovirus on the expression of interferon-stimulated genes may represent an example of action and evolutionary reaction between virus and host. Images PMID:2446013

  17. The NRIF3 Family of Transcriptional Coregulators Induces Rapid and Profound Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dangsheng; Das, Sharmistha; Yamada, Tatsuya; Samuels, Herbert H.

    2004-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs kill cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. Despite the progress in understanding apoptosis, how to harness the cellular death machinery to selectively deliver tumor-specific cytotoxicity (while minimizing damage to other cells) remains an important challenge. We report here that expression of the NRIF3 family of transcriptional coregulators in a variety of breast cancer cell lines induces rapid and profound apoptosis (nearly 100% cell death within 24 h). A novel death domain (DD1) was mapped to a short 30-amino-acid region common to all members of the NRIF3 family. Mechanistic studies showed that DD1-induced apoptosis occurs through a novel caspase 2-mediated pathway that involves mitochondrial membrane permeabilization but does not require other caspases. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity of NRIF3 and DD1 appears to be cell type specific, as they selectively kill breast cancer or related cells but not other examined cells of different origins. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of selectively inducing cytotoxicity in a specific cancer and suggests that breast cancer cells contain a novel “death switch” that can be specifically triggered by NRIF3 or DD1. Strategies utilizing NRIF3 and/or DD1 and/or targeting this death switch may lead to the development of novel and more selective therapeutics against breast cancer. PMID:15082778

  18. Egr1 regulates lithium-induced transcription of the Period 2 (PER2) gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hyun; Yu, Hyun Sook; Park, Hong Guen; Ahn, Yong Min; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Young Han; Ha, Kyooseob; Shin, Soon Young

    2013-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the circadian molecular system is involved in the pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms underlying bipolar disorders. Lithium, a representative mood stabilizer, has been reported to induce the Period 2 (PER2) gene; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms require further study. We found that lithium upregulated PER2 expression at the transcriptional level in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Promoter reporter analyses using serial deletions of the PER2 promoter revealed that two early growth response 1 (Egr1)-binding sites (EBS) between positions -180 and -100 are required for maximal activation of the PER2 promoter by lithium. Ectopic expression of Egr1 enhanced lithium-induced PER2 promoter activity, while a point mutation in EBS abolished it. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that Egr1 bound directly to the PER2 promoter. Stimulation of the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2/Elk1 pathway by lithium was functionally linked to PER2 expression through Egr1 induction, and lithium-induced PER2 expression was strongly attenuated by depletion of Egr1 by siRNA. Lithium also upregulated the expression of Per2 and Egr1 in mouse frontal cortex. Induction of Per2 by lithium was attenuated in Egr1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, lithium stimulates PER2 transcription through the ERK/Elk1/Egr1 pathway in neuronal cells, indicating a connection between the ERK-Egr1 pathway and a circadian gene system in the mechanism of action of lithium.

  19. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luis E F; Murray, Peter D; Zielke, H Ronald; Roby, Clinton D; Kingsbury, Tami J; Krueger, Bruce K

    2009-10-01

    cAMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of l-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca(2+) entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks.

  20. Analysis of dynamic changes in retinoid-induced transcription and epigenetic profiles of murine Hox clusters in ES cells

    PubMed Central

    De Kumar, Bony; Parrish, Mark E.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Gogol, Madelaine; Seidel, Christopher; Paulson, Ariel; Li, Hua; Gaudenz, Karin; Peak, Allison; McDowell, William; Fleharty, Brian; Ahn, Youngwook; Lin, Chengqi; Smith, Edwin; Shilatifard, Ali; Krumlauf, Robb

    2015-01-01

    The clustered Hox genes, which are highly conserved across metazoans, encode homeodomain-containing transcription factors that provide a blueprint for segmental identity along the body axis. Recent studies have underscored that in addition to encoding Hox genes, the homeotic clusters contain key noncoding RNA genes that play a central role in development. In this study, we have taken advantage of genome-wide approaches to provide a detailed analysis of retinoic acid (RA)-induced transcriptional and epigenetic changes within the homeotic clusters of mouse embryonic stem cells. Although there is a general colinear response, our analyses suggest a lack of strict colinearity for several genes in the HoxA and HoxB clusters. We have identified transcribed novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and their cis-regulatory elements that function in response to RA and demonstrated that the expression of these ncRNAs from both strands represent some of the most rapidly induced transcripts in ES cells. Finally, we have provided dynamic analyses of chromatin modifications for the coding and noncoding genes expressed upon activation and suggest that active transcription can occur in the presence of chromatin modifications and machineries associated with repressed transcription state over the clusters. Overall, our data provide a resource for a better understanding of the dynamic nature of the coding and noncoding transcripts and their associated chromatin marks in the regulation of homeotic gene transcription during development. PMID:26025802

  1. Global analysis of induced transcription factors and cofactors identifies Tfdp2 as an essential coregulator during terminal erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cynthia; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2014-01-01

    Key transcriptional regulators of terminal erythropoiesis, such as GATA1 and TAL1, have been well characterized, but transcription factors and cofactors and their expression modulations have not yet been explored on a global scale. Here we use global gene expression analysis to identify 28 transcription factors and 19 transcriptional cofactors induced during terminal erythroid differentiation and whose promoters are enriched for binding by GATA1 and TAL1. Utilizing protein-protein interaction databases to identify cofactors for each transcription factor, we pinpoint several co-induced pairs, of which E2f2 and its cofactor Tfdp2 were the most highly induced. TFDP2 is a critical cofactor required for proper cell cycle control and gene expression. GATA1 and TAL1 are bound to the regulatory regions of Tfdp2 and upregulate its expression, and knockdown of Tfdp2 results in significantly reduced rates of proliferation, as well as reduced upregulation of many erythroid-important genes. Loss of Tfdp2 also globally inhibits the normal downregulation of many E2F2 target genes, including those that regulate the cell cycle, causing cells to accumulate in S phase and resulting in increased erythrocyte size. Our findings highlight the importance of TFDP2 in coupling the erythroid cell cycle with terminal differentiation and validate this study as a resource for future work on elucidating the role of diverse transcription factors and coregulators in erythropoiesis. PMID:24607859

  2. p300 relieves p53-evoked transcriptional repression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Tobias; Zhou, Jie; Köhl, Roman; Brüne, Bernhard

    2004-05-15

    HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1), a heterodimeric transcription factor comprising HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta subunits, serves as a key regulator of metabolic adaptation to hypoxia. HIF-1 activity largely increases during hypoxia by attenuating pVHL (von Hippel-Lindau protein)-dependent ubiquitination and subsequent 26 S-proteasomal degradation of HIF-1alpha. Besides HIF-1, the transcription factor and tumour suppressor p53 accumulates and is activated under conditions of prolonged/severe hypoxia. Recently, the interaction between p53 and HIF-1alpha was reported to evoke HIF-1alpha degradation. Destruction of HIF-1alpha by p53 was corroborated in the present study by using pVHL-deficient RCC4 (renal carcinoma) cells, supporting the notion of a pVHL-independent degradation process. In addition, low p53 expression repressed HIF-1 transactivation without affecting HIF-1alpha protein amount. Establishing that p53-evoked inhibition of HIF-1 reporter activity was relieved upon co-transfection of p300 suggested competition between p53 and HIF-1 for limiting amounts of the shared co-activator p300. This assumption was confirmed by showing competitive binding of in vitro transcription/translation-generated p53 and HIF-1alpha to the CH1 domain of p300 in vitro. We conclude that low p53 expression attenuates HIF-1 transactivation by competing for p300, whereas high p53 expression destroys the HIF-1alpha protein and thereby eliminates HIF-1 reporter activity. Thus once p53 becomes activated under conditions of severe hypoxia/anoxia, it contributes to terminating HIF-1 responses.

  3. Induction of transcription factor CEBP homology protein mediates hypoglycaemia-induced necrotic cell death in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kögel, Donat; Svensson, Birte; Copanaki, Ekaterini; Anguissola, Sergio; Bonner, Caroline; Thurow, Nadia; Gudorf, Daniel; Hetschko, Holger; Müller, Thorsten; Peters, Marion; König, Hans-Georg; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2006-11-01

    Oxygen and glucose deprivation are direct consequences of tissue ischaemia. We explored the interaction of hypoxia and hypoglycaemia on cell survival and gene expression in the absence of glutamatergic signalling using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as a model. In agreement with previous investigations in non-neural cells, prolonged hypoxia (0.5% O(2)) failed to induce significant cell death in this system. In contrast, exposure to hypoglycaemia induced significant necrotic cell death (> 80% after 72 h). Interestingly, hypoglycaemia-induced cell death was completely abrogated by simultaneous exposure to hypoxia, suggesting strong cytoprotective effects of hypoxia. Subsequent microarray analysis of the underlying transcriptional responses revealed that the transcription factor CEBP homology protein (CHOP) was strongly induced by hypoglycaemia, and suppressed by simultaneous hypoxia. RNA interference against CHOP significantly protected cells from glucose deprivation-induced cell death. Hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) activation also protected cells against hypoglycaemia-induced cell death, but VEGF failed to modify hypoglycaemia-induced CHOP induction. Our data suggest that hypoglycaemia-induced necrotic cell death of neuroblastoma cells is an active process mediated via the induction of the transcription factor CHOP, and that hypoxia counteracts this cell death via at least two distinct mechanisms: repression of CHOP and induction of VEGF.

  4. Inducible removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from transcriptionally active and inactive genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Waters, R; Zhang, R; Jones, N J

    1993-05-01

    The prior UV irradiation of alpha haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a UV dose of 25 J/m2 substantially increases the repairability of damage subsequently induced by a UV dose of 70 J/m2 given 1 h after the first irradiation. This enhancement of repair is seen at both the MAT alpha and HML alpha loci, which are, respectively, transcriptionally active and inactive in alpha haploid cells. The presence in the medium of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide in the period between the two irradiations eliminated this effect. Enhanced repair still occurred if cycloheximide was present only after the final UV irradiation. This indicated that the first result is not due to cycloheximide merely blocking the synthesis of repair enzymes associated with a hypothetical rapid turnover of such molecules. The enhanced repairability is not the result of changes in chromatin accessibility without protein synthesis, merely caused by the repair of the damage induced by the prior irradiation. The data clearly show that a UV-inducible removal of pyrimidine dimers has occurred which involves the synthesis of new proteins. The genes known to possess inducible promoters, and which are involved in excision are RAD2, RAD7, RAD16 and RAD23. Studies with the rad7 and rad16 mutants which are defective in the ability to repair HML alpha and proficient in the repair of MAT alpha showed that in rad7, preirradiation enhanced the repair at MAT alpha, whereas in rad16 this increased repair of MAT alpha was absent. The preirradiation did not modify the inability to repair HML alpha in either strain. Thus RAD16 has a role in this inducible repair.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  6. A Drought-Inducible Transcription Factor Delays Reproductive Timing in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Zhao, Tao; Gomez, Adam; Li, Cong; Yu, Chunsheng; Lin, Jianzhong; Lin, Chentao

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying photoperiod or temperature control of flowering time have been recently elucidated, but how plants regulate flowering time in response to other external factors, such as water availability, remains poorly understood. Using a large-scale Hybrid Transcription Factor approach, we identified a bZIP transcriptional factor, O. sativa ABA responsive element binding factor 1 (OsABF1), which acts as a suppressor of floral transition in a photoperiod-independent manner. Simultaneous knockdown of both OsABF1 and its closest homologous gene, OsbZIP40, in rice (Oryza sativa) by RNA interference results in a significantly earlier flowering phenotype. Molecular and genetic analyses demonstrate that a drought regime enhances expression of the OsABF1 gene, which indirectly suppresses expression of the Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) gene that encodes a key activator of rice flowering. Furthermore, we identified a drought-inducible gene named OsWRKY104 that is under the direct regulation of OsABF1. Overexpression of OsWRKY104 can suppress Ehd1 expression and confers a later flowering phenotype in rice. Together, these findings reveal a novel pathway by which rice modulates heading date in response to the change of ambient water availability. PMID:26945049

  7. A Drought-Inducible Transcription Factor Delays Reproductive Timing in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyu; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Tao; Gomez, Adam; Li, Cong; Yu, Chunsheng; Li, Hongyu; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Yuanzhu; Liu, Bin; Lin, Chentao

    2016-05-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying photoperiod or temperature control of flowering time have been recently elucidated, but how plants regulate flowering time in response to other external factors, such as water availability, remains poorly understood. Using a large-scale Hybrid Transcription Factor approach, we identified a bZIP transcriptional factor, O. sativa ABA responsive element binding factor 1 (OsABF1), which acts as a suppressor of floral transition in a photoperiod-independent manner. Simultaneous knockdown of both OsABF1 and its closest homologous gene, OsbZIP40, in rice (Oryza sativa) by RNA interference results in a significantly earlier flowering phenotype. Molecular and genetic analyses demonstrate that a drought regime enhances expression of the OsABF1 gene, which indirectly suppresses expression of the Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) gene that encodes a key activator of rice flowering. Furthermore, we identified a drought-inducible gene named OsWRKY104 that is under the direct regulation of OsABF1 Overexpression of OsWRKY104 can suppress Ehd1 expression and confers a later flowering phenotype in rice. Together, these findings reveal a novel pathway by which rice modulates heading date in response to the change of ambient water availability. PMID:26945049

  8. Radiation-induced alternative transcription and splicing events and their applicability to practical biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Macaeva, Ellina; Saeys, Yvan; Tabury, Kevin; Janssen, Ann; Michaux, Arlette; Benotmane, Mohammed A.; De Vos, Winnok H.; Baatout, Sarah; Quintens, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the individual exposure dose based on easily accessible samples (e.g. blood) immediately following a radiological accident is crucial. We aimed at developing a robust transcription-based signature for biodosimetry from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells irradiated with different doses of X-rays (0.1 and 1.0 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.26 Gy/min. Genome-wide radiation-induced changes in mRNA expression were evaluated at both gene and exon level. Using exon-specific qRT-PCR, we confirmed that several biomarker genes are alternatively spliced or transcribed after irradiation and that different exons of these genes exhibit significantly different levels of induction. Moreover, a significant number of radiation-responsive genes were found to be genomic neighbors. Using three different classification models we found that gene and exon signatures performed equally well on dose prediction, as long as more than 10 features are included. Together, our results highlight the necessity of evaluating gene expression at the level of single exons for radiation biodosimetry in particular and transcriptional biomarker research in general. This approach is especially advisable for practical gene expression-based biodosimetry, for which primer- or probe-based techniques would be the method of choice. PMID:26763932

  9. Single transcription factor reprogramming of hair follicle dermal papilla cells to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Bouwman, Britta Am; Ang, Yen-Sin; Kim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Dung-Fang; Lemischka, Ihor R; Rendl, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Reprogramming patient-specific somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has great potential to develop feasible regenerative therapies. However, several issues need to be resolved such as ease, efficiency, and safety of generation of iPS cells. Many different cell types have been reprogrammed, most conveniently even peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, they typically require the enforced expression of several transcription factors, posing mutagenesis risks as exogenous genetic material. To reduce this risk, iPS cells were previously generated with Oct4 alone from rather inaccessible neural stem cells that endogenously express the remaining reprogramming factors and very recently from fibroblasts with Oct4 alone in combination with additional small molecules. Here, we exploit that dermal papilla (DP) cells from hair follicles in the skin express all but one reprogramming factors to show that these accessible cells can be reprogrammed into iPS cells with the single transcription factor Oct4 and without further manipulation. Reprogramming was already achieved after 3 weeks and with efficiencies similar to other cell types reprogrammed with four factors. Dermal papilla-derived iPS cells are comparable to embryonic stem cells with respect to morphology, gene expression, and pluripotency. We conclude that DP cells may represent a preferred cell type for reprogramming accessible cells with less manipulation and for ultimately establishing safe conditions in the future by replacing Oct4 with small molecules.

  10. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Stress-Induced Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Taymaz-Nikerel, Hilal; Cankorur-Cetinkaya, Ayca; Kirdar, Betul

    2016-01-01

    Cells respond to environmental and/or genetic perturbations in order to survive and proliferate. Characterization of the changes after various stimuli at different -omics levels is crucial to comprehend the adaptation of cells to the changing conditions. Genome-wide quantification and analysis of transcript levels, the genes affected by perturbations, extends our understanding of cellular metabolism by pointing out the mechanisms that play role in sensing the stress caused by those perturbations and related signaling pathways, and in this way guides us to achieve endeavors, such as rational engineering of cells or interpretation of disease mechanisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system has been studied in response to different perturbations and corresponding transcriptional profiles were followed either statically or/and dynamically, short and long term. This review focuses on response of yeast cells to diverse stress inducing perturbations, including nutritional changes, ionic stress, salt stress, oxidative stress, osmotic shock, and to genetic interventions such as deletion and overexpression of genes. It is aimed to conclude on common regulatory phenomena that allow yeast to organize its transcriptomic response after any perturbation under different external conditions. PMID:26925399

  11. Transcription factor NFAT1 controls allergic contact hypersensitivity through regulation of activation induced cell death program

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Gi-Cheon; Hwang, Ji Sun; Kim, Young; Chae, Chang-Suk; Nam, Jong Hee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Rudra, Dipayan; Surh, Charles D.; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is an inflammatory skin disease mediated by allergen specific T cells. In this study, we investigated the role of transcription factor NFAT1 in the pathogenesis of contact hypersensitivity. NFAT1 knock out (KO) mice spontaneously developed CHS-like skin inflammation in old age. Healthy young NFAT1 KO mice displayed enhanced susceptibility to hapten-induced CHS. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from NFAT1 KO mice displayed hyper-activated properties and produced significantly enhanced levels of inflammatory T helper 1(Th1)/Th17 type cytokines. NFAT1 KO T cells were more resistant to activation induced cell death (AICD), and regulatory T cells derived from these mice showed a partial defect in their suppressor activity. NFAT1 KO T cells displayed a reduced expression of apoptosis associated BCL-2/BH3 family members. Ectopic expression of NFAT1 restored the AICD defect in NFAT1 KO T cells and increased AICD in normal T cells. Recipient Rag2−/− mice transferred with NFAT1 KO T cells showed more severe CHS sensitivity due to a defect in activation induced hapten-reactive T cell apoptosis. Collectively, our results suggest the NFAT1 plays a pivotal role as a genetic switch in CD4+/CD8+ T cell tolerance by regulating AICD process in the T cell mediated skin inflammation. PMID:26777750

  12. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  13. Closing the circadian loop: CLOCK-induced transcription of its own inhibitors per and tim.

    PubMed

    Darlington, T K; Wager-Smith, K; Ceriani, M F; Staknis, D; Gekakis, N; Steeves, T D; Weitz, C J; Takahashi, J S; Kay, S A

    1998-06-01

    The circadian oscillator generates a rhythmic output with a period of about 24 hours. Despite extensive studies in several model systems, the biochemical mode of action has not yet been demonstrated for any of its components. Here, the Drosophila CLOCK protein was shown to induce transcription of the circadian rhythm genes period and timeless. dCLOCK functioned as a heterodimer with a Drosophila homolog of BMAL1. These proteins acted through an E-box sequence in the period promoter. The timeless promoter contains an 18-base pair element encompassing an E-box, which was sufficient to confer dCLOCK responsiveness to a reporter gene. PERIOD and TIMELESS proteins blocked dCLOCK's ability to transactivate their promoters via the E-box. Thus, dCLOCK drives expression of period and timeless, which in turn inhibit dCLOCK's activity and close the circadian loop.

  14. Standardized Whole-Blood Transcriptional Profiling Enables the Deconvolution of Complex Induced Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Alejandra; Duffy, Darragh; Rouilly, Vincent; Posseme, Céline; Djebali, Raouf; Illanes, Gabriel; Libri, Valentina; Albaud, Benoit; Gentien, David; Piasecka, Barbara; Hasan, Milena; Fontes, Magnus; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Albert, Matthew L

    2016-09-01

    Systems approaches for the study of immune signaling pathways have been traditionally based on purified cells or cultured lines. However, in vivo responses involve the coordinated action of multiple cell types, which interact to establish an inflammatory microenvironment. We employed standardized whole-blood stimulation systems to test the hypothesis that responses to Toll-like receptor ligands or whole microbes can be defined by the transcriptional signatures of key cytokines. We found 44 genes, identified using Support Vector Machine learning, that captured the diversity of complex innate immune responses with improved segregation between distinct stimuli. Furthermore, we used donor variability to identify shared inter-cellular pathways and trace cytokine loops involved in gene expression. This provides strategies for dimension reduction of large datasets and deconvolution of innate immune responses applicable for characterizing immunomodulatory molecules. Moreover, we provide an interactive R-Shiny application with healthy donor reference values for induced inflammatory genes. PMID:27568558

  15. Ceramide Induces Human Hepcidin Gene Transcription through JAK/STAT3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sizhao; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Mott, Justin L.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2016-01-01

    Changes in lipid metabolism and iron content are observed in the livers of patients with fatty liver disease. The expression of hepcidin, an iron-regulatory and acute phase protein synthesized by the liver, is also modulated. The potential interaction of lipid and iron metabolism is largely unknown. We investigated the role of lipid intermediate, ceramide in the regulation of human hepcidin gene, HAMP. Human hepatoma HepG2 cells were treated with cell-permeable ceramide analogs. Ceramide induced significant up-regulation of HAMP mRNA expression in HepG2 cells. The effect of ceramide on HAMP expression was mediated through transcriptional mechanisms because it was completely blocked with actinomycin D treatment. Reporter assays also confirmed the activation of 0.6 kb HAMP promoter by ceramide. HepG2 cells treated with ceramide displayed increased phosphorylation of STAT3, JNK, and NF-κB proteins. However, ceramide induced the binding of STAT3, but not NF-κB or c-Jun, to HAMP promoter, as shown by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. The mutation of STAT3 response element within 0.6 kb HAMP promoter region significantly inhibited the stimulatory effect of ceramide on HAMP promoter activity. Similarly, the inhibition of STAT3 with a pan-JAK kinase inhibitor and STAT3 siRNA pool also diminished the induction of both HAMP promoter activity and mRNA expression by ceramide. In conclusion, we have shown a direct role for ceramide in the activation of hepatic HAMP transcription via STAT3. Our findings suggest a crosstalk between lipid and iron metabolism in the liver, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-related fatty liver disease. PMID:26807955

  16. Methamphetamine Preconditioning Alters Midbrain Transcriptional Responses to Methamphetamine-Induced Injury in the Rat Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, Jean Lud; McCoy, Michael T.; Cai, Ning Sheng; Krasnova, Irina N.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Beauvais, Genevieve; Wilson, Natascha; Wood, William; Becker, Kevin G.; Hodges, Amber B.

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an illicit drug which is neurotoxic to the mammalian brain. Numerous studies have revealed significant decreases in dopamine and serotonin levels in the brains of animals exposed to moderate-to-large METH doses given within short intervals of time. In contrast, repeated injections of small nontoxic doses of the drug followed by a challenge with toxic METH doses afford significant protection against monoamine depletion. The present study was undertaken to test the possibility that repeated injections of the drug might be accompanied by transcriptional changes involved in rendering the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system refractory to METH toxicity. Our results confirm that METH preconditioning can provide significant protection against METH-induced striatal dopamine depletion. In addition, the presence and absence of METH preconditioning were associated with substantial differences in the identity of the genes whose expression was affected by a toxic METH challenge. Quantitative PCR confirmed METH-induced changes in genes of interest and identified additional genes that were differentially impacted by the toxic METH challenge in the presence of METH preconditioning. These genes include small heat shock 27 kD 27 protein 2 (HspB2), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), c-fos, and some encoding antioxidant proteins including CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1, and heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox-1). These observations are consistent, in part, with the transcriptional alterations reported in models of lethal ischemic injuries which are preceded by ischemic or pharmacological preconditioning. Our findings suggest that multiple molecular pathways might work in tandem to protect the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway against the deleterious effects of the toxic psychostimulant. Further analysis of the molecular and cellular pathways regulated by these genes should help to provide some

  17. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and lipopolysaccharide induce different transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the IRG1 gene in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Jeckstadt, Sabine; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2006-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a chronic enteritis in ruminants. In addition, MAP is presently the most favored pathogen linked to Crohn's disease. In this study, we were interested in dissecting the molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation or deactivation after infection with MAP. By subtractive hybridization of cDNAs, we identified the immune-responsive gene 1 (IRG1), which was expressed substantially higher in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated than in MAP-infected murine macrophage cell lines. A nuclear run-on transcription assay revealed that the IRG1 gene was activated transcriptionally in LPS-stimulated and MAP-infected macrophages with higher expression in LPS-stimulated cells. Analysis of post-transcriptional regulation demonstrated that IRG1 mRNA stability was increased in LPS-stimulated but not in MAP-infected macrophages. Furthermore, IRG1 gene expression of macrophages infected with the nonpathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis differed from those of LPS-stimulated and MAP-infected macrophages. At 2 h postinfection, M. smegmatis-induced IRG1 gene expression was as low as in MAP-infected, and 8 h postinfection, it increased nearly to the level in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Transient transfection experiments revealed similar IRG1 promoter activities in MAP- and M. smegmatis-infected cells. Northern analysis demonstrated increased IRG1 mRNA stability in M. smegmatis-infected macrophages. IRG1 mRNA stabilization was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent. Inhibition of protein synthesis revealed that constitutively expressed factors seemed to be responsible for IRG1 mRNA destabilization. Thus, our data demonstrate that transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are responsible for a differential IRG1 gene expression in murine macrophages treated with LPS, MAP, and M. smegmatis.

  18. Identification of key transcription factors in caerulein-induced pancreatitis through expression profiling data.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dachuan; Wu, Bo; Tong, Danian; Pan, Ye; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The current study aimed to isolate key transcription factors (TFs) in caerulein-induced pancreatitis, and to identify the difference between wild type and Mist1 knockout (KO) mice, in order to elucidate the contribution of Mist1 to pancreatitis. The gene profile of GSE3644 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database then analyzed using the t-test. The isolated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mapped into a transcriptional regulatory network derived from the Integrated Transcription Factor Platform database and in the network, the interaction pairs involving at least one DEG were screened. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the functional enrichment of the target genes. A total of 1,555 and 3,057 DEGs were identified in the wild type and Mist1KO mice treated with caerulein, respectively. DEGs screened in Mist1KO mice were predominantly enriched in apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and other cancer-associated pathways. A total of 188 and 51 TFs associated with pathopoiesis were isolated in Mist1KO and wild type mice, respectively. Out of the top 10 TFs (ranked by P-value), 7 TFs, including S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2); minichromosome maintenance complex component 3 (Mcm3); cell division cycle 6 (Cdc6); cyclin B1 (Ccnb1); mutS homolog 6 (Msh6); cyclin A2 (Ccna2); and cyclin B2 (Ccnb2), were expressed in the two types of mouse. These TFs were predominantly involved in phosphorylation, DNA replication, cell division and DNA mismatch repair. In addition, specific TFs, including minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (Mcm7); lymphoid-specific helicase (Hells); and minichromosome maintenance complex component 6 (Mcm6), that function in the unwinding of DNA were identified to participate in Mist1KO pancreatitis. The DEGs, including Cdc6, Mcm6, Msh6 and Wdr1 are closely associated with the regulation of caerulein-induced pancreatitis. Furthermore, other identified TFs were also involved in this type of

  19. Developmental Expression and Hypoxic Induction of Hypoxia Inducible Transcription Factors in the Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Köblitz, Louise; Fiechtner, Birgit; Baus, Katharina; Lussnig, Rebecca; Pelster, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF) has been shown to coordinate the hypoxic response of vertebrates and is expressed in three different isoforms, HIF-1α, HIF-2α and HIF-3α. Knock down of either Hif-1α or Hif-2α in mice results in lethality in embryonic or perinatal stages, suggesting that this transcription factor is not only controlling the hypoxic response, but is also involved in developmental phenomena. In the translucent zebrafish embryo the performance of the cardiovascular system is not essential for early development, therefore this study was designed to analyze the expression of the three Hif-isoforms during zebrafish development and to test the hypoxic inducibility of these transcription factors. To complement the existing zfHif-1α antibody we expressed the whole zfHif-2α protein and used it for immunization and antibody generation. Similarly, fragments of the zfHif-3α protein were used for immunization and generation of a zfHif-3α specific antibody. To demonstrate presence of the Hif-isoforms during development [between 1 day post fertilization (1 dpf) and 9 dpf] affinity-purified antibodies were used. Hif-1α protein was present under normoxic conditions in all developmental stages, but no significant differences between the different developmental stages could be detected. Hif-2α was also present from 1 dpf onwards, but in post hatching stages (between 5 and 9 dpf) the expression level was significantly higher than prior to hatching. Similarly, Hif-3α was expressed from 1 dpf onwards, and the expression level significantly increased until 5 dpf, suggesting that Hif-2α and Hif-3α play a particular role in early development. Hypoxic exposure (oxygen partial pressure = 5 kPa) in turn caused a significant increase in the level of Hif-1α protein even at 1 dpf and in later stages, while neither Hif-2α nor Hif-3α protein level were affected. In these early developmental stages Hif-1α therefore appears to be more important for

  20. Transcription networks responsible for early regulation of Salmonella-induced inflammation in the jejunum of pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify transcription factors/regulators that play a crucial role in steering the (innate) immune response shortly (within a few hours) after the first contact of the intestinal mucosa with an inflammatory mediator, and to test whether the processes regulated by these factors/regulators can be modulated by chemical substances of natural origin. Methods We experimentally induced inflammation by perfusion of surgically applied jejunal loops with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in three pigs. Segments of mock and Salmonella treated loops were dissected after 2, 4 and 8 hours of perfusion. IL8 and IL1-beta mRNA expression levels were measured in mucosal scrapings of all segments. Furthermore, intra-animal microarray comparisons (isogenic) between Salmonella and mock treated segments after 8 hours, and inter-animal comparisons between similar Salmonella-treated loops of each pig at 2 and 4 hours, were performed. Results IL-1beta and IL8 mRNA levels, and intra-animal microarray comparisons at 8 hours between Salmonella and mock treated segments showed that the response-time and type of response to Salmonella was different in all three pigs. This plasticity allowed us to extract a comprehensive set of differentially expressed genes from inter-animal comparisons at 2 and 4 hours. Pathway analysis indicated that many of these genes play a role in induction and/or tempering the inflammatory response in the intestine. Among them a set of transcription factors/regulators known to be involved in regulation of inflammation, but also factors/regulators for which involvement was not expected. Nine out of twenty compounds of natural origin, which according to literature had the potential to modulate the activity of these factors/regulators, were able to stimulate or inhibit a Salmonella-induced mRNA response of inflammatory-reporter genes IL8 and/or nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene

  1. NMDA-mediated and self-induced bdnf exon IV transcriptions are differentially regulated in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcriptional up-regulation of bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) is involved in regulating many aspects of neuronal functions. The NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid)-mediated and BDNF-mediated exon IV transcription may represent mechanistically different responses, and relevant to activity-dependent changes in neurons. We found that the activities of ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase), CaM KII/IV (calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and IV), PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase), and PLC (phospholipase C) are required for NMDA receptor-mediated bdnf exon IV transcription in cultured cortical neurons. In contrast, the BDNF-induced and TrkB-dependent exon IV transcription was regulated by ERK and CaM KII/IV, but not by PI3K and PLC. While ERK and CaM KII/IV are separate signaling pathways in BDNF-stimulated neurons, CaM KII/IV appeared to regulate exon IV transcription through ERK in NMDA-stimulated neurons. Similarly, the PI3K and PLC signaling pathways converged on ERK in NMDA- but not BDNF-stimulated neurons. Our results implicate that the NMDA-induced and the self-maintenance of bdnf transcription are differentially regulated.

  2. Distinct roles of the steroid receptor coactivator 1 and of MED1 in retinoid-induced transcription and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Flajollet, Sébastien; Lefebvre, Bruno; Rachez, Christophe; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2006-07-21

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are the molecular relays of retinoid action on transcription, cellular differentiation and apoptosis. Transcriptional activation of retinoid-regulated promoters requires the dismissal of corepressors and the recruitment of coactivators to promoter-bound RAR. RARs recruit in vitro a plethora of coactivators whose actual contribution to retinoid-induced transcription is poorly characterized in vivo. Embryonal carcinoma P19 cells, which are highly sensitive to retinoids, were depleted from archetypical coactivators by RNAi. SRC1-deficient P19 cells showed severely compromised retinoid-induced responses, in agreement with the supposed role of SRC1 as a RAR coactivator. Unexpectedly, Med1/TRAP220/DRIP205-depleted cells exhibited an exacerbated response to retinoids, both in terms transcriptional responses and of cellular differentiation. Med1 depletion affected TFIIH and cdk9 detection at the prototypical retinoid-regulated RARbeta2 promoter, and favored a higher RNA polymerase II detection in transcribed regions of the RARbeta2 gene. Furthermore, the nature of the ligand impacted strongly on the ability of RARs to interact with a given coactivator and to activate transcription in intact cells. Thus RAR accomplishes transcriptional activation as a function of the ligand structure, by recruiting regulatory complexes which control distinct molecular events at retinoid-regulated promoters.

  3. Abiotic-stress induces demethylation and transcriptional activation of a gene encoding a glycerophosphodiesterase-like protein in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Sun; Sano, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    To examine the relationship between gene expression and DNA methylation, transcriptionally activated genes were screened in hypomethylated transgenic tobacco plants expressing an anti-DNA methyltransferase sequence. Among 16 genes initially identified, one clone was found to encode a glycerophosphodiesterase-like protein (NtGPDL), earlier reported to be responsive to aluminium stress. When detached leaves from wild type tobacco plants were treated with aluminium, NtGPDL transcripts were induced within 6 h, and corresponding genomic loci were demethylated at CCGG sites within 1 h. Direct bisulfite methylation mapping revealed that CG sites in coding regions were selectively demethylated, and that promoter regions were totally unmethylated regardless of the stress. Salt and low temperature treatments also induced similar demethylation patterns. Such effects could be attributable to oxidative stress, since reactive oxygen species generated by paraquat efficiently induced the same pattern of demethylation at coding regions. Pathogen infection induced neither transcripts nor genomic demethylation. These results suggested a close correlation between methylation and expression of NtGPDL upon abiotic stresses with a cause-effect relationship. Since DNA methylation is linked to histone modification, it is conceivable that demethylation at coding regions might induce alteration of chromatin structure, thereby enhancing transcription. We propose that environmental responses of plants are partly mediated through active alteration of the DNA methylation status. PMID:17273870

  4. Topoisomerase 1 and single-strand break repair modulate transcription-induced CAG repeat contraction in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Leroy; Lin, Yunfu; Dion, Vincent; Wilson, John H

    2011-08-01

    Expanded trinucleotide repeats are responsible for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1. The mechanisms that underlie repeat instability in the germ line and in the somatic tissues of human patients are undefined. Using a selection assay based on contraction of CAG repeat tracts in human cells, we screened the Prestwick chemical library in a moderately high-throughput assay and identified 18 novel inducers of repeat contraction. A subset of these compounds targeted pathways involved in the management of DNA supercoiling associated with transcription. Further analyses using both small molecule inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdowns demonstrated the involvement of topoisomerase 1 (TOP1), tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), and single-strand break repair (SSBR) in modulating transcription-dependent CAG repeat contractions. The TOP1-TDP1-SSBR pathway normally functions to suppress repeat instability, since interfering with it stimulated repeat contractions. We further showed that the increase in repeat contractions when the TOP1-TDP1-SSBR pathway is compromised arises via transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair, a previously identified contributor to transcription-induced repeat instability. These studies broaden the scope of pathways involved in transcription-induced CAG repeat instability and begin to define their interrelationships. PMID:21628532

  5. Alteration of BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of RNA Pol III-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qian; Shi, Ganggang; Zhang, Yanmei; Lu, Lei; Levy, Daniel; Zhong, Shuping

    2015-02-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated that alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Deregulation of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription enhances cellular Pol III gene production, leading to an increase in translational capacity to promote cell transformation and tumor formation. We have reported that alcohol intake increases Pol III gene transcription to promote cell transformation and tumor formation in vitro and in vivo. Studies revealed that tumor suppressors, pRb, p53, PTEN and Maf1 repress the transcription of Pol III genes. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor and its mutation is tightly related to breast cancer development. However, it is not clear whether BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of Pol III genes. At the present studies, we report that restoring BRCA1 in HCC 1937 cells, which is a BRCA1 deficient cell line, represses Pol III gene transcription. Expressing mutant or truncated BRCA1 in these cells does not affect the ability of repression on Pol III genes. Our analysis has demonstrated that alcohol induces Pol III gene transcription. More importantly, overexpression of BRCA1 in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells (MCF-7) decreases the induction of tRNA(Leu) and 5S rRNA genes by alcohol, whereas reduction of BRCA1 by its siRNA slightly increases the transcription of the class of genes. This suggests that BRCA1 is associated with alcohol-induced deregulation of Pol III genes. These studies for the first time demonstrate the role of BRCA1 in induction of Pol III genes by alcohol and uncover a novel mechanism of alcohol-associated breast cancer.

  6. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug’s mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  7. Cell-specific regulation of Ferroportin transcription following experimentally-induced acute anemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiabrando, Deborah; Fiorito, Veronica; Marro, Samuele; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Ferroportin (FPN), the sole characterized iron exporter, is mainly controlled by the peptide hormone hepcidin in response to iron, erythroid factors, hypoxia, and inflammation. In addition, intracellular iron level controls FPN translation by modulating the binding of Iron Responsive Proteins at the 5'UTR of FPN mRNA. Recently, hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)2α has been shown to regulate FPN expression in intestinal cells. Here we show that, during experimentally-induced acute anemia in mice, FPN is regulated at transcriptional level in a cell-specific manner. FPN mRNA level increases in duodenum and spleen macrophages, whereas it does not change in liver and is strongly down-regulated in erythroid precursors. These results were confirmed in Caco2, Raw264.7 and K562 cells treated with a hypoxic stimulus. Moreover, we found a differential expression of HIF1α and HIF2α in cells and tissues that might account for the specificity of FPN regulation. Thus, hypoxia, by directly controlling hepcidin and its target FPN, orchestrates a complex regulatory network aimed at ensuring rapid iron recovery from the periphery and efficient iron utilization in the erythroid compartment.

  8. Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript 2 protein treatment attenuates experimentally-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Vishal; Amdare, Nitin; Yadav, Ravi Shankar; Tarnekar, Aaditya; Goswami, Kalyan; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2015-11-01

    Helminths are known to modulate host's immunity by suppressing host protective pro-inflammatory responses. Such immunomodulatory effects have been experimentally shown to have therapeutic implications in immune mediated disorders. In the present study, we have explored a filarial protein i.e. Brugia malayi recombinant abundant larval transcript 2 (rBmALT2) for its therapeutic effect in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis in mouse model. The immunomodulatory activity of rBmALT-2 was initially confirmed by demonstrating that it suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide synthesis and down-regulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro by peritoneal exudate cells of mice. Treatment with rBmALT2 reduced severity of colitis associated with significant reduction in weight loss, disease activity, colon damage, mucosal edema and histopathological score including myeloperoxidase activity in colon tissues. rBmALT2 was comparatively more effective in attenuation of colitis when used in the preventive mode than when used for curative purpose. The therapeutic effect of rBmALT2 was found to be associated with downregulation of IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17 and upregulation of IL-10 cytokines. These results provide strong experimental evidence that BmALT2 could be a potential alternative therapeutic agent in colitis. PMID:26669016

  9. A quick signal of starvation induced autophagy: transcription versus post-translational modification of LC3.

    PubMed

    Karim, Md Razaul; Kawanago, Hisayo; Kadowaki, Motoni

    2014-11-15

    Autophagy is the major intracellular lysosomal bulk degradation pathway induced by nutrient starvation and contributes to the elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates to recycle building block and is essential for cell survival. Microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) plays an indispensable role in macroautophagy formation and is a molecular marker for the process. Here, we show that autophagy increased through quick robust signaling from starvation by enhanced levels of LC3, LC3-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) punctate, and bulk proteolysis in rat hepatoma H4-II-E cells and fresh rat hepatocytes. After the addition of amino acids to the starvation condition, a similar quick signal appeared by significant reduction of the LC3 ratio and bulk proteolysis. Interestingly, we observed that post-translational modification of LC3 conversion occurred even long before the changes happened in the level of LC3-mRNA (messenger RNA) expression. A similar coordinated but diverse effect on LC3 was confirmed by using autophagy and lysosomal inhibitors. These results indicated that during starvation the initial robust signal to the cytoplasm can induce autophagy activity through modification at the protein level, whereas after depleting readily available autophagy proteins the signal goes to the DNA transcription level to maintain the autophagy capacity of cells.

  10. Gene Transcriptional and Metabolic Profile Changes in Mimetic Aging Mice Induced by D-Galactose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue-Yue; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Li, Rong-Hua; Mu, Chang-Kao; Wang, Chun-Lin; Song, Wei-Wei

    2015-01-01

    D-galactose injection has been shown to induce many changes in mice that represent accelerated aging. This mouse model has been widely used for pharmacological studies of anti-aging agents. The underlying mechanism of D-galactose induced aging remains unclear, however, it appears to relate to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders. Currently, there has yet to be a study that focuses on investigating gene expression changes in D-galactose aging mice. In this study, integrated analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and gene expression profiles was used to investigate the changes in transcriptional and metabolic profiles in mimetic aging mice injected with D-galactose. Our findings demonstrated that 48 mRNAs were differentially expressed between control and D-galactose mice, and 51 potential biomarkers were identified at the metabolic level. The effects of D-galactose on aging could be attributed to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders, oxidative damage, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reduction in abnormal substance elimination, cell apoptosis, and insulin resistance. PMID:26176541

  11. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  12. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  13. Modulation of IL-6 induced RANKL expression in arthritic synovium by a transcription factor SOX5.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoke; Shi, Yumeng; Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaoxi; Sun, Wei; Lu, Yan; Tsao, Betty P; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) is critically involved in bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We previously reported association between younger age at onset of RA and a RANKL promoter SNP that conferred an elevated promoter activity via binding to a transcription factor SOX5. Here we study the regulation of SOX5 levels in relation to RANKL expression in RA synovial fibroblasts (SF) and the development of bone erosion in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse. Our data indicated SOX5 levels were higher in synovium and synovial fluid from RA compared to osteoarthritis patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines upregulated SOX5 and RANKL expression in both primary RA SF and the rheumatoid synovial fibroblast cell line, MH7A. Overexpression of SOX5 resulted in significantly increased RANKL levels, while knockdown of SOX5 resulted in diminished IL-6 mediated RANKL upregulation in MH7A cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed approximately 3-fold enrichment of RANKL-specific DNA in anti-SOX5 immunoprecipitate in IL-6 treated MH7A cells as compared to untreated cells. Locally silencing SOX5 gene significantly diminished RANKL positive cells and bone erosion in CIA mice. These findings suggest SOX5 is an important regulator of IL-6-induced RANKL expression in RA SF. PMID:27550416

  14. Modulation of IL-6 induced RANKL expression in arthritic synovium by a transcription factor SOX5

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoke; Shi, Yumeng; Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaoxi; Sun, Wei; Lu, Yan; Tsao, Betty P.; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) is critically involved in bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We previously reported association between younger age at onset of RA and a RANKL promoter SNP that conferred an elevated promoter activity via binding to a transcription factor SOX5. Here we study the regulation of SOX5 levels in relation to RANKL expression in RA synovial fibroblasts (SF) and the development of bone erosion in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse. Our data indicated SOX5 levels were higher in synovium and synovial fluid from RA compared to osteoarthritis patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines upregulated SOX5 and RANKL expression in both primary RA SF and the rheumatoid synovial fibroblast cell line, MH7A. Overexpression of SOX5 resulted in significantly increased RANKL levels, while knockdown of SOX5 resulted in diminished IL-6 mediated RANKL upregulation in MH7A cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed approximately 3-fold enrichment of RANKL-specific DNA in anti-SOX5 immunoprecipitate in IL-6 treated MH7A cells as compared to untreated cells. Locally silencing SOX5 gene significantly diminished RANKL positive cells and bone erosion in CIA mice. These findings suggest SOX5 is an important regulator of IL-6-induced RANKL expression in RA SF. PMID:27550416

  15. RNA polymerase II pauses at the 5 prime end of the transcriptionally induced Drosophila hsp70 gene

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, T.; Lis, J.T. )

    1991-10-01

    An RNA polymerase II molecule is associated with the 5{prime} end of the Drosophila melanogaster hsp70 gene under non-heat shock conditions. This polymerase is engaged in transcription but has paused, or arrested, after synthesizing about 25 nucleotides. Resumption of elongation by this paused polymerase appears to be the rate-limiting step in hsp70 transcription in uninduced cells. Here the authors report results of nuclear run-on assays that measure the distribution of elongating and paused RNA polymerase molecules on the hsp70 gene in induced cells. Pausing of polymerase was detected at the 5{prime} end of hsp70 was transcribed approximately five times during the 25-min heat shock that they used. Therefore, once the hsp70 gene is induced to an intermediate level, initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II remains more rapid than the resumption of elongation by a paused polymerase molecule.

  16. TGF-β-Induced Transcription Sustains Amoeboid Melanoma Migration and Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Cantelli, Gaia; Orgaz, Jose L.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Irene; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Maiques, Oscar; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Nestle, Frank O.; Marti, Rosa M.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.; Sanz-Moreno, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell migration underlies metastatic dissemination of cancer cells, and fast “amoeboid” migration in the invasive fronts of tumors is controlled by high levels of actomyosin contractility. How amoeboid migration is regulated by extracellular signals and sustained over time by transcriptional changes is not fully understood. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is well known to promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and contribute to metastasis, but melanocytes are neural crest derivatives that have undergone EMT during embryonic development. Surprisingly, we find that in melanoma, TGF-β promotes amoeboid features such as cell rounding, membrane blebbing, high levels of contractility, and increased invasion. Using genome-wide transcriptomics, we find that amoeboid melanoma cells are enriched in a TGF-β-driven signature. We observe that downstream of TGF-β, SMAD2 and its adaptor CITED1 control amoeboid behavior by regulating the expression of key genes that activate contractile forces. Moreover, CITED1 is highly upregulated during melanoma progression, and its high expression is associated with poor prognosis. CITED1 is coupled to a contractile-rounded, amoeboid phenotype in a panel of 16 melanoma cell lines, in mouse melanoma xenografts, and in 47 human melanoma patients. Its expression is also enriched in the invasive fronts of lesions. Functionally, we show how the TGF-β-SMAD2-CITED1 axis promotes different steps associated with progression: melanoma detachment from keratinocytes, 2D and 3D migration, attachment to endothelial cells, and in vivo lung metastatic initial colonization and outgrowth. We propose a novel mechanism by which TGF-β-induced transcription sustains actomyosin force in melanoma cells and thereby promotes melanoma progression independently of EMT. PMID:26526369

  17. Transcriptional Dysregulation of Upstream Signaling of IFN Pathway in Chronic HCV Type 4 Induced Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Marwa K.; Salum, Ghada Maher; Bader El Din, Noha G.; Dawood, Reham M.; Barakat, Ahmed; Khairy, Ahmed; El Awady, Mostafa K.

    2016-01-01

    IFN orchestrates the expression of various genes to halt hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication with the possibility of either reduced or increased liver fibrosis; due to controlled viral replication or overproduction of inflammatory mediators, repectively. In this study, we examined the transcriptional profiling of type I IFN related genes in HCV-chronically infected patients with varying degrees of liver fibrosis. PCR array was used to examine the expression of 84 type I IFN related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) RNA from 12 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (5 F0-F1 and 7 F2-F4) and 5 healthy subjects. We further validated our results by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) in 103 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (43 F0-F1 and 60 F2-F4) and 15 controls. PCR array data revealed dysregulation in TLR7 pathway. The expression of TLR7 was decreased by 4 folds and MyD88 was increased by 3 folds in PBMCs of F2-F4 patients when compared to the healthy volunteers (p = 0.03 and 0.002, respectively). In addition, IRF7 and TLR7 showed dramatic downregulation (6 and 8 folds, respectively) in F2-F4 patients when compared to F0-F1 ones. qRT-PCR confirmed the altered expression patterns of TLR7 and MyD88 in F2-F4 patients when compared to either controls or F0-F1 patients. However, by qRT-PCR, IRF7 and NF-κB1 (TLR7 pathway transcription factors) exhibited similar mRNA abundance among F2-F4 and F0-F1 patients. These results suggest that TLR7 and MyD88 are possible candidates as biomarkers for the progression of HCV-induced liver fibrosis and/ or targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27135246

  18. Lack of Transcription Factor p53 Exacerbates Elastase-Induced Emphysema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chrusciel, Sandra; Zysman, Maéva; Caramelle, Philippe; Tiendrebeogo, Arnaud; Baskara, Indoumady; Le Gouvello, Sabine; Chabot, François; Giraudier, Stéphane; Boczkowski, Jorge; Boyer, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    The transcription factor p53 is overexpressed in the lung of patients with emphysema, but it remains unclear if it has a deleterious or protective effect in disease progression. We investigated the role of p53 in the elastase-induced emphysema model and the molecular underlining mechanisms. Wild-type (WT) and p53(-/-) mice were instilled with pancreatic porcine elastase. We quantified emphysema (morphometric analysis), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), and TNF-α in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) (ELISA), oxidative stress markers [heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 (NQO1), and quantitative RT-PCR], matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12) expression, and macrophage apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3, immunofluorescence). p53 gene expression was up-regulated in the lung of elastase-instilled mice. p53 deletion aggravated elastase-induced emphysema severity, pulmonary inflammation (macrophage and neutrophil numbers and CCL2 and TNF-α levels in BAL), and lung oxidative stress. These findings, except for the increase in CCL2, were reproduced in WT mice transplanted with p53(-/-) bone marrow cells. The increased number of macrophages in p53(-/-) mice was not a consequence of reduced apoptosis or an excess of chemotaxis toward CCL2. Macrophage expression of MMP12 was higher in p53(-/-) mice compared with WT mice after elastase instillation. These findings provide evidence that p53(-/-) mice and WT mice grafted with p53(-/-) bone marrow cells are more prone to developing elastase-induced emphysema, supporting a protective role of p53, and more precisely p53 expressed in macrophages, against emphysema development. The pivotal role played by macrophages in this phenomenon may involve the MMP12-TNF-α pathway.

  19. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  20. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  1. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-06

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  2. Ocular surface foreign bodies: novel findings mimicking ocular malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Maudgil, A; Wagner, B E; Rundle, P; Rennie, I G; Mudhar, H S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Malignant melanoma of the eye is an uncommon condition that is important to recognise. We describe three cases in which ocular foreign bodies have masqueraded as ocular malignant melanoma. Methods Interventional case reports. Results Case 1 describes diathermy-induced carbon particle implantation, during plaque therapy for the treatment of uveal melanoma, mimicking recurrence with extra-scleral invasion. Case 2 shows a foreign body called ‘mullite' mimicking conjunctival melanoma. Case 3 demonstrates a conjunctival foreign body called ‘illite' that mimicked a limbal melanocytic lesion, clinically thought to be either melanocytoma or melanoma. Conclusion This report highlights the importance of careful history taking, examination, and appropriate biopsy in cases of suspected malignant melanoma, to prevent unnecessary and potentially radical treatment. PMID:25104745

  3. Dirofilariasis Mimicking an Acute Scrotum.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi, Mirko; Rinaldi, Victoria Elisa; Prestipino, Marco; Giovenali, Paolo; Appignani, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Human infections caused by Dirofilaria repens have been reported in many areas of the world. We describe a case of a 3-year-old child with an intrascrotal mass caused by D repens mimicking an acute scrotum. This represents the first case of scrotal dirofilariasis described in pediatric age with such an unusual presentation.

  4. Mutations in the yeast SRB2 general transcription factor suppress hpr1-induced recombination and show defects in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Piruat, J I; Aguilera, A

    1996-08-01

    We have obtained genetic and molecular evidence that the hrs2-1 mutation, isolated as a suppressor of the hyperrecombination phenotype of hpr1 delta, is in the SRB2 gene, which encodes a component of the RNA polII holoenzyme. A newly constructed srb2 delta allele restores the wild-type levels of deletions in hpr1 delta cells, indicating that the lack of a functional SRB2 transcription factor suppresses recombination between direct repeats. These results suggest a direct connection between transcription and recombination between DNA repeats. On the other hand, the hrs2-1 mutation (renamed srb2-101), in which Gly150 has been changed to Asp, makes cells sensitive to long MMS treatments, a phenotype observed for the srb2 delta null allele only in a hpr1 delta background. This indicates that mutations in the basal transcription factor SRB2 impair DNA repair of MMS-induced damage, which adds a new connection between transcription and DNA repair. We discuss the possibility that hpr1-induced deletions occurred as a consequence of a SRB2-dependent stalled or blocked transcription complex.

  5. The lysine deacetylase inhibitor givinostat inhibits β-cell IL-1β induced IL-1β transcription and processing

    PubMed Central

    Dahllöf, Mattias S.; Christensen, Dan P.; Lundh, Morten; Dinarello, Charles A.; Mascagni, Paolo; Grunnet, Lars G.; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, in particular IL-1β, IFNγ, and CXCL10, contribute to β-cell failure and loss in DM via IL-1R, IFNγR, and TLR4 signaling. IL-1 signaling deficiency reduces diabetes incidence, islet IL-1β secretion, and hyperglycemia in animal models of diabetes. Further, IL-1R antagonism improves normoglycemia and β-cell function in type 2 diabetic patients. Inhibition of lysine deacetylases (KDACi) counteracts β-cell toxicity induced by the combination of IL-1 and IFNγ and reduces diabetes incidence in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We hypothesized that KDACi breaks an autoinflammatory circuit by differentially preventing β-cell expression of the β-cell toxic inflammatory molecules IL-1β and CXCL10 induced by single cytokines. Results: CXCL10 did not induce transcription of IL-1β mRNA. IL-1β induced β-cell IL-1β mRNA and both IL-1β and IFNγ individually induced Cxcl10 mRNA transcription. Givinostat inhibited IL-1β-induced IL-1β mRNA expression in INS-1 and rat islets and IL-1β processing in INS-1 cells. Givinostat also reduced IFNγ induced Cxcl10 transcription in INS-1 cells but not in rat islets, while IL-1β induced Cxcl10 transcription was unaffected in both. Materials and Methods: INS-1 cells and rat islets of Langerhans were exposed to IL-1β, IFNγ or CXCL10 in the presence or absence of KDACi (givinostat). Cytokine and chemokine mRNA expressions were quantified by real-time qPCR, and IL-1β processing by western blotting of cell lysates. Conclusion/Interpretation: Inhibition of β-cell IL-1β expression and processing and Cxcl10 transcription contributes to the β-cell protective actions of KDACi. In vitro β-cell destructive effects of CXCL10 are not mediated via IL-1β transcription. The differential proinflammatory actions of KDACs may be attractive novel drug targets in DM. PMID:23486342

  6. Peroxiredoxin Ahp1 Acts as a Receptor for Alkylhydroperoxides to Induce Disulfide Bond Formation in the Cad1 Transcription Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Kenta; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during cellular metabolism are toxic to cells. As a result, cells must be able to identify ROS as a stress signal and induce stress response pathways that protect cells from ROS toxicity. Recently, peroxiredoxin (Prx)-induced relays of disulfide bond formation have been identified in budding yeast, namely the disulfide bond formation of Yap1, a crucial transcription factor for oxidative stress response, by a specific Prx Gpx3 and by a major Prx Tsa1. Here, we show that an atypical-type Prx Ahp1 can act as a receptor for alkylhydroperoxides, resulting in activation of the Cad1 transcription factor that is homologous to Yap1. We demonstrate that Ahp1 is required for the formation of intermolecular Cad1 disulfide bond(s) in both an in vitro redox system and in cells treated with alkylhydroperoxide. Furthermore, we found that Cad1-dependent transcriptional activation of the HSP82 gene is dependent on Ahp1. Our results suggest that, although the Gpx3-Yap1 pathway contributes more strongly to resistance than the Ahp1-Cad1 pathway, the Ahp1-induced activation of Cad1 can function as a defense system against stress induced by alkylhydroperoxides, possibly including lipid peroxides. Thus, the Prx family of proteins have an important role in determining peroxide response signals and in transmitting the signals to specific target proteins by inducing disulfide bond formation. PMID:20145245

  7. Peroxiredoxin Ahp1 acts as a receptor for alkylhydroperoxides to induce disulfide bond formation in the Cad1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Kenta; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2010-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during cellular metabolism are toxic to cells. As a result, cells must be able to identify ROS as a stress signal and induce stress response pathways that protect cells from ROS toxicity. Recently, peroxiredoxin (Prx)-induced relays of disulfide bond formation have been identified in budding yeast, namely the disulfide bond formation of Yap1, a crucial transcription factor for oxidative stress response, by a specific Prx Gpx3 and by a major Prx Tsa1. Here, we show that an atypical-type Prx Ahp1 can act as a receptor for alkylhydroperoxides, resulting in activation of the Cad1 transcription factor that is homologous to Yap1. We demonstrate that Ahp1 is required for the formation of intermolecular Cad1 disulfide bond(s) in both an in vitro redox system and in cells treated with alkylhydroperoxide. Furthermore, we found that Cad1-dependent transcriptional activation of the HSP82 gene is dependent on Ahp1. Our results suggest that, although the Gpx3-Yap1 pathway contributes more strongly to resistance than the Ahp1-Cad1 pathway, the Ahp1-induced activation of Cad1 can function as a defense system against stress induced by alkylhydroperoxides, possibly including lipid peroxides. Thus, the Prx family of proteins have an important role in determining peroxide response signals and in transmitting the signals to specific target proteins by inducing disulfide bond formation. PMID:20145245

  8. HDAC2 selectively regulates FOXO3a-mediated gene transcription during oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shengyi; Zhao, Siqi; Yan, Feng; Cheng, Jinbo; Huang, Li; Chen, Hong; Liu, Qingsong; Ji, Xunming; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2015-01-21

    All neurodegenerative diseases are associated with oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) is a key transcription factor involved in neuronal apoptosis. However, how FOXO3a forms complexes and functions in oxidative stress processing remains largely unknown. In the present study, we show that histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) forms a physical complex with FOXO3a, which plays an important role in FOXO3a-dependent gene transcription and oxidative stress-induced mouse cerebellar granule neuron (CGN) apoptosis. Interestingly, we also found that HDAC2 became selectively enriched in the promoter region of the p21 gene, but not those of other target genes, and inhibited FOXO3a-mediated p21 transcription. Furthermore, we found that oxidative stress reduced the interaction between FOXO3a and HDAC2, leading to an increased histone H4K16 acetylation level in the p21 promoter region and upregulated p21 expression in a manner independent of p53 or E2F1. Phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 is important for the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction, and we found that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion reduced phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 and mitigated the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction in mouse brain tissue. Our study reveals the novel regulation of FOXO3a-mediated selective gene transcription via epigenetic modification in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death, which could be exploited therapeutically.

  9. Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha down-regulates type i collagen through Sp3 transcription factor in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Duval, Elise; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Leclercq, Sylvain; Baugé, Catherine; Boumédiene, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Cartilage engineering is one challenging issue in regenerative medicine. Low oxygen tension or hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α) gene therapy are promising strategies in the field of cartilage repair. Previously, we showed that hypoxia and its mediator HIF-1 regulate matrix genes expression (collagens and aggrecan). Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of type I collagen (COL1A1) by HIF-1 in human articular chondrocytes. We show that HIF-1α reduces COL1A1 transcription, through a distal promoter (-2300 to -1816 bp upstream transcription initiation site), containing two GC boxes that bind Sp transcription factors (Sp1/Sp3). Sp1 acts as a positive regulator but is not induced by HIF-1. COL1A1 inhibition caused by HIF-1 implies only Sp3, which accumulates and competes Sp1 binding on COL1A1 promoter. Additionally, Sp3 ectopic expression inhibits COL1A1, while Sp3 knockdown counteracts the downregulation of COL1A1 induced by HIF-1. In conclusion, we established a new regulatory model of COL1A1 regulation by HIF-1, and bring out its relationship with Sp3 transcription factor. In a fundamental level, these findings give insights in the mechanisms controlling COL1A1 gene expression. This may be helpful to improve strategies to impair type I collagen expression during chondrocyte differentiation for cartilage engineering. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(9):756-763, 2016. PMID:27521280

  10. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028 mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes.

  11. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028 mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes. PMID:26453223

  12. Hydrogen peroxide induced repression of icaADBC transcription and biofilm development in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Aaron A; O'Donnell, Sinead T; Molony, Diarmuid C; Sheehan, Eoin; McCormack, Damian J; O'Gara, James P

    2009-05-01

    Expression of the icaADBC-encoded polysaccharide intercellular adhesion by Staphylococcus epidermidis promotes biofilm formation and represents an important virulence factor in biomaterial-related infections following orthopedic surgery. Biofilm development by the pathogen can be viewed as a protective reaction to environmental stressors including osmotic stress, thermal stress, and antimicrobial chemotherapy. Oxidative stress, arising from the release of toxic oxygen radicals by polymorphonuclear cells, is encountered by bacteria entering the body perioperatively. Evasion of this and other cell-mediated immune responses by pathogenic bacteria plays an important role in the development of chronic biomaterial-related infection. Here we investigated the impact of sublethal oxidative stress induced by H2O2 (<18 mM) on S. epidermidis biofilm formation. S. epidermidis grown in brain heart infusion (BHI) media supplemented with 5 mM H2O2 or 10 mM H2O2 formed significantly less biofilm (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively) than bacteria grown in BHI alone. Consistent with this, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction expression of the ica locus was also shown to be reduced by subinhibitory concentrations of H2O2. Furthermore, diminished ica operon expression correlated with increased expression of icaR, which encodes a repressor of icaADBC. Thus, these data suggest that mild oxidative stress downregulates biofilm development by S. epidermidis and may have potential in a therapeutic context.

  13. Early transcriptional responses to mercury: a role for ethylene in mercury-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Martín-Barranco, Amanda; Escobar, Carolina; Hernández, Luis E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of plant tolerance to mercury (Hg) is important for developing phytoremediation strategies of Hg-contaminated soils. The early responses of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) seedlings to Hg were studied using transcriptomics analysis. A Medicago truncatula microarray was hybridized with high-quality root RNA from M. sativa treated with 3 μM Hg for 3, 6 and 24 h. The transcriptional pattern data were complementary to the measurements of root growth inhibition, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) accumulation and NADPH-oxidase activity as stress indexes. Of 559 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 91% were up-regulated. The majority of DEGs were shared between the 3 and 6 h (60%) time points, including the 'stress', 'secondary metabolism' and 'hormone metabolism' functional categories. Genes from ethylene metabolism and signalling were highly represented, suggesting that this phytohormone may be relevant for metal perception and homeostasis. Ethylene-insensitive alfalfa seedlings preincubated with the ethylene signalling inhibitor 1-methylcyclopronene and Arabidopsis thaliana ein2-5 mutants confirmed that ethylene participates in the early perception of Hg stress. It modulates root growth inhibition, NADPH-oxidase activity and Hg-induced apoplastic H2 O2 accumulation. Therefore, ethylene signalling attenuation could be useful in future phytotechnological applications to ameliorate stress symptoms in Hg-polluted plants. PMID:24033367

  14. Mechanism of Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A Attenuation of CpG-Induced Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Saifee, Jessica F.; Torres, Raul M.; Janoff, Edward N.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) had previously been shown to act as a damage associated molecular pattern with the ability to enhance CpG-A phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN)-mediated stimulation of IFNα production from human plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Examination of the mechanism by which TFAM might influence CpG ODN mediated innate immune responses revealed that TFAM binds directly, tightly and selectively to the structurally related CpG-A, -B, and -C ODN. TFAM also modulated the ability of the CpG-B or -C to stimulate the production of antibodies from human B cells. TFAM showed a dose-dependent modulation of CpG-B, and -C -induced antibody production from human B cells in vitro, with enhancement of high dose and inhibition of low doses of CpG stimulation. This effect was linked to the ability of TFAM to directly inhibit the binding of CpG ODNs to B cells, in a manner consistent with the relative binding affinities of TFAM for the ODNs. These data suggest that TFAM alters the free concentration of the CpG available to stimulate B cells by sequestering this ODN in a TFAM-CpG complex. Thus, TFAM has the potential to decrease the pathogenic consequences of exposure to natural CpG-like hypomethylated DNA in vivo, as well as such as that found in traumatic injury, infection, autoimmune disease and during pregnancy. PMID:27280778

  15. Mechanism of Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A Attenuation of CpG-Induced Antibody Production.

    PubMed

    Malarkey, Christopher S; Gustafson, Claire E; Saifee, Jessica F; Torres, Raul M; Churchill, Mair E A; Janoff, Edward N

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) had previously been shown to act as a damage associated molecular pattern with the ability to enhance CpG-A phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN)-mediated stimulation of IFNα production from human plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Examination of the mechanism by which TFAM might influence CpG ODN mediated innate immune responses revealed that TFAM binds directly, tightly and selectively to the structurally related CpG-A, -B, and -C ODN. TFAM also modulated the ability of the CpG-B or -C to stimulate the production of antibodies from human B cells. TFAM showed a dose-dependent modulation of CpG-B, and -C -induced antibody production from human B cells in vitro, with enhancement of high dose and inhibition of low doses of CpG stimulation. This effect was linked to the ability of TFAM to directly inhibit the binding of CpG ODNs to B cells, in a manner consistent with the relative binding affinities of TFAM for the ODNs. These data suggest that TFAM alters the free concentration of the CpG available to stimulate B cells by sequestering this ODN in a TFAM-CpG complex. Thus, TFAM has the potential to decrease the pathogenic consequences of exposure to natural CpG-like hypomethylated DNA in vivo, as well as such as that found in traumatic injury, infection, autoimmune disease and during pregnancy. PMID:27280778

  16. Early transcriptional responses to mercury: a role for ethylene in mercury-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Martín-Barranco, Amanda; Escobar, Carolina; Hernández, Luis E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of plant tolerance to mercury (Hg) is important for developing phytoremediation strategies of Hg-contaminated soils. The early responses of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) seedlings to Hg were studied using transcriptomics analysis. A Medicago truncatula microarray was hybridized with high-quality root RNA from M. sativa treated with 3 μM Hg for 3, 6 and 24 h. The transcriptional pattern data were complementary to the measurements of root growth inhibition, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) accumulation and NADPH-oxidase activity as stress indexes. Of 559 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 91% were up-regulated. The majority of DEGs were shared between the 3 and 6 h (60%) time points, including the 'stress', 'secondary metabolism' and 'hormone metabolism' functional categories. Genes from ethylene metabolism and signalling were highly represented, suggesting that this phytohormone may be relevant for metal perception and homeostasis. Ethylene-insensitive alfalfa seedlings preincubated with the ethylene signalling inhibitor 1-methylcyclopronene and Arabidopsis thaliana ein2-5 mutants confirmed that ethylene participates in the early perception of Hg stress. It modulates root growth inhibition, NADPH-oxidase activity and Hg-induced apoplastic H2 O2 accumulation. Therefore, ethylene signalling attenuation could be useful in future phytotechnological applications to ameliorate stress symptoms in Hg-polluted plants.

  17. Gamma Radiation-Induced Damage in the Zinc Finger of the Transcription Factor IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Miao, YuJi; Hu, XiaoDan; Min, Rui; Liu, PeiDang; Zhang, HaiQian

    2016-01-01

    A zinc finger motif is an element of proteins that can specifically recognize and bind to DNA. Because they contain multiple cysteine residues, zinc finger motifs possess redox properties. Ionizing radiation generates a variety of free radicals in organisms. Zinc finger motifs, therefore, may be a target of ionizing radiation. The effect of gamma radiation on the zinc finger motifs in transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a zinc finger protein, was investigated. TFIIIA was exposed to different gamma doses from 60Co sources. The dose rates were 0.20 Gy/min and 800 Gy/h, respectively. The binding capacity of zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA was determined using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found that 1000 Gy of gamma radiation impaired the function of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. The sites of radiation-induced damage in the zinc finger were the thiol groups of cysteine residues and zinc (II) ions. The thiol groups were oxidized to form disulfide bonds and the zinc (II) ions were indicated to be reduced to zinc atoms. These results indicate that the zinc finger motif is a target domain for gamma radiation, which may decrease 5S rRNA expression via impairment of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. PMID:27803644

  18. Inactivation of PITX2 transcription factor induced apoptosis of gonadotroph tumoral cells.

    PubMed

    Acunzo, Julie; Roche, Catherine; Defilles, Celine; Thirion, Sylvie; Quentien, Marie-Helene; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Graillon, Thomas; Dufour, Henry; Brue, Thierry; Pellegrini, Isabelle; Enjalbert, Alain; Barlier, Anne

    2011-10-01

    Nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA; gonadotroph derived), even not inducing hormonal hypersecretion, cause significant morbidity by compression neighboring structures. No effective and specific medical methods are available so far for treating these tumors. The pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) gene is a member of the bicoid-like homeobox transcription factor family, which is involved in the Wnt/Dvl/β-catenin pathway. PITX2 is overexpressed in NFPA. PITX2 mutations are known to be responsible for Axenfield Rieger syndrome, a genetic disorder in which pituitary abnormalities have been detected. The R91P mutant identified in Axenfeld Rieger syndrome is a dominant-negative factor, which is able to block the expression of several pituitary genes activated by PITX2. To better understand the role of Pitx2 on gonadotroph tumorigenesis and to explore new approach for inhibiting tumoral growth, the R91P mutant was transferred via a lentiviral vector in tumoral gonadotroph cells of two kinds: the αT3-1 cell line and human adenoma cells. R91P mutant and small interfering RNA directed against Pitx2 both decreased the viability of αT3-1 cells via an apoptotic mechanism involving the activation of executioner caspase. Similar effects of the R91P mutant were observed on human gonadotroph cells in primary culture. Therefore, Pitx2 overexpression may play an antiapoptotic role during NFPA tumorigenesis. PMID:21810944

  19. Transcriptional analysis through RNA sequencing of giant cells induced by Meloidogyne graminicola in rice roots

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongli; Gheysen, Godelieve; Denil, Simon; Lindsey, Keith; Topping, Jennifer F.; Nahar, Kamrun; Haegeman, Annelies; De Vos, Winnok H.; Trooskens, Geert; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim; Kyndt, Tina

    2013-01-01

    One of the reasons for the progressive yield decline observed in aerobic rice production is the rapid build-up of populations of the rice root knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola. These nematodes induce specialized feeding cells inside root tissue, called giant cells. By injecting effectors in and sipping metabolites out of these cells, they reprogramme normal cell development and deprive the plant of its nutrients. In this research we have studied the transcriptome of giant cells in rice, after isolation of these cells by laser-capture microdissection. The expression profiles revealed a general induction of primary metabolism inside the giant cells. Although the roots were shielded from light induction, we detected a remarkable induction of genes involved in chloroplast biogenesis and tetrapyrrole synthesis. The presence of chloroplast-like structures inside these dark-grown cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy. On the other hand, genes involved in secondary metabolism and more specifically, the majority of defence-related genes were strongly suppressed in the giant cells. In addition, significant induction of transcripts involved in epigenetic processes was detected inside these cells 7 days after infection. PMID:23881398

  20. Abundant and broad expression of transcription-induced chimeras and protein products in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guanting; Wu, Jin; Zhao, Gangbin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Weihua; Mu, Shijie

    2016-02-12

    The expression of transcription-induced chimeras (TICs) was underestimated due to strategic and logical reasons. In order to thoroughly examine TICs, systematic survey of TIC events was conducted in mammalian genomes using ESTs, followed by experimental validation using RT-PCR and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The expression of ∼98% TIC events in at least one tissue or cell line from both mouse and human was verified. Besides, ∼40% TICs were broadly expressed, and ∼33% of TICs showed expression levels comparable to or higher than their upstream parental genes. We further identified putative chimeric proteins in public databases and validated two using Western blotting. GO analysis revealed that proteins resided in one multi-protein complex or functioning in metabolic or signaling pathway tended to produce fused products. Taken together, we have shown substantial evidence for the underestimated TIC events; and TICs could be a novel regulated way to further increases the proteome complexity in mammalian genomes. Possible regulation mechanisms and evolution of TICs were also discussed. PMID:26718406

  1. A sorghum MYB transcription factor induces 3-deoxyanthocyanidins and enhances resistance against leaf blights in maize.

    PubMed

    Ibraheem, Farag; Gaffoor, Iffa; Tan, Qixian; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Chopra, Surinder

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum responds to the ingress of the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum sublineolum through the biosynthesis of 3-deoxyanthocyanidin phytoalexins at the site of primary infection. Biosynthesis of 3-deoxyanthocyanidins in sorghum requires a MYB transcription factor encoded by yellow seed1 (y1), an orthologue of the maize gene pericarp color1 (p1). Maize lines with a functional p1 and flavonoid structural genes do not produce foliar 3-deoxyanthocyanidins in response to fungal ingress. To perform a comparative metabolic analysis of sorghum and maize 3-deoxyanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathways, we developed transgenic maize lines expressing the sorghum y1 gene. In maize, the y1 transgene phenocopied p1-regulated pigment accumulation in the pericarp and cob glumes. LC-MS profiling of fungus-challenged Y1-maize leaves showed induction of 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, specifically luteolinidin. Y1-maize plants also induced constitutive and higher levels of flavonoids in leaves. In response to Colletotrichum graminicola, Y1-maize showed a resistance response. PMID:25647576

  2. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis grown in xylem mimicking medium.

    PubMed

    Hiery, Eva; Adam, Susanne; Reid, Stephen; Hofmann, Jörg; Sonnewald, Sophia; Burkovski, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis with its host, the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum), is poorly understood and only few virulence factors are known. While studying of the bacteria in planta is time-consuming and difficult, the analysis in vitro would facilitate research. Therefore, a xylem mimicking medium (XMM) for C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis was established in this study based on an apoplast medium for Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. In contrast to the apoplast medium, XMM contains no sugars, but amino acids which serve as nitrogen and carbon source. As a result, growth in XMM induced transcriptional changes of genes encoding putative sugar, amino acid and iron uptake systems. In summary, mRNA levels of about 8% of all C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis genes were changed when XMM-grown bacteria were compared to M9 minimal medium-grown cells. Almost no transcriptional changes of genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes were detected, leading to the idea that XMM reflects the situation in the beginning of infection and therefore allows the characterization of virulence factors in this early stage of infection. The addition of the plant wound substance acetosyringone to the XMM medium led to a change in transcript amount, including genes coding for proteins involved in protein transport, iron uptake and regulation processes.

  3. The Case of a Zebra That Was Misdiagnosed as a Horse: Pulmonary Tumor Thrombotic Microangiopathy, a New Paraneoplastic Syndrome, Mimicking PD-1-Induced Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Corey A.; Browning, Robert; Oronsky, Bryan T.; Scicinski, Jan J.; Brzezniak, Christina

    2016-01-01

    A case report of a 47-year-old woman with triple-negative breast cancer on a clinical trial called PRIMETIME (NCT02518958) who received the anti-PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab and the experimental anticancer agent RRx-001 is presented. Although initially diagnosed and treated for anti-PD-1-induced pneumonitis, clinical and radiological abnormalities triggered further investigation, leading to the diagnosis of pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM). This example highlights the importance of exercising due diligence in determining immune-related adverse events and suggests that PD-1-induced pneumonitis should be a diagnosis of exclusion rather than a diagnosis by default. A case history and review of the literature are presented for PTTM, which we propose to define as a paraneoplastic syndrome. PMID:26933422

  4. Talc granulomatosis mimicking sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, A; Aggarwal, B; Menon, B; Kulshreshtha, R

    2008-07-01

    Pulmonary disease due to talc, a group of hydrous magnesium silicates, is almost exclusively encountered secondary to occupational exposure or intravenous drug abuse. Talcosis or talc pneumoconiosis is one of the rarer forms of silicate-induced lung disease. It is seen in workers exposed during its production, and occasionally, in users of cosmetic talc and in intravenous drug addicts. Very often, the history of exposure is not recognised by the patient, and it is only the finding of granulomatous cellular interstitial lesions containing birefringent crystals which indicates considerable talc exposure. We report a 38-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed with sarcoidosis, until a bronchoscopic biopsy revealed the presence of numerous foreign body giant cells and birefringent particles forming non-caseating granulomas. There was no history of occupational exposure to talc or intravenous drug abuse. The patient responded to oral corticosteroid treatment. Talcosis is generally considered to be relatively benign.

  5. Unique transcriptional profile of liver-resident memory CD8+ T cells induced by immunization with malaria sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Sze-Wah; Cockburn, Ian A.; Zhang, Hao; Scott, Alan L.; Zavala, Fidel

    2013-01-01

    Sterile immunity against live Plasmodium infection can be achieved by immunization with radiation attenuated sporozoites. This protection is known to be mediated in part by antigen-specific memory CD8+ T cells, presumably those residing in the liver. We characterized and compared the transcriptional profile of parasite-specific memory CD8+ T cells residing in the liver and spleen after immunization of mice with irradiated sporozoites. Microarray-based expression analysis of these memory CD8+ T cells indicated that liver resident memory cells display a distinct gene expression profile. We found major differences in the expression of immune function genes as well as genes involved in the cell cycle, cell trafficking, transcription and intracellular signaling. Importantly, the malaria parasite-induced liver resident CD8+ T cells display a transcriptional profile different to that described for CD8+ T cells following other microbial challenges. PMID:23594961

  6. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in transcriptional activation of ceruloplasmin by iron deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Mazumder, B.; Fox, P. L.

    2000-01-01

    A role of the copper protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) in iron metabolism is suggested by its ferroxidase activity and by the tissue iron overload in hereditary Cp deficiency patients. In addition, plasma Cp increases markedly in several conditions of anemia, e.g. iron deficiency, hemorrhage, renal failure, sickle cell disease, pregnancy, and inflammation. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) involved. We have reported that iron chelators increase Cp mRNA expression and protein synthesis in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we have shown that the increase in Cp mRNA is due to increased rate of transcription. We here report the results of new studies designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional activation of Cp by iron deficiency. The 5'-flanking region of the Cp gene was cloned from a human genomic library. A 4774-base pair segment of the Cp promoter/enhancer driving a luciferase reporter was transfected into HepG2 or Hep3B cells. Iron deficiency or hypoxia increased luciferase activity by 5-10-fold compared with untreated cells. Examination of the sequence showed three pairs of consensus hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Deletion and mutation analysis showed that a single HRE was necessary and sufficient for gene activation. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was shown by gel-shift and supershift experiments that showed HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta binding to a radiolabeled oligonucleotide containing the Cp promoter HRE. Furthermore, iron deficiency (and hypoxia) did not activate Cp gene expression in Hepa c4 hepatoma cells deficient in HIF-1beta, as shown functionally by the inactivity of a transfected Cp promoter-luciferase construct and by the failure of HIF-1 to bind the Cp HRE in nuclear extracts from these cells. These results are consistent with in vivo findings that iron deficiency increases plasma Cp and provides a molecular mechanism that may help to understand these

  7. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in transcriptional activation of ceruloplasmin by iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, C K; Mazumder, B; Fox, P L

    2000-07-14

    A role of the copper protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) in iron metabolism is suggested by its ferroxidase activity and by the tissue iron overload in hereditary Cp deficiency patients. In addition, plasma Cp increases markedly in several conditions of anemia, e.g. iron deficiency, hemorrhage, renal failure, sickle cell disease, pregnancy, and inflammation. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) involved. We have reported that iron chelators increase Cp mRNA expression and protein synthesis in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we have shown that the increase in Cp mRNA is due to increased rate of transcription. We here report the results of new studies designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional activation of Cp by iron deficiency. The 5'-flanking region of the Cp gene was cloned from a human genomic library. A 4774-base pair segment of the Cp promoter/enhancer driving a luciferase reporter was transfected into HepG2 or Hep3B cells. Iron deficiency or hypoxia increased luciferase activity by 5-10-fold compared with untreated cells. Examination of the sequence showed three pairs of consensus hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Deletion and mutation analysis showed that a single HRE was necessary and sufficient for gene activation. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was shown by gel-shift and supershift experiments that showed HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta binding to a radiolabeled oligonucleotide containing the Cp promoter HRE. Furthermore, iron deficiency (and hypoxia) did not activate Cp gene expression in Hepa c4 hepatoma cells deficient in HIF-1beta, as shown functionally by the inactivity of a transfected Cp promoter-luciferase construct and by the failure of HIF-1 to bind the Cp HRE in nuclear extracts from these cells. These results are consistent with in vivo findings that iron deficiency increases plasma Cp and provides a molecular mechanism that may help to understand these

  8. Dehydration stress-induced oscillations in LEA protein transcripts involves abscisic acid in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Nurul Islam, M; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2012-07-01

    • Physcomitrella patens is a bryophyte belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period. Mosses are typically found in refugial habitats and can experience rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions. The acquisition of dehydration tolerance by bryophytes is of fundamental importance as they lack water-conducting tissues and are generally one cell layer thick. • Here, we show that dehydration induced oscillations in the steady-state transcript abundances of two group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein genes in P. patens protonemata, and that the amplitudes of these oscillations are reflective of the severity of dehydration stress. • Dehydration stress also induced elevations in the concentrations of abscisic acid (ABA), and ABA alone can also induce dosage-dependent oscillatory increases in the steady-state abundance of LEA protein transcripts. Additionally, removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of these oscillatory increases. • Our data demonstrate that dehydration stress-regulated expression of LEA protein genes is temporally dynamic and highlight the importance of oscillations as a robust mechanism for optimal responses. Our results suggest that dehydration stress-induced oscillations in the steady-state abundance of LEA protein transcripts may constitute an important cellular strategy for adaptation to life in a constantly changing environment. PMID:22591374

  9. Reprogramming A375 cells to induced-resembled neuronal cells by structured overexpression of specific transcription genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hengzhu; Wei, Min; Jiang, Yangyang; Wang, Xiaodong; She, Lei; Yan, Zhengcun; Dong, Lun; Pang, Lujun; Wang, Xingdong

    2016-01-01

    Induced-resembled neuronal cells (irNCs) are generated by reprogramming human melanoma cells through the introduction of key transcription factors, providing novel concepts in the treatment of malignant tumor cells and making it possible to supply neural cells for laboratory use. In the present study, irNCs were derived from A375 cells by inducing the 'forced' overexpression of specific genes, including achaete-scute homolog 1 (Ascl1), neuronal differentiation factor 1 (Neurod1), myelin transcription factor 1 (Myt1), brain protein 2 (Brn2, also termed POU3F2) and human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (h-BDNF). irNCs induced from A375 cells express multiple neuronal markers and fire action potentials, exhibiting properties similar to those of motor neurons. The reprogramming procedure comprised reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence staining; furthermore, electrophysiological profiling demonstrated the characteristics of the induced-resembled neurons. The present study obtained a novel type of human irNC from human melanoma, which secreted BDNF continuously, providing a model for neuron-like cells. Thus, irNCs offer promise in investigating various neural diseases by using neural-like cells derived directly from the patient of interest. PMID:27510459

  10. N-acetylglucosamine sensing by a GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase induces transcription via chromatin histone acetylation in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chang; Lu, Yang; Liu, Haoping

    2016-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) exists ubiquitously as a component of the surface on a wide range of cells, from bacteria to humans. Many fungi are able to utilize environmental GlcNAc to support growth and induce cellular development, a property important for their survival in various host niches. However, how the GlcNAc signal is sensed and subsequently transduced is largely unknown. Here, we identify a gene that is essential for GlcNAc signalling (NGS1) in Candida albicans, a commensal and pathogenic yeast of humans. Ngs1 can bind GlcNAc through the N-terminal β-N-acetylglucosaminidase homology domain. This binding activates N-acetyltransferase activity in the C-terminal GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase domain, which is required for GlcNAc-induced promoter histone acetylation and transcription. Ngs1 is targeted to the promoters of GlcNAc-inducible genes constitutively by the transcription factor Rep1. Ngs1 is conserved in diverse fungi that have GlcNAc catabolic genes. Thus, fungi use Ngs1 as a GlcNAc-sensor and transducer for GlcNAc-induced transcription. PMID:27694804

  11. Dehydration stress-induced oscillations in LEA protein transcripts involves abscisic acid in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Nurul Islam, M; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2012-07-01

    • Physcomitrella patens is a bryophyte belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period. Mosses are typically found in refugial habitats and can experience rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions. The acquisition of dehydration tolerance by bryophytes is of fundamental importance as they lack water-conducting tissues and are generally one cell layer thick. • Here, we show that dehydration induced oscillations in the steady-state transcript abundances of two group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein genes in P. patens protonemata, and that the amplitudes of these oscillations are reflective of the severity of dehydration stress. • Dehydration stress also induced elevations in the concentrations of abscisic acid (ABA), and ABA alone can also induce dosage-dependent oscillatory increases in the steady-state abundance of LEA protein transcripts. Additionally, removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of these oscillatory increases. • Our data demonstrate that dehydration stress-regulated expression of LEA protein genes is temporally dynamic and highlight the importance of oscillations as a robust mechanism for optimal responses. Our results suggest that dehydration stress-induced oscillations in the steady-state abundance of LEA protein transcripts may constitute an important cellular strategy for adaptation to life in a constantly changing environment.

  12. Interactions of the ubiquitous octamer-binding transcription factor-1 with both the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 and the glucocorticoid receptor mediate prolactin and glucocorticoid-induced β-casein gene expression in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2013-03-01

    Regulation of milk protein gene expression by lactogenic hormones (prolactin and glucocorticoids) provides an attractive model for studying the mechanisms by which protein and steroid hormones synergistically regulate gene expression. β-Casein is one of the major milk proteins and its expression in mammary epithelial cells is stimulated by lactogenic hormones. The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 and glucocorticoid receptor are essential downstream mediators of prolactin and glucocorticoid signaling, respectively. Previous studies have shown that mutating the octamer-binding site of the β-casein gene proximal promoter dramatically reduces the hormonal induction of the promoter activity. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this report, we show that lactogenic hormones rapidly induce the binding of octamer-binding transcription factor-1 to the β-casein promoter and this induction is not mediated by either increasing the expression of octamer-binding transcription factor-1 or inducing its translocation to the nucleus. Rather, lactogenic hormones induce physical interactions between the octamer-binding transcription factor-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5, and glucocorticoid receptor to form a ternary complex, and these interactions enhance or stabilize the binding of these transcription factors to the promoter. Abolishing these interactions significantly reduces the hormonal induction of β-casein gene transcription. Thus, our study indicates that octamer-binding transcription factor-1 may serve as a master regulator that facilitates the DNA binding of both signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 and glucocorticoid receptor in hormone-induced β-casein expression, and defines a novel mechanism of regulation of tissue-specific gene expression by the ubiquitous octamer-binding transcription factor-1.

  13. Atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia induce transcriptional regulators of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the rat heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In skeletal muscle, transcript levels of proteins regulating the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) increase with atrophy and decrease with hypertrophy. Whether the same is true for heart muscle is not known. We set out to characterize the transcriptional profile of regulators of the UPS during atrop...

  14. Transcription factors GAF and HSF act at distinct regulatory steps to modulate stress-induced gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Fuda, Nicholas J.; Mahat, Dig B.; Core, Leighton J.; Guertin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level is fundamental to development and homeostasis. Inducible systems are invaluable when studying transcription because the regulatory process can be triggered instantaneously, allowing the tracking of ordered mechanistic events. Here, we use precision run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) to examine the genome-wide heat shock (HS) response in Drosophila and the function of two key transcription factors on the immediate transcription activation or repression of all genes regulated by HS. We identify the primary HS response genes and the rate-limiting steps in the transcription cycle that GAGA-associated factor (GAF) and HS factor (HSF) regulate. We demonstrate that GAF acts upstream of promoter-proximally paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) formation (likely at the step of chromatin opening) and that GAF-facilitated Pol II pausing is critical for HS activation. In contrast, HSF is dispensable for establishing or maintaining Pol II pausing but is critical for the release of paused Pol II into the gene body at a subset of highly activated genes. Additionally, HSF has no detectable role in the rapid HS repression of thousands of genes. PMID:27492368

  15. Computational identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites upstream of genes induced in rat brain by transient focal ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pulliam, John V.K.; Xu, Zhenfeng; Ford, Gregory D.; Liu, Cuimei; Li, Yonggang; Stovall, Kyndra; Cannon, Virginetta S.; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Moreno, Carlos S.; Ford, Byron D.

    2013-01-01

    Microarray analysis has been used to understand how gene regulation plays a critical role in neuronal injury, survival and repair following ischemic stroke. To identify the transcriptional regulatory elements responsible for ischemia-induced gene expression, we examined gene expression profiles of rat brains following focal ischemia and performed computational analysis of consensus transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the genes of the dataset. In this study, rats were sacrificed 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke and gene transcription in brain tissues following ischemia/reperfusion was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. The CONserved transcription FACtor binding site (CONFAC) software package was used to identify over-represented TFBS in the upstream promoter regions of ischemia-induced genes compared to control datasets. CONFAC identified 12 TFBS that were statistically over-represented from our dataset of ischemia-induced genes, including three members of the Ets-1 family of transcription factors (TFs). Microarray results showed that mRNA for Ets-1 was increased following tMCAO but not pMCAO. Immunohistochemical analysis of Ets-1 protein in rat brains following MCAO showed that Ets-1 was highly expressed in neurons in the brain of sham control animals. Ets-1 protein expression was virtually abolished in injured neurons of the ischemic brain but was unchanged in peri-infarct brain areas. These data indicate that TFs, including Ets-1, may influence neuronal injury following ischemia. These findings could provide important insights into the mechanisms that lead to brain injury and could provide avenues for the development of novel therapies. PMID:23246490

  16. Transcriptional read-through is not sufficient to induce an epigenetic switch in the silencing activity of Polycomb response elements

    PubMed Central

    Erokhin, Maksim; Elizar’ev, Pavel; Parshikov, Aleksander; Schedl, Paul; Georgiev, Pavel; Chetverina, Darya

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, Polycomb (PcG) and Trithorax (TrxG) group proteins are assembled on Polycomb response elements (PREs) to maintain tissue and stage-specific patterns of gene expression. Critical to coordinating gene expression with the process of differentiation, the activity of PREs can be switched “on” and “off.” When on, the PRE imposes a silenced state on the genes in the same domain that is stably inherited through multiple rounds of cell division. When the PRE is switched off, the domain is in a state permissive for gene expression that can be stably inherited. Previous studies have suggested that a burst of transcription through a PRE sequence displaces PcG proteins and provides a universal mechanism for inducing a heritable switch in PRE activity from on to off; however, the evidence favoring this model is indirect. Here, we have directly tested the transcriptional read-through mechanism. Contrary to previous suggestions, we show that transcription through the PRE is not sufficient for inducing an epigenetic switch in PRE activity. In fact, even high levels of continuous transcription through a PRE fails to dislodge the PcG proteins, nor does it remove repressive histone marks. Our results indicate that other mechanisms involving adjacent DNA regulatory elements must be implicated in heritable switch of PRE activity. PMID:26504232

  17. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells’ Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription. PMID:26642061

  18. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells' Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription. PMID:26642061

  19. Functional characterization of Arabidopsis NaCl-inducible WRKY25 and WRKY33 transcription factors in abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuanqing; Deyholos, Michael K

    2009-01-01

    Previous microarray analyses of Arabidopsis roots identified two closely related WRKY transcription factors (WRKY25 and WRKY33) among the transcripts that increased in abundance following treatment with NaCl. Here, we report further characterization of these genes, which we found to be inducible by a variety of abiotic stresses in an SOS-pathway independent manner, although WRKY33 induction was dependent on ABA signaling. Transcripts of both genes were detected in roots and leaves, while specific patterns of enrichment were observed in stems and floral buds for WRKY25 and WRKY33, respectively. We also identified upstream intergenic regions from each gene that were sufficient to confer stress-inducible expression on a reporter gene. However, the stress sensitivity of wrky25 null mutants did not differ from wild-type under any assay condition, while wrky33 null mutants and wrky25wrky33 double mutants showed only a moderate increase in NaCl-sensitivity, suggesting functional redundancy with other transcription factors. Nevertheless, overexpression of WRKY25 or WRKY33 was sufficient to increase Arabidopsis NaCl tolerance, while increasing sensitivity to ABA. Through microarray analyses of relevant genotypes, we identified 31 and 208 potential downstream targets of WRKY25 and WRKY33, respectively, most of which contained a W-box in their upstream regions.

  20. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells' Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription.

  1. The hnRNP-Htt axis regulates necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression through impaired RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Y; Tamura, T; Yuki, Y; Abe, D; Tamada, Y; Imoto, S; Tanaka, H; Homma, H; Tagawa, K; Miyano, S; Okazawa, H

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we identify signaling network of necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression (TRIAD) by α-amanitin (AMA), the selective RNA polymerase II inhibitor, as a model of neurodegenerative cell death. We performed genetic screen of a knockdown (KD) fly library by measuring the ratio of transformation from pupa to larva (PL ratio) under TRIAD, and selected the cell death-promoting genes. Systems biology analysis of the positive genes mapped on protein–protein interaction databases predicted the signaling network of TRIAD and the core pathway including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) and huntingtin (Htt). RNA sequencing revealed that AMA impaired transcription and RNA splicing of Htt, which is known as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stabilizing molecule. The impairment in RNA splicing and PL ratio was rescued by overexpresion of hnRNP that had been also affected by transcriptional repression. Fly genetics with suppressor or expresser of Htt and hnRNP worsened or ameliorated the decreased PL ratio by AMA, respectively. Collectively, these results suggested involvement of RNA splicing and a regulatory role of the hnRNP-Htt axis in the process of the transcriptional repression-induced necrosis. PMID:27124581

  2. The hnRNP-Htt axis regulates necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression through impaired RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Y; Tamura, T; Yuki, Y; Abe, D; Tamada, Y; Imoto, S; Tanaka, H; Homma, H; Tagawa, K; Miyano, S; Okazawa, H

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we identify signaling network of necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression (TRIAD) by α-amanitin (AMA), the selective RNA polymerase II inhibitor, as a model of neurodegenerative cell death. We performed genetic screen of a knockdown (KD) fly library by measuring the ratio of transformation from pupa to larva (PL ratio) under TRIAD, and selected the cell death-promoting genes. Systems biology analysis of the positive genes mapped on protein-protein interaction databases predicted the signaling network of TRIAD and the core pathway including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) and huntingtin (Htt). RNA sequencing revealed that AMA impaired transcription and RNA splicing of Htt, which is known as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stabilizing molecule. The impairment in RNA splicing and PL ratio was rescued by overexpresion of hnRNP that had been also affected by transcriptional repression. Fly genetics with suppressor or expresser of Htt and hnRNP worsened or ameliorated the decreased PL ratio by AMA, respectively. Collectively, these results suggested involvement of RNA splicing and a regulatory role of the hnRNP-Htt axis in the process of the transcriptional repression-induced necrosis. PMID:27124581

  3. Calorie restriction in humans inhibits the PI3K/AKT pathway and induces a younger transcription profile

    PubMed Central

    Mercken, Evi M.; Crosby, Seth D.; Lamming, Dudley W.; JeBailey, Lellean; Krzysik-Walker, Susan; Villareal, Dennis; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin; Sabatini, David M.; de Cabo, Rafael; Fontana, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Caloric restriction (CR) and down-regulation of the insulin/IGF pathway are the most robust interventions known to increase longevity in lower organisms. However, little is known about the molecular adaptations induced by CR in humans. Here we report that long-term CR in humans inhibits the IGF-1/insulin pathway in skeletal muscle, a key metabolic tissue. We also demonstrate that CR-induced dramatic changes of the skeletal muscle transcriptional profile that resemble those of younger individuals. Finally, in both rats and humans CR evoked similar responses in the transcriptional profiles of skeletal muscle. This common signature consisted of three key pathways typically associated with longevity: IGF-1/insulin signaling, mitochondrial biogenesis and inflammation. Furthermore, our data identifies promising pathways for therapeutic targets to combat age-related diseases and promote health in humans. PMID:23601134

  4. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is robustly

  5. Inducible transcript expressed by reactive epithelial cells at sites of olfactory sensory neuron proliferation.

    PubMed

    Stoss, Thomas D; Nickell, Melissa D; Hardin, Debra; Derby, Charles D; McClintock, Timothy S

    2004-02-15

    The continuous replacement of cells in the spiny lobster olfactory organ depends on proliferation of new cells at a specific site, the proximal proliferation zone (PPZ). Using representational difference analysis of cDNA, we identified transcripts enriched in the PPZ compared to the mature zone (MZ) of the organ. The 12 clones identified included four novel sequences, three exoskeletal proteins, a serine protease, two protease inhibitors, a putative growth factor, and a sequence named PET-15 that has similarity to antimicrobial proteins of the crustin type. PET-15 mRNA was only detected in epithelial cells. It was abundant in all epithelial cells of the PPZ, but was only detected in the MZ at sites of damage to the olfactory organ. PET-15 mRNA was increased by types of damage that are known to induce proliferation of new olfactory sensory neurons in the olfactory organ. It increased in the PPZ after partial ablation of the olfactory organ and in the MZ after shaving of aesthetasc sensilla. These ipsilateral effects were mirrored by smaller increases in the undamaged contralateral olfactory organ. These contralateral effects are most parsimoniously explained by the action of a diffusible signal. Because epithelial cells are the source of proliferating progenitors in the olfactory organ, the same diffusible signal may stimulate increases in both cellular proliferation and PET-15 mRNA. The uniformity of expression of PET-15 in the PPZ epithelium suggests that the epithelial cells that give rise to new olfactory sensory neurons are a subset of cells that express PET-15.

  6. Glyceollin-elicited soy protein consumption induces distinct transcriptional effects as compared to standard soy protein.

    PubMed

    Wood, Charles E; Boue, Stephen M; Collins-Burow, Bridgette M; Rhodes, Lyndsay V; Register, Thomas C; Cline, J Mark; Dewi, Fitriya N; Burow, Matthew E

    2012-01-11

    Glyceollins are stress-induced compounds in soybeans with bioactive properties distinct from parent soy isoflavones. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of dietary glyceollin-enriched and standard soy protein isolates and identify candidate target pathways of glyceollins on transcriptional profiles within mammary gland tissue. Thirty female postmenopausal cynomolgus monkeys were randomized to diets containing one of three protein sources for 3 weeks: (1) control casein/lactalbumin (C/L), (2) standard soy protein containing 194 mg/day isoflavones (SOY), and (3) glyceollin-enriched soy protein containing 189 mg/day isoflavones + 134 mg/day glyceollins (GLY). All diets contained a physiologic dose of estradiol (E2) (1 mg/day). All doses are expressed in human equivalents scaled by caloric intake. Relative to the control C/L diet, the GLY diet resulted in greater numbers of differentially regulated genes, which showed minimal overlap with those of SOY. Effects of GLY related primarily to pathways involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, adipocytokine expression, triglyceride synthesis, and lipase activity. Notable genes upregulated by the GLY diet included PPAR-γ, adiponectin, leptin, lipin 1, and lipoprotein lipase. The GLY diet also resulted in lower serum total cholesterol, specifically nonhigh-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and increased serum triglycerides as compared to the C/L diet. No effects of GLY or SOY were seen on serum insulin, adipocytokines, or vascular and bone turnover markers. These preliminary findings suggest that glyceollin-enriched soy protein has divergent effects from standard soy with some specificity for adipocyte activity and nutrient metabolism.

  7. The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an epithelial–mesenchymal transition in MDCK cells independent of β-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Wakako; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an EMT in MDCK cells. •A mutant LEF-1 that cannot interact with β-catenin retained the ability. •The nuclear function of β-catenin was not necessary for the LEF-1-induced EMT. •The mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 increased significantly in these cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cell–cell junctions and cell polarity, as well as the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. LEF-1 is a member of the lymphoid enhancer-binding factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) family of DNA-binding transcription factors, which interact with nuclear β-catenin and act as central transcriptional mediators of Wnt signaling. To investigate the role of LEF-1 in EMT, we generated stable LEF-1 transfectants using MDCK cells. The transfectants had a spindle-shaped mesenchymal morphology, and enhanced migration and invasiveness relative to control cells. These EMT changes were accompanied by the downregulation of an epithelial marker protein, E-cadherin, and the upregulation of mesenchymal marker proteins, vimentin and N-cadherin. Consistent with these observations, the mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2—EMT-related transcription factors—increased significantly. Although the N-terminally deleted mutant LEF-1 cannot interact with β-catenin, it retained the ability to induce EMT. Consistent with these observations, neither the expression of a dominant negative β-catenin/engrailed chimera, nor the expression of a cytoplasmic domain of E-cadherin that sequesters β-catenin from binding to LEF/TCF, reversed LEF-1-induced EMT. Together, these data indicated that the nuclear function of β-catenin was not necessary for the induction of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 expression leading to EMT.

  8. Density-dependent interference of aphids with caterpillar-induced defenses in Arabidopsis: involvement of phytohormones and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Anneke; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    In nature, plants are exposed to attacks by multiple herbivore species at the same time. To cope with these attacks, plants regulate defenses with the production of hormones such as salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). Because herbivore densities are dynamic in time, this may affect plant-mediated interactions between different herbivores attacking at the same time. In Arabidopsis thaliana, feeding by Brevicoryne brassicae aphids interferes with induced defenses against Plutella xylostella caterpillars. This is density dependent: at a low aphid density, the growth rate of P. xylostella was increased, whereas caterpillars feeding on plants colonized by aphids at a high density have a reduced growth rate. Growth of P. xylostella larvae was unaffected on sid2-1 or on dde2-2 mutant plants when feeding simultaneously with a low or high aphid density. This shows that aphid interference with caterpillar-induced defenses requires both SA and JA signal transduction pathways. Transcriptional analysis revealed that simultaneous feeding by caterpillars and aphids at a low density induced the expression of the SA transcription factor gene WRKY70 whereas expression of WRKY70 was lower in plants induced with both caterpillars and a high aphid density. Interestingly, the expression of the JA transcription factor gene MYC2 was significantly higher in plants simultaneously attacked by aphids at a high density and caterpillars. These results indicate that a lower expression level of WRKY70 leads to significantly higher MYC2 expression through SA-JA cross-talk. Thus, plant-mediated interactions between aphids and caterpillars are density dependent and involve phytohormonal cross-talk and differential activation of transcription factors.

  9. A subtle mimicker in emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Angelis, Maria Vittoria De; Giacomo, Roberta Di; Muzio, Antonio Di; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Movement disorder emergencies include any movement disorder which develops over hours to days, in which failure to appropriately diagnose and manage can result in patient morbidity or mortality. Movement disorder emergencies include acute dystonia: sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements. Acute dystonia is a serious challenge for emergency room doctors and neurologists, because of the high probability of misdiagnosis, due to the presence of several mimickers including partial seizures, meningitis, localized tetanus, serum electrolyte level abnormalities, strychnine poisoning, angioedema, malingering, catatonia, and conversion. Methods: We describe 2 examples, accompanied by videos, of acute drug-induced oro-mandibular dystonia, both subsequent to occasional haloperidol intake. Results: Management and treatment of this movement disorder are often difficult: neuroleptics withdrawal, treatment with benzodiazepines, and anticholinergics are recommended. Conclusion: Alternative treatment options are also discussed. PMID:27741141

  10. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath; Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar; Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  11. A viral satellite DNA vector-induced transcriptional gene silencing via DNA methylation of gene promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zheng; Wang, Lei; Cao, Dongyan; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been widely used for plant functional genomics study at the post-transcriptional level using various DNA or RNA viral vectors. However, while virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) via DNA methylation of gene promoter was achieved using several plant RNA viral vectors, it has not yet been done using a satellite DNA viral vector. In this study, a viral satellite DNA associated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which has been modified as a VIGS vector in previous research, was developed as a VITGS vector. Firstly, the viral satellite DNA VIGS vector was further optimized to a more convenient p1.7A+2mβ vector with high silencing efficiency of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Secondly, the constructed VITGS vector (TYLCCNV:35S), which carried a portion of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, could successfully induce heritable transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in the 35S-GFP transgenic N. benthamiana line 16c plants. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing results revealed higher methylated cytosine residues at CG, CHG and CHH sites of the 35S promoter sequence in TYLCCNV:35S-inoculated plants than in TYLCCNV-inoculated line 16c plants (control). Overall, these results demonstrated that the viral satellite DNA vector could be used as an effective VITGS vector to study DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:27422476

  12. TGF-β induces p53/Smads complex formation in the PAI-1 promoter to activate transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kawarada, Yuki; Inoue, Yasumichi; Kawasaki, Fumihiro; Fukuura, Keishi; Sato, Koichi; Tanaka, Takahito; Itoh, Yuka; Hayashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling facilitates tumor development during the advanced stages of tumorigenesis, but induces cell-cycle arrest for tumor suppression during the early stages. However, the mechanism of functional switching of TGF-β is still unknown, and it is unclear whether inhibition of TGF-β signaling results amelioration or exacerbation of cancers. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 cooperates with Smad proteins, which are TGF-β signal transducers, to selectively activate plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) transcription. p53 forms a complex with Smad2/3 in the PAI-1 promoter to recruit histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CBP) and enhance histone H3 acetylation, resulting in transcriptional activation of the PAI-1 gene. Importantly, p53 is required for TGF-β-induced cytostasis and PAI-1 is involved in the cytostatic activity of TGF-β in several cell lines. Our results suggest that p53 enhances TGF-β-induced cytostatic effects by activating PAI-1 transcription, and the functional switching of TGF-β is partially caused by p53 mutation or p53 inactivation during cancer progression. It is expected that these findings will contribute to optimization of TGF-β-targeting therapies for cancer. PMID:27759037

  13. Ozone and nitric oxide induce cGMP-dependent and -independent transcription of defence genes in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Stefania; Meier, Stuart; Gehring, Chris; Madeo, Laura; Fornaciari, Marco; Romano, Bruno; Ederli, Luisa

    2009-03-01

    Here, we analyse the temporal signatures of ozone (O3)-induced hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) and the role of the second messenger guanosine3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in transcriptional changes of genes diagnostic for biotic and abiotic stress responses. Within 90 min O3 induced H2O2 and NO peaks and we demonstrate that NO donors cause rapid H2O2 accumulation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf. Ozone also causes highly significant, late (> 2 h) and sustained cGMP increases, suggesting that the second messenger may not be required in all early (< 2 h) responses to O3,but is essential and sufficient for the induction of some O3-dependent pathways.This hypothesis was tested resolving the time course of O3-induced transcript accumulation of alternative oxidase (AOX1a), glutathione peroxidase (GPX),aminocyclopropancarboxylic acid synthase (ACS2) that is critical for the synthesis of ethylene, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PALa) and the pathogenesis-related protein PR1a.The data show that early O3 and NO caused transcriptional activation of the scavenger encoding proteins AOX1a, GPX and the induction of ethylene production through ACS2 are cGMP independent. By contrast, the early response of PALa and the late response of PR1a show critical dependence on cGMP.

  14. Inheritance and memory of stress-induced epigenome change: roles played by the ATF-2 family of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Ki-Hyeon; Maekawa, Toshio; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    Data on the inheritance-of-stress effect have been accumulating and some mechanistic insights, such as epigenetic regulation, have also been suggested. In particular, the modern view of Lamarckian inheritance appears to be affected by the finding that stress-induced epigenetic changes can be inherited. This review summarizes the current data on the inheritance of stress effect and possible mechanisms involved in this process. In particular, we focus on the stress-induced epigenetic changes mediated by the ATF-2 family of transcription factors. PMID:22380515

  15. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  16. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  17. Tuning the Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia by Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF) Prolyl and Asparaginyl Hydroxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Mun Chiang; Ilott, Nicholas E.; Schödel, Johannes; Sims, David; Tumber, Anthony; Lippl, Kerstin; Mole, David R.; Pugh, Christopher W.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) system orchestrates cellular responses to hypoxia in animals. HIF is an α/β-heterodimeric transcription factor that regulates the expression of hundreds of genes in a tissue context-dependent manner. The major hypoxia-sensing component of the HIF system involves oxygen-dependent catalysis by the HIF hydroxylases; in humans there are three HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1–3) and an asparaginyl hydroxylase (factor-inhibiting HIF (FIH)). PHD catalysis regulates HIFα levels, and FIH catalysis regulates HIF activity. How differences in HIFα hydroxylation status relate to variations in the induction of specific HIF target gene transcription is unknown. We report studies using small molecule HIF hydroxylase inhibitors that investigate the extent to which HIF target gene expression is induced by PHD or FIH inhibition. The results reveal substantial differences in the role of prolyl and asparaginyl hydroxylation in regulating hypoxia-responsive genes in cells. PHD inhibitors with different structural scaffolds behave similarly. Under the tested conditions, a broad-spectrum 2-oxoglutarate dioxygenase inhibitor is a better mimic of the overall transcriptional response to hypoxia than the selective PHD inhibitors, consistent with an important role for FIH in the hypoxic transcriptional response. Indeed, combined application of selective PHD and FIH inhibitors resulted in the transcriptional induction of a subset of genes not fully responsive to PHD inhibition alone. Thus, for the therapeutic regulation of HIF target genes, it is important to consider both PHD and FIH activity, and in the case of some sets of target genes, simultaneous inhibition of the PHDs and FIH catalysis may be preferable. PMID:27502280

  18. A wheat salinity-induced WRKY transcription factor TaWRKY93 confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuxiang; Tian, Yanchen; Liu, Xiuzhi

    2015-08-21

    Wheat is an important crop in the world. But most of the cultivars are salt sensitive, and often adversely affected by salt stress. WRKY transcription factors play a major role in plant responses to salt stress, but the effective salinity regulatory WRKYs identified in bread wheat are limited and the mechanism of salt stress tolerance is also not well explored. Here, we identified a salt (NaCl) induced class II WRKY transcription factor TaWRKY93. Its transcript level was strongly induced by salt (NaCl) and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expression of TaWRKY93 in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced salt (NaCl), drought, low temperature and osmotic (mannitol) stress tolerance, mainly demonstrated by transgenic plants forming longer primary roots or more lateral roots on MS plates supplemented with NaCl and mannitol individually, higher survival rate under drought and low temperature stress. Further, transgenic plants maintained a more proline content, higher relative water content and less electrolyte leakage than the wild type plants. The transcript abundance of a series of abiotic stress-related genes was up-regulated in the TaWRKY93 transgenic plants. In summary, TaWRKY93 is a new positive regulator of abiotic stress, it may increase salinity, drought and low temperature stress tolerance through enhancing osmotic adjustment, maintaining membrane stability and increasing transcription of stress related genes, and contribute to the superior agricultural traits of SR3 through promoting root development. It can be used as a candidate gene for wheat transgenic engineering breeding against abiotic stress.

  19. Hypoxia-Inducible Angiopoietin-2 Expression Is Mimicked by Iodonium Compounds and Occurs in the Rat Brain and Skin in Response to Systemic Hypoxia and Tissue Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mandriota, Stefano J.; Pyke, Charles; Di Sanza, Corinne; Quinodoz, Pierre; Pittet, Brigitte; Pepper, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Angiopoietins are ligands for the endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor Tie-2. Ang-1, the major physiological activator of Tie-2, promotes blood vessel maturation and stability. Ang-2 counteracts this effect by competitively inhibiting the binding of Ang-1 to Tie-2. Using a combined RNase protection/semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction approach, we demonstrate that hypoxia up-regulates Ang-2 mRNA levels by up to 3.3-fold in two human endothelial cell lines. In bovine microvascular endothelial (BME) cells, the flavoprotein oxidoreductase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and the related compound iodonium diphenyl mimic induction of Ang-2 but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by hypoxia; in combination with hypoxia, DPI further increases Ang-2 expression but has no effect on the induction of VEGF by hypoxia. Neither Ang-2 or VEGF was increased by cyanide or rotenone, suggesting that failure in mitochondrial electron transport is not involved in the oxygen-sensing system that controls their expression. In ischemic rat dorsal skin flaps or in the brain of rats maintained for 12 hours under conditions of hypoxia, Ang-2 mRNA was up-regulated 7.5- or 17.6- fold, respectively. VEGF was concomitantly increased, whereas expression of Ang-1, Tie-2, and the related receptor Tie-1 was unaltered. In situ hybridization localized Ang-2 mRNA to endothelial cells in hypoxic skin. These findings 1) show that up-regulation of Ang-2 by hypoxia occurs widely in endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo; 2) suggest that induction of Ang-2, but not VEGF, by hypoxia in BME cells is controlled by a flavoprotein oxidoreductase that is sensitive to iodonium compounds; and 3) point to Ang-2 and VEGF as independently regulated and selective effectors of hypoxia-induced vascular sprouting. PMID:10854229

  20. UVB-Induced Cell Death Signaling Is Associated with G1-S Progression and Transcription Inhibition in Primary Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ortolan, Tatiana Grohmann; Menck, Carlos Frederico M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation can be removed by nucleotide excision repair through two sub-pathways, one general (GGR) and the other specific for transcribed DNA (TCR), and the processing of unrepaired lesions trigger signals that may lead to cell death. These signals involve the tumor suppressor p53 protein, a central regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, that forms a feedback regulatory loop with p53. The involvement of cell cycle and transcription on the signaling to apoptosis was investigated in UVB-irradiated synchronized, DNA repair proficient, CS-B (TCR-deficient) and XP-C (GGR-deficient) primary human fibroblasts. Cells were irradiated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with two doses with equivalent levels of apoptosis (low and high), defined for each cell line. In the three cell lines, the low doses of UVB caused only a transient delay in progression to the S phase, whereas the high doses induced permanent cell cycle arrest. However, while accumulation of Mdm2 correlated well with the recovery from transcription inhibition at the low doses for normal and CS-B fibroblasts, for XP-C cells this protein was shown to be accumulated even at UVB doses that induced high levels of apoptosis. Thus, UVB-induced accumulation of Mdm2 is critical for counteracting p53 activation and apoptosis avoidance, but its effect is limited due to transcription inhibition. However, in the case of XP-C cells, an excess of unrepaired DNA damage would be sufficient to block S phase progression, which would signal to apoptosis, independent of Mdm2 accumulation. The data clearly discriminate DNA damage signals that lead to cell death, depending on the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage in replicating or transcribing regions. PMID:24155908

  1. UVB-induced cell death signaling is associated with G1-S progression and transcription inhibition in primary human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ortolan, Tatiana Grohmann; Menck, Carlos Frederico M

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation can be removed by nucleotide excision repair through two sub-pathways, one general (GGR) and the other specific for transcribed DNA (TCR), and the processing of unrepaired lesions trigger signals that may lead to cell death. These signals involve the tumor suppressor p53 protein, a central regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, that forms a feedback regulatory loop with p53. The involvement of cell cycle and transcription on the signaling to apoptosis was investigated in UVB-irradiated synchronized, DNA repair proficient, CS-B (TCR-deficient) and XP-C (GGR-deficient) primary human fibroblasts. Cells were irradiated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with two doses with equivalent levels of apoptosis (low and high), defined for each cell line. In the three cell lines, the low doses of UVB caused only a transient delay in progression to the S phase, whereas the high doses induced permanent cell cycle arrest. However, while accumulation of Mdm2 correlated well with the recovery from transcription inhibition at the low doses for normal and CS-B fibroblasts, for XP-C cells this protein was shown to be accumulated even at UVB doses that induced high levels of apoptosis. Thus, UVB-induced accumulation of Mdm2 is critical for counteracting p53 activation and apoptosis avoidance, but its effect is limited due to transcription inhibition. However, in the case of XP-C cells, an excess of unrepaired DNA damage would be sufficient to block S phase progression, which would signal to apoptosis, independent of Mdm2 accumulation. The data clearly discriminate DNA damage signals that lead to cell death, depending on the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage in replicating or transcribing regions. PMID:24155908

  2. Activation of the Kss1 invasive-filamentous growth pathway induces Ty1 transcription and retrotransposition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Morillon, A; Springer, M; Lesage, P

    2000-08-01

    Using a set of genomic TY1A-lacZ fusions, we show that Ste12 and Tec1, two transcription factors of the Kss1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade activate Ty1 transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This result strongly suggests that the invasive-filamentous pathway regulates Ty1 transcription. Since this pathway is active in diploid cells, we suspected that Ty1 transposition might occur in this cell type, despite the fact that this event has been never reported before (unless activated by heterologous promoters such as that of GAL1). We demonstrate here that constitutive activation of the invasive-filamentous pathway by the STE11-4 allele or by growth in low-nitrogen medium induces Ty1 transcription and retrotransposition in diploid cells. We show that Ty1 retrotransposition can be activated by STE11-4 in haploid cells as well. Our findings provide the first evidence that Ty1 retrotransposition can be activated by environmental signals that affect differentiation. Activation of the Kss1 MAPK cascade by stress is known to cause filament formation that permits the search for nutrients away from the colonization site. We propose that activation of Ty1 retrotransposition by this cascade could play a role in adaptive mutagenesis in response to stress. PMID:10891512

  3. Gene transcription and steviol glycoside accumulation in Stevia rebaudiana under polyethylene glycol-induced drought stress in greenhouse cultivation.

    PubMed

    Hajihashemi, Shokoofeh; Geuns, Jan M C

    2016-09-01

    Stevia rebaudiana is a sweet herb of the Astraceae family, which is cultivated for the natural sweeteners it contains. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of drought, simulated by the application of polyethylene glycol (5%, 10%, and 15% w/v), on the content of steviol glycosides (SVglys) and transcription levels of six genes involved in the biosynthesis of these natural sweeteners. The transcription levels of ent-kaurene synthase, ent-kaurene oxidase, ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, and three UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases, UGT85C2,UGT74G1 and UGT76G1 were downregulated under polyethylene glycol treatment. Polyethylene glycol treatment significantly decreased the amount of stevioside, rebaudioside A, B, C and F, steviolbioside, dulcoside A, rubusoside, and total SVglys. These results strongly suggest a close relationship of SVglys content with the transcription of genes involved in the SVglys biosynthesis pathway. Comparing the observations of the present study with other reports provided the knowledge that the Stevia response to drought stress can be influenced by different environmental and experimental factors, in addition to intensity of drought stress. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that polyethylene glycol-induced drought stress has a negative effect on the content of SVglys and transcription of SVglys biosynthetic genes and that this should be investigated further. We recommend that sufficient irrigation of Stevia is required to obtain a high content of SVglys. PMID:27642557

  4. MRTF-A mediates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory transcription by interacting with the COMPASS complex.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liming; Weng, Xinyu; Liang, Peng; Dai, Xin; Wu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Huihui; Fang, Mingming; Fang, Fei; Xu, Yong

    2014-11-01

    Chronic inflammation underscores the pathogenesis of a range of human diseases. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) elicits strong pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages through the transcription factor NF-κB. The epigenetic mechanism underlying LPS-induced pro-inflammatory transcription is not fully understood. Herein, we describe a role for myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A, also known as MKL1) in this process. MRTF-A overexpression enhanced NF-κB-dependent pro-inflammatory transcription, whereas MRTF-A silencing inhibited this process. MRTF-A deficiency also reduced the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators in a mouse model of colitis. LPS promoted the recruitment of MRTF-A to the promoters of pro-inflammatory genes in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Reciprocally, MRTF-A influenced the nuclear enrichment and target binding of NF-κB. Mechanistically, MRTF-A was necessary for the accumulation of active histone modifications on NF-κB target promoters by communicating with the histone H3K4 methyltransferase complex (COMPASS). Silencing of individual members of COMPASS, including ASH2, WDR5 and SET1 (also known as SETD1A), downregulated the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and impaired the NF-κB kinetics. In summary, our work has uncovered a previously unknown function for MRTF-A and provided insights into the rationalized development of anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies. PMID:25189621

  5. Live cell imaging of interleukin-6-induced targeting of "transcription factor" STAT3 to sequestering endosomes in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2007-10-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family transcription factors are classically viewed as transducing cytokine- and growth factor-activated signals from the plasma membrane to the cell nucleus for the purpose of activating transcription. We report live cell imaging studies of fluorescently labeled STAT3 expressed in Hep3B hepatocytes that reveal interleukin (IL)-6-activated targeting of STAT3 and PY-STAT3 to relatively long-lived sequestering endosomes in the cytoplasm. This targeting was rapid but transient, required phosphorylation and integrity of Tyr 705 in STAT3, and was blocked by nocodazole, geldanamycin, and indirubin E804 and by overexpression of wild-type caveolin-1. Strikingly, overexpression of the dominant-negative (DN) mutant K44A of the GTPase dynamin II led to marked constitutive accumulation of STAT3 in the endocytic compartment with depletion of the STAT3 nuclear pool. Subsets of the native and K44A-generated STAT3- and PY-STAT3-sequestering endosomes colocalized with MyD88, an adapter protein that integrates pathways of Toll-like receptor and IL-1 transcriptional signaling and stabilization of mRNAs. These data provide direct evidence for the cytokine-induced "signal transduction" by STAT3 from the plasma membrane to a cytoplasmic membrane destination for yet to be elucidated function(s) in the cytoplasm including prolongation of signaling and/or cross talk.

  6. Gene transcription and steviol glycoside accumulation in Stevia rebaudiana under polyethylene glycol-induced drought stress in greenhouse cultivation.

    PubMed

    Hajihashemi, Shokoofeh; Geuns, Jan M C

    2016-09-01

    Stevia rebaudiana is a sweet herb of the Astraceae family, which is cultivated for the natural sweeteners it contains. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of drought, simulated by the application of polyethylene glycol (5%, 10%, and 15% w/v), on the content of steviol glycosides (SVglys) and transcription levels of six genes involved in the biosynthesis of these natural sweeteners. The transcription levels of ent-kaurene synthase, ent-kaurene oxidase, ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, and three UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases, UGT85C2,UGT74G1 and UGT76G1 were downregulated under polyethylene glycol treatment. Polyethylene glycol treatment significantly decreased the amount of stevioside, rebaudioside A, B, C and F, steviolbioside, dulcoside A, rubusoside, and total SVglys. These results strongly suggest a close relationship of SVglys content with the transcription of genes involved in the SVglys biosynthesis pathway. Comparing the observations of the present study with other reports provided the knowledge that the Stevia response to drought stress can be influenced by different environmental and experimental factors, in addition to intensity of drought stress. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that polyethylene glycol-induced drought stress has a negative effect on the content of SVglys and transcription of SVglys biosynthetic genes and that this should be investigated further. We recommend that sufficient irrigation of Stevia is required to obtain a high content of SVglys.

  7. A TRIP230-Retinoblastoma Protein Complex Regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α-Mediated Transcription and Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Labrecque, Mark P.; Takhar, Mandeep K.; Jagdeo, Julienne M.; Tam, Kevin J.; Chiu, Christina; Wang, Te-Yu; Prefontaine, Gratien G.; Cox, Michael E.; Beischlag, Timothy V.

    2014-01-01

    Localized hypoxia in solid tumors activates transcriptional programs that promote the metastatic transformation of cells. Like hypoxia-inducible hyper-vascularization, loss of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is a trait common to advanced stages of tumor progression in many metastatic cancers. However, no link between the role of Rb and hypoxia-driven metastatic processes has been established. We demonstrated that Rb is a key mediator of the hypoxic response mediated by HIF1α/β, the master regulator of the hypoxia response, and its essential co-activator, the thyroid hormone receptor/retinoblastoma-interacting protein (TRIP230). Furthermore, loss of Rb unmasks the full co-activation potential of TRIP230. Using small inhibitory RNA approaches in vivo, we established that Rb attenuates the normal physiological response to hypoxia by HIF1α. Notably, loss of Rb results in hypoxia-dependent biochemical changes that promote acquisition of an invasive phenotype in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In addition, Rb is present in HIF1α-ARNT/HIF1β transcriptional complexes associated with TRIP230 as determined by co-immuno-precipitation, GST-pull-down and ChIP assays. These results demonstrate that Rb is a negative modulator of hypoxia-regulated transcription by virtue of its direct effects on the HIF1 complex. This work represents the first link between the functional ablation of Rb in tumor cells and HIF1α-dependent transcriptional activation and invasion. PMID:24919196

  8. DELLA-induced early transcriptional changes during etiolated development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Bartolomé, Javier; Alabadí, David; Blázquez, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    The hormones gibberellins (GAs) control a wide variety of processes in plants, including stress and developmental responses. This task largely relies on the activity of the DELLA proteins, nuclear-localized transcriptional regulators that do not seem to have DNA binding capacity. The identification of early target genes of DELLA action is key not only to understand how GAs regulate physiological responses, but also to get clues about the molecular mechanisms by which DELLAs regulate gene expression. Here, we have investigated the global, early transcriptional response triggered by the Arabidopsis DELLA protein GAI during skotomorphogenesis, a developmental program tightly regulated by GAs. Our results show that the induction of GAI activity has an almost immediate effect on gene expression. Although this transcriptional regulation is largely mediated by the PIFs and HY5 transcription factors based on target meta-analysis, additional evidence points to other transcription factors that would be directly involved in DELLA regulation of gene expression. First, we have identified cis elements recognized by Dofs and type-B ARRs among the sequences enriched in the promoters of GAI targets; and second, an enrichment in additional cis elements appeared when this analysis was extended to a dataset of early targets of the DELLA protein RGA: CArG boxes, bound by MADS-box proteins, and the E-box CACATG that links the activity of DELLAs to circadian transcriptional regulation. Finally, Gene Ontology analysis highlights the impact of DELLA regulation upon the homeostasis of the GA, auxin, and ethylene pathways, as well as upon pre-existing transcriptional networks.

  9. Nitrate-induced early transcriptional changes during imbibition in non-after-ripened Sisymbrium officinale seeds.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Barral, Nestor; Matilla, Angel J; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Del Carmen Rodríguez-Gacio, María

    2013-08-01

    We have here demonstrated for the first time that nitrate not only accelerates testa rupture of non- AR seeds but also modifies expression pattern of the cell-wall remodeling proteins (mannanases; SoMAN6 and SoMAN7) and key genes belonging to metabolism and signaling of ABA (SoNCED6, SoNCED9, SoCYP707A2 and SoABI5) and GAs (SoGA3ox, SoGA20ox, SoGA2ox and SoRGL2). These results were obtained during Sisymbrium officinale seed imbibition in the absence of endosperm rupture. Exogenous ABA induced a notable inhibition of testa rupture in both absence and presence of nitrate being this effect sharply reversed by GA(4+7). However, nitrate was capable to provoke testa rupture in absence of ABA synthesis. The expression of SoMAN6 and SoMAN7 were positively altered by nitrate. Although ABA synthesis seems apparent at the start of non-AR seed imbibition, taken together the results of SoNCED6, SoNCED9 and SoCYP707A2 expression seem to suggest that nitrate leads to a strong net ABA decrease. Likewise, nitrate positively affected the SoABI5 expression when the SoNCED9 expression was also stimulated. By contrast, at the early and final of imbibition, nitrate clearly inhibited the SoABI5 expression. The expression of SoGA2ox6 and SoGA3ox2 are strongly inhibited by nitrate whereas of SoGA20ox6 was stimulated. On the other hand, SoRGL2 transcript level decreased in the presence of nitrate. Taken together, the results presented here suggest that the nitrate signaling is already operative during the non-AR S. officinale seeds imbibition. The nitrate, in cross-talk with the AR network likely increases the favorable molecular conditions that trigger germination. PMID:23106241

  10. Aryl organophosphate flame retardants induced cardiotoxicity during zebrafish embryogenesis: by disturbing expression of the transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhongkun; Wang, Guowei; Gao, Shixiang; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-04-01

    As a result of the ban on some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), the use of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) increases, and they are detected in multi-environment media at higher frequency and concentrations. However, the toxicity data of OPFRs, especially those on developmental toxicology are quite limited, which prevents an accurate evaluation of their environmental and health risk. Because a previous study reported that two aryl-OPFRs induced cardiotoxicity during zebrafish embryogenesis, we designed experiments to compare the heart developmental toxicity of a series of aryl-OPFRs with alkyl-OPFRs and explored possible internal mechanism. First, acute toxicity of 9 frequently used OPFRs were studied with zebrafish embryos (2-96 hpf). By comparing the LC50 and EC50 (pericardium edema) data, two aryl-OPFRs, triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) and cresyl diphenyl phosphate (CDP) showed greater heart developmental toxicity than the others. It was also found that the acute toxicity of OPFRs varied mainly depending on their hydrophobicity. Further study on the cardiotoxicity of TPhP and CDP showed that the cardiac looping progress can be impeded by 0.10mg/L TPhP or CDP exposure. Bradycardia and reduction of myocardium were also observed in 0.50 and 1.0mg/L TPhP groups and 0.10, 0.50, and 1.0mg/L CDP groups. 0-48 hpf is the vulnerable window of zebrafish cardiogenesis that can be easily affected by TPhP and CDP. RT-qPCR measurement on the expressions of key transcriptional regulators in cardiogenesis showed that BMP4, NKX2-5, and TBX5 were significantly inhibited at the exposure points of 12 hpf and 24 hpf which may be the internal factors related to the heart developmental toxicity. As zebrafish is a good model organism for human health study, the present results call for a greater attention to the health risk of fetus in pregnant women exposed to such OPFRs. PMID:25661707

  11. Berloque dermatitis mimicking child abuse.

    PubMed

    Gruson, Lisa Moed; Chang, Mary Wu

    2002-11-01

    Berloque dermatitis is a type of photocontact dermatitis. It occurs after perfumed products containing bergamot (or a psoralen) are applied to the skin followed by exposure to sunlight. Striking linear patterns of hyperpigmentation are characteristic, corresponding to local application of the scented product. In the acute phase, erythema and even blistering can be seen. We report a case of berloque dermatitis in a 9-year-old girl that was initially reported as child abuse. To our knowledge, this is the first report of berloque dermatitis mimicking child abuse. Questioning to elicit a history of perfume application coupled with sunlight exposure should help to prevent this misdiagnosis in children.

  12. Enhanced transcription of pancreatic peptide YY by 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 administration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Jun; Choi, Mihwa; Endo-Umeda, Kaori; Sakurai, Kenichi; Amano, Sadao; Makishima, Makoto

    2013-10-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a peptide hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine in response to food intake that regulates appetite and gastrointestinal function. PYY is also produced in the pancreatic islets. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a nuclear receptor for the active form of vitamin D3 that regulates numerous physiological processes. VDR is expressed in the pancreatic islets and pharmacological VDR activation increases PYY expression in mouse peripheral islet cells. Although VDR is present in insulin-producing β cells as well as non-β cells, the role of β cell VDR in Pyy transcription remains unknown. We treated mice with streptozotocin to ablate β cells in the pancreas. Pancreatic Vdr mRNA expression was decreased in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Interestingly, streptozotocin-treated mice exhibited increased basal Pyy expression and 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 treatment further increased expression. Moreover, 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 increased mRNA expression of pancreatic polypeptide and decreased that of neuropeptide Y in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice but not in control mice. 1α-Hydroxyvitamin D3 slightly increased mRNA expression of insulin but transcript levels were nearly undetectable in the pancreas of streptozotocin-treated mice. Thus, VDR in non-β islet cells is involved in Pyy expression in the mouse pancreas. The findings from this β cell ablation study suggest a hormone transcription regulatory network composed of β cells and non-β cells.

  13. Transcriptional initiation under conditions of anoxia-induced quiescence in mitochondria from Artemia franciscana embryos.

    PubMed

    Eads, Brian D; Hand, Steven C

    2003-02-01

    In response to anoxia, embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana are able coordinately to downregulate metabolism to levels low enough to permit survival for several years at room temperature. In addition to dramatic decreases in free ATP levels and heat production, intracellular pH drops from 7.8 to 6.3 overnight. Use of isolated mitochondria to study transcriptional responses to anoxia offers several advantages: (1). the localized nature of transcript initiation, processing and degradation, all of which may be followed in organello; (2). the relatively simple cis- and trans-machinery involved and (3). the ability to provide relevant physiological treatments in vitro. In response to anoxic incubation of embryos in vivo for 4 h followed by anoxic mitochondrial isolation and anoxic transcription assay at pH 6.4, a significant decrease in overall UTP incorporation (77%) was seen after 30 min relative to normoxic, pH 7.9 controls. A less severe inhibition of transcription under anoxia (52%) was observed compared with controls when pH was raised to 7.9. Similarly, under normoxia, the incubation at low pH (6.4) reduced transcription by 59%. Ribonuclease protection assays showed that the contribution of in vitro initiation during the assay fell from 78% at pH 7.9 to approximately 32% at pH 6.4 under either normoxic or anoxic conditions. DNA footprinting of putative transcriptional promoters revealed proteins at regular intervals upstream of the 12S rRNA in the control region, which previously had been indirectly inferred to contain promoters for H-strand transcription. The area between 1230 and 12065 contains a sequence in the tRNA(leu) gene believed to bind the transcription termination factor mTERF or TERM, and we provide the first evidence that this sequence is protein-bound in A. franciscana. However, our hypothesis that initiation is reduced at low pH because of a change in DNA binding by mitochondrial transcription factors was not confirmed. We propose that

  14. Transcriptional regulation is insufficient to explain substrate-induced flux changes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chubukov, Victor; Uhr, Markus; Le Chat, Ludovic; Kleijn, Roelco J; Jules, Matthieu; Link, Hannes; Aymerich, Stephane; Stelling, Jörg; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    One of the key ways in which microbes are thought to regulate their metabolism is by modulating the availability of enzymes through transcriptional regulation. However, the limited success of efforts to manipulate metabolic fluxes by rewiring the transcriptional network has cast doubt on the idea that transcript abundance controls metabolic fluxes. In this study, we investigate control of metabolic flux in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis by quantifying fluxes, transcripts, and metabolites in eight metabolic states enforced by different environmental conditions. We find that most enzymes whose flux switches between on and off states, such as those involved in substrate uptake, exhibit large corresponding transcriptional changes. However, for the majority of enzymes in central metabolism, enzyme concentrations were insufficient to explain the observed fluxes—only for a number of reactions in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were enzyme changes approximately proportional to flux changes. Surprisingly, substrate changes revealed by metabolomics were also insufficient to explain observed fluxes, leaving a large role for allosteric regulation and enzyme modification in the control of metabolic fluxes. PMID:24281055

  15. Myrosinase-binding proteins are derived from a large wound-inducible and repetitive transcript.

    PubMed

    Taipalensuu, J; Falk, A; Ek, B; Rask, L

    1997-02-01

    Several non-myrosinase proteins have been found in association with some of the myrosinases extracted from rape (Brassica napus) seed. Most of these proteins seemed to belong to a large family of proteins ranging in size over approximately 30-110 kDa, namely the myrosinase-binding protein (MBP) family. Potentially all of these MBPs might be derived from a single large precursor, encoded by a 3.3-kb transcript. This transcript coded for a 99-kDa glycine-rich protein with a highly repetitive structure. The mature 50-kDa and 52-kDa MBP amino-terminal was located 255 amino acids from the putative initiation methionine. Also, a more divergently related transcript, the protein product of which was unknown, has been cloned. However, the largest open reading frame suggested a proline-rich protein. While this transcript seemed to be expressed predominantly in seeds, the MBP transcripts were expressed in several tissues and also exhibited a responsiveness to wounding and methyl jasmonate. Both proteins exhibited significant similarities to lectins from Artocarpus integer and from Maclura pomifera.

  16. The Transcription Factor Ehf Is Involved in TGF-β-Induced Suppression of FcεRI and c-Kit Expression and FcεRI-Mediated Activation in Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Susumu; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Honjo, Asuka; Hara, Mutsuko; Maeda, Keiko; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Kitaura, Jiro; Ohtsuka, Yoshikazu; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2015-10-01

    FcεRI, which is composed of α, β, and γ subunits, plays an important role in IgE-mediated allergic responses. TGF-β1 has been reported to suppress FcεRI and stem cell factor receptor c-Kit expression on mast cell surfaces and to suppress mast cell activation induced by cross-linking of FcεRI. However, the molecular mechanism by which these expressions and activation are suppressed by TGF-β1 remains unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of Ets homologous factor (Ehf), a member of the Ets family transcriptional factors, is upregulated by TGF-β/Smad signaling in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Forced expression of Ehf in BMMCs repressed the transcription of genes encoding FcεRIα, FcεRIβ, and c-Kit, resulting in a reduction in cell surface FcεRI and c-Kit expression. Additionally, forced expression of Ehf suppressed FcεRI-mediated degranulation and cytokine production. Ehf inhibited the promoter activity of genes encoding FcεRIα, FcεRIβ, and c-Kit by binding to these gene promoters. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of Gata1, Gata2, and Stat5b were lower in BMMCs stably expressing Ehf compared with control cells. Because GATA-1 and GATA-2 are positive regulators of FcεRI and c-Kit expression, decreased expression of GATAs may be also involved in the reduction of FcεRI and c-Kit expression. Decreased expression of Stat5 may contribute to the suppression of cytokine production by BMMCs. In part, mast cell response to TGF-β1 was mimicked by forced expression of Ehf, suggesting that TGF-β1 suppresses FcεRI and c-Kit expression and suppresses FcεRI-mediated activation through upregulation of Ehf.

  17. Involvement of fish signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in nodavirus infection induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Yang, Ying; Wang, Wei; Yu, Yepin; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-03-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is an important signaling pathway activated by interferons in response to virus infection. Fish STAT3 has been demonstrated to be involved in Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection and virus induced paraptosis, but its effects on the replication of other fish viruses still remained uncertain. Here, the roles of grouper STAT3 (Ec-STAT3) in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infection were investigated. The present data showed that the distribution of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 was altered in RGNNV infected fish cells, and the promoter activity of STAT3 was significantly increased during virus infection, suggesting that STAT3 activation was involved in RGNNV infection. Using STAT3 specific inhibitor, we found that inhibition of Ec-STAT3 in vitro did not affect the transcription and protein synthesis of RGNNV coat protein (CP), however, the severity of RGNNV induced vacuolation and autophagy was significantly increased. Meanwhile, at the late stage of virus infection, RGNNV induced necrotic cell death was significantly decreased after inhibition of Ec-STAT3. Further studies indicated that Ec-STAT3 inhibition significantly increased the transcript level of autophagy related genes, including UNC-51-like kinase 2 (ULK2) and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) induced by RGNNV infection. Moreover, the expression of several pro-inflammatory factors, including TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 were mediated by Ec-STAT3 during RGNNV infection. Together, our results not only firstly revealed that STAT3 exerted novel roles in response to fish virus infection, but also provided new insights into understanding the roles of STAT3 in different forms of programmed cell death. PMID:25555814

  18. SA-inducible Arabidopsis glutaredoxin interacts with TGA factors and suppresses JA-responsive PDF1.2 transcription.

    PubMed

    Ndamukong, Ivan; Abdallat, Ayed Al; Thurow, Corinna; Fode, Benjamin; Zander, Mark; Weigel, Ralf; Gatz, Christiane

    2007-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant signaling molecule that mediates the induction of defense responses upon attack by a variety of pathogens. Moreover, it antagonizes gene induction by the stress signaling molecule jasmonic acid (JA). Several SA-responsive genes are regulated by basic/leucine zipper-type transcription factors of the TGA family. TGA factors interact with NPR1, a central regulator of many SA-induced defense responses including SA/JA antagonism. In order to identify further regulatory proteins of SA-dependent signaling pathways, a yeast protein interaction screen with tobacco TGA2.2 as bait and an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA prey library was performed and led to the identification of a member of the glutaredoxin family (GRX480, encoded by At1g28480). Glutaredoxins are candidates for mediating redox regulation of proteins because of their capacity to catalyze disulfide transitions. This agrees with previous findings that the redox state of both TGA1 and NPR1 changes under inducing conditions. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants ectopically expressing GRX480 show near wild-type expression of standard marker genes for SA- and xenobiotic-inducible responses. In contrast, transcription of the JA-dependent defensin gene PDF1.2 was antagonized by transgenic GRX480. This, together with the observation that GRX480 transcription is SA-inducible and requires NPR1, suggests a role of GRX480 in SA/JA cross-talk. Suppression of PDF1.2 by GRX480 depends on the presence of TGA factors, indicating that the GRX480/TGA interaction is effective in planta.

  19. Involvement of fish signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in nodavirus infection induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Yang, Ying; Wang, Wei; Yu, Yepin; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-03-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is an important signaling pathway activated by interferons in response to virus infection. Fish STAT3 has been demonstrated to be involved in Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection and virus induced paraptosis, but its effects on the replication of other fish viruses still remained uncertain. Here, the roles of grouper STAT3 (Ec-STAT3) in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infection were investigated. The present data showed that the distribution of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 was altered in RGNNV infected fish cells, and the promoter activity of STAT3 was significantly increased during virus infection, suggesting that STAT3 activation was involved in RGNNV infection. Using STAT3 specific inhibitor, we found that inhibition of Ec-STAT3 in vitro did not affect the transcription and protein synthesis of RGNNV coat protein (CP), however, the severity of RGNNV induced vacuolation and autophagy was significantly increased. Meanwhile, at the late stage of virus infection, RGNNV induced necrotic cell death was significantly decreased after inhibition of Ec-STAT3. Further studies indicated that Ec-STAT3 inhibition significantly increased the transcript level of autophagy related genes, including UNC-51-like kinase 2 (ULK2) and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) induced by RGNNV infection. Moreover, the expression of several pro-inflammatory factors, including TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 were mediated by Ec-STAT3 during RGNNV infection. Together, our results not only firstly revealed that STAT3 exerted novel roles in response to fish virus infection, but also provided new insights into understanding the roles of STAT3 in different forms of programmed cell death.

  20. Retinoic acid-induced AP-1 transcriptional activity regulates B16 mouse melanoma growth inhibition and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Boskovic, Goran; Niles, Richard M

    2003-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) inhibits growth and induces differentiation of B16 mouse melanoma cells. These effects are accompanied by a large increase in PKCalpha mRNA and protein levels and surprisingly an increase in activating protein-1 (AP-1) transcriptional activity. To further investigate the RA-induced AP-1 activity we established clones of B16 cells stably expressing an AP-1-luciferase reporter gene. Treatment of these clones with phorbol dibutyrate increased AP-1 activity which peaked at 2-4 h and returned to baseline level by 24 h. In contrast, RA treatment resulted in a slow increase in AP-1 activity that reached a maximum level at 48 h and was maintained for the duration of the treatment. We tested the importance of the RA-induced AP-1 activity by establishing clones which stably express a dominant negative fos gene (A-fos) and have greatly diminished AP-1 activity. Growth rates of untreated A-fos expressing cells were similar to wt B16 and clones not expressing A-fos. However, clones expressing the dominant-negative fos had a markedly decreased sensitivity to RA-induced inhibition of anchorage-dependent and -independent growth. Treatment of wt B16 cells for 48 h with RA increased melanin production by two to fourfold, but this effect was completely lost in the A-fos clones. The ability of RA to induce RARbeta and PKCalpha expression was retained in A-fos clones, suggesting that A-fos was not interfering with RAR transcription activation functions. We tested whether the RA-induced AP-1 activity might be mediated by the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation stimulated AP-1 activity, which was not additive to that induced by RA. This finding raises the possibility that this MAPK pathway may be a target of retinoid action. Our observations suggest that AP-1 transcriptional activity induced by RA likely plays an important role in the biological changes mediated by this retinoid in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:12494454

  1. Auxin and Ethylene Induce Flavonol Accumulation through Distinct Transcriptional Networks1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Ramirez, Melissa V.; Miller, Nathan D.; Vallabhaneni, Prashanthi; Ray, W. Keith; Helm, Richard F.; Winkel, Brenda S.J.; Muday, Gloria K.

    2011-01-01

    Auxin and ethylene are key regulators of plant growth and development, and thus the transcriptional networks that mediate responses to these hormones have been the subject of intense research. This study dissected the hormonal cross talk regulating the synthesis of flavonols and examined their impact on root growth and development. We analyzed the effects of auxin and an ethylene precursor on roots of wild-type and hormone-insensitive Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants at the transcript, protein, and metabolite levels at high spatial and temporal resolution. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) differentially increased flavonol pathway transcripts and flavonol accumulation, altering the relative abundance of quercetin and kaempferol. The IAA, but not ACC, response is lost in the transport inhibitor response1 (tir1) auxin receptor mutant, while ACC responses, but not IAA responses, are lost in ethylene insensitive2 (ein2) and ethylene resistant1 (etr1) ethylene signaling mutants. A kinetic analysis identified increases in transcripts encoding the transcriptional regulators MYB12, Transparent Testa Glabra1, and Production of Anthocyanin Pigment after hormone treatments, which preceded increases in transcripts encoding flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes. In addition, myb12 mutants were insensitive to the effects of auxin and ethylene on flavonol metabolism. The equivalent phenotypes for transparent testa4 (tt4), which makes no flavonols, and tt7, which makes kaempferol but not quercetin, showed that quercetin derivatives are the inhibitors of basipetal root auxin transport, gravitropism, and elongation growth. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate that auxin and ethylene regulate flavonol biosynthesis through distinct signaling networks involving TIR1 and EIN2/ETR1, respectively, both of which converge on MYB12. This study also provides new evidence that quercetin is the flavonol that modulates basipetal auxin transport

  2. MINCR is a MYC-induced lncRNA able to modulate MYC's transcriptional network in Burkitt lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Doose, Gero; Haake, Andrea; Bernhart, Stephan H; López, Cristina; Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Wojciech, Franziska; Bergmann, Anke K; Borkhardt, Arndt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Dimitrova, Lora; Haas, Siegfried; Hoell, Jessica I; Hummel, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleo, Karsten; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Möller, Peter; Ott, German; Richter, Julia; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schneider, Markus; Scholz, Ingrid; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A; Hoffmann, Steve; Siebert, Reiner; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2015-09-22

    Despite the established role of the transcription factor MYC in cancer, little is known about the impact of a new class of transcriptional regulators, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), on MYC ability to influence the cellular transcriptome. Here, we have intersected RNA-sequencing data from two MYC-inducible cell lines and a cohort of 91 B-cell lymphomas with or without genetic variants resulting in MYC overexpression. We identified 13 lncRNAs differentially expressed in IG-MYC-positive Burkitt lymphoma and regulated in the same direction by MYC in the model cell lines. Among them, we focused on a lncRNA that we named MYC-induced long noncoding RNA (MINCR), showing a strong correlation with MYC expression in MYC-positive lymphomas. To understand its cellular role, we performed RNAi and found that MINCR knockdown is associated with an impairment in cell cycle progression. Differential gene expression analysis after RNAi showed a significant enrichment of cell cycle genes among the genes down-regulated after MINCR knockdown. Interestingly, these genes are enriched in MYC binding sites in their promoters, suggesting that MINCR acts as a modulator of the MYC transcriptional program. Accordingly, MINCR knockdown was associated with a reduction in MYC binding to the promoters of selected cell cycle genes. Finally, we show that down-regulation of Aurora kinases A and B and chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 may explain the reduction in cellular proliferation observed on MINCR knockdown. We, therefore, suggest that MINCR is a newly identified player in the MYC transcriptional network able to control the expression of cell cycle genes.

  3. A MYB transcription factor from the grey mangrove is induced by stress and confers NaCl tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, G; Sankararamasubramanian, H M; Harikrishnan, M; Ganpudi, Ashwin; Ashwin, G; Parida, Ajay

    2012-07-01

    MYB transcription factor genes play important roles in developmental and various other processes in plants. In this study, functional characterization of AmMYB1, a single-repeat MYB transcription factor isolated from the salt-tolerant mangrove tree Avicennia marina is reported. AmMYB1 cDNA was 1046 bp in length with an open reading frame of 783 bp, encoding 260 amino acids. The corresponding gene had two introns and three exons and was present as a single copy in A. marina. The deduced amino acid sequence showed similarities to MYB proteins reported in other plants, including the conserved MYB binding domain. RNA gel blot analysis showed that the AmMYB1 transcript expression was more pronounced in green photosynthetic tissue and was strongly induced by stresses such as salt (500 mM), light (500 µE m(-2) s(-1)), and the exogenous application of ABA (100 µM). An analysis of the upstream sequence of AmMYB1 gene revealed the presence of regulatory elements identical to those present in the promoters of stress inducible genes. The promoter was responsive to NaCl and could enhance reporter gene expression in planta. An in vitro DNA binding assay using the promoter region (TGGTTAG) of the AtRD22 gene and a transactivation assay in yeast cells suggest the possibility of AmMYB1 protein regulating the expression of other genes during salt stress. Transgenic tobacco plants constitutively expressing the AmMYB1 transcription factor showed better tolerance to NaCl stress.

  4. OxyR acts as a transcriptional repressor of hydrogen peroxide-inducible antioxidant genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum R.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2013-07-01

    OxyR, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, has been established as a redox-responsive activator of antioxidant genes in bacteria. This study shows that OxyR acts as a transcriptional repressor of katA, dps, ftn and cydA in Corynebacterium glutamicum R. katA encodes H2O2-detoxifing enzyme catalase, dps and ftn are implicated in iron homeostasis and cydA encodes a subunit of cytochrome bd oxidase. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that expression of katA and dps, but not of ftn and cydA, was induced by H2O2. Disruption of the oxyR gene encoding OxyR resulted in a marked increase in katA and dps mRNAs to a level higher than that induced by H2O2, and the oxyR-deficient mutant showed a H2O2-resistant phenotype. This is in contrast to the conventional OxyR-dependent regulatory model. ftn and cydA were also upregulated by oxyR disruption but to a smaller extent. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the OxyR protein specifically binds to all four upstream regions of the respective genes under reducing conditions. We observed that the oxidized form of OxyR similarly bound to not only the target promoter regions, but also nonspecific DNA fragments. Based on these findings, we propose that the transcriptional repression by OxyR is alleviated under oxidative stress conditions in a titration mechanism due to the decreased specificity of its DNA-binding activity. DNase I footprinting analyses revealed that the OxyR-binding site in the four target promoters is ~ 50 bp in length and has multiple T-N11-A motifs, a feature of LysR-type transcriptional regulators, but no significant overall sequence conservation. PMID:23621709

  5. Resveratrol Inhibits IL-6-Induced Transcriptional Activity of AR and STAT3 in Human Prostate Cancer LNCaP-FGC Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Keum, Young-Sam; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Surh, Young-Joon; Choi, Bu Young

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer. Although prostate tumors respond to androgen ablation therapy at an early stage, they often acquire the potential of androgen-independent growth. Elevated transcriptional activity of androgen receptor (AR) and/or signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) contributes to the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the effect of resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in grapes, on the reporter gene activity of AR and STAT3 in human prostate cancer (LNCaP-FGC) cells stimulated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and/or dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Our study revealed that resveratrol suppressed the growth of LNCaP-FGC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Whereas the AR transcriptional activity was induced by treatment with either IL-6 or DHT, the STAT3 transcriptional activity was induced only by treatment with IL-6 but not with DHT. Resveratrol significantly attenuated IL-6-induced STAT3 transcriptional activity, and DHT- or IL-6-induced AR transcriptional activity. Treatment of cells with DHT plus IL-6 significantly increased the AR transcriptional activity as compared to DHT or IL-6 treatment alone and resveratrol markedly diminished DHT plus IL-6-induced AR transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was decreased by resveratrol in the DHT-, IL-6- or DHT plus IL-6-treated LNCaP-FGC cells. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on IL-6- and/or DHT-induced AR transcriptional activity in LNCaP prostate cancer cells are partly mediated through the suppression of STAT3 reporter gene activity, suggesting that resveratrol may be a promising therapeutic choice for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. Transcript profiles in cortical cells of maize primary root during ethylene-induced lysigenous aerenchyma formation under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yamauchi, Takaki; Rajhi, Imene; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Nakazono, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Internal aeration is important for plants to survive during periods of waterlogging, and the ability to form aerenchyma contributes by creating a continuous gas space between the shoots and the roots. Roots of maize (Zea mays) react to prolonged waterlogging by forming aerenchyma in root cortical cells by programmed cell death (PCD) in response to ethylene. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of ethylene-induced aerenchyma formation by identifying genes that are either up- or downregulated by ethylene treatment in maize root cortical cells. Methods Three-day-old maize seedlings were treated with ethylene for several hours under aerobic conditions. Cortical cells were isolated from the primary roots using laser microdissection (LM), and transcript profiles with and without ethylene treatment were compared by microarray. In addition, the effect on ethylene-induced aerenchyma formation of diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, was examined in order to assess the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Key Results A total of 223 genes were identified whose transcript levels were significantly increased or decreased by ethylene treatment in root cortical cells under aerobic conditions. Subsequent tissue-specific quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analyses revealed that ethylene increased the transcript levels of genes related to ethylene signalling in all of the root tissues examined (stelar cells, cortical cells and outer cell layers), whereas it increased the transcript levels of genes related to cell wall modification and proteolysis specifically in the cortical cells. DPI treatment inhibited the ethylene-induced aerenchyma formation and suppressed expression of some cell wall modification-related genes. Conclusions Several genes related to cell wall modification and proteolysis are specifically up- or downregulated in cortical cells during lysigenous aerenchyma formation under aerobic

  7. Concordance of Transcriptional and Apical Benchmark Dose Levels for Conazole-Induced Liver Effects in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The ability to anchor chemical class-based gene expression changes to phenotypic lesions and to describe these changes as a function of dose and time informs mode of action determinations and improves quantitative risk assessments. Previous transcription-based microarra...

  8. Colorimetric detection of gene transcript by target-induced three-way junction formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Liu, Weiwei; Yin, Binbin; Yu, Pan; Duan, Xiuzhi; Liao, Zhaoping; Liu, Chunhua; Sang, Yiwen; Zhang, Gong; Chen, Yuhua; Tao, Zhihua

    2016-09-01

    Gene transcript often varies by alternative splicing, which plays different biological role that results in diversity of gene expression. Therefore, a simple and accurate identification of targeted transcript variant is of prime importance to achieve a precise molecular diagnosis. In this work, we presented a three-way junction based system where two split G-quadruplex forming sequences were coupled into two probes. Only upon the introduction of target gene transcript that offering a specific recognizable splicing site did the two probes assembled into three way junction conformation in a devised process, thus providing a functional G-quadruplex conformation that greatly enhanced hemin peroxidation. A notable resolution for gene splicing site detection was achieved. The detection limitation by colorimetric assay was 0.063μM, and this system has been proved to discriminate even in a single base false level around splicing site (about 3 times of single mismatched analyte to gain an equal signal by perfect analyte ). Furthermore, recoveries of 78.1%, 88.1%, 104.6% were obtained with 0.75μM, 0.25μM, 0.083μM of target, respectively, showing a capacity to further exploit a simple equipped device for gene transcript detection. PMID:27343570

  9. Wnt-induced transcriptional activation is exclusively mediated by TCF/LEF.

    PubMed

    Schuijers, Jurian; Mokry, Michal; Hatzis, Pantelis; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2014-01-13

    Active canonical Wnt signaling results in recruitment of β-catenin to DNA by TCF/LEF family members, leading to transcriptional activation of TCF target genes. However, additional transcription factors have been suggested to recruit β-catenin and tether it to DNA. Here, we describe the genome-wide pattern of β-catenin DNA binding in murine intestinal epithelium, Wnt-responsive colorectal cancer (CRC) cells and HEK293 embryonic kidney cells. We identify two classes of β-catenin binding sites. The first class represents the majority of the DNA-bound β-catenin and co-localizes with TCF4, the prominent TCF/LEF family member in these cells. The second class consists of β-catenin binding sites that co-localize with a minimal amount of TCF4. The latter consists of lower affinity β-catenin binding events, does not drive transcription and often does not contain a consensus TCF binding motif. Surprisingly, a dominant-negative form of TCF4 abrogates the β-catenin/DNA interaction of both classes of binding sites, implying that the second class comprises low affinity TCF-DNA complexes. Our results indicate that β-catenin is tethered to chromatin overwhelmingly through the TCF/LEF transcription factors in these three systems.

  10. Functional domains required for tat-induced transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J A; Harrich, D; Pearson, L; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1988-10-01

    The transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type I involves the interaction of both viral and cellular proteins. The viral protein tat is important in increasing the amount of viral steady-state mRNA and may also play a role in regulating the translational efficiency of viral mRNA. To identify distinct functional domains of tat, oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of the tat gene was performed. Point mutations of cysteine residues in three of the four Cys-X-X-Cys sequences in the tat protein resulted in a marked decrease in transcriptional activation of the HIV long terminal repeat. Point mutations which altered the basic C-domain of the protein also resulted in decreases in transcriptional activity, as did a series of mutations that repositioned either the N or C termini of the protein. Conservative mutations of other amino acids in the cysteine-rich or basic regions and in a series of proline residues in the N terminus of the molecule resulted in minimal changes in tat activation. These results suggest that several domains of tat protein are involved in transcriptional activation with the cysteine-rich domain being required for complete activity of the tat protein.

  11. DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4) mediates methamphetamine-induced autophagy and apoptosis through mTOR signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Bin; Chen, Ling; Cai, Dunpeng; Li, Bing; Chen, Chuanxiang; Huang, Enping; Liu, Chao; Lin, Zhoumeng; Xie, Wei-Bing; Wang, Huijun

    2016-03-15

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an amphetamine-like psychostimulant that is commonly abused. Previous studies have shown that METH can induce damages to the nervous system and recent studies suggest that METH can also cause adverse and potentially lethal effects on the cardiovascular system. Recently, we demonstrated that DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4) regulates METH-induced neurotoxicity. However, the role of DDIT4 in METH-induced cardiotoxicity remains unknown. We hypothesized that DDIT4 may mediate METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis, we examined DDIT4 protein expression in cardiomyocytes and in heart tissues of rats exposed to METH with Western blotting. We also determined the effects on METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis after silencing DDIT4 expression with synthetic siRNA with or without pretreatment of a mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in cardiomyocytes using Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy and TUNEL staining. Our results showed that METH exposure increased DDIT4 expression and decreased phosphorylation of mTOR that was accompanied with increased autophagy and apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. These effects were normalized after silencing DDIT4. On the other hand, rapamycin promoted METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis in DDIT4 knockdown cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that DDIT4 mediates METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis through mTOR signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes. PMID:26825372

  12. DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4) mediates methamphetamine-induced autophagy and apoptosis through mTOR signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Bin; Chen, Ling; Cai, Dunpeng; Li, Bing; Chen, Chuanxiang; Huang, Enping; Liu, Chao; Lin, Zhoumeng; Xie, Wei-Bing; Wang, Huijun

    2016-03-15

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an amphetamine-like psychostimulant that is commonly abused. Previous studies have shown that METH can induce damages to the nervous system and recent studies suggest that METH can also cause adverse and potentially lethal effects on the cardiovascular system. Recently, we demonstrated that DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4) regulates METH-induced neurotoxicity. However, the role of DDIT4 in METH-induced cardiotoxicity remains unknown. We hypothesized that DDIT4 may mediate METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis, we examined DDIT4 protein expression in cardiomyocytes and in heart tissues of rats exposed to METH with Western blotting. We also determined the effects on METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis after silencing DDIT4 expression with synthetic siRNA with or without pretreatment of a mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in cardiomyocytes using Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy and TUNEL staining. Our results showed that METH exposure increased DDIT4 expression and decreased phosphorylation of mTOR that was accompanied with increased autophagy and apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. These effects were normalized after silencing DDIT4. On the other hand, rapamycin promoted METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis in DDIT4 knockdown cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that DDIT4 mediates METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis through mTOR signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes.

  13. Tomato Whole Genome Transcriptional Response to Tetranychus urticae Identifies Divergence of Spider Mite-Induced Responses Between Tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Martel, Catherine; Zhurov, Vladimir; Navarro, Marie; Martinez, Manuel; Cazaux, Marc; Auger, Philippe; Migeon, Alain; Santamaria, M Estrella; Wybouw, Nicky; Diaz, Isabel; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Navajas, Maria; Grbic, Miodrag; Grbic, Vojislava

    2015-03-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most significant mite pests in agriculture, feeding on more than 1,100 plant hosts, including model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Here, we describe timecourse tomato transcriptional responses to spider mite feeding and compare them with Arabidopsis in order to determine conserved and divergent defense responses to this pest. To refine the involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in mite-induced responses and to improve tomato Gene Ontology annotations, we analyzed transcriptional changes in the tomato JA-signaling mutant defenseless1 (def-1) upon JA treatment and spider mite herbivory. Overlay of differentially expressed genes (DEG) identified in def-1 onto those from the timecourse experiment established that JA controls expression of the majority of genes differentially regulated by herbivory. Comparison of defense responses between tomato and Arabidopsis highlighted 96 orthologous genes (of 2,133 DEG) that were recruited for defense against spider mites in both species. These genes, involved in biosynthesis of JA, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, and terpenoids, represent the conserved core of induced defenses. The remaining tomato DEG support the establishment of tomato-specific defenses, indicating profound divergence of spider mite-induced responses between tomato and Arabidopsis.

  14. Fluid shear stress induces endothelial transforming growth factor beta-1 transcription and production. Modulation by potassium channel blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, M; Cooke, J P; Dzau, V J; Gibbons, G H

    1995-01-01

    The endothelium has the capacity to modulate vascular structure in response to hemodynamic stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of the endothelium to increased laminar shear stress induces the expression of TGF beta 1 via a signal transduction pathway modulated by K+ channel currents. Although TGF beta 1 is normally secreted in a latent, inactive form, exposure of cultured endothelial cells to steady laminar shear stress (20 dynes/cm2) induced increased generation of biologically active TGF beta 1. This increase in active TGF beta 1 was associated with a sustained increase in TGF beta 1 mRNA expression within 2 h of stimulation. TGF beta 1 mRNA levels increased in direct proportion to the intensity of the shear stress within the physiologic range. The effect of shear stress on TGF beta 1 mRNA expression was regulated at the transcriptional level as defined by nuclear run-off studies and transient transfection of a TGF beta 1 promoter-reporter gene construct. Blockade of endothelial K+ channels with tetraethylammonium significantly inhibited: activation of TGF beta 1 gene transcription; increase in steady state mRNA levels; and generation of active TGF beta 1 in response to shear stress. These data suggest that endothelial K+ channels and autocrine-paracrine TGF beta 1 may be involved in the mechanotransduction mechanisms mediating flow-induced vascular remodeling. Images PMID:7883983

  15. Serine 105 phosphorylation of transcription factor GATA4 is necessary for stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Berlo, Jop H; Elrod, John W; Aronow, Bruce J; Pu, William T; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2011-07-26

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive growth process that occurs in response to stress stimulation or injury wherein multiple signal transduction pathways are induced, culminating in transcription factor activation and the reprogramming of gene expression. GATA4 is a critical transcription factor in the heart that is known to induce/regulate the hypertrophic program, in part, by receiving signals from MAPKs. Here we generated knock-in mice in which a known MAPK phosphorylation site at serine 105 (S105) in Gata4 that augments activity was mutated to alanine. Homozygous Gata4-S105A mutant mice were viable as adults, although they showed a compromised stress response of the myocardium. For example, cardiac hypertrophy in response to phenylephrine agonist infusion for 2 wk was largely blunted in Gata4-S105A mice, as was the hypertrophic response to pressure overload at 1 and 2 wk of applied stimulation. Gata4-S105A mice were also more susceptible to heart failure and cardiac dilation after 2 wk of pressure overload. With respect to the upstream pathway, hearts from Gata4-S105A mice did not efficiently hypertrophy following direct ERK1/2 activation using an activated MEK1 transgene in vivo. Mechanistically, GATA4 mutant protein from these hearts failed to show enhanced DNA binding in response to hypertrophic stimulation. Moreover, hearts from Gata4-S105A mice had significant changes in the expression of hypertrophy-inducible, fetal, and remodeling-related genes.

  16. TG-interacting factor transcriptionally induced by AKT/FOXO3A is a negative regulator that antagonizes arsenic trioxide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zi-Miao; Tseng, Hong-Yu; Cheng, Ya-Ling; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Huei-Sheng

    2015-05-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a multi-target drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration as the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In addition, several clinical trials are being conducted with arsenic-based drugs for the treatment of other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. However, ATO's modest clinical efficacy on some cancers, and potential toxic effects on humans have been reported. Determining how best to reduce these adverse effects while increasing its therapeutic efficacy is obviously a critical issue. Previously, we demonstrated that the JNK-induced complex formation of phosphorylated c-Jun and TG-interacting factor (TGIF) antagonizes ERK-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}) expression and resultant apoptosis in response to ATO in A431 cells. Surprisingly, at low-concentrations (0.1–0.2 μM), ATO increased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion, involving TGIF expression, however, at high-concentrations (5–20 μM), ATO induced cell apoptosis. Using a promoter analysis, TGIF was transcriptionally regulated by ATO at the FOXO3A binding site (− 1486 to − 1479 bp) via the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway. Stable overexpression of TGIF promoted advancing the cell cycle into the S phase, and attenuated 20 μM ATO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, blockage of the AKT pathway enhanced ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis in cancer cells, but overexpression of AKT1 inhibited CDKN1A expression. Therefore, we suggest that TGIF is transcriptionally regulated by the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway, which plays a role as a negative regulator in antagonizing ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis. Suppression of these antagonistic effects might be a promising therapeutic strategy toward improving clinical efficacy of ATO. - Highlights: • ATO-induced biphasic survival responses of cancer cells depend on low- or high-concentrations. • TGIF mediates

  17. Dynamical behavior of psb gene transcripts in greening wheat seedlings. I. Time course of accumulation of the pshA through psbN gene transcripts during light-induced greening.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, H; Fukuda, I; Shiina, T; Toyoshima, Y

    1992-11-01

    The time course of the accumulation of the transcripts from 13 psb genes encoding a major part of the proteins composing photosystem II during light-induced greening of dark-grown wheat seedlings was examined focusing on early stages of plastid development (0.5 h through 72 h). The 13 genes can be divided into three groups. (1) The psbA gene is transcribed as a single transcript of 1.3 kb in the dark-grown seedlings, but its level increases 5- to 7-fold in response to light due to selective increase in RNA stability as well as in transcription activity. (2) The psbE-F-L-J operon, psbM and psbN genes are transcribed as a single transcript of 1.1 kb, two transcripts of 0.5 and 0.7 kb and a single transcript of 0.3 kb, respectively, in the dark-grown seedlings. The levels of accumulation of every transcript remain unchanged or rather decrease during plastid development under illumination. (3) The psbK-I-D-C gene cluster and psbB-H operon exhibit fairly complicated northern hybridization patterns during the greening process. When a psbC or psbD gene probe was used for northern hybridization, five transcripts differing in length were detected in the etioplasts from 5-day old dark-grown seedlings. After 2 h illumination, two new transcripts of different length appeared. Light induction of new transcripts was also observed in the psbB-H operon. PMID:1450384

  18. The transcription elongation factor NusA is required for stress-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Walker, Graham C

    2010-01-12

    Stress-induced mutagenesis describes the accumulation of mutations that occur in nongrowing cells, in contrast to mutagenesis that occurs in actively dividing populations, and has been referred to as stationary-phase or adaptive mutagenesis. The most widely studied system for stress-induced mutagenesis involves monitoring the appearance of Lac(+) revertants of the strain FC40 under starvation conditions in Escherichia coli. The SOS-inducible translesion DNA polymerase DinB plays an important role in this phenomenon. Loss of DinB (DNA pol IV) function results in a severe reduction of Lac(+) revertants. We previously reported that NusA, an essential component of elongating RNA polymerases, interacts with DinB. Here we report our unexpected observation that wild-type NusA function is required for stress-induced mutagenesis. We present evidence that this effect is unlikely to be due to defects in transcription of lac genes but rather is due to an inability to adapt and mutate in response to environmental stress. Furthermore, we extended our analysis to the formation of stress-induced mutants in response to antibiotic treatment, observing the same striking abolition of mutagenesis under entirely different conditions. Our results are the first to implicate NusA as a crucial participant in the phenomenon of stress-induced mutagenesis. PMID:20036541

  19. STAT5 is a key transcription factor for IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongwon; Seong, Semun; Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Jeong, Byung-chul; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Among the diverse cytokines involved in osteoclast differentiation, interleukin (IL)-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5) by IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through the induction of the expression of Id genes. We found that STAT5 overexpression inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, RANKL did not regulate the expression or activation of STAT5 during osteoclast differentiation. STAT5 deficiency prevented IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting a key role of STAT5 in IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, IL-3-induced STAT5 activation upregulated the expression of Id1 and Id2, which are negative regulators of osteoclastogenesis. Overexpression of ID1 or ID2 in STAT5-deficient cells reversed osteoclast development recovered from IL-3-mediated inhibition. Importantly, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analysis revealed that STAT5 conditional knockout mice showed reduced bone mass, with an increased number of osteoclasts. Furthermore, IL-3 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation less effectively in the STAT5 conditional knockout mice than in the wild-type mice after RANKL injection. Taken together, our findings indicate that STAT5 contributes to the remarkable IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by activating Id genes and their associated pathways. PMID:27485735

  20. STAT5 is a key transcription factor for IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Seong, Semun; Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Jeong, Byung-Chul; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Among the diverse cytokines involved in osteoclast differentiation, interleukin (IL)-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5) by IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through the induction of the expression of Id genes. We found that STAT5 overexpression inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, RANKL did not regulate the expression or activation of STAT5 during osteoclast differentiation. STAT5 deficiency prevented IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting a key role of STAT5 in IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, IL-3-induced STAT5 activation upregulated the expression of Id1 and Id2, which are negative regulators of osteoclastogenesis. Overexpression of ID1 or ID2 in STAT5-deficient cells reversed osteoclast development recovered from IL-3-mediated inhibition. Importantly, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analysis revealed that STAT5 conditional knockout mice showed reduced bone mass, with an increased number of osteoclasts. Furthermore, IL-3 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation less effectively in the STAT5 conditional knockout mice than in the wild-type mice after RANKL injection. Taken together, our findings indicate that STAT5 contributes to the remarkable IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by activating Id genes and their associated pathways. PMID:27485735

  1. Induced heteroduplex genotyping of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-10 polymorphisms associated with transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Morse, H R; Olomolaiye, O O; Wood, N A; Keen, L J; Bidwell, J L

    1999-10-01

    We describe the construction and use of 7 induced heteroduplex generators, reagents for the rapid and unequivocal genotyping of nucleotide sequence polymorphism in TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-10. Polymorphisms detected are those previously associated with regulation of gene transcription: TNF-alpha positions -308 and -238; IL-1beta position +3953; IL-6 position -174; and IL-10 positions -1082, -819 and -592. The reagents were used for analysis of allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of healthy Caucasian volunteer blood donors.

  2. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

    SciTech Connect

    Brüning, Ansgar Matsingou, Christina; Brem, German Johannes; Rahmeh, Martina; Mylonas, Ioannis

    2012-10-15

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-β super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin βE subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin βE in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin βE overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin βE. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin βE subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin βE re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin βE expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin βE as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin βE subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ► Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ► Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ► Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  3. E2F1 localizes predominantly to neuronal cytoplasm and fails to induce expression of its transcriptional targets in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Shyam, Nikhil; Ting, Jenhao H.; Akay, Cagla; Lindl, Kathryn A.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.

    2010-01-01

    As human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not induce neuronal damage by direct infection, the mechanisms of neuronal damage or loss in HIV associated dementia (HAD) remain unclear. We have shown previously that immunoreactivity of transcription factor, E2F1, increases in neurons, localizing predominantly to the cytoplasm, in HIV-associated pathologies. Here we confirm that E2F1 localization is predominantly cytoplasmic in primary post-mitotic neurons in vitro and cortical neurons in vivo. To determine whether E2F1 contributes to neuronal death in HAD via transactivation of target promoters, we assessed the mRNA and protein levels of several classical E2F1 transcriptional targets implicated in cell cycle progression and apoptosis in an in vitro model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity and in cortical autopsy tissue from patients infected with HIV. By qPCR, we show that mRNA levels of E2F1 transcriptional targets implicated in cell cycle progression (E2F1, cyclin A, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and dyhydrofolate reductase (DHFR)) and apoptosis (caspases 3, 8, 9 and p19ARF) remain unchanged in an in vitro model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity. Further, we show that protein levels of p19ARF, Cyclin A, and PCNA are not altered in vitro or in the cortex of patients with HAD. We propose that the predominantly cytoplasmic localization of E2F1 in neurons may account for the lack of E2F1 target transactivation in neurons responding to HIV-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:20580656

  4. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2008-07-15

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to

  5. Transcriptional landscapes at the intersection of neuronal apoptosis and substance P-induced survival: exploring pathways and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Paparone, S; Severini, C; Ciotti, M T; D’Agata, V; Calissano, P; Cavallaro, S

    2016-01-01

    A change in the delicate equilibrium between apoptosis and survival regulates the neurons fate during the development of nervous system and its homeostasis in adulthood. Signaling pathways promoting or protecting from apoptosis are activated by multiple signals, including those elicited by neurotrophic factors, and depend upon specific transcriptional programs. To decipher the rescue program induced by substance P (SP) in cerebellar granule neurons, we analyzed their whole-genome expression profiles after induction of apoptosis and treatment with SP. Transcriptional pathways associated with the survival effect of SP included genes encoding for proteins that may act as pharmacological targets. Inhibition of one of these, the Myc pro-oncogene by treatment with 10058-F4, reverted in a dose-dependent manner the rescue effect of SP. In addition to elucidate the transcriptional mechanisms at the intersection of neuronal apoptosis and survival, our systems biology-based perspective paves the way towards an innovative pharmacology based on targets downstream of neurotrophic factor receptors. PMID:27551538

  6. An Intronic Enhancer Is Required for Deflagellation-induced Transcriptional Regulation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dynein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yong; Mitchell, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar regeneration is accompanied by rapid induction of genes encoding a large set of flagellar structural components and provides a model system to study coordinate gene regulation and organelle assembly. After deflagellation, the abundance of a 70-kDa flagellar dynein intermediate chain (IC70, encoded by ODA6) mRNA increases approximately fourfold within 40 min and returns to predeflagellation levels by ∼90 min. We show by nuclear run-on that this increase results, in part, from increased rates of transcription. To localize cis induction elements, we created an IC70 minigene and measured accumulation, in C. reinhardtii, of transcripts from the endogenous gene and from introduced promoter deletion constructs. Clones containing 416 base pairs (bp) of 5′- and 2 kilobases (kb) of 3′-flanking region retained all sequences necessary for a normal pattern of mRNA abundance change after deflagellation. Extensive 5′- and 3′- flanking region deletions, which removed multiple copies of a proposed deflagellation-response element (the tub box), did not eliminate induction, and the IC70 5′-flanking region alone did not confer deflagellation responsiveness to a promoterless arylsulfatase (ARS) gene. Instead, an intron in the IC70 gene 5′-untranslated region was found to contain the deflagellation response element. These results suggest that the tub box does not play an essential role in deflagellation-induced transcriptional regulation of this dynein gene. PMID:9802898

  7. Transcriptional landscapes at the intersection of neuronal apoptosis and substance P-induced survival: exploring pathways and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Paparone, S; Severini, C; Ciotti, M T; D'Agata, V; Calissano, P; Cavallaro, S

    2016-01-01

    A change in the delicate equilibrium between apoptosis and survival regulates the neurons fate during the development of nervous system and its homeostasis in adulthood. Signaling pathways promoting or protecting from apoptosis are activated by multiple signals, including those elicited by neurotrophic factors, and depend upon specific transcriptional programs. To decipher the rescue program induced by substance P (SP) in cerebellar granule neurons, we analyzed their whole-genome expression profiles after induction of apoptosis and treatment with SP. Transcriptional pathways associated with the survival effect of SP included genes encoding for proteins that may act as pharmacological targets. Inhibition of one of these, the Myc pro-oncogene by treatment with 10058-F4, reverted in a dose-dependent manner the rescue effect of SP. In addition to elucidate the transcriptional mechanisms at the intersection of neuronal apoptosis and survival, our systems biology-based perspective paves the way towards an innovative pharmacology based on targets downstream of neurotrophic factor receptors. PMID:27551538

  8. HMGN2 inducibly binds a novel transactivation domain in nuclear PRLr to coordinate Stat5a-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Alyson A; Medler, Terry R; Feeney, Yvonne B; Liu, Yi; Tommerdahl, Kalie L; Clevenger, Charles V

    2011-09-01

    The direct actions of transmembrane receptors within the nucleus remain enigmatic. In this report, we demonstrate that the prolactin receptor (PRLr) localizes to the nucleus where it functions as a coactivator through its interactions with the latent transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (Stat5a) and the high-mobility group N2 protein (HMGN2). We identify a novel transactivation domain within the PRLr that is activated by ligand-induced phosphorylation, an event coupled to HMGN2 binding. The association of the PRLr with HMGN2 enables Stat5a-responsive promoter binding, thus facilitating transcriptional activation and promoting anchorage-independent growth. We propose that HMGN2 serves as a critical regulatory factor in Stat5a-driven gene expression by facilitating the assembly of PRLr/Stat5a onto chromatin and that these events may serve to promote biological events that contribute to a tumorigenic phenotype. Our data imply that phosphorylation may be the molecular switch that activates a cell surface receptor transactivation domain, enabling it to tether chromatin-modifying factors, such as HMGN2, to target promoter regions in a sequence-specific manner.

  9. Transcription factor Sox4 is required for PUMA-mediated apoptosis induced by histone deacetylase inhibitor, TSA.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sang-Min; Kang, Eun-Jin; Kim, Jung-Woong; Kim, Chul-Hong; An, Joo-Hee; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2013-08-23

    PUMA is a crucial regulator of apoptotic cell death mediated by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In many cancer cells, PUMA expression is induced in response to DNA-damaging reagent in a p53-dependent manner. However, few studies have investigated transcription factors that lead to the induction of PUMA expression via p53-independent apoptotic signaling. In this study, we found that the transcription factor Sox4 increased PUMA expression in response to trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor in the p53-null human lung cancer cell line H1299. Ectopic expression of Sox4 led to the induction of PUMA expression at the mRNA and protein levels, and TSA-mediated up-regulation of PUMA transcription was repressed by the knockdown of Sox4. Using luciferase assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we also determined that Sox4 recruits p300 on the PUMA promoter region and increases PUMA gene expression in response to TSA treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that Sox4 is required for p53-independent apoptotic cell death mediated by PUMA induction via TSA treatment.

  10. Estrogen receptor beta inhibits transcriptional activity of hypoxia inducible factor-1 through the downregulation of arylhydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in prevention of breast cancer development and metastasis. We have shown previously that ERβ inhibits hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α mediated transcription, but the mechanism by which ERβ works to exert this effect is not understood. Methods Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured in conditioned medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, luciferase assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were used to ascertain the implication of ERβ on HIF-1 function. Results In this study, we found that the inhibition of HIF-1 activity by ERβ expression was correlated with ERβ's ability to degrade aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) via ubiquitination processes leading to the reduction of active HIF-1α/ARNT complexes. HIF-1 repression by ERβ was rescued by overexpression of ARNT as examined by hypoxia-responsive element (HRE)-driven luciferase assays. We show further that ERβ attenuated the hypoxic induction of VEGF mRNA by directly decreasing HIF-1α binding to the VEGF gene promoter. Conclusions These results show that ERβ suppresses HIF-1α-mediated transcription via ARNT down-regulation, which may account for the tumour suppressive function of ERβ. PMID:21435239

  11. EVI1 promotes cell proliferation in HBx-induced hepatocarcinogenesis as a critical transcription factor regulating lncRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen-xi; Guo, Ying-jun; Sun, Shu-han

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of the hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein in epigenetic modifications during hepatocarcinogenesis has been previously characterized. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a kind of epigenetic regulator molecules, have also been shown to play crucial roles in HBx-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we analyzed the key transcription factors of aberrantly expressed lncRNAs in the livers of HBx transgenic mice by bioinformatics prediction, and found that ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Evi1) was a potential main transcription regulator. Further investigation showed that EVI1 was positively correlated to HBx expression and was frequently up-regulated in HBV-related HCC tissues. The forced expression of HBx in liver cell lines resulted in a significant increase of the expression of EVI1. Furthermore, suppression of EVI1 expression decreased the proliferation of HCC cells overexpressing HBx in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that EVI1 is frequently up-regulated and regulates a cluster of lncRNAs in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These findings highlight a novel mechanism for HBx-induced hepatocarcinogenesis through transcription factor EVI1 and its target lncRNAs, and provide a potential new approach to predict the functions of lncRNAs. PMID:26967394

  12. Transcriptional repression of Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1 by hypoxia-inducible factor-1.

    PubMed

    Ibla, Juan C; Khoury, Joseph; Kong, Tianqing; Robinson, Andreas; Colgan, Sean P

    2006-08-01

    Tissue edema is commonly associated with hypoxia. Generally, such episodes of fluid accumulation are self-limiting. At present, little is known about mechanisms to compensate excessive fluid transport. Here we describe an adaptive mechanism to dampen fluid loss during hypoxia. Initial studies confirmed previous observations of attenuated electrogenic Cl- secretion after epithelial hypoxia. A screen of known ion transporters in Cl- -secreting epithelia revealed selective downregulation of Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1 mRNA, protein, and function. Subsequent studies identified transcriptional repression of NKCC1 mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis identified a functional HIF binding site oriented on the antisense strand of genomic DNA downstream of the transcription start site corresponding to the NKCC1 5'-untranslated region. Additional in vivo studies using conditional Hif1a-null mice revealed that the loss of HIF-1alpha in Cl- -secreting epithelia results in a loss of NKCC1 repression. These studies describe a novel regulatory pathway for NKCC1 transcriptional repression by hypoxia. These results suggest that HIF-dependent repression of epithelial NKCC1 may provide a compensatory mechanism to prevent excessive fluid loss during hypoxia. PMID:16571862

  13. Achalasia mimicking prepubertal anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Richterich, Andreas; Brunner, Romuald; Resch, Franz

    2003-04-01

    A 9-year-old girl presents for continuing weight loss of 10 kg over the course of 1 year. Medical history showed three episodes of pneumonia requiring hospital admission in the 6 months before presentation and 4 months of weekly psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa. A thorough history of eating behavior and a review of systems revealed not only typical aspects of prepubertal anorexia nervosa but also vomiting at night while asleep, difficulty drinking liquids, epigastric pain, and a frequent experience of "a lump in the throat"; these symptoms were not suggestive of a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa but rather of esophageal achalasia. The patient was transferred to the Department of Pediatrics, and a diagnosis of esophageal achalasia was made by chest x-ray and barium swallow. After dilatation and botulinum toxin application, the patient regained weight easily and was discharged in stable condition. In this case, esophageal achalasia mimicked prepubertal anorexia nervosa.

  14. Genetic background drives transcriptional variation in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Foad; Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; de Brito, Miguel Cardoso; Bradley, Allan; Vallier, Ludovic; Gaffney, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Human iPS cells have been generated using a diverse range of tissues from a variety of donors using different reprogramming vectors. However, these cell lines are heterogeneous, which presents a limitation for their use in disease modeling and personalized medicine. To explore the basis of this heterogeneity we generated 25 iPS cell lines under normalised conditions from the same set of somatic tissues across a number of donors. RNA-seq data sets from each cell line were compared to identify the majority contributors to transcriptional heterogeneity. We found that genetic differences between individual donors were the major cause of transcriptional variation between lines. In contrast, residual signatures from the somatic cell of origin, so called epigenetic memory, contributed relatively little to transcriptional variation. Thus, underlying genetic background variation is responsible for most heterogeneity between human iPS cell lines. We conclude that epigenetic effects in hIPSCs are minimal, and that hIPSCs are a stable, robust and powerful platform for large-scale studies of the function of genetic differences between individuals. Our data also suggest that future studies using hIPSCs as a model system should focus most effort on collection of large numbers of donors, rather than generating large numbers of lines from the same donor.

  15. FHL2 mediates p53-induced transcriptional activation through a direct association with HIPK2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Wang . E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    To understand the molecular mechanism underlying HIPK2 regulation of the transcriptional activation by p53, we sought to identify the protein that interacts with HIPK2. From our yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) could bind to the C-terminal half of HIPK2. Further assays in yeast mapped the minimal interaction domain to amino acids 812-907 in HIPK2. The interaction was confirmed using a GST pull-down assay in vitro, and an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay and fluorescence microscopy in vivo. FHL2 alone spread throughout both the cytoplasm and nucleus but was redistributed to dot-like structures in the nucleus when HIPK2 was coexpressed in HEK293 cells. When tethered to the Gal4-responsive promoter through the Gal4 DBD fusion, FHL2 showed autonomous transcriptional activity that was enhanced by wild-type HIPK2, but not by the kinase-defective mutant. In addition, FHL2 increased the p53-dependent transcriptional activation and had an additive effect on the activation when coexpressed with HIPK2, which was again not observed with the kinase-defective mutant of HIPK2. Finally, we found a ternary complex of p53, HIPK2, and FHL2 using IP, and their recruitment to the p53-responsive p21Waf1 promoter in chromatin IP assays. Overall, our findings indicate that FHL2 can also regulate p53 via a direct association with HIPK2.

  16. Pregnancy complicated by obesity induces global transcript expression alterations in visceral and subcutaneous fat.

    PubMed

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-08-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet not much is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n = 4/group) at the time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations led to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase, tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2, and ephrin type-B receptor 6, not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis as compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity.

  17. Baculovirus Induced Transcripts in Hemocytes from the Larvae of Heliothis virescens

    PubMed Central

    Breitenbach, Jonathan E.; Shelby, Kent S.; Popham, Holly J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Using RNA-seq digital difference expression profiling methods, we have assessed the gene expression profiles of hemocytes harvested from Heliothis virescens that were challenged with Helicoverpa zea single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HzSNPV). A reference transcriptome of hemocyte-expressed transcripts was assembled from 202 million 42-base tags by combining the sequence data of all samples, and the assembled sequences were then subject to BLASTx analysis to determine gene identities. We used the fully sequenced HzSNPV reference genome to align 477,264 Illumina sequence tags from infected hemocytes in order to document expression of HzSNPV genes at early points during infection. A comparison of expression profiles of control insects to those lethally infected with HzSNPV revealed differential expression of key cellular stress response genes and genes involved in lipid metabolism. Transcriptional regulation of specific insect hormones in baculovirus-infected insects was also altered. A number of transcripts bearing homology to retroviral elements that were detected add to a growing body of evidence for extensive invasion of errantiviruses into the insect genome. Using this method, we completed the first and most comprehensive gene expression survey of both baculoviral infection and host immune defense in lepidopteran larvae. PMID:22163334

  18. Characterization of MxFIT, an iron deficiency induced transcriptional factor in Malus xiaojinensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lili; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Mudan; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Xuefeng; Han, Zhenhai

    2014-02-01

    Iron deficiency often results in nutritional disorder in fruit trees. Transcription factors play an important role in the regulation of iron uptake. In this study, we isolated an iron deficiency response transcription factor gene, MxFIT, from an iron-efficient apple genotype of Malus xiaojinensis. MxFIT encoded a basic helix-loop-helix protein and contained a 966 bp open reading frame. MxFIT protein was targeted to the nucleus in onion epidermal cells and showed strong transcriptional activation in yeast cells. Spatiotemporal expression analysis revealed that MxFIT was up-regulated in roots under iron deficiency at both mRNA and protein levels, while almost no expression was detected in leaves irrespective of iron supply. Ectopic expression of MxFIT resulted in enhanced iron deficiency responses in Arabidopsis under iron deficiency and stronger resistance to iron deficiency. Thus, MxFIT might be involved in iron uptake and plays an important role in iron deficiency response.

  19. Pregnancy Complicated by Obesity Induces Global Transcript Expression Alterations in Visceral and Subcutaneous Fat

    PubMed Central

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J.; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H.; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet little is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n=4/group) at time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations lead to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT), tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), and ephrin type-B receptor 6 (EPHB6), not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:24696292

  20. The transcription of the alarmin cytokine interleukin-1 alpha is controlled by hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 alpha in hypoxic cells.

    PubMed

    Rider, Peleg; Kaplanov, Irena; Romzova, Marianna; Bernardis, Liora; Braiman, Alex; Voronov, Elena; Apte, Ron N

    2012-01-01

    During hypoxia, cells undergo transcriptional changes to adjust to metabolic stress, to promote cell survival, and to induce pro-angiogenic factors. Hypoxia-induced factors (HIFs) regulate these transcriptional alterations. Failure to restore oxygen levels results in cell death by necrosis. IL-1α is one of the most important mediators of sterile inflammation following hypoxia-mediated necrosis. During hypoxia, IL-1α is up-regulated and released from necrotic cells, promoting the initiation of sterile inflammation. This study examined the role of IL-1α transcription in initiation of hypoxic stress and the correlation between IL-1α transcription and HIFα factors. In an epithelial cell line cultured under hypoxic conditions, IL-1α transcription was up-regulated in a process mediated and promoted by HIFα factors. IL-1α transcription was also up-regulated in hypoxia in a fibroblast cell line, however, in these cells, HIFα factors inhibited the elevation of transcription. These data suggest that HIFα factors play a significant role in initiating sterile inflammation by controlling IL-1α transcription during hypoxia in a differential manner, depending on the cell type.

  1. The transcription of the alarmin cytokine interleukin-1 alpha is controlled by hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 alpha in hypoxic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Peleg; Kaplanov, Irena; Romzova, Marianna; Bernardis, Liora; Braiman, Alex; Voronov, Elena; Apte, Ron N.

    2012-01-01

    During hypoxia, cells undergo transcriptional changes to adjust to metabolic stress, to promote cell survival, and to induce pro-angiogenic factors. Hypoxia-induced factors (HIFs) regulate these transcriptional alterations. Failure to restore oxygen levels results in cell death by necrosis. IL-1α is one of the most important mediators of sterile inflammation following hypoxia-mediated necrosis. During hypoxia, IL-1α is up-regulated and released from necrotic cells, promoting the initiation of sterile inflammation. This study examined the role of IL-1α transcription in initiation of hypoxic stress and the correlation between IL-1α transcription and HIFα factors. In an epithelial cell line cultured under hypoxic conditions, IL-1α transcription was up-regulated in a process mediated and promoted by HIFα factors. IL-1α transcription was also up-regulated in hypoxia in a fibroblast cell line, however, in these cells, HIFα factors inhibited the elevation of transcription. These data suggest that HIFα factors play a significant role in initiating sterile inflammation by controlling IL-1α transcription during hypoxia in a differential manner, depending on the cell type. PMID:23049530

  2. Rational Design of Pathogen-Mimicking Amphiphilic Materials as Nanoadjuvants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulery, Bret D.; Petersen, Latrisha K.; Phanse, Yashdeep; Kong, Chang Sun; Broderick, Scott R.; Kumar, Devender; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Rajan, Krishna; Wannemuehler, Michael J.; Bellaire, Bryan H.; Metzger, Dennis W.; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2011-12-01

    An opportunity exists today for cross-cutting research utilizing advances in materials science, immunology, microbial pathogenesis, and computational analysis to effectively design the next generation of adjuvants and vaccines. This study integrates these advances into a bottom-up approach for the molecular design of nanoadjuvants capable of mimicking the immune response induced by a natural infection but without the toxic side effects. Biodegradable amphiphilic polyanhydrides possess the unique ability to mimic pathogens and pathogen associated molecular patterns with respect to persisting within and activating immune cells, respectively. The molecular properties responsible for the pathogen-mimicking abilities of these materials have been identified. The value of using polyanhydride nanovaccines was demonstrated by the induction of long-lived protection against a lethal challenge of Yersinia pestis following a single administration ten months earlier. This approach has the tantalizing potential to catalyze the development of next generation vaccines against diseases caused by emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

  3. An inducible HSP70 gene from the midge Chironomus dilutus: Characterization and transcription profile under environmental stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karouna-Renier, N. K.; Rao, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we identified and characterized an inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) from the midge Chironomus dilutus and investigated the transcriptional profile of the gene under baseline and environmentally stressful conditions. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we observed increased expression of CD-HSP70-1 in response to both heat shock and copper stress. We also investigated the expression of this gene during midge development. All C. dilutus developmental stages expressed CD-HSP70-1 under normal conditions, although at extremely low levels. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence demonstrated distinct clustering of this gene with inducible HSP70s from other insect species. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  4. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in aniline-induced splenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M. Firoze . E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu; Kannan, Subburaj; Wang Jianling

    2006-01-15

    Signaling mechanisms in aniline-induced fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen are not known. Previous studies have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron accumulation and oxidative stress in the spleen, which may cause activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors and regulate the transcription of genes involved in fibrosis and/or tumorigenesis. To test this, male SD rats were treated with 0.5 mmol/kg/day aniline via drinking water for 30 days, and activation of transcription factor AP-1 was determined in the splenocyte nuclear extracts (NEs). AP-1 DNA-binding activity in the NEs of freshly isolated splenocytes from aniline-treated rats increased in comparison to the controls, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). AP-1 binding was also determined in the NEs of cultured splenocytes (2 h and 24 h), which showed even a greater increase in binding activity at 2 h. The specificity of AP-1 binding for relevant DNA motifs was confirmed by competition EMSA and by supershift EMSA using antibodies specific to c-Jun and c-Fos. To further explore the signaling mechanisms in the AP-1 activation, phosphorylation patterns of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Aniline exposure induced increases in the phosphorylation of the three classes of MAPKs: extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1/2), and p38 MAPKs. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression showed a 3-fold increase in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. These observations suggest a strong association among MAPK phosphorylation, AP-1 activation, and enhanced TGF-{beta}1 gene expression. The observed sequence of events subsequent to aniline exposure could regulate genes that lead to fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  5. Repeated Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Induced PC-12 Cell Death through the Involvement of FOXO Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Han, Na; Kim, You Jeong; Park, Su Min; Kim, Seung Man; Lee, Ji Suk; Jung, Hye Sook; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyoon; Kim, Tae Nyun; Kwon, Min Jeong; Lee, Soon Hee; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment and brain damage in diabetes is suggested to be associated with hypoglycemia. The mechanisms of hypoglycemia-induced neural death and apoptosis are not clear and reperfusion injury may be involved. Recent studies show that glucose deprivation/reperfusion induced more neuronal cell death than glucose deprivation itself. The forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are implicated in the regulation of cell apoptosis and survival, but their role in neuronal cells remains unclear. We examined the role of FOXO transcription factors and the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and apoptosis-related signaling pathways in PC-12 cells exposed to repeated glucose deprivation/reperfusion. Methods PC-12 cells were exposed to control (Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium [DMEM] containing 25 mM glucose) or glucose deprivation/reperfusion (DMEM with 0 mM glucose for 6 hours and then DMEM with 25 mM glucose for 18 hours) for 5 days. MTT assay and Western blot analysis were performed for cell viability, apoptosis, and the expression of survival signaling pathways. FOXO3/4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining was done to ascertain the involvement of FOXO transcription factors in glucose deprivation/reperfusion conditions. Results Compared to PC-12 cells not exposed to hypoglycemia, cells exposed to glucose deprivation/reperfusion showed a reduction of cell viability, decreased expression of phosphorylated Akt and Bcl-2, and an increase of cleaved caspase-3 expression. Of note, FOXO3 protein was localized in the nuclei of glucose deprivation/reperfusion cells but not in the control cells. Conclusion Repeated glucose deprivation/reperfusion caused the neuronal cell death. Activated FOXO3 via the PI3K/Akt pathway in repeated glucose deprivation/reperfusion was involved in genes related to apoptosis. PMID:27766247

  6. Activation of the neu tyrosine kinase induces the fos/jun transcription factor complex, the glucose transporter and ornithine decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the ability of the neu tyrosine kinase to induce a signal for the activation of cell growth-regulated genes. Serum-starved NIH 3T3 cells expressing an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF- R)/neu construct encoding a hybrid receptor protein were stimulated with EGF and the activation of the neu tyrosine kinase and stimulation of growth factor inducible genes were followed at the mRNA, protein, and activity levels, and compared to the corresponding responses in the neu proto-oncogene and oncogene expressing cells. Induction of the expression of jun mRNAs was an immediate early effect of EGF stimulation, followed by a marked increase in the biosynthesis of the fos/jun transcription factor complex and an increased transcription factor activity as measured by a recombinant transcription unit using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays. In distinction, elevated AP- 1/PEA-1 activity in the absence of a significant increase in jun and fos expression was characteristic of the neu oncogene-expressing cells. The glucose transporter mRNA increased at 2 h of EGF stimulation and was associated with enhanced glucose transport of the EGF-treated cells. An increase of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) mRNA and activity followed these changes. In contrast, serum-starved, EGF-treated neu proto-oncogene- and oncogene-expressing cells showed constitutively low and high glucose transporter and ODC activities, respectively. These findings demonstrate that the chimeric EGF-R/neu receptor is capable of activating the expression of both immediate early genes and biochemical activities associated with cell growth stimulation. PMID:2572601

  7. Functions of Smad Transcription Factors in TGF-β1-Induced Selectin Ligand Expression on Murine CD4 Th Cells.

    PubMed

    Ebel, Mark E; Kansas, Geoffrey S

    2016-10-01

    Selectins are carbohydrate-binding adhesion molecules that control leukocyte traffic. Induction of selectin ligands on T cells is controlled primarily by cytokines, including TGF-β1, and requires p38α MAPK, but transcriptional mechanisms that underlie cytokine-driven selectin ligand expression are poorly understood. In this study, we show, using mice with conditional deletions of the TGF-β1-responsive transcription factors Smad2, Smad3, or Smad4, that induction of selectin ligands on CD4 cells in response to TGF-β1 requires Smad4 plus either Smad2 or Smad3. Analysis of CD4 cells from mice with only one functional Smad4 allele revealed a sharp gene dosage effect, suggesting the existence of a threshold of TGF-β1 signal strength required for selectin ligand induction. Both Smad4 plus either Smad2 or Smad3 were selectively required for induction of Fut7 and Gcnt1, glycosyltransferases critical for selectin ligand biosynthesis, but they were not required for St3gal4 or St3gal6 induction. Smad4 plus either Smad2 or Smad3 were also required for induction of Runx transcription factors by TGF-β1. Enforced expression of Runx2, but not Runx1 or Runx3, in Smad2/Smad3 doubly deficient CD4 cells restored selectin ligand expression to wild-type levels. In contrast, enforced expression of Runx1, Runx2, or Runx3 failed to restore differentiation of TGF-β1-dependent Th cell lineages, including Th17, Th9, and induced regulatory T cells. These results show that Smads are directly required for Th cell differentiation independent of Runx induction but only indirectly required via Runx2 for TGF-β1-induced selectin ligand induction on murine CD4 T cells. PMID:27543612

  8. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase activates Nrf2 signalling and induces heme oxygenase 1 transcription in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Wood, J T; Whitten, K M; Vadivel, S K; Seng, S; Makriyannis, A; Avraham, H K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Endocannabinoids such as anandamide (AEA) are important lipid ligands regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Their levels are regulated by hydrolase enzymes, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). Here, we investigated whether FAAH or AEA are involved in NF (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant responsive element (ARE) pathway. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of AEA or FAAH inhibition by the URB597 inhibitor or FAAH/siRNA on the activation of Nrf2-ARE signalling pathway and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction and transcription. KEY RESULTS Endogenous AEA was detected in the immortalized human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells (0.034 ng per 106 cells) but not in MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Because breast tumour cells express FAAH abundantly, we examined the effects of FAAH on Nrf2/antioxidant pathway. We found that inhibition of FAAH by the URB597 inhibitor induced antioxidant HO-1 in breast cancer cells and MCF-10A cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of FAAH or treatment with AEA-activated ARE-containing reporter induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, independent of the cannabinoid receptors, CB1, CB2 or TRPV1. Furthermore, URB597, AEA and siRNA-FAAH treatments induced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2, while siRNA-Nrf2 treatment and Keap1 expression blocked AEA, URB597 and si-FAAH from activation of ARE reporter and HO-1 induction. siRNA-HO-1 treatment decreased the viability of breast cancer cells and MCF-10A cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data uncovered a novel mechanism by which inhibition of FAAH or exposure to AEA induced HO-1 transcripts and implicating AEA and FAAH as direct modifiers in signalling mediated activation of Nrf2-HO-1 pathway, independent of cannabinoid receptors. PMID:23347118

  9. Triptolide Abrogates Growth of Colon Cancer and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest by Inhibiting Transcriptional Activation of E2F

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Rohit; Skube, Steven J; Majumder, Kaustav; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sangwan, Veena; Li, Lihua; Dawra, Rajinder; Subramanian, Subbaya; Saluja, Ashok; Dudeja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite significant progress in diagnostics and therapeutics, over fifty thousand patients die from colorectal cancer annually. Hence there is urgent need for new lines of treatment. Triptolide, a natural compound isolated from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii, is effective against multiple cancers. We have synthesized a water soluble analog of triptolide, named Minnelide, which is currently in phase I trial against pancreatic cancer. The aims of the current study were to evaluate whether triptolide/Minnelide is effective against colorectal cancer and to elucidate the mechanism by which triptolide induces cell death in colorectal cancer. Methods Efficacy of Minnelide was evaluated in subcutaneous xenograft and liver metastasis model of colorectal cancer. For mechanistic studies colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 were treated with triptolide and the effect on viability, caspase activation, annexin positivity, lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) release and cell cycle progression was evaluated. Effect of triptolide on E2F transcriptional activity, mRNA levels of E2F dependent genes, E2F1-Rb binding and proteins levels of regulator of G1-S transition was also measured. DNA binding of E2F1 was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Results Triptolide decreased colon cancer cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Minnelide markedly inhibited the growth of colon cancer in the xenograft and liver metastasis model of colon cancer and more than doubles the median survival of animals with liver metastases from colon cancer. Mechanistically we demonstrate that at low concentrations, triptolide induces apoptotic cell death but at higher concentrations it induces cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that triptolide is able to induce G1 cell cycle arrest by inhibiting transcriptional activation of E2F1. Our data also show that triptolide downregulates E2F activity by potentially modulating events downstream of DNA binding. Conclusion

  10. A major peroxiredoxin-induced activation of Yap1 transcription factor is mediated by reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds and reveals a low level of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Shoko; Murayama, Asako; Naganuma, Akira; Nomoto, Akio; Kuge, Shusuke

    2009-02-13

    Redox reactions involving cysteine thiol-disulfide exchange are crucial for the intracellular monitoring of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Yap1, the master transcription factor for the oxidative stress response in budding yeast, is activated by the formation of disulfide bonds in response to H(2)O(2). Gpx3 (glutathione peroxidase-like protein 3) acts as a receptor for H(2)O(2), and Ybp1 (Yap1-binding protein 1) is crucial for Gpx3-dependent disulfide bond formation in Yap1. We previously reported that Tsa1, a major peroxiredoxin in yeast cells, is required for activation of Yap1 in a widely used yeast strain, W303-1b, carrying the ybp1-1 mutant allele encoding a truncated Ybp1 protein. In the present study, we show that Tsa1 can interact with Yap1 via disulfide linkages and induce the formation of intramolecular disulfide bonds in Yap1 in ybp1-1 cells. The results provide evidence that Prx can have intrinsic activity as an H(2)O(2) receptor and can relay H(2)O(2) as a signal to the Prx target proteins in terms of formation of disulfide linkage. Furthermore, our data reveal that there is more of the reduction-resistant active form of Yap1 (i.e. Yap1 (oxII)) when it is partnered with Gpx3 than with Tsa1. These data support our hypothesis that changes in the redox status of Yap1 to reduction-resistant forms by multiple disulfide bond formation are important for determining the level and duration of Yap1 activity in the dynamic equilibrium of redox reactions in cells exposed to H(2)O(2). PMID:19106090

  11. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT. PMID:26160345

  12. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  13. DNA damage and transcriptional changes induced by tributyltin (TBT) after short in vivo exposures of Chironomus riparius (Diptera) larvae.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Ozáez, Irene; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a widespread environmental contaminant in aquatic systems whose adverse effects in development and reproduction are related to its well-known endocrine-disrupting activity. In this work, the early molecular effects of TBT in Chironomus riparius (Diptera) were evaluated by analyzing its DNA damaging potential and the transcriptional response of different endocrine-related genes. Twenty-four-hour in vivo exposures of the aquatic larvae, at environmentally relevant doses of TBT, revealed genotoxic activity as shown by significant increases in DNA strand breaks quantified with the comet assay. TBT was also able to induce significant increases in transcripts from the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the ultraspiracle gene (usp) (insect ortholog of the retinoid X receptor), the estrogen-related receptor (ERR) gene and the E74 early ecdysone-inducible gene, as measured by real-time RT-PCR. In contrast, the expression of the vitellogenin (vg) gene remained unaltered, while the hsp70 gene appeared to be down-regulated. The ability of TBT to up-regulate hormonal target genes provides the first evidence, at genomic level, of its endocrine disruptive effects and also suggests a mechanism of action that mimics ecdysteroid hormones in insects. These data reveal for the first time the early genomic effects of TBT on an insect genome.

  14. Characterization of the arom gene in Rhizoctonia solani, and transcription patterns under stable and induced hypovirulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Liu, Chunyu; Mishra, Prashant K; Tavantzis, Stellos

    2006-03-01

    The quinate pathway is induced by quinate in the wild-type virulent Rhizoctonia solani isolate Rhs 1AP but is constitutive in the hypovirulent, M2 dsRNA-containing isolate Rhs 1A1. Constitutive expression of the quinate pathway results in downregulation of the shikimate pathway, which includes the pentafunctional arom gene in Rhs 1A1. The arom gene has 5,323 bp including five introns as opposed to a single intron found in arom in ascomycetes. A 199-bp upstream sequence has a GC box, no TATAA box, but two GTATTAGA repeats. The largest arom transcript is 5,108 nucleotides long, excluding the poly(A) tail. It contains an open reading frame of 4,857 bases, coding for a putative 1,618-residue pentafunctional AROM protein. A Kozak sequence (GCGCCATGG) is present between +127 and +135. The 5'-end of the arom mRNA includes two nucleotides (UA) that are not found in the genomic sequence, and are probably added post-transcriptionally. Size and sequence heterogeneity were observed at both 5'- and 3'-end of the mRNA. Northern blot and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses showed that presence of a low amount of quinate, inducer of the quinate pathway, resulted in increased levels of arom mRNA, consistent with the compensation effect observed in ascomycetes.

  15. HCV Infection and Interferon-Based Treatment Induce p53 Gene Transcription in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients.

    PubMed

    Świątek-Kościelna, Bogna; Kałużna, Ewelina Maria; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Rembowska, Jolanta; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona; Bereszyńska, Iwona; Czubała, Katarzyna; Dziechciowska, Katarzyna; Wysocka-Leszczyńska, Joanna; Barcińska, Dominika; Wysocki, Jacek; Nowak, Jerzy Stanisław

    2015-10-01

    It is suggested that the tumor suppressor p53 gene, classified as an interferon-stimulated gene, is implicated in the interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity against viruses. This study aimed to examine the transcriptional response of the p53 gene to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and IFN-based therapy in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. The study included 65 CHC patients (HCV genotype 1), treated with pegylated IFN-α and ribavirin, and 51 healthy individuals. p53 gene expression was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Analyses were performed before and at weeks 4 and 12 of treatment. p53 gene expression was significantly upregulated in CHC patients compared with healthy controls and at week 4 of therapy. No significant differences in p53 mRNA expression between rapid virologic responders, complete early virologic responders, and nonresponders were observed. No significant correlation was found between p53 gene expression and viral load. The results obtained indicate that HCV infection and IFN-based treatment induces p53 gene transcription in PBMCs. The p53 gene may therefore play a role in HCV infection but is not directly involved in treatment-induced HCV elimination. Moreover, variations in p53 gene expression do not determine on-treatment response in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection.

  16. Transcription-coupled and global genome repair differentially influence UV-B-induced acute skin effects and systemic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Garssen, J; van Steeg, H; de Gruijl, F; de Boer, J; van der Horst, G T; van Kranen, H; van Loveren, H; van Dijk, M; Fluitman, A; Weeda, G; Hoeijmakers, J H

    2000-06-15

    Exposure to UV-B radiation impairs immune responses in mammals by inhibiting especially Th1-mediated contact hypersensitivity and delayed-type hypersensitivity. Immunomodulation is not restricted to the exposed skin, but is also observed at distant sites, indicating the existence of mediating factors such as products from exposed skin cells or photoactivated factors present in the superficial layers. DNA damage appears to play a key role, because enhanced nucleotide excision repair (NER) strongly counteracts immunosuppression. To determine the effects of the type and genomic location of UV-induced DNA damage on immunosuppression and acute skin reactions (edema and erythema) four congenic mouse strains carrying different defects in NER were compared: CSB and XPC mice lacking transcription-coupled or global genome NER, respectively, as well as XPA and TTD/XPD mice carrying complete or partial defects in both NER subpathways, respectively. The major conclusions are that 1) transcription-coupled DNA repair is the dominant determinant in protection against acute skin effects; 2) systemic immunomodulation is only affected when both NER subpathways are compromised; and 3) sunburn is not related to UV-B-induced immunosuppression. PMID:10843671

  17. Overproduction of Indole-3-Acetic Acid in Free-Living Rhizobia Induces Transcriptional Changes Resembling Those Occurring in Nodule Bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Defez, Roberto; Esposito, Roberta; Angelini, Claudia; Bianco, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    Free-living bacteria grown under aerobic conditions were used to investigate, by next-generation RNA sequencing analysis, the transcriptional profiles of Sinorhizobium meliloti wild-type 1021 and its derivative, RD64, overproducing the main auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Among the upregulated genes in RD64 cells, we detected the main nitrogen-fixation regulator fixJ, the two intermediate regulators fixK and nifA, and several other genes known to be FixJ targets. The gene coding for the sigma factor RpoH1 and other genes involved in stress response, regulated in a RpoH1-dependent manner in S. meliloti, were also induced in RD64 cells. Under microaerobic condition, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the genes fixJL and nifA were up-regulated in RD64 cells as compared with 1021 cells. This work provided evidence that the overexpression of IAA in S. meliloti free-living cells induced many of the transcriptional changes that normally occur in nitrogen-fixing root nodule. PMID:27003799

  18. Cocaine induces cell death and activates the transcription nuclear factor kappa-B in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Munhoz, Carolina D; Kawamoto, Elisa M; Yshii, Lidia M; Lima, Larissa S; Curi-Boaventura, Maria F; Salgado, Thais M L; Curi, Rui; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine is a worldwide used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is very complex and involves several neurotransmitter systems. For example, cocaine increases extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulates several transcription factors. NF-kappaB is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression involved in cellular death. Our aim was to investigate the toxicity and modulation of NF-kappaB activity by cocaine in PC 12 cells. Treatment with cocaine (1 mM) for 24 hours induced DNA fragmentation, cellular membrane rupture and reduction of mitochondrial activity. A decrease in Bcl-2 protein and mRNA levels, and an increase in caspase 3 activity and cleavage were also observed. In addition, cocaine (after 6 hours treatment) activated the p50/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB complex and the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the NF-kappaB activation. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by using PDTC and Sodium Salicilate increased cell death caused by cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine induces cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) and activates NF-kappaB in PC12 cells. This activation occurs, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors and seems to have an anti-apoptotic effect on these cells. PMID:19183502

  19. N-Acetylneuraminic Acid Supplementation Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats through Transcriptional and Nontranscriptional Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yida, Zhang; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Ismail, Norsharina; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Wong, Waiteng; Altine Adamu, Hadiza; Md Zamri, Nur Diyana; Ideris, Aini; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini

    2015-01-01

    N-Acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is a biomarker of cardiometabolic diseases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that dietary Neu5Ac may improve cardiometabolic indices. A high fat diet (HFD) + Neu5Ac (50 or 400 mg/kg BW/day) was fed to rats and compared with HFD + simvastatin (10 mg/kg BW/day) or HFD alone for 12 weeks. Weights and serum biochemicals (lipid profile, oral glucose tolerance test, leptin, adiponectin, and insulin) were measured, and mRNA levels of insulin signaling genes were determined. The results indicated that low and high doses of sialic acid (SA) improved metabolic indices, although only the oral glucose tolerance test, serum triglycerides, leptin, and adiponectin were significantly better than those in the HFD and HFD + simvastatin groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the results showed that only high-dose SA significantly affected the transcription of hepatic and adipose tissue insulin signaling genes. The data suggested that SA prevented HFD-induced insulin resistance in rats after 12 weeks of administration through nontranscriptionally mediated biochemical changes that may have differentially sialylated glycoprotein structures at a low dose. At higher doses, SA induced transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes. These effects suggest that low and high doses of SA may produce similar metabolic outcomes in relation to insulin sensitivity through multiple mechanisms. These findings are worth studying further. PMID:26688813

  20. Purification and characterization of FBI-1, a cellular factor that binds to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inducer of short transcripts.

    PubMed

    Pessler, F; Pendergrast, P S; Hernandez, N

    1997-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of RNA molecules, short transcripts and full-length transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts depends on a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts (IST), located in large part downstream of the HIV-1 start site of transcription. IST does not require any viral product for function and is thought to direct the assembly of transcription complexes that are incapable of efficient elongation. Nothing is known, however, about the biochemical mechanisms that mediate IST function. Here, we report the identification and purification of a factor that binds specifically to the IST. This factor, FBI-1, recognizes a large bipartite binding site that coincides with the bipartite IST element. It is constituted at least in part by an 86-kDa polypeptide that can be specifically cross-linked to IST. FBI-1 also binds to promoter and attenuation regions of a number of cellular and viral transcription units that are regulated by a transcription elongation block. This observation, together with the observation that the binding of FBI-1 to IST mutants correlates with the ability of these mutants to direct IST function, suggests that FBI-1 may be involved in the establishment of abortive transcription complexes.

  1. Purification and characterization of FBI-1, a cellular factor that binds to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inducer of short transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Pessler, F; Pendergrast, P S; Hernandez, N

    1997-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of RNA molecules, short transcripts and full-length transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts depends on a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts (IST), located in large part downstream of the HIV-1 start site of transcription. IST does not require any viral product for function and is thought to direct the assembly of transcription complexes that are incapable of efficient elongation. Nothing is known, however, about the biochemical mechanisms that mediate IST function. Here, we report the identification and purification of a factor that binds specifically to the IST. This factor, FBI-1, recognizes a large bipartite binding site that coincides with the bipartite IST element. It is constituted at least in part by an 86-kDa polypeptide that can be specifically cross-linked to IST. FBI-1 also binds to promoter and attenuation regions of a number of cellular and viral transcription units that are regulated by a transcription elongation block. This observation, together with the observation that the binding of FBI-1 to IST mutants correlates with the ability of these mutants to direct IST function, suggests that FBI-1 may be involved in the establishment of abortive transcription complexes. PMID:9199312

  2. Definition of early transcriptional circuitry involved in light-induced reversal of PIF-imposed repression of photomorphogenesis in young Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Leivar, Pablo; Tepperman, James M; Monte, Elena; Calderon, Robert H; Liu, Tiffany L; Quail, Peter H

    2009-11-01

    Light signals perceived by the phytochromes induce the transition from skotomorphogenic to photomorphogenic development (deetiolation) in dark-germinated seedlings. Evidence that a quadruple mutant (pifq) lacking four phytochrome-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIF1, 3, 4, and 5) is constitutively photomorphogenic in darkness establishes that these factors sustain the skotomorphogenic state. Moreover, photoactivated phytochromes bind to and induce rapid degradation of the PIFs, indicating that the photoreceptor reverses their constitutive activity upon light exposure, initiating photomorphogenesis. Here, to define the modes of transcriptional regulation and cellular development imposed by the PIFs, we performed expression profile and cytological analyses of pifq mutant and wild-type seedlings. Dark-grown mutant seedlings display cellular development that extensively phenocopies wild-type seedlings grown in light. Similarly, 80% of the gene expression changes elicited by the absence of the PIFs in dark-grown pifq seedlings are normally induced by prolonged light in wild-type seedlings. By comparing rapidly light-responsive genes in wild-type seedlings with those responding in darkness in the pifq mutant, we identified a subset, enriched in transcription factor-encoding genes, that are potential primary targets of PIF transcriptional regulation. Collectively, these data suggest that the transcriptional response elicited by light-induced PIF proteolysis is a major component of the mechanism by which the phytochromes pleiotropically regulate deetiolation and that at least some of the rapidly light-responsive genes may comprise a transcriptional network directly regulated by the PIF proteins.

  3. Male Fertility Is Reduced by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Mimicking Sleep Apnea in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Marta; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Dalmases, Mireia; Calle, Alexandra; Pericuesta, Eva; Montserrat, Josep M.; Navajas, Daniel; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Farré, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by intermittent hypoxia and oxidative stress. However, it is unknown whether intermittent hypoxia mimicking OSA modifies male fertility. We tested the hypothesis that male fertility is reduced by chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking OSA in a mouse model. Design: Case-control comparison in a murine model. Setting: University research laboratory. Participants: Eighteen F1 (C57BL/6xCBA) male mice. Interventions: Mice were subjected to a pattern of periodic hypoxia (20 sec at 5% O2 followed by 40 sec of room air) 6 h/day for 60 days or normoxia. After this period, mice performed a mating trial to determine effective fertility by assessing the number of pregnant females and fetuses. Measurements and Results: After euthanasia, oxidative stress in testes was assessed by measuring the expression of glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) and superoxide dismutase-1 (Sod1) by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sperm motility was determined by Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS). Intermittent hypoxia significantly increased testicular oxidative stress, showing a reduction in the expression of Gpx1 and Sod1 by 38.9% and 34.4%, respectively, as compared with normoxia (P < 0.05). Progressive sperm motility was significantly reduced from 27.0 ± 6.4% in normoxia to 12.8 ± 1.8% in the intermittent hypoxia group (P = 0.04). The proportion of pregnant females and number of fetuses per mating was significantly lower in the intermittent hypoxia group (0.33 ± 0.10 and 2.45 ± 0.73, respectively) than in normoxic controls (0.72 ± 0.16 and 5.80 ± 1.24, respectively). Conclusions: These results suggest that the intermittent hypoxia associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) could induce fertility reduction in male patients with this sleep breathing disorder. Citation: Torres M, Laguna-Barraza R, Dalmases M, Calle A, Pericuesta E, Montserrat JM, Navajas D, Gutierrez-Adan A, Farré R. Male fertility is

  4. BET Inhibition Attenuates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammatory Response by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Transcription and Enhancer Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinjing; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Ruichuan; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. H. pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by enhanced expression of many NF-κB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. Brd4 has emerged as an important NF-κB regulator and regulates the expression of many NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. In this study, we demonstrated that Brd4 was not only actively involved in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene mRNA transcription but also H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene enhancer RNA (eRNA) synthesis. Suppression of H. pylori-induced eRNA synthesis impaired H. pylori-induced mRNA synthesis. Furthermore, H. pylori stimulated NF-κB-dependent recruitment of Brd4 to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes to facilitate the RNA polymerase II-mediated eRNA and mRNA synthesis. Inhibition of Brd4 by JQ1 attenuated H. pylori-induced eRNA and mRNA synthesis for a subset of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. JQ1 also inhibited H. pylori-induced interaction between Brd4 and RelA and the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA polymerase II to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 suppressed inflammatory gene expression, inflammation, and cell proliferation in H. pylori-infected mice. These studies highlight the importance of Brd4 in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene expression and suggest that Brd4 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of H. pylori-triggered inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27084101

  5. Molecular characterization of BZR transcription factor family and abiotic stress induced expression profiling in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Kayum, Md Abdul; Kang, Jong-Goo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-07-01

    BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT (BZR) transcription factors (TFs) are primarily well known as positive regulators of Brassinosteroid (BR) signal transduction in different plants. BR is a plant specific steroid hormone, which has multiple stress resistance functions besides various growth regulatory roles. Being an important regulator of the BR synthesis, BZR TFs might have stress resistance related activities. However, no stress resistance related functional study of BZR TFs has been reported in any crop plants so far. Therefore, this study identified 15 BZR TFs of Brassica rapa (BrBZR) from a genome-wide survey and characterized them through sequence analysis and expression profiling against several abiotic stresses. Various systematic in silico analysis of these TFs validated the fundamental properties of BZRs, where a high degree of similarity also observed with recognized BZRs of other plant species from the comparison studies. In the organ specific expression analyses, 6 BrBZR TFs constitutively expressed in flower developmental stages indicating their flower specific functions. Subsequently, from the stress resistance related expression profiles differential transcript abundance levels were observed by 6 and 11 BrBZRs against salt and drought stresses, respectively. All BrBZRs showed several folds up-regulation against exogenous ABA treatment. All BrBZRs also showed differential expression against low temperature stress treatments and these TFs were proposed as transcriptional activators of CBF cold response pathway of B. rapa. Notably, three BrBZRs gave co-responsive expression against all the stresses tested here, suggesting their multiple stress resistance related functions. Thus, the findings would be helpful in resolving the complex regulatory mechanism of BZRs in stress resistance and further functional genomics study of these potential TFs in different Brassica crops. PMID:25931321

  6. Transcription Factor Amr1 Induces Melanin Biosynthesis and Suppresses Virulence in Alternaria brassicicola

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yangrae; Srivastava, Akhil; Ohm, Robin A.; Lawrence, Christopher B.; Wang, Koon-Hui; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Marahatta, Sharadchandra P.

    2012-05-01

    Alternaria brassicicola is a successful saprophyte and necrotrophic plant pathogen. Several A. brassicicola genes have been characterized as affecting pathogenesis of Brassica species. To study regulatory mechanisms of pathogenesis, we mined 421 genes in silico encoding putative transcription factors in a machine-annotated, draft genome sequence of A. brassicicola. In this study, targeted gene disruption mutants for 117 of the transcription factor genes were produced and screened. Three of these genes were associated with pathogenesis. Disruption mutants of one gene (AbPacC) were nonpathogenic and another gene (AbVf8) caused lesions less than half the diameter of wild-type lesions. Unexpectedly, mutants of the third gene, Amr1, caused lesions with a two-fold larger diameter than the wild type and complementation mutants. Amr1 is a homolog of Cmr1, a transcription factor that regulates melanin biosynthesis in several fungi. We created gene deletion mutants of ?amr1 and characterized their phenotypes. The ?amr1 mutants used pectin as a carbon source more efficiently than the wild type, were melanin-deficient, and more sensitive to UV light and glucanase digestion. The AMR1 protein was localized in the nuclei of hyphae and in highly melanized conidia during the late stage of plant pathogenesis. RNA-seq analysis revealed that three genes in the melanin biosynthesis pathway, along with the deleted Amr1 gene, were expressed at low levels in the mutants. In contrast, many hydrolytic enzyme-coding genes were expressed at higher levels in the mutants than in the wild type during pathogenesis. The results of this study suggested that a gene important for survival in nature negatively affected virulence, probably by a less efficient use of plant cell-wall materials. We speculate that the functions of the Amr1 gene are important to the success of A. brassicicola as a competitive saprophyte and plant parasite.

  7. Transcription factor IIIA induced bending of the Xenopus somatic 5S gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Schroth, G P; Cook, G R; Bradbury, E M; Gottesfeld, J M

    1989-08-10

    Transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), the canonical zinc-finger protein, is a protein of relative molecular mass 39,000 (39K) that is required for transcription of 5S-ribosomal subunit genes in Xenopus. It binds in a sequence-specific manner to the internal control region of the 5S gene (see Fig. 1) and facilitates transcription of the gene by RNA polymerase III. It also binds to the 5S gene product to form a 7S ribonucleoprotein particle. In oocytes the 7S particle acts as a storage form of the RNA to be utilized later in development. TFIIIA binds to DNA through its 30 K N-terminal domain, which contains nine zinc-fingers. TFIIIA was the first protein described to have this type of DNA binding motif, but numerous other proteins have now been shown to have zinc-finger domains. A structure for a single zinc-finger from the yeast protein ADR1, was recently proposed based on two-dimensional NMR data (ref. 8), and a similar structure was proposed based on comparison with crystal structures of other metalloproteins. Although models for the interaction of TFIIIA with the 5S-ribosomal gene DNA have been proposed, based on nuclease digestion and methylation interference data, little precise structural information is available for TFIIIA and the physical basis for the interaction of zinc-fingers with DNA is not understood. Using both circular permutation and circularization assays we provide convincing biochemical evidence that TFIIIA bends the DNA at the internal promoter of the 5S gene.

  8. Endothelial Inflammatory Transcriptional Responses Induced by Plasma Following Inhalation of Diesel Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Ronnebaum, Sarah M.; Madden, Michael; Channell, Meghan M.; Campen, Matthew J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Air pollution, especially emissions derived from traffic sources, is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it remains unclear how inhaled factors drive extrapulmonary pathology. Objectives Previously, we found that canonical inflammatory response transcripts were elevated in cultured endothelial cells treated with plasma obtained after exposure compared with pre-exposure samples or filtered air (sham) exposures. While the findings confirmed the presence of bioactive factor(s) in the plasma after diesel inhalation, we wanted to better examine the complete genomic response to investigate 1) major responsive transcripts and 2) collected response pathways and ontogeny that may help to refine this method and inform the pathogenesis. Methods We assayed endothelial RNA with gene expression microarrays, examining the responses of cultured endothelial cells to plasma obtained from 6 healthy human subjects exposed to 100 μg/m3 diesel exhaust or filtered air for 2 h on separate occasions. In addition to pre-exposure baseline samples, we investigated samples obtained immediately-post and 24h-post exposure. Results Microarray analysis of the coronary artery endothelial cells challenged with plasma identified 855 probes that changed over time following diesel exhaust exposure. Over-representation analysis identified inflammatory cytokine pathways were upregulated both at the 2 and 24 h condition. Novel pathways related to FOX transcription factors and secreted extracellular factors were also identified in the microarray analysis. Conclusions These outcomes are consistent with our recent findings that plasma contains bioactive and inflammatory factors following pollutant inhalation. The specific study design implicates a novel pathway related to inflammatory blood borne components that may drive the extrapulmonary toxicity of ambient air pollutants. PMID:25942053

  9. Molecular characterization of BZR transcription factor family and abiotic stress induced expression profiling in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Kayum, Md Abdul; Kang, Jong-Goo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-07-01

    BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT (BZR) transcription factors (TFs) are primarily well known as positive regulators of Brassinosteroid (BR) signal transduction in different plants. BR is a plant specific steroid hormone, which has multiple stress resistance functions besides various growth regulatory roles. Being an important regulator of the BR synthesis, BZR TFs might have stress resistance related activities. However, no stress resistance related functional study of BZR TFs has been reported in any crop plants so far. Therefore, this study identified 15 BZR TFs of Brassica rapa (BrBZR) from a genome-wide survey and characterized them through sequence analysis and expression profiling against several abiotic stresses. Various systematic in silico analysis of these TFs validated the fundamental properties of BZRs, where a high degree of similarity also observed with recognized BZRs of other plant species from the comparison studies. In the organ specific expression analyses, 6 BrBZR TFs constitutively expressed in flower developmental stages indicating their flower specific functions. Subsequently, from the stress resistance related expression profiles differential transcript abundance levels were observed by 6 and 11 BrBZRs against salt and drought stresses, respectively. All BrBZRs showed several folds up-regulation against exogenous ABA treatment. All BrBZRs also showed differential expression against low temperature stress treatments and these TFs were proposed as transcriptional activators of CBF cold response pathway of B. rapa. Notably, three BrBZRs gave co-responsive expression against all the stresses tested here, suggesting their multiple stress resistance related functions. Thus, the findings would be helpful in resolving the complex regulatory mechanism of BZRs in stress resistance and further functional genomics study of these potential TFs in different Brassica crops.

  10. Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Jim S

    2014-01-01

    Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety. PMID:25114385

  11. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kimberly C.; Manna, Sunil K.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L.; Thomas, Renard L.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Pellis, Neil R.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent.

  12. P53 plays a protective role against UV- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis in transcription-coupled repair proficient fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    McKay, B C; Becerril, C; Ljungman, M

    2001-10-11

    We previously reported that transcription-coupled repair (TCR)-deficient human fibroblasts are extremely sensitive to UV-induced apoptosis and this sensitivity correlated with the induction of the p53 tumour suppressor. However, we have also found that p53 can be protective against UV-induced apoptosis. Thus, prior to this study, it was not clear whether the induction of p53 in TCR-deficient fibroblasts contributed to their death. To address this issue, we have expressed human papillomavirus E6 (HPV-E6) in primary fibroblasts derived from patients affected with xeroderma pigmentosum (complementation groups A, B and C) and Cockayne syndrome (complementation group B). We found that TCR-deficient (XP-A, XP-B and CS-B) fibroblasts were more sensitive than TCR-proficient cells (XP-C and normal) to both UV light and cisplatin treatment and this increase in sensitivity was not p53 dependent. Importantly, HPV-E6 expression increased the sensitivity of TCR-proficient normal and XP-C fibroblasts to UV- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. This increase in sensitivity correlated with a decrease in the capacity of HPV-E6 expressing cells to recover mRNA synthesis following UV-irradiation. Therefore, we propose that p53 protects against UV- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis in a TCR-dependent manner and that p53 does not contribute strongly to the induction of apoptosis in TCR-deficient fibroblasts. PMID:11709715

  13. Ybp1 is required for the hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation of the Yap1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Veal, Elizabeth A; Ross, Sarah J; Malakasi, Panagiota; Peacock, Emma; Morgan, Brian A

    2003-08-15

    We describe the characterization of Ybp1, a novel protein, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that is required for the oxidative stress response to peroxides. Ybp1 is required for H2O2-induced expression of the antioxidant encoding gene TRX2. Our data indicate that the effects of Ybp1 are mediated through the Yap1 transcription factor. Indeed, Ybp1 forms a stress-induced complex with Yap1 in vivo and stimulates the nuclear accumulation of Yap1 in response to H2O2 but not in response to the thiol-oxidizing agent diamide. The H2O2-induced nuclear accumulation of Yap1 is regulated by the oxidation of specific cysteine residues and is dependent on the thiol peroxidase Gpx3. Our data suggest that Ybp1 is required for the H2O2-induced oxidation of Yap1 and acts in the same pathway as Gpx3. Consequently, Ybp1 represents a novel class of stress regulator of Yap1. These data have important implications for the regulation of protein oxidation and stress responses in eukaryotes. PMID:12743123

  14. Transcription Factor HBP1 Enhances Radiosensitivity by Inducing Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yicheng; Wang, Yueping; Yu, Yanlan; Xu, Liwei; Zhang, Youyun; Yu, Shicheng; Li, Gonghui; Zhang, Zhigeng

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for prostate cancer has been gradually carried out in recent years; however, acquired radioresistance often occurred in some patients after radiotherapy. HBP1 (HMG-box transcription factor 1) is a transcriptional inhibitor which could inhibit the expression of dozens of oncogenes. In our previous study, we showed that the expression level of HBP1 was closely related to prostate cancer metastasis and prognosis, but the relationship between HBP1 and radioresistance for prostate cancer is largely unknown. In this study, the clinical data of patients with prostate cancer was compared, and the positive correlation was revealed between prostate cancer brachytherapy efficacy and the expression level of HBP1 gene. Through research on prostate cancer cells in vitro, we found that HBP1 expression levels were negatively correlated with oncogene expression levels. Furthermore, HBP1 overexpression could sensitize prostate cancer cells to radiation and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. In addition, animal model was employed to analyze the relationship between HBP1 gene and prostate cancer radiosensitivity in vivo; the result showed that knockdown of HBP1 gene could decrease the sensitivity to radiation of xenograft. These studies identified a specific molecular mechanism underlying prostate cancer radiosensitivity, which suggested HBP1 as a novel target in prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26942107

  15. Transcriptional biomarkers and mechanisms of copper-induced olfactory injury in zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, Fred; Tilton, Susan C.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard; Farin, Frederico; Stapleton, Patricia L.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2012-01-01

    Metals such as copper disrupt olfactory function in fish. Unfortunately, little is understood of the molecular consequences of copper olfactory impairment, thus hindering the development of relevant diagnostic tools of olfactory injury. To address this critical data gap, we analyzed gene expression within olfactory tissues of adult zebrafish exposed to CuCl2 (6, 16, 40 ppb) for 24 hrs. Transcriptional markers of copper impairment within the entire olfactory system were identified and specific genes of interest (e.g. S100a, parvalbumin 8, olfactory marker protein, and calbindin 2-like protein) were confirmed with quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, we performed gene set analysis (GSA) using both a-priori and custom pathways of gene sets specifically targeting the olfactory signal transduction (OST) pathway. These analyses revealed down-regulated gene sets related to calcium channels and ion transport, g-proteins, and olfactory receptors. Collectively, these data demonstrate that copper causes a depression of transcription of key genes within the OST pathway and elsewhere within olfactory tissues, likely resulting in an olfactory system less responsive to odorants. Further, these data provide a mechanistic explanation in support of earlier studies of functional olfactory impairment in fish following copper exposure. PMID:19174923

  16. Nonselective inhibition of the epigenetic transcriptional regulator BET induces marked lymphoid and hematopoietic toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong U; Katavolos, Paula; Palanisamy, Gopinath; Katewa, Arna; Sioson, Charly; Corpuz, Janice; Pang, Jodie; DeMent, Kevin; Choo, Edna; Ghilardi, Nico; Diaz, Dolores; Danilenko, Dimitry M

    2016-06-01

    Bromo and extra terminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4 and BRDT) are epigenetic transcriptional regulators required for efficient expression of growth promoting, cell cycle progression and antiapoptotic genes. Through their bromodomain, these proteins bind to acetylated lysine residues of histones and are recruited to transcriptionally active chromatin. Inhibition of the BET-histone interaction provides a tractable therapeutic strategy to treat diseases that may have epigenetic dysregulation. JQ1 is a small molecule that blocks BET interaction with histones. It has been shown to decrease proliferation of patient-derived multiple myeloma in vitro and to decrease tumor burden in vivo in xenograft mouse models. While targeting BET appears to be a viable and efficacious approach, the nonclinical safety profile of BET inhibition remains to be well-defined. We report that mice dosed with JQ1 at efficacious exposures demonstrate dose-dependent decreases in their lymphoid and immune cell compartments. At higher doses, JQ1 was not tolerated and due to induction of significant body weight loss led to early euthanasia. Flow cytometry analysis of lymphoid tissues showed a decrease in both B- and T-lymphocytes with a concomitant decrease in peripheral white blood cells that was confirmed by hematology. Further investigation with the inactive enantiomer of JQ1 showed that these in vivo effects were on-target mediated and not elicited through secondary pharmacology due to chemical structure. PMID:27078884

  17. Transcription factor-induced lineage programming of noradrenaline and motor neurons from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mong, Jamie; Panman, Lia; Alekseenko, Zhanna; Kee, Nigel; Stanton, Lawrence W; Ericson, Johan; Perlmann, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    An important goal in stem cell biology is to develop methods for efficient generation of clinically interesting cell types from relevant stem cell populations. This is particularly challenging for different types of neurons of the central nervous system where hundreds of distinct neuronal cell types are generated during embryonic development. We previously used a strategy based on forced transcription factor expression in embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors to generate specific types of neurons, including dopamine and serotonin neurons. Here, we extend these studies and show that noradrenergic neurons can also be generated from pluripotent embryonic stem cells by forced expression of the homeobox transcription factor Phox2b under the signaling influence of fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) and bone morphogenetic proteins. In neural progenitors exposed to FGF8 and sonic hedgehog both Phox2b and the related Phox2a instead promoted the generation of neurons with the characteristics of mid- and hindbrain motor neurons. The efficient generation of these neuron types enabled a comprehensive genome-wide gene expression analysis that provided further validation of the identity of generated cells. Moreover, we also demonstrate that the generated cell types are amenable to drug testing in vitro and we show that variants of the differentiation protocols can be applied to cultures of human pluripotent stem cells for the generation of human noradrenergic and visceral motor neurons. Thus, these studies provide a basis for characterization of yet an additional highly clinically relevant neuronal cell type.

  18. The hepatocarcinogenic conazoles: cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, and propiconazole induce a common set of toxicological and transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Hester, Susan; Moore, Tanya; Padgett, William T; Murphy, Lynea; Wood, Charles E; Nesnow, Stephen

    2012-05-01

    Conazoles are fungicides used as agricultural pesticides and pharmaceutical products. We investigated whether a common core of toxicological and transcriptional responses underlies the observed carcinogenic effects of three conazoles: cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, and propiconazole. In studies where mice were fed diets of these conazoles for 30 days, we found a common set of toxicological effects altered by these conazoles: hepatomegaly, hepatocellular hypertrophy, decreased serum cholesterol, decreased hepatic levels of all-trans-retinoic acid, and increased hepatic cell proliferation. Microarray-based transcriptional analysis revealed 330 significantly altered probe sets common to these conazoles, many of which showed strong dose responses for cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferase, and oxidative stress genes. More detailed analyses identified a subset of 80 altered genes common to the three conazoles that were associated with cancer. Pathways associated with these genes included xenobiotic metabolism, oxidative stress, cell signaling, and cell proliferation. A common TGFα-centric pathway was identified within the 80-gene set, which, in combination with the toxicological and other transcriptomic findings, provides a more refined toxicity profile for these carcinogenic conazoles.

  19. The Intracellular Domain of Teneurin-1 Induces the Activity of Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF) by Binding to Transcriptional Repressor HINT1

    PubMed Central

    Schöler, Jonas; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Thiry, Stéphane; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Teneurins are large type II transmembrane proteins that are necessary for the normal development of the CNS. Although many studies highlight the significance of teneurins, especially during development, there is only limited information known about the molecular mechanisms of function. Previous studies have shown that the N-terminal intracellular domain (ICD) of teneurins can be cleaved at the membrane and subsequently translocates to the nucleus, where it can influence gene transcription. Because teneurin ICDs do not contain any intrinsic DNA binding sequences, interaction partners are required to affect transcription. Here, we identified histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1) as a human teneurin-1 ICD interaction partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen. This interaction was confirmed in human cells, where HINT1 is known to inhibit the transcription of target genes by directly binding to transcription factors at the promoter. In a whole transcriptome analysis of BS149 glioblastoma cells overexpressing the teneurin-1 ICD, several microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) target genes were found to be up-regulated. Directly comparing the transcriptomes of MITF versus TEN1-ICD-overexpressing BS149 cells revealed 42 co-regulated genes, including glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB). Using real-time quantitative PCR to detect endogenous GPNMB expression upon overexpression of MITF and HINT1 as well as promoter reporter assays using GPNMB promoter constructs, we could demonstrate that the teneurin-1 ICD binds HINT1, thus switching on MITF-dependent transcription of GPNMB. PMID:25648896

  20. Effect of thyroid hormone concentration on the transcriptional response underlying induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma)

    PubMed Central

    Page, Robert B; Voss, Stephen R; Samuels, Amy K; Smith, Jeramiah J; Putta, Srikrishna; Beachy, Christopher K

    2008-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones (TH) induce gene expression programs that orchestrate amphibian metamorphosis. In contrast to anurans, many salamanders do not undergo metamorphosis in nature. However, they can be induced to undergo metamorphosis via exposure to thyroxine (T4). We induced metamorphosis in juvenile Mexican axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) using 5 and 50 nM T4, collected epidermal tissue from the head at four time points (Days 0, 2, 12, 28), and used microarray analysis to quantify mRNA abundances. Results Individuals reared in the higher T4 concentration initiated morphological and transcriptional changes earlier and completed metamorphosis by Day 28. In contrast, initiation of metamorphosis was delayed in the lower T4 concentration and none of the individuals completed metamorphosis by Day 28. We identified 402 genes that were statistically differentially expressed by ≥ two-fold between T4 treatments at one or more non-Day 0 sampling times. To complement this analysis, we used linear and quadratic regression to identify 542 and 709 genes that were differentially expressed by ≥ two-fold in the 5 and 50 nM T4 treatments, respectively. Conclusion We found that T4 concentration affected the timing of gene expression and the shape of temporal gene expression profiles. However, essentially all of the identified genes were similarly affected by 5 and 50 nM T4. We discuss genes and biological processes that appear to be common to salamander and anuran metamorphosis, and also highlight clear transcriptional differences. Our results show that gene expression in axolotls is diverse and precise, and that axolotls provide new insights about amphibian metamorphosis. PMID:18267027

  1. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tatsuya; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation) system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1300 to produce pCALSR1 and pCALSR2-XSB or pCALSR2-XSB/MN. When these vector constructs were agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a construct expressing a viral silencing suppressor, the infection efficiency of the vectors was 100%. A recombinant ALSV vector carrying part of the 35S promoter sequence induced transcriptional gene silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene in a line of N. benthamiana plants, resulting in the disappearance of green fluorescence of infected plants. Bisulfite sequencing showed that cytosine residues at CG and CHG sites of the 35S promoter sequence were highly methylated in the silenced generation zero plants infected with the ALSV carrying the promoter sequence as well as in progeny. The ALSV-mediated VITGS state was inherited by progeny for multiple generations. In addition, induction of VITGS of an endogenous gene (chalcone synthase-A) was demonstrated in petunia plants infected with an ALSV vector carrying the native promoter sequence. These results suggest that ALSV-based vectors can be applied to study DNA methylation in plant genomes, and provide a useful tool for plant breeding via epigenetic modification. PMID:25426109

  2. Transcription factors RUNX1 and RUNX3 in the induction and suppressive function of Foxp3+ inducible regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Klunker, Sven; Chong, Mark M.W.; Mantel, Pierre-Yves; Palomares, Oscar; Bassin, Claudio; Ziegler, Mario; Rückert, Beate; Meiler, Flurina; Akdis, Mübeccel; Littman, Dan R.

    2009-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)+CD4+CD25+ inducible regulatory T (iT reg) cells play an important role in immune tolerance and homeostasis. In this study, we show that the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induces the expression of the Runt-related transcription factors RUNX1 and RUNX3 in CD4+ T cells. This induction seems to be a prerequisite for the binding of RUNX1 and RUNX3 to three putative RUNX binding sites in the FOXP3 promoter. Inactivation of the gene encoding RUNX cofactor core-binding factor-β (CBFβ) in mice and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated suppression of RUNX1 and RUNX3 in human T cells resulted in reduced expression of Foxp3. The in vivo conversion of naive CD4+ T cells into Foxp3+ iT reg cells was significantly decreased in adoptively transferred CbfbF/F CD4-cre naive T cells into Rag2−/− mice. Both RUNX1 and RUNX3 siRNA silenced human T reg cells and CbfbF/F CD4-cre mouse T reg cells showed diminished suppressive function in vitro. Circulating human CD4+ CD25high CD127− T reg cells significantly expressed higher levels of RUNX3, FOXP3, and TGF-β mRNA compared with CD4+CD25− cells. Furthermore, FOXP3 and RUNX3 were colocalized in human tonsil T reg cells. These data demonstrate Runx transcription factors as a molecular link in TGF-β–induced Foxp3 expression in iT reg cell differentiation and function. PMID:19917773

  3. HIF-1α and PPARγ during physiological cardiac hypertrophy induced by pregnancy: Transcriptional activities and effects on target genes.

    PubMed

    Soñanez-Organis, José G; Godoy-Lugo, José A; Hernández-Palomares, Magally L E; Rodríguez-Martínez, Daniel; Rosas-Rodríguez, Jesús A; González-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2016-10-15

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) are transcription factors that activate genes involved in cellular metabolism. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy induced by pregnancy initiates compensatory changes in metabolism. However, the contributions of HIF-1α and PPARγ to this physiological status and to its reversible, metabolic process (postpartum) in the heart are not well-defined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the transcriptional activities of HIF-1α and PPARγ in the left ventricle of rats before, during, and after pregnancy. Furthermore, the effects of pregnancy on target genes of glycolysis and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis, key regulatory enzymes, and metabolic intermediates were evaluated. The activities of HIF-1α and PPARγ increased 1.2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, during pregnancy, and decreased to basal levels during postpartum. Expressions of mRNA for glucose transport 1 (GLUT1), enzymes of glycolysis (HK2, PFKM, and GAPDH) and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis (GPAT and GPD1) increased 1.6- to 14-fold during pregnancy and returned to basal levels postpartum. The increase in GPD1 expression translated to an increase in its activity, but such was not the case for GAPDH suggesting that post-translational regulation of these proteins is differential during pregnancy. Glycolytic (glucose, lactate, and DHAP) and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis (G3P and FFA) intermediates increased with pregnancy and were maintained postpartum. The results demonstrate that pregnancy-induced, physiological cardiac hypertrophy activates the expression of genes involved in glycolytic and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis suggesting that the shift in cardiac metabolism is mediated by the activation of HIF-1α and PPARγ.

  4. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Tatsuya; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation) system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1300 to produce pCALSR1 and pCALSR2-XSB or pCALSR2-XSB/MN. When these vector constructs were agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a construct expressing a viral silencing suppressor, the infection efficiency of the vectors was 100%. A recombinant ALSV vector carrying part of the 35S promoter sequence induced transcriptional gene silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene in a line of N. benthamiana plants, resulting in the disappearance of green fluorescence of infected plants. Bisulfite sequencing showed that cytosine residues at CG and CHG sites of the 35S promoter sequence were highly methylated in the silenced generation zero plants infected with the ALSV carrying the promoter sequence as well as in progeny. The ALSV-mediated VITGS state was inherited by progeny for multiple generations. In addition, induction of VITGS of an endogenous gene (chalcone synthase-A) was demonstrated in petunia plants infected with an ALSV vector carrying the native promoter sequence. These results suggest that ALSV-based vectors can be applied to study DNA methylation in plant genomes, and provide a useful tool for plant breeding via epigenetic modification. PMID:25426109

  5. The hepatocarcinogenic conazoles: cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, and propiconazole induce a common set of toxicological and transcriptional responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used as agricultural pesticides and pharmaceutical products. The mechanism of conazole-induced liver carcinogenesis in mice has been the subject of intensive investigations. The goals of this study were to apply toxicological and transcriptomic approaches...

  6. The Bacillus subtilis TRAP protein can induce transcription termination in the leader region of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) operon independent of the trp attenuator RNA.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Natalie M; Gollnick, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon is regulated by an attenuation mechanism. When intracellular tryptophan levels are high, the TRAP protein binds to the 5' leader region of the nascent trp mRNA and induces transcription termination prior to the structural genes. In limiting tryptophan, TRAP does not bind and the operon is transcribed. Two competing RNA secondary structures termed the antiterminator and terminator (attenuator) can form in the leader region RNA. In prior attenuation models, the only role of TRAP binding was to alter the RNA secondary structure to allow formation of the attenuator, which has been thought function as an intrinsic transcription terminator. However, recent studies have shown that the attenuator is not an effective intrinsic terminator. From these studies it was not clear whether TRAP functions independently or requires the presence of the attenuator RNA structure. Hence we have further examined the role of the attenuator RNA in TRAP-mediated transcription termination. TRAP was found to cause efficient transcription termination in the trp leader region in vivo when the attenuator was mutated or deleted. However, TRAP failed to induce transcription termination at these mutant attenuators in a minimal in vitro transcription system with B. subtilis RNA polymerase. Further studies using this system showed that NusA as well as the timing of TRAP binding to RNA play a role in the observed differences in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24505391

  7. Acidic extracellular pH of tumors induces octamer-binding transcription factor 4 expression in murine fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Som, Avik; Bloch, Sharon; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4) is an important marker of cellular de-differentiation that can be induced by environmental stressors, such as acidity. Here we demonstrate that chronic acidic stress in solid tumors induced OCT-4 expression in fibroblasts and other stromal cells in four tumor models. The results have implications for how tumors utilize pH modulation to recruit associated stromal cells, induce partial reprogramming of tumor-associated stromal cells, and respond to therapy. PMID:27302093

  8. Defective transcription-coupled repair in Cockayne syndrome B mice is associated with skin cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, G T; van Steeg, H; Berg, R J; van Gool, A J; de Wit, J; Weeda, G; Morreau, H; Beems, R B; van Kreijl, C F; de Gruijl, F R; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1997-05-01

    A mouse model for the nucleotide excision repair disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS) was generated by mimicking a truncation in the CSB(ERCC6) gene of a CS-B patient. CSB-deficient mice exhibit all of the CS repair characteristics: ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity, inactivation of transcription-coupled repair, unaffected global genome repair, and inability to resume RNA synthesis after UV exposure. Other CS features thought to involve the functioning of basal transcription/repair factor TFIIH, such as growth failure and neurologic dysfunction, are present in mild form. In contrast to the human syndrome, CSB-deficient mice show increased susceptibility to skin cancer. Our results demonstrate that transcription-coupled repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers contributes to the prevention of carcinogenesis in mice. Further, they suggest that the lack of cancer predisposition in CS patients is attributable to a global genome repair process that in humans is more effective than in rodents. PMID:9150142

  9. Humanlike Robots - Synthetically Mimicking Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Nature inspired many inventions and the field of technology that is based on the mimicking or inspiration of nature is widely known as Biomimetics and it is increasingly leading to many new capabilities. There are numerous examples of biomimetic successes including the copying of fins for swimming, and the inspiration of the insects and birds flight. More and more commercial implementations of biomimetics are appearing and behaving lifelike and applications are emerging that are important to our daily life. Making humanlike robots is the ultimate challenge to biomimetics and, for many years, it was considered science fiction, but such robots are becoming an engineering reality. Advances in producing such robot are allowing them to perform impressive functions and tasks. The development of such robots involves addressing many challenges and is raising concerns that are related to fear of their application implications and potential ethical issues. In this paper, the state-of-the-art of humanlike robots, potential applications and challenges will be reviewed.

  10. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important.

  11. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important. PMID:27594885

  12. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Tanrıverdi, Elif; Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Gül, Şule; Çörtük, Mustafa; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important. PMID:27594885

  13. Fibrosing mediastinitis mimicking bronchogenic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bayiz, Hulya; Mutluay, Neslihan; Koyuncu, Adem; Demirag, Funda; Dagli, Gulfidan; Berktas, Bahadir; Berkoglu, Mine

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosing mediastinitis is a rare but benign disorder characterized by an excessive fibrotic reaction in the mediastinum which can result in compromise of airways, great vessels, and other mediastinal structures. In this paper we presented a patient with fibrosing mediastinitis mimicking bronchogenic carcinoma. The patient was a 32-year-old diabetic male admitting with cough and hemoptysis. There was a right hilar mass and multiple mediastinal conglomerated lymph nodes on chest computed tomography. Positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) scan demonstrated increased fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake at the right hilar mass lesion and mediastinal lymph nodes. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed mucosal distortion of right upper lobe. Pathologic examination of the mucosal biopsy revealed inflammation. Endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle and cervical mediastinoscopic lymph node biopsies were undiagnostic. Diagnostic thoracotomy confirmed the diagnosis fibrosing mediastinitis. Administration of six months of systemic corticosteroid and antituberculous therapy was not beneficial. In conclusion, despite being a rare clinical entity, fibrosing mediastinitis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal mass lesions of unknown etiology. The diagnosis is exceptionally difficult in the presence of atypical radiological findings. The treatment is particularly challenging without any proven effective therapy. PMID:23372962

  14. Long-distance transport, vacuolar sequestration, tolerance, and transcriptional responses induced by cadmium and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Jobe, Timothy O; Hauser, Felix; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-10-01

    Iron, zinc, copper and manganese are essential metals for cellular enzyme functions while cadmium, mercury and the metalloid arsenic lack any biological function. Both, essential metals, at high concentrations, and non-essential metals and metalloids are extremely reactive and toxic. Therefore, plants have acquired specialized mechanisms to sense, transport and maintain essential metals within physiological concentrations and to detoxify non-essential metals and metalloids. This review focuses on the recent identification of transporters that sequester cadmium and arsenic in vacuoles and the mechanisms mediating the partitioning of these metal(loid)s between roots and shoots. We further discuss recent models of phloem-mediated long-distance transport, seed accumulation of Cd and As and recent data demonstrating that plants posses a defined transcriptional response that allow plants to preserve metal homeostasis. This research is instrumental for future engineering of reduced toxic metal(loid) accumulation in edible crop tissues as well as for improved phytoremediation technologies.

  15. Long-distance transport, vacuolar sequestration and transcriptional responses induced by cadmium and arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Jobe, Timothy O.; Hauser, Felix; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Iron, zinc, copper and manganese are essential metals for cellular enzyme functions while cadmium, mercury and the metalloid arsenic lack any biological function. Both, essential and non-essential metals and metalloids are extremely reactive and toxic. Therefore, plants have acquired specialized mechanisms to sense, transport and maintain essential metals within physiological concentrations and to detoxify non-essential metals and metalloids. This review focuses on the recent identification of transporters that sequester cadmium and arsenic in vacuoles and the mechanisms mediating the partitioning of these metal(loid)s between roots and shoots. We further discuss recent models of phloem-mediated long-distance transport, seed accumulation of Cd and As and recent data demonstrating that plants posses a defined transcriptional response that allow plants to preserve metal homeostasis. This research is instrumental for future engineering of reduced toxic metal(loid) accumulation in edible crop tissues as well as for improved phytoremediation technologies. PMID:21820943

  16. Vitamin C modulates cadmium-induced hepatic antioxidants' gene transcripts and toxicopathic changes in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Yasser S; El-Gazzar, Ahmed M; El-Nahas, Abeer F; Ashry, Khaled M

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the naturally occurring heavy metals having adverse effects, while vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) is an essential micronutrient for fish, which can attenuate tissue damage owing to its chain-breaking antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties. The adult Nile tilapia fish were exposed to Cd at 5 mg/l with and without vitamin C (500 mg/kg diet) for 45 days in addition to negative and positive controls fed with the basal diet and basal diet supplemented with vitamin C, respectively. Hepatic relative mRNA expression of genes involved in antioxidant function, metallothionein (MT), glutathione S-transferase (GST-α1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx1), was assessed using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Hepatic architecture was also histopathologically examined. Tilapia exposed to Cd exhibited upregulated antioxidants' gene transcript levels, GST-⍺1, GPx1, and MT by 6.10-, 4.60-, and 4.29-fold, respectively. Histopathologically, Cd caused severe hepatic changes of multifocal hepatocellular and pancreatic acinar necrosis, and lytic hepatocytes infiltrated with eosinophilic granular cells. Co-treatment of Cd-exposed fish with vitamin C overexpressed antioxidant enzyme-related genes, GST-⍺1 (16.26-fold) and GPx1 (18.68-fold), and maintained the expression of MT gene close to control (1.07-fold), averting the toxicopathic lesions induced by Cd. These results suggested that vitamin C has the potential to protect Nile tilapia from Cd hepatotoxicity via sustaining hepatic antioxidants' genes transcripts and normal histoarchitecture.

  17. Cytosolic calcium transients are a determinant of contraction-induced HSP72 transcription in single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Stary, Creed M; Hogan, Michael C

    2016-05-15

    The intrinsic activating factors that induce transcription of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle following exercise remain unclear. We hypothesized that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with depolarization is a determinant. We utilized intact, single skeletal muscle fibers from Xenopus laevis to test the role of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient and several other exercise-related factors (fatigue, hypoxia, AMP kinase, and cross-bridge cycling) on the activation of HSP72 transcription. HSP72 and HSP60 mRNA levels were assessed with real-time quantitative PCR; cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was assessed with fura-2. Both fatiguing and nonfatiguing contractions resulted in a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. As expected, peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained tightly coupled with peak developed tension in contracting fibers. Pretreatment with N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) resulted in depressed peak developed tension with stimulation, while peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained largely unchanged from control values. Despite excitation-contraction uncoupling, BTS-treated fibers displayed a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. Treatment of fibers with hypoxia (Po2: <3 mmHg) or AMP kinase activation had no effect on HSP72 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the intermittent cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with skeletal muscle depolarization provides a sufficient activating stimulus for HSP72 transcription. Metabolic or mechanical factors associated with fatigue development and cross-bridge cycling likely play a more limited role. PMID:26869714

  18. Residual expression of reprogramming factors affects the transcriptional program and epigenetic signatures of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Cesar A; Christodoulou, Constantina; Gianotti-Sommer, Andreia; Shen, Steven S; Sailaja, Badi Sri; Hezroni, Hadas; Spira, Avrum; Meshorer, Eran; Kotton, Darrell N; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Delivery of the transcription factors Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc via integrating viral vectors has been widely employed to generate induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from both normal and disease-specific somatic tissues, providing an invaluable resource for medical research and drug development. Residual reprogramming transgene expression from integrated viruses nevertheless alters the biological properties of iPSCs and has been associated with a reduced developmental competence both in vivo and in vitro. We performed transcriptional profiling of mouse iPSC lines before and after excision of a polycistronic lentiviral reprogramming vector to systematically define the overall impact of persistent transgene expression on the molecular features of iPSCs. We demonstrate that residual expression of the Yamanaka factors prevents iPSCs from acquiring the transcriptional program exhibited by embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and that the expression profiles of iPSCs generated with and without c-Myc are indistinguishable. After vector excision, we find 36% of iPSC clones show normal methylation of the Gtl2 region, an imprinted locus that marks ESC-equivalent iPSC lines. Furthermore, we show that the reprogramming factor Klf4 binds to the promoter region of Gtl2. Regardless of Gtl2 methylation status, we find similar endodermal and hepatocyte differentiation potential comparing syngeneic Gtl2(ON) vs Gtl2(OFF) iPSC clones. Our findings provide new insights into the reprogramming process and emphasize the importance of generating iPSCs free of any residual transgene expression. PMID:23272148

  19. DEP-induced fra-1 expression correlates with a distinct activation of AP-1-dependent gene transcription in the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Kleeberger, Steven R; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies indicate a potential role for Fra-1, a heterodimeric partner of activator protein (AP)-1, in toxicant-induced epithelial injury, repair, and cellular transformation. Here we have investigated the effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on fra-1 expression in C10 cells, a murine lung epithelial cell line. DEP markedly upregulated fra-1, but not fra-2, expression. The increase in fra-1 mRNA expression correlated well with its protein- and DNA-binding activity. DNA-binding assays also revealed a predominant presence of Jun-B and Jun-D in the AP-1 complex. Interestingly, DEP did not alter Jun-B and Jun-D protein levels. Transcriptional analysis revealed that fra-1 induction is regulated in part at the transcriptional level. The -379 to +32 bp 5'-flanking region mediated this induction. Furthermore, inhibitors of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) significantly suppressed DEP-stimulated fra-1 transcription, suggesting their involvement in the induction process. Consistent with this finding, DEP stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 MAPKs with a distinct activation pattern. Overexpression of Fra-1 downregulated c-Jun and Nrf2 enhanced AP-1- and ARE-mediated reporter gene expression, respectively. In contrast, Fra-1 had the opposite effect on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 promoter activity. In particular, it bound to the functional AP-1 site of the MMP-9 promoter after DEP stimulation. Consistent with this result, DEP also markedly upregulated MMP-9 promoter activity. Collectively, these findings suggest that fra-1 induction by DEP may play a role in selectively regulating gene expression involved in alveolar epithelial cell injury and repair. PMID:14565943

  20. DkMyb2 wound-induced transcription factor of persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.), contributes to proanthocyanidin regulation.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takashi; Ikegami, Ayako; Yonemori, Keizo

    2010-10-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are secondary metabolites that contribute to the protection of a plant against biotic and abiotic stresses. Persimmon (Diospyros kaki) accumulates abundant PAs in each plant organ, and some potential Myb-like transcription factors (Myb-TFs) involved in the production of PAs have been isolated. In this study, we aimed to molecularly characterize one of them, DkMyb2, which was placed in a subclade including a PA regulator of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), TRANSPARENT TESTA2 (TT2), and was co-induced with PA pathway genes after wound stress. Ectopic DkMyb2 overexpression caused significant up-regulation of PA pathway genes in transgenic persimmon calluses and significant accumulation of PA, and increased mean degree of polymerization of PAs in transgenic kiwifruit calluses. Analysis of the DNA-binding ability of DkMyb2 by electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that DkMyb2 directly binds to the AC-rich cis-motifs known as AC elements in the promoters of the two PA pathway genes in persimmon, DkANR, and DkLAR. Furthermore, a transient reporter assay using a dual-luciferase system demonstrated direct transcriptional activation of DkANR and DkLAR by DkMyb2. We also discuss subfunctionalization of two PA regulators in persimmon, DkMyb2 and DkMyb4, as well as PA regulators in other plant species from the viewpoint of their ability to bind to cis-motifs and their functions in transcriptional activation. Our results provide insight into the multiple regulatory mechanisms that control PA metabolism by Myb-TFs in persimmon.

  1. Concordance of transcriptional and apical benchmark dose levels for conazole-induced liver effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Virunya S; Hester, Susan D; Nesnow, Stephen; Eastmond, David A

    2013-11-01

    The ability to anchor chemical class-based gene expression changes to phenotypic lesions and to describe these changes as a function of dose and time informs mode-of-action determinations and improves quantitative risk assessments. Previous global expression profiling identified a 330-probe cluster differentially expressed and commonly responsive to 3 hepatotumorigenic conazoles (cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, and propiconazole) at 30 days. Extended to 2 more conazoles (triadimefon and myclobutanil), the present assessment encompasses 4 tumorigenic and 1 nontumorigenic conazole. Transcriptional benchmark dose levels (BMDL(T)) were estimated for a subset of the cluster with dose-responsive behavior and a ≥ 5-fold increase or decrease in signal intensity at the highest dose. These genes primarily encompassed CAR/RXR activation, P450 metabolism, liver hypertrophy- glutathione depletion, LPS/IL-1-mediated inhibition of RXR, and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress pathways. Median BMDL(T) estimates from the subset were concordant (within a factor of 2.4) with apical benchmark doses (BMDL(A)) for increased liver weight at 30 days for the 5 conazoles. The 30-day median BMDL(T) estimates were within one-half order of magnitude of the chronic BMDLA for hepatocellular tumors. Potency differences seen in the dose-responsive transcription of certain phase II metabolism, bile acid detoxification, and lipid oxidation genes mirrored each conazole's tumorigenic potency. The 30-day BMDL(T) corresponded to tumorigenic potency on a milligram per kilogram day basis with cyproconazole > epoxiconazole > propiconazole > triadimefon > myclobutanil (nontumorigenic). These results support the utility of measuring short-term gene expression changes to inform quantitative risk assessments from long-term exposures.

  2. Resveratrol-induced transcriptional up-regulation of ASMase (SMPD1) of human leukemia and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Naoki; Omori, Yukari; Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Sobue, Sayaka; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Murate, Takashi

    2016-02-19

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant-derived phytoalexin present in plants, whose pleiotropic effects for health benefits have been previously reported. Its anti-cancer activity is among the current topics for novel cancer treatment. Here, effects of RSV on cell proliferation and the sphingolipid metabolism of K562, a human leukemia cell line, were analyzed. Some experiments were also performed in HCT116, a human colon cancer cell line. RSV inhibited cell proliferation of both cell lines. Increased cellular ceramide and decreased sphingomyelin and S1P by RSV were observed in RSV-treated K562 cells. Further analysis revealed that acid sphingomyelinase mRNA and enzyme activity levels were increased by RSV. Desipramine, a functional ASMase inhibitor, prevented RSV-induced ceramide increase. RSV increased ATF3, EGR1, EGR3 proteins and phosphorylated c-Jun and FOXO3. However, co-transfection using these transcription factor expression vectors and ASMase promoter reporter vector revealed positive effects of EGR1 and EGR3 but not others. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated the direct binding of EGR1/3 transcription factors with ASMase 5'-promoter. These results indicate that increased EGR1/3 and ASMase expression play an important role in cellular ceramide increase by RSV treatment. PMID:26809095

  3. Methylation-dependent regulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha gene expression by the transcription factor Kaiso.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Christina C; Longo, Joseph; Bassey-Archibong, Blessing I; Hallett, Robin M; Milosavljevic, Snezana; Beatty, Laura; Hassell, John A; Daniel, Juliet M

    2015-12-01

    Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) is a common characteristic of solid tumors and strongly correlates with poor prognosis and resistance to treatment. In response to hypoxia, cells initiate a cascade of transcriptional events regulated by the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) heterodimer. Since the oxygen-sensitive HIF-1α subunit is stabilized during hypoxia, it functions as the regulatory subunit of the protein. To date, while the mechanisms governing HIF-1α protein stabilization and function have been well studied, those governing HIF1A gene expression are not fully understood. However, recent studies have suggested that methylation of a HIF-1 binding site in the HIF1A promoter prevents its autoregulation. Here we report that the POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso modulates HIF1A gene expression by binding to the methylated HIF1A promoter in a region proximal to the autoregulatory HIF-1 binding site. Interestingly, Kaiso's regulation of HIF1A occurs primarily during hypoxia, which is consistent with the finding that Kaiso protein levels peak after 4 h of hypoxic incubation and return to normoxic levels after 24 h. Our data thus support a role for Kaiso in fine-tuning HIF1A gene expression after extended periods of hypoxia.

  4. Hsp90 induces increased genomic instability toward DNA-damaging agents by tuning down RAD53 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Nidhi; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal K.; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda

    2016-01-01

    It is well documented that elevated body temperature causes tumors to regress upon radiotherapy. However, how hyperthermia induces DNA damage sensitivity is not clear. We show that a transient heat shock and particularly the concomitant induction of Hsp90 lead to increased genomic instability under DNA-damaging conditions. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote, we demonstrate that elevated levels of Hsp90 attenuate efficient DNA damage signaling and dictate preferential use of the potentially mutagenic double-strand break repair pathway. We show that under normal physiological conditions, Hsp90 negatively regulates RAD53 transcription to suppress DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, under DNA damaging conditions, RAD53 is derepressed, and the increased level of Rad53p triggers an efficient DNA damage response. A higher abundance of Hsp90 causes increased transcriptional repression on RAD53 in a dose-dependent manner, which could not be fully derepressed even in the presence of DNA damage. Accordingly, cells behave like a rad53 loss-of-function mutant and show reduced NHEJ efficiency, with a drastic failure to up-regulate RAD51 expression and manifestly faster accumulation of CLN1 and CLN2 in DNA-damaged G1, cells leading to premature release from checkpoint arrest. We further demonstrate that Rad53 overexpression is able to rescue all of the aforementioned deleterious effects caused by Hsp90 overproduction. PMID:27307581

  5. Inhibition of N-Terminal Lysines Acetylation and Transcription Factor Assembly by Epirubicin Induced Deranged Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahper N.; Danishuddin, Mohd; Varshney, Bhavna; Lal, Sunil K.; Khan, Asad U.

    2012-01-01

    Epirubicin (EPI), an anthracycline antitumour antibiotic, is a known intercalating and DNA damaging agent. Here, we study the molecular interaction of EPI with histones and other cellular targets. EPI binding with histone core protein was predicted with spectroscopic and computational techniques. The molecular distance r, between donor (histone H3) and acceptor (EPI) was estimated using Förster’s theory of non-radiation energy transfer and the detailed binding phenomenon is expounded. Interestingly, the concentration dependent reduction in the acetylated states of histone H3 K9/K14 was observed suggesting more repressed chromatin state on EPI treatment. Its binding site near N-terminal lysines is further characterized by thermodynamic determinants and molecular docking studies. Specific DNA binding and inhibition of transcription factor (Tf)-DNA complex formation implicates EPI induced transcriptional inhibition. EPI also showed significant cell cycle arrest in drug treated cells. Chromatin fragmentation and loss of membrane integrity in EPI treated cells is suggestive of their commitment to cell death. This study provides an analysis of nucleosome dynamics during EPI treatment and provides a novel insight into its action. PMID:23251640

  6. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis. PMID:23956416

  7. Overexpression of Arabidopsis and rice stress genes' inducible transcription factor confers drought and salinity tolerance to rice.

    PubMed

    Datta, Karabi; Baisakh, Niranjan; Ganguly, Moumita; Krishnan, Sellapan; Yamaguchi Shinozaki, Kazuko; Datta, Swapan K

    2012-06-01

    Rice yield is greatly affected by environmental stresses such as drought and salinity. In response to the challenge of producing rice plants tolerant to these stresses, we introduced cDNA encoding the transcription factors DREB1A and DREB1B under the control of the stress inducible rd29 promoter. Two different indica rice cultivars were used, BR29, an improved commercially cultivated variety from Bangladesh and IR68899B, an IRRI bred maintainer line for hybrid rice. Agrobacterium mediated transformation of BR29 was done independently with DREB1A isolated from rice and Arabidopsis and DREB1B isolated from rice, whereas biolistic transformation was done with rice- DREB1B in the case of IR68899B. Initial genetic integration was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Salinity tolerance was assayed in very young seedlings. Drought stress tests were found to be more reliable when they were carried out at the pre-flowering booting stage. RNA gel blot analysis as well as quantitative PCR analysis was performed to estimate the transcription level under stressed and unstressed conditions. Agronomic performance studies were done with stressed and unstressed plants to compare the yield losses due to dehydration and salt loading stresses. Noticeably enhanced tolerance to dehydration was observed in the plants transformed with DREB1A isolated from Arabidopsis while DREB1B was found to be more effective for salt tolerance.

  8. Transcript and metabolite analysis of the Trichoderma-induced systemic resistance response to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Yariv; Lisec, Jan; Méret, Michaël; Chet, Ilan; Willmitzer, Lothar; Viterbo, Ada

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we have assessed, by transcriptional and metabolic profiling, the systemic defence response of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to the leaf pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) induced by the beneficial fungus Trichoderma asperelloides T203. Expression analysis (qPCR) of a set of 137 Arabidopsis genes related to Pst defence responses showed that T203 root colonization is not associated with major detectable transcriptomic changes in leaves. However, plants challenged with the bacterial pathogen showed quantitative differences in gene expression when pre-inoculated with T203, supporting priming of the plant by this beneficial fungus. Among the defence-related genes affected by T203, lipid transfer protein (LTP)4, which encodes a member of the lipid transfer pathogenesis-related family, is upregulated, whereas the WRKY40 transcription factor, known to contribute to Arabidopsis susceptibility to bacterial infection, shows reduced expression. On the other hand, root colonization by this beneficial fungus substantially alters the plant metabolic profile, including significant changes in amino acids, polyamines, sugars and citric acid cycle intermediates. This may in part reflect an increased energy supply required for the activation of plant defences and growth promotion effects mediated by Trichoderma species.

  9. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS E7 ENHANCES HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1 MEDIATED TRANSCRIPTION BY INHIBITING BINDING OF HISTONE DEACETYLASES

    PubMed Central

    Bodily, Jason M.; Mehta, Kavi P. M.; Laimins, Laimonis A.

    2010-01-01

    Infection by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) leads to the formation of benign lesions, warts, and in some cases, cervical cancer. The formation of these lesions is dependent upon increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors. Angiogenesis is linked to tissue hypoxia through the activity of the oxygen sensitive hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). Our studies indicate that the HPV E7 protein enhances HIF-1 transcriptional activity while E6 functions to counteract the repressive effects of p53. Both high and low risk HPV E7 proteins were found to bind to HIF-1α through a domain located in the the N terminus. Importantly, the ability of E7 to enhance HIF-1 activity mapped to the C terminus and correlated with the displacement of the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC4, and HDAC7 from HIF-1α by E7. Our findings describe a novel role of the E7 oncoprotein in activating the function of a key transcription factor mediating hypoxic responses by blocking the binding of HDACs. PMID:21148070

  10. Plants on constant alert: elevated levels of jasmonic acid and jasmonate-induced transcripts in caterpillar-resistant maize.

    PubMed

    Shivaji, Renuka; Camas, Alberto; Ankala, Arunkanth; Engelberth, Jurgen; Tumlinson, James H; Williams, W Paul; Wilkinson, Jeff R; Luthe, Dawn Sywassink

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine if constitutive levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and other octadecanoid compounds were elevated prior to herbivory in a maize genotype with documented resistance to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and other lepidopteran pests. The resistant inbred Mp708 had approximately 3-fold higher levels of jasmonic acid (JA) prior to herbivore feeding than the susceptible inbred Tx601. Constitutive levels of cis-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) also were higher in Mp708 than Tx601. In addition, the constitutive expression of JA-inducible genes, including those in the JA biosynthetic pathway, was higher in Mp708 than Tx601. In response to herbivory, Mp708 generated comparatively higher levels of hydrogen peroxide, and had a greater abundance of NADPH oxidase transcripts before and after caterpillar feeding. Before herbivore feeding, low levels of transcripts encoding the maize insect resistance cysteine protease (Mir1-CP) and the Mir1-CP protein were detected consistently. Thus, Mp708 appears to have a portion of its defense pathway primed, which results in constitutive defenses and the ability to mount a stronger defense when caterpillars attack. Although the molecular mechanisms that regulate the constitutive accumulation of JA in Mp708 are unknown, it might account for its enhanced resistance to lepidopteran pests. This genotype could be valuable in studying the signaling pathways that maize uses to response to insect herbivores.

  11. ATF1 Modulates the Heat Shock Response by Regulating the Stress-Inducible Heat Shock Factor 1 Transcription Complex

    PubMed Central

    Takii, Ryosuke; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Tan, Ke; Takaki, Eiichi; Hayashida, Naoki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The heat shock response is an evolutionally conserved adaptive response to high temperatures that controls proteostasis capacity and is regulated mainly by an ancient heat shock factor (HSF). However, the regulation of target genes by the stress-inducible HSF1 transcription complex has not yet been examined in detail in mammalian cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that HSF1 interacted with members of the ATF1/CREB family involved in metabolic homeostasis and recruited them on the HSP70 promoter in response to heat shock. The HSF1 transcription complex, including the chromatin-remodeling factor BRG1 and lysine acetyltransferases p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP), was formed in a manner that was dependent on the phosphorylation of ATF1. ATF1-BRG1 promoted the establishment of an active chromatin state and HSP70 expression during heat shock, whereas ATF1-p300/CBP accelerated the shutdown of HSF1 DNA-binding activity during recovery from acute stress, possibly through the acetylation of HSF1. Furthermore, ATF1 markedly affected the resistance to heat shock. These results revealed the unanticipated complexity of the primitive heat shock response mechanism, which is connected to metabolic adaptation. PMID:25312646

  12. S-S synapsis during class switch recombination is promoted by distantly located transcriptional elements and activation-induced deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wuerffel, Robert; Wang, Lili; Grigera, Fernando; Manis, John; Selsing, Erik; Perlot, Thomas; Alt, Frederick W; Cogne, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Kenter, Amy L

    2007-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying synapsis of activation-induced deaminase (AID)-targeted S regions during class switch recombination (CSR) are poorly understood. By using chromosome conformation capture techniques, we found that in B cells, the Emicro and 3'Ealpha enhancers were in close spatial proximity, forming a unique chromosomal loop configuration. B cell activation led to recruitment of the germline transcript (GLT) promoters to the Emicro:3'Ealpha complex in a cytokine-dependent fashion. This structure facilitated S-S synapsis because Smicro was proximal to Emicro and a downstream S region was corecruited with the targeted GLT promoter to Emicro:3'Ealpha. We propose that GLT promoter association with the Emicro:3'Ealpha complex creates an architectural scaffolding that promotes S-S synapsis during CSR and that these interactions are stabilized by AID. Thus, the S-S synaptosome is formed as a result of the self-organizing transcription system that regulates GLT expression and may serve to guard against spurious chromosomal translocations.

  13. ATF1 modulates the heat shock response by regulating the stress-inducible heat shock factor 1 transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Takii, Ryosuke; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Tan, Ke; Takaki, Eiichi; Hayashida, Naoki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Nakai, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock response is an evolutionally conserved adaptive response to high temperatures that controls proteostasis capacity and is regulated mainly by an ancient heat shock factor (HSF). However, the regulation of target genes by the stress-inducible HSF1 transcription complex has not yet been examined in detail in mammalian cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that HSF1 interacted with members of the ATF1/CREB family involved in metabolic homeostasis and recruited them on the HSP70 promoter in response to heat shock. The HSF1 transcription complex, including the chromatin-remodeling factor BRG1 and lysine acetyltransferases p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP), was formed in a manner that was dependent on the phosphorylation of ATF1. ATF1-BRG1 promoted the establishment of an active chromatin state and HSP70 expression during heat shock, whereas ATF1-p300/CBP accelerated the shutdown of HSF1 DNA-binding activity during recovery from acute stress, possibly through the acetylation of HSF1. Furthermore, ATF1 markedly affected the resistance to heat shock. These results revealed the unanticipated complexity of the primitive heat shock response mechanism, which is connected to metabolic adaptation.

  14. PHO13 deletion-induced transcriptional activation prevents sedoheptulose accumulation during xylose metabolism in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiqing; Kim, Sooah; Sorek, Hagit; Lee, Youngsuk; Jeong, Deokyeol; Kim, Jungyeon; Oh, Eun Joong; Yun, Eun Ju; Wemmer, David E; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-03-01

    The deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a phosphatase enzyme of unknown specificity, results in the transcriptional activation of genes related to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as TAL1 encoding transaldolase. It has been also reported that the pho13Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae expressing a heterologous xylose pathway can metabolize xylose efficiently compared to its parental strain. However, the interaction between the pho13Δ-induced transcriptional changes and the phenotypes of xylose fermentation was not understood. Thus we investigated the global metabolic changes in response to pho13Δ when cells were exponentially growing on xylose. Among the 134 intracellular metabolites that we identified, the 98% reduction of sedoheptulose was found to be the most significant change in the pho13Δ mutant as compared to its parental strain. Because sedoheptulose-7-phosphate (S7P), a substrate of transaldolase, reduced significantly in the pho13Δ mutant as well, we hypothesized that limited transaldolase activity in the parental strain might cause dephosphorylation of S7P, leading to carbon loss and inefficient xylose metabolism. Mutants overexpressing TAL1 at different degrees were constructed, and their TAL1 expression levels and xylose consumption rates were positively correlated. Moreover, as TAL1 expression levels increased, intracellular sedoheptulose concentration dropped significantly. Therefore, we concluded that TAL1 upregulation, preventing the accumulation of sedoheptulose, is the most critical mechanism for the improved xylose metabolism by the pho13Δ mutant of engineered S. cerevisiae.

  15. A forkhead Transcription Factor Is Wound-Induced at the Planarian Midline and Required for Anterior Pole Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scimone, M. Lucila; Lapan, Sylvain W.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Planarian regeneration requires positional information to specify the identity of tissues to be replaced as well as pluripotent neoblasts capable of differentiating into new cell types. We found that wounding elicits rapid expression of a gene encoding a Forkhead-family transcription factor, FoxD. Wound-induced FoxD expression is specific to the ventral midline, is regulated by Hedgehog signaling, and is neoblast-independent. FoxD is subsequently expressed within a medial subpopulation of neoblasts at wounds involving head regeneration. Ultimately, FoxD is co-expressed with multiple anterior markers at the anterior pole. Inhibition of FoxD with RNA interference (RNAi) results in the failure to specify neoblasts expressing anterior markers (notum and prep) and in anterior pole formation defects. FoxD(RNAi) animals fail to regenerate a new midline and to properly pattern the anterior blastema, consistent with a role for the anterior pole in organizing pattern of the regenerating head. Our results suggest that wound signaling activates a forkhead transcription factor at the midline and, if the head is absent, FoxD promotes specification of neoblasts at the prior midline for anterior pole regeneration. PMID:24415944

  16. Characterization and expression of transcripts induced by oxygen deprivation in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed Central

    Peschke, V M; Sachs, M M

    1994-01-01

    Until recently, the only genes described in plants induced by oxygen deprivation (anoxia or hypoxia) encoded enzymes of glucose-phosphate metabolism. In the present study, two flooding-induced maize (Zea mays L.) genes that may serve a different function have been identified. These genes, with unique kinetics of mRNA induction under flooding conditions, were not induced by heat, cold, or salt stress or by seedling death. The predicted protein sequence of one gene, wusl1005, is similar to that of several other plant genes, including a nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L.) xyloglucan-endo-transglycosylase. The predicted protein sequence of the other gene showed no significant homology to genes of known function, indicating that both of these genes may play novel roles in the maize response to oxygen deprivation. PMID:7909162

  17. Induced expression from the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat during differentiation of human myeloid cells is mediated through its transcriptional enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Reisman, D; Rotter, V

    1989-01-01

    Transcription from the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) long terminal repeat (LTR) is inhibited in murine stem cells and induced during maturation of these cells. We have investigated whether alterations in the activity of this viral regulatory element also occur during differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells. The Mo-MuLV LTR and the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter were introduced into HL-60 promyelocytes on Epstein-Barr virus-derived chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression vectors. When these cells were induced to terminally differentiate, transcription from the Mo-MuLV LTR was induced approximately 10-fold. Expression from the SV40 promoter remained constant during differentiation of these cells. Replacing the SV40 transcriptional enhancer with the Mo-MuLV LTR transcriptional enhancer rendered the SV40 promoter inducible during differentiation. We conclude that sequences within the transcriptional enhancer of the Mo-MuLV LTR contain cis-acting elements responsible for induction of gene expression during differentiation of human myeloid cells. Images PMID:2477690

  18. IKKβ and NFκB transcription govern lymphoma cell survival through AKT-induced plasma membrane trafficking of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Sommermann, Thomas; O’Neill, Kathleen; Plas, David R.; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    All cancer cells require increased nutrient uptake to support proliferation. Here we investigated the signals that govern glucose uptake in B-cell lymphomas and determined that the protein kinase IKKβ induced GLUT1 membrane trafficking in both viral and spontaneous B-cell lymphomas. IKKβ induced AKT activity, while IKKβ-driven NFκB transcription was required for GLUT1 surface localization downstream of AKT. Activated NFκB promoted AKT-mediated phosphorylation of the GLUT1 regulator, AKT Substrate 160kD (AS160), but was not required for AKT phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulator Tuberous Sclerosis 2 (TSC2). In Epstein Barr virus (EBV) transformed B-cells, NFκB inhibition repressed glucose uptake and induced caspase-independent cell death associated with autophagy. After NFκB inhibition, an alternate carbon source ameliorated both autophagy and cell death, whereas autophagy inhibitors specifically accelerated cell death. Taken together, the results suggest that NFκB signaling establishes a metabolic program supporting proliferation and apoptosis resistance by driving glucose import. PMID:21987722

  19. Phorate-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and transcriptional activation of p53 and caspase genes in male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saquib, Quaiser; Attia, Sabry M.; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A.M.; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Giesy, John P.; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-02-15

    Male Wistar rats exposed to a systemic organophosphorus insecticide, phorate [O,O-diethyl S-[(ethylthio) methyl] phosphorothioate] at varying oral doses of 0.046, 0.092 or 0.184 mg phorate/kg bw for 14 days, exhibited substantial oxidative stress, cellular DNA damage and activation of apoptosis-related p53, caspase 3 and 9 genes. The histopathological changes including the pyknotic nuclei, inflammatory leukocyte infiltrations, renal necrosis, and cardiac myofiber degeneration were observed in the liver, kidney and heart tissues. Biochemical analysis of catalase and glutathione revealed significantly lesser activities of antioxidative enzymes and lipid peroxidation in tissues of phorate exposed rats. Furthermore, generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in bone marrow cells confirmed phorate-induced oxidative stress. Significant DNA damage was measured through comet assay in terms of the Olive tail moment in bone marrow cells of treated animals as compared to control. Cell cycle analysis also demonstrated the G{sub 2}/M arrest and appearance of a distinctive SubG{sub 1} peak, which signified induction of apoptosis. Up-regulation of tumor suppressor p53 and caspase 3 and 9 genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, elucidated the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways in response to cellular stress. Overall, the results suggest that phorate induces genetic alterations and cellular toxicity, which can adversely affect the normal cellular functioning in rats. -- Highlights: ► This is the first report on molecular toxicity of phorate in an in vivo test system. ► Phorate induces biochemical and histological changes in liver, kidney and heart. ► Rats treated with phorate exhibited DNA damage in bone marrow cells. ► Phorate induces apoptosis, oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial fluorescence. ► Phorate induces transcriptional changes and enhanced

  20. Homocysteine Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression via Transcription Factor Nrf2 Activation in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Monireh; Golmohammadi, Taghi; Khaghani, Shahnaz; Zamani, Zahra; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Meshkani, Reza; Pasalar, Parvin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Elevated level of plasma homocysteine has been related to various diseases. Patients with hyperhomocysteinemia can develop hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. We hypothesized that oxidative stress induced by homocysteine might play an important role in pathogenesis of liver injury. Also, the cellular response designed to combat oxidative stress is primarily controlled by the transcription factor Nrf2, a principal inducer of anti-oxidant and phase II-related genes. Methods: HepG2 cells were treated with homocysteine in different time periods. Glutathione content was measured by flowcytometry. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Western-blotting, anti-oxidant response element (ARE)-binding activity of Nrf2 for heme ocygenase-1 (HO-1) was demonstrated. Real time RT-PCR and Western-blotting were performed to evaluate whether homocysteine was able to induce mRNA and protein expression of HO-1. Results: The role of Nrf2 in cellular response to homocysteine is substantiated by the following observations in HepG2 cells exposed to homocysteine (i) Western-blotting revealed that Nrf2 is strongly stabilized and became detectable in nuclear extracts. (ii) EMSA demonstrated increased binding of Nrf2 to oligomers containing HO-1 promoter-specific ARE-binding site. (iii) Real time RT-PCR and Western-blotting revealed increased mRNA and protein expression of inducible gene HO-1 after treatment with homocysteine. Conclusion: Data presented in the current study provide direct evidence that the immediate cellular response to oxidative stress provoked by homocysteine is orchestrated mainly by the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Therefore, induction of Nrf2-ARE-dependent expression of HO-1 could be a therapeutic option for hepatic cells damage induced by homocysteine. PMID:23567851

  1. CM156, a Sigma Receptor Ligand, Reverses Cocaine-Induced Place Conditioning and Transcriptional Responses in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Tong; Robson, Matthew J.; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Patel, Divyen; Rooney, Robert; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine induces neuroadaptations which contribute to the rewarding properties of cocaine. Using cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) as an animal model of reward, earlier studies have shown that sigma (σ) receptor ligands can attenuate the acquisition, expression and reactivation of CPP. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that are associated with these changes are not yet understood. In the present study, CM156, a novel antagonist with high selectivity and affinity for σ receptors was used to attenuate the expression of cocaine-induced CPP in mice. Immediately following the behavioral evaluations, mouse brain tissues were collected and alterations in gene expression in half brain samples were profiled by cDNA microarray analysis. Microarray data was analyzed by three distinct normalization methods and four genes were consistently found to be upregulated by cocaine when compared to saline controls. Each of these gene changes were found by more than one normalization method to be reversed by at least one dose of CM156. Quantitative real time PCR confirmed that a single administration of CM156 was able to reverse the cocaine-induced increases in three of these four genes: metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (malat1), tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein (ywhaz), and transthyretin (ttr). These genes are involved in processes related to neuroplasticity and RNA editing. The data presented herein provides evidence that pharmacological intervention with a putative σ receptor antagonist reverses alterations in gene expression that are associated with cocaine-induced reward. PMID:22234290

  2. The transcription factor ATF7 mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced epigenetic changes in macrophages involved in innate immunological memory.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Maekawa, Toshio; Zhu, Yujuan; Renard-Guillet, Claire; Chatton, Bruno; Inoue, Kentaro; Uchiyama, Takeru; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Yamada, Takuji; Ohno, Naohito; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2015-10-01

    Immunological memory is thought to be mediated exclusively by lymphocytes. However, enhanced innate immune responses caused by a previous infection increase protection against reinfection, which suggests the presence of innate immunological memory. Here we identified an important role for the stress-response transcription factor ATF7 in innate immunological memory. ATF7 suppressed a group of genes encoding factors involved in innate immunity in macrophages by recruiting the histone H3K9 dimethyltransferase G9a. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics bacterial infection, induced phosphorylation of ATF7 via the kinase p38, which led to the release of ATF7 from chromatin and a decrease in repressive histone H3K9me2 marks. A partially disrupted chromatin structure and increased basal expression of target genes were maintained for long periods, which enhanced resistance to pathogens. ATF7 might therefore be important in controlling memory in cells of the innate immune system.

  3. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation.

  4. A bHLH-Type Transcription Factor, ABA-INDUCIBLE BHLH-TYPE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR/JA-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1, Acts as a Repressor to Negatively Regulate Jasmonate Signaling in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Herde, Marco; Koo, Abraham J.K.; Moreno, Javier E.; Suzuki, Kaoru; Howe, Gregg A.; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are plant hormones that regulate the balance between plant growth and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although recent studies have uncovered the mechanisms for JA-induced responses in Arabidopsis thaliana, the mechanisms by which plants attenuate the JA-induced responses remain elusive. Here, we report that a basic helix-loop-helix–type transcription factor, ABA-INDUCIBLE BHLH-TYPE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR/JA-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1), acts as a transcriptional repressor and negatively regulates JA signaling. Gain-of-function transgenic plants expressing the chimeric repressor for JAM1 exhibited substantial reduction of JA responses, including JA-induced inhibition of root growth, accumulation of anthocyanin, and male fertility. These plants were also compromised in resistance to attack by the insect herbivore Spodoptera exigua. Conversely, jam1 loss-of-function mutants showed enhanced JA responsiveness, including increased resistance to insect attack. JAM1 and MYC2 competitively bind to the target sequence of MYC2, which likely provides the mechanism for negative regulation of JA signaling and suppression of MYC2 functions by JAM1. These results indicate that JAM1 negatively regulates JA signaling, thereby playing a pivotal role in fine-tuning of JA-mediated stress responses and plant growth. PMID:23673982

  5. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine induces pulmonary vascular dysfunction via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha.

    PubMed

    Pekarova, Michaela; Koudelka, Adolf; Kolarova, Hana; Ambrozova, Gabriela; Klinke, Anna; Cerna, Anna; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Trundova, Maria; Sindlerova Svihalkova, Lenka; Kuchta, Radek; Kuchtova, Zdenka; Lojek, Antonin; Kubala, Lukas

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), associated with imbalance in vasoactive mediators and massive remodeling of pulmonary vasculature, represents a serious health complication. Despite the progress in treatment, PH patients typically have poor prognoses with severely affected quality of life. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), also represents one of the critical regulators of pulmonary vascular functions. The present study describes a novel mechanism of ADMA-induced dysfunction in human pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The effect of ADMA was compared with well-established model of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular dysfunction. It was discovered for the first time that ADMA induced the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in both types of cells, associated with drastic alternations in normal cellular functions (e.g., nitric oxide production, cell proliferation/Ca(2+) concentration, production of pro-inflammatory mediators, and expression of eNOS, DDAH1, and ICAM-1). Additionally, ADMA significantly enhanced the hypoxia-mediated increase in the signaling cascades. In summary, increased ADMA may lead to manifestation of PH phenotype in human endothelial and smooth muscle cells via the STAT3/HIF-1α cascade. Therefore this signaling pathway represents the potential pathway for future clinical interventions in PH. PMID:26091577

  6. The influence of EDDS on the metabolic and transcriptional responses induced by copper in hydroponically grown Brassica carinata seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cestone, Benedetta; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Sgherri, Cristina; Navari-Izzo, Flavia

    2012-06-01

    To improve the knowledge about the use of plants for the removal of toxic metals from contaminated soils, metabolic and transcriptional responses of Brassica carinata to different forms of copper (Cu) were studied. Two-week-old hydroponically grown seedlings were exposed for 24 h to 30 μM CuSO₄ or CuEDDS. CuSO₄ appeared to be more toxic than CuEDDS as roots showed higher levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and increased relative leakage ratios (RLR), although the superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) activity increased following both exposures. In CuSO₄-exposed seedlings the higher toxicity was underlined by increased transcription of lipoxygenases (EC 1.13.11.12) and NADPH oxidases (EC 1.6.99.6) and by the higher Cu accumulation in both tissues compared to CuEDDS exposure. The presence of EDDS increased Cu translocation, which resulted 5-times higher than when exposed to CuSO₄. Decreases in catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) activities together with increases of reduced glutathione (GSH) and tocopherols and a reduction of lipoic acid (LA) were observed in roots of CuSO₄-exposed seedlings. On the contrary, CuEDDS exposure induced a general increase in enzyme activities and decreases in ascorbate (AsA) and tocopherol levels. In the primary leaves, in both exposures Cu differently affected the oxidative stress responses indicating that the cellular redox balance was anyway maintained. EDDS plays a crucial role in B. carinata tolerance to oxidative stress induced by Cu and might be proposed to improve the efficiency of Cu phytoextraction.

  7. Sodium hydrosulfide induces systemic thermotolerance to strawberry plants through transcriptional regulation of heat shock proteins and aquaporin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperature extremes represent an important limiting factor to plant growth and productivity. The present study evaluated the effect of hydroponic pretreatment of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa cv. ‘Camarosa’) roots with an H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; 100 μM for 48 h), on the response of plants to acute heat shock treatment (42°C, 8 h). Results Heat stress-induced phenotypic damage was ameliorated in NaHS-pretreated plants, which managed to preserve higher maximum photochemical PSII quantum yields than stressed plants. Apparent mitigating effects of H2S pretreatment were registered regarding oxidative and nitrosative secondary stress, since malondialdehyde (MDA), H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO) were quantified in lower amounts than in heat-stressed plants. In addition, NaHS pretreatment preserved ascorbate/glutathione homeostasis, as evidenced by lower ASC and GSH pool redox disturbances and enhanced transcription of ASC (GDH) and GSH biosynthetic enzymes (GS, GCS), 8 h after heat stress imposition. Furthermore, NaHS root pretreatment resulted in induction of gene expression levels of an array of protective molecules, such as enzymatic antioxidants (cAPX, CAT, MnSOD, GR), heat shock proteins (HSP70, HSP80, HSP90) and aquaporins (PIP). Conclusion Overall, we propose that H2S root pretreatment activates a coordinated network of heat shock defense-related pathways at a transcriptional level and systemically protects strawberry plants from heat shock-induced damage. PMID:24499299

  8. Mild Glucose Starvation Induces KDM2A-Mediated H3K36me2 Demethylation through AMPK To Reduce rRNA Transcription and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuji; Yano, Hirohisa; Ogasawara, Sachiko; Yoshioka, Sho-Ichi; Imamura, Hiromi; Okamoto, Kengo; Tsuneoka, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Environmental conditions control rRNA transcription. Previously, we found that serum and glucose deprivation induces KDM2A-mediated H3K36me2 demethylation in the rRNA gene (rDNA) promoter and reduces rRNA transcription in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. However, the molecular mechanism and biological significance are still unclear. In the present study, we found that glucose starvation alone induced the KDM2A-dependent reduction of rRNA transcription. The treatment of cells with 2-deoxy-d-glucose, an inhibitor of glycolysis, reduced rRNA transcription and H3K36me2 in the rDNA promoter, both of which were completely dependent on KDM2A in low concentrations of 2-deoxy-d-glucose, that is, mild starvation conditions. The mild starvation induced these KDM2A activities through AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) but did not affect another AMPK effector of rRNA transcription, TIF-IA. In the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, the mild starvation also reduced rRNA transcription in a KDM2A-dependent manner. We detected KDM2A in breast cancer tissues irrespective of their estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 status, including triple-negative cancer tissues. In both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, mild starvation reduced cell proliferation, and KDM2A knockdown suppressed the reduction of cell proliferation. These results suggest that under mild glucose starvation AMPK induces KDM2A-dependent reduction of rRNA transcription to control cell proliferation.

  9. Mild Glucose Starvation Induces KDM2A-Mediated H3K36me2 Demethylation through AMPK To Reduce rRNA Transcription and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuji; Yano, Hirohisa; Ogasawara, Sachiko; Yoshioka, Sho-ichi; Imamura, Hiromi; Okamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions control rRNA transcription. Previously, we found that serum and glucose deprivation induces KDM2A-mediated H3K36me2 demethylation in the rRNA gene (rDNA) promoter and reduces rRNA transcription in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. However, the molecular mechanism and biological significance are still unclear. In the present study, we found that glucose starvation alone induced the KDM2A-dependent reduction of rRNA transcription. The treatment of cells with 2-deoxy-d-glucose, an inhibitor of glycolysis, reduced rRNA transcription and H3K36me2 in the rDNA promoter, both of which were completely dependent on KDM2A in low concentrations of 2-deoxy-d-glucose, that is, mild starvation conditions. The mild starvation induced these KDM2A activities through AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) but did not affect another AMPK effector of rRNA transcription, TIF-IA. In the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, the mild starvation also reduced rRNA transcription in a KDM2A-dependent manner. We detected KDM2A in breast cancer tissues irrespective of their estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 status, including triple-negative cancer tissues. In both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, mild starvation reduced cell proliferation, and KDM2A knockdown suppressed the reduction of cell proliferation. These results suggest that under mild glucose starvation AMPK induces KDM2A-dependent reduction of rRNA transcription to control cell proliferation. PMID:26416883

  10. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN induces long-term metabolic and transcriptional changes involved in Arabidopsis thaliana salt tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Ignacio; Ledger, Thomas; Greve, Macarena; Poupin, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major limitations for food production worldwide. Improvement of plant salt-stress tolerance using plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has arisen as a promising strategy to help overcome this limitation. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms controlling PGPR/plant interactions under salt-stress remain unclear. The main objective of this study was to obtain new insights into the mechanisms underlying salt-stress tolerance enhancement in the salt-sensitive Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 plants, when inoculated with the well-known PGPR strain Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN. To tackle this, different life history traits, together with the spatiotemporal accumulation patterns for key metabolites and salt-stress related transcripts, were analyzed in inoculated plants under short and long-term salt-stress. Inoculated plants displayed faster recovery and increased tolerance after sustained salt-stress. PsJN treatment accelerated the accumulation of proline and transcription of genes related to abscisic acid signaling (Relative to Dessication, RD29A and RD29B), ROS scavenging (Ascorbate Peroxidase 2), and detoxification (Glyoxalase I 7), and down-regulated the expression of Lipoxygenase 2 (related to jasmonic acid biosynthesis). Among the general transcriptional effects of this bacterium, the expression pattern of important ion-homeostasis related genes was altered after short and long-term stress (Arabidopsis K+ Transporter 1, High-Affinity K+ Transporter 1, Sodium Hydrogen Exchanger 2, and Arabidopsis Salt Overly Sensitive 1). In all, the faster and stronger molecular changes induced by the inoculation suggest a PsJN-priming effect, which may explain the observed tolerance after short-term and sustained salt-stress in plants. This study provides novel information about possible mechanisms involved in salt-stress tolerance induced by PGPR in plants, showing that certain changes are maintained over time. This opens up new venues to

  11. Involvement of fish signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in SGIV replication and virus induced paraptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Yang, Ying; Wei, Shina; Qin, Qiwei

    2014-12-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an important transcription factor which plays crucial roles in immune regulation, inflammation, cell proliferation, transformation, and other physiological processes of the organism. In this study, a novel STAT3 gene from orange spotted grouper (Ec-STAT3) was cloned and characterized. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that full-length of Ec-STAT3 was 3105-bp long and contained a 280-bp 5'UTR, a 470-bp 3'UTR, and a 2355-bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a 784-amino acid peptide. The deduced protein of Ec-STAT3 showed 98% identity to that of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). Amino acid alignment showed that Ec-STAT3 contained four conserved domains, including a protein interaction domain, a coiled coil domain, a DNA binding domain, and an SH2 domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the highest expression level was detected in the liver, followed by skin and spleen. After injection with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), the transcript of Ec-STAT3 in spleen was increased significantly. To further explore the function of Ec-STAT3, we investigated the roles of Ec-STAT3 in SGIV infection in vitro. Immune fluorescence analysis indicated that SGIV infection altered the distribution of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 in nucleus, and a small part of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 was associated with virus assembly sites, suggesting that Ec-STAT3 might be important for SGIV infection. Using STAT3 specific inhibitor, S3I-201, we found that inhibition of Ec-STAT3 activation decreased the SGIV replication significantly. Moreover, inhibition of Ec-STAT3 activation obviously altered SGIV infection induced cell cycle arrest and the expression of pro-survival genes, including Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bax inhibitor. Together, our results firstly demonstrated the critical roles of fish STAT3 in DNA virus replication and virus induced paraptosis, but also provided new insights into the mechanism of iridovirus pathogenesis.

  12. Transcriptional Pathways in cPGI2-Induced Adipocyte Progenitor Activation for Browning

    PubMed Central

    Bayindir, Irem; Babaeikelishomi, Rohollah; Kocanova, Silvia; Sousa, Isabel Sofia; Lerch, Sarah; Hardt, Olaf; Wild, Stefan; Bosio, Andreas; Bystricky, Kerstin; Herzig, Stephan; Vegiopoulos, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    De novo formation of beige/brite adipocytes from progenitor cells contributes to the thermogenic adaptation of adipose tissue and holds great potential for the therapeutic remodeling of fat as a treatment for obesity. Despite the recent identification of several factors regulating browning of white fat, there is a lack of physiological cell models for the mechanistic investigation of progenitor-mediated beige/brite differentiation. We have previously revealed prostacyclin (PGI2) as one of the few known endogenous extracellular mediators promoting de novo beige/brite formation by relaying β-adrenergic stimulation to the progenitor level. Here, we present a cell model based on murine primary progenitor cells defined by markers previously shown to be relevant for in vivo browning, including a simplified isolation procedure. We demonstrate the specific and broad induction of thermogenic gene expression by PGI2 signaling in the absence of lineage conversion, and reveal the previously unidentified nuclear relocalization of the Ucp1 gene locus in association with transcriptional activation. By profiling the time course of the progenitor response, we show that PGI2 signaling promoted progenitor cell activation through cell cycle and adhesion pathways prior to metabolic maturation toward an oxidative cell phenotype. Our results highlight the importance of core progenitor activation pathways for the recruitment of thermogenic cells and provide a resource for further mechanistic investigation. PMID:26347713

  13. Characterization and stress-induced expression analysis of Alfin-like transcription factors in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Kayum, Md Abdul; Park, Jong-In; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Saha, Gopal; Kang, Jong-Goo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-08-01

    The Alfin-like (AL) transcription factors (TFs) family is involved in many developmental processes, including the growth and development of roots, root hair elongation, meristem development, etc. However, stress resistance-related function and the regulatory mechanism of these TFs have yet to be elucidated. This study identified 15 Brassica rapa AL (BrAL) TFs from BRAD database, analyzed the sequences and profiled their expression first time in response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum in fection, cold, salt and drought stresses in B. rapa. Structural and phylogenetic analyses of 15 BrAL TFs revealed four distinct groups (groups I-IV) with AL TFs of Arabidopsis thaliana. In the expression analyses, ten BrAL TFs showed responsive expression after F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans infection, while all BrAL TFs showed responses under cold, salt and drought stresses in B. rapa. Interestingly, ten BrAL TFs showed responses to both biotic and abiotic stress factors tested here. The differentially expressed BrAL TFs thus represent potential resources for molecular breeding of Brassica crops resistant against abiotic and biotic stresses. Our findings will also help to elucidate the complex regulatory mechanism of AL TFs in stress resistance and provide a foundation for further functional genomics studies and applications.

  14. RAM-induced Allostery Facilitates Assembly of a Notch Pathway Active Transcription Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, David R.; Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Kovall, Rhett A.

    2008-07-09

    The Notch pathway is a conserved cell-to-cell signaling mechanism, in which extracellular signals are transduced into transcriptional outputs through the nuclear effector CSL. CSL is converted from a repressor to an activator through the formation of the CSL-NotchIC-Mastermind ternary complex. The RAM (RBP-J associated molecule) domain of NotchIC avidly interacts with CSL; however, its role in assembly of the CSL-NotchIC-Mastermind ternary complex is not understood. Here we provide a comprehensive thermodynamic, structural, and biochemical analysis of the RAM-CSL interaction for components from both mouse and worm. Our binding data show that RAM and CSL form a high affinity complex in the presence or absence of DNA. Our structural studies reveal a striking distal conformational change in CSL upon RAM binding, which creates a docking site for Mastermind to bind to the complex. Finally, we show that the addition of a RAM peptide in trans facilitates formation of the CSL-NotchIC-Mastermind ternary complex in vitro.

  15. Characterization and stress-induced expression analysis of Alfin-like transcription factors in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Kayum, Md Abdul; Park, Jong-In; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Saha, Gopal; Kang, Jong-Goo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-08-01

    The Alfin-like (AL) transcription factors (TFs) family is involved in many developmental processes, including the growth and development of roots, root hair elongation, meristem development, etc. However, stress resistance-related function and the regulatory mechanism of these TFs have yet to be elucidated. This study identified 15 Brassica rapa AL (BrAL) TFs from BRAD database, analyzed the sequences and profiled their expression first time in response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum in fection, cold, salt and drought stresses in B. rapa. Structural and phylogenetic analyses of 15 BrAL TFs revealed four distinct groups (groups I-IV) with AL TFs of Arabidopsis thaliana. In the expression analyses, ten BrAL TFs showed responsive expression after F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans infection, while all BrAL TFs showed responses under cold, salt and drought stresses in B. rapa. Interestingly, ten BrAL TFs showed responses to both biotic and abiotic stress factors tested here. The differentially expressed BrAL TFs thus represent potential resources for molecular breeding of Brassica crops resistant against abiotic and biotic stresses. Our findings will also help to elucidate the complex regulatory mechanism of AL TFs in stress resistance and provide a foundation for further functional genomics studies and applications. PMID:25618423

  16. Abiotic stress-induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels of Group 3 LEA protein genes in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Shinde, Rupali; Downey, Frances; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2013-01-01

    The moss, Physcomitrella patens is a non-seed land plant belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period in Earth's history. Evidence suggests that mosses can be highly tolerant of abiotic stress. We showed previously that dehydration stress and abscisic acid treatments induced oscillations in steady-state levels of LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) protein transcripts, and that removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of oscillatory increases in transcript levels. Here, we show that other abiotic stresses like salt and osmotic stresses also induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels and that the amplitudes of the oscillatory increases in steady-state transcript levels are reflective of the severity of the abiotic stress treatment. Together, our results suggest that oscillatory increases in transcript levels in response to abiotic stresses may be a general phenomenon in P. patens and that temporally dynamic increases in steady-state transcript levels may be important for adaptation to life in constantly fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:23221763

  17. Abiotic stress-induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels of Group 3 LEA protein genes in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Shinde, Rupali; Downey, Frances; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2013-01-01

    The moss, Physcomitrella patens is a non-seed land plant belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period in Earth's history. Evidence suggests that mosses can be highly tolerant of abiotic stress. We showed previously that dehydration stress and abscisic acid treatments induced oscillations in steady-state levels of LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) protein transcripts, and that removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of oscillatory increases in transcript levels. Here, we show that other abiotic stresses like salt and osmotic stresses also induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels and that the amplitudes of the oscillatory increases in steady-state transcript levels are reflective of the severity of the abiotic stress treatment. Together, our results suggest that oscillatory increases in transcript levels in response to abiotic stresses may be a general phenomenon in P. patens and that temporally dynamic increases in steady-state transcript levels may be important for adaptation to life in constantly fluctuating environmental conditions.

  18. 8-Modified-2′-Deoxyadenosine Analogues Induce Delayed Polymerization Arrest during HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Marwan; Smyth, Redmond; Ben Gaied, Nouha; Barhoum, Patrick; Laumond, Géraldine; Bec, Guillaume; Götte, Matthias; Mak, Johnson; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Burger, Alain; Marquet, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of resistant viruses to any of the anti-HIV-1 compounds used in the current therapies against AIDS underlies the urge for the development of new drug targets and/or new drugs acting through novel mechanisms. While all anti-HIV-1 nucleoside analogues in clinical use and in clinical trials rely on ribose modifications for activity, we designed nucleosides with a natural deoxyribose moiety and modifications of position 8 of the adenine base. Such modifications might induce a steric clash with helix αH in the thumb domain of the p66 subunit of HIV-1 RT at a distance from the catalytic site, causing delayed chain termination. Eleven new 2′-deoxyadenosine analogues modified on position 8 of the purine base were synthesized and tested in vitro and in cell-based assays. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that chemical modifications on position 8 of 2′-deoxyadenosine induce delayed chain termination in vitro, and also inhibit DNA synthesis when incorporated in a DNA template strand. Furthermore, one of them had moderate anti-HIV-1 activity in cell-culture. Our results constitute a proof of concept indicating that modification on the base moiety of nucleosides can induce delayed polymerization arrest and inhibit HIV-1 replication. PMID:22087320

  19. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  20. Transcriptional Profiles Uncover Aspergillus flavus-Induced Resistance in Maize Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Meng; Brown, Robert L.; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Menkir, Abebe; Yu, Jiujiang; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination caused by the opportunistic pathogen A. flavus is a major concern in maize production prior to harvest and through storage. Previous studies have highlighted the constitutive production of proteins involved in maize kernel resistance against A. flavus’ infection. However, little is known about induced resistance nor about defense gene expression and regulation in kernels. In this study, maize oligonucleotide arrays and a pair of closely-related maize lines varying in aflatoxin accumulation were used to reveal the gene expression network in imbibed mature kernels in response to A. flavus’ challenge. Inoculated kernels were incubated 72 h via the laboratory-based Kernel Screening Assay (KSA), which highlights kernel responses to fungal challenge. Gene expression profiling detected 6955 genes in resistant and 6565 genes in susceptible controls; 214 genes induced in resistant and 2159 genes induced in susceptible inoculated kernels. Defense related and regulation related genes were identified in both treatments. Comparisons between the resistant and susceptible lines indicate differences in the gene expression network which may enhance our understanding of the maize-A. flavus interaction. PMID:22069739

  1. Transcriptional profiles uncover Aspergillus flavus-induced resistance in maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Meng; Brown, Robert L; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Menkir, Abebe; Yu, Jiujiang; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2011-07-01

    Aflatoxin contamination caused by the opportunistic pathogen A. flavus is a major concern in maize production prior to harvest and through storage. Previous studies have highlighted the constitutive production of proteins involved in maize kernel resistance against A. flavus' infection. However, little is known about induced resistance nor about defense gene expression and regulation in kernels. In this study, maize oligonucleotide arrays and a pair of closely-related maize lines varying in aflatoxin accumulation were used to reveal the gene expression network in imbibed mature kernels in response to A. flavus' challenge. Inoculated kernels were incubated 72 h via the laboratory-based Kernel Screening Assay (KSA), which highlights kernel responses to fungal challenge. Gene expression profiling detected 6955 genes in resistant and 6565 genes in susceptible controls; 214 genes induced in resistant and 2159 genes induced in susceptible inoculated kernels. Defense related and regulation related genes were identified in both treatments. Comparisons between the resistant and susceptible lines indicate differences in the gene expression network which may enhance our understanding of the maize-A. flavus interaction. PMID:22069739

  2. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE) induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core "DSB" response specific to clastogenic treatments.

    PubMed

    Missirian, Victor; Conklin, Phillip A; Culligan, Kevin M; Huefner, Neil D; Britt, Anne B

    2014-01-01

    Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as "collateral" damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe(26+) high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles) and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5-24 h after irradiation) in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the "DSB response" were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 h post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 h after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing "extended night." This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants.

  3. Mfd is required for rapid recovery of transcription following UV-induced DNA damage but not oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schalow, Brandy J; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2012-05-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a cellular process by which some forms of DNA damage are repaired more rapidly from transcribed strands of active genes than from nontranscribed strands or the overall genome. In humans, the TCR coupling factor, CSB, plays a critical role in restoring transcription following both UV-induced and oxidative DNA damage. It also contributes indirectly to the global repair of some forms of oxidative DNA damage. The Escherichia coli homolog, Mfd, is similarly required for TCR of UV-induced lesions. However, its contribution to the restoration of transcription and to global repair of oxidative damage has not been examined. Here, we report the first direct study of transcriptional recovery following UV-induced and oxidative DNA damage in E. coli. We observed that mutations in mfd or uvrA reduced the rate that transcription recovered following UV-induced damage. In contrast, no difference was detected in the rate of transcription recovery in mfd, uvrA, fpg, nth, or polB dinB umuDC mutants relative to wild-type cells following oxidative damage. mfd mutants were also fully resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and removed oxidative lesions from the genome at rates comparable to wild-type cells. The results demonstrate that Mfd promotes the rapid recovery of gene expression following UV-induced damage in E. coli. In addition, these findings imply that Mfd may be functionally distinct from its human CSB homolog in that it does not detectably contribute to the recovery of gene expression or global repair following oxidative damage.

  4. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Ward, William O; Ledbetter, Allen D; Schladweiler, Mette C; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2015-01-01

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive analysis of these changes will allow us to better understand the mechanism of pulmonary injury and inflammation. Male Wistar Kyoto rats (10-12 week) were exposed to air, or ozone (0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 ppm) for 4 h and pulmonary injury and inflammation were assessed at 0-h or 20-h (n = 8/group). Lung gene expression profiling was assessed at 0-h (air and 1.0 ppm ozone, n = 3-4/group). At 20-h bronchoalveolar lavage, fluid protein and neutrophils increased at 1 ppm ozone. Numerous genes involved in acute inflammatory response were up-regulated along with changes in genes involved in cell adhesion and migration, steroid metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle control and cell growth. A number of NRF2 target genes were also induced after ozone exposure. Based on expression changes, Rela, SP1 and TP3-mediated signaling were identified to be mediating downstream changes. Remarkable changes in the processes of endocytosis provide the insight that ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation are likely initiated by changes in cell membrane components and receptors likely from oxidatively modified lung lining lipids and proteins. In conclusion, ozone-induced injury and inflammation are preceded by changes in gene targets for cell adhesion/migration, apoptosis, cell cycle control and growth regulated by Rela, SP1 and TP53, likely mediated by the process of endocytosis and altered steroid receptor signaling.

  5. SPBP Is a Sulforaphane Induced Transcriptional Coactivator of NRF2 Regulating Expression of the Autophagy Receptor p62/SQSTM1

    PubMed Central

    Darvekar, Sagar Ramesh; Elvenes, Julianne; Brenne, Hanne Britt; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Organisms exposed to oxidative stress respond by orchestrating a stress response to prevent further damage. Intracellular levels of antioxidant agents increase, and damaged components are removed by autophagy induction. The KEAP1-NRF2 signaling pathway is the main pathway responsible for cell defense against oxidative stress and for maintaining the cellular redox balance at physiological levels. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, is a potent inducer of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and antioxidant response element driven gene expression. In this study, we show that sulforaphane enhances the expression of the transcriptional coregulator SPBP. The expression curve peaks 6–8 hours post stimulation, and parallels the sulforaphane-induced expression of NRF2 and the autophagy receptor protein p62/SQSTM1. Reporter gene assays show that SPBP stimulates the expression of p62/SQSTM1 via ARE elements in the promoter region, and siRNA mediated knock down of SPBP significantly decreases the expression of p62/SQSTM1 and the formation of p62/SQSTM1 bodies in HeLa cells. Furthermore, SPBP siRNA reduces the sulforaphane induced expression of NRF2, and the expression of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Both these proteins contain ARE-like elements in their promoter regions. Over-expressed SPBP and NRF2 acts synergistically on the p62/SQSTM1 promoter and colocalize in nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Collectively, these results suggest that SPBP is a coactivator of NRF2, and hence may be important for securing enhanced and sustained expression of NRF2 induced genes such as proteins involved in selective autophagy. PMID:24416372

  6. SPBP is a sulforaphane induced transcriptional coactivator of NRF2 regulating expression of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar Ramesh; Elvenes, Julianne; Brenne, Hanne Britt; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Organisms exposed to oxidative stress respond by orchestrating a stress response to prevent further damage. Intracellular levels of antioxidant agents increase, and damaged components are removed by autophagy induction. The KEAP1-NRF2 signaling pathway is the main pathway responsible for cell defense against oxidative stress and for maintaining the cellular redox balance at physiological levels. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, is a potent inducer of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and antioxidant response element driven gene expression. In this study, we show that sulforaphane enhances the expression of the transcriptional coregulator SPBP. The expression curve peaks 6-8 hours post stimulation, and parallels the sulforaphane-induced expression of NRF2 and the autophagy receptor protein p62/SQSTM1. Reporter gene assays show that SPBP stimulates the expression of p62/SQSTM1 via ARE elements in the promoter region, and siRNA mediated knock down of SPBP significantly decreases the expression of p62/SQSTM1 and the formation of p62/SQSTM1 bodies in HeLa cells. Furthermore, SPBP siRNA reduces the sulforaphane induced expression of NRF2, and the expression of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Both these proteins contain ARE-like elements in their promoter regions. Over-expressed SPBP and NRF2 acts synergistically on the p62/SQSTM1 promoter and colocalize in nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Collectively, these results suggest that SPBP is a coactivator of NRF2, and hence may be important for securing enhanced and sustained expression of NRF2 induced genes such as proteins involved in selective autophagy. PMID:24416372

  7. SPBP is a sulforaphane induced transcriptional coactivator of NRF2 regulating expression of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar Ramesh; Elvenes, Julianne; Brenne, Hanne Britt; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Organisms exposed to oxidative stress respond by orchestrating a stress response to prevent further damage. Intracellular levels of antioxidant agents increase, and damaged components are removed by autophagy induction. The KEAP1-NRF2 signaling pathway is the main pathway responsible for cell defense against oxidative stress and for maintaining the cellular redox balance at physiological levels. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, is a potent inducer of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and antioxidant response element driven gene expression. In this study, we show that sulforaphane enhances the expression of the transcriptional coregulator SPBP. The expression curve peaks 6-8 hours post stimulation, and parallels the sulforaphane-induced expression of NRF2 and the autophagy receptor protein p62/SQSTM1. Reporter gene assays show that SPBP stimulates the expression of p62/SQSTM1 via ARE elements in the promoter region, and siRNA mediated knock down of SPBP significantly decreases the expression of p62/SQSTM1 and the formation of p62/SQSTM1 bodies in HeLa cells. Furthermore, SPBP siRNA reduces the sulforaphane induced expression of NRF2, and the expression of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Both these proteins contain ARE-like elements in their promoter regions. Over-expressed SPBP and NRF2 acts synergistically on the p62/SQSTM1 promoter and colocalize in nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Collectively, these results suggest that SPBP is a coactivator of NRF2, and hence may be important for securing enhanced and sustained expression of NRF2 induced genes such as proteins involved in selective autophagy.

  8. A case of generalized ostraceous psoriasis mimicking dermatitis neglecta*

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdo; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Dias, Carolina Moraes; Lage, Thaiane Lima; Carneiro, Clívia Maria Oliveira; Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano

    2015-01-01

    Lithium has been implicated in the exacerbation of pre-existing psoriasis, in the induction of psoriasis on previously uninvolved skin of psoriasis patients, and in the triggering of psoriasis for the first time in patients without a personal or family history. Lithium-induced psoriasis (and its resistance to treatment) is one of the major reasons for noncompliance in patients treated with lithium. We describe a male patient who developed generalized ostraceous psoriasis whose clinical appearance mimicked dermatitis neglecta, 10 months after starting therapy with lithium. PMID:26312715

  9. UV filters induce transcriptional changes of different hormonal receptors in Chironomus riparius embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Aquilino, Mónica; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are emerging contaminants that are ubiquitous in fresh and marine aquatic systems due to their extensive use in cosmetics, plastics, paints, textiles, and many other industrial products. The estrogenic effects of organic UV filters have been long demonstrated in vertebrates, and other hormonal activities may be altered, according to more recent reports. The impact of UV filters on the endocrine system of invertebrates is largely unknown. We have previously reported that some UV filters may affect ecdysone-related genes in the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius, an ecotoxicologically important model organism. To further analyze other possible effects on endocrine pathways, we first characterized four pivotal genes related with hormonal pathways in insects; thereafter, these genes were assessed for alterations in transcriptional activity after exposure to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) or benzophenone-3 (BP-3), two extensively used sunscreens. We found that both chemicals disturbed the expression of all four genes analyzed: hormonal receptor 38 (HR38), methoprene-tolerant (Met), membrane-associate progesterone receptor (MAPR) and insulin-like receptor (INSR), measured by changes in mRNA levels by real-time PCR. An upregulatory effect at the genomic level was detected in different developmental stages. Interestingly, embryos appeared to be more sensitive to the action of the UV filters than larvae. Our results suggest that the risk of disruption through different endocrine routes is not negligible, considering the significant effects of UV filters on key hormonal receptor and regulatory genes. Further effort is needed to develop environmental risk assessment studies on these pollutants, particularly for aquatic invertebrate model organisms. PMID:27089421

  10. UV filters induce transcriptional changes of different hormonal receptors in Chironomus riparius embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Aquilino, Mónica; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are emerging contaminants that are ubiquitous in fresh and marine aquatic systems due to their extensive use in cosmetics, plastics, paints, textiles, and many other industrial products. The estrogenic effects of organic UV filters have been long demonstrated in vertebrates, and other hormonal activities may be altered, according to more recent reports. The impact of UV filters on the endocrine system of invertebrates is largely unknown. We have previously reported that some UV filters may affect ecdysone-related genes in the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius, an ecotoxicologically important model organism. To further analyze other possible effects on endocrine pathways, we first characterized four pivotal genes related with hormonal pathways in insects; thereafter, these genes were assessed for alterations in transcriptional activity after exposure to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) or benzophenone-3 (BP-3), two extensively used sunscreens. We found that both chemicals disturbed the expression of all four genes analyzed: hormonal receptor 38 (HR38), methoprene-tolerant (Met), membrane-associate progesterone receptor (MAPR) and insulin-like receptor (INSR), measured by changes in mRNA levels by real-time PCR. An upregulatory effect at the genomic level was detected in different developmental stages. Interestingly, embryos appeared to be more sensitive to the action of the UV filters than larvae. Our results suggest that the risk of disruption through different endocrine routes is not negligible, considering the significant effects of UV filters on key hormonal receptor and regulatory genes. Further effort is needed to develop environmental risk assessment studies on these pollutants, particularly for aquatic invertebrate model organisms.

  11. Shear stress-induced transcriptional regulation via hybrid promoters as a potential tool for promoting angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michal; Barac, Yaron D; Yahav, Hava; Wolfovitz, Efrat; Einav, Shmuel; Resnick, Nitzan; Binah, Ofer

    2009-01-01

    Among the key effects of fluid shear stress on vascular endothelial cells is modulation of gene expression. Promoter sequences termed shear stress response elements (SSREs) mediate the responsiveness of endothelial genes to shear stress. While previous studies showed that shear stress responsiveness is mediated by a single SSRE, these endogenous promoters often encode for multiple SSREs. Moreover, hybrid promoters encoding a single SSRE rarely respond to shear stress at the same magnitude as the endogenous promoter. Thus, to better understand the interplay between the various SSREs, and between SSREs and endothelial-specific sequences (ESS), we generated a series of constructs regulated by SSREs cassettes alone, or in combination with ESS, and tested their response to shear stress and endothelial specific expression. Among these constructs, the most responsive promoter (NR1/2) encoded a combination of two GAGACC/SSREs, the Sp1/Egr1 sequence, as well as a TPA response element (TRE). This construct was four- to five-fold more responsive to shear stress than a promoter encoding a single SSRE. The expression of constructs containing other SSRE combinations was unaffected or suppressed by shear stress. Addition of ESS derived from the Tie2 promoter, either 5' or 3' to NR1/2 resulted in shear stress transcriptional suppression, yet retained endothelial specific expression. Thus, the combination and localization order of the various SSREs in a single promoter is crucial in determining the pattern and degree of shear stress responsiveness. These shear stress responsive cassettes may prove beneficial in our attempt to time the expression of an endothelial transgene in the vasculature.

  12. Diabetes-induced activation of nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, and its inhibition by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Kowluru, Renu A; Koppolu, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Chen, Shali

    2003-11-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in the retina in diabetes, and long-term administration of antioxidants inhibits the development of retinopathy in diabetic rats. The purpose of this study is to determine how diabetes affects the activation of a redox-sensitive nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, NF-kappaB, and its inhibition by antioxidants. Alloxan diabetic rats were assigned to receive standard diet or the diet supplemented with multiple antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, Trolox, dl alpha-tocopherol acetate, N-acetyl cysteine, beta-carotene, and selenium for up to 14 months. NF-kappaB activation, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were measured in the retina at 2, 8 and 14 months of diabetes. Retinal NF-kappaB was activated by about 60% at two months after induction of diabetes, remained activated for up to 14 months of diabetes, and the duration of diabetes had no effect on the intensity of NF-kappaB activation. Similarly, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were elevated by over 50% in the retina of rats diabetic for 14 months, and nitrotyrosine levels were elevated by over two folds. Administration of the antioxidants to the rats for the entire duration of diabetes inhibited activation of NF-kappaB and elevations in oxidative stress, nitric oxides and nitrotyrosine formation without ameliorating the severity of hyperglycemia. These in vivo results were confirmed by in vitro studies showing that high glucose activates NF-kappaB and elevates NO and lipid peroxides in both retinal endothelial cells and pericytes that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Thus, the results suggest that the activation of retinal NF-KB in diabetes is an early event in the development of retinopathy, and it remains active when the retinal capillary cell death is accelerating, and histopathology is developing. Beneficial effects of antioxidants on the development of diabetic retinopathy might involve inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and its downstream pathways in the retina.

  13. RNA pol II transcript abundance controls condensin accumulation at mitotically up-regulated and heat-shock-inducible genes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Norihiko; Sajiki, Kenichi; Xu, Xingya; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Arakawa, Orie; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Condensin plays fundamental roles in chromosome dynamics. In this study, we determined the binding sites of condensin on fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) chromosomes at the level of nucleotide sequences using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq). We found that condensin binds to RNA polymerase I-, II- and III-transcribed genes during both mitosis and interphase, and we focused on pol II constitutive and inducible genes. Accumulation sites for condensin are distinct from those of cohesin and DNA topoisomerase II. Using cell cycle stage and heat-shock-inducible genes, we show that pol II-mediated transcripts cause condensin accumulation. First, condensin's enrichment on mitotically activated genes was abolished by deleting the sep1(+) gene that encodes an M-phase-specific forkhead transcription factor. Second, by raising the temperature, condensin accumulation was rapidly induced at heat-shock protein genes in interphase and even during mid-mitosis. In interphase, condensin accumulates preferentially during the postreplicative phase. Pol II-mediated transcription was neither repressed nor activated by condensin, as levels of transcripts per se did not change when mutant condensin failed to associate with chromosomal DNA. However, massive chromosome missegregation occurred, suggesting that abundant pol II transcription may require active condensin before proper chromosome segregation. PMID:25847133

  14. The involvement of NFAT transcriptional activity suppression in SIRT1-mediated inhibition of COX-2 expression induced by PMA/Ionomycin.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu-Yan; Lu, Jie; Huang, Yue; Liu, Guang; Gao, Peng; Wan, Yan-Zhen; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Yang, Rui-Feng; Tang, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xu; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-01-01

    SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase, acts as a negative regulator for many transcription factors, and plays protective roles in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been previously shown to play pro-inflammatory roles in endothelial cells. Inhibition of NFAT signaling may be an attractive target to regulate inflammation in atherosclerosis. However, whether NFAT transcriptional activity is suppressed by SIRT1 remains unknown. In this study, we found that SIRT1 suppressed NFAT-mediated transcriptional activity. SIRT1 interacted with NFAT, and the NHR and RHR domains of NFAT mediated the interaction with SIRT1. Moreover, we found that SIRT1 primarily deacetylated NFATc3. Adenoviral over-expression of SIRT1 suppressed PMA and calcium ionophore Ionomycin (PMA/Io)-induced COX-2 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), while SIRT1 RNAi reversed the effects in HUVECs. Moreover, inhibition of COX-2 expression by SIRT1 in PMA/Io-treated HUVECs was largely abrogated by inhibiting NFAT activation. Furthermore, SIRT1 inhibited NFAT-induced COX-2 promoter activity, and reduced NFAT binding to the COX-2 promoter in PMA/Io-treated HUVECs. These results suggest that suppression of NFAT transcriptional activity is involved in SIRT1-mediated inhibition of COX-2 expression induced by PMA/Io, and that the negative regulatory mechanisms of NFAT by SIRT1 may contribute to its anti-inflammatory effects in atherosclerosis.

  15. Hypoxia-induced expression of RTEF-1 (related transcriptional enhancer factor-1) in endothelial cells is independent of HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cuili; Song, Q.H.; Li, Jian; Tian, Ye

    2009-04-10

    Related transcriptional enhancer factor-1 (RTEF-1) plays an important role in transcriptional regulation of angiogenic genes in hypoxic endothelial cells. The mechanisms involved in the induction of RTEF-1 expression in hypoxia are poorly understood. In bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) subjected to hypoxia, Western blot and quantitative PCR analysis revealed that RTEF-1 protein and mRNA levels were significantly increased by hypoxia. To address the potential role of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in RTEF-1 induction, a hepatoma cell line deficient in HIF-1 (c4) and a control HIF-1 positive cell line (vT{l_brace}2{r_brace}) were exposed to hypoxia. We report that RTEF-1 protein expression assessed by either Western blotting or immunofluorescence was increased in both cell lines. This demonstrates that HIF-1 is not required for RTEF-1 upregulation by hypoxia. Conversely, RTEF-1 appeared to regulate the expression of HIF-1: HIF-1{alpha} promoter activity was increased (3.6-fold) by RTEF-1 overexpression in BAEC. Furthermore, RTEF-1 enhanced BAEC proliferation and tubule formation; these were inhibited by RTEF-1 knockdown with siRNA. We propose that RTEF-1, acting via HIF-1, is a key regulator of angiogenesis in response to hypoxia.

  16. Role of x-ray-induced transcripts in adaptive responses following x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair, may be the same manifestations of a series of common enzymatic steps. PLDR, has two distinct phases based upon DNA lesion repair and survival recovery studies. The first phase of PLDR occurs very quickly (t{sub {1/2}}:2--20 mins) to increase the survival of X-irradiated cells by mending the vast array of DNA lesions created by ionizing radiation. The second slower phase of PLDR proceeds much later (i.e., >1--2 hrs) following X-irradiation, during which the remaining double-stranded DNA breaks are completely repaired. This second phase of repair closely corresponds to the restructuring of gross chromosomal damage, and can be partially blocked in some human cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. This slower phase of PLDR correlated with a rapid decline in X-ray-induced transformation of normal cells. The fast component of PLDR may be due to constitutively synthesized DNA ligases, topoisomerases, or polymerases, which act immediately to repair damaged, DNA. In contrast, the slow phase of PLDR in human cells may require the induction of specific genes and gene product's involved in the repair of potentially lethal or carcinogenic DNA lesions. Induced gene products (i.e., proteins) specifically synthesized in response to physiological doses of ionizing radiation in radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells, and in a variety of other human normal and cancer-prone cells, were identified using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We identified and partially characterized ten proteins synthesized by U1-Mel cells. The synthesis of eight of these proteins were specifically induced by ionizing radiation and two proteins were repressed Neither heat shock, UV-irradiation, nor bifunctional alkylating agent treatments resulted in the induction of these proteins. The expression of one protein, XIP269, correlated very well with PLDR capacity.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inhibition of transcription of tlr4 in vitro is reversed by dexamethasone and correlates with presence of conserved NFκB binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bonin, Camila P.; Baccarin, Raquel Y.A.; Nostell, Katarina; Nahum, Laila A.; Fossum, Caroline; Camargo, Maristela M. de

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Chimpanzees, horses and humans have regions of similarity on TLR4 and MD2 promoters. ► Rodents have few regions of similarity on TLR4 promoter when compared to primates. ► Conserved NFkB binding sites were found in the promoters of TLR4 and MD2. ► LPS-induced inhibition of TLR4 transcription is reversed by dexamethasone. ► LPS-induced transcription of MD2 is inhibited by dexamethasone. -- Abstract: Engagement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a master trigger of the deleterious effects of septic shock. Horses and humans are considered the most sensitive species to septic shock, but the mechanisms explaining these phenomena remain elusive. Analysis of tlr4 promoters revealed high similarity among LPS-sensitive species (human, chimpanzee, and horse) and low similarity with LPS-resistant species (mouse and rat). Four conserved nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) binding sites were found in the tlr4 promoter and two in the md2 promoter sequences that are likely to be targets for dexamethasone regulation. In vitro treatment of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (eqPBMC) with LPS decreased transcripts of tlr4 and increased transcription of md2 (myeloid differentiation factor 2) and cd14 (cluster of differentiation 14). Treatment with dexamethasone rescued transcription of tlr4 after LPS inhibition. LPS-induced transcription of md2 was inhibited in the presence of dexamethasone. Dexamethasone alone did not affect transcription of tlr4 and md2.

  18. Tumor hypoxia induces nuclear paraspeckle formation through HIF-2α dependent transcriptional activation of NEAT1 leading to cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, H; Albukhari, A; Morotti, M; Haider, S; Moralli, D; Smythies, J; Schödel, J; Green, C M; Camps, C; Buffa, F; Ratcliffe, P; Ragoussis, J; Harris, A L; Mole, D R

    2015-08-20

    Activation of cellular transcriptional responses, mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), is common in many types of cancer, and generally confers a poor prognosis. Known to induce many hundreds of protein-coding genes, HIF has also recently been shown to be a key regulator of the non-coding transcriptional response. Here, we show that NEAT1 long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is a direct transcriptional target of HIF in many breast cancer cell lines and in solid tumors. Unlike previously described lncRNAs, NEAT1 is regulated principally by HIF-2 rather than by HIF-1. NEAT1 is a nuclear lncRNA that is an essential structural component of paraspeckles and the hypoxic induction of NEAT1 induces paraspeckle formation in a manner that is dependent upon both NEAT1 and on HIF-2. Paraspeckles are multifunction nuclear structures that sequester transcriptionally active proteins as well as RNA transcripts that have been subjected to adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing. We show that the nuclear retention of one such transcript, F11R (also known as junctional adhesion molecule 1, JAM1), in hypoxia is dependent upon the hypoxic increase in NEAT1, thereby conferring a novel mechanism of HIF-dependent gene regulation. Induction of NEAT1 in hypoxia also leads to accelerated cellular proliferation, improved clonogenic survival and reduced apoptosis, all of which are hallmarks of increased tumorigenesis. Furthermore, in patients with breast cancer, high tumor NEAT1 expression correlates with poor survival. Taken together, these results indicate a new role for HIF transcriptional pathways in the regulation of nuclear structure and that this contributes to the pro-tumorigenic hypoxia-phenotype in breast cancer.

  19. Myc post-transcriptionally induces HIF1 protein and target gene expression in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Doe, Megan R.; Ascano, Janice; Kaur, Mandeep; Cole, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc is frequently overexpressed in tumors and plays an important role in the regulation of cancer metabolism. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1), the master regulator of the hypoxic response, enhances tumorigenesis and influences metabolism via upregulation of the glycolytic pathway and suppression of mitochondrial respiration. Together, deregulated Myc and HIF1 cooperate to lend metabolic advantages to proliferating cancer cells and contribute to the Warburg Effect. Here we show that overexpression of Myc significantly stabilizes the alpha subunit of HIF1 (HIF1alpha) under normoxic conditions and enhances HIF1alpha accumulation under hypoxic conditions in cells. Post-transcriptional regulation of HIF1α by Myc led to the induction of HIF1α gene targets. Normoxic HIF1α protein expression was also dependent on Myc. Functionally; HIF1α expression was required for Myc-induced anchorage-independent growth and cell proliferation. Myc-dependent stabilization of HIF1α involved either disruption of binding to the VHL complex or post-translational protein modifications. Taken together, our findings uncover a previously uncharacterized regulatory relationship between Myc and HIF1 that has important implications for cancer metabolism and development. PMID:22186139

  20. Capsaicin-induced transcriptional changes in hypothalamus and alterations in gut microbial count in high fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baboota, Ritesh K; Murtaza, Nida; Jagtap, Sneha; Singh, Dhirendra P; Karmase, Aniket; Kaur, Jaspreet; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Boparai, Ravneet K; Premkumar, Louis S; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2014-09-01

    Obesity is a global health problem and recently it has been seen as a growing concern for developing countries. Several bioactive dietary molecules have been associated with amelioration of obesity and associated complications and capsaicin is one among them. The present work is an attempt to understand and provide evidence for the novel mechanisms of anti-obesity activity of capsaicin in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Swiss albino mice divided in three groups (n=8-10) i.e. control, HFD fed and capsaicin (2mg/kg, po)+HFD fed were administered respective treatment for 3months. After measuring phenotypic and serum related biochemical changes, effect of capsaicin on HFD-induced transcriptional changes in hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT) (visceral and subcutaneous), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and gut microbial alterations was studied and quantified. Our results suggest that, in addition to its well-known effects, oral administration of capsaicin (a) modulates hypothalamic satiety associated genotype, (b) alters gut microbial composition, (c) induces "browning" genotype (BAT associated genes) in subcutaneous WAT and (d) increases expression of thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis genes in BAT. The present study provides evidence for novel and interesting mechanisms to explain the anti-obesity effect of capsaicin.

  1. HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription substitutes for oxidative signaling in activation-induced T cell death.

    PubMed

    Gülow, Karsten; Kaminski, Marcin; Darvas, Katalin; Süss, Dorothee; Li-Weber, Min; Krammer, Peter H

    2005-05-01

    Termination of an immune response requires elimination of activated T lymphocytes by activation-induced cell death (AICD). In AICD, CD95 (Apo-1/Fas) ligand (L) triggers apoptosis of CD95-positive activated T lymphocytes. In AIDS patients, AICD is strongly enhanced and accelerated. We and others have previously shown that HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription (HIV-1 Tat) sensitizes T cells toward CD95-mediated apoptosis and up-regulates CD95L expression by affecting the cellular redox balance. In this study, we show that it is hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) that functions as an essential second messenger in TCR signaling. The H(2)O(2) signal combined with simultaneous calcium (Ca(2+)) influx into the cytosol constitutes the minimal requirement for induction of CD95L expression. Either signal alone is insufficient. We further show that HIV-1 Tat interferes with TCR signaling and induces a H(2)O(2) signal. H(2)O(2) generated by HIV-1 Tat combines with CD4-dependent calcium influx and causes massive T cell apoptosis. Thus, our data provide an explanation for CD4(+) T lymphocyte depletion during progression of AIDS.

  2. Melanogenesis-inducing effect of cirsimaritin through increases in microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Il Soon; Dong, Yin; Lee, Ik-Soo; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Jong-Sang; Woo, Je-Tae; Cha, Byung-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    The melanin-inducing properties of cirsimaritin were investigated in murine B16F10 cells. Cirsimaritin is an active flavone with methoxy groups, which is isolated from the branches of Lithocarpus dealbatus. Tyrosinase activity and melanin content in murine B16F10 melanoma cells were increased by cirsimaritin in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis revealed that tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein (TRP) 1, TRP2 protein levels were enhanced after treatment with cirsimaritin for 48 h. Cirsimaritin also upregulated the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) after 24 h of treatment. Furthermore, cirsimaritin induced phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) in a dose-dependent manner after treatment for 15 min. The cirsimaritin-mediated increase of tyrosinase activity was significantly attenuated by H89, a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibitor. These findings indicate that cirsimaritin stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 cells by activation of CREB as well as upregulation of MITF and tyrosinase expression, which was activated by cAMP signaling. Finally, the melanogenic effect of cirsimaritin was confirmed in human epidermal melanocytes. These results support the putative application of cirsimaritin in ultraviolet photoprotection and hair coloration treatments. PMID:25903150

  3. Involvement of a banana MADS-box transcription factor gene in ethylene-induced fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juhua; Xu, Biyu; Hu, Lifang; Li, Meiying; Su, Wei; Wu, Jing; Yang, Jinghao; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of MADS-box genes in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group cv. Brazilian) fruit development and postharvest ripening, we isolated from banana fruit a MADS-box gene designated MuMADS1. Amino acid alignment indicated MuMADS1 belongs to the AGAMOUS subfamily, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that this gene is most similar to class D MADS-box genes. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that MuMADS1 is expressed in the stamen and pistil of male and female flowers and in the rhizome, the vegetative reproductive organ of the banana plant. In preharvest banana fruit, MuMADS1 is likely expressed throughout banana fruit development. In postharvest banana ripening, MuMADS1 is associated with ethylene biosynthesis. Expression patterns of MuMADS1 during postharvest ripening as determined by real-time RT-PCR suggest that differential expression of MuMADS1 may not only be induced by ethylene biosynthesis associated with postharvest banana ripening, but also may be induced by exogenous ethylene. PMID:18820933

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of the Triterpenoid, CDDO Methyl Amide, a Potent Inducer of Nrf2-Mediated Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichuan; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Thomas, Bobby; Chaturvedi, Rajnish K.; Kiaei, Mahmoud; Wille, Elizabeth J.; Liby, Karen T.; Williams, Charlotte; Royce, Darlene; Risingsong, Renee; Musiek, Eric S.; Morrow, Jason D.; Sporn, Michael; Beal, M. Flint

    2009-01-01

    The NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway regulates phase 2 detoxification genes, including a variety of antioxidative enzymes. We tested neuroprotective effects of the synthetic triterpenoid CDDO-MA, a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE signaling. CDDO-MA treatment of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells resulted in Nrf2 upregulation and translocation from cytosol to nucleus and subsequent activation of ARE pathway genes. CDDO-MA blocked t-butylhydroperoxide-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by activation of ARE genes only in wild type, but not Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Oral administration of CDDO-MA resulted in significant protection against MPTP-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration, pathological alpha-synuclein accumulation and oxidative damage in mice. Additionally, CDDO-MA treatment in rats produced significant rescue against striatal lesions caused by the neurotoxin 3-NP, and associated increases in the oxidative damage markers malondialdehyde, F2-Isoprostanes, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, 3-nitrotyrosine, and impaired glutathione homeostasis. Our results indicate that the CDDO-MA renders its neuroprotective effects through its potent activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, and suggest that triterpenoids may be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. PMID:19484125

  5. Transcriptional and biochemical markers in transplanted Perca flavescens to characterize cadmium- and copper-induced oxidative stress in the field.

    PubMed

    Defo, Michel A; Bernatchez, Louis; Campbell, Peter G C; Couture, Patrice

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent progress achieved in elucidating the mechanisms underlying local adaptation to pollution, little is known about the evolutionary change that may be occurring at the molecular level. The goal of this study was to examine patterns of gene transcription and biochemical responses induced by metal accumulation in clean yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and metal depuration in contaminated fish in a mining and smelting region of Canada. Fish were collected from a reference lake (lake Opasatica) and a Cd, Cu and Zn contaminated lake (lake Dufault) located in the Rouyn-Noranda region (Qc, Canada) and caged for one or four weeks in their own lake or transplanted in the other lake. Free-ranging fish from the same lakes were also collected. Kidney Cd and Cu concentrations in clean fish caged in the contaminated lake increased with the time of exposure, but metal depuration did not occur in contaminated fish caged in the clean lake. After 4 weeks, the major retinoid metabolites analysed, the percentage of free dehydroretinol (dROH) and the retinol dehydrogenase-2 (rdh-2) transcription level in liver decreased in clean fish transplanted into the metal-contaminated lake, suggesting that metal exposure negatively impacted retinoid metabolism. However, we observed an increase in almost all of the retinoid parameters analysed in fish from the metal-impacted lake caged in the same lake, which we interpret as an adaptation response to higher ambient metal concentration. In support of this hypothesis, liver transcription levels of microsomal glutathione-S-transferase-3 (mgst-3) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (g6pdh) were enhanced in clean fish transplanted into the metal-contaminated lake and this up-regulation was accompanied by an increase in the activities of corresponding enzymes, involved in antioxidant response. However, although in the same fish the transcription level of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn sod) was also increased, this did not lead to a

  6. Definition of Early Transcriptional Circuitry Involved in Light-Induced Reversal of PIF-Imposed Repression of Photomorphogenesis in Young Arabidopsis Seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light signals perceived by the phytochromes induce the transition from skotomorphogenic to photomorphogenic development (deetiolation) in dark-germinated seedlings. Evidence that a quadruple mutant (pifq) lacking four phytochrome-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIF1, 3, 4, and 5) is constitu...

  7. Definition of early transcriptional circuitry involved in light-induced reversal of PIF imposed repression of photomorphogenesis in young Arabidopsis seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light signals perceived by the phytochromes induce the transition from skotomorphogenic to photomorphogenic development (deetiolation) in dark-germinated seedlings. Evidence that a quadruple mutant (pifq) lacking four phytochromeinteracting bHLH transcription factors (PIF1, 3, 4, and 5) is constitut...

  8. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-11-24

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER-mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to