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Sample records for inducing dna damage

  1. Persistent damage induces mitochondrial DNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Shokolenko, Inna N; Wilson, Glenn L; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2013-07-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently toward understanding the processes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair. However, a paucity of information still exists regarding the physiological effects of persistent mtDNA damage. This is due, in part, to experimental difficulties associated with targeting mtDNA for damage, while sparing nuclear DNA. Here, we characterize two systems designed for targeted mtDNA damage based on the inducible (Tet-ON) mitochondrial expression of the bacterial enzyme, exonuclease III, and the human enzyme, uracil-N-glyosylase containing the Y147A mutation. In both systems, damage was accompanied by degradation of mtDNA, which was detectable by 6h after induction of mutant uracil-N-glycosylase and by 12h after induction of exoIII. Unexpectedly, increases in the steady-state levels of single-strand lesions, which led to degradation, were small in absolute terms indicating that both abasic sites and single-strand gaps may be poorly tolerated in mtDNA. mtDNA degradation was accompanied by the loss of expression of mtDNA-encoded COX2. After withdrawal of the inducer, recovery from mtDNA depletion occurred faster in the system expressing exonuclease III, but in both systems reduced mtDNA levels persisted longer than 144h after doxycycline withdrawal. mtDNA degradation was followed by reduction and loss of respiration, decreased membrane potential, reduced cell viability, reduced intrinsic reactive oxygen species production, slowed proliferation, and changes in mitochondrial morphology (fragmentation of the mitochondrial network, rounding and "foaming" of the mitochondria). The mutagenic effects of abasic sites in mtDNA were low, which indicates that damaged mtDNA molecules may be degraded if not rapidly repaired. This study establishes, for the first time, that mtDNA degradation can be a direct and immediate consequence of persistent mtDNA damage and that increased ROS production is not an invariant consequence of mtDNA damage.

  2. Parvovirus infection-induced DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    Parvoviruses are a group of small DNA viruses with ssDNA genomes flanked by two inverted terminal structures. Due to a limited genetic resource they require host cellular factors and sometimes a helper virus for efficient viral replication. Recent studies have shown that parvoviruses interact with the DNA damage machinery, which has a significant impact on the life cycle of the virus as well as the fate of infected cells. In addition, due to special DNA structures of the viral genomes, parvoviruses are useful tools for the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying viral infection-induced DNA damage response (DDR). This review aims to summarize recent advances in parvovirus-induced DDR, with a focus on the diverse DDR pathways triggered by different parvoviruses and the consequences of DDR on the viral life cycle as well as the fate of infected cells. PMID:25429305

  3. The DNA Damage Response Induces Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Brzostek-Racine, Sabrina; Gordon, Chris; Van Scoy, Sarah; Reich, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    This study reveals a new complexity in the cellular response to DNA damage: activation of interferon (IFN) signaling. The DNA damage response involves the rapid recruitment of repair enzymes, and the activation of signal transducers that regulate cell cycle checkpoints and cell survival. To understand the link between DNA damage and innate cellular defense that occurs in response to many viral infections, we evaluated the effects of agents such as etoposide that promote double-stranded DNA breaks. Treatment of human cells with etoposide led to the induction of IFN-stimulated genes, and the IFN-α and IFN-λ genes. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), known to be activated in response to DNA damage, was shown to be a key regulator of this IFN gene induction. Expression of an NF-κB subunit, p65/RelA was sufficient for induction of the human IFN-λ1 gene. In addition, NF-κB was required for the induction of the IFN regulatory factors-1 and -7 that are able to stimulate expression of the IFN-α and IFN-λ genes. Cells that lack the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), lack the ability to induce the IFN genes following DNA damage. Breaks in DNA are generated during normal physiological processes of replication, transcription, and recombination, as well as by external genotoxic agents or infectious agents. The significant finding of IFN production as a stress response to DNA damage provides a new perspective on the role of IFN signaling. PMID:22013119

  4. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  5. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  6. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  7. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P.; Chow, Vincent T.K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  8. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P; Chow, Vincent T K

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  9. Influenza infection induces host DNA damage and dynamic DNA damage responses during tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Parrish, Marcus; Chan, Tze Khee; Yin, Lu; Rai, Prashant; Yoshiyuki, Yamada; Abolhassani, Nona; Tan, Kong Bing; Kiraly, Orsolya; Chow, Vincent TK; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses account for significant morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory responses, including excessive generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), mediate lung injury in severe Influenza infections. However, the molecular basis of inflammation-induced lung damage is not fully understood. Here, we studied influenza H1N1 infected cells in vitro, as well as H1N1 infected mice, and we monitored molecular and cellular responses over the course of two weeks in vivo. We show that influenza induces DNA damage both when cells are directly exposed to virus in vitro (measured using the comet assay) and also when cells are exposed to virus in vivo (estimated via γH2AX foci). We show that DNA damage, as well as responses to DNA damage, persist in vivo until long after virus has been cleared, at times when there are inflammation associated RONS (measured by xanthine oxidase activity and oxidative products). The frequency of lung epithelial and immune cells with increased γH2AX foci is elevated in vivo, especially for dividing cells (Ki-67 positive) exposed to oxidative stress during tissue regeneration. Additionally, we observed a significant increase in apoptotic cells as well as increased levels of DSB repair proteins Ku70, Ku86 and Rad51 during the regenerative phase. In conclusion, results show that influenza induces DNA both in vitro and in vivo, and that DNA damage responses are activated, raising the possibility that DNA repair capacity may be a determining factor for tissue recovery and disease outcome. PMID:25809161

  10. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  11. DNA damage-induced replication arrest in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Matthew P.; Michael, W. Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal replication is sensitive to the presence of DNA-damaging alkylating agents, such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). MMS is known to inhibit replication though activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and through checkpoint-independent slowing of replication fork progression. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we now report an additional pathway that is stimulated by MMS-induced damage. We show that, upon incubation in egg extracts, MMS-treated DNA activates a diffusible inhibitor that blocks, in trans, chromosomal replication. The downstream effect of the inhibitor is a failure to recruit proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but not DNA polymerase α, to the nascent replication fork. Thus, alkylation damage activates an inhibitor that intercepts the replication pathway at a point between the polymerase α and proliferating cell nuclear antigen execution steps. We also show that activation of the inhibitor does not require the DNA damage checkpoint; rather, stimulation of the pathway described here results in checkpoint activation. These data describe a novel replication arrest pathway, and they also provide an example of how subpathways within the DNA damage response network are integrated to promote efficient cell cycle arrest in response to damaged DNA. PMID:14581453

  12. UV-induced DNA damage and repair: a review.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Häder, Donat P

    2002-04-01

    Increases in ultraviolet radiation at the Earth's surface due to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer have recently fuelled interest in the mechanisms of various effects it might have on organisms. DNA is certainly one of the key targets for UV-induced damage in a variety of organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. UV radiation induces two of the most abundant mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs) and their Dewar valence Isomers. However, cells have developed a number of repair or tolerance mechanism to counteract the DNA damage caused by UV or any other stressors. Photoreactivation with the help of the enzyme photolyase is one of the most important and frequently occurring repair mechanisms in a variety of organisms. Excision repair, which can be distinguished into base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER), also plays an important role in DNA repair in several organisms with the help of a number of glycosylases and polymerases, respectively. In addition, mechanisms such as mutagenic repair or dimer bypass, recombinational repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, apoptosis and certain alternative repair pathways are also operative in various organisms. This review deals with UV-induced DNA damage and the associated repair mechanisms as well as methods of detecting DNA damage and its future perspectives.

  13. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  14. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  15. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  16. Analysis of alcohol-induced DNA damage in Escherichia coli by visualizing single genomic DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yujin; Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Jisoo; Oh, Yeeun; Kim, Dogeun; Lee, Jungyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-07-21

    Consumption of alcohol injures DNA, and such damage is considered to be a primary cause for the development of cancer and many other diseases essentially due to reactive oxygen species generated from alcohol. To sensitively detect alcohol-induced DNA lesions in a biological system, we introduced a novel analytical platform for visualization of single genomic DNA molecules using E. coli. By fluorescently labelling the DNA lesions, our approach demonstrated, with the highest sensitivity, that we could count the number of DNA lesions induced by alcohol metabolism in a single bacterial cell. Moreover, our results showed a linear relationship between ethanol concentration and the number of DNA lesions: 0.88 lesions per 1% ethanol. Using this approach, we quantitatively analysed the DNA damage induced by exposure to alcoholic beverages such as beer (5% ethanol), rice wine (13%), soju (20%), and whisky (40%). PMID:27186604

  17. DNA damage profiles induced by sunlight at different latitudes.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Yagura, Teiti; Makita, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; MacMahon, Ricardo Monreal; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2012-04-01

    Despite growing knowledge on the biological effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on human health and ecosystems, it is still difficult to predict the negative impacts of the increasing incidence of solar UV radiation in a scenario of global warming and climate changes. Hence, the development and application of DNA-based biological sensors to monitor the solar UV radiation under different environmental conditions is of increasing importance. With a mind to rendering a molecular view-point of the genotoxic impact of sunlight, field experiments were undertaken with a DNA-dosimeter system in parallel with physical photometry of solar UVB/UVA radiation, at various latitudes in South America. On applying biochemical and immunological approaches based on specific DNA-repair enzymes and antibodies, for evaluating sunlight-induced DNA damage profiles, it became clear that the genotoxic potential of sunlight does indeed vary according to latitude. Notwithstanding, while induction of oxidized DNA bases is directly dependent on an increase in latitude, the generation of 6-4PPs is inversely so, whereby the latter can be regarded as a biomolecular marker of UVB incidence. This molecular DNA lesion-pattern largely reflects the relative incidence of UVA and UVB energy at any specific latitude. Hereby is demonstrated the applicability of this DNA-based biosensor for additional, continuous field experiments, as a means of registering variations in the genotoxic impact of solar UV radiation.

  18. Clustered DNA damage induced by heavy ion particles.

    PubMed

    Terato, Hiroaki; Ide, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    Clustered DNA damage (locally multiply damaged site) is thought to be a critical lesion caused by ionizing radiation, and high LET radiation such as heavy ion particles is believed to produce high yields of such damage. Since heavy ion particles are major components of ionizing radiation in a space environment, it is important to clarify the chemical nature and biological consequences of clustered DNA damage and its relationship to the health effects of exposure to high LET particles in humans. The concept of clustered DNA damage emerged around 1980, but only recently has become the subject of experimental studies. In this article, we review methods used to detect clustered DNA damage, and the current status of our understanding of the chemical nature and repair of clustered DNA damage. PMID:15858387

  19. Nicotine induces DNA damage in human salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Kampfinger, Katja; Friehs, Gudrun; Köhler, Christian; Hagen, Rudolf; Richter, Elmar; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2009-01-10

    The tobacco alkaloid nicotine is responsible for addiction to tobacco and supposed to contribute to tobacco carcinogensis, too. Recently, genotoxic effects of nicotine have been reported in human cells from blood and upper aerodigestive tract. Because of nicotine accumulation in saliva, the study of possible in vitro genotoxic effects of nicotine have been extended to human salivary gland cells. Specimens of parotid glands of 10 tumor patients were obtained from tumor-free tissue. Single cells were prepared by enzymatic digestion immediately after surgery and exposed for 1h to 0.125-4.0mM of nicotine. Possible genotoxic effects were determined by the Comet assay using the % DNA in tail (DT) as a reliable indicator of DNA damage. Nicotine induced a significant dose-dependent increase of DNA migration in parotid gland single-cells. The mean DT was 1.12-fold (0.125mM) to 2.24-fold (4.0mM) higher compared to control. The lowest concentration eliciting significant DNA damage within 1h, 0.25mM nicotine, is only 10-fold higher than maximal concentrations of nicotine reported in saliva after unrestricted smoking. Although conclusive evidence for a carcinogenic potential of nicotine is still lacking, the safety of long-term nicotine replacement therapy should be carefully monitored. PMID:18852035

  20. Ultraviolet induced DNA damage and hereditary skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Francis, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Clearly, cells from normal individuals possess the ability to repair a variety of damage to DNA. Numerous studies indicate that defects in DNA repair may increase an individual's susceptibility to cancer. It is hoped that continued studies of the exact structural changes produced in the DNA by environmental insults, and the correlation of specific DNA changes with particulr cellular events, such as DNA repair, will lead to a better understanding of cell-killing, mutagenesis and carbinogenesis. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  1. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  2. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  3. Stress-induced DNA Damage biomarkers: Applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism’s endogenous processes like replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damages play a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g. X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e. single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition to such DNA damage products, we suggest possible gene inductions that can be used to characterize responses to different types of stresses i.e. radiation, oxidative and replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and stringent meta-analysis of literature data.

  4. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92–1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  5. Increased Sensitivity of DNA Damage Response-Deficient Cells to Stimulated Microgravity-Induced DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; An, Lili; Hang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG). In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES) and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR) defects. PMID:25915950

  6. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; An, Lili; Hang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG). In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES) and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR) defects.

  7. In cellulo phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 by DNA-PK induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Samarth, Ravindra Mahadeo; Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    XRCC4 is a protein associated with DNA Ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. In response to treatment with ionizing radiation or DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation. Furthermore, Ser260 and Ser320 (or Ser318 in alternatively spliced form) of XRCC4 were identified as the major phosphorylation sites by purified DNA-PK in vitro through mass spectrometry. However, it has not been clear whether these sites are phosphorylated in vivo in response to DNA damage. In the present study, we generated an antibody that reacts with XRCC4 phosphorylated at Ser320 and examined in cellulo phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was induced by γ-ray irradiation and treatment with Zeocin. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was detected even after 1 Gy irradiation and increased in a manner dependent on radiation dose. The phosphorylation was observed immediately after irradiation and remained mostly unchanged for up to 4 h. The phosphorylation was inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 and was undetectable in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating that the phosphorylation was mainly mediated by DNA-PK. These results suggested potential usefulness of the phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320 as an indicator of DNA-PK functionality in living cells. PMID:26666690

  8. In cellulo phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 by DNA-PK induced by DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Samarth, Ravindra Mahadeo; Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    XRCC4 is a protein associated with DNA Ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. In response to treatment with ionizing radiation or DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation. Furthermore, Ser260 and Ser320 (or Ser318 in alternatively spliced form) of XRCC4 were identified as the major phosphorylation sites by purified DNA-PK in vitro through mass spectrometry. However, it has not been clear whether these sites are phosphorylated in vivo in response to DNA damage. In the present study, we generated an antibody that reacts with XRCC4 phosphorylated at Ser320 and examined in cellulo phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was induced by γ-ray irradiation and treatment with Zeocin. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was detected even after 1 Gy irradiation and increased in a manner dependent on radiation dose. The phosphorylation was observed immediately after irradiation and remained mostly unchanged for up to 4 h. The phosphorylation was inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 and was undetectable in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating that the phosphorylation was mainly mediated by DNA-PK. These results suggested potential usefulness of the phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320 as an indicator of DNA-PK functionality in living cells. PMID:26666690

  9. A novel bisindole-PBD conjugate causes DNA damage induced apoptosis via inhibition of DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Pranjal; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Kamal, Ahmed; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) that includes cell cycle check points, DNA repair, apoptosis, and senescence is intimately linked with cancer. It shields an organism against cancer development when genomic integrity fails. DNA repair pathways protect the cells from tumor progression caused as a result of DNA damage induced by irradiation or due to chemotherapeutic treatment. Many promising anticancer agents have been identified that target specific DNA repair pathways in response to DNA damage thereby leading to apoptosis. Here we identified a novel bisindole-PBD conjugate that possess potent anticancer activity in breast cancer cells. Further studies aimed at understanding the mechanism of action of the molecule showed its role in DNA damage induced apoptosis via inhibition of DNA repair pathway. Trypan blue and BrdU assay exhibited a dose-dependent effect. Single-stranded DNA damage was observed by COMET assay. In addition DNA damage induced ROS generation with simultaneous activation of ATM and ATR upon compound treatment was observed. Further downregulation of Bcl-XL and activation of Bax showed DNA damage induced apoptosis in MCF-7 and MDAMB-231 cells. In conclusion, it can be summarized that bisindole-PBD conjugate induces DNA damage in a dose dependent (2, 4, and 8 μM) manner by inhibiting the DNA repair genes. PMID:25010292

  10. Effects of pH on nicotine-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Ju; Chi, Chin-Wen; Liu, Tsung-Yun

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that chewing betel quid and smoking have synergistic potential in the development of oral squamous-cell carcinoma in Taiwan. Chewing betel quid produces alkalization of saliva. This study investigated the response of human oral cancer OEC-M1 cells to nicotine in different pH environments (6.5 and 8) by examining its effects on DNA damage as evidenced by single-cell gel electrophoresis. Nicotine (1 and 10 muM) significantly induced DNA strand breakage when cultured at pH 8 for 6 h but did not induce DNA damage at pH 6.5. Nicotine-induced DNA damage was also time dependent. When cells were pretreated with catalase or N-acetylcysteine, a significant reduction in nicotine-induced DNA damage was observed. Flow cytometric analyses showed that the production of 8-oxoguanine was significantly increased following nicotine (10 muM) treatment. Posttreatment of nicotine-damaged DNA by endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase, recognizing oxidized DNA bases, increased the extent of DNA damage. These results suggest that nicotine-induced DNA strand breakage is pH dependent, and oxidative stress might be involved in nicotine-induced DNA damage. Finally, cigarette smoke condensate (equivalent to 8 muM nicotine) induced significant DNA strand breaks in OEC-M1 cells at pH 8 and correlated with the generation of oxidative DNA damage. Thus, alkaline saliva generated by chewing betel quid plays an important role in cigarette-related nicotine-induced DNA damage, and reactive oxygen species may be involved in generating this DNA damage. PMID:16076763

  11. DNA damage induced by red food dyes orally administered to pregnant and male mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Murakami, M; Matsusaka, N; Kano, K; Taniguchi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2001-05-01

    We determined the genotoxicity of synthetic red tar dyes currently used as food color additives in many countries, including JAPAN: For the preliminary assessment, we treated groups of 4 pregnant mice (gestational day 11) once orally at the limit dose (2000 mg/kg) of amaranth (food red No. 2), allura red (food red No. 40), or acid red (food red No. 106), and we sampled brain, lung, liver, kidney, glandular stomach, colon, urinary bladder, and embryo 3, 6, and 24 h after treatment. We used the comet (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis) assay to measure DNA damage. The assay was positive in the colon 3 h after the administration of amaranth and allura red and weakly positive in the lung 6 h after the administration of amaranth. Acid red did not induce DNA damage in any sample at any sampling time. None of the dyes damaged DNA in other organs or the embryo. We then tested male mice with amaranth, allura red, and a related color additive, new coccine (food red No. 18). The 3 dyes induced DNA damage in the colon starting at 10 mg/kg. Twenty ml/kg of soaking liquid from commercial red ginger pickles, which contained 6.5 mg/10 ml of new coccine, induced DNA damage in colon, glandular stomach, and bladder. The potencies were compared to those of other rodent carcinogens. The rodent hepatocarcinogen p-dimethylaminoazobenzene induced colon DNA damage at 1 mg/kg, whereas it damaged liver DNA only at 500 mg/kg. Although 1 mg/kg of N-nitrosodimethylamine induced DNA damage in liver and bladder, it did not induce colon DNA damage. N-nitrosodiethylamine at 14 mg/kg did not induce DNA damage in any organs examined. Because the 3 azo additives we examined induced colon DNA damage at a very low dose, more extensive assessment of azo additives is warranted.

  12. The DNA replication and damage checkpoint pathways induce transcription by inhibition of the Crt1 repressor.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Zhou, Z; Elledge, S J

    1998-09-01

    We have identified the yeast CRT1 gene as an effector of the DNA damage and replication checkpoint pathway. CRT1 encodes a DNA-binding protein that recruits the general repressors Ssn6 and Tup1 to the promoters of damage-inducible genes. Derepression of the Crt1 regulon suppresses the lethality of mec1 and rad53 null alleles and is essential for cell viability during replicative stress. In response to DNA damage and replication blocks, Crt1 becomes hyperphosphorylated and no longer binds DNA, resulting in transcriptional induction. CRT1 is autoregulated and is itself induced by DNA damage, indicating the existence of a negative feedback pathway that facilitates return to the repressed state after elimination of damage. The inhibition of an autoregulatory repressor in response to DNA damage is a strategy conserved throughout prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolution.

  13. Lycopene-induced hydroxyl radical causes oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonyoung; Lee, Dong Gun

    2014-09-01

    Lycopene, which is a well-known red carotenoid pigment, has been drawing scientific interest because of its potential biological functions. The current study reports that lycopene acts as a bactericidal agent by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated DNA damage in Escherichia coli. Lycopene treatment elevated the level of ROS-in particular, hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) -which can damage DNA in E. coli. Lycopene-induced DNA damage in bacteria was confirmed and we also observed cell filamentation caused by cell division arrest, an indirect marker of the DNA damage repair system, in lycopene-treated E. coli. Increased RecA expression was observed, indicating activation of the DNA repair system (SOS response). To summarize, lycopene exerts its antibacterial effects by inducing (•)OH -mediated DNA damage that cannot be ameliorated by the SOS response. Lycopene may be a clinically useful adjuvant for current antimicrobial therapies.

  14. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  15. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  16. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  17. Neurotoxin-induced DNA damage is persistentin SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Musich, Phillip R.; Cui, Kui; Zou, Yue; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the noradrenergic neurons has been reported in the brain of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. However, their pathologic characteristics during the neurodegenerative course and underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we used the neurotoxincamptothecin (CPT)to induce the DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, normal fibroblast cells, and primarily cultured LC and raphe neurons to examine cellular responses and repair capabilities after neurotoxin exposure. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and deficientin DNA repair, as compared to fibroblast cells. Furthermore, similar to SH-SY5Y cells, primarily cultured LC neurons are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and show a deficiency in repairing this damage. Moreover, while N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) exposure also results in DNA damage in cultured LC neurons, neither CPT nor DSP4 induce DNA damage in neuronal cultures from the raphe nuclei. Taken together, noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons are sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and exhibit a repair deficiency, providing a mechanistic explanation for the pathologic characteristics of LC degeneration when facing endogenous and environmental DNA-damaging insultsin vivo. PMID:25724887

  18. Polymerase η suppresses telomere defects induced by DNA damaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Pope-Varsalona, Hannah; Liu, Fu-Jun; Guzik, Lynda; Opresko, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres at chromosome ends are normally masked from proteins that signal and repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Bulky DNA lesions can cause DSBs if they block DNA replication, unless they are bypassed by translesion (TLS) DNA polymerases. Here, we investigated roles for TLS polymerase η, (polη) in preserving telomeres following acute physical UVC exposure and chronic chemical Cr(VI) exposure, which both induce blocking lesions. We report that polη protects against cytotoxicity and replication stress caused by Cr(VI), similar to results with ultraviolet C light (UVC). Both exposures induce ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase and polη accumulation into nuclear foci and localization to individual telomeres, consistent with replication fork stalling at DNA lesions. Polη-deficient cells exhibited greater numbers of telomeres that co-localized with DSB response proteins after exposures. Furthermore, the genotoxic exposures induced telomere aberrations associated with failures in telomere replication that were suppressed by polη. We propose that polη's ability to bypass bulky DNA lesions at telomeres is critical for proper telomere replication following genotoxic exposures. PMID:25355508

  19. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  20. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Josie K.; Lane, Simon I. R.; Merriman, Julie A.; Jones, Keith T.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule–kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  1. Oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis induced by metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, S; Nishino, K; Oikawa, S; Inoue, S; Mizutani, T; Kawanishi, S

    1998-08-01

    DNA damage by metabolites of a food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), was investigated as a potential mechanism of carcinogenicity. The mechanism of DNA damage by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxyl-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-OOH), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) in the presence of metal ions was investigated by using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the c-Ha-ras-1 proto-oncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. BHT-OOH caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II), whereas BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO did not. However, BHT-quinone did induce DNA damage in the presence of NADH and Cu(II). Bathocuproine inhibited Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, indicating the participation of Cu(I) in the process. Catalase also inhibited DNA damage induced by BHT-quinone, but not that induced by BHT-OOH. The DNA cleavage pattern observed with BHT-quinone plus NADH was different from that seen with BHT-OOH. With BHT-quinone plus NADH, piperidine-labile sites could be generated at nucleotides other than adenine residue. BHT-OOH caused cleavage specifically at guanine residues. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that BHT-OOH and BHT-quinone induced DNA strand breaks in cultured cells, whereas BHT-CHO did not. Both BHT-quinone and BHT-OOH induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which is the characteristic of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of peroxides in cultured cells treated with BHT-OOH or BHT-quinone. These results suggest that BHT-OOH participates in oxidative DNA damage directly, whereas BHT-quinone causes DNA damage through H2O2 generation, which leads to internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. PMID:9744574

  2. Oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis induced by metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, S; Nishino, K; Oikawa, S; Inoue, S; Mizutani, T; Kawanishi, S

    1998-08-01

    DNA damage by metabolites of a food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), was investigated as a potential mechanism of carcinogenicity. The mechanism of DNA damage by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxyl-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-OOH), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) in the presence of metal ions was investigated by using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the c-Ha-ras-1 proto-oncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. BHT-OOH caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II), whereas BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO did not. However, BHT-quinone did induce DNA damage in the presence of NADH and Cu(II). Bathocuproine inhibited Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, indicating the participation of Cu(I) in the process. Catalase also inhibited DNA damage induced by BHT-quinone, but not that induced by BHT-OOH. The DNA cleavage pattern observed with BHT-quinone plus NADH was different from that seen with BHT-OOH. With BHT-quinone plus NADH, piperidine-labile sites could be generated at nucleotides other than adenine residue. BHT-OOH caused cleavage specifically at guanine residues. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that BHT-OOH and BHT-quinone induced DNA strand breaks in cultured cells, whereas BHT-CHO did not. Both BHT-quinone and BHT-OOH induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which is the characteristic of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of peroxides in cultured cells treated with BHT-OOH or BHT-quinone. These results suggest that BHT-OOH participates in oxidative DNA damage directly, whereas BHT-quinone causes DNA damage through H2O2 generation, which leads to internucleosomal DNA fragmentation.

  3. Molecular beacon probes for the detection of cisplatin-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Shire, Zahra J; Loppnow, Glen R

    2012-04-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)) causes crosslinking of DNA at AG and GG sites in cellular DNA, inhibiting replication, and making it a useful anti-cancer drug. Several techniques have been used previously to detect nucleic acid damage but most of these tools are labour-intensive, time-consuming, and/or expensive. Here, we describe a sensitive, robust, and quantitative tool for detecting cisplatin-induced DNA damage by using fluorescent molecular beacon probes (MB). Our results show a decrease of fluorescence in the presence of cisplatin-induced DNA damage, confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The decrease in fluorescence upon damage scales with the number of AG and GG sites, indicating the ability of MB to quantitatively detect DNA damage by cisplatin.

  4. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  5. Detection of DNA damage induced by heavy ion irradiation in the individual cells with comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, S.; Natsuhori, M.; Ito, N.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2003-05-01

    Investigating the biological effects of high-LET heavy ion irradiation at low fluence is important to evaluate the risk of charged particles. Especially it is important to detect radiation damage induced by the precise number of heavy ions in the individual cells. Thus we studied the relationship between the number of ions traversing the cell and DNA damage produced by the ion irradiation. We applied comet assay to measure the DNA damage in the individual cells. Cells attached on the ion track detector CR-39 were irradiated with ion beams at TIARA, JAERI-Takasaki. After irradiation, the cells were stained with ethidium bromide and the opposite side of the CR-39 was etched. We observed that the heavy ions with higher LET values induced the heavier DNA damage. The result indicated that the amount of DNA damage induced by one particle increased with the LET values of the heavy ions.

  6. DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of the human telomere-associated protein TRF2

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromi; Mendonca, Marc S.; Bradshaw, Paul S.; Hoelz, Derek J.; Malkas, Linda H.; Meyn, M. Stephen; Gilley, David

    2005-01-01

    Several protein kinases from diverse eukaryotes known to perform important roles in DNA repair have also been shown to play critical roles in telomere maintenance. Here, we report that the human telomere-associated protein TRF2 is rapidly phosphorylated in response to DNA damage. We find that the phosphorylated form of TRF2 is not bound to telomeric DNA, as is the ground form of TRF2, and is rapidly localized to damage sites. Our results suggest that the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein kinase signal-transduction pathway is primarily responsible for the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of TRF2. Unlike DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of other ATM targets, the phosphorylated form of TRF2 is transient, being detected rapidly at DNA damage sites postirradiation, but largely dissipated by 2 hours. In addition, we report that the phosphorylated form of TRF2 is present at telomeres in cell types undergoing telomere-based crisis and a recombination-driven, telomerase-independent, alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway, likely as a consequence of a telomere-based DNA damage response. Our results link the induction of TRF2 phosphorylation to the DNA damage-response system, providing an example of direct cross-talk via a signaling pathway between these two major cellular processes essential for genomic stability, telomere maintenance, and DNA repair. PMID:16223874

  7. Autophosphorylation and Pin1 binding coordinate DNA damage-induced HIPK2 activation and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bitomsky, Nadja; Conrad, Elisa; Moritz, Christian; Polonio-Vallon, Tilman; Sombroek, Dirk; Schultheiss, Kathrin; Glas, Carolina; Greiner, Vera; Herbel, Christoph; Mantovani, Fiamma; del Sal, Giannino; Peri, Francesca; Hofmann, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive genome damage activates the apoptosis response. Protein kinase HIPK2 is a key regulator of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we deciphered the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 activation and show its relevance for DNA damage-induced apoptosis in cellulo and in vivo. HIPK2 autointeracts and site-specifically autophosphorylates upon DNA damage at Thr880/Ser882. Autophosphorylation regulates HIPK2 activity and mutation of the phosphorylation-acceptor sites deregulates p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and apoptosis in cellulo. Moreover, HIPK2 autophosphorylation is conserved between human and zebrafish and is important for DNA damage-induced apoptosis in vivo. Mechanistically, autophosphorylation creates a binding signal for the phospho-specific isomerase Pin1. Pin1 links HIPK2 activation to its stabilization by inhibiting HIPK2 polyubiquitination and modulating Siah-1–HIPK2 interaction. Concordantly, Pin1 is required for DNA damage-induced HIPK2 stabilization and p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and is essential for induction of apotosis both in cellulo and in zebrafish. Our results identify an evolutionary conserved mechanism regulating DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:24145406

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells' molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  9. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  10. HTLV-1 Tax protein sensitizes cells to apoptotic cell death induced by DNA damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Kao, S Y; Lemoine, F J; Mariott, S J

    2000-04-27

    Transient HTLV-1 Tax expression suppresses cellular nucleotide excision repair, and this effect correlates with Tax transactivation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter. The inability to repair DNA damage typically induces apoptotic cell death. Therefore, we investigated the effect of Tax-mediated suppression of DNA repair on apoptosis in stable Tax-expressing cells. Constitutive Tax expression reduced cellular nucleotide excision repair activity compared with parental and control cells. Tax-expressing cells were also more sensitive to apoptosis induced by DNA damaging agents than control cells. Even though Tax-expressing cells displayed reduced DNA repair, they showed increased DNA replication following UV damage. These results suggest that Tax suppresses the cell's ability to repair DNA damage and stimulates DNA replication even in the presence of damage. The inability to repair DNA damage is likely to stimulate apoptotic cell death in the majority of Tax-expressing cells while the ability to promote DNA replication may also allow the survival of a small population of cells. We propose that together these effects contribute to the monoclonal nature and low efficiency of HTLV-1 transformation.

  11. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  12. Zinc protects HepG2 cells against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Hao, Junran; Shen, Xiao Li; Yang, Xuan; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun

    2013-04-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are the most studied mechanisms by which ochratoxin A (OTA) induces its toxic effects, which include nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Zinc, which is an essential trace element, is considered a potential antioxidant. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplement could inhibit OTA-induced oxidative damage and DNA damage in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of inhibition. The results indicated that that exposure of OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration; zinc supplement significantly reduced the OTA-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity but did not affect the OTA-induced decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}). Meanwhile, the addition of the zinc chelator N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) strongly aggravated the OTA-induced oxidative damage. This study also demonstrated that zinc helped to maintain the integrity of DNA through the reduction of OTA-induced DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation and DNA hypomethylation. OTA increased the mRNA expression of metallothionein1-A (MT1A), metallothionein2-A (MT2A) and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Zinc supplement further enhanced the mRNA expression of MT1A and MT2A, but it had no effect on the mRNA expression of SOD1 and catalase (CAT). Zinc was for the first time proven to reduce the cytotoxicity of OTA through inhibiting the oxidative damage and DNA damage, and regulating the expression of zinc-associated genes. Thus, the addition of zinc can potentially be used to reduce the OTA toxicity of contaminated feeds. - Highlights: ► OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration. ► OTA induced the formation of 8-OHdG in HepG2 cells. ► It was testified for the first time that OTA induced DNA hypomethylation. ► Zinc protects against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by

  13. UV-induced DNA damage in Cyclops abyssorum tatricus populations from clear and turbid alpine lakes

    PubMed Central

    Tartarotti, Barbara; Saul, Nadine; Chakrabarti, Shumon; Trattner, Florian; Steinberg, Christian E. W.; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Zooplankton from clear alpine lakes thrive under high levels of solar UV radiation (UVR), but in glacially turbid ones they are more protected from this damaging radiation. Here, we present results from experiments done with Cyclops abyssorum tatricus to assess UV-induced DNA damage and repair processes using the comet assay. Copepods were collected from three alpine lakes of differing UV transparency ranging from clear to glacially turbid, and exposed to artificial UVR. In addition, photoprotection levels [mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and lipophilic antioxidant capacity] were estimated in the test populations. Similar UV-induced DNA damage levels were observed among the copepods from all lakes, but background DNA damage (time zero and dark controls) was lowest in the copepods from the glacially turbid lake, resulting in a higher relative DNA damage accumulation. Most DNA strand breaks were repaired after recovery in the dark. Low MAA concentrations were found in the copepods from the glacially turbid lake, while the highest levels were observed in the population from the most UV transparent lake. However, the highest lipophilic antioxidant capacities were measured in the copepods from the lake with intermediate UV transparency. Photoprotection and the ability to repair DNA damage, and consequently reducing UV-induced damage, are part of the response mechanisms in zooplankton to changes in water transparency caused by glacier retreat. PMID:24616551

  14. DNA damage induced by m-phenylenediamine and its derivative in the presence of copper ion.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Murata, M; Hiraku, Y; Yamashita, N; Oikawa, S; Kawanishi, S

    1998-09-01

    To clarify the mechanism of carcinogenesis by hair dyes, we compared the extent of DNA damage induced by mutagenic m-phenylenediamine and 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine, using 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Carcinogenic 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine caused DNA damage at thymine and cytosine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine, a Cu(I)-specific chelator, inhibited 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine-induced DNA damage, suggesting the involvement of H2O2 and Cu(I). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) enhanced the DNA damage. Formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) was induced by 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine in the presence of Cu(II). UV-visible spectroscopic studies have shown that Cu(II) mediated autoxidation of 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine and SOD accelerated the autoxidation. On the other hand, non-carcinogenic m-phenylenediamine did not cause clear DNA damage and significant autoxidation even in the presence of Cu(II). These results suggest that carcinogenicity of m-phenylenediamines is associated with ability to cause oxidative DNA damage rather than bacterial mutagenicity. PMID:9802551

  15. DNA Damage-induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Stress Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Lori A.; Degtyareva, Natalya; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    Cells are exposed to both endogenous and exogenous sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). At high levels, ROS can lead to impaired physiological function through cellular damage of DNA, proteins, lipids, and other macromolecules, which can lead to certain human pathologies including cancers, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease, as well as aging. We have employed Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to examine the levels and types of ROS that are produced in response to DNA damage in isogenic strains with different DNA repair capacities. We find that when DNA damage is introduced into cells from exogenous or endogenous sources there is an increase in the amount of intracellular ROS which is not directly related to cell death. We have examined the spectrum of ROS in order to elucidate its role in the cellular response to DNA damage. As an independent verification of the DNA damage-induced ROS response, we show that a major activator of the oxidative stress response, Yap1, relocalizes to the nucleus following exposure to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. Our results indicate that the DNA damage-induced increase in intracellular ROS levels is a generalized stress response that is likely to function in various signaling pathways. PMID:18708137

  16. Ochratoxin A induces oxidative DNA damage in liver and kidney after oral dosing to rats.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Hennicke G; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine; Kiossev, Jetchko; Latendresse, John R; Schlatter, Josef; Turesky, Robert J

    2005-12-01

    The nephrotoxic/carcinogenic mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) occurs as a contaminant in food and feed and may be linked to human endemic Balkan nephropathy. The mechanism of OTA-derived carcinogenicity is still under debate, since reactive metabolites of OTA and DNA adducts have not been unambiguously identified. Oxidative DNA damage, however, has been observed in vitro after incubation of mammalian cells with OTA. In this study, we investigated whether OTA induces oxidative DNA damage in vivo as well. Male F344 rats were dosed with 0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg bw per day OTA for 4 wk (gavage, 7 days/wk, five animals per dose group). Subsequently, oxidative DNA damage was determined in liver and kidney by the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) with/without use of the repair enzyme formamido-pyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG). The administration of OTA had no effect on basic DNA damage (determined without FPG); however, OTA-mediated oxidative damage was detected with FPG treatment in kidney and liver DNA of all dose groups. Since the doses were in a range that had caused kidney tumors in a 2-year carcinogenicity study with rats, the oxidative DNA damage induced by OTA may help to explain its mechanism of carcinogenicity. For the selective induction of tumors in the kidney, increased oxidative stress in connection with severe cytotoxicity and increased cell proliferation might represent driving factors.

  17. Repair of ultraviolet B and singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells.

    PubMed

    Rünger, T M; Epe, B; Möller, K

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) (290-320 nm) is capable of damaging the DNA molecule directly by generating predominantly pyrimidine dimers. UVA (320-400 nm) does not alter the DNA molecule directly. However, when it is absorbed by cellular photosensitizers, it can damage the DNA molecule indirectly, e.g., by mediation of singlet oxygen, generating predominantly 8-hydroxyguanine. These indirect effects have been implicated in the mutagenic, genotoxic, and carcinogenic effects of UVA. To study the processing of directly and indirectly UV-induced DNA damage in intact, DNA-repair-proficient and -deficient human cells, we used the replicating plasmid pRSVcat, either irradiated with up to 10 kJ/m2 UVB or treated with the photosensitizer methylene blue plus visible light (which generates singlet oxygen). These treated plasmids were introduced into lymphoblast lines from normal donors or from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A, C, D, E, and variant. DNA repair was assessed by measuring activity of reactivated chloramphenicol-acetyl-transferase enzyme, encoded by the plasmid's cat gene, in cell extracts after 3 d. As expected, the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage was reduced in all XP cell lines, and the degree varied with the complementation group. XP-A, -D, -E, and -variant cells were normally efficient in the repair of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage. Only three of four XP-C cell lines showed a markedly reduced repair of these lesions. This indicates differential DNA-repair pathways for directly and indirectly UV-induced DNA damage in human cells and suggests that both may be affected in XP-C. PMID:7798643

  18. 2-Aminopurine hairpin probes for the detection of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2012-05-13

    Nucleic acid exposure to radiation and chemical insults leads to damage and disease. Thus, detection and understanding DNA damage is important for elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease. However, current methods of DNA damage detection are either time-consuming, destroy the sample, or are too specific to be used for generic detection of damage. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence sensor of 2-aminopurine (2AP), a fluorescent analogue of adenine, incorporated in the loop of a hairpin probe for the quantification of ultraviolet (UV) C-induced nucleic acid damage. Our results show that the selectivity of the 2AP hairpin probe to UV-induced nucleic acid damage is comparable to molecular beacon (MB) probes of DNA damage. The calibration curve for the 2AP hairpin probe shows good linearity (R(2)=0.98) with a limit of detection of 17.2 nM. This probe is a simple, fast and economic fluorescence sensor for the quantification of UV-induced damage in DNA.

  19. Single-cell analysis challenges the connection between autophagy and senescence induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Bueno e Silva, Mardja Manssur; Thomé, Marcos Paulo; Lenz, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy and senescence have been described as central features of cell biology, but the interplay between these mechanisms remains obscure. Using a therapeutically relevant model of DNA damage-induced senescence in human glioma cells, we demonstrated that acute treatment with temozolomide induces DNA damage, a transitory activation of PRKAA/AMPK-ULK1 and MAPK14/p38 and the sustained inhibition of AKT-MTOR. This produced a transient induction of autophagy, which was followed by senescence. However, at the single cell level, this coordinated transition was not observed, and autophagy and senescence were triggered in a very heterogeneous manner. Indeed, at a population level, autophagy was highly negatively correlated with senescence markers, while in single cells this correlation did not exist. The inhibition of autophagy triggered apoptosis and decreased senescence, while its activation increased temozolomide-induced senescence, showing that DNA damage-induced autophagy acts by suppressing apoptosis.

  20. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma.

  1. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma. PMID:24798949

  2. Ultrasound-induced DNA damage and signal transductions indicated by gammaH2AX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Yukihiro; Fujiwara, Yoshisada; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Ogawa, Ryohei; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Ichiro; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Kondo, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been shown to induce cancer cell death via different forms including apoptosis. Here, we report the potential of low-intensity pulsed US (LIPUS) to induce genomic DNA damage and subsequent DNA damage response. Using the ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as the positive control, we were able to observe the induction of DSBs (as neutral comet tails) and the subsequent formation of gammaH2AX-positive foci (by immunofluorescence detection) in human leukemia cells following exposure to LIPUS. The LIPUS-induced DNA damage arose most likely from the mechanical, but not sonochemical, effect of cavitation, based on our observation that the suppression of inertial cavitation abrogated the gammH2AX foci formation, whereas scavenging of free radical formation (e.g., hydroxyl radical) had no protective effect on it. Treatment with the specific kinase inhibitor of ATM or DNA-PKcs, which can phosphorylate H2AX Ser139, revealed that US-induced gammaH2AX was inhibited more effectively by the DNA-PK inhibitor than ATM kinase inhibitor. Notably, these inhibitor effects were opposite to those with radiation-induced gammH2AX. In conclusion, we report, for the first time that US can induce DNA damage and the DNA damage response as indicated by gammaH2AX was triggered by the cavitational mechanical effects. Thus, it is expected that the data shown here may provide a better understanding of the cellular responses to US.

  3. Protection from radiation-induced mitochondrial and genomic DNA damage by an extract of Hippophae rhamnoides.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Kumar, Indracanti Prem; Samanta, Namita; Afrin, Farhat; Gupta, Manju Lata; Sharma, Upendra Kumar; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Yogendra Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2006-12-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides or seabuckthorn is used extensively in Indian and Tibetan traditional medicine for the treatment of circulatory disorders, ischemic heart disease, hepatic injury, and neoplasia. In the present study, we have evaluated the radioprotective potential of REC-1001, a fraction isolated from the berries of H. rhamnoides. Chemical analysis of the extract indicated that REC-1001 was approximately 68% by weight polyphenols, and contained kaempferol, isorhamnetin, and quercetin. The effect of REC-1001 on modulating radiation-induced DNA damage was determined in murine thymocytes by measuring nonspecific nuclear DNA damage at the whole genome level using the alkaline halo assay and by measuring sequence/gene-specific DNA damage both in nuclear DNA (beta-globin gene) and in mitochondrial DNA using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Treatment with 10 Gy resulted in a significant amount of DNA damage in the halo assay and reductions in the amplification of both the beta-globin gene and mitochondrial DNA. REC-1001 dose-dependently reduced the amount of damage detected in each assay, with the maximum protective effects observed at the highest REC-1001 dose evaluated (250 micro g/ml). Studies measuring the nicking of naked plasmid DNA further established the radioprotective effect of REC-1001. To elucidate possible mechanisms of action, the antioxidant properties and the free-radical scavenging activities of REC-1001 were evaluated. REC-1001 dose-dependently scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals, chemically-generated superoxide anions, stabilized DPPH radicals, and reduced Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). The results of the study indicate that the REC-1001 extract of H. rhamnoides protects mitochondrial and genomic DNA from radiation-induced damage. The polyphenols/flavonoids present in the extract might be responsible for the free radical scavenging and DNA protection afforded by REC-1001. PMID:16948057

  4. p38γ regulates UV-induced checkpoint signaling and repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Cheng; Wu, Xiaohua; Han, Jiahuai; Sun, Peiqing

    2010-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA damage triggers activation of checkpoint signaling pathways that coordinate cell cycle arrest and repair of damaged DNA. These DNA damage responses serve to maintain genome stability and prevent accumulation of genetic mutations and development of cancer. The p38 MAPK was previously implicated in cellular responses to several types of DNA damage. However, the role of each of the four p38 isoforms and the mechanism for their involvement in DNA damage responses remained poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that p38γ, but not the other p38 isoforms, contributes to the survival of UV-treated cells. Deletion of p38γ sensitizes cells to UV exposure, accompanied by prolonged S phase cell cycle arrest and increased rate of apoptosis. Further investigation reveal that p38γ is essential for the optimal activation of the checkpoint signaling caused by UV, and for the efficient repair of UV-induced DNA damage. These findings have established a novel role of p38γ in UV-induced DNA damage responses, and suggested that p38γ contributes to the ability of cells to cope with UV exposure by regulating the checkpoint signaling pathways and the repair of damaged DNA.

  5. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  6. A DNA Damage-Induced, SOS-Independent Checkpoint Regulates Cell Division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Modell, Joshua W.; Kambara, Tracy K.; Perchuk, Barrett S.; Laub, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  7. DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification occurs via excessive formation of centriolar satellites.

    PubMed

    Löffler, H; Fechter, A; Liu, F Y; Poppelreuther, S; Krämer, A

    2013-06-13

    Centrosome amplification is a frequent phenomenon in malignancies and may facilitate tumorigenesis by promoting chromosomal instability. On the other hand, a centrosome inactivation checkpoint comprising centrosome amplification leading to elimination of cells by mitotic catastrophe has been described in response to DNA damage by ionizing radiation or cytostatic drugs. So far, the exact nature of DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification, which might be overduplication or fragmentation of existing centrosomes, has been controversial. To solve this controversy, we have established a method to distinguish between these two possibilities using A549 cells expressing photoconvertible CETN2-Dendra2. In response to various DNA-damaging treatments, centrosome amplification but not fragmentation was observed. Moreover, centrosome amplification was preceded by excessive formation of centrin-containing centriolar satellites, which were identified as de novo-generated atypical centrin dots staining positive for centriolar satellite markers but negative or only weakly positive for other established centrosomal markers, and which could be verified as centriolar satellites using immunogold electron microscopy. In line with this notion, disruption of dynein-mediated recruitment of centrosomal proteins via centriolar satellites suppressed centrosome amplification after DNA damage, and excessive formation of centriolar satellites could be inhibited by interference with Chk1, a known mediator of centrosome amplification in response to DNA damage. In conclusion, we provide a model in which a Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint induces excessive formation of centriolar satellites constituting assembly platforms for centrosomal proteins, which subsequently leads to centrosome amplification. PMID:22824794

  8. Correlation between helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) variables and plasma induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ek R.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source with a dielectric capillary and two tubular electrodes was used to induce damage in aqueous plasmid DNA. The fraction of different types of DNA damage (i.e., intact or undamaged, double strand breaks (DSBs), and single strand breaks (SSBs)) that occurred as the result of plasma irradiation was quantified through analysis of agarose gel electrophoresis images. The total DNA damage increased with an increase in both flow rate and duration of irradiation, but decreased with an increase in distance between the APPJ and sample. The average power of the plasma was calculated and the length of APPJ was measured for various flow rates and voltages applied. The possible effects of plasma power and reactive species on DNA damage are discussed.

  9. Correlation between helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) variables and plasma induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ek R.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source with a dielectric capillary and two tubular electrodes was used to induce damage in aqueous plasmid DNA. The fraction of different types of DNA damage (i.e., intact or undamaged, double strand breaks (DSBs), and single strand breaks (SSBs)) that occurred as the result of plasma irradiation was quantified through analysis of agarose gel electrophoresis images. The total DNA damage increased with an increase in both flow rate and duration of irradiation, but decreased with an increase in distance between the APPJ and sample. The average power of the plasma was calculated and the length of APPJ was measured for various flow rates and voltages applied. The possible effects of plasma power and reactive species on DNA damage are discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  10. Chromatin structure following UV-induced DNA damage-repair or death?

    PubMed

    Farrell, Andrew W; Halliday, Gary M; Lyons, James Guy

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is compacted into a complex structure known as chromatin. The unravelling of DNA is a crucial step in DNA repair, replication, transcription and recombination as this allows access to DNA for these processes. Failure to package DNA into the nucleosome, the individual unit of chromatin, can lead to genomic instability, driving a cell into apoptosis, senescence, or cellular proliferation. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation damage causes destabilisation of chromatin integrity. UV irradiation induces DNA damage such as photolesions and subjects the chromatin to substantial rearrangements, causing the arrest of transcription forks and cell cycle arrest. Highly conserved processes known as nucleotide and base excision repair (NER and BER) then begin to repair these lesions. However, if DNA repair fails, the cell may be forced into apoptosis. The modification of various histones as well as nucleosome remodelling via ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes are required not only to repair these UV-induced DNA lesions, but also for apoptosis signalling. Histone modifications and nucleosome remodelling in response to UV also lead to the recruitment of various repair and pro-apoptotic proteins. Thus, the way in which a cell responds to UV irradiation via these modifications is important in determining its fate. Failure of these DNA damage response steps can lead to cellular proliferation and oncogenic development, causing skin cancer, hence these chromatin changes are critical for a proper response to UV-induced injury.

  11. Mcl-1 protects prostate cancer cells from cell death mediated by chemotherapy-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Teresita; de las Pozas, Alicia; Parrondo, Ricardo; Palenzuela, Deanna; Cayuso, William; Rai, Priyamvada; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 is highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), resulting in resistance to apoptosis and association with poor prognosis. Although predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, there is evidence that Mcl-1 exhibits nuclear localization where it is thought to protect against DNA damage-induced cell death. The role of Mcl-1 in mediating resistance to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in prostate cancer (PCa) is not known. We show in human PCa cell lines and in TRAMP, a transgenic mouse model of PCa, that the combination of the antimitotic agent ENMD-1198 (analog of 2-methoxyestradiol) with betulinic acid (BA, increases proteotoxic stress) targets Mcl-1 by increasing its proteasomal degradation, resulting in increased γH2AX (DNA damage) and apoptotic/necrotic cell death. Knockdown of Mcl-1 in CRPC cells leads to elevated γH2AX, DNA strand breaks, and cell death after treatment with 1198 + BA- or doxorubicin. Additional knockdowns in PC3 cells suggests that cytoplasmic Mcl-1 protects against DNA damage by blocking the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor and thereby preventing its nuclear translocation and subsequent interaction with the cyclophilin A endonuclease. Overall, our results suggest that chemotherapeutic agents that target Mcl-1 will promote cell death in response to DNA damage, particularly in CRPC. PMID:26425662

  12. Positive feedback regulation of p53 transactivity by DNA damage-induced ISG15 modification

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Ho; Yang, Seung Wook; Park, Jung Mi; Ka, Seung Hyeun; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kong, Young-Yun; Jeon, Young Joo; Seol, Jae Hong; Chung, Chin Ha

    2016-01-01

    p53 plays a pivotal role in tumour suppression under stresses, such as DNA damage. ISG15 has been implicated in the control of tumorigenesis. Intriguingly, the expression of ISG15, UBE1L and UBCH8 is induced by DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet and doxorubicin, which are known to induce p53. Here, we show that the genes encoding ISG15, UBE1L, UBCH8 and EFP, have the p53-responsive elements and their expression is induced in a p53-dependent fashion under DNA damage conditions. Furthermore, DNA damage induces ISG15 conjugation to p53 and this modification markedly enhances the binding of p53 to the promoters of its target genes (for example, CDKN1 and BAX) as well as of its own gene by promoting phosphorylation and acetylation, leading to suppression of cell growth and tumorigenesis. These findings establish a novel feedback circuit between p53 and ISG15-conjugating system for positive regulation of the tumour suppressive function of p53 under DNA damage conditions. PMID:27545325

  13. Detection of DNA damage induced by space radiation in Mir and space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Ohnishi, Ken; Takahashi, Akihisa; Taniguchi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Masaru; Nakano, Tamotsu; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2002-12-01

    Although physical monitoring of space radiation has been accomplished, we aim to measure exact DNA damage as caused by space radiation. If DNA damage is caused by space radiation, we can detect DNA damage dependent on the length of the space flight periods by using post-labeling methods. To detect DNA damage caused by space radiation, we placed fixed human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in the Russian Mir space station for 40 days and in an American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by enzymatic incorporation of [3H]-dATP with terminal deoxyribo-nucleotidyl transferase (TdT). We detected DNA damage as many grains on fixed silver emulsion resulting from beta-rays emitted from 3H-atoms in the nuclei of the cells placed in the Mir-station (J/Mir mission, STS-89), but detected hardly any in the ground control sample. In the space shuttle samples (S/MM-8), the number of cells having many grains was lower than that in the J/Mir mission samples. These results suggest that DNA damage is caused by space radiation and that it is dependent on the length of the space flight.

  14. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  15. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  16. Investigation of perfluorooctanoic acid induced DNA damage using electrogenerated chemiluminescence associated with charge transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Guo, Linqing; Li, Meng; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Miao, Wujian

    2016-10-01

    An electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL)-DNA sensor was designed and fabricated for the investigation of DNA damage by a potential environmental pollutant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The ECL-DNA sensor consisted of a Au electrode that had a self-assembled monolayer of 15 base-pair double-stranded (ds) DNA oligonucleotides with covalently attached semiconductor CdSe quantum dots (QDs) at the distal end of the DNA. Characterization of the ECL-DNA sensor was conducted with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ECL, and cyclic voltammetry before and after the exposure of the sensor to PFOA. Consistent data revealed that the dsDNA on Au was severely damaged upon the incubation of the electrode in PFOA, causing significant increase in charge (or electron) transfer (CT) resistance within DNA strands. Consequently, the cathodic coreactant ECL responses of the Au/dsDNA-QDs electrode in the presence of K2S2O8 were markedly decreased. The strong interaction between DNA and PFOA via the hydrophobic interaction, especially the formation of F···H hydrogen bonds by insertion of the difluoro-methylene group of PFOA into the DNA base pairs, was believed to be responsible for the dissociation or loosening of dsDNA structure, which inhibited the CT through DNA. A linear relationship between the ECL signal of the sensor and the logarithmical concentration of PFOA displayed a dynamic range of 1.00 × 10(-14)-1.00 × 10(-4) M, with a limit of detection of 1.00 × 10(-15) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Graphical Abstract Illustration of ECL detection of PFOA on a Au/dsDNA-QDs ECL-DNA sensor.

  17. Investigation of perfluorooctanoic acid induced DNA damage using electrogenerated chemiluminescence associated with charge transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Guo, Linqing; Li, Meng; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Miao, Wujian

    2016-10-01

    An electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL)-DNA sensor was designed and fabricated for the investigation of DNA damage by a potential environmental pollutant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The ECL-DNA sensor consisted of a Au electrode that had a self-assembled monolayer of 15 base-pair double-stranded (ds) DNA oligonucleotides with covalently attached semiconductor CdSe quantum dots (QDs) at the distal end of the DNA. Characterization of the ECL-DNA sensor was conducted with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ECL, and cyclic voltammetry before and after the exposure of the sensor to PFOA. Consistent data revealed that the dsDNA on Au was severely damaged upon the incubation of the electrode in PFOA, causing significant increase in charge (or electron) transfer (CT) resistance within DNA strands. Consequently, the cathodic coreactant ECL responses of the Au/dsDNA-QDs electrode in the presence of K2S2O8 were markedly decreased. The strong interaction between DNA and PFOA via the hydrophobic interaction, especially the formation of F···H hydrogen bonds by insertion of the difluoro-methylene group of PFOA into the DNA base pairs, was believed to be responsible for the dissociation or loosening of dsDNA structure, which inhibited the CT through DNA. A linear relationship between the ECL signal of the sensor and the logarithmical concentration of PFOA displayed a dynamic range of 1.00 × 10(-14)-1.00 × 10(-4) M, with a limit of detection of 1.00 × 10(-15) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Graphical Abstract Illustration of ECL detection of PFOA on a Au/dsDNA-QDs ECL-DNA sensor. PMID:27108285

  18. MicroRNA-mediated gene silencing modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage response

    PubMed Central

    Pothof, Joris; Verkaik, Nicole S; van IJcken, Wilfred; Wiemer, Erik A C; Ta, Van T B; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; van Gent, Dik C; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Persengiev, Stephan P

    2009-01-01

    DNA damage provokes DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation and apoptosis. This DNA-damage response encompasses gene-expression regulation at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. We show that cellular responses to UV-induced DNA damage are also regulated at the post-transcriptional level by microRNAs. Survival and checkpoint response after UV damage was severely reduced on microRNA-mediated gene-silencing inhibition by knocking down essential components of the microRNA-processing pathway (Dicer and Ago2). UV damage triggered a cell-cycle-dependent relocalization of Ago2 into stress granules and various microRNA-expression changes. Ago2 relocalization required CDK activity, but was independent of ATM/ATR checkpoint signalling, whereas UV-responsive microRNA expression was only partially ATM/ATR independent. Both microRNA-expression changes and stress-granule formation were most pronounced within the first hours after genotoxic stress, suggesting that microRNA-mediated gene regulation operates earlier than most transcriptional responses. The functionality of the microRNA response is illustrated by the UV-inducible miR-16 that downregulates checkpoint-gene CDC25a and regulates cell proliferation. We conclude that microRNA-mediated gene regulation adds a new dimension to the DNA-damage response. PMID:19536137

  19. DNA damage and estrogenic activity induced by the environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene and its metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chigusa; Egami, Takashi; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene (2-NO2-T) is carcinogenic and reproductively toxic in animals. In this study, we elucidated the mechanisms of its carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Methods We examined DNA damage induced by 2-NO2-T and its metabolite, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), using 32P-5′-end-labeled DNA. We measured 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, in calf thymus DNA and cellular DNA in cultured human leukemia (HL-60) cells treated with 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) gene expression in HL-60 cells was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We examined estrogenic activity using an E-screen assay and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. Results In experiments with isolated DNA fragments, 2-NO-T induced oxidative DNA damage in the presence of Cu (II) and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide disodium salt (reduced form) (NADH), while 2-NO2-T did not. 2-NO-T significantly increased levels of 8-oxodG in HL-60 cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed upregulation of OGG1 gene expression induced by 2-NO-T. An E-screen assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 revealed that 2-NO2-T induced estrogen-dependent cell proliferation. In contrast, 2-NO-T decreased the cell number and suppressed 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation. The data obtained with the SPR sensor using estrogen receptor α and the estrogen response element supported the results of the E-screen assay. Conclusions Oxidative DNA damage caused by 2-NO-T and estrogen-disrupting effects caused by 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T may play a role in the reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity of these entities. PMID:21432561

  20. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, James N.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Malone, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation. PMID:26136689

  1. The catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane induces DNA breaks, ATF3 and the DNA damage response in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shiwei; Yan, Tiandong; Nikolova, Teodora; Fuhrmann, Dominik; Nemecek, Andrea; Gödtel-Armbrust, Ute; Kaina, Bernd; Wojnowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane has been associated not only with improved cancer patient survival but also with secondary malignancies and reduced tumour response. Experimental Approach We investigated the DNA damage response and the role of the activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) accumulation in tumour cells exposed to dexrazoxane. Key Results Dexrazoxane exposure induced topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A)-dependent cell death, γ-H2AX accumulation and increased tail moment in neutral comet assays. Dexrazoxane induced DNA damage responses, shown by enhanced levels of γ-H2AX/53BP1 foci, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ATM and Rad3-related), Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylation, and by p53 accumulation. Dexrazoxane-induced γ-H2AX accumulation was dependent on ATM. ATF3 protein was induced by dexrazoxane in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which was abolished in TOP2A-depleted cells and in cells pre-incubated with ATM inhibitor. Knockdown of ATF3 gene expression by siRNA triggered apoptosis in control cells and diminished the p53 protein level in both control and dexrazoxane -treated cells. This was accompanied by increased γ-H2AX accumulation. ATF3 knockdown also delayed the repair of dexrazoxane -induced DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions and Implications As with other TOP2A poisons, dexrazoxane induced DNA double-strand breaks followed by activation of the DNA damage response. The DNA damage-triggered ATF3 controlled p53 accumulation and generation of double-strand breaks and is proposed to serve as a switch between DNA damage and cell death following dexrazoxane treatment. These findings suggest a mechanistic explanation for the diverse clinical observations associated with dexrazoxane. PMID:25521189

  2. DNA damage-induced activation of CUL4B targets HUWE1 for proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juan; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Wang, Xiaozhen; Cao, Li; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2015-05-19

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 plays an important role in integrating/coordinating diverse cellular processes such as DNA damage repair and apoptosis. A previous study has shown that HUWE1 is required for the early step of DNA damage-induced apoptosis, by targeting MCL-1 for proteasomal degradation. However, HUWE1 is subsequently inactivated, promoting cell survival and the subsequent DNA damage repair process. The mechanism underlying its regulation during this process remains largely undefined. Here, we show that the Cullin4B-RING E3 ligase (CRL4B) is required for proteasomal degradation of HUWE1 in response to DNA damage. CUL4B is activated in a NEDD8-dependent manner, and ubiquitinates HUWE1 in vitro and in vivo. The depletion of CUL4B stabilizes HUWE1, which in turn accelerates the degradation of MCL-1, leading to increased induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, cells deficient in CUL4B showed increased sensitivity to DNA damage reagents. More importantly, upon CUL4B depletion, these phenotypes can be rescued through simultaneous depletion of HUWE1, consistent with the role of CUL4B in regulating HUWE1. Collectively, these results identify CRL4B as an essential E3 ligase in targeting the proteasomal degradation of HUWE1 in response to DNA damage, and provide a potential strategy for cancer therapy by targeting HUWE1 and the CUL4B E3 ligase.

  3. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Chang, H. C.; Cho, I. C.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, C. S.; Chou, W. T.

    2014-08-01

    In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair.

  4. Comet-FISH with rDNA probes for the analysis of mutagen-induced DNA damage in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Kwasniewska, Jolanta; Grabowska, Marta; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Kolano, Bozena

    2012-06-01

    We used comet-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the model plant species Crepis capillaris following exposure of seedlings to maleic hydrazide (MH). FISH with 5S and 25S rDNA probes was applied to comets obtained under alkaline conditions to establish whether these DNA regions were preferentially involved in comet tail formation. MH treatment induced significant fragmentation of nuclear DNA and of rDNA loci. A 24-h post-treatment recovery period allowed a partial reversibility of MH-induced damage on nuclear and rDNA regions. Analyses of FISH signals demonstrated that rDNA sequences were always involved in tail formation and that 5S rDNA was more frequently present in the tail than 25S rDNA, regardless of treatment. The involvement of 25S rDNA in nucleolus formation and differences in chromatin structure between the two loci may explain the different susceptibility of the 25S and 5S rDNA regions to migrate into the tail. This work is the first report on the application of FISH to comet preparations from plants to analyze the distribution and repair of DNA damage within specific genomic regions after mutagenic treatment. Moreover, our work suggests that comet-FISH in plants may be a useful tool for environmental monitoring assessment. PMID:22556029

  5. p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects Aβ42-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyunjung; Song, Hyundong; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Ahbin; Ryu, Hoon; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and age-related neurodegenerative disease. Elucidating the cellular changes that occur during ageing is an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. SIRT6 is a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of anti-aging genes. However, the relationship between SIRT6 and AD has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that SIRT6 protein expression levels are reduced in the brains of both the 5XFAD AD mouse model and AD patients. Aβ42, a major component of senile plaques, decreases SIRT6 expression, and Aβ42-induced DNA damage is prevented by the overexpression of SIRT6 in HT22 mouse hippocampal neurons. Also, there is a strong negative correlation between Aβ42-induced DNA damage and p53 levels, a protein involved in DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition, upregulation of p53 protein by Nutlin-3 prevents SIRT6 reduction and DNA damage induced by Aβ42. Taken together, this study reveals that p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects cells from Aβ42-induced DNA damage, making SIRT6 a promising new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:27156849

  6. Exercise-induced oxidatively damaged DNA in humans: evaluation in plasma or urine?

    PubMed

    Karpouzi, Christina; Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Tsalis, George; Mougios, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise can induce oxidative damage in humans. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is a widely known biomarker of DNA oxidation, which can be determined in blood and urine. The aim of the present study was to compare these two biological fluids in terms of which is more suitable for the estimation of the oxidative damage of DNA by measuring the concentration of 8-OHdG one hour after maximal exercise by enzyme immunoassay. The concentration of 8-OHdG increased with exercise only in plasma (p < 0.001), and values differed between exercise tests in both plasma and urine (p < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma appears to be more sensitive to exercise-induced 8-OHdG changes than urine and, hence, a more appropriate medium for assessing oxidative damage of DNA, although the poor repeatability of the measurement needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:26849281

  7. Listeria monocytogenes induces host DNA damage and delays the host cell cycle to promote infection

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Elsa; Costa, Ana Catarina; Brito, Cláudia; Costa, Lionel; Pombinho, Rita; Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a human intracellular pathogen widely used to uncover the mechanisms evolved by pathogens to establish infection. However, its capacity to perturb the host cell cycle was never reported. We show that Lm infection affects the host cell cycle progression, increasing its overall duration but allowing consecutive rounds of division. A complete Lm infectious cycle induces a S-phase delay accompanied by a slower rate of DNA synthesis and increased levels of host DNA strand breaks. Additionally, DNA damage/replication checkpoint responses are triggered in an Lm dose-dependent manner through the phosphorylation of DNA-PK, H2A.X, and CDC25A and independently from ATM/ATR. While host DNA damage induced exogenously favors Lm dissemination, the override of checkpoint pathways limits infection. We propose that host DNA replication disturbed by Lm infection culminates in DNA strand breaks, triggering DNA damage/replication responses, and ensuring a cell cycle delay that favors Lm propagation. PMID:24552813

  8. Assessing the mechanism of DNA damage induced by lead through direct and indirect interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wei, Kai; Zhang, Mengyu; Liu, Rutao; Chen, Yadong

    2014-07-01

    Lead still possesses great threats to human health owing to its widespread distribution in the environment caused by human activities, although various actions have been taken to cut down the use and distribution of lead. In this work, mechanisms of DNA damage caused by lead through indirect and direct interactions were investigated. Results from comet assay showed lead at 1-10 μM induced DNA strand breaks in mice liver cells according to olive tail moment analysis. Signals of DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) were not significantly detected until exposed at 100 μM Pb(2+). Further more, direct interactions between Pb(2+) and DNA were explored to determine the binding mode between them using spectra analysis, isothermal titration calorimetry studies and molecular docking investigations, which indicated that Pb(2+) could bind to DNA with four binding sites to form Pb(2)(+)-DNA complex by minor groove binding effects and electrostatic forces, resulting in damage to the structure of DNA double helix. Combined studies of lead genotoxicity in indirect (comet assay and DPC assay) and direct (binding mode investigations) interactions can be applied to study the potential damages to DNA induced by heavy metal pollutants.

  9. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Outside the protection of the geomagnetic field, astronauts and other living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, have effects on cellular responses to DNA damage induced by exposure to radiation or cytotoxic chemicals is still unknown, as is their impact on the radiation risks for astronauts and on the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damages in the DNA were measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (g-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ki-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in g-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect initial transcriptional responses of the DNA damage response genes to

  10. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, affects on the cellular response to DNA damage induced by exposures to radiation or other toxic chemicals will have an impact on the radiation risks for the astronauts, as well as on the mutation rate in microorganisms, is still an open question. Although the possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on the cellular response to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induces DNA damages including the double strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damage in the DNA was measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ti-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in -H2AX between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect the response of the DNA damage response genes to bleomycin treatment.

  11. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age

    PubMed Central

    Marangos, Petros; Stevense, Michelle; Niaka, Konstantina; Lagoudaki, Michaela; Nabti, Ibtissem; Jessberger, Rolf; Carroll, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes from aged mice. These data lead us to propose that the SAC is a major gatekeeper preventing the progression of oocytes harbouring DNA damage. The SAC therefore acts to integrate protection against both aneuploidy and DNA damage by preventing production of abnormal mature oocytes and subsequent embryos. Finally, we suggest escaping this DNA damage checkpoint in maternal ageing may be one of the causes of increased chromosome anomalies in oocytes and embryos from older mothers. PMID:26522734

  12. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age.

    PubMed

    Marangos, Petros; Stevense, Michelle; Niaka, Konstantina; Lagoudaki, Michaela; Nabti, Ibtissem; Jessberger, Rolf; Carroll, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes from aged mice. These data lead us to propose that the SAC is a major gatekeeper preventing the progression of oocytes harbouring DNA damage. The SAC therefore acts to integrate protection against both aneuploidy and DNA damage by preventing production of abnormal mature oocytes and subsequent embryos. Finally, we suggest escaping this DNA damage checkpoint in maternal ageing may be one of the causes of increased chromosome anomalies in oocytes and embryos from older mothers. PMID:26522734

  13. Mfd is required for rapid recovery of transcription following UV-induced DNA damage but not oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schalow, Brandy J; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2012-05-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a cellular process by which some forms of DNA damage are repaired more rapidly from transcribed strands of active genes than from nontranscribed strands or the overall genome. In humans, the TCR coupling factor, CSB, plays a critical role in restoring transcription following both UV-induced and oxidative DNA damage. It also contributes indirectly to the global repair of some forms of oxidative DNA damage. The Escherichia coli homolog, Mfd, is similarly required for TCR of UV-induced lesions. However, its contribution to the restoration of transcription and to global repair of oxidative damage has not been examined. Here, we report the first direct study of transcriptional recovery following UV-induced and oxidative DNA damage in E. coli. We observed that mutations in mfd or uvrA reduced the rate that transcription recovered following UV-induced damage. In contrast, no difference was detected in the rate of transcription recovery in mfd, uvrA, fpg, nth, or polB dinB umuDC mutants relative to wild-type cells following oxidative damage. mfd mutants were also fully resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and removed oxidative lesions from the genome at rates comparable to wild-type cells. The results demonstrate that Mfd promotes the rapid recovery of gene expression following UV-induced damage in E. coli. In addition, these findings imply that Mfd may be functionally distinct from its human CSB homolog in that it does not detectably contribute to the recovery of gene expression or global repair following oxidative damage.

  14. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dong; Li, Wenjian; Wu, Xin; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Shuang; Liu, Qingfang; He, Jinyu; Jing, Xigang; Ding, Nan; Dai, Zhongying; Zhou, Jianping

    2010-12-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20Ne10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  15. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-09-30

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition.

  16. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  17. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N.; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  18. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, K.D.; Holman, M.A.; Mitchell, D.

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlated with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Malloy, K D; Holman, M A; Mitchell, D; Detrich, H W

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlate with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. PMID:9037040

  20. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-24

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  1. ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENICALS SENSITIZE HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lungs are a target organ for arsenic carcinogenesis, however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that inorganic arsenic (iAs) can potentiate DNA damage induced by other agents. Once inside the human body iAs generally undergoes two ...

  2. IKKα and IKKβ Regulation of DNA Damage-Induced Cleavage of Huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnan, Ali; Ko, Jan; Tescu, Simona; Brundin, Patrick; Patterson, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteolysis of huntingtin (Htt) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). However, the environmental cues and signaling pathways that regulate Htt proteolysis are poorly understood. One stimulus may be the DNA damage that accumulates in neurons over time, and the subsequent activation of signaling pathways such as those regulated by IκB kinase (IKK), which can influence neurodegeneration in HD. Methodology/Principal Findings We asked whether DNA damage induces the proteolysis of Htt and if activation of IKK plays a role. We report that treatment of neurons with the DNA damaging agent etoposide or γ-irradiation promotes cleavage of wild type (WT) and mutant Htt, generating N-terminal fragments of 80–90 kDa. This event requires IKKβ and is suppressed by IKKα. Elevated levels of IKKα, or inhibition of IKKβ expression by a specific small hairpin RNA (shRNA) or its activity by sodium salicylate, prevents Htt proteolysis and increases neuronal resistance to DNA damage. Moreover, IKKβ phosphorylates the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL, a modification known to reduce Bcl-xL levels, and activates caspases that can cleave Htt. When IKKβ expression is blocked, etoposide treatment does not decrease Bcl-xL and activation of caspases is diminished. Similar to silencing of IKKβ, increasing the level of Bcl-xL in neurons prevents etoposide-induced caspase activation and Htt proteolysis. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that DNA damage triggers cleavage of Htt and identify IKKβ as a prominent regulator. Moreover, IKKβ-dependent reduction of Bcl-xL is important in this process. Thus, inhibition of IKKβ may promote neuronal survival in HD as well as other DNA damage-induced neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19488402

  3. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B

    PubMed Central

    Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity. PMID:27472060

  4. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity. PMID:27472060

  5. Chromatin Modifications during Repair of Environmental Exposure-Induced DNA Damage: A Potential Mechanism for Stable Epigenetic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Exposures to environmental toxicants and toxins cause epigenetic changes that likely play a role in the development of diseases associated with exposure. The mechanism behind these exposure-induced epigenetic changes is currently unknown. One commonality between most environmental exposures is that they cause DNA damage either directly or through causing an increase in reactive oxygen species, which can damage DNA. Like transcription, DNA damage repair must occur in the context of chromatin requiring both histone modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling. These chromatin changes aid in DNA damage accessibility and signaling. Several proteins and complexes involved in epigenetic silencing during both development and cancer have been found to be localized to sites of DNA damage. The chromatin-based response to DNA damage is considered a transient event, with chromatin being restored to normal as DNA damage repair is completed. However, in individuals chronically exposed to environmental toxicants or with chronic inflammatory disease, repeated DNA damage-induced chromatin rearrangement may ultimately lead to permanent epigenetic alterations. Understanding the mechanism behind exposure-induced epigenetic changes will allow us to develop strategies to prevent or reverse these changes. This review focuses on epigenetic changes and DNA damage induced by environmental exposures, the chromatin changes that occur around sites of DNA damage, and how these transient chromatin changes may lead to heritable epigenetic alterations at sites of chronic exposure. PMID:24259318

  6. Hyperprolinemia induces DNA, protein and lipid damage in blood of rats: antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andréa G K; Scherer, Emilene B; da Cunha, Aline A; Manfredini, Vanusa; Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Vanzin, Camila Simioni; Vargas, Carmen R; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of hyperprolinemia on oxidative damage to biomolecules (protein, lipids and DNA) and the antioxidant status in blood of rats. The influence of the antioxidants on the effects elicited by proline was also examined. Wistar rats received two daily injections of proline and/or vitamin E plus C (6th-28th day of life) and were killed 12h after the last injection. Results showed that hyperprolinemia induced a significant oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA demonstrated by increased carbonyl content, malondialdehyde levels and a greater damage index in comet assay, respectively. The concomitant antioxidants administration to proline treatment completely prevented oxidative damage to proteins, but partially prevented lipids and DNA damage. We also observed that the non-enzymatic antioxidant potential was decreased by proline treatment and partially prevented by antioxidant supplementation. The plasma levels of vitamins E and C significantly increased in rats treated exogenously with these vitamins but, interestingly, when proline was administered concomitantly with vitamin E plus C, the levels of these vitamins were similar to those found in plasma of control and proline rats. Our findings suggest that hyperprolinemia promotes oxidative damage to the three major classes of macromolecules in blood of rats. These effects were accomplished by decrease in non-enzymatic antioxidant potential and decrease in vitamins administered exogenously, which significantly decreased oxidative damage to biomolecules studied. These data suggest that antioxidants may be an effective adjuvant therapeutic to limit oxidative damage caused by proline.

  7. Hyperprolinemia induces DNA, protein and lipid damage in blood of rats: antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andréa G K; Scherer, Emilene B; da Cunha, Aline A; Manfredini, Vanusa; Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Vanzin, Camila Simioni; Vargas, Carmen R; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of hyperprolinemia on oxidative damage to biomolecules (protein, lipids and DNA) and the antioxidant status in blood of rats. The influence of the antioxidants on the effects elicited by proline was also examined. Wistar rats received two daily injections of proline and/or vitamin E plus C (6th-28th day of life) and were killed 12h after the last injection. Results showed that hyperprolinemia induced a significant oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA demonstrated by increased carbonyl content, malondialdehyde levels and a greater damage index in comet assay, respectively. The concomitant antioxidants administration to proline treatment completely prevented oxidative damage to proteins, but partially prevented lipids and DNA damage. We also observed that the non-enzymatic antioxidant potential was decreased by proline treatment and partially prevented by antioxidant supplementation. The plasma levels of vitamins E and C significantly increased in rats treated exogenously with these vitamins but, interestingly, when proline was administered concomitantly with vitamin E plus C, the levels of these vitamins were similar to those found in plasma of control and proline rats. Our findings suggest that hyperprolinemia promotes oxidative damage to the three major classes of macromolecules in blood of rats. These effects were accomplished by decrease in non-enzymatic antioxidant potential and decrease in vitamins administered exogenously, which significantly decreased oxidative damage to biomolecules studied. These data suggest that antioxidants may be an effective adjuvant therapeutic to limit oxidative damage caused by proline. PMID:24980685

  8. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  9. Persistent and heritable structural damage induced in heterochromatic DNA from rat liver by N-nitrosodimethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, E.J.; Stewart, B.W.

    1987-03-24

    Analysis, by benzoylated DEAE-cellulose chromatography, has been made of structural change in eu- and heterochromatic DNA from rat liver following administration of the carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine. Either hepatic DNA was prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine administered 2-3 weeks before injection of the carcinogen or the labeled precursor was given during regenerative hyperplasia in rats treated earlier with N-nitrosodimethylamine. Following phenol extraction of either whole liver homogenate or nuclease-fractionated eu- and heterochromatin, carcinogen-modified DNA was examined by stepwise or caffeine gradient elution from benzoylated DEAE-cellulose. In whole DNA, nitrosamine-induced single-stranded character was maximal 4-24 h after treatment, declining rapidly thereafter; gradient elution of these DNA preparations also provided short-term evidence of structural change. Caffeine gradient chromatography suggested short-term nitrosamine-induced structural change in euchromatic DNA, while increased binding of heterochromatic DNA was evident for up to 3 months after carcinogen treatment. Preparations of newly synthesized heterochromatic DNA from animals subjected to hepatectomy up to 2 months after carcinogen treatment provided evidence of heritable structural damage. Carcinogen-induced binding of heterochromatic DNA to benzoylated DEAE-cellulose was indicative of specific structural lesions whose affinity equalled that of single-stranded DNA up to 1.0 kilobase in length. The data suggest that structural lesions in heterochromatin, which may be a consequence of incomplete repair, are preferentially degraded by endogenous nuclease(s).

  10. Artesunate induces oxidative DNA damage, sustained DNA double-strand breaks, and the ATM/ATR damage response in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Berdelle, Nicole; Nikolova, Teodora; Quiros, Steve; Efferth, Thomas; Kaina, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Artesunate, the active agent from Artemisia annua L. used in the traditional Chinese medicine, is being applied as a first-line drug for malaria treatment, and trials are ongoing that include this drug in cancer therapy. Despite increasing interest in its therapeutic application, the mode of cell killing provoked by artesunate in human cells is unknown. Here, we show that artesunate is a powerful inducer of oxidative DNA damage, giving rise to formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase-sensitive sites and the formation of 8-oxoguanine and 1,N6-ethenoadenine. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in LN-229 human glioblastoma cells dose dependently and was paralleled by cell death executed by apoptosis and necrosis, which could be attenuated by radical scavengers such as N-acetyl cysteine. Oxidative DNA damage resulted in DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) as determined by γH2AX foci that colocalized with 53BP1. Upon chronic treatment with artesunate, the level of DSB continuously increased over the treatment period up to a steady-state level, which is in contrast to ionizing radiation that induced a burst of DSB followed by a decline due to their repair. Knockdown of Rad51 by short interfering RNA and inactivation of DNA-PK strongly sensitized glioma cells to artesunate. These data indicate that both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining are involved in the repair of artesunate-induced DSB. Artesunate provoked a DNA damage response (DDR) with phosphorylation of ATM, ATR, Chk1, and Chk2. Overall, these data revealed that artesunate induces oxidative DNA lesions and DSB that continuously increase during the treatment period and accumulate until they trigger DDR and finally tumor cell death. PMID:21998290

  11. The neuroprotectant ebselen inhibits oxidative DNA damage induced by dopamine in the presence of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunbo; Cao, Zhuoxiao

    2002-09-13

    Ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one), a seleno-organic compound with glutathione peroxidase-like activity, has been shown to be protective against brain ischemic injury and Parkinson's disease. This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effects of ebselen on oxidative DNA damage induced by dopamine in the presence of copper ions. Incubation of phiX-174 plasmid DNA with micromolar dopamine in the presence of Cu(II) resulted in a concentration-dependent induction of DNA strand breaks. Both a Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox cycle and H(2)O(2) formation were critically involved in the induction of DNA strand breaks by the dopamine/Cu(II) system. The presence of ebselen at micromolar concentrations led to a marked concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA strand breaks induced by the dopamine/Cu(II) system. Further studies showed that ebselen did not affect either the Cu(II)-mediated oxidation of dopamine to dopamine quinone or the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) by dopamine. Instead, the presence of ebselen resulted in a marked decrease in the levels of H(2)O(2) derived from the Cu(II)-mediated oxidation of dopamine. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that ebselen is able to inhibit the dopamine/Cu(II)-induced oxidative DNA damage, which appears to be attributable to the ability of ebselen to decrease the levels of H(2)O(2) derived from the dopamine/Cu(II) system. Since oxidative DNA damage has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases, the inhibition of oxidative DNA damage by ebselen may be responsible, at least partially, for its neuroprotective activities observed in both humans and experimental animals.

  12. The protective effect of clay minerals against damage to adsorbed DNA induced by cadmium and mercury.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yakun; Wu, Pingxiao; Zhu, Nengwu

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of Salmon Sperm DNA on three kinds of raw clay (rectorite, montmorillonite and sericite) was investigated as a function of pH, ionic strength and the concentrations of DNA and phosphate ions in solution. The DNA adsorption was reduced in the following order: rectorite>montmorillonite>sericite. Based on these findings, there is a strong evidence that the mechanisms for DNA adsorption on clay involve electrostatic forces, cation bridging and ligand exchange. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to compare the properties of unbound DNA and the absorbed DNA on rectorite, both in the absence and presence of Cd(2+) and Hg(2+) inaqueous solutions. The interaction of heavy metals with the unbound DNA was evidenced by the disappearance of reduction peaks in CV, a small bathochromic shift in UV-vis spectroscopy and an incomplete quenching in the emission spectra. Such changes were not observed in the DNA-rectorite hybrids, which is evidence that adsorption on the clay can reduce the extent of the DNA damage caused by heavy metals. Therefore, in these experience the rectorite played an important role in protecting DNA against Cd(2+) and Hg(2+) induced damage.

  13. The eucalyptus oil ingredient 1,8-cineol induces oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, Bastian; Wu, Ching-Fen; Efferth, Thomas; Kaina, Bernd; Fahrer, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The natural compound 1,8-cineol, also known as eucalyptol, is a major constituent of eucalyptus oil. This epoxy-monoterpene is used as flavor and fragrance in consumer goods as well as medical therapies. Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, 1,8-cineol is also applied to treat upper and lower airway diseases. Despite its widespread use, only little is known about the genotoxicity of 1,8-cineol in mammalian cells. This study investigates the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of 1,8-cineol in human and hamster cells. First, we observed a significant and concentration-dependent increase in oxidative DNA damage in human colon cancer cells, as detected by the Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-modified alkaline comet assay. Pre-treatment of cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented the formation of Fpg-sensitive sites after 1,8-cineol treatment, supporting the notion that 1,8-cineol induces oxidative DNA damage. In the dose range of DNA damage induction, 1,8-cineol did neither reduce the viability of colon cancer cells nor affected their cell cycle distribution, suggesting that cells tolerate 1,8-cineol-induced oxidative DNA damage by engaging DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, hamster cell lines with defects in BRCA2 and Rad51, which are essentials players of homologous recombination (HR)-mediated repair, were treated with 1,8-cineol. The monoterpene induced oxidative DNA damage and subsequent DNA double-strand breaks in the hamster cell lines tested. Intriguingly, we detected a significant concentration-dependent decrease in viability of the HR-defective cells, whereas the corresponding wild-type cell lines with functional HR were not affected. Based on these findings, we conclude that 1,8-cineol is weakly genotoxic, inducing primarily oxidative DNA damage, which is most likely tolerated in DNA repair proficient cells without resulting in cell cycle arrest and cell death. However, cells with deficiency in HR were compromised after 1,8-cineol

  14. The eucalyptus oil ingredient 1,8-cineol induces oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, Bastian; Wu, Ching-Fen; Efferth, Thomas; Kaina, Bernd; Fahrer, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The natural compound 1,8-cineol, also known as eucalyptol, is a major constituent of eucalyptus oil. This epoxy-monoterpene is used as flavor and fragrance in consumer goods as well as medical therapies. Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, 1,8-cineol is also applied to treat upper and lower airway diseases. Despite its widespread use, only little is known about the genotoxicity of 1,8-cineol in mammalian cells. This study investigates the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of 1,8-cineol in human and hamster cells. First, we observed a significant and concentration-dependent increase in oxidative DNA damage in human colon cancer cells, as detected by the Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-modified alkaline comet assay. Pre-treatment of cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented the formation of Fpg-sensitive sites after 1,8-cineol treatment, supporting the notion that 1,8-cineol induces oxidative DNA damage. In the dose range of DNA damage induction, 1,8-cineol did neither reduce the viability of colon cancer cells nor affected their cell cycle distribution, suggesting that cells tolerate 1,8-cineol-induced oxidative DNA damage by engaging DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, hamster cell lines with defects in BRCA2 and Rad51, which are essentials players of homologous recombination (HR)-mediated repair, were treated with 1,8-cineol. The monoterpene induced oxidative DNA damage and subsequent DNA double-strand breaks in the hamster cell lines tested. Intriguingly, we detected a significant concentration-dependent decrease in viability of the HR-defective cells, whereas the corresponding wild-type cell lines with functional HR were not affected. Based on these findings, we conclude that 1,8-cineol is weakly genotoxic, inducing primarily oxidative DNA damage, which is most likely tolerated in DNA repair proficient cells without resulting in cell cycle arrest and cell death. However, cells with deficiency in HR were compromised after 1,8-cineol

  15. Cdt1 and Cdc6 Are Destabilized by Rereplication-induced DNA Damage*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jonathan R.; Lee, Hyun O.; Bunker, Brandon D.; Dorn, Elizabeth S.; Rogers, Greg C.; Duronio, Robert J.; Cook, Jeanette Gowen

    2008-01-01

    The replication factors Cdt1 and Cdc6 are essential for origin licensing, a prerequisite for DNA replication initiation. Mechanisms to ensure that metazoan origins initiate once per cell cycle include degradation of Cdt1 during S phase and inhibition of Cdt1 by the geminin protein. Geminin depletion or overexpression of Cdt1 or Cdc6 in human cells causes rereplication, a form of endogenous DNA damage. Rereplication induced by these manipulations is however uneven and incomplete, suggesting that one or more mechanisms restrain rereplication once it begins. We find that both Cdt1 and Cdc6 are degraded in geminin-depleted cells. We further show that Cdt1 degradation in cells that have rereplicated requires the PCNA binding site of Cdt1 and the Cul4DDB1 ubiquitin ligase, and Cdt1 can induce its own degradation when overproduced. Cdc6 degradation in geminin-depleted cells requires Huwe1, the ubiquitin ligase that regulates Cdc6 after DNA damage. Moreover, perturbations that specifically disrupt Cdt1 and Cdc6 degradation in response to DNA damage exacerbate rereplication when combined with geminin depletion, and this enhanced rereplication occurs in both human cells and in Drosophila melanogaster cells. We conclude that rereplication-associated DNA damage triggers Cdt1 and Cdc6 ubiquitination and destruction, and propose that this pathway represents an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that minimizes the extent of rereplication. PMID:18617514

  16. Facilitation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis by endoplasmic reticulum protein mitsugumin23

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Tetsuo; Sasaki, Nozomi; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi

    2010-02-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) emanates context-dependent signals, thereby mediating cellular response to a variety of stresses. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have been enigmatic. To better understand the signaling capacity of the ER, we focused on roles played by mitsugumin23 (MG23), a protein residing predominantly in this organelle. Overexpression of MG23 in human embryonic kidney 293T cells specifically enhanced apoptosis triggered by etoposide, a DNA-damaging anti-cancer drug. Conversely, genetic deletion of MG23 reduced susceptibility of thymocytes to DNA damage-induced apoptosis, which was demonstrated by whole-body irradiation experiments. In this setting, induction of the tumor-suppressor gene p53 was attenuated in MG23-knockout thymocytes as compared with their wild-type counterparts, consistent with the elevated radioresistance. It is therefore suggested that MG23 is an essential component of ER-generated lethal signals provoked upon DNA damage, specifying cell fate under pathophysiological conditions.

  17. Biochemical behaviour of norbixin during in vitro DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kovary, K; Louvain, T S; Costa e Silva, M C; Albano, F; Pires, B B; Laranja, G A; Lage, C L; Felzenszwalb, I

    2001-04-01

    Naturally occurring antioxidants such as carotenoids are extensively studied for their potential in reducing the risk for cancer and other chronic diseases. In the present study, the radical-scavenger activity of the food additive norbixin, a water-soluble carotenoid extracted from Bixa orellana seeds and commercialized as annatto, was evaluated under conditions of DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species, particularly by hydroxyl radicals. The cell-free scavenger activity of norbixin was evaluated using plasmid DNA as target molecule and Sn2+ or Fe2+ as oxidant. The addition of H2O2 enhanced DNA breakage induced by metal ions, particularly Fe2+. Under these conditions, norbixin started to protect plasmid DNA against single- and double-strand breakage at a metal:norbixin ratio of 1:1 (Sn2+) and 1:10 (Fe2+). However, at lower ratios to Sn2+, norbixin enhanced Sn2+-induced DNA breakage (P < 0.05). The ability of norbixin to protect genomic DNA against oxidative damage was assessed in murine fibroblasts submitted to H2O2-induced oxidative stress and the results were evaluated by the comet assay. Under low serum conditions (2 % fetal bovine serum (FBS)), a protective effect of norbixin against H2O2-induced DNA breakage was inversely related to its concentration, a protection ranging from 41 % (10 microm) to 21 % (50 microm). At higher concentrations of norbixin, however, oxidative DNA breakage was still enhanced, even in the presence of a high serum concentration (10 % FBS). Under normal conditions, norbixin per se has no detectable genotoxic or cytotoxic effects on murine fibroblasts. The antimutagenic potential of norbixin against oxidative mutagens was also evaluated by the Salmonella typhimurium assay, with a maximum inhibition of 87 % against the mutagenicity induced by H2O2. Although plasmid DNA and Ames data indicated that norbixin can protect DNA against oxidative damage, it seems to be a risky guardian of genomic DNA as it can also increase the extent of

  18. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single delta rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA (see the accompanying paper: W.R. Holley and A. Chatterjee, Radiat. Res. 145, 188-199, 1996). In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [3H]thymidine and exposed at 0 degrees C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/microns. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated "regionally multiply damaged sites." Postirradiation incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown.

  19. TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-induced cardiac myofibroblasts are nonproliferating functional cells carrying DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Victor V. Pelt, Jos F. van; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Van Duppen, Viktor J.; Vekemans, Katrien; Fagard, Robert H.; Lijnen, Paul J.

    2008-04-15

    TGF-{beta}{sub 1} induces differentiation and total inhibition of cardiac MyoFb cell division and DNA synthesis. These effects of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} are irreversible. Inhibition of MyoFb proliferation is accompanied with the expression of Smad1, Mad1, p15Ink4B and total inhibition of telomerase activity. Surprisingly, TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are growth-arrested not only at G1-phase but also at S-phase of the cell cycle. Staining with TUNEL indicates that these cells carry DNA damages. However, the absolute majority of MyoFbs are non-apoptotic cells as established with two apoptosis-specific methods, flow cytometry and caspase-dependent cleavage of cytokeratin 18. Expression in MyoFbs of proliferative cell nuclear antigen even in the absence of serum confirms that these MyoFbs perform repair of DNA damages. These results suggest that TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs can be growth-arrested by two checkpoints, the G1/S checkpoint, which prevents cells from entering S-phase and the intra-S checkpoint, which is activated by encountering DNA damage during the S phase or by unrepaired damage that escapes the G1/S checkpoint. Despite carrying of the DNA damages TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are highly functional cells producing lysyl oxidase and contracting the collagen matrix.

  20. Dovitinib induces mitotic defects and activates the G2 DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Poon, Randy Y C

    2014-01-01

    Dovitinib (TKI258; formerly CHIR-258) is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. Interestingly, Dovitinib triggered a G2 /M arrest in cancer cell lines from diverse origins including HeLa, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Single-cell analysis revealed that Dovitinib promoted a delay in mitotic exit in a subset of cells, causing the cells to undergo mitotic slippage. Higher concentrations of Dovitinib induced a G2 arrest similar to the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. In support of this, DNA damage was triggered by Dovitinib as revealed by γ-H2AX and comet assays. The mitotic kinase CDK1 was found to be inactivated by phosphorylation in the presence of Dovitinib. Furthermore, the G2 arrest could be overcome by abrogation of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint using small molecule inhibitors of CHK1 and WEE1. Finally, Dovitinib-mediated G2 cell cycle arrest and subsequent cell death could be promoted after DNA damage repair was disrupted by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. These results are consistent with the recent finding that Dovitinib can also target topoisomerases. Collectively, these results suggest additional directions for use of Dovitinib, in particular with agents that target the DNA damage checkpoint. PMID:24238094

  1. Dovitinib induces mitotic defects and activates the G2 DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Poon, Randy Y C

    2014-01-01

    Dovitinib (TKI258; formerly CHIR-258) is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. Interestingly, Dovitinib triggered a G2 /M arrest in cancer cell lines from diverse origins including HeLa, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Single-cell analysis revealed that Dovitinib promoted a delay in mitotic exit in a subset of cells, causing the cells to undergo mitotic slippage. Higher concentrations of Dovitinib induced a G2 arrest similar to the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. In support of this, DNA damage was triggered by Dovitinib as revealed by γ-H2AX and comet assays. The mitotic kinase CDK1 was found to be inactivated by phosphorylation in the presence of Dovitinib. Furthermore, the G2 arrest could be overcome by abrogation of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint using small molecule inhibitors of CHK1 and WEE1. Finally, Dovitinib-mediated G2 cell cycle arrest and subsequent cell death could be promoted after DNA damage repair was disrupted by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. These results are consistent with the recent finding that Dovitinib can also target topoisomerases. Collectively, these results suggest additional directions for use of Dovitinib, in particular with agents that target the DNA damage checkpoint.

  2. DNA damage induces the accumulation of Tiam1 by blocking β-TrCP-dependent degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guixin; Fan, Zhongyun; Ding, Miao; Mu, Libing; Liang, Juan; Ding, Yajie; Fu, Yu; Huang, Binlu; Wu, Wei

    2014-05-30

    The Rac1/JNK cascade plays important roles in DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, how this cascade is activated upon DNA damage remains to be fully understood. We show here that, in untreated cells, Tiam1, a Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, is phosphorylated by casein kinase 1 (CK1) at its C terminus, leading to Skp, Cullin, F-box-containing(β-TrCP) recognition, ubiquitination, and proteasome-mediated degradation. Upon DNA-damaging anticancer drug treatment, CK1/β-TrCP-mediated Tiam1 degradation is abolished, and the accumulated Tiam1 contributes to downstream activation of Rac1/JNK. Consistently, tumor cells overexpressing Tiam1 are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging drug treatment. In xenograft mice, Tiam1-high cells are more susceptible to doxorubicin treatment. Thus, our results uncover that inhibition of proteasome-mediated Tiam1 degradation is an upstream event leading to Rac1/JNK activation and cell apoptosis in response to DNA-damaging drug treatment.

  3. Repair of DNA Damage Induced by the Cytidine Analog Zebularine Requires ATR and ATM in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Hsin; Finke, Andreas; Díaz, Mariana; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Baubec, Tuncay; Pecinka, Ales

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage repair is an essential cellular mechanism that maintains genome stability. Here, we show that the nonmethylable cytidine analog zebularine induces a DNA damage response in Arabidopsis thaliana, independent of changes in DNA methylation. In contrast to genotoxic agents that induce damage in a cell cycle stage-independent manner, zebularine induces damage specifically during strand synthesis in DNA replication. The signaling of this damage is mediated by additive activity of ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED AND RAD3-RELATED and ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED kinases, which cause postreplicative cell cycle arrest and increased endoreplication. The repair requires a functional STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES5 (SMC5)-SMC6 complex and is accomplished predominantly by synthesis-dependent strand-annealing homologous recombination. Here, we provide insight into the response mechanism for coping with the genotoxic effects of zebularine and identify several components of the zebularine-induced DNA damage repair pathway. PMID:26023162

  4. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely

    2014-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory widely used due to its low cost and high effectiveness. This compound has been found in water bodies worldwide and is toxic to aquatic organisms; nevertheless its capacity to induce oxidative stress in bioindicators like Daphnia magna remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate toxicity in D. magna induced by acetylsalicylic acid in water, using oxidative stress and DNA damage biomarkers. An acute toxicity test was conducted in order to determine the median lethal concentration (48-h LC50) and the concentrations to be used in the subsequent subacute toxicity test in which the following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation, oxidized protein content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and level of DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation level and oxidized protein content were significantly increased (p<0.05), and antioxidant enzymes significantly altered with respect to controls; while the DNA damage were significantly increased (p<0.05) too. In conclusion, acetylsalicylic acid induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in D. magna.

  5. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA: plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage contribution increasing towards the Bragg peak. Therefore, 12C ions at the spread-out Bragg peak (dose averaged LET∞ = 189 ± 15 keV/ μm) and in the plateau region of the Bragg curve (LET = 40 keV/ μm) were employed and the radical scavenger concentration in the plasmid solution was varied to quantify the indirect effect. In order to minimize the influence of 12C break-up fragments, a relatively low initial energy of 90 MeV/nucleon was employed for the carbon ions. DNA damage has been quantified by subsequent electrophoresis on agarose gels. We find that strand breaks due to both indirect and direct effects are systematically higher in the plateau region as compared to the Bragg peak region with the difference being smallest at high scavenging capacities. In view of the fact that the relative biological effectiveness for many biological endpoints is maximum at the Bragg peak our findings imply that DNA damage at the Bragg peak is qualitatively most severe.

  6. Lead-, cadmium-, and arsenic-induced DNA damage in rat germinal cells.

    PubMed

    Nava-Hernández, Martha P; Hauad-Marroquín, Leticia A; Bassol-Mayagoitia, Susana; García-Arenas, Guadalupe; Mercado-Hernández, Roberto; Echávarri-Guzmán, Miguel A; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M

    2009-05-01

    Toxic agents can interfere with the male reproductive system at many targets. One of the major unresolved questions concerning male infertility is identification of its molecular origins. Clinical and animal studies indicate that abnormalities of spermatogenesis result from exposure to three toxic metals (lead acetate, cadmium chloride, and arsenic trioxide), but the effects on primary spermatocyte DNA of the male rat after chronic exposure to these metals have not been identified. The aims of this study were to analyze, in three independent experiments, the DNA damage induced by lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As) in rat germinal cells during three time periods, and to determine the relationship between DNA damage and blood Pb, blood Cd, and urine As levels. For lead acetate and cadmium chloride experiments, blood was collected by cardiac puncture, while for arsenic trioxide a 24-h urine sample was collected. Afterward, the animals were sacrificed by decapitation. Pachytene spermatocytes from rat testes were purified by trypsin digestion followed by centrifugal elutriation. After establishment of cell purity and viability, DNA damage (tail length) was measured employing a single cell gel/comet assay. Significant DNA damage was found in primary spermatocytes from rats with chronic exposure (13 weeks) to toxic metals. In conclusion, these findings indicate that exposure to toxic metals affects primary spermatocyte DNA and are suggestive of possible direct testicular toxicity. PMID:19388847

  7. Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repairing oxidative damages induced by antitumor drug adriamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shukun; Wu Mei; Zhang Zunzhen

    2010-08-01

    Adriamycin (ADM) is a widely used antineoplastic drug. However, the increasing cellular resistance has become a serious limitation to ADM clinical application. The most important mechanism related to ADM-induced cell death is oxidative DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway in the repair of DNA single strand break (SSB) and oxidized base. In this study, we firstly applied the murine embryo fibroblasts wild-type (pol {beta} +/+) and homozygous pol {beta} null cell (pol {beta} -/-) as a model to investigate ADM DNA-damaging effects and the molecular basis underlying these effects. Here, cellular sensitivity to ADM was examined using colorimetric assay and colony forming assay. ADM-induced cellular ROS level and the alteration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by commercial kits. Further, DNA strand break, chromosomal damage and gene mutation were assessed by comet assay, micronucleus test and hprt gene mutation assay, respectively. The results showed that pol {beta} -/- cells were more sensitive to ADM compared with pol {beta} +/+ cells and more severe SSB and chromosomal damage as well as higher hprt gene mutation frequency were observed in pol {beta} -/- cells. ROS level in pol {beta} -/- cells increased along with decreased activity of SOD. These results demonstrated that pol {beta} deficiency could enable ROS accumulation with SOD activity decrease, further elevate oxidative DNA damage, and subsequently result in SSB, chromosome cleavage as well as gene mutation, which may be partly responsible for the cytotoxicity of ADM and the hypersensitivity of pol {beta} -/- cells to ADM. These findings suggested that pol {beta} is vital for repairing oxidative damage induced by ADM.

  8. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-05-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data.

  9. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xu; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.

    2013-06-10

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  10. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-06-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  11. Mitochondria regulate DNA damage and genomic instability induced by high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Davidson, Mercy M.; Hei, Tom K.

    2014-04-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation including α particles and heavy ions is the major type of radiation found in space and is considered a potential health risk for astronauts. Even though the chance that these high LET particles traversing through the cytoplasm of cells is higher than that through the nuclei, the contribution of targeted cytoplasmic irradiation to the induction of genomic instability and other chromosomal damages induced by high LET radiation is not known. In the present study, we investigated whether mitochondria are the potential cytoplasmic target of high LET radiation in mediating cellular damage using a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depleted (ρ0) human small airway epithelial (SAE) cell model and a precision charged particle microbeam with a beam width of merely one micron. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation by high LET α particles induced DNA oxidative damage and double strand breaks in wild type ρ+ SAE cells. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in autophagy and micronuclei, which is an indication of genomic instability, together with the activation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling pathways in ρ+ SAE cells. In contrast, ρ0 SAE cells exhibited a significantly lower response to these same endpoints examined after cytoplasmic irradiation with high LET α particles. The results indicate that mitochondria are essential in mediating cytoplasmic radiation induced genotoxic damage in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the findings may shed some light in the design of countermeasures for space radiation.

  12. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  13. Chronic administration of troxerutin protects mouse kidney against D-galactose-induced oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan-Min; Ma, Jie-Qiong; Lou, Yao

    2010-10-01

    Troxerutin, a natural bioflavonoid, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of troxerutin against D-gal-induced oxidative DNA damage in mouse kidney, and explored the potential mechanism of its action. Our data showed that troxerutin significantly decreased levels of urea, uric acid and creatinine in serum and the renal histological injury in D-gal-treated mice. Troxerutin markedly restored Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and GPx activities in the kidney of D-gal-treated mouse. Furthermore, the increase of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (a marker of oxidative DNA damage) induced by d-gal was effectively suppressed by troxerutin. Internucleosomal DNA ladder fragmentation and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in D-gal-treated mice were inhibited by troxerutin, which might be attributed to its antioxidant property by decreasing activities of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse kidney against D-gal-induced injury by improving renal function, attenuating histopathologic changes, reducing ROS production, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreasing DNA oxidative damage. This study provided novel insights into the protective mechanisms of troxerutin in D-gal-induced kidney injury.

  14. Nicotine overrides DNA damage-induced G1/S restriction in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Zhu, Tongbo; Guo, Jinjin; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chen, Chang Yan

    2011-01-01

    As an addictive substance, nicotine has been suggested to facilitate pro-survival activities (such as anchorage-independent growth or angiogenesis) and the establishment of drug resistance to anticancer therapy. Tobacco smoking consists of a variety of carcinogens [such as benzopyrene (BP) and nitrosamine derivatives] that are able to cause DNA double strand breaks. However, the effect of nicotine on DNA damage-induced checkpoint response induced by genotoxins remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the events occurred during G(1) arrest induced by γ-radiation or BP in nicotine-treated murine or human lung epithelial cells. DNA synthesis was rapidly inhibited after exposure to γ-radiation or BP treatment, accompanied with the activation of DNA damage checkpoint. When these cells were co-treated with nicotine, the growth restriction was compromised, manifested by upregulation of cyclin D and A, and attenuation of Chk2 phosphorylation. Knockdown of cyclin D or Chk2 by the siRNAs blocked nicotine-mediated effect on DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, nicotine treatment appeared to play no role in nocodazole-induced mitotic checkpoint activation. Overall, our study presented a novel observation, in which nicotine is able to override DNA damage checkpoint activated by tobacco-related carcinogen BP or γ-irradiation. The results not only indicates the potentially important role of nicotine in facilitating the establishment of genetic instability to promote lung tumorigenesis, but also warrants a dismal prognosis for cancer patients who are smokers, heavily exposed second-hand smokers or nicotine users. PMID:21559516

  15. Differential effects of NF-kappaB on apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents: the type of DNA damage determines the final outcome.

    PubMed

    Strozyk, E; Pöppelmann, B; Schwarz, T; Kulms, D

    2006-10-12

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) is generally regarded as an antiapoptotic factor. Accordingly, NF-kappaB activation inhibits death ligand-induced apoptosis. In contrast, ultraviolet light B (UVB)-induced apoptosis is not inhibited but even enhanced upon NF-kappaB activation by interleukin-1 (IL-1). This study was performed to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this switch of NF-kappaB. Enhancement of UVB-induced apoptosis was always associated with increased release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), which was dependent on NF-kappaB activation. The same was observed when UVA and cisplatin were used, which like UVB induce base modifications. In contrast, apoptosis caused by DNA strand breaks was not enhanced by IL-1, indicating that the type of DNA damage is critical for switching the effect of NF-kappaB on apoptosis. Surprisingly, activated NF-kappaB induced TNF-alpha mRNA expression in the presence of all DNA damage-inducing agents. However, in the presence of DNA strand breaks, there was no release of the TNF-alpha protein, which is so crucial for enhancing apoptosis. Together, this indicates that induction of DNA damage may have a significant impact on biological effects but it is the type of DNA damage that determines the final outcome. This may have implications for the role of NF-kappaB in carcinogenesis and for the application of NF-kappaB inhibitors in anticancer therapy.

  16. Dietary spices protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage and inhibit nicotine-induced cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, R; Kanthimathi, M S

    2012-10-01

    Spices are rich sources of antioxidants due to the presence of phenols and flavonoids. In this study, the DNA protecting activity and inhibition of nicotine-induced cancer cell migration of 9 spices were analysed. Murine fibroblasts (3T3-L1) and human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells were pre-treated with spice extracts and then exposed to H₂O₂ and nicotine. The comet assay was used to analyse the DNA damage. Among the 9 spices, ginger, at 50 μg/ml protected against 68% of DNA damage in 3T3-L1 cells. Caraway, cumin and fennel showed statistically significant (p<0.05) DNA protecting activity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with nicotine induced cell migration, whereas pre-treatment with spices reduced this migration. Pepper, long pepper and ginger exhibited a high rate of inhibition of cell migration. The results of this study prove that spices protect DNA and inhibit cancer cell migration. PMID:25005983

  17. Relationship between the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from potentially lethal damage in 9L rat brain tumor cells. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    vanAnkeren, S.C.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) for fed plateau-phase 9L/Ro rat brain tumor cells were compared after single doses of gamma-radiation and after combined treatment with 3 micrograms of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)/ml given 16 hr prior to irradiation. DNA damage and repair were assayed using alkaline filter elution, while cell survival was assayed by colony formation. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced PLD followed statistically identical biphasic kinetics; the fast-phase half-times were 4.1 +/- 0.3 (S.D.) min and 4.0 +/- 0.8 min, while the slow-phase half-times were 59.7 +/- 11.2 min and 78.7 +/- 34.1 min, respectively. Treatment with BCNU prior to irradiation resulted in both additional DNA damage and increased cell kill. When DNA damage and cell survival after the combined treatment were corrected for the contribution from BCNU given alone, no inhibition of either repair of radiation-induced DNA damage or of recovery from radiation-induced PLD was observed. However, postirradiation hypertonic treatment inhibited both DNA repair and recovery from radiation-induced PLD. These correlations between the kinetics of the molecular and cellular repair processes support a role for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in recovery from radiation-induced PLD. The lack of inhibition by BCNU of both repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and of recovery from radiation-induced PLD also demonstrates that these are not the mechanisms by which BCNU enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in 9L cells.

  18. Metastasis suppressor NM23-H1 promotes repair of UV-induced DNA damage and suppresses UV-induced melanomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Stuart G; Novak, Marian; Dabernat, Sandrine; Daniel, Jean-Yves; Mellon, Isabel; Zhang, Qingbei; Harris, Nathan; Ciesielski, Michael J; Fenstermaker, Robert A; Kovacic, Diane; Slominski, Andrzej; Kaetzel, David M

    2012-01-01

    Reduced expression of the metastasis suppressor NM23-H1 is associated with aggressive forms of multiple cancers. Here, we establish that NM23-H1 (termed H1 isoform in human, M1 in mouse) and two of its attendant enzymatic activities, the 3'-5' exonuclease and nucleoside diphosphate kinase, are novel participants in the cellular response to UV radiation (UVR)-induced DNA damage. NM23-H1 deficiency compromised the kinetics of repair for total DNA polymerase-blocking lesions and nucleotide excision repair of (6-4) photoproducts in vitro. Kinase activity of NM23-H1 was critical for rapid repair of both polychromatic UVB/UVA-induced (290-400 nm) and UVC-induced (254 nm) DNA damage, whereas its 3'-5' exonuclease activity was dominant in the suppression of UVR-induced mutagenesis. Consistent with its role in DNA repair, NM23-H1 rapidly translocated to sites of UVR-induced (6-4) photoproduct DNA damage in the nucleus. In addition, transgenic mice hemizygous-null for nm23-m1 and nm23-m2 exhibited UVR-induced melanoma and follicular infundibular cyst formation, and tumor-associated melanocytes displayed invasion into adjacent dermis, consistent with loss of invasion-suppressing activity of NM23 in vivo. Taken together, our data show a critical role for NM23 isoforms in limiting mutagenesis and suppressing UVR-induced melanomagenesis.

  19. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction.

  20. A DNA-damage-induced cell cycle checkpoint in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, S B; Britt, A B

    2003-01-01

    Although it is well established that plant seeds treated with high doses of gamma radiation arrest development as seedlings, the cause of this arrest is unknown. The uvh1 mutant of Arabidopsis is defective in a homolog of the human repair endonuclease XPF, and uvh1 mutants are sensitive to both the toxic effects of UV and the cytostatic effects of gamma radiation. Here we find that gamma irradiation of uvh1 plants specifically triggers a G(2)-phase cell cycle arrest. Mutants, termed suppressor of gamma (sog), that suppress this radiation-induced arrest and proceed through the cell cycle unimpeded were recovered in the uvh1 background; the resulting irradiated plants are genetically unstable. The sog mutations fall into two complementation groups. They are second-site suppressors of the uvh1 mutant's sensitivity to gamma radiation but do not affect the susceptibility of the plant to UV radiation. In addition to rendering the plants resistant to the growth inhibitory effects of gamma radiation, the sog1 mutation affects the proper development of the pollen tetrad, suggesting that SOG1 might also play a role in the regulation of cell cycle progression during meiosis. PMID:12750343

  1. Induced DNA damage by dental resin monomers in somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Arossi, Guilherme Anziliero; Lehmann, Mauricio; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Reguly, Maria Luiza; de Andrade, Heloisa Helena Rodrigues

    2010-02-01

    The present in vivo study investigated the genotoxicity of four dental resin monomers: triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA) and bisphenol A-glycidylmethacrylate (BisGMA). The Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster was applied to analyse their genotoxicity expressed as homologous mitotic recombination, point and chromosomal mutation. SMART detects the loss of heterozygosity of marker genes expressed phenotypically on the fly's wings. This fruit fly has an extensive genetic homology to mammalians, which makes it a suitable model organism for genotoxic investigations. The present findings provide evidence that the mechanistic basis underlying the genotoxicity of UDMA and TEGDMA is related to homologous recombination and gene/chromosomal mutation. A genotoxic pattern can correspondingly be discerned for both UDMA and TEGDMA: their genotoxicity is attributed respectively to 49% and 44% of mitotic recombination, as well as 51% and 56% of mutational events, including point and chromosomal alterations. The monomer UDMA is 1.6 times more active than TEGDMA to induce mutant clones per treatment unit. BisGMA and HEMA had no statistically significant effect on total spot frequencies - suggesting no genotoxic action in the SMART assay. The clinical significance of these observations has to be interpreted for data obtained in other bioassays.

  2. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure.

  3. Cocaine induces DNA damage in distinct brain areas of female rats under different hormonal conditions.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Marilise F; Gonçales, Tierre A; Steinmetz, Aline; Moura, Dinara J; Saffi, Jenifer; Gomez, Rosane; Barros, Helena M T

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated levels of neuronal DNA damage after acute or repeated cocaine treatment in different brain areas of female rats after ovariectomy or sham surgery. Rats in the control and acute groups were given saline i.p., whereas in the repeated group were given 15 mg/kg, i.p., cocaine for 8 days. After a 10 day washout period, the control group was given saline i.p., whereas rats in the acute and repeated groups were given a challenge dose of 15 mg/kg, i.p., cocaine. After behavioural assessment, rats were killed and the cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and striatum were dissected for the Comet assay. Acute cocaine exposure induced DNA damage in all brain areas. This effect persisted after repeated administration, except in the hypothalamus, where repeated treatment did not cause increased DNA damage. Sexual hormones exhibited a neuroprotective effect, decreasing cocaine-induced DNA damage in cycling rats in all brain areas. PMID:24552452

  4. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure. PMID:23541438

  5. Leukotriene C4 is the major trigger of stress-induced oxidative DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Dvash, Efrat; Har-Tal, Michal; Barak, Sara; Meir, Ofir; Rubinstein, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and major chemotherapeutic agents damage DNA by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that ER stress and chemotherapy induce leukotriene C4 (LTC4) biosynthesis by transcriptionally upregulating and activating the enzyme microsomal glutathione-S-transferase 2 (MGST2) in cells of non-haematopoietic lineage. ER stress and chemotherapy also trigger nuclear translocation of the two LTC4 receptors. Acting in an intracrine manner, LTC4 then elicits nuclear translocation of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), ROS accumulation and oxidative DNA damage. Mgst2 deficiency, RNAi and LTC4 receptor antagonists abolish ER stress- and chemotherapy-induced ROS and oxidative DNA damage in vitro and in mouse kidneys. Cell death and mouse morbidity are also significantly attenuated. Hence, MGST2-generated LTC4 is a major mediator of ER stress- and chemotherapy-triggered oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage. LTC4 inhibitors, commonly used for asthma, could find broad clinical use in major human pathologies associated with ER stress-activated NOX4. PMID:26656251

  6. Low energy electron induced damage to plasmid DNA pQE30

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. V. K.; Pota, Tasneem; Peri, Dinakar; Dongre, Anushka D.; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2012-07-28

    Low energy electrons (LEEs) are produced in copious amounts by the primary radiation used in radiation therapy. The damage caused to the DNA by these secondary electrons in the energy range 5-22 eV has been studied to understand their possible role in radiation induced damage. Electrons are irradiated on dried films of plasmid DNA (pQE30) and analysed using agarose gel electrophoresis. Single strand breaks (SSBs) induced by LEE to supercoiled plasmid DNA show resonance structures at 7, 12, and 15 eV for low doses and 6, 10, and {approx}18 eV at saturation doses. The present measurements have an overall agreement with the literature that LEEs resonantly induce SSBs in DNA. Resonant peaks in the SSBs induced by LEEs at 7, 12, and 15 eV with the lowest employed dose in the current study are somewhat different from those reported earlier by two groups. The observed differences are perhaps related to the irradiation dose, conditions and the nature of DNA employed, which is further elaborated.

  7. Rofecoxib prevents ctdsDNA against damage induced by copper sulfate and ultraviolet B radiation in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nimer, Marwan S. M.; Al-Deen, Suad M.; Abdul Lateef, Zainab W.

    2010-01-01

    Rofecoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase COX-2 enzyme inhibitor with chemoprotective effect against cancer in experimental models. This study aimed to investigate the effect of rofecoxib against ctds DNA damage induced by copper ions or ultraviolet (UV)B radiation. Aliquot ctdsDNA samples were incubated with copper sulfate solution (50 nmol) and rofecoxib (0.8 mol) was added either before or after the admixing the ctdsDNA with copper sulfate. In another experimental series, aliquot of ctdsDNA were exposed to UVB radiation for 30 min in absence or presence of rofecoxib. Rofecoxib significantly attenuated the separation of double strands of DNA (detected by increase the absorbance of DNA at 260 nm) induced by Cu ions. Rofecoxib significantly offered protection against UVB-induced DNA damage. It is concluded that rofecoxib offered protection against copper ions or UVB induced-DNA damage via different mechanisms not related to the inhibition COX-2. PMID:24825998

  8. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Skipper, Anthony; Sims, Jennifer N.; Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that has been shown to cause its toxicity in humans and animals. Many documented studies have shown that cadmium produces various genotoxic effects such as DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. Ailments such as bone disease, renal damage, and several forms of cancer are attributed to overexposure to cadmium.  Although there have been numerous studies examining the effects of cadmium in animal models and a few case studies involving communities where cadmium contamination has occurred, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. To test our hypothesis, cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Lipid hydroperoxide content stress was estimated by lipid peroxidation assay. Genotoxic damage was tested by the means of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry assessment (Annexin-V/PI assay). The result of MTT assay indicated that cadmium chloride induces toxicity to HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, showing a 48 hr-LD50 of 3.6 µg/mL. Data generated from lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) increase of hydroperoxide production, specifically at the highest concentration tested. Data obtained from the Comet assay indicated that cadmium chloride causes DNA damage in HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. A strong concentration-response relationship (p < 0.05) was recorded between annexin V positive cells and cadmium chloride exposure. In summary, these in vitro studies provide clear evidence that cadmium chloride induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and programmed cell death in human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. PMID:26729151

  9. Identification of pathways controlling DNA damage induced mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lis, Ewa T; O'Neill, Bryan M; Gil-Lamaignere, Cristina; Chin, Jodie K; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2008-05-01

    Mutation in response to most types of DNA damage is thought to be mediated by the error-prone sub-branch of post-replication repair and the associated translesion synthesis polymerases. To further understand the mutagenic response to DNA damage, we screened a collection of 4848 haploid gene deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for decreased damage-induced mutation of the CAN1 gene. Through extensive quantitative validation of the strains identified by the screen, we identified ten genes, which included error-prone post-replication repair genes known to be involved in induced mutation, as well as two additional genes, FYV6 and RNR4. We demonstrate that FYV6 and RNR4 are epistatic with respect to induced mutation, and that they function, at least partially, independently of post-replication repair. This pathway of induced mutation appears to be mediated by an increase in dNTP levels that facilitates lesion bypass by the replicative polymerase Pol delta, and it is as important as error-prone post-replication repair in the case of UV- and MMS-induced mutation, but solely responsible for EMS-induced mutation. We show that Rnr4/Pol delta-induced mutation is efficiently inhibited by hydroxyurea, a small molecule inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, suggesting that if similar pathways exist in human cells, intervention in some forms of mutation may be possible.

  10. Artesunate derived from traditional Chinese medicine induces DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Paul C H; Lam, Elena; Roos, Wynand P; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z; Kaina, Bernd; Efferth, Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Artesunate is a semisynthetic derivative from artemisinin, a natural product from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua L. It exerts antimalarial activity, and, additionally, artemisinin and its derivatives are active against cancer cells. The active moiety is an endoperoxide bridge. Its cleavage leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species and carbon-centered radicals. These highly reactive molecules target several proteins in Plasmodia, which is thought to result in killing of the microorganism. DNA damage induced by artemisinins has not yet been described. Here, we show that artesunate induces apoptosis and necrosis. It also induces DNA breakage in a dose-dependent manner as shown by single-cell gel electrophoresis. This genotoxic effect was confirmed by measuring the level of gamma-H2AX, which is considered to be an indication of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Polymerase beta-deficient cells were more sensitive than the wild-type to artesunate, indicating that the drug induces DNA damage that is repaired by base excision repair. irs1 and VC8 cells defective in homologous recombination (HR) due to inactivation of XRCC2 and BRCA2, respectively, were more sensitive to artesunate than the corresponding wild-type. This was also true for XR-V15B cells defective in nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) due to inactivation of Ku80. The data indicate that DSBs induced by artesunate are repaired by the HR and NHEJ pathways. They suggest that DNA damage induced by artesunate contributes to its therapeutic effect against cancer cells. PMID:18519695

  11. Aag DNA Glycosylase Promotes Alkylation-Induced Tissue Damage Mediated by Parp1

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Jennifer A.; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A.; Lake, Annabelle; Eichinger, Lindsey W.; Shah, Dharini; Jhun, Iny; Limsirichai, Prajit; Bronson, Roderick T.; Christiani, David C.; Meira, Lisiane B.; Samson, Leona D.

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of front-line cancer chemotherapeutic compounds, and while these agents effectively kill tumor cells, they also damage healthy tissues. Although base excision repair (BER) is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, initiation of BER can be detrimental. Here we illustrate that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) mediates alkylation-induced tissue damage and whole-animal lethality following exposure to alkylating agents. Aag-dependent tissue damage, as observed in cerebellar granule cells, splenocytes, thymocytes, bone marrow cells, pancreatic β-cells, and retinal photoreceptor cells, was detected in wild-type mice, exacerbated in Aag transgenic mice, and completely suppressed in Aag−/− mice. Additional genetic experiments dissected the effects of modulating both BER and Parp1 on alkylation sensitivity in mice and determined that Aag acts upstream of Parp1 in alkylation-induced tissue damage; in fact, cytotoxicity in WT and Aag transgenic mice was abrogated in the absence of Parp1. These results provide in vivo evidence that Aag-initiated BER may play a critical role in determining the side-effects of alkylating agent chemotherapies and that Parp1 plays a crucial role in Aag-mediated tissue damage. PMID:23593019

  12. Neurotoxin-induced DNA damage is persistent in SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Musich, Phillip R; Cui, Kui; Zou, Yue; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-05-01

    Degeneration of the noradrenergic neurons has been reported in the brain of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. However, their pathological characteristics during the neurodegenerative course and underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we used the neurotoxin camptothecin (CPT) to induce the DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, normal fibroblast cells, and primarily cultured locus coeruleus (LC) and raphe neurons to examine cellular responses and repair capabilities after neurotoxin exposure. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and deficient in DNA repair, as compared to fibroblast cells. Furthermore, similar to SH-SY5Y cells, primarily cultured LC neurons are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and show a deficiency in repairing this damage. Moreover, while N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) exposure also results in DNA damage in cultured LC neurons, neither CPT nor DSP4 induce DNA damage in neuronal cultures from the raphe nuclei. Taken together, noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons are sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and exhibit a repair deficiency, providing a mechanistic explanation for the pathological characteristics of LC degeneration when facing endogenous and environmental DNA-damaging insults in vivo.

  13. Plasma induced DNA damage: Comparison with the effects of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lazović, S.; Maletić, D.; Puač, N.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Leskovac, A.; Filipović, J.; Joksić, G.

    2014-09-22

    We use human primary fibroblasts for comparing plasma and gamma rays induced DNA damage. In both cases, DNA strand breaks occur, but of fundamentally different nature. Unlike gamma exposure, contact with plasma predominantly leads to single strand breaks and base-damages, while double strand breaks are mainly consequence of the cell repair mechanisms. Different cell signaling mechanisms are detected confirming this (ataxia telangiectasia mutated - ATM and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related - ATR, respectively). The effective plasma doses can be tuned to match the typical therapeutic doses of 2 Gy. Tailoring the effective dose through plasma power and duration of the treatment enables safety precautions mainly by inducing apoptosis and consequently reduced frequency of micronuclei.

  14. Plasma induced DNA damage: Comparison with the effects of ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazović, S.; Maletić, D.; Leskovac, A.; Filipović, J.; Puač, N.; Malović, G.; Joksić, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2014-09-01

    We use human primary fibroblasts for comparing plasma and gamma rays induced DNA damage. In both cases, DNA strand breaks occur, but of fundamentally different nature. Unlike gamma exposure, contact with plasma predominantly leads to single strand breaks and base-damages, while double strand breaks are mainly consequence of the cell repair mechanisms. Different cell signaling mechanisms are detected confirming this (ataxia telangiectasia mutated - ATM and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related - ATR, respectively). The effective plasma doses can be tuned to match the typical therapeutic doses of 2 Gy. Tailoring the effective dose through plasma power and duration of the treatment enables safety precautions mainly by inducing apoptosis and consequently reduced frequency of micronuclei.

  15. Differential colon DNA damage induced by azo food additives between rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Chihiro; Kano, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Yu F; Sato, Itaru; Tsudua, Shuji

    2010-08-01

    Azo dyes, amaranth, allura red and new coccine, which are currently used as food color additives in Japan, have been reported to cause colon specific DNA damage in mice. To examine species difference in the DNA damage between rats and mice, each of dyes was administered to male mice (1 and 10 mg/kg) and male rats (10, 100 and 1,000 mg/kg) by gavage. Brain, lung, liver, kidney, glandular stomach, colon, urinary bladder and bone marrow were sampled 3 hr (for mice) and 3, 6, 12 and 24 hr (for rats) after the treatment. The alkaline comet assay showed DNA damage in the mouse colon 3 hr after the administration of all of the dyes at 10 mg/kg. In rats, however, none of the dyes damaged DNA. Azo dyes should undergo metabolic reduction in the colon to be adducted to DNA. To determine transit time of the dyes to the colon after their administration, gastric emptying and intestinal transport in mice and rats were examined using brilliant blue FCF (BB) as an indicator. The half times of gastric emptying were 70 and 80 min for mice and rats, respectively; and about 60% of the BB was removed from the stomach 1 hr after the gastric intubation in both mice and rats. BB reached the mouse and rat colon 1 and 3 hr after the administration, respectively. Considering the wide dose range and sampling times well covering the transit time to the colon, rats may be insensitive to these azo dye-induced DNA damage.

  16. Low Dose Iron Treatments Induce a DNA Damage Response in Human Endothelial Cells within Minutes

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Inês G.; Giess, Adam; Paschalaki, Koralia; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lidington, Elaine C.; Mason, Justin C.; Jones, Michael D.; Game, Laurence; Ali, Simak; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2016-01-01

    , and induce a DNA damage response. PMID:26866805

  17. A microsuspension adaptation of the Bacillus subtilis ''rec'' assay. [Detection of chemically induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    McCarroll, N.E.; Keech, B.H.; Piper, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    We have demonstrated the utility of an Escherichia coli microsuspension assay to detect and characterize chemical mediation of DNA damage by a wide variety of mutagens and carcinogens. The assay have been improved by the development of a microsuspension modification to the Bacillus subtilis ''rec'' assay. The addition of these gram-positive organisms has allowed detection of DNA damage induced by benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), 3-aminopyrene (3-AP), 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthrancene (DMBA), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), and 4-nitrobiphenyl (4-NBP). Data presented in this paper from tests of 61 additional compounds, including a representative number of direct and promutagenic agents, indicate that the B subtilis H17 and M45 strains provide an effective microbial system for identification of DNA damage susceptible to postreplicational repair. The results of this study further suggests that the inclusion of these strains in the microsuspension assay for DNA damage will markedly enhance the detection of agents which cannot readily penetrate the intact cell wall of E coli.

  18. DNA damage-induced translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus regulates cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteins are able to react in response to distinct stress stimuli by alteration of their subcellular distribution. The stress-responsive protein S100A11 belongs to the family of multifunctional S100 proteins which have been implicated in several key biological processes. Previously, we have shown that S100A11 is directly involved in DNA repair processes at damaged chromatin in the nucleus. To gain further insight into the underlying mechanism subcellular trafficking of S100A11 in response to DNA damage was analyzed. Results We show that DNA damage induces a nucleolin-mediated translocation of S100A11 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. This translocation is impeded by inhibition of the phosphorylation activity of PKCα. Translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus correlates with an increased cellular p21 protein level. Depletion of nucleolin by siRNA severely impairs translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus resulting in a decreased p21 protein level. Additionally, cells lacking nucleolin showed a reduced colony forming capacity. Conclusions These observations suggest that regulation of the subcellular distribution of S100A11 plays an important role in the DNA damage response and p21-mediated cell cycle control. PMID:21167017

  19. Resveratrol affects DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Basso, Emiliano; Regazzo, Giulia; Fiore, Mario; Palma, Valentina; Traversi, Gianandrea; Testa, Antonella; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2016-08-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene; RSV) acts on cancer cells in several ways, inducing cell cycle delay and apoptotic death, and enhancing ionizing radiation (IR)-mediated responses. However, fewer studies have examined RSV effects on normal cells. We have treated human lymphocytes in vitro with RSV, either alone or combined with IR, to evaluate its potential use as a radioprotector. We measured the effects of RSV on induction of DNA damage, repair kinetics, and modulation of histone deacetylase activity. PMID:27476334

  20. Oxidative stress and DNA damage in broad bean (Vicia faba L.) seedlings induced by thallium.

    PubMed

    Radić, Sandra; Cvjetko, Petra; Glavas, Katarina; Roje, Vibor; Pevalek-Kozlina, Branka; Pavlica, Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Thallium (Tl) is a metal of great toxicological concern because it is highly toxic to all living organisms through mechanisms that are yet poorly understood. Since Tl is accumulated by important crops, the present study aimed to analyze the biological effects induced by bioaccumulation of Tl in broad bean (Vicia faba L.) as well as the plant's antioxidative defense mechanisms usually activated by heavy metals. Thallium toxicity was related to production of reactive oxygen species in leaves and roots of broad bean seedlings following short-term (72 h) exposure to thallium (I) acetate (0, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 mg/L) by evaluating DNA damage and oxidative stress parameters as well as antioxidative response. The possible antagonistic effect of potassium (K) was tested by combined treatment with 5 mg/L of Tl (Tl+) and 10 mg/L of potassium (K+) acetate. Accumulation of Tl+ in roots was 50 to 250 times higher than in broad bean shoots and was accompanied by increase in dry weight and proline. Despite responsive antioxidative defense (increased activities of superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and pyrogallol peroxidase), Tl+ caused oxidative damage to lipids and proteins as evaluated by malondialdehyde and carbonyl group levels, and induced DNA strand breaks. Combined treatment caused no oxidative alternations to lipids and proteins though it induced DNA damage. The difference in Tl-induced genotoxicity following both acellular and cellular exposure implies indirect DNA damage. Results obtained indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the mechanism of Tl toxicity and that the tolerance of broad bean to Tl is achieved, at least in part, through the increased activity of antioxidant enzymes.

  1. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo. PMID:26114388

  2. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo. PMID:26114388

  3. Molecular and sensory mechanisms to mitigate sunlight-induced DNA damage in treefrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André P; Lipinski, Victor M; Santos, Mauricio B; Santos, Caroline P; Jardim, Sinara S; Cechin, Sonia Z; Loreto, Elgion L S

    2015-10-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been proposed as an environmental stressor, which may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations worldwide. Despite growing knowledge regarding the UV-induced biological effects in several amphibian models, little is known about the efficacy of DNA repair pathways. In addition, little attention has been given to the interplay between these molecular mechanisms with other physiological strategies that avoid the damage induced by sunlight. Here, DNA lesions induced by environmental doses of solar UVB and UVA radiation were detected in genomic DNA samples of treefrog tadpoles (Hypsiboas pulchellus) and their DNA repair activity was evaluated. These data were complemented by monitoring the induction of apoptosis in blood cells and tadpole survival. Furthermore, the tadpoles' ability to perceive and escape from UV wavelengths was evaluated as an additional strategy of photoprotection. The results show that tadpoles are very sensitive to UVB light, which could be explained by the slow DNA repair rates for both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6,4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6,4PPs). However, they were resistant to UVA, probably as a result of the activation of photolyases during UVA irradiation. Surprisingly, a sensory mechanism that triggers their escape from UVB and UVA light avoids the generation of DNA damage and helps to maintain the genomic integrity. This work demonstrates the genotoxic impact of both UVB and UVA radiation on tadpoles and emphasizes the importance of the interplay between molecular and sensory mechanisms to minimize the damage caused by sunlight.

  4. Avermectin Confers Its Cytotoxic Effects by Inducing DNA Damage and Mitochondria-Associated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Luo, Mingming; Xu, Wenping; Yang, Mingjun; Wang, Bo; Gao, Jufang; Li, Yaxiao; Tao, Liming

    2016-09-14

    Avermectin (AVM) has been widely used in agriculture and animal husbandry on the basis of its broad spectrum of effective anthelmintic activity and specificity targets. However, AVM induction of cytotoxicity through DNA damage is remains elusive. Here we investigate the cytotoxic effects of AVM in human nontarget cells in vitro. We clarify that AVM inhibited the viability of HeLa cells and enhanced apoptosis. We have used alkaline comet assay and γH2AX foci formation to detect DNA damage of HeLa cells. As expected, we found AVM caused DNA double-strand breaks in HeLa cells, as measured by significance of comet assay parameters (e.g., tail DNA) and increases of γH2AX foci in HeLa cells. Moreover, established assays of cytotoxicity were performed to characterize the mechanism of AVM toxicity on HeLa cells. The results demonstrated the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and up-regulating the expression level of Bax/Bcl-2 resulted in a release of cytochrome c into cytosol as well as the activation of caspase-9/-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We conclude that AVM has a potential risk to human health by inducing human cell DNA damage and mitochondria-associated apoptosis. PMID:27551889

  5. Laser microbeam-induced DNA damage inhibits cell division in fertilized eggs and early embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Wei; Ma, Xue-Shan; Ma, Jun-Yu; Luo, Yi-Bo; Lin, Fei; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Fan, Heng-Yu; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2013-10-15

    DNA double-strand breaks are caused by both intracellular physiological processes and environmental stress. In this study, we used laser microbeam cut (abbreviated microcut or cut), which allows specific DNA damage in the pronucleus of a fertilized egg and in individual blastomere(s) of an early embryo, to investigate the response of early embryos to DNA double-strand breaks. Line type γH2AX foci were detected in the cut region, while Chk2 phosphorylation staining was observed in the whole nuclear region of the cut pronuclei or blastomeres. Zygotes with cut male or female pronucleus showed poor developmental capability: the percentage of cleavage embryos was significantly decreased, and the embryos failed to complete further development to blastocysts. The cut blastomeres in 2-cell, 4-cell, and 8-cell embryos ceased cleavage, and they failed to incorporate into compacted morulae, but instead underwent apoptosis and cell death at the blastocyst stage; the uncut part of embryos could develop to blastocysts, with a reduced percentage or decreased cell number. When both blastomeres of the 2-cell embryos were cut by laser microbeam, cell death occurred 24 h earlier, suggesting important functions of the uncut blastomere in delaying cell death of the cut blastomere. Taken together, we conclude that microbeam-induced DNA damage in early embryos causes compromised development, and that embryos may have their own mechanisms to exclude DNA-damaged blastomeres from participating in further development. PMID:24036543

  6. Ion-induced electron production in tissue-like media and DNA damage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Obolensky, O. I.; Scifoni, E.; Pshenichnov, I.; Mishustin, I.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2009-01-01

    This work is the first stage in the development of an inclusive approach to calculation of the DNA damage caused by irradiation of biological tissue by ion/proton beams. The project starts with an analysis of ionization caused by the projectiles and the characteristics of secondary electrons produced in tissue-like media. We consider interactions with the medium on a microscopic level and this allows us to obtain the energy spectrum and abundance of secondary electrons as functions of the projectile’s kinetic energy. The physical information obtained in this analysis is related to biological processes responsible for the DNA damage induced by the projectile. In particular, we consider double strand breaks of DNA caused by secondary electrons and free radicals, and local heating in the ion’s track. The heating may enhance the biological effectiveness of electron/free radical nteractions with the DNA and may even be considered as an independent mechanism of DNA damage. Numerical estimates are performed for the case of carbon-ion beams. The obtained dose-depth curves are compared with results of the MCHIT model based on the GEANT4 toolkit.

  7. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Bassler, N.; Herrmann, R.; Prise, K. M.; Schettino, G.

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer a further enhancement due to their annihilation at the end of the path. The work presented here aimed to establish and validate an experimental procedure for the quantification of plasmid and genomic DNA damage resulting from antiproton exposure. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess DNA damage in directly and indirectly exposed human fibroblasts irradiated in both plateau and Bragg peak regions of a 126 MeV antiproton beam at CERN. Cells were stained post irradiation with an anti- γ-H2AX antibody. Quantification of the γ-H2AX foci-dose relationship is consistent with a linear increase in the Bragg peak region. A qualitative analysis of the foci detected in the Bragg peak and plateau region indicates significant differences highlighting the different severity of DNA lesions produced along the particle path. Irradiation of desalted plasmid DNA with 5 Gy antiprotons at the Bragg peak resulted in a significant portion of linear plasmid in the resultant solution.

  8. Co-transcriptional R-loops are the main cause of estrogen-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Caroline Townsend; Bocek, Michael; Crossley, Madzia P; Sollier, Julie; Sanz, Lionel A; Chédin, Frédéric; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2016-01-01

    The hormone estrogen (E2) binds the estrogen receptor to promote transcription of E2-responsive genes in the breast and other tissues. E2 also has links to genomic instability, and elevated E2 levels are tied to breast cancer. Here, we show that E2 stimulation causes a rapid, global increase in the formation of R-loops, co-transcriptional RNA-DNA products, which in some instances have been linked to DNA damage. We show that E2-dependent R-loop formation and breast cancer rearrangements are highly enriched at E2-responsive genomic loci and that E2 induces DNA replication-dependent double-strand breaks (DSBs). Strikingly, many DSBs that accumulate in response to E2 are R-loop dependent. Thus, R-loops resulting from the E2 transcriptional response are a significant source of DNA damage. This work reveals a novel mechanism by which E2 stimulation leads to genomic instability and highlights how transcriptional programs play an important role in shaping the genomic landscape of DNA damage susceptibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17548.001 PMID:27552054

  9. Visible light may directly induce nuclear DNA damage triggering the death pathway in RGC-5 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bin; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Visible light has been previously demonstrated to induce retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-5 cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. The present study was designed to determine whether visible light might also directly trigger the death pathway by damaging nuclear DNA. Methods RGC-5 cells were exposed to various intensities and durations of visible light exposure. Cell viability and death were monitored with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide staining. Nuclear DNA damage caused by light was determined with the plasmid assay, genome DNA assay, and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. The subsequent activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was measured with western blot, and PARP-1’s role in the death pathway was assessed by using specific inhibitors. Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) inhibitors were used to show their influence on light-induced cell death. Calcium influx was examined with the fura-2 assay and calcium channel blocker. Results We found that visible light induced RGC-5 cell death in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. After the light intensity was increased to 2,600 lx, activation of the death pathway in RGC-5 cells was clearly observed by detecting double-strand DNA breaks and nuclear DNA damage in vitro. Nuclear enzyme PARP-1 was promptly activated after exposure to 2,600 lx of light for 2 days, and specific inhibitors of PARP-1 had significant neuroprotective effects. The poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitor tannic acid and AIF inhibitor N-phenylmaleimide partially protected RGC-5 cells from light injury. A massive calcium influx was detected after 2 days of light exposure, and a calcium channel blocker partially protected cells against light injury. Conclusions These results suggest that visible light exposure may directly cause nuclear DNA damage, which consequently activates

  10. Ganglioside GT1b protects human spermatozoa from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA and membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Gavella, Mirjana; Garaj-Vrhovac, Verica; Lipovac, Vaskresenija; Antica, Mariastefania; Gajski, Goran; Car, Nikica

    2010-06-01

    We have reported previously that various gangliosides, the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, provide protection against sperm injury caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we investigated the effect of treatment of human spermatozoa with ganglioside GT1b on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced DNA fragmentation and plasma membrane damage. Single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) used in the assessment of sperm DNA integrity showed that in vitro supplemented GT1b (100 microm) significantly reduced DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) (200 microm) (p < 0.05). Measurements of Annexin V binding in combination with the propidium iodide vital dye labelling demonstrated that the spermatozoa pre-treated with GT1b exhibited a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the percentage of live cells with intact membrane and decreased phosphatidylserine translocation after exposure to H(2)O(2). Flow cytometry using the intracellular ROS-sensitive fluorescence dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate dye employed to investigate the transport of the extracellularly supplied H(2)O(2) into the cell interior revealed that ganglioside GT1b completely inhibited the passage of H(2)O(2) through the sperm membrane. These results suggest that ganglioside GT1b may protect human spermatozoa from H(2)O(2)-induced damage by rendering sperm membrane more hydrophobic, thus inhibiting the diffusion of H(2)O(2) across the membrane.

  11. DNA-damaging drug-induced apoptosis sensitized by N-myc in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai; Wang, Lin; Ke, Xiao-Xue; Gong, Xue-Yang; Wan, Jian-Hua; Hao, Xiang-Wei; Xu, Man; Xiang, Zonghuai; Cui, Zhao-Bo; Cui, Hongjuan

    2012-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common solid tumours in children (8-10% of all malignancies). Over 22% of cases have N-myc amplification associated with aggressively growing neuroblastomas. Oncogene-induced sensitization of cells to apoptosis is an important mechanism for suppression of tumorigenesis. Tumour suppressors often play a critical role in linking oncogenes to apoptotic machinery. For example, activated p53 then targets both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to promote apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Understanding of the involved mechanisms has important clinical implications. We have employed DNA-damaging drug-induced apoptosis sensitized by oncogene N-myc as a model. DNA damaging drugs trigger high levels of p53, leading to caspase-9 activation in neuroblastoma cells. Inactivation of p53 protects cells from drug-triggered apoptosis sensitized by N-myc. These findings thus define a molecular pathway for mediating DNA-damaging drug-induced apoptosis sensitized by oncogene, and suggest that inactivation of p53 or other components of this apoptotic pathway may confer drug resistance in neuroblastoma cells. The data also suggests that inactivation of apoptotic pathways through co-operating oncogenes may be necessary for the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma with N-myc amplification.

  12. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  13. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P; Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N; Matyunin, S N; Nazarov, M M; Cherkasova, O P

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  14. DNA damage-induced replication fork regression and processing in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Courcelle, Justin; Donaldson, Janet R; Chow, Kin-Hoe; Courcelle, Charmain T

    2003-02-14

    DNA lesions that block replication are a primary cause of rearrangements, mutations, and lethality in all cells. After ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage in Escherichia coli, replication recovery requires RecA and several other recF pathway proteins. To characterize the mechanism by which lesion-blocked replication forks recover, we used two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis to show that replication-blocking DNA lesions induce a transient reversal of the replication fork in vivo. The reversed replication fork intermediate is stabilized by RecA and RecF and is degraded by the RecQ-RecJ helicase-nuclease when these proteins are absent. We propose that fork regression allows repair enzymes to gain access to the replication-blocking lesion, allowing processive replication to resume once the blocking lesion is removed. PMID:12543983

  15. Calcitriol-induced DNA damage: toward a molecular mechanism of selective cell death.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S Saif; Rizvi, Asim; Naseem, Imrana

    2013-09-01

    Calcitriol, the biologically active form of vitamin D, is known to function as an important anticancer agent. The exact mechanism by which calcitriol exerts its effects remains unknown. Recent evidence suggests a link between calcitriol-induced, free-radical-mediated DNA damage and cell death, in the presence of elevated levels of copper, such as those observed in malignant cells. As calcitriol is a lipid-soluble molecule, its interaction with DNA and copper would require a "chaperone"-like molecule, which binds the relatively hydrophobic calcitriol and polar DNA. A candidate protein is the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which binds both molecules. Using the recently elucidated full-length structure of the VDR molecule, we present and discuss three possible mechanisms to explain the interaction between calcitriol and DNA, as mediated by VDR.

  16. N-nitroso-N-ethylurea activates DNA damage surveillance pathways and induces transformation in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The DNA damage checkpoint signalling cascade sense damaged DNA and coordinates cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and/or apoptosis. However, it is still not well understood how the signalling system differentiates between different kinds of DNA damage. N-nitroso-N-ethylurea (NEU), a DNA ethylating agent induces both transversions and transition mutations. Methods Immunoblot and comet assays were performed to detect DNA breaks and activation of the canonical checkpoint signalling kinases following NEU damage upto 2 hours. To investigate whether mismatch repair played a role in checkpoint activation, knock-down studies were performed while flow cytometry analysis was done to understand whether the activation of the checkpoint kinases was cell cycle phase specific. Finally, breast epithelial cells were grown as 3-dimensional spheroid cultures to study whether NEU can induce upregulation of vimentin as well as disrupt cell polarity of the breast acini, thus causing transformation of epithelial cells in culture. Results We report a novel finding that NEU causes activation of major checkpoint signalling kinases, Chk1 and Chk2. This activation is temporally controlled with Chk2 activation preceding Chk1 phosphorylation, and absence of cross talk between the two parallel signalling pathways, ATM and ATR. Damage caused by NEU leads to the temporal formation of both double strand and single strand breaks. Activation of checkpoints following NEU damage is cell cycle phase dependent wherein Chk2 is primarily activated during G2-M phase whilst in S phase, there is immediate Chk1 phosphorylation and delayed Chk2 response. Surprisingly, the mismatch repair system does not play a role in checkpoint activation, at doses and duration of NEU used in the experiments. Interestingly, NEU caused disruption of the well-formed polarised spheroid archithecture and upregulation of vimentin in three-dimensional breast acini cultures of non-malignant breast epithelial cells upon NEU

  17. Zingerone protects against stannous chloride-induced and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Iyappan; Narayanan, Nithya; Rabindran, Remitha; Jayasree, P R; Manish Kumar, P R

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the dose-dependent antioxidant activity and DNA protective effects of zingerone. At 500 μg/mL, the DPPH radical scavenging activity of zingerone and ascorbic acid as a standard was found to be 86.7 and 94.2 % respectively. At the same concentration, zingerone also showed significant reducing power (absorbance 0.471) compared to that of ascorbic acid (absorbance 0.394). The in vitro toxicity of stannous chloride (SnCl2) was evaluated using genomic and plasmid DNA. SnCl2-induced degradation of genomic DNA was found to occur at a concentration of 0.8 mM onwards with complete degradation at 1.02 mM and above. In the case of plasmid DNA, conversion of supercoiled DNA into the open circular form indicative of DNA nicking activity was observed at a concentration of 0.2 mM onwards; complete conversion was observed at a concentration of 1.02 mM and above. Zingerone was found to confer protection against SnCl2-induced oxidative damage to genomic and plasmid DNA at concentrations of 500 and 750 μg/mL onwards, respectively. This protective effect was further confirmed in the presence of UV/H2O2-a known reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system-wherein protection by zingerone against ROS-mediated DNA damage was observed at a concentration of 250 μg/mL onwards in a dose-dependent manner. This study clearly indicated the in vitro DNA protective property of zingerone against SnCl2-induced, ROS-mediated DNA damage.

  18. Aluminium induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in root cells of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Achary, V Mohan Murali; Jena, Suprava; Panda, Kamal K; Panda, Brahma B

    2008-06-01

    Aluminium (Al) was evaluated for induction of oxidative stress and DNA damage employing the growing roots of Allium cepa L. as the assay system. Intact roots of A. cepa were treated with different concentrations, 0, 1, 10, 50, 100, or 200 microM of aluminium chloride, at pH 4.5 for 4 h (or 2 h for comet assay) at room temperature, 25+/-1 degrees C. Following treatment the parameters investigated in root tissue were Al-uptake, cell death, extra cellular generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), viz. O(2)(*-), H(2)O(2) and (*)OH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, activities of antioxidant enzymes namely catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX); and DNA damage, assessed by comet assay. The findings indicated that Al triggered generation of extra-cellular ROI following a dose-response. Through application of specific enzyme inhibitors it was demonstrated that extra-cellular generation of ROI was primarily due to the activity of cell wall bound NADH-PX. Generation of ROI in root tissue as well as cell death was better correlated to the levels of root Al-uptake rather than to the concentrations of Al in ambient experimental solutions. Induction of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation by Al were statistically significant. Whereas Al inhibited CAT activity, enhanced SOD, GPX and APX activities significantly; that followed dose-response. Comet assay provided evidence that Al induced DNA damage in a range of concentrations 50-200 microM, which was comparable to that induced by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS), an alkylating mutagen served as the positive control. The findings provided evidence that Al comparable to biotic stress induced oxidative burst at the cell surface through up- or down-regulation of some of the key enzymes of oxidative metabolism ultimately resulting in oxidative stress leading to DNA damage and cell death in root cells of A. cepa. PMID:18068230

  19. Nucleotide excision repair activity on DNA damage induced by photoactivated methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Berra, Carolina Maria; de Oliveira, Carla Santos; Garcia, Camila Carrião Machado; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro Reily; Lerner, Letícia Koch; Lima, Leonardo Carmo de Andrade; Baptista, Maurício da Silva; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2013-08-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) mechanism is well known to be involved in the removal of UV-induced lesions. Nevertheless, the involvement of this pathway in the repair of lesions generated after DNA oxidation remains controversial. The effects of visible-light-excited methylene blue (MB), known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), were examined directly in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A and XP-C NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Initially, MB was confirmed as being incorporated in similar amounts by the cells and that its photoexcitation induces the generation of (1)O2 within cells. The analysis of cell survival indicated that NER-deficient cells were hypersensitive to photoactivated MB. This sensitivity was confirmed with cells silenced for the XPC gene and by host-cell reactivation (HCR) of plasmid exposed to the photosensitizing effects of photoexcited MB. The sensitivity detected by HCR was restored in complemented cells, confirming the participation of XPA and XPC proteins in the repair of DNA lesions induced by photosensitized MB. Furthermore, DNA damage (single- and double-strand breaks and alkali-sensitive sites) was observed in the nuclei of treated cells by alkaline comet assay, with higher frequency of lesions in NER-deficient than in NER-proficient cells. Likewise, NER-deficient cells also presented more γ-H2AX-stained nuclei and G2/M arrest after photoactivated MB treatment, probably as a consequence of DNA damage response. Notwithstanding, the kinetics of both alkali- and FPG-sensitive sites repair were similar among cells, thereby demonstrating not only that MB photoexcitation generates nuclear DNA damage, but also that the removal of these lesions is NER-independent. Therefore, this work provides further evidence that XPA and XPC proteins have specific roles in cell protection and repair/tolerance of ROS-induced DNA damage. Moreover, as XPC-deficient patients do not present neurodegeneration, premature aging, or developmental clinical

  20. Infrared A radiation promotes survival of human melanocytes carrying ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kimeswenger, Susanne; Schwarz, Agatha; Födinger, Dagmar; Müller, Susanne; Pehamberger, Hubert; Schwarz, Thomas; Jantschitsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The link between solar radiation and melanoma is still elusive. Although infrared radiation (IR) accounts for over 50% of terrestrial solar energy, its influence on human skin is not well explored. There is increasing evidence that IR influences the expression patterns of several molecules independently of heat. A previous in vivo study revealed that pretreatment with IR might promote the development of UVR-induced non-epithelial skin cancer and possibly of melanoma in mice. To expand on this, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of IR on UVR-induced apoptosis and DNA repair in normal human epidermal melanocytes. The balance between these two effects is a key factor of malignant transformation. Human melanocytes were exposed to physiologic doses of IR and UVR. Compared to cells irradiated with UVR only, simultaneous exposure to IR significantly reduced the apoptotic rate. However, IR did not influence the repair of UVR-induced DNA damage. IR partly reversed the pro-apoptotic effects of UVR via modification of the expression and activity of proteins mainly of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, IR enhances the survival of melanocytes carrying UVR-induced DNA damage and thereby might contribute to melanomagenesis.

  1. Cytoprotection against Cr(6+)-induced DNA damage by alpha-lipoic acid: implications in reducing occupational cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Budhwar, Roli; Nigam, Akanksha; Priya, Shivam

    2009-11-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (LA), the metabolic antioxidant, was evaluated for its potential to protect against Cr(6+)-induced DNA damage. Potassium dichromate was administered to Swiss albino mice orally ad libitum at the doses of 5, 10 or 25 mg/kg body weight in drinking water to set DNA damage in cells, which was characterized in mouse peripheral blood mononuclear cells and bone marrow cells using single-cell gel electrophoresis and analyses of generated comets for Tail moment, Tail DNA and Tail length. DNA damage was dose dependent. Cytoprotection by LA was remarkable. LA (5, 10 and 25 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally) in pre-, co- and post-toxicant administration schedule abrogated DNA damage substantially in both cell types. Protection by LA was also dose dependent. LA annulled DNA damage by Cr(6+) in plasmid relaxation assay. A negligible DNA damage resulted during interaction of Cr(6+) and LA. Compared to ascorbate, LA emerged as a better antioxidant and least DNA damaging. In conclusion, our study advocated an experimental therapeutic research potential in LA against Cr(6+)-induced DNA damage for reduction of occupational cancer risk in humans. PMID:19710206

  2. Inhibition of KDM6 activity during murine ESC differentiation induces DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Christine; Kampka, Justyna M; Huppertz, Sascha; Weber, Heike; Schlosser, Andreas; Müller, Albrecht M; Becker, Matthias

    2016-02-15

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterised by their capacity to self-renew indefinitely while maintaining the potential to differentiate into all cell types of an adult organism. Both the undifferentiated and differentiated states are defined by specific gene expression programs that are regulated at the chromatin level. Here, we have analysed the contribution of the H3K27me2- and H3K27me23-specific demethylases KDM6A and KDM6B to murine ESC differentiation by employing the GSK-J4 inhibitor, which is specific for KDM6 proteins, and by targeted gene knockout (KO) and knockdown. We observe that inhibition of the H3K27 demethylase activity induces DNA damage along with activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and cell death in differentiating but not in undifferentiated ESCs. Laser microirradiation experiments revealed that the H3K27me3 mark, but not the KDM6B protein, colocalise with γH2AX-positive sites of DNA damage in differentiating ESCs. Lack of H3K27me3 attenuates the GSK-J4-induced DDR in differentiating Eed-KO ESCs. Collectively, our findings indicate that differentiating ESCs depend on KDM6 and that the H3K27me3 demethylase activity is crucially involved in DDR and survival of differentiating ESCs. PMID:26759175

  3. Inhibition of KDM6 activity during murine ESC differentiation induces DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Christine; Kampka, Justyna M; Huppertz, Sascha; Weber, Heike; Schlosser, Andreas; Müller, Albrecht M; Becker, Matthias

    2016-02-15

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterised by their capacity to self-renew indefinitely while maintaining the potential to differentiate into all cell types of an adult organism. Both the undifferentiated and differentiated states are defined by specific gene expression programs that are regulated at the chromatin level. Here, we have analysed the contribution of the H3K27me2- and H3K27me23-specific demethylases KDM6A and KDM6B to murine ESC differentiation by employing the GSK-J4 inhibitor, which is specific for KDM6 proteins, and by targeted gene knockout (KO) and knockdown. We observe that inhibition of the H3K27 demethylase activity induces DNA damage along with activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and cell death in differentiating but not in undifferentiated ESCs. Laser microirradiation experiments revealed that the H3K27me3 mark, but not the KDM6B protein, colocalise with γH2AX-positive sites of DNA damage in differentiating ESCs. Lack of H3K27me3 attenuates the GSK-J4-induced DDR in differentiating Eed-KO ESCs. Collectively, our findings indicate that differentiating ESCs depend on KDM6 and that the H3K27me3 demethylase activity is crucially involved in DDR and survival of differentiating ESCs.

  4. Oxidative stress and DNA damage induced by imidacloprid in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Ge, Weili; Yan, Saihong; Wang, Jinhua; Zhu, Lusheng; Chen, Aimei; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-18

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid insecticide that can have negative effects on nontarget animals. The present study was conducted to assess the toxicity of various imidacloprid doses (0.3, 1.25, and 5 mg/mL) on zebrafish sampled after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of exposure. The levels of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and malondialdehyde (MDA) and the extent of DNA damage were measured to evaluate the toxicity of imidacloprid on zebrafish. SOD and GST activities were noticeably increased during early exposure but were inhibited toward the end of the exposure period. In addition, the CAT levels decreased to the control level following their elevation during early exposure. High concentrations of imidacloprid (1.25 and 5 mg/L) induced excessive ROS production and markedly increased MDA content on the 21st day of exposure. DNA damage was dose- and time-dependent. In conclusion, the present study showed that imidacloprid can induce oxidative stress and DNA damage in zebrafish. PMID:25607931

  5. Buckwheat Honey Attenuates Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Liver and DNA Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ni; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Jianbin; Cao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Buckwheat honey, which is widely consumed in China, has a characteristic dark color. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of buckwheat honey on liver and DNA damage induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice. The results revealed that buckwheat honey had high total phenolic content, and rutin, hesperetin, and p-coumaric acid were the main phenolic compounds present. Buckwheat honey possesses super DPPH radical scavenging activity and strong ferric reducing antioxidant power. Administration of buckwheat honey for 10 weeks significantly inhibited serum lipoprotein oxidation and increased serum oxygen radical absorbance capacity. Moreover, buckwheat honey significantly inhibited aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities, which are enhanced by carbon tetrachloride. Hepatic malondialdehyde decreased and hepatic antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) increased in the presence of buckwheat honey. In a comet assay, lymphocyte DNA damage induced by carbon tetrachloride was significantly inhibited by buckwheat honey. Therefore, buckwheat honey has a hepatoprotective effect and inhibits DNA damage, activities that are primarily attributable to its high antioxidant capacity. PMID:26508989

  6. Effects of temperature on UV-B-induced DNA damage and photorepair in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-shan; Wang, Yan; Björn, Lars Olof

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers(CPDs) and (6-4) photoproducts(6-4PPs) induced by UV-B radiation in Arabidopsis thaliana at different temperatures was investigated using ELISA with specific monoclonal antibodies. CPDs and 6-4PPs increased during 3 h UV-B exposure, but further exposure led to decreases. Contrary to the commonly accepted view that DNA damage induced by UV-B radiation is temperature-independent because of its photochemical nature, we found UV-B-induction of CPDs and 6-4PPs in Arabidopsis to be slower at a low than at a high temperature. Photorepair of CPDs at 24 degrees C was much faster than that at 0 degrees C and 12 degrees C, with 50% CPDs removal during 1 h exposure to white light. Photorepair of 6-4PPs at 12 degrees C was very slow as compared with that at 24 degrees C, and almost no removal of 6-4PPs was detected after 4 h exposure to white light at 0 degrees C. There was evidence to suggest that temperature-dependent DNA damage and photorepair could have important ecological implications.

  7. Energy Thresholds of DNA Damage Induced by UV Radiation: An XPS Study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, P J; Ferraria, A M; Botelho do Rego, A M; Hoffmann, S V; Ribeiro, P A; Raposo, M

    2015-04-30

    This work stresses on damage at the molecular level caused by ultraviolet radiation (UV) in the range from 3.5 to 8 eV, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) films observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed quantitative XPS analysis, in which all the amounts are relative to sodium-assumed not to be released from the samples, of the carbon, oxygen, and particularly, nitrogen components, reveals that irradiation leads to sugar degradation with CO-based compounds release for energies above 6.9 eV and decrease of nitrogen groups which are not involved in hydrogen bonding at energies above 4.2 eV. Also the phosphate groups are seen to decrease to energies above 4.2 eV. Analysis of XPS spectra allowed to conclude that the damage on bases peripheral nitrogen atoms are following the damage on phosphates. It suggests that very low kinetic energy photoelectrons are ejected from the DNA bases, as a result of UV light induced breaking of the phosphate ester groups which forms a transient anion with resonance formation and whereby most of the nitrogen DNA peripheral groups are removed. The degree of ionization of DNA was observed to increase with radiation energy, indicating that the ionized phosphate groups are kept unchanged. This result was interpreted by the shielding of phosphate groups caused by water molecules hydration near sodium atoms. PMID:25844940

  8. Melamine induces sperm DNA damage and abnormality, but not genetic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan-xin; Yang, Guang-yu; Li, Jun-tao; Li, Wen-xue; Zhang, Bo; Zhu, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Melamine is a category III carcinogen. However, its illegal addition to milk and other protein products has led to the pet melamine poisoning in USA and infant renal calculus cases in China. Its long-term toxicity is not clear and needs to be investigated urgently to appease the public panic. In this study, the effects of melamine on mutagenesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes were tested by Ames test, in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, mouse micronucleus test and sperm abnormality test; the effects of melamine on DNA damage in sperm cells were observed by single cell gel electrophoresis, and the effects on malignant transformation were examined by malignant transformation experiment of normal human liver cell line L02. The results show that melamine has no mutagenic function in prokaryotes and eukaryotes in vitro and in vivo, and does not induce malignant cell transformation after long-term exposure. However, it has ability to increase sperm abnormality rate and DNA damage.

  9. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer T.; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Teneva, Nedelina; Simmons, Steven O.; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-01-01

    Human ATAD5 is a biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATAD5 protein levels increase posttranscriptionally in response to DNA damage. We screened over 4,000 compounds with a cell-based quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-luciferase assay detecting genotoxic compounds. We identified 22 antioxidants, including resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein, that are currently used or investigated for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis, as well as for antiaging. Treatment of dividing cells with these compounds induced DNA damage and resulted in cell death. Despite their genotoxic effects, resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein did not cause mutagenesis, which is a major side effect of conventional anticancer drugs. Furthermore, resveratrol and genistein killed multidrug-resistant cancer cells. We therefore propose that resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein are attractive candidates for improved chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22431602

  10. [Study of blue light induced DNA damage of retinal pigment epithelium(RPE) cells and the protection of vitamin C].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian Wei; Ren, Guo Liang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Zhu, Xi; Lin, Hai Yan; Zhou, Ji Lin

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate protection of vitamin C on blue light-induced DNA damage of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. The cultured RPE cells were divided into 3 groups: Control group (no blue light exposure), blue light exposure group (blue light exposure for 20 minutes) and blue light exposure + vitamin C group (blue light exposure + 100 mumol/L vitamin C). Travigen's comet assay kit and Euclid comet assay software were used to assay the DNA damage levels. The DNA percentage in the tail of electrophoretogram in the three groups were 18.44%, 54.42% and 32.43% respectively (p < 0.01). Tail moments were 8.2, 48.3, and 18.4 respectively (p < 0.01). Blue light could induce DNA damage to RPE cells but vitamin C could protect the RPE cells from the blue light-induced DNA damage.

  11. Quercetin ameliorates polychlorinated biphenyls-induced testicular DNA damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Lovato, F L; de Oliveira, C R; Adedara, I A; Barbisan, F; Moreira, K L S; Dalberto, M; da Rocha, M I U M; Marroni, N P; da Cruz, I B; Costabeber, I B

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of environmental contaminants widely reported to cause gonadal toxicity in both humans and animals. This study investigated the amelioratory role of quercetin in PCBs-induced DNA damage in male Wistar rats. Polychlorinated biphenyls were administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 2 mg kg(-1) alone or in combination with quercetin (orally) at 50 mg kg(-1) for 25 days. Quercetin modulation of PCBs-induced gonadal toxicity was evaluated using selected oxidative stress indices, comet assay, measurement of DNA concentration and histology of the testes. Administration of PCBs alone caused a significant (P < 0.05) depletion in the total thiol level in testes of treated rats. Conversely, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) production were markedly elevated in testes of PCBs-treated rats compared with control. Further, PCBs exposure produced statistically significant increases in DNA tail migration, degraded double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) concentration and histological alterations of testes of the treated rats compared to control. Quercetin cotreatment significantly improved the testicular antioxidant status, decreased DNA fragmentation and restored the testicular histology, thus demonstrating the protective effect of quercetin in PCBs-treated rats.

  12. Effects of Ligustrazine on DNA damage and apoptosis induced by irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Wang, Siying; Zhou, Pingkun; Liu, Wei; Ni, Fang

    2013-11-01

    Ligustrazine has been used to treat heart and blood vessel disease in China. In the present study, we investigated the potential action of Ligustrazine as a component of chuanxiong (a Chinese herb) in scavenging hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical as indicated in the ESR spin-trapping measurement. Treatment of Ligustrazine in mice decreased mortality after whole body γ-irradiation. The anti-radiation action of Ligustrazine was studied by measuring DNA damage (Comet assay and γ-H2AX formation) and apoptosis induced by irradiation. It was triggered by altering the level of DNA-PKcs protein, a critical component of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways in mice after irradiation. Consistently, the phosphorylation of Akt protein, a mediator of survival signaling, was concurrently increased by Ligustrazine treatment. Additionally, the cytokines along with the phosphorylation of the p38 protein which is activated by a variety of environmental stresses and inflammatory cytokines decreased in the Ligustrazine-treated group as compared to irradiation group. Our results suggest that Ligustrazine has radioprotective effect through its capabilities as a powerful antioxidant, in reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) level induced by irradiation, minimizing DNA damage and apoptosis, and activating survival signal Akt pathways. This study will be of value in the development of novel radioprotective compounds. PMID:24184571

  13. Black tea extract: a supplementary antioxidant in radiation-induced damage to DNA and normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debjani; Pal, Sandip; Saha, Chabita; Chakrabarti, Amit Kumar; Datta, Salil C; Dey, Subrata Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Myriad research has contributed significantly toward the understanding and identification of health benefits stemming from tea polyphenols and many other naturally occurring flavonoids present in fruits and vegetables. These flavonoids are known to mitigate reactive oxygen species-induced damage by scavenging them. In this study, hot-water black tea extract rich in flavonoids is evaluated as a supplementary antioxidant. The antioxidant efficacy of black tea extract was investigated by evaluating radioprotection conferred to pBR322 DNA, calf thymus DNA, and normal lymphocytes during gamma irradiation. The protection was measured by gel electrophoresis, fluorimetric study, cell viability assay, cytokinesis-blocked micronuclei assay, and comet assay. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging ability of the tea extract used increased in a dose-dependent manner (IC50: 182.45 µg/mL). Positive correlation of radioprotection with antioxidant activity of black tea extract was observed in all systems. Maximum protection against radiation-induced damage was observed in pBR322 DNA and calf thymus DNA at ≥200 µg/mL of black tea extract. At a dose of black tea extract as low as 5 µg/mL, efficient radioprotection was observed in normal lymphocytes, which is encouraging and can be tested in the future as a natural antioxidant supplement during radiotherapy.

  14. Oxidative stress induced sperm DNA damage, a possible reason for male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hosen, Md Bayejid; Islam, Md Rakibul; Begum, Firoza; Kabir, Yearul; Howlader, M Zakir Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sperm DNA damage is an important factor in the etiology of male infertility. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of oxidative stress induced sperm DNA damage with the pathogenesis of male infertility. Materials and Methods: The study comprised a total of 66 subjects, including fertile men (n=25) and infertile men (n=41) matched by age. Seminal malondialdehyde (MDA), phospholipid hydroperoxide (PHP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant status (TAS) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) were estimated by spectrophotometric and ELISA based methods and the association with the sperm parameters was assessed. Results: The percentages of motile and morphologically normal cells were significantly lower (p < 0.001, p <0.001, respectivly) in infertile men. Seminal levels of MDA, PHP and 8-OHdG were significantly higher (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p=0. 02, respectively) while the SOD and TAS were significantly lower (p=0. 0003, p< 0.001, respectively) in infertile men. Sperm parameters were negatively correlated with MDA, PHP and 8-OHdG while positively correlated with SOD and TAS. A positive correlation of 8-OHdG with MDA and PHP and a negative correlation with TAS and SOD were also found. Conclusion: These results suggested that oxidative stress induced sperm DNA damage might have a critical effect on the etiology of infertility. Therefore, evaluation of oxidative status, antioxidant defense systems and DNA damage, together with sperm parameters might be a useful tool for diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:26568756

  15. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of ssDNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide using graphene based nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Berghian-Grosan, Camelia; Biris, Alexandru Radu; Coros, Maria; Pogacean, Florina; Pruneanu, Stela

    2015-06-01

    The oxidative damage of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been intensively studied due to its role in the occurrence of some diseases. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can induce oxidation of DNA bases, sugar lesions or DNA strand breaks. The Pt/Gr-Au-3 modified electrode was employed for the analysis of four ssDNA samples: single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), ssDNA pre-treated with hydrogen peroxide (ssDNA-H2O2), ssDNA pre-treated with graphene-gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-Gr-Au) and ssDNA-Gr-Au complex pre-treated with hydrogen peroxide (ssDNA-Gr-Au-H2O2). By monitoring the changes of the purine oxidation peaks currents, we obtained valuable information about the damage induced by the hydrogen peroxide onto the un-treated or graphene pre-treated ssDNA and also about the interaction between ssDNA and graphene-based nanomaterial. The FTIR analysis has been also used to obtain information about the ssDNA damage. These findings allowed us to prove the utility of graphene-based nanomaterials (mainly Gr-Au-3) not only for the investigation of the oxidative damage induced by a non-radical oxidant, but also for the determination of the type of interaction between ssDNA and graphene surface. The stability of the ssDNA-Gr-Au-3 complex against the damage induced by H2O2, in the absence of reduced transition metals, was also established.

  16. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION-AND CHEMICALLY-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid, sensitive and simple assays for radiation- and chemically-induced DNA damage can be of significant benefit to a number of fields including radiation biology, clinical research, and environmental monitoring. Although temperature-induced DNA strand separation has been use...

  17. Plant Nuclei Move to Escape Ultraviolet-Induced DNA Damage and Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hidema, Jun; Tamura, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    A striking feature of plant nuclei is their light-dependent movement. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf mesophyll cells, the nuclei move to the side walls of cells within 1 to 3 h after blue-light reception, although the reason is unknown. Here, we show that the nuclear movement is a rapid and effective strategy to avoid ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damages. Mesophyll nuclei were positioned on the cell bottom in the dark, but sudden exposure of these cells to UVB caused severe DNA damage and cell death. The damage was remarkably reduced in both blue-light-treated leaves and mutant leaves defective in the actin cytoskeleton. Intriguingly, in plants grown under high-light conditions, the mesophyll nuclei remained on the side walls even in the dark. These results suggest that plants have two strategies for reducing UVB exposure: rapid nuclear movement against acute exposure and nuclear anchoring against chronic exposure. PMID:26681797

  18. Plant Nuclei Move to Escape Ultraviolet-Induced DNA Damage and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kosei; Hidema, Jun; Tamura, Kentaro; Takagi, Shingo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-02-01

    A striking feature of plant nuclei is their light-dependent movement. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf mesophyll cells, the nuclei move to the side walls of cells within 1 to 3 h after blue-light reception, although the reason is unknown. Here, we show that the nuclear movement is a rapid and effective strategy to avoid ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damages. Mesophyll nuclei were positioned on the cell bottom in the dark, but sudden exposure of these cells to UVB caused severe DNA damage and cell death. The damage was remarkably reduced in both blue-light-treated leaves and mutant leaves defective in the actin cytoskeleton. Intriguingly, in plants grown under high-light conditions, the mesophyll nuclei remained on the side walls even in the dark. These results suggest that plants have two strategies for reducing UVB exposure: rapid nuclear movement against acute exposure and nuclear anchoring against chronic exposure.

  19. Fundamental mechanisms of DNA radiosensitization: damage induced by low-energy electrons in brominated oligonucleotide trimers.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeunsoo; Polska, Katarzyna; Rak, Janusz; Wagner, J Richard; Sanche, Léon

    2012-08-16

    The replacement of nucleobases with brominated analogs enhances DNA radiosensitivity. We examine the chemistry of low-energy electrons (LEEs) in this sensitization process by experiments with thin films of the oligonucleotide trimers TBrXT, where BrX = 5-BrU (5-bromouracil), 5-BrC (5-bromocytosine), 8-BrA (8-bromoadenine), or 8-BrG (8-bromoguanine). The products induced from irradiation of thin (∼ 2.5 nm) oligonucleotide films, with 10 eV electrons, under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are analyzed by HPLC-UV. The number of damaged brominated trimers ranges from about 12 to 15 × 10(-3) molecules per incident electron, whereas under the identical conditions, these numbers drop to 4-7 × 10(-3) for the same, but nonbrominated oligonucleotides. The results of HPLC analysis show that the main degradation pathway of trinucleotides containing brominated bases involve debromination (i.e., loss of the bromine atom and its replacement with a hydrogen atom). The electron-induced sum of products upon bromination increases by factors of 2.1 for the pyrimidines and 3.2 for the purines. Thus, substitution of any native nucleobase with a brominated one in simple models of DNA increases LEE-induced damage to DNA and hence its radiosensitivity. Furthermore, besides the brominated pyrimidines that have already been tested in clinical trials, brominated purines not only appear to be promising sensitizers for radiotherapy, but could provide a higher degree of radiosensitization.

  20. Analysis of nicotine-induced DNA damage in cells of the human respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Stueber, Thomas; Friehs, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Hackenberg, Stephan; Richter, Elmar; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2012-01-01

    Epithelium of the upper and lower airways is a common origin of tobacco-related cancer. The main tobacco alkaloid nicotine may be associated with tumor progression. The potential of nicotine in inducing DNA mutations as a step towards cancer initiation is still controversially discussed. Different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are expressed in human nasal mucosa and a human bronchial cell line representing respiratory mucosa as a possible target for receptor-mediated pathways. In the present study, both cell systems were investigated with respect to DNA damage induced by nicotine and its mechanisms. Specimens of human nasal mucosa were harvested during surgery of the nasal air passage. After enzymatic digestion over night, single cells were exposed to an increasing nicotine concentration between 0.001 mM and 4.0mM. In a second step co-incubation was performed using the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine. DNA damage was assessed using the alkali version of the comet assay. Dose finding experiments for mecamylamine to evaluate the maximal inhibitory effect were performed in the human bronchial cell line BEAS-2B with an increasing mecamylamine concentration and a constant nicotine concentration. The influence of nicotine in the apoptotic pathway was evaluated in BEAS-2B cells with the TUNEL assay combined with flow cytometry. After 1h of nicotine exposure with 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 4.0mM, significant DNA damage was determined at 1.0mM. Further co-incubation experiments with mecamylamine and NAC were performed using 1.0mM of nicotine. The strongest inhibitory effect was measured at 1.0mM mecamylamine and this concentration was used for co-incubation. Both, the antioxidant NAC at a concentration of 1.0mM, based on the literature, as well as the receptor antagonist were capable of complete inhibition of the nicotine-induced DNA migration in the comet assay. A nicotine-induced increase or decrease in

  1. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY STYRENE OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple assay to detect DNA damage to calf thymus DNA caused by styrene oxide (SO) is reported. This assay is based on changes observed in the melting and annealing behavior of the damaged DNA. The melting annealing process was monitored using a fluorescence indicat...

  2. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the reported effects for exposure to many of the toxic industrial chemicals is DNA damage. The present study describes a simple, rapid and innovative assay to detect DNA damage resulting from exposure of surrogate DNA to toxic industrial chemicals (acrolein, allylamine, ch...

  3. Diphenylmethyl selenocyanate attenuates malachite green induced oxidative injury through antioxidation & inhibition of DNA damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayanta Kumar; Sarkar, Sibani; Hossain, Sk Ugir; Chakraborty, Pramita; Das, Rajat Kumar; Bhattacharya, Sudin

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Malachite green (MG), an environmentally hazardous material, is used as a non permitted food colouring agent, especially in India. Selenium (Se) is an essential nutritional trace element required for animals and humans to guard against oxidative stress induced by xenobiotic compounds of diverse nature. In the present study, the role of the selenium compound diphenylmethyl selenocyanate (DMSE) was assessed on the oxidative stress (OS) induced by a food colouring agent, malachite green (MG) in vivo in mice. Methods: Swiss albino mice (Mus musculus) were intraperitoneally injected with MG at a standardized dose of 100 μg/ mouse for 30 days. DMSE was given orally at an optimum dose of 3 mg/kg b.w. in pre (15 days) and concomitant treatment schedule throughout the experimental period. The parameters viz. ALT, AST, LPO, GSH, GST, SOD, CAT, GPx, TrxR, CA, MN, MI and DNA damage have been evaluated. Results: The DMSE showed its potential to protect against MG induced hepatotoxicity by controlling the serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate amino transferase (ALT and AST) levels and also ameliorated oxidative stress by modulating hepatic lipid peroxidation and different detoxifying and antioxidative enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and also the selenoenzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and reduced glutathione level which in turn reduced DNA damage. Interpretation & conclusions: The organo-selenium compound DMSE showed significant protection against MG induced heptotoxicity and DNA damage in murine model. Better protection was observed in pretreatment group than in the concomitant group. Further studies need to be done to understand the mechanism of action. PMID:23852297

  4. Firpronil induced spermotoxicity is associated with oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saleem; Jan, M H; Kumar, Dhirendra; Telang, A G

    2015-10-01

    The present study is the first to investigate and characterize the fipronil (FPN) induced spermotoxicity in male rats. Male rats were orally given FPN (2.5, 5.0 and 10 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Epididymal sperms were collected and remaining testis was processed for histopathological evaluation. FPN treatment significantly reduced sperm density, motility, viability and per cent intact acrosome along with concomitant increase in spermatozoa abnormalities. Exposure of FPN caused excessive ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential leading to apoptosis of spermatozoa in dose dependent manner. Higher FPN doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) markedly reduced the DNA integrity of spermatozoa. These data suggest that FPN causes male reproductive toxicity through oxidative stress induced DNA damage and apoptosis of spermatozoa.

  5. YAP activation protects urothelial cell carcinoma from treatment-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Ciamporcero, Eric; Shen, He; Ramakrishnan, Swathi; Ku, Sheng Yu; Chintala, Sreenivasulu; Shen, Li; Adelaiye, Remi; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Ullio, Chiara; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Daga, Martina; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Attwood, Kris; Johnson, Candace; Zhang, Jianmin; Barrera, Giuseppina; Pili, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Current standard of care for muscle-invasive urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is surgery along with perioperative platinum-based chemotherapy. UCC is sensitive to cisplatin-based regimens, but acquired resistance eventually occurs, and a subset of tumors is intrinsically resistant. Thus, there is an unmet need for new therapeutic approaches to target chemotherapy-resistant UCC. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator that has been associated with bladder cancer progression and cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. In contrast, YAP has been shown to induce DNA damage associated apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma. However, no data have been reported on the YAP role in UCC chemo-resistance. Thus, we have investigated the potential dichotomous role of YAP in UCC response to chemotherapy utilizing two patient-derived xenograft models recently established. Constitutive expression and activation of YAP inversely correlated with in vitro and in vivo cisplatin sensitivity. YAP overexpression protected while YAP knock-down sensitized UCC cells to chemotherapy and radiation effects via increased accumulation of DNA damage and apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacological YAP inhibition with verteporfin inhibited tumor cell proliferation and restored sensitivity to cisplatin. In addition, nuclear YAP expression was associated with poor outcome in UCC patients who received perioperative chemotherapy. In conclusion, these results suggest that YAP activation exerts a protective role and represents a pharmacological target to enhance the anti-tumor effects of DNA damaging modalities in the treatment of UCC. PMID:26119935

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Clustered DNA Damages Induced by Silicon Beams of Different Kinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman D. J.; Keszenman, D.J.; Bennett, P.V.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

    2013-05-14

    Humans may b exposed to highly energetic charged particle radiation as a result of medical treatments, occupational activitie or accidental events. In recent years, our increasing presence and burgeoning interest in space exploration beyond low Earth orbit has led to a large increase in the research of the biological effects ofcharged particle radiation typical of that encountered in the space radiation environment. The study of the effects of these types of radiation qualities in terms ofDNA damage induction and repair is fundamental to understand mechanisms both underlying their greater biological effectiveness as we)) as the short and long term risks of health effects such as carcinogenesis, degen rative diseases and premature aging. Charged particle radiation induces a variety of DNA alterations, notably bistranded clustered damages, defined as two or more closely-opposed strand break , oxidized bases or abasic sites within a few helical turns. The induction of such highly complex DNA damage enhances the probability of incorrect or incomplete repair and thus constitutes greater potential for genomic instability, cell death and transformation.

  7. Biosynthesis of Se nanoparticles and its effect on UV-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit; Patel, Hirnee; Patel, Tirtha; Patel, Khusbu; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports, an environmentally benign procedure of synthesis and characterizations of selenium nanoparticles and their protective effect against UV-induced DNA damage activities. An aqueous leaf extract of lemon plant was used as a precursor for synthesis of colloidal selenium nanoparticles. Resulting nanoparticles were characterized using UV-vis spectrophotometer, photoluminescence, TEM, EDAX, FT-IR and XRD, respectively. Selenium colloidal solution exhibited an absorption maximum at 395 nm and produced an emission maximum at 525 nm. Transmission electron microscopy followed by selected area electron diffraction pattern analysis indicated the formation of spherical, polydispersed, crystalline, selenium nanoparticles of diameter ranging from (∼60 to 80 nm). X-ray diffraction studies showed the formation of 111, 200 and 220 planes of face-centered cubic (fcc) selenium. EDAX analysis confirmed the presence of selenium in nanosphere. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic investigation reveled the involvement of carboxyl (−C=O), hydroxyl (−OH), amine (−NH) functional group of lemon plant extract in preparation of selenium nanoparticles. MTT assay as well single cell gel electrophoresis assay or comet assay revealed that synthesized selenium nanoparticles, caused less cell death of lymphocytes and prevented DNA damage, when cells were exposed to UVB. The fluorescent property of selenium nanoparticles can be used as diagnostic agent. Further, their anti DNA damaging property can be investigated as a chemotherapeutic agent in cancer therapy.

  8. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Foriş, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as μEq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co γ-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 μEq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with γ-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 μEq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 μEq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  9. Switch telomerase to ALT mechanism by inducing telomeric DNA damages and dysfunction of ATRX and DAXX.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Laichen; Li, Feng; Jiang, Yuanling; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Wenbin; Zhao, Yong; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2016-01-01

    Activation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is necessary for tumours to escape from dysfunctional telomere-mediated senescence. Anti-telomerase drugs might be effective in suppressing tumour growth in approximately 85-90% of telomerase-positive cancer cells. However, there are still chances for these cells to bypass drug treatment after switching to the ALT mechanism to maintain their telomere integrity. But the mechanism underlying this switch is unknown. In this study, we used telomerase-positive cancer cells (HTC75) to discover the mechanism of the telomerase-ALT switch by inducing telomere-specific DNA damage, alpha-thalassemia X-linked syndrome protein (ATRX) knockdown and deletion of death associated protein (DAXX). Surprisingly, two important ALT hallmarks in the ALT-like HTC75 cells were observed after treatments: ALT-associated promyelocytic leukaemia bodies (APBs) and extrachromosomal circular DNA of telomeric repeats. Moreover, knocking out hTERT by utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 technique led to telomere elongation in a telomerase-independent manner in ALT-like HTC75 cells. In summary, this is the first report to show that inducing telomeric DNA damage, disrupting the ATRX/DAXX complex and inhibiting telomerase activity in telomerase-positive cancer cells lead to the ALT switch. PMID:27578458

  10. Switch telomerase to ALT mechanism by inducing telomeric DNA damages and dysfunction of ATRX and DAXX

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Laichen; Li, Feng; Jiang, Yuanling; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Wenbin; Zhao, Yong; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2016-01-01

    Activation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is necessary for tumours to escape from dysfunctional telomere-mediated senescence. Anti-telomerase drugs might be effective in suppressing tumour growth in approximately 85–90% of telomerase-positive cancer cells. However, there are still chances for these cells to bypass drug treatment after switching to the ALT mechanism to maintain their telomere integrity. But the mechanism underlying this switch is unknown. In this study, we used telomerase-positive cancer cells (HTC75) to discover the mechanism of the telomerase-ALT switch by inducing telomere-specific DNA damage, alpha-thalassemia X-linked syndrome protein (ATRX) knockdown and deletion of death associated protein (DAXX). Surprisingly, two important ALT hallmarks in the ALT-like HTC75 cells were observed after treatments: ALT-associated promyelocytic leukaemia bodies (APBs) and extrachromosomal circular DNA of telomeric repeats. Moreover, knocking out hTERT by utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 technique led to telomere elongation in a telomerase-independent manner in ALT-like HTC75 cells. In summary, this is the first report to show that inducing telomeric DNA damage, disrupting the ATRX/DAXX complex and inhibiting telomerase activity in telomerase-positive cancer cells lead to the ALT switch. PMID:27578458

  11. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by imidacloprid exposure in the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Guangchi; Zhu, Lusheng; Wang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the soil ecological effect of imidacloprid, earthworm Eisenia fetida was exposed to various concentrations of imidacloprid (0.10, 0.50, and 1.00 mg kg(-1) soil) respectively after 7, 14, 21, and 28 d. The effect of imidacloprid on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, antioxidant enzymes activity [superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST)], malondialdehyde (MDA) content and DNA damage of the E. fetida was investigated. Significant increase of the ROS level was observed. The SOD and GST activity were significantly induced at most exposure intervals. CAT activity was inhibited and reflected a dose-dependent relationship on days 7, 14 and 21. High MDA levels were observed and the olive tail moment (OTM) as well as the percentage of DNA in the comet tail (tail DNA%) in comet assay declined with increasing concentrations and exposure time after 7 d. Our results suggested that the sub-chronic exposure of imidacloprid caused DNA damage and lipid peroxidation (LPO) leading to antioxidant responses in earthworm E. fetida.

  12. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by imidacloprid exposure in the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Guangchi; Zhu, Lusheng; Wang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the soil ecological effect of imidacloprid, earthworm Eisenia fetida was exposed to various concentrations of imidacloprid (0.10, 0.50, and 1.00 mg kg(-1) soil) respectively after 7, 14, 21, and 28 d. The effect of imidacloprid on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, antioxidant enzymes activity [superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST)], malondialdehyde (MDA) content and DNA damage of the E. fetida was investigated. Significant increase of the ROS level was observed. The SOD and GST activity were significantly induced at most exposure intervals. CAT activity was inhibited and reflected a dose-dependent relationship on days 7, 14 and 21. High MDA levels were observed and the olive tail moment (OTM) as well as the percentage of DNA in the comet tail (tail DNA%) in comet assay declined with increasing concentrations and exposure time after 7 d. Our results suggested that the sub-chronic exposure of imidacloprid caused DNA damage and lipid peroxidation (LPO) leading to antioxidant responses in earthworm E. fetida. PMID:26397468

  13. Methoxychlor and estradiol induce oxidative stress DNA damage in the mouse ovarian surface epithelium.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Daniel A; Merchenthaler, Istvan; Flaws, Jodi A

    2008-09-01

    Estrogenic compounds such as 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) and methoxychlor (MXC) induce oxidative stress damage in breast cells and mouse ovarian follicles, respectively. However, little is known about whether estrogenic compounds cause oxidative stress in the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that E(2) and MXC cause oxidative stress in the OSE. To test this hypothesis, we employed an improved mouse tissue culture assay in which OSE cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; positive control), MXC, or E(2) +/- the anti-oxidant vitamin E, or progesterone. The cells then were subjected to a novel direct immunofluorescent assay in which cells in the microtiter plate were reacted with antibodies that detect oxidative damage to DNA (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine). The signal was identified with a tyramide Alexa Fluor fluorescent probe and quantified by microfluorimetry. Correction for cellularity was carried out for each well with a fluorescent DNA dye system (CyQuant) at a different wavelength. After 24 h, the mean Alexa Fluor CyQuant ratio was 11.3 +/- 0.9 for controls, 132 +/- 15 for H2O2 treated positive control cells (p < or = 0.01 from control), 105 +/- 6.6 for E(2) treated cells (p < or = 0.01 from control), and 64 +/- 5.1 for MXC-treated cells (p < or = 0.01 from control). After 72 h, the mean ratio was 121 +/- 10.6 for controls, 391 +/- 23 for H2O2 treated cells (p < or = 0.01 from control), 200 +/- 15 for E(2) treated cells (p < or = 0.03), and 228 +/- 21 for MXC-treated cells (p < or = 0.01). Further, vitamin E, but not progesterone, protected OSE cells from E(2)- and MXC-induced oxidative damage. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct immunofluorescent quantitation of DNA adducts in cell cultures without DNA extraction. Moreover, these data indicate that E(2) and MXC produce oxidative DNA damage in the OSE, and that this damage is prevented by the anti-oxidant vitamin E.

  14. 6-Hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharides induced DNA damage in astrocytes: involvement of nitric oxide and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonam; Goswami, Poonam; Biswas, Joyshree; Joshi, Neeraj; Sharma, Sharad; Nath, C; Singh, Sarika

    2015-01-15

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of the neurotoxins 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide on astrocytes. Rat astrocyte C6 cells were treated with different concentration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS) for 24 h. Both neurotoxins significantly decreased the viability of astrocytes, augmented the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the astrocyte marker--glial fibrillar acidic protein. A significantly decreased mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, caspase-3 mRNA level, chromatin condensation and DNA damage was observed in 6-OHDA/LPS treated astroglial cells. 6-OHDA/LPS treatment also caused the significantly increased expression of iNOS and nitrite level. Findings showed that 6-OHDA/LPS treatment caused mitochondrial dysfunction mediated death of astrocytes, which significantly involve the nitric oxide. Since we have observed significantly increased level of iNOS along with mitochondrial impairment and apoptotic cell death in astrocytes, therefore to validate the role of iNOS, the cells were co-treated with iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG, 100 μM). Co-treatment of AG significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA/LPS induced cell death, mitochondrial activity, augmented ROS level, chromatin condensation and DNA damage. GFAP and caspase-3 expression were also inhibited with co-treatment of AG, although the extent of inhibition was different in both experimental sets. In conclusion, the findings showed that iNOS mediated increased level of nitric oxide acts as a key regulatory molecule in 6-OHDA/LPS induced mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage and apoptotic death of astrocytes.

  15. XPD-dependent activation of apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik Tiwari, Meetu; Rogers, Faye A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA sequences capable of forming triplexes are prevalent in the human genome and have been found to be intrinsically mutagenic. Consequently, a balance between DNA repair and apoptosis is critical to counteract their effect on genomic integrity. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotides to synthetically create altered helical distortions, we have determined that pro-apoptotic pathways are activated by the formation of triplex structures. Moreover, the TFIIH factor, XPD, occupies a central role in triggering apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA strand breaks. Here, we show that triplexes are capable of inducing XPD-independent double strand breaks, which result in the formation of γH2AX foci. XPD was subsequently recruited to the triplex-induced double strand breaks and co-localized with γH2AX at the damage site. Furthermore, phosphorylation of H2AX tyrosine 142 was found to stimulate the signaling pathway of XPD-dependent apoptosis. We suggest that this mechanism may play an active role in minimizing genomic instability induced by naturally occurring noncanonical structures, perhaps protecting against cancer initiation. PMID:23913414

  16. Genoprotective effect of hyaluronic acid against benzalkonium chloride-induced DNA damage in human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Changjun; Wu, Yihua; Xie, Jiajun; Jin, Xiuming; Yang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate hyaluronic acid (HA) protection on cultured human corneal epithelial cells (HCEs) against benzalkonium chloride (BAC)-induced DNA damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase. Methods Cells were incubated with different concentrations of BAC with or without the presence of 0.2% HA for 30 min. DNA damage to HCEs was examined by alkaline comet assay and by immunofluorescence microscopic detection of the phosphorylated form of histone variant H2AX (γH2AX) foci. ROS production was assessed by the fluorescent probe, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Cell apoptosis was determined with annexin V staining by flow cytometry. Results HA significantly reduced BAC-induced DNA damage as indicated by the tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM) of alkaline comet assay and by γH2AX foci formation, respectively. Moreover, HA significantly decreased BAC-induced ROS increase and cell apoptosis. However, exposure to HA alone did not produce any significant change in DNA damage, ROS generation, or cell apoptosis. Conclusions BAC could induce DNA damage and cell apoptosis in HCEs, probably through increasing oxidative stress. Furthermore, HA was an effective protective agent that had antioxidant properties and could decrease DNA damage and cell apoptosis induced by BAC. PMID:22219631

  17. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  18. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Yume; Tada, Shusuke; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi

    2014-09-12

    WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH(-/-)) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  19. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Yume; Tada, Shusuke; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • The UV sensitivity of POLH{sup −/−} cells was suppressed by disruption of WRNIP1. • In WRNIP1{sup −/−/−}/POLH{sup −/−} cells, mutation frequencies and SCE after irradiation reduced. • WRNIP1 defect recovered rate of fork progression after irradiation in POLH{sup −/−} cells. • WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the translesion DNA synthesis pathway. - Abstract: WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH{sup −/−}) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  20. Low levels of methylmercury induce DNA damage in rats: protective effects of selenium.

    PubMed

    Grotto, Denise; Barcelos, Gustavo R M; Valentini, Juliana; Antunes, Lusânia M G; Angeli, José Pedro F; Garcia, Solange C; Barbosa, Fernando

    2009-03-01

    In this study we examined the possible antigenotoxic effect of selenium (Se) in rats chronically exposed to low levels of methylmercury (MeHg) and the association between glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and DNA lesions (via comet assay) in the same exposed animals. Rats were divided into six groups as follows: (Group I) received water; (Group II) received MeHg (100 mug/day); (Group III) received Se (2 mg/L drinking water); (Group IV) received Se (6 mg/L drinking water); (Group V) received MeHg (100 mug/day) and Se (2 mg/L drinking water); (Group VI) received MeHg (100 mug/day) and Se (6 mg/L drinking water). Total treatment time was 100 days. GSH-Px activity was determined spectrophotometrically and DNA damage was determined by comet assay. Mean GSH-Px activity in groups I, II, III, IV, V and VI were, respectively: 40.19 +/- 17.21; 23.63 +/- 6.04; 42.64 +/- 5.70; 38.50 +/- 7.15; 34.54 +/- 6.18 and 41.39 +/- 11.67 nmolNADPH/min/gHb. DNA damage was represented by a mean score from 0 to 300; the results for groups I, II, III, IV, V and VI were, respectively: 6.87 +/- 3.27; 124.12 +/- 13.74; 10.62 +/- 3.81; 13.25 +/- 1.76; 86.87 +/- 11.95 and 76.25 +/- 7.48. There was a significant inhibition of GSH-Px activity in group II compared with group I (P < 0.05). Groups V and VI did not show a difference in enzyme activity compared with groups III and IV, showing the possible protective action of Se. Comet assay presented a significant difference in DNA migration between group II and group I (P < 0.0001). Groups V and VI showed a significant reduction in MeHg-induced genotoxicity (P < 0.001) when compared with group II. A negative correlation (r = -0.559, P < 0.05) was found between GSH-Px activity and DNA lesion, showing that the greater the DNA damage, the lower the GSH-Px activity. Our findings demonstrated the oxidative and genotoxic properties of MeHg, even at low doses. Moreover, Se co-administration reestablished GSH-Px activity and reduced DNA damage.

  1. Hsp90 induces increased genomic instability toward DNA-damaging agents by tuning down RAD53 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Nidhi; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal K.; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda

    2016-01-01

    It is well documented that elevated body temperature causes tumors to regress upon radiotherapy. However, how hyperthermia induces DNA damage sensitivity is not clear. We show that a transient heat shock and particularly the concomitant induction of Hsp90 lead to increased genomic instability under DNA-damaging conditions. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote, we demonstrate that elevated levels of Hsp90 attenuate efficient DNA damage signaling and dictate preferential use of the potentially mutagenic double-strand break repair pathway. We show that under normal physiological conditions, Hsp90 negatively regulates RAD53 transcription to suppress DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, under DNA damaging conditions, RAD53 is derepressed, and the increased level of Rad53p triggers an efficient DNA damage response. A higher abundance of Hsp90 causes increased transcriptional repression on RAD53 in a dose-dependent manner, which could not be fully derepressed even in the presence of DNA damage. Accordingly, cells behave like a rad53 loss-of-function mutant and show reduced NHEJ efficiency, with a drastic failure to up-regulate RAD51 expression and manifestly faster accumulation of CLN1 and CLN2 in DNA-damaged G1, cells leading to premature release from checkpoint arrest. We further demonstrate that Rad53 overexpression is able to rescue all of the aforementioned deleterious effects caused by Hsp90 overproduction. PMID:27307581

  2. DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damage can occur at any time on any genomic location, a specialized spatio-temporal orchestration of this defense apparatus is required. PMID:20980439

  3. Effects of melatonin on DNA damage induced by cyclophosphamide in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, S.G.; Peliciari-Garcia, R.A.; Takahashi-Hyodo, S.A.; Rodrigues, A.C.; Amaral, F.G.; Berra, C.M.; Bordin, S.; Curi, R.; Cipolla-Neto, J.

    2013-01-01

    The antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties of melatonin have been well described in the literature. In this study, our objective was to determine the protective effect of the pineal gland hormone against the DNA damage induced by cyclophosphamide (CP), an anti-tumor agent that is widely applied in clinical practice. DNA damage was induced in rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of CP (20 or 50 mg/kg). Animals received melatonin during the dark period for 15 days (1 mg/kg in the drinking water). Rat bone marrow cells were used for the determination of chromosomal aberrations and of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase enzyme (Fpg)-sensitive sites by the comet technique and of Xpf mRNA expression by qRT-PCR. The number (mean ± SE) of chromosomal aberrations in pinealectomized (PINX) animals treated with melatonin and CP (2.50 ± 0.50/100 cells) was lower than that obtained for PINX animals injected with CP (12 ± 1.8/100 cells), thus showing a reduction of 85.8% in the number of chromosomal aberrations. This melatonin-mediated protection was also observed when oxidative lesions were analyzed by the Fpg-sensitive assay, both 24 and 48 h after CP administration. The expression of Xpf mRNA, which is involved in the DNA nucleotide excision repair machinery, was up-regulated by melatonin. The results indicate that melatonin is able to protect bone marrow cells by completely blocking CP-induced chromosome aberrations. Therefore, melatonin administration could be an alternative and effective treatment during chemotherapy. PMID:23471360

  4. Prion-induced neurotoxicity: Possible role for cell cycle activity and DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Bujdoso, Raymond; Landgraf, Matthias; Jackson, Walker S; Thackray, Alana M

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases arise through neurotoxicity induced by aggregation of host proteins. These conditions include Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, motor neuron disease, tauopathies and prion diseases. Collectively, these conditions are a challenge to society because of the increasing aged population and through the real threat to human food security by animal prion diseases. It is therefore important to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie protein misfolding-induced neurotoxicity as this will form the basis for designing strategies to alleviate their burden. Prion diseases are an important paradigm for neurodegenerative conditions in general since several of these maladies have now been shown to display prion-like phenomena. Increasingly, cell cycle activity and the DNA damage response are recognised as cellular events that participate in the neurotoxic process of various neurodegenerative diseases, and their associated animal models, which suggests they are truly involved in the pathogenic process and are not merely epiphenomena. Here we review the role of cell cycle activity and the DNA damage response in neurodegeneration associated with protein misfolding diseases, and suggest that these events contribute towards prion-induced neurotoxicity. In doing so, we highlight PrP transgenic Drosophila as a tractable model for the genetic analysis of transmissible mammalian prion disease. PMID:26279981

  5. Enhanced susceptibility of ovaries from obese mice to 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Nteeba, Jackson Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-12-01

    7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) depletes ovarian follicles and induces DNA damage in extra-ovarian tissues, thus, we investigated ovarian DMBA-induced DNA damage. Additionally, since obesity is associated with increased offspring birth defect incidence, we hypothesized that a DMBA-induced DNA damage response (DDR) is compromised in ovaries from obese females. Wild type (lean) non agouti (a/a) and KK.Cg-Ay/J heterozygote (obese) mice were dosed with sesame oil or DMBA (1 mg/kg; intraperitoneal injection) at 18 weeks of age, for 14 days. Total ovarian RNA and protein were isolated and abundance of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm), X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 6 (Xrcc6), breast cancer type 1 (Brca1), Rad 51 homolog (Rad51), poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (Parp1) and protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide (Prkdc) were quantified by RT-PCR or Western blot. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) level was determined by Western blotting. Obesity decreased (P < 0.05) basal protein abundance of PRKDC and BRCA1 proteins but increased (P < 0.05) γH2AX and PARP1 proteins. Ovarian ATM, XRCC6, PRKDC, RAD51 and PARP1 proteins were increased (P < 0.05) by DMBA exposure in lean mice. A blunted DMBA-induced increase (P < 0.05) in XRCC6, PRKDC, RAD51 and BRCA1 was observed in ovaries from obese mice, relative to lean counterparts. Taken together, DMBA exposure induced γH2AX as well as the ovarian DDR, supporting that DMBA causes ovarian DNA damage. Additionally, ovarian DDR was partially attenuated in obese females raising concern that obesity may be an additive factor during chemical-induced ovotoxicity. - Highlights: • DMBA induces markers of ovarian DNA damage. • Obesity induces low level ovarian DNA damage. • DMBA-induced DNA repair response is altered by obesity.

  6. Role of platinum DNA damage-induced transcriptional inhibition in chemotherapy-induced neuronal atrophy and peripheral neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Johnson J; Ip, Virginia; Jamieson, Stephen M F; McKeage, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause peripheral neurotoxicity by damaging sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. The roles of platinum DNA binding, transcription inhibition and altered cell size were investigated in primary cultures of rat DRG cells. Click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging of RNA-incorporated 5-ethynyluridine showed high, but wide ranging, global levels of transcription in individual neurons that correlated with their cell body size. Treatment with platinum drugs reduced neuronal transcription and cell body size to an extent that corresponded to the amount of preceding platinum DNA binding, but without any loss of neuronal cells. The effects of platinum drugs on neuronal transcription and cell body size were inhibited by blocking platinum DNA binding with sodium thiosulfate, and mimicked by treatment with a model transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D. In vivo oxaliplatin treatment depleted the total RNA content of DRG tissue concurrently with altering DRG neuronal size. These findings point to a mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. DRG neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this mechanism of toxicity because of their requirements for high basal levels of global transcriptional activity. Findings point to a new stepwise mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. Dorsal root ganglion neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this neurotoxicity because of their high global transcriptional outputs, demonstrated in this study by click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging.

  7. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 µg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by foci and pattern counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (?-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average foci counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profile of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in ?-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not significantly affect

  8. XPC is essential for nucleotide excision repair of zidovudine-induced DNA damage in human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qiangen; Beland, Frederick A.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Fang Jialong

    2011-03-01

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-dexoythymidine, AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, can be incorporated into DNA and cause DNA damage. The mechanisms underlying the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage are unknown. To investigate the pathways involved in the recognition and repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, human hepatoma HepG2 cells were incubated with AZT for 2 weeks and the expression of DNA damage signaling pathways was determined using a pathway-based real-time PCR array. Compared to control cultures, damaged DNA binding and nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways showed significantly increased gene expression. Further analysis indicated that AZT treatment increased the expression of genes associated with NER, including XPC, XPA, RPA1, GTF2H1, and ERCC1. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of XPC and GTF2H1 were also significantly up-regulated. To explore further the function of XPC in the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, XPC expression was stably knocked down by 71% using short hairpin RNA interference. In the XPC knocked-down cells, 100 {mu}M AZT treatment significantly increased [{sup 3}H]AZT incorporation into DNA, decreased the total number of viable cells, increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase, induced apoptosis, and caused a more extensive G2/M cell cycle arrest when compared to non-transfected HepG2 cells or HepG2 cells transfected with a scrambled short hairpin RNA sequence. Overall, these data indicate that XPC plays an essential role in the NER repair of AZT-induced DNA damage.

  9. Levetiracetam mitigates doxorubicin-induced DNA and synaptic damage in neurons.

    PubMed

    Manchon, Jose Felix Moruno; Dabaghian, Yuri; Uzor, Ndidi-Ese; Kesler, Shelli R; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Tsvetkov, Andrey S

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity may occur in cancer patients and survivors during or after chemotherapy. Cognitive deficits associated with neurotoxicity can be subtle or disabling and frequently include disturbances in memory, attention, executive function and processing speed. Searching for pathways altered by anti-cancer treatments in cultured primary neurons, we discovered that doxorubicin, a commonly used anti-neoplastic drug, significantly decreased neuronal survival. The drug promoted the formation of DNA double-strand breaks in primary neurons and reduced synaptic and neurite density. Pretreatment of neurons with levetiracetam, an FDA-approved anti-epileptic drug, enhanced survival of chemotherapy drug-treated neurons, reduced doxorubicin-induced formation of DNA double-strand breaks, and mitigated synaptic and neurite loss. Thus, levetiracetam might be part of a valuable new approach for mitigating synaptic damage and, perhaps, for treating cognitive disturbances in cancer patients and survivors. PMID:27168474

  10. Levetiracetam mitigates doxorubicin-induced DNA and synaptic damage in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Manchon, Jose Felix Moruno; Dabaghian, Yuri; Uzor, Ndidi-Ese; Kesler, Shelli R.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.; Tsvetkov, Andrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity may occur in cancer patients and survivors during or after chemotherapy. Cognitive deficits associated with neurotoxicity can be subtle or disabling and frequently include disturbances in memory, attention, executive function and processing speed. Searching for pathways altered by anti-cancer treatments in cultured primary neurons, we discovered that doxorubicin, a commonly used anti-neoplastic drug, significantly decreased neuronal survival. The drug promoted the formation of DNA double-strand breaks in primary neurons and reduced synaptic and neurite density. Pretreatment of neurons with levetiracetam, an FDA-approved anti-epileptic drug, enhanced survival of chemotherapy drug-treated neurons, reduced doxorubicin-induced formation of DNA double-strand breaks, and mitigated synaptic and neurite loss. Thus, levetiracetam might be part of a valuable new approach for mitigating synaptic damage and, perhaps, for treating cognitive disturbances in cancer patients and survivors. PMID:27168474

  11. Trivalent arsenicals induce lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and oxidative DNA damage in human urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Cheng; Jan, Kun-Yan; Wang, Alexander S S; Gurr, Jia-Ran

    2007-02-01

    Drinking arsenic-contaminated water is associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. Arsenate (iAs(V)), arsenite (iAs(III)), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) have all been detected in the urine of people who drink arsenic-contaminated water. The aim of this research was to investigate which of these arsenicals are more hazardous to human urothelial cells. The results indicate that iAs(III), MMA(III), and DMA(III) were more potent in inducing cytotoxicity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, oxidative DNA damage, nitric oxide, superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and cellular free iron than MMA(V), DMA(V), and iAs(V) in human urothelial carcinoma and transformed cells. However, the results did not show convincingly that the trivalent arsenicals were more potent than pentavalent arsenicals in decreasing the intracellular contents of total thiol, protein thiol, and reduced glutathione. Induction of oxidative DNA damage was observed with 0.2 microM of iAs(III), MMA(III), or DMA(III) as early as 1h. Because of its high oxidative damage, higher proportion in urine, and lower cytotoxicity, DMA(III) may be the most hazardous arsenical to human urothelial cells.

  12. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY RADIATION, CHEMICAL MUTAGENS AND ENZYMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid assay to detect DNA damage is reported. This novel assay is based on changes in melting/annealing behavior and facilitated using certain dyes that increase their fluorescence upon association with double stranded (ds)DNA. Damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) ra...

  13. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE: INDUCED BY RADIATION, CHEMICALS AND ENZYMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid assay to detect DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on the ability of certain dyes to fluoresce upon intercalation with dsDNA. Damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, chemicals or restriction enzymes is detected using this assay. UV radiation at...

  14. Formation, Accumulation, and Hydrolysis of Endogenous and Exogenous Formaldehyde-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Hartwell, Hadley J; Moeller, Benjamin C; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Kracko, Dean; Bodnar, Wanda M; Starr, Thomas B; Swenberg, James A

    2015-07-01

    Formaldehyde is not only a widely used chemical with well-known carcinogenicity but is also a normal metabolite of living cells. It thus poses unique challenges for understanding risks associated with exposure. N(2-)hydroxymethyl-dG (N(2)-HOMe-dG) is the main formaldehyde-induced DNA mono-adduct, which together with DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) and toxicity-induced cell proliferation, play important roles in a mutagenic mode of action for cancer. In this study, N(2)-HOMe-dG was shown to be an excellent biomarker for direct adduction of formaldehyde to DNA and the hydrolysis of DPCs. The use of inhaled [(13)CD2]-formaldehyde exposures of rats and primates coupled with ultrasensitive nano ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry permitted accurate determinations of endogenous and exogenous formaldehyde DNA damage. The results show that inhaled formaldehyde only reached rat and monkey noses, but not tissues distant to the site of initial contact. The amounts of exogenous adducts were remarkably lower than those of endogenous adducts in exposed nasal epithelium. Moreover, exogenous adducts accumulated in rat nasal epithelium over the 28-days exposure to reach steady-state concentrations, followed by elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 7.1 days. Additionally, we examined artifact formation during DNA preparation to ensure the accuracy of nonlabeled N(2)-HOMe-dG measurements. These novel findings provide critical new data for understanding major issues identified by the National Research Council Review of the 2010 Environmental Protection Agency's Draft Integrated Risk Information System Formaldehyde Risk Assessment. They support a data-driven need for reflection on whether risks have been overestimated for inhaled formaldehyde, whereas underappreciating endogenous formaldehyde as the primary source of exposure that results in bone marrow toxicity and leukemia in susceptible humans and rodents deficient in DNA repair.

  15. Formation, Accumulation, and Hydrolysis of Endogenous and Exogenous Formaldehyde-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Hartwell, Hadley J.; Moeller, Benjamin C.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Kracko, Dean; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Starr, Thomas B.; Swenberg, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is not only a widely used chemical with well-known carcinogenicity but is also a normal metabolite of living cells. It thus poses unique challenges for understanding risks associated with exposure. N2-hydroxymethyl-dG (N2-HOMe-dG) is the main formaldehyde-induced DNA mono-adduct, which together with DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) and toxicity-induced cell proliferation, play important roles in a mutagenic mode of action for cancer. In this study, N2-HOMe-dG was shown to be an excellent biomarker for direct adduction of formaldehyde to DNA and the hydrolysis of DPCs. The use of inhaled [13CD2]-formaldehyde exposures of rats and primates coupled with ultrasensitive nano ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry permitted accurate determinations of endogenous and exogenous formaldehyde DNA damage. The results show that inhaled formaldehyde only reached rat and monkey noses, but not tissues distant to the site of initial contact. The amounts of exogenous adducts were remarkably lower than those of endogenous adducts in exposed nasal epithelium. Moreover, exogenous adducts accumulated in rat nasal epithelium over the 28-days exposure to reach steady-state concentrations, followed by elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 7.1 days. Additionally, we examined artifact formation during DNA preparation to ensure the accuracy of nonlabeled N2-HOMe-dG measurements. These novel findings provide critical new data for understanding major issues identified by the National Research Council Review of the 2010 Environmental Protection Agency’s Draft Integrated Risk Information System Formaldehyde Risk Assessment. They support a data-driven need for reflection on whether risks have been overestimated for inhaled formaldehyde, whereas underappreciating endogenous formaldehyde as the primary source of exposure that results in bone marrow toxicity and leukemia in susceptible humans and rodents deficient in DNA repair. PMID:25904104

  16. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  17. DNA Damage-Induced Cell Cycle Regulation and Function of Novel Chk2 Phosphoresidues▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Buscemi, Giacomo; Carlessi, Luigi; Zannini, Laura; Lisanti, Sofia; Fontanella, Enrico; Canevari, Silvana; Delia, Domenico

    2006-01-01

    Chk2 kinase is activated by DNA damage to regulate cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Phosphorylation of Chk2 in vivo by ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) on threonine 68 (T68) initiates a phosphorylation cascade that promotes the full activity of Chk2. We identified three serine residues (S19, S33, and S35) on Chk2 that became phosphorylated in vivo rapidly and exclusively in response to ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks in an ATM- and Nbs1-dependent but ataxia telangiectasia- and Rad3-related-independent manner. Phosphorylation of these residues, restricted to the G1 phase of the cell cycle, was induced by a higher dose of IR (>1 Gy) than that required for phosphorylation of T68 (0.25 Gy) and declined by 45 to 90 min, concomitant with a rise in Chk2 autophosphorylation. Compared to the wild-type form, Chk2 with alanine substitutions at S19, S33, and S35 (Chk2S3A) showed impaired dimerization, defective auto- and trans-phosphorylation activities, and reduced ability to promote degradation of Hdmx, a phosphorylation target of Chk2 and regulator of p53 activity. Besides, Chk2S3A failed to inhibit cell growth and, in response to IR, to arrest G1/S progression. These findings underscore the critical roles of S19, S33, and S35 and argue that these phosphoresidues may serve to fine-tune the ATM-dependent response of Chk2 to increasing amounts of DNA damage. PMID:16940182

  18. Biomolecular damage induced by ionizing radiation: the direct and indirect effects of low-energy electrons on DNA.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Orlando, Thomas M; Sanche, Léon

    2015-04-01

    Many experimental and theoretical advances have recently allowed the study of direct and indirect effects of low-energy electrons (LEEs) on DNA damage. In an effort to explain how LEEs damage the human genome, researchers have focused efforts on LEE interactions with bacterial plasmids, DNA bases, sugar analogs, phosphate groups, and longer DNA moieties. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved in LEE-induced damage of DNA and complex biomolecule films. Results obtained by several laboratories on films prepared and analyzed by different methods and irradiated with different electron-beam current densities and fluencies are presented. Despite varied conditions (e.g., film thicknesses and morphologies, intrinsic water content, substrate interactions, and extrinsic atmospheric compositions), comparisons show a striking resemblance in the types of damage produced and their yield functions. The potential of controlling this damage using molecular and nanoparticle targets with high LEE yields in targeted radiation-based cancer therapies is also discussed.

  19. Biomolecular Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation: The Direct and Indirect Effects of Low-Energy Electrons on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Orlando, Thomas M.; Sanche, Léon

    2015-04-01

    Many experimental and theoretical advances have recently allowed the study of direct and indirect effects of low-energy electrons (LEEs) on DNA damage. In an effort to explain how LEEs damage the human genome, researchers have focused efforts on LEE interactions with bacterial plasmids, DNA bases, sugar analogs, phosphate groups, and longer DNA moieties. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved in LEE-induced damage of DNA and complex biomolecule films. Results obtained by several laboratories on films prepared and analyzed by different methods and irradiated with different electron-beam current densities and fluencies are presented. Despite varied conditions (e.g., film thicknesses and morphologies, intrinsic water content, substrate interactions, and extrinsic atmospheric compositions), comparisons show a striking resemblance in the types of damage produced and their yield functions. The potential of controlling this damage using molecular and nanoparticle targets with high LEE yields in targeted radiation-based cancer therapies is also discussed.

  20. Oxidative damage of DNA induced by X-irradiation decreases the uterine endometrial receptivity which involves mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Liang, Jin-Xiao; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Chang; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Yan, Qiu

    2015-01-01

    X irradiation may lead to female infertility and the mechanism is still not clear. After X irradiation exposure, significantly morphological changes and functional decline in endometrial epithelial cells were observed. The mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction and oxidative DNA damage were noticed after X irradiation. In addition, pretreatment with NAC, NH4Cl or Pep A reduced the X irradiation induced damages. These studies demonstrate that the oxidative DNA damage which involved dysfunctional lysosomal and mitochondrial contribute to X irradiation-induced impaired receptive state of uterine endometrium and proper protective reagents can be helpful in improving endometrial function. PMID:26064230

  1. DDB2 association with PCNA is required for its degradation after UV-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cazzalini, Ornella; Perucca, Paola; Mocchi, Roberto; Sommatis, Sabrina; Prosperi, Ennio; Stivala, Lucia Anna

    2014-01-01

    DDB2 is a protein playing an essential role in the lesion recognition step of the global genome sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) process. Among the proteins involved in the DNA damage response, p21(CDKN1A) (p21) has been reported to participate in NER, but also to be removed by proteolytic degradation, thanks to its association with PCNA. DDB2 is involved in the CUL4-DDB1 complex mediating p21 degradation; however, the direct interaction between DDB2, p21 and PCNA has been never investigated. Here, we show that DDB2 co-localizes with PCNA and p21 at local UV-induced DNA-damage sites, and these proteins co-immunoprecipitate in the same complex. In addition, we provide evidence that p21 is not able to bind directly DDB2, but, to this end, the presence of PCNA is required. Direct physical association of recombinant DDB2 protein with PCNA is mediated by a conserved PIP-box present in the N-terminal region of DDB2. Mutation of the PIP-box resulted in the loss of protein interaction. Interestingly, the same mutation, or depletion of PCNA by RNA interference, greatly impaired DDB2 degradation induced by UV irradiation. These results indicate that DDB2 is a PCNA-binding protein, and that this association is required for DDB2 proteolytic degradation.

  2. Cytoplasmic localization of p21 protects trophoblast giant cells from DNA damage induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    de Renty, Christelle; DePamphilis, Melvin L; Ullah, Zakir

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) can differentiate into nonproliferating but viable trophoblast giant cells (TGCs) that are resistant to DNA damage induced apoptosis. Differentiation is associated with selective up-regulation of the Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p57 and p21; expression of p27 remains constant. Previous studies showed that p57 localizes to the nucleus in TGCs where it is essential for endoreplication. Here we show that p27 also remains localized to the nucleus during TSC differentiation where it complements the role of p57. Unexpectedly, p21 localized to the cytoplasm where it was maintained throughout both the G- and S-phases of endocycles, and where it prevented DNA damage induced apoptosis. This unusual status for a Cip/Kip protein was dependent on site-specific phosphorylation of p21 by the Akt1 kinase that is also up-regulated in TGCs. Although cytoplasmic p21 is widespread among cancer cells, among normal cells it has been observed only in monocytes. The fact that it also occurs in TGCs reveals that p57 and p21 serve nonredundant functions, and suggests that the role of p21 in suppressing apoptosis is restricted to terminally differentiated cells.

  3. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  4. Isoliquiritigenin induces G2 and M phase arrest by inducing DNA damage and by inhibiting the metaphase/anaphase transition.

    PubMed

    Park, Iha; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2009-05-18

    Isoliquiritigenin, a natural flavonoid found in licorice, shallots, and bean sprouts, has been demonstrated to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells. We attempted to ascertain the underlying mechanism by which isoliquiritigenin induced cell cycle arrest and cytotoxicity in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. Isoliquiritigenin treatment arrested cells in both G2 and M phase. The cells arrested in interphase (G2) showed markers for DNA damage including the formation of gamma-H2AX foci and the phosphorylation of ATM and Chk2, whereas the cells arrested in M phase evidenced separate poles and mitotic metaphase-like spindles with partially unaligned chromosomes. The induction of DNA damage and blockade at the metaphase/anaphase transition implied that isoliquiritigenin might function as a topoisomerase II poison, which was further demonstrated via an in vitro topoisomerase II inhibition assay. These results show that isoliquiritigenin inhibits topoiosmerase II activity, and the resultant DNA damage and arrest in mitotic metaphase-like stage contributes to the antiproliferative effects of isoliquiritigenin. PMID:19167809

  5. In vivo antigenotoxic activity of watercress juice (Nasturtium officinale) against induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Natalia A; Ariagno, Julia I; López Nigro, Marcela M; Mendeluk, Gabriela R; de los A Gette, María; Petenatti, Elisa; Palaoro, Luis A; Carballo, Marta A

    2013-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the genotoxicity as well as possible protective activity against damage induced by cyclophosphamide (CP) of the aqueous juice of watercress (Nasturtium officinale, W.T. Aiton) in vivo. Male and female Swiss mice 7-8 weeks old (N = 48) were treated by gavage with 1 g kg(-1) body weight and 0.5 g kg(-1) body weight of watercress juice during 15 consecutive days. Genotoxicity and its possible protective effect were tested by the comet assay in peripheral blood cells and the micronucleus test in bone marrow. In addition, biopsies of the bladder, epididymis and testicles of mice were performed to extend the experimental design. Watercress juice per se did not induce genetic damage according to the comet assay and micronucleus study, exhibiting a protective activity against CP (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). The comparative analysis of bladder histological changes obtained in the watercress plus CP group against those treated with CP alone suggests a probable protective effect. Further studies are needed in order to establish the protective role of watercress juice against DNA damage.

  6. Platelet-activating factor induces cell cycle arrest and disrupts the DNA damage response in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Puebla-Osorio, N; Damiani, E; Bover, L; Ullrich, S E

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid modulator of inflammation that has diverse physiological and pathological functions. Previously, we demonstrated that PAF has an essential role in ultraviolet (UV)-induced immunosuppression and reduces the repair of damaged DNA, suggesting that UV-induced PAF is contributing to skin cancer initiation by inducing immune suppression and also affecting a proper DNA damage response. The exact role of PAF in modulating cell proliferation, differentiation or transformation is unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) by which PAF affects the cell cycle and impairs early DNA damage response. PAF arrests proliferation in transformed and nontransformed human mast cells by reducing the expression of cyclin-B1 and promoting the expression of p21. PAF-treated cells show a dose-dependent cell cycle arrest mainly at G2–M, and a decrease in the DNA damage response elements MCPH1/BRIT-1 and ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (ATR). In addition, PAF disrupts the localization of p-ataxia telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), and phosphorylated-ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (p-ATR) at the site of DNA damage. Whereas the potent effect on cell cycle arrest may imply a tumor suppressor activity for PAF, the impairment of proper DNA damage response might implicate PAF as a tumor promoter. The outcome of these diverse effects may be dependent on specific cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25950475

  7. Cell cycle-dependent DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 involves ATM, ATR, CHK2, and BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Iha; Avraham, Hava Karsenty . E-mail: havraham@bidmc.harvard.edu

    2006-07-01

    Topoisomerase II is essential for cell proliferation and survival and has been a target of various anticancer drugs. ICRF-193 has long been used as a catalytic inhibitor to study the function of topoisomerase II. Here, we show that ICRF-193 treatment induces DNA damage signaling. Treatment with ICRF-193 induced G2 arrest and DNA damage signaling involving {gamma}-H2AX foci formation and CHK2 phosphorylation. DNA damage by ICRF-193 was further demonstrated by formation of the nuclear foci of 53BP1, NBS1, BRCA1, MDC1, and FANCD2 and increased comet tail moment. The DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 was mediated by ATM and ATR and was restricted to cells in specific cell cycle stages such as S, G2, and mitosis including late and early G1 phases. Downstream signaling of ATM and ATR involved the phosphorylation of CHK2 and BRCA1. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ICRF-193 induces DNA damage signaling in a cell cycle-dependent manner and suggest that topoisomerase II might be essential for the progression of the cell cycle at several stages including DNA decondensation.

  8. DNA damage checkpoints in mammals.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    DNA damage is a common event and probably leads to mutation or deletion within chromosomal DNA, which may cause cancer or premature aging. DNA damage induces several cellular responses including DNA repair, checkpoint activity and the triggering of apoptotic pathways. DNA damage checkpoints are associated with biochemical pathways that end delay or arrest of cell-cycle progression. These checkpoints engage damage sensor proteins, such as the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, and the Rad17-RFC complex, in the detection of DNA damage and transduction of signals to ATM, ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. Chk1 and Chk2 kinases regulate Cdc25, Wee1 and p53 that ultimately inactivate cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) which inhibit cell-cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which DNA damage is recognized by sensor proteins and signals are transmitted to Cdks. We classify the genes involved in checkpoint signaling into four categories, namely sensors, mediators, transducers and effectors, although their proteins have the broad activity, and thus this classification is for convenience and is not definitive. PMID:16314342

  9. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. PMID:24769180

  10. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles.

  11. DNA damage induced by a new 2-chloroethyl nitrosourea on malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Godeneche, D; Rapp, M; Thierry, A; Laval, F; Madelmont, J C; Chollet, P; Veyre, A

    1990-09-15

    Different biological aspects of a novel 2-chloroethyl nitrosourea derived from cysteamine, N'-(2-chloroethyl)-N-[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]-N'- nitrosourea (CMSOEN2), were studied. Drug-induced cytotoxic effects, uptake kinetics, DNA damage, and O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity were determined in 3 melanoma cell lines: the murine B16 and 2 human metastatic-derived cell lines (M4 Beu and M3 Dau). We found that radioactivity uptake and incorporation in acido-precipitable material was inversely proportional to cell drug viability. The highly CMSOEN2-sensitive B16 line showed the lowest total radioactivity uptake. In fact, among the melanoma cell parameters studied, 3 of them were well correlated: (a) cytotoxicity as reflected by the colony-forming assay; (b) DNA cross-link frequency estimated by the alkaline elution technique; and (c) O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity (Mer phenotype), defined as the ability of cell extracts to remove O6-methylguanine from N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-alkylated DNA. The 2 human cell lines (M4 Beu and M3 Dau), the most resistant to the cytostatic drug effects, showed little or no ability to form DNA lethal cross-links. These results correspond to the higher O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity found in human-derived cell lines compared with that present in murine B16 cell lines. This study confirms that the cell content in this repair DNA protein is certainly one of the important factors implicated in the variability of response to 2-chloroethyl nitrosourea treatment observed in a number of established malignant cell lines. It has been shown that pretreatment of derived cell lines with methylating agents (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine) or O6-methylguanine used as a free base, increased cytotoxic effects of this class of anticancer agents, likely by saturating receptor sites (sulfhydryl groups) of this specific DNA repair enzyme. Nevertheless, in preliminary Phase I and II clinical

  12. Oxidative DNA damage induced by hair dye components ortho-phenylenediamines and the enhancement by superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Murata, Mariko; Nishimura, Tomoko; Chen, Fang; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2006-09-01

    There is an association between occupational exposure to hair dyes and incidence of cancers. Permanent oxidant hair dyes are consisted of many chemical components including ortho-phenylenediamines. To clarify the mechanism of carcinogenesis by hair dyes, we examined DNA damage induced by mutagenic ortho-phenylenediamine (o-PD) and its derivatives, 4-chloro-ortho-phenylenediamine (Cl-PD) and 4-nitro-ortho-phenylenediamine (NO(2)-PD), using (32)P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human p16 and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. We also measured the content of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage, in calf thymus DNA with an electrochemical detector coupled to a high performance liquid chromatograph. Carcinogenic o-PD and Cl-PD caused Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, including 8-oxodG formation, and antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) enhanced DNA damage. o-PD and Cl-PD caused piperidine-labile and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase-sensitive lesions at cytosine and guanine residues respectively in the 5'-ACG-3' sequence, complementary to codon 273, a well-known hotspot of the human p53 tumor suppressor gene. UV-vis spectroscopic studies showed that the spectral change of o-PD and Cl-PD required Cu(II), and addition of SOD enhanced it. This suggested that SOD enhanced the rate of Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation of o-PD and Cl-PD, leading to enhancement of DNA damage. On the other hand, mutagenic but non-carcinogenic NO(2)-PD induced no DNA damage. These results suggest that carcinogenicity of ortho-phenylenediamines is associated with ability to cause oxidative DNA damage rather than bacterial mutagenicity. PMID:16798066

  13. C-NAP1 and rootletin restrain DNA damage-induced centriole splitting and facilitate ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Pauline C; Saladino, Chiara; Dantas, Tiago J; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2012-10-15

    Cilia are found on most human cells and exist as motile cilia or non-motile primary cilia. Primary cilia play sensory roles in transducing various extracellular signals, and defective ciliary functions are involved in a wide range of human diseases. Centrosomes are the principal microtubule-organizing centers of animal cells and contain two centrioles. We observed that DNA damage causes centriole splitting in non-transformed human cells, with isolated centrioles carrying the mother centriole markers CEP170 and ninein but not kizuna or cenexin. Loss of centriole cohesion through siRNA depletion of C-NAP1 or rootletin increased radiation-induced centriole splitting, with C-NAP1-depleted isolated centrioles losing mother markers. As the mother centriole forms the basal body in primary cilia, we tested whether centriole splitting affected ciliogenesis. While irradiated cells formed apparently normal primary cilia, most cilia arose from centriolar clusters, not from isolated centrioles. Furthermore, C-NAP1 or rootletin knockdown reduced primary cilium formation. Therefore, the centriole cohesion apparatus at the proximal end of centrioles may provide a target that can affect primary cilium formation as part of the DNA damage response. PMID:23070519

  14. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with gamma-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH* radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH. radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  15. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with γ-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH· radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH· radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  16. Intracellular accumulation of indium ions released from nanoparticles induces oxidative stress, proinflammatory response and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Sonoda, Akinari; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Makita, Yoji; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Horie, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Due to the widespread use of indium tin oxide (ITO), it is important to investigate its effect on human health. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of ITO nanoparticles (NPs), indium chloride (InCl3) and tin chloride (SnCl3) using human lung epithelial A549 cells. Transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were employed to study cellular ITO NP uptake. Interestingly, greater uptake of ITO NPs was observed, as compared with soluble salts. ITO NP species released could be divided into two types: 'indium release ITO' or 'tin release ITO'. We incubated A549 cells with indium release ITO, tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2 and investigated oxidative stress, proinflammatory response, cytotoxicity and DNA damage. We found that intracellular reactive oxygen species were increased in cells incubated with indium release ITO, but not tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2. Messenger RNA and protein levels of the inflammatory marker, interleukin-8, also increased following exposure to indium release ITO. Furthermore, the alkaline comet assay revealed that intracellular accumulation of indium ions induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that the accumulation of ionic indium, but not ionic tin, from ITO NPs in the intracellular matrix has extensive cellular effects.

  17. Age-dependent oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in Down's lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zana, Marianna . E-mail: mzana@freemail.hu; Szecsenyi, Anita; Czibula, Agnes; Bjelik, Annamaria; Juhasz, Anna; Rimanoczy, Agnes; Vetro, Agnes; Pakaski, Magdolna; Janka, Zoltan; Kalman, Janos; Szabo, Krisztina; Szucs, Peter; Varkonyi, Agnes; Boda, Krisztina; Rasko, Istvan

    2006-06-30

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the oxidative status of lymphocytes from children (n = 7) and adults (n = 18) with Down's syndrome (DS). The basal oxidative condition, the vulnerability to in vitro hydrogen peroxide exposure, and the repair capacity were measured by means of the damage-specific alkaline comet assay. Significantly and age-independently elevated numbers of single strand breaks and oxidized bases (pyrimidines and purines) were found in the nuclear DNA of the lymphocytes in the DS group in the basal condition. These results may support the role of an increased level of endogenous oxidative stress in DS and are similar to those previously demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease. In the in vitro oxidative stress-induced state, a markedly higher extent of DNA damage was observed in DS children as compared with age- and gender-matched healthy controls, suggesting that young trisomic lymphocytes are more sensitive to oxidative stress than normal ones. However, the repair ability itself was not found to be deteriorated in either DS children or DS adults.

  18. C-NAP1 and rootletin restrain DNA damage-induced centriole splitting and facilitate ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Pauline C; Saladino, Chiara; Dantas, Tiago J; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2012-10-15

    Cilia are found on most human cells and exist as motile cilia or non-motile primary cilia. Primary cilia play sensory roles in transducing various extracellular signals, and defective ciliary functions are involved in a wide range of human diseases. Centrosomes are the principal microtubule-organizing centers of animal cells and contain two centrioles. We observed that DNA damage causes centriole splitting in non-transformed human cells, with isolated centrioles carrying the mother centriole markers CEP170 and ninein but not kizuna or cenexin. Loss of centriole cohesion through siRNA depletion of C-NAP1 or rootletin increased radiation-induced centriole splitting, with C-NAP1-depleted isolated centrioles losing mother markers. As the mother centriole forms the basal body in primary cilia, we tested whether centriole splitting affected ciliogenesis. While irradiated cells formed apparently normal primary cilia, most cilia arose from centriolar clusters, not from isolated centrioles. Furthermore, C-NAP1 or rootletin knockdown reduced primary cilium formation. Therefore, the centriole cohesion apparatus at the proximal end of centrioles may provide a target that can affect primary cilium formation as part of the DNA damage response.

  19. Homogenous repair of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage in differentially transcribed regions and strands of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Anson, R M; Croteau, D L; Stierum, R H; Filburn, C; Parsell, R; Bohr, V A

    1998-01-01

    Photoactivated methylene blue was used to damage purified DNA and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of human fibroblasts in culture. The primary product of this reaction is the DNA lesion 7-hydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG). The DNA damage was quantitated using Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) in a gene-specific damage and repair assay. Assay conditions were refined to give incision at all enzyme-sensitive sites with minimal non-specific cutting. Cultured fibroblasts were exposed to photoactivated methylene blue under conditions that would produce an average of three oxidative lesions per double-stranded mitochondrial genome. Within 9 h, 47% of this damage had been removed by the cells. This removal was due to repair rather than to replication, cell loss or degradation of damaged genomes. The rate of repair was measured in both DNA strands of the frequently transcribed ribosomal region of the mitochondrial genome and in both strands of the non-ribosomal region. Fpg-sensitive alkali-resistant oxidative base damage was efficiently removed from human mtDNA with no differences in the rate of repair between strands or between two different regions of the genome that differ substantially with regard to transcriptional activity. PMID:9421531

  20. Evaluation of DNA damage and antioxidant system induced by di-n-butyl phthalates exposure in earthworms (Eisenia fetida).

    PubMed

    Du, Li; Li, Guangde; Liu, Mingming; Li, Yanqiang; Yin, Suzhen; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Xinyi

    2015-05-01

    Di-n-butyl phthalates (DBP) are recognized as ubiquitous contaminants in soil and adversely impact the health of organisms. The effect of DBP on the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA) content and DNA damage were used as biomarkers to analyze the relationship between DNA damage and oxidative stress and to evaluate the genotoxic effect of DBP on earthworms (Eisenia fetida). DBP was added to artificial soil in the amounts of 0, 5, 10, 50 and 100mg per kg of soil. Earthworm tissues exposed to each treatment were collected on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day of the treatment. The results showed that SOD and CAT levels were significantly inhibited in the 100mgkg(-1) treatment group on day 28. MDA content in treatment groups was higher than in the control group throughout the exposure time, suggesting that DBP may lead to oxidative stress in cells. A dose-response relationship existed between DNA damage and total soil DBP levels. The comet assay showed that increasing concentrations of DBP resulted in a gradual increase in the OTM, Comet Tail Length and Tail DNA %. The degree of DNA damage was increased with increasing concentration of DBP. These results suggested that DBP induced serious oxidative damage on earthworms and induced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in earthworms. The excessive generation of ROS caused damage to vital macromolecules including lipids and DNA. DBP in the soils were responsible for the exerting genotoxic effects on earthworms.

  1. Comet-assay in combination with PNA-FISH detects mutagen-induced DNA damage and specific repeat sequences in the damaged DNA of transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, G; Rapp, A; Arutyunyan, R; Greulich, K O; Gebhart, E

    2005-03-01

    The Comet-assay was applied to three transformed cell lines (HT1080, CCRF-CEM line and CHO) which were treated with the cytostatics bleomycin (BLM) or mitomycin C (MMC). In addition, PNA probes for the telomere repeat (TTAGGG)(n) were used for detection of telomeric DNA sequences in the damaged DNA. Data were compared with previously obtained results from peripheral leukocytes. The amount of migrating DNA increased in all cell types in a dose-dependent manner after BLM exposure. CHO cells reacted sensitively at low doses of the mutagen, and leukocytes had the highest dose-related effect up to 25 IU/ml which, however, did not further increase. A rather linear dose response characterized the HT1080 cells, the effect was lowest for the CCRF-CEM cells. While MMC at lower doses increased the percentage of migrating DNA in a dose-dependent manner, the higher doses induced shorter comets, on average, than the lower ones in all cell lines. With PNA-Comet-FISH obvious differences were found between the studied cell lines with respect to quantitative head/tail distribution of telomeric signals after BLM exposure. A large number of signal spots of various sizes were found in CHO cells, very small signals could be detected in the comets of both neoplasia cell lines. Dose-dependence of telomeres in the tail was most pro-nounced in CCRF-CEM and normal leukocytes, less in HT1080. The steepest dose-related increase of telomeric signals in the tail was found in CHO cells. The ratio between the migrated DNA and the telomeric signals in the tail varied distinctly between the examined cell types from 3:1 to 1:1. Taken together, Comet-FISH can detect mutagenic effects on specific DNA sequences. This may be of high practical value if amplified DNA sequences will be addressed by those examinations in future. PMID:15702234

  2. DNA damage in oral cancer and normal cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Kapaldo, James; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) have been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory operates based on dielectric barrier discharge. It consists of two copper electrodes alternatively wrapping around a fused silica tube with nitrogen as a feed gas. It is generally more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, N2 provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to noble gases, thus this design can be beneficial for the future long-term clinical use. To compare the effects of plasma on cancer cells (SCC25) and normal cells (OKF), the cells from both types were treated at the same experimental condition for various treatment times. The effective area with different damage levels after the treatment was visualized as 3D maps. The delayed damage effects were also explored by varying the incubation times after the treatment. All of these studies are critical for a better understanding of the damage responses of cellular systems exposed to the plasma radiation, thus are useful for the development of the advanced plasma cancer therapy. The research described herein was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  3. Effects of motexafin gadolinium on DNA damage and X-ray-induced DNA damage repair, as assessed by the Comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Erling T.; Liu Yanfeng; Paul, Tracy K.; Rockwell, Sara . E-mail: sara.rockwell@yale.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and DNA damage in EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma cells. The ability of MGd to alter radiosensitivity and to inhibit DNA damage repair after X-ray irradiation was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: Reactive oxygen species and GSH levels were assessed by 2,7-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence flow cytometry and the Tietze method, respectively. Cellular radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic assays. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage and DNA damage repair were assessed in plateau-phase EMT6 cells by the Comet assay and clonogenic assays. Results: Cells treated with 100 {mu}mol/L MGd plus equimolar ascorbic acid (AA) had significantly increased levels of ROS and a 58.9% {+-} 3.4% decrease in GSH levels, relative to controls. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA treatment increased the hypoxic, but not the aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. There were increased levels of single-strand breaks in cells treated with 100 {mu}mol/L MGd plus equimolar AA, as evidenced by changes in the alkaline tail moment (MGd + AA, 6 h: 14.7 {+-} 1.8; control: 2.8 {+-} 0.9). The level of single-strand breaks was dependent on the length of treatment. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA did not increase double-strand breaks. The repair of single-strand breaks at 2 h, but not at 4 h and 6 h, after irradiation was altered significantly in cells treated with MGd plus AA (MGd + AA, 2 h: 15.8 {+-} 3.4; control: 5.8 {+-} 0.6). Motexafin gadolinium did not alter the repair of double-strand breaks at any time after irradiation with 10 Gy. Conclusions: Motexafin gadolinium plus AA generated ROS, which in turn altered GSH homeostasis and induced DNA strand breaks. The MGd plus AA-mediated alteration of GSH levels increased the hypoxic, but not aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. Motexafin gadolinium altered the kinetics of single-strand break repair soon after irradiation but

  4. Role of AtMSH7 in UV-B-induced DNA damage recognition and recombination.

    PubMed

    Lario, Luciana Daniela; Botta, Pablo; Casati, Paula; Spampinato, Claudia Patricia

    2015-06-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) system maintains genome integrity by correcting replication-associated errors and inhibiting recombination between divergent DNA sequences. The basic features of the pathway have been highly conserved throughout evolution, although the nature and number of the proteins involved in this DNA repair system vary among organisms. Plants have an extra mismatch recognition protein, MutSγ, which is a heterodimer: MSH2-MSH7. To further understand the role of MSH7 in vivo, we present data from this protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. First, we generated transgenic plants that express β-glucuronidase (GUS) under the control of the MSH7 promoter. Histochemical staining of the transgenic plants indicated that MSH7 is preferentially expressed in proliferating tissues. Then, we identified msh7 T-DNA insertion mutants. Plants deficient in MSH7 show increased levels of UV-B-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers relative to wild-type (WT) plants. Consistent with the patterns of MSH7 expression, we next analysed the role of the protein during somatic and meiotic recombination. The frequency of somatic recombination between homologous or homeologous repeats (divergence level of 1.6%) was monitored using a previously described GUS recombination reporter assay. Disruption of MSH7 has no effect on the rates of somatic homologous or homeologous recombination under control conditions or after UV-B exposure. However, the rate of meiotic recombination between two genetically linked seed-specific fluorescent markers was 97% higher in msh7 than in WT plants. Taken together, these results suggest that MSH7 is involved in UV-B-induced DNA damage recognition and in controlling meiotic recombination.

  5. Radiation-induced transgenerational alterations in genome stability and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Barber, R C; Hickenbotham, P; Hatch, T; Kelly, D; Topchiy, N; Almeida, G M; Jones, G D D; Johnson, G E; Parry, J M; Rothkamm, K; Dubrova, Y E

    2006-11-30

    Mutation induction in directly exposed cells is currently regarded as the main component of the genetic risk of ionizing radiation for humans. However, recent data on the transgenerational increases in mutation rates in the offspring of irradiated parents indicate that the genetic risk could be greater than predicted previously. Here, we have analysed transgenerational changes in mutation rates and DNA damage in the germline and somatic tissues of non-exposed first-generation offspring of irradiated inbred male CBA/Ca and BALB/c mice. Mutation rates at an expanded simple tandem repeat DNA locus and a protein-coding gene (hprt) were significantly elevated in both the germline (sperm) and somatic tissues of all the offspring of irradiated males. The transgenerational changes in mutation rates were attributed to the presence of a persistent subset of endogenous DNA lesions (double- and single-strand breaks), measured by the phosphorylated form of histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX) and alkaline Comet assays. Such remarkable transgenerational destabilization of the F(1) genome may have important implications for cancer aetiology and genetic risk estimates. Our data also provide important clues on the still unknown mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability.

  6. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-09-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC-25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory consists of two external electrodes wrapping around a quartz tube and nitrogen as a feed gas and operates based on dielectric barrier gas discharge. Generally, it is more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, this design provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to the noble gases for future clinical operation. Different parameters of the APPJ configuration were tested in order to determine radiation dosage. To explore the effects of delayed damage and cell self-repairing, various incubation times of cells after plasma treatment were also performed. Reactive species generated in plasma jet and in liquid environment are essential to be identified and quantified, with the aim of unfolding the mystery of detailed mechanisms for plasma-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, from the comparison of plasma treatment effect on normal oral cells OKF6T, an insight to the selectivity for cancer treatment by APPJ can be explored. All of these studies are critical to better understand the damage responses of normal and abnormal cellular systems to plasma radiation, which are useful for the development of advanced plasma therapy for cancer treatment at a later stage.

  7. DNA damage induced by phorbol ester-stimulated neutrophils is augmented by extracellular cofactors. Role of histidine and metals.

    PubMed

    Shacter, E; Lopez, R L; Beecham, E J; Janz, S

    1990-04-25

    Activated neutrophils cause extensive DNA damage in neighboring nonphagocytic cells. To determine whether compounds in the extracellular milieu participate in the DNA damage process, murine neutrophils were cocultivated with target tumor cells in media of varying composition. Using the alkaline elution assay, it was found that the level of strand breaks induced was significantly higher (2.8-fold) in complex cell culture media than in minimal phosphate-buffered saline. Addition of amino acids in general and of histidine in particular increased the level of damage nearly to that observed in complete media (2.7- and 2.1-fold, respectively). The histidine stimulation was concentration-dependent and reached a maximum at 100-400 microM. The mechanism whereby this occurred is not proven but probably derived from chelation of metals and participation in a site-specific Fenton reaction. Addition of the cell-impermeable chelator EDTA dramatically inhibited induction of strand breaks by neutrophils in complete media and prevented the enhancement of damage induced by histidine in phosphate-buffered saline. None of the effects on neutrophil-induced damage could be attributed to modulation of the oxidative burst activity of the cells (O2- and H2O2 production). Histidine also enhanced induction of strand breaks by reagent H2O2. However, EDTA had no effect or actually increased the level of damage induced by both a bolus of H2O2 and a flux of H2O2 generated by glucose oxidase. The cell-permeable chelator o-phenanthroline inhibited both neutrophil- and H2O2-induced damage. The results indicate that secondary reactions involving extracellular amino acids and metals contribute significantly to neutrophil-induced DNA damage to neighboring cells. Moreover, the data show that the mechanism whereby neutrophils induce this damage cannot be attributed solely to secretion of H2O2.

  8. Individual variations in the correlation between erythemal threshold, UV-induced DNA damage and sun-burn cell formation.

    PubMed

    Heenen, M; Giacomoni, P U; Golstein, P

    2001-10-01

    A linear correlation between erythema intensity and DNA damage upon exposure to UV has not been firmly established. Many of the deleterious effects of UV exposure do occur after exposure to suberythemal doses. After DNA damage, cells undergo DNA repair. It is commonly accepted that when the burden of damage is beyond the repair capacities, the cell undergoes programmed cell death or apoptosis. The aim of this study is to quantify the amount of UV-induced DNA damage (estimated via the measurement of DNA repair or unscheduled DNA synthesis or UDS) and cellular damage (estimated via the determination of the density of sunburn cells or SBC). If DNA damage and erythema are correlated, similar intensity of UDS and similar density of SBC should be found in volunteers irradiated with a UV dose equal to two minimal erythema doses (MED). Our results show that in 15 different individuals the same relative dose (2 MEDs) provokes UDS values, which vary within a factor of 4. An even larger variability affects SBC counts after the same relative dose. When DNA damage or SBC are plotted versus the absolute dose (i.e. the dose expressed in J/m(2)), there is a rough correlation (with several exceptions) between dose and extent of UDS and SBC counts. It seems possible to divide the volunteers into two subpopulations with different susceptibilities to UV damage. It is well known that UDS and SBC measurements are often affected by large experimental indeterminacy, yet, the analysis of our results makes it plausible to suggest that for the triggering of erythema, a common threshold value for DNA damage or for SBC count are not to be found. In conclusion, the erythema response seems to be loosely correlated with DNA damage. This suggests that the protection offered by the sunscreens against DNA damage, the molecular basis of UV-induced mutagenesis, might not be related to the sun protection factor (SPF) indicated on the label of sunscreens, which is evaluated using the erythema as an

  9. Growth factor independence-1 antagonizes a p53-induced DNA damage response pathway in lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Cyrus; Phelan, James D.; Vassen, Lothar; Schütte, Judith; Chen, Riyan; Horman, Shane R.; Gaudreau, Marie-Claude; Krongold, Joseph; Zhu, Jinfang; Paul, William E.; Dührsen, Ulrich; Göttgens, Bertie; Grimes, H. Leighton; Möröy, Tarik

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) fail current treatments highlighting the need for better therapies. Since oncogenic signaling activates a p53-dependent DNA-damage response and apoptosis, leukemic cells must devise appropriate countermeasures. We show here that growth factor independence 1 (Gfi1) can serve such a function, since Gfi1 ablation exacerbates p53 responses, and lowers the threshold for p53-induced cell death. Specifically, Gfi1 restricts p53 activity and expression of pro-apoptotic p53 targets such as Bax, Noxa (Pmaip1) and Puma (Bbc3). Subsequently, Gfi1 ablation cures mice from leukemia and limits the expansion of primary human T-ALL xenografts in mice. This suggests that targeting Gfi1 could improve the prognosis of patients with T-ALL or other lymphoid leukemias. PMID:23410974

  10. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage induced by acute inorganic arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Wei Waalkes, Michael P.

    2015-02-01

    We studied how protein metallothionein (MT) impacts arsenic-induced oxidative DNA damage (ODD) using cells that poorly express MT (MT-I/II double knockout embryonic cells; called MT-null cells) and wild-type (WT) MT competent cells. Arsenic (as NaAsO{sub 2}) was less cytolethal over 24 h in WT cells (LC{sub 50} = 11.0 ± 1.3 μM; mean ± SEM) than in MT-null cells (LC{sub 50} = 5.6 ± 1.2 μM). ODD was measured by the immuno-spin trapping method. Arsenic (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) induced much less ODD in WT cells (121% and 141% of control, respectively) than in MT-null cells (202% and 260%). In WT cells arsenic caused concentration-dependent increases in MT expression (transcript and protein), and in the metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1), which is required to induce the MT gene. In contrast, basal MT levels were not detectable in MT-null cells and unaltered by arsenic exposure. Transfection of MT-I gene into the MT-null cells markedly reduced arsenic-induced ODD levels. The transport genes, Abcc1 and Abcc2 were increased by arsenic in WT cells but either showed no or very limited increases in MT-null cells. Arsenic caused increases in oxidant stress defense genes HO-1 and GSTα2 in both WT and MT-null cells, but to much higher levels in WT cells. WT cells appear more adept at activating metal transport systems and oxidant response genes, although the role of MT in these responses is unclear. Overall, MT protects against arsenic-induced ODD in MT competent cells by potential sequestration of scavenging oxidant radicals and/or arsenic. - Highlights: • Metallothionein blocks arsenic toxicity. • Metallothionein reduces arsenic-induced DNA damage. • Metallothionein may bind arsenic or radicals produced by arsenic.

  11. Paricalcitol may improve oxidative DNA damage on experimental amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity model.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Gulay; Basbugan, Yildiray; Ari, Elif; Erten, Remzi; Bektas, Havva; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Bayram, Irfan

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of paricalcitol on experimental amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity model in rats. Wistar albino rats (n = 32) were allocated into four equal groups of eight each, the control (Group C), paricalcitol (Group P), amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity (Group A), and paricalcitol-treated amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity (Group A + P) groups. Paricalcitol was given intra-peritoneally at a dose of 0.4 μg/kg/d for 5 consecutive days prior to induction of amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity. Intra-peritoneal amikacin (1.2 g/kg) was used to induce nephrotoxicity at day 4. Renal function parameters, oxidative stress biomarkers, oxidative DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine ratio), kidney histology, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunoexpression were determined. Group A + P had lower mean fractional sodium excretion (p < 0.001) as well as higher creatinine clearance (p = 0.026) than the amikacin group (Group A). Renal tissue malondialdehyde levels (p = 0.035) and serum 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine ratio (8-OHdG/dG ratio) (p < 0.001) were significantly lower; superoxide dismutase (p = 0.024) and glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.007) activities of renal tissue were significantly higher in group A + P than in group A. The mean scores of tubular necrosis (p = 0.024), proteinaceous casts (p = 0.038), medullary congestion (p = 0.035), and VEGF immunoexpression (p = 0.018) were also lower in group A + P when compared with group A. This study demonstrates the protective effect of paricalcitol in the prevention of amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity in an experimental model. Furthermore, it is the first study to demonstrate that paricalcitol improves oxidative DNA damage in an experimental acute kidney injury model.

  12. Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible, beta (GADD45b)-mediated DNA demethylation in major psychosis.

    PubMed

    Gavin, David P; Sharma, Rajiv P; Chase, Kayla A; Matrisciano, Francesco; Dong, Erbo; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant neocortical DNA methylation has been suggested to be a pathophysiological contributor to psychotic disorders. Recently, a growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible, beta (GADD45b) protein-coordinated DNA demethylation pathway, utilizing cytidine deaminases and thymidine glycosylases, has been identified in the brain. We measured expression of several members of this pathway in parietal cortical samples from the Stanley Foundation Neuropathology Consortium (SFNC) cohort. We find an increase in GADD45b mRNA and protein in patients with psychosis. In immunohistochemistry experiments using samples from the Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center, we report an increased number of GADD45b-stained cells in prefrontal cortical layers II, III, and V in psychotic patients. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor IX (BDNF IXabcd) was selected as a readout gene to determine the effects of GADD45b expression and promoter binding. We find that there is less GADD45b binding to the BDNF IXabcd promoter in psychotic subjects. Further, there is reduced BDNF IXabcd mRNA expression, and an increase in 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at its promoter. On the basis of these results, we conclude that GADD45b may be increased in psychosis compensatory to its inability to access gene promoter regions.

  13. A novel cis-acting element required for DNA damage-inducible expression of yeast DIN7

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitani, Ayako; Yoshida, Minoru; Ling Feng

    2008-01-04

    Din7 is a DNA damage-inducible mitochondrial nuclease that modulates the stability of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. How DIN7 gene expression is regulated, however, has remained largely unclear. Using promoter sequence alignment, we found a highly conserved 19-bp sequence in the promoter regions of DIN7 and NTG1, which encodes an oxidative stress-inducible base-excision-repair enzyme. Deletion of the 19-bp sequence markedly reduced the hydroxyurea (HU)-enhanced DIN7 promoter activity. In addition, nuclear fractions prepared from HU-treated cells were used in in vitro band shift assays to reveal the presence of currently unidentified trans-acting factor(s) that preferentially bound to the 19-bp region. These results suggest that the 19-bp sequence is a novel cis-acting element that is required for the regulation of DIN7 expression in response to HU-induced DNA damage.

  14. GC-Rich Extracellular DNA Induces Oxidative Stress, Double-Strand DNA Breaks, and DNA Damage Response in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kostyuk, Svetlana; Smirnova, Tatiana; Kameneva, Larisa; Porokhovnik, Lev; Speranskij, Anatolij; Ershova, Elizaveta; Stukalov, Sergey; Izevskaya, Vera; Veiko, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cell free DNA (cfDNA) circulates throughout the bloodstream of both healthy people and patients with various diseases. CfDNA is substantially enriched in its GC-content as compared with human genomic DNA. Principal Findings. Exposure of haMSCs to GC-DNA induces short-term oxidative stress (determined with H2DCFH-DA) and results in both single- and double-strand DNA breaks (comet assay and γH2AX, foci). As a result in the cells significantly increases the expression of repair genes (BRCA1 (RT-PCR), PCNA (FACS)) and antiapoptotic genes (BCL2 (RT-PCR and FACS), BCL2A1, BCL2L1, BIRC3, and BIRC2 (RT-PCR)). Under the action of GC-DNA the potential of mitochondria was increased. Here we show that GC-rich extracellular DNA stimulates adipocyte differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs). Exposure to GC-DNA leads to an increase in the level of RNAPPARG2 and LPL (RT-PCR), in the level of fatty acid binding protein FABP4 (FACS analysis) and in the level of fat (Oil Red O). Conclusions. GC-rich fragments in the pool of cfDNA can potentially induce oxidative stress and DNA damage response and affect the direction of mesenchymal stem cells differentiation in human adipose—derived mesenchymal stem cells. Such a response may be one of the causes of obesity or osteoporosis. PMID:26273425

  15. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Chou, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-09-22

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed. PMID:26208482

  16. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed. PMID:26208482

  17. Assessment of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of individuals susceptible to arsenic induced toxicity in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anamika; Som, Arundhati; Ghoshal, Sarbani; Mondal, Lakshmikanta; Chaubey, Ramesh C; Bhilwade, Hari N; Rahman, Mohammad M; Giri, Ashok K

    2005-10-15

    Assessment of DNA damage was carried out using alkaline comet assay in lymphocytes of 30 individuals exposed to high levels of arsenic (247.12+/-18.93 microg/l) through contaminated groundwater in North 24 Parganas district, West Bengal, India. All of them exhibited high arsenic contents in nail (4.20+/-0.67 microg/g), hair (2.06+/-0.20 microg/g) and urine (259.75+/-33.89 microg/l) samples and manifested various arsenical skin lesions. Unexposed samples were collected from 30 residents of the unaffected East Midnapur district with very little or no exposure to arsenic (7.69+/-0.49 microg/l) in drinking water. The results were evaluated principally by manual analysis of comets and partly by computerized image analysis. Both the analytical methods exhibited a high degree of agreement in results. The exposed participants expressed significantly higher DNA damage (p < 0.01) in their lymphocytes than the unexposed participants. Alkaline comet assay was also combined with formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase enzyme digestion to confirm that arsenic induced oxidative base damage in the lymphocytes. Significant positive trend effects of comet lengths in relation to arsenic levels in water prove that DNA damage can be used as a sensitive biomarker of arsenic exposure. This study demonstrates that arsenic induced significant DNA damage in the exposed participants, which could correspond to a higher susceptibility to arsenic induced toxicity and carcinogenicity.

  18. Damage proneness induced by genomic DNA demethylation in mammalian cells cultivated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perticone, P; Gensabella, G; Cozzi, R

    1997-07-01

    Variations in the genomic DNA methylation level have been shown to be an epigenetic inheritable modification affecting, among other targets, the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) rate in mammalian cells in vitro. The inheritable increase in SCE rate in affected cell populations appears as a puzzling phenomenon in view of the well established relation between SCE and both mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In the present work we demonstrate that, in a treated cell population, demethylation could be responsible for the inheritable induction of damage proneness affecting both damage induction and repair. Normal and ethionine or azacytidine treated Chinese hamster ovary cells, subclone K1 (CHO-K1), were challenged with UV light (UV) or mitomycin-C (MMC) at different times from the demethylating treatment. The SCE rate was measured with two main objects in view: (i) the induction of synergism or additivity in combined treatments, where mutagen (UV or MMC) pulse is supplied from 0 to 48 h after the end of the demethylating treatment; and (ii) the pattern of damage extinction, for the duration of up to six cell cycles after the end of the combined (demethylating agent + mutagen) treatment. Results indicate both a synergism in SCE induction by mutagens in demethylated cells even if supplied up to four cell cycles after the end of the demethylation treatment and a delay in recovery of induced damage, compared with normally methylated cells. These data are discussed in the light of the supposed mechanism of SCE increase and of the possible biological significance in terms of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  19. Damage proneness induced by genomic DNA demethylation in mammalian cells cultivated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perticone, P; Gensabella, G; Cozzi, R

    1997-07-01

    Variations in the genomic DNA methylation level have been shown to be an epigenetic inheritable modification affecting, among other targets, the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) rate in mammalian cells in vitro. The inheritable increase in SCE rate in affected cell populations appears as a puzzling phenomenon in view of the well established relation between SCE and both mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In the present work we demonstrate that, in a treated cell population, demethylation could be responsible for the inheritable induction of damage proneness affecting both damage induction and repair. Normal and ethionine or azacytidine treated Chinese hamster ovary cells, subclone K1 (CHO-K1), were challenged with UV light (UV) or mitomycin-C (MMC) at different times from the demethylating treatment. The SCE rate was measured with two main objects in view: (i) the induction of synergism or additivity in combined treatments, where mutagen (UV or MMC) pulse is supplied from 0 to 48 h after the end of the demethylating treatment; and (ii) the pattern of damage extinction, for the duration of up to six cell cycles after the end of the combined (demethylating agent + mutagen) treatment. Results indicate both a synergism in SCE induction by mutagens in demethylated cells even if supplied up to four cell cycles after the end of the demethylation treatment and a delay in recovery of induced damage, compared with normally methylated cells. These data are discussed in the light of the supposed mechanism of SCE increase and of the possible biological significance in terms of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:9237771

  20. Casticin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair-associated protein expression in B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yung-Luen; Chou, Jason; Yeh, Ming-Yang; Chou, Hsiao-Min; Chou, Hsiu-Chen; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Chu, Yung-Lin; Hsueh, Shu-Ching; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-10-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, has been demonstrated to possess anticancer activities, yet no study has shown in detail that casticin induces DNA damage in lung cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible molecular mechanisms of casticin which induce DNA damage and nuclear condensation in murine melanoma cancer B16F10 cells. In this study, by examining and capturing images using phase contrast microscopy, we found that casticin induced cell morphological changes. Moreover, it decreased the total number of viable cells which was measured by flow cytometry. Casticin-induced DNA damage and nuclear DNA condensation were measured by DAPI staining, respectively. Western blotting indicated that casticin decreased the protein levels of O6‑methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) but increased phospho-p53 tumor suppressor protein (p-p53), phospho-ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (p-ATM), phospho-histone H2A.X (Ser139) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in the B16F10 cells. Furthermore, we used confocal laser system microscopy to examine the protein expression levels and we found that casticin increased the expression of p-p53 and p-H2A.X in the B16F10 cells. Collectively, casticin induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair proteins in the B16F10 cells in vitro.

  1. Casticin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair-associated protein expression in B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yung-Luen; Chou, Jason; Yeh, Ming-Yang; Chou, Hsiao-Min; Chou, Hsiu-Chen; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Chu, Yung-Lin; Hsueh, Shu-Ching; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-10-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, has been demonstrated to possess anticancer activities, yet no study has shown in detail that casticin induces DNA damage in lung cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible molecular mechanisms of casticin which induce DNA damage and nuclear condensation in murine melanoma cancer B16F10 cells. In this study, by examining and capturing images using phase contrast microscopy, we found that casticin induced cell morphological changes. Moreover, it decreased the total number of viable cells which was measured by flow cytometry. Casticin-induced DNA damage and nuclear DNA condensation were measured by DAPI staining, respectively. Western blotting indicated that casticin decreased the protein levels of O6‑methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) but increased phospho-p53 tumor suppressor protein (p-p53), phospho-ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (p-ATM), phospho-histone H2A.X (Ser139) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in the B16F10 cells. Furthermore, we used confocal laser system microscopy to examine the protein expression levels and we found that casticin increased the expression of p-p53 and p-H2A.X in the B16F10 cells. Collectively, casticin induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair proteins in the B16F10 cells in vitro. PMID:27572101

  2. Arsenic Biotransformation as a Cancer Promoting Factor by Inducing DNA Damage and Disruption of Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Victor D.; Vucic, Emily A.; Adonis, Marta; Gil, Lionel; Lam, Wan L.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water poses a major global health concern. Populations exposed to high concentrations of arsenic-contaminated drinking water suffer serious health consequences, including alarming cancer incidence and death rates. Arsenic is biotransformed through sequential addition of methyl groups, acquired from s-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Metabolism of arsenic generates a variety of genotoxic and cytotoxic species, damaging DNA directly and indirectly, through the generation of reactive oxidative species and induction of DNA adducts, strand breaks and cross links, and inhibition of the DNA repair process itself. Since SAM is the methyl group donor used by DNA methyltransferases to maintain normal epigenetic patterns in all human cells, arsenic is also postulated to affect maintenance of normal DNA methylation patterns, chromatin structure, and genomic stability. The biological processes underlying the cancer promoting factors of arsenic metabolism, related to DNA damage and repair, will be discussed here. PMID:22091411

  3. Cadmium-induced DNA damage and mutations in Arabidopsis plantlet shoots identified by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan; Sun, Lizong; Zhong, Ming; Zhou, Qixing; Gong, Zongqiang; Li, Peijun; Tai, Peidong; Li, Xiaojun

    2012-11-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) test is a feasible method to evaluate the toxicity of environmental pollutants on vegetal organisms. Herein, Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plantlets following Cadmium (Cd) treatment for 26 d were screened for DNA genetic alterations by DNA fingerprinting. Four primers amplified 20-23 mutated RAPD fragments in 0.125-3.0 mg L(-1) Cd-treated Arabidopsis plantlets, respectively. Cloning and sequencing analysis of eight randomly selected mutated fragments revealed 99-100% homology with the genes of VARICOSE-Related, SLEEPY1 F-box, 40S ribosomal protein S3, phosphoglucomutase, and noncoding regions in Arabidopsis genome correspondingly. The results show the ability of RAPD analysis to detect significant genetic alterations in Cd-exposed seedlings. Although the exact functional importance of the other mutated bands is unknown, the presence of mutated loci in Cd-treated seedlings, prior to the onset of significant physiological effects, suggests that these altered loci are the early events in Cd-treated Arabidopsis seedlings and would greatly improve environmental risk assessment.

  4. DNA damage in stem cells activates p21, inhibits p53, and induces symmetric self-renewing divisions.

    PubMed

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Faretta, Mario; Gallo, Barbara; Albano, Luisa; Ronzoni, Simona; Furia, Laura; Viale, Andrea; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    DNA damage leads to a halt in proliferation owing to apoptosis or senescence, which prevents transmission of DNA alterations. This cellular response depends on the tumor suppressor p53 and functions as a powerful barrier to tumor development. Adult stem cells are resistant to DNA damage-induced apoptosis or senescence, however, and how they execute this response and suppress tumorigenesis is unknown. We show that irradiation of hematopoietic and mammary stem cells up-regulates the cell cycle inhibitor p21, a known target of p53, which prevents p53 activation and inhibits p53 basal activity, impeding apoptosis and leading to cell cycle entry and symmetric self-renewing divisions. p21 also activates DNA repair, limiting DNA damage accumulation and self-renewal exhaustion. Stem cells with moderate DNA damage and diminished self-renewal persist after irradiation, however. These findings suggest that stem cells have evolved a unique, p21-dependent response to DNA damage that leads to their immediate expansion and limits their long-term survival.

  5. Nucleotide Excision Repair Factor XPC Enhances DNA Damage-Induced Apoptosis by Downregulating the Antiapoptotic Short Isoform of Caspase-2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi-En; Han, Chunhua; Zhang, Bo; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Wani, Altaf A.

    2012-01-01

    XPC protein is a critical DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) for which genetic deficiency confers a predisposition to cancer. In this study we demonstrate that XPC has a function that is independent of its canonical function in DNA repair, potentially altering the interpretation of how XPC deficiency leads to heightened cancer susceptibility. XPC enhances apoptosis induced by DNA damage in a p53 nullizygous background, acting downstream of mitochondrial permeabilization and upstream of caspase-9 activation in the DNA damage-induced apoptosis cascade. We found that deficiency in XPC upregulated production of the short isoform of caspase-2 (casp-2S). This upregulation occurred at both protein and mRNA levels through repression of the caspase-2 promoter by XPC protein. Targeted RNAi-mediated downregulation of casp-2S enhanced UV-induced apoptosis as well as activation of caspase-9 and caspase-6 in XPC-deficient cells, but not in XPC-proficient cells. In addition, XPC overexpression in various p53-deficient cancer cells resistant to cisplatin improved their sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Given that casp-2S functions as an anti-apoptotic protein, our findings suggest that XPC enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis through inhibition of casp-2S transcription. Together, these findings offer a mechanistic foundation to overcome the resistance of highly prevalent p53-deficient tumors to cell death induced by DNA-damaging therapeutic agents, by targeting strategies that inhibit the expression or function of casp-2S. PMID:22174370

  6. The muc genes of pKM101 are induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Elledge, S J; Walker, G C

    1983-01-01

    A gene fusion was constructed in vitro that resulted in the synthesis of a hybrid protein consisting of the amino-terminal segment of the MucB protein of the mutagenesis-enhancing plasmid pKM101 joined to an enzymatically active carboxy-terminal segment of the beta-galactosidase protein. In strains bearing this fusion, beta-galactosidase activity was induced by UV radiation and other DNA-damaging agents. A genetic analysis of the regulation of expression of the phi (mucB'-lacZ') fusion was consistent with the LexA protein acting as the direct repressor of the mucB gene. Examination of the expression of the mucA and phi (mucB'-lacZ') gene products in maxicells in the presence and absence of a high-copy-number plasmid carrying the lexA+ gene demonstrated that lexA regulated both the mucA and mucB genes, thus supporting our conclusion that the two genes are organized in an operon with the mucA gene transcribed first. An analysis of the effects of the recA430(lexB30) mutation on muc expression led to the discovery of the differential ability of the recA430 gene product to induce expression of a dinB::Mu d1(Ap lac) fusion located on the chromosome and the same phi (dinB'-lacZ+) fusion cloned into plasmid pBR322. Models to account for the role of the recA430 allele on the expression of damage-inducible genes and on mutagenesis are discussed. Images PMID:6350267

  7. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R2 > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity. PMID:27624453

  8. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Stephen J; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R(2) > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity. PMID:27624453

  9. Control of Trx1 redox state modulates protection against methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage via stabilization of p21.

    PubMed

    Gu, Li; Gao, Wei; Yang, Hui Min; Wang, Bei Bei; Wang, Xiao Na; Xu, Jianguo; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) is known to play an important role in protecting against cell death. However, the mechanism for control of Trx1 in cell death resulting from DNA damage has not been fully investigated. In this study, we used the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) to investigate the protective effects of Trx1 against DNA damage and cell death in HEK293 cells. We found that MMS application caused dose-dependent changes in the Trx1 redox state determined by redox western blotting. At lower concentrations, both reduced and oxidized Trx1 were observed, whereas the reduced band was fully oxidized at the higher concentration. Trx1 overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown in cells revealed that reduced Trx1 after exposure to lower doses of MMS attenuated DNA damage, assessed by comet assay, and level of the DNA-damage marker histone γ-H2AX, possibly through scavenging intracellular ROS and an increase in p21 protein level via enhancing its stability. However, oxidized Trx1 lost its protective ability to DNA damage in response to higher concentration of MMS. Corresponding to the redox state control of Trx1, cell death induced by different dose of MMS was also found, by inhibiting phosphorylations of p38 and 4E-BP1. These results indicate that reduced Trx1 plays important protective roles against MMS-induced DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that cell protection is regulated by the intracellular redox state. Control of the redox state of Trx1 and its regulating proteins may offer a novel therapeutic strategy for the control of cancer.

  10. Accelerated Repair and Reduced Mutagenicity of DNA Damage Induced by Cigarette Smoke in Human Bronchial Cells Transfected with E.coli Formamidopyrimidine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Foresta, Mara; Izzotti, Alberto; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Micale, Rosanna; Poggi, Alessandro; Vecchio, Donatella; Frosina, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is associated to a number of pathologies including lung cancer. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects are partially linked to the presence of reactive oxygen species and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) inducing DNA damage. The bacterial DNA repair enzyme formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) repairs both oxidized bases and different types of bulky DNA adducts. We investigated in vitro whether FPG expression may enhance DNA repair of CS-damaged DNA and counteract the mutagenic effects of CS in human lung cells. NCI-H727 non small cell lung carcinoma cells were transfected with a plasmid vector expressing FPG fused to the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP). Cells expressing the fusion protein EGFP-FPG displayed accelerated repair of adducts and DNA breaks induced by CS condensate. The mutant frequencies induced by low concentrations of CS condensate to the Na+K+-ATPase locus (ouar) were significantly reduced in cells expressing EGFP-FPG. Hence, expression of the bacterial DNA repair protein FPG stably protects human lung cells from the mutagenic effects of CS by improving cells’ capacity to repair damaged DNA. PMID:24498234

  11. In vitro study of DNA damage induced by acid orange 52 and its biodegradation derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ben Mansour, Hedi; Barillier, Daniel; Corroler, David; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila; Mosrati, Ridha

    2009-03-01

    Mutagenicity of acid orange 52 (AO52) and its degradation products by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 was evaluated with the use of Salmonella Typhimurium TA102 and TA104 with and without the metabolic activation system (S9). No mutagenicity was observed in the absence of S9 and in the presence of S9 for biodegradation under shaking conditions, but it increased significantly in the presence of S9 after biodegradation under static conditions. In addition, the ability of tested compounds to induce DNA damage in vitro was evaluated with the DNA strand scission assay. The toxicity generated by the pure azo dye and the corresponding azoreduction products (4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid and N,N'-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine) were compared. We suggest that the mutagenicity mechanism of these molecules occurs through free radical generation processes. In this study, we demonstrate that P. putida mt-2 incubated under aerobic conditions undergoes catabolism that enables it to degrade AO52 completely and, especially, to detoxify the dye mixtures.

  12. Soy isoflavones have antimutagenic activity on DNA damage induced by the antileishmanial Glucantime (meglumine antimoniate).

    PubMed

    Cantanhêde, Ludymila Furtado; Almeida, Laís Pinheiro; Soares, Rossy-Eric Pereira; Castelo Branco, Patrícia Valéria Gomes; Pereira, Silma Regina Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens reported to be potent antioxidant agents. In contrast, the antileishmanial meglumine antimoniate has mutagenic activities. This study evaluated the ability of soy isoflavones to reduce DNA damage induced by meglumine antimoniate. Antimutagenic effects (by micronucleus test) were tested using Swiss mice divided into seven groups treated with meglumine antimoniate (425 mg/kg bw pentavalent antimony); cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg bw); water (negative control); single isoflavones dose (1.6 mg/kg bw), and three groups received one dose of isoflavones via gavage (0.4 mg/kg bw, 0.8 mg/kg bw or 1.6 mg/kg bw) plus meglumine antimoniate via intraperitoneal, simultaneously. To evaluate antigenotoxicity (by Comet assay), each group with 10 animals received the above-mentioned control doses; single dose of isoflavones 0.8 mg/kg bw, and three groups received isoflavones (0.8 mg/kg bw) by gavage along with intraperitoneal meglumine antimoniate, which were treated with isoflavones 24 h before or after receiving meglumine antimoniate (pre-treatment and post-treatment, respectively) or simultaneously. Cells were harvested 24 h after the treatment, and the data were evaluated by ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The data from the simultaneous treatment by micronucleus test revealed that isoflavones (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg) were able to reverse the mutagenic effect of Glucantime. Moreover, all regimes of the treatment with 0.8 mg/kg bw dose were able to reduce the genotoxicity caused by meglumine antimoniate. It is suggested that the protective effect of isoflavones against DNA damage is related to their ability to reduce oxidative stress caused by the trivalent Sb(III) metabolite of meglumine antimoniate. PMID:25268948

  13. Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    1999-05-12

    DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein

  14. Effects of antidepressants on DSP4/CPT-induced DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Hilton, Benjamin A.; Cui, Kui; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a form of cell stress and injury. Increased systemic DNA damage is related to the pathogenic development of neurodegenerative diseases. Depression occurs in a relatively high percentage of patients suffering from degenerative diseases, for whom antidepressants are often used to relieve depressive symptoms. However, few studies have attempted to elucidate why different groups of antidepressants have similar effects on relieving symptoms of depression. Previously, we demonstrated that neurotoxins N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4)- and camptothecin (CPT)-induced the DNA damage response in SH-SY5Y cells, and DSP4 caused cell cycle arrest which was predominately in the S-phase. The present study shows that CPT treatment also resulted in similar cell cycle arrest. Some classic antidepressants could reduce the DNA damage response induced by DSP4 or CPT in SH-SY5Y cells. Cell viability examination demonstrated that both DSP4 and CPT caused cell death, which was prevented by spontaneous administration of some tested antidepressants. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that a majority of the tested antidepressants protect cells from being arrested in S-phase. These results suggest that blocking the DNA damage response may be an important pharmacologic characteristic of antidepressants. Exploring the underlying mechanisms may allow for advances in the effort to improve therapeutic strategies for depression appearing in degenerative and psychiatric diseases. PMID:26038195

  15. VRK1 chromatin kinase phosphorylates H2AX and is required for foci formation induced by DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Salzano, Marcella; Sanz-García, Marta; Monsalve, Diana M; Moura, David S; Lazo, Pedro A

    2015-01-01

    All types of DNA damage cause a local alteration and relaxation of chromatin structure. Sensing and reacting to this initial chromatin alteration is a necessary trigger for any type of DNA damage response (DDR). In this context, chromatin kinases are likely candidates to participate in detection and reaction to a locally altered chromatin as a consequence of DNA damage and, thus, initiate the appropriate cellular response. In this work, we demonstrate that VRK1 is a nucleosomal chromatin kinase and that its depletion causes loss of histones H3 and H4 acetylation, which are required for chromatin relaxation, both in basal conditions and after DNA damage, independently of ATM. Moreover, VRK1 directly and stably interacts with histones H2AX and H3 in basal conditions. In response to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, histone H2AX is phosphorylated in Ser139 by VRK1. The phosphorylation of H2AX and the formation of γH2AX foci induced by ionizing radiation (IR), are prevented by VRK1 depletion and are rescued by kinase-active, but not kinase-dead, VRK1. In conclusion, we found that VRK1 is a novel chromatin component that reacts to its alterations and participates very early in DDR, functioning by itself or in cooperation with ATM. PMID:25923214

  16. Use of molecular beacons for the rapid analysis of DNA damage induced by exposure to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Miyachika, Saki; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-12-01

    A rapid method for evaluating the damage caused to DNA molecules upon exposure to plasma is demonstrated. Here, we propose the use of a molecular beacon for rapid detection of DNA strand breaks induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) irradiation. Scission of the molecular beacon by APPJ irradiation leads to separation of the fluorophore-quencher pair, resulting in an increase in fluorescence that directly correlates with the DNA strand breaks. The results show that the increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the exposure time and the rate of fluorescence increase is proportional to the discharge power. This simple and rapid method allows the estimation of DNA damage induced by exposure to a non-thermal plasma.

  17. Use of molecular beacons for the rapid analysis of DNA damage induced by exposure to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Hirofumi E-mail: mizuno@ens.tut.ac.jp; Miyachika, Saki; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira E-mail: mizuno@ens.tut.ac.jp

    2015-12-28

    A rapid method for evaluating the damage caused to DNA molecules upon exposure to plasma is demonstrated. Here, we propose the use of a molecular beacon for rapid detection of DNA strand breaks induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) irradiation. Scission of the molecular beacon by APPJ irradiation leads to separation of the fluorophore-quencher pair, resulting in an increase in fluorescence that directly correlates with the DNA strand breaks. The results show that the increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the exposure time and the rate of fluorescence increase is proportional to the discharge power. This simple and rapid method allows the estimation of DNA damage induced by exposure to a non-thermal plasma.

  18. Autophagy and senescence, stress responses induced by the DNA-damaging mycotoxin alternariol.

    PubMed

    Solhaug, A; Torgersen, M L; Holme, J A; Lagadic-Gossmann, D; Eriksen, G S

    2014-12-01

    The mycotoxin alternariol (AOH), a frequent contaminant in fruit and grain, is known to induce cellular stress responses such as reactive oxygen production, DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. Cellular stress is often connected to autophagy, and we employed the RAW264.7 macrophage model to test the hypothesis that AOH induces autophagy. Indeed, AOH treatment led to a massive increase in acidic vacuoles often observed upon autophagy induction. Moreover, expression of the autophagy marker LC3 was markedly increased and there was a strong accumulation of LC3-positive puncta. Increased autophagic activity was verified biochemically by measuring the degradation rate of long-lived proteins. Furthermore, AOH induced expression of Sestrin2 and phosphorylation of AMPK as well as reduced phosphorylation of mTOR and S6 kinase, common mediators of signaling pathways involved in autophagy. Transmission electron microscopy analyzes of AOH treated cells not only clearly displayed structures associated with autophagy such as autophagosomes and autolysosomes, but also the appearance of lamellar bodies. Prolonged AOH treatment resulted in changed cell morphology from round into more star-shaped as well as increased β-galactosidase activity. This suggests that the cells eventually entered senescence. In conclusion, our data identify here AOH as an inducer of both autophagy and senescence. These effects are suggested to be to be linked to AOH-induced DSB (via a reported effect on topoisomerase activity), resulting in an activation of p53 and the Sestrin2-AMPK-mTOR-S6K signaling pathway. PMID:25456271

  19. Histone peptide AKRHRK enhances H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced DNA damage and alters its site specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Midorikawa, Kaoru; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke . E-mail: kawanisi@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp

    2005-08-12

    Histone proteins are involved in compaction of DNA and the protection of cells from oxygen toxicity. However, several studies have demonstrated that the metal-binding histone reacts with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, leading to oxidative damage to a nucleobase. We investigated whether histone can accelerate oxidative DNA damage, using a minimal model for the N-terminal tail of histone H4, CH{sub 3}CO-AKRHRK-CONH{sub 2}, which has a metal-binding site. This histone peptide enhanced DNA damage induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Cu(II), especially at cytosine residues, and induced additional DNA cleavage at the 5'-guanine of GGG sequences. The peptide also enhanced the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and ESR spin-trapping signal from H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Cu(II). Cyclic redox reactions involving histone-bound Cu(II) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, may give rise to multiple production of radicals leading to multiple hits in DNA. It is noteworthy that the histone H4 peptide with specific sequence AKRHRK can cause DNA damage rather than protection under metal-overloaded condition.

  20. Sevoflurane Induces DNA Damage Whereas Isoflurane Leads to Higher Antioxidative Status in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Thalita L. A.; Dias-Junior, Carlos A.; Possomato-Vieira, Jose S.; Gonçalves-Rizzi, Victor H.; Nogueira, Flávia R.; de Souza, Kátina M.; Braz, Leandro G.; Braz, Mariana G.

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account that there are controversial antioxidative effects of inhalational anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane and absence of comparison of genotoxicity of both anesthetics in animal model, the aim of this study was to compare DNA damage and antioxidant status in Wistar rats exposed to a single time to isoflurane or sevoflurane. The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) was performed in order to evaluate DNA damage in whole blood cells of control animals (unexposed; n = 6) and those exposed to 2% isoflurane (n = 6) or 4% sevoflurane (n = 6) for 120 min. Plasma antioxidant status was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. There was no statistically significant difference between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups regarding hemodynamic and temperature variables (P > 0.05). Sevoflurane significantly increased DNA damage compared to unexposed animals (P = 0.02). In addition, Wistar rats anesthetized with isoflurane showed higher antioxidative status (MTT) than control group (P = 0.019). There were no significant differences in DNA damage or antioxidant status between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups (P > 0.05). In conclusion, our findings suggest that, in contrast to sevoflurane exposure, isoflurane increases systemic antioxidative status, protecting cells from DNA damage in rats. PMID:26101770

  1. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 mg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by focus pattern and focus number counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (γg-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average focus counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profiles of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in γg-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not

  2. Pulsewidth-dependent nature of laser-induced DNA damage in RPE cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Rebecca M.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Kumar, Neeru; Noojin, Gary D.

    2001-07-01

    Ultrashort pulse laser radiation may produce cellular damage through unique mechanisms. Primary cultures of bovine retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were exposed to the out put of a Ti:Sapphire laser producing 30 fs (mode-locked) pulses, 44 amplified fs pulses, or continuous wave exposures at 800 nm. Laser exposures at and below the damage threshold were studied. DNA damage was detected using single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Unexposed (control) cells produced short tails with low tail moments. In contrast, all laser-exposed cells showed some degree of DNA fragmentation, but the size and shape of the resulting comets differed among the various modalities. CW-exposed cells produced generally light and relatively compact tails, suggesting fewer and larger DNA fragments, while mode-locked laser exposures (30 fs pulses) resulted in large and diffuse comets, indicating the DNA was fragmented into many very small pieces. Work is continuing to define the relationship of laser pulsewidth and intensity with the degree of DNA fragmentation. These results suggest that DNA damage may result from multiple mechanisms of laser-cell interaction, including multiphoton absorption.

  3. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy. PMID:25824410

  4. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy.

  5. Assessment of nicotine-induced DNA damage in a genotoxicological test battery.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Friehs, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Hackenberg, Stephan; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2013-02-18

    The role of the tobacco-alkaloid nicotine in tumour biology is widely discussed in the literature. Due to a strong capacity to induce angiogenesis, a pro-mutagenic potential in non-tumour and cancer cells, and a pro- and anti-apoptotic influence, nicotine seems to promote the growth of established tumours. However, results indicating DNA damage and genetic instability associated with nicotine have been contradictory thus far. A variety of markers and endpoints of genotoxicity are required to characterize the genotoxic potential of nicotine. Induction of DNA single- and double-strand breaks, the formation of micronuclei, and the induction of sister chromatid exchange and chromosome aberrations represent possible genotoxicological endpoints at different cellular levels. Human lymphocytes were exposed to nicotine concentrations between 1μM and 1mM for 24h in vitro. The comet assay, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test, the chromosome aberration (CA) test, and the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test were then applied. Viability and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry in combination with the annexin V-propidium iodide staining test. In this test setting, no enhanced DNA migration was measured by the comet assay. An increase in the micronucleus frequency was detected at a concentration of 100μM nicotine without affecting the frequency of apoptotic cells. A distinct genotoxic effect was determined by the CA test and the SCE test, with a significant increase in CA and SCE at a concentration of 1μM. In the annexin V test, nicotine did not influence the proportion of apoptotic or necrotic cells. The current data indicating the induction of CA by nicotine underscore the necessity of ongoing investigations on the potential of nicotine to initiate mutagenesis and tumour promotion. Taking into account the physiological nicotine plasma levels in smokers or in nicotine-replacement therapy, particularly the long-term use of nicotine should be critically discussed. PMID

  6. Exposure to 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field induces DNA damage-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunyun; Xia, Ruohong; Jiang, Hengjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Hong, Ling; Yu, Yunxian; Xu, Zhengping; Zeng, Qunli

    2016-08-01

    As electromagnetic field (EMF) is commonly encountered within our daily lives, the biological effects of EMF are of great concern. Autophagy is a key process for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and it can also reveal cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological effects of a 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field on autophagy and we identified its mechanism of action in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells. CHL cells were exposed to a 50Hz sinusoidal EMF at 0.4mT for 30min or 24h. In this study, we found that a 0.4mT EMF resulted in: (i) an increase in LC3-II expression and increased autophagosome formation; (ii) no significant difference in the incidence of γH2AX foci between the sham and exposure groups; (iii) reorganized actin filaments and increased pseudopodial extensions without promoting cell migration; and (iv) enhanced cell apoptosis when autophagy was blocked by Bafilomycin A1. These results implied that DNA damage was not directly involved in the autophagy induced by a 0.4mT 50Hz EMF. In addition, an EMF induced autophagy balanced the cellular homeostasis to protect the cells from severe adverse biological consequences.

  7. Growth control switch by a DNA-damage-inducible toxin-antitoxin system in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Martins, Daniel; Redder, Peter; Frandi, Antonio; Mignolet, Johann; Chapalay, Julien Bortoli; Chambon, Marc; Turcatti, Gerardo; Viollier, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems (TASs) are thought to respond to various stresses, often inducing growth-arrested (persistent) sub-populations of cells whose housekeeping functions are inhibited. Many such TASs induce this effect through the translation-dependent RNA cleavage (RNase) activity of their toxins, which are held in check by their cognate antitoxins in the absence of stress. However, it is not always clear whether specific mRNA targets of orthologous RNase toxins are responsible for their phenotypic effect, which has made it difficult to accurately place the multitude of TASs within cellular and adaptive regulatory networks. Here, we show that the TAS HigBA of Caulobacter crescentus can promote and inhibit bacterial growth dependent on the dosage of HigB, a toxin regulated by the DNA damage (SOS) repressor LexA in addition to its antitoxin HigA, and the target selectivity of HigB's mRNA cleavage activity. HigB reduced the expression of an efflux pump that is toxic to a polarity control mutant, cripples the growth of cells lacking LexA, and targets the cell cycle circuitry. Thus, TASs can have outcome switching activity in bacterial adaptive (stress) and systemic (cell cycle) networks. PMID:27572440

  8. DNA damage and effects on antioxidative enzymes in zebra fish (Danio rerio) induced by atrazine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lu-Sheng; Shao, Bo; Song, Yan; Xie, Hui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jin-Hua; Liu, Wei; Hou, Xin-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The effect of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1, 3, 5-triazine) on the activity of some antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; and guaiacol peroxidase, POD) and DNA damage induced by atrazine were investigated in zebra fish (Danio rerio). Zebra fish were exposed to four different concentrations of atrazine (0, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/L) for 7, 14, and 21 days, with three replicates of 10 fishes per treatment. Compared to the controls, the SOD activity in the 2.5 mg/L treatment was markedly stimulated in 21 days, while the SOD activities in the 5 mg/L treatment was stimulated at first and then inhibited. The change of CAT activity at 2.5 mg/L was similar to the SOD activity at 2.5 mg/L. The POD activities in the 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/L treatment were markedly higher on days 14 and 21 compared with the controls. The olive tail moments of single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) of zebra fish enhanced after treatment of different doses on days 7, 14, and 21, and significant differences were found compared to the controls. In conclusion, these findings showed the effect regularity of atrazine to zebra fish, and also provide the basis for the future research of adverse effects induced by atrazine in aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Exposure to 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field induces DNA damage-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunyun; Xia, Ruohong; Jiang, Hengjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Hong, Ling; Yu, Yunxian; Xu, Zhengping; Zeng, Qunli

    2016-08-01

    As electromagnetic field (EMF) is commonly encountered within our daily lives, the biological effects of EMF are of great concern. Autophagy is a key process for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and it can also reveal cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological effects of a 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field on autophagy and we identified its mechanism of action in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells. CHL cells were exposed to a 50Hz sinusoidal EMF at 0.4mT for 30min or 24h. In this study, we found that a 0.4mT EMF resulted in: (i) an increase in LC3-II expression and increased autophagosome formation; (ii) no significant difference in the incidence of γH2AX foci between the sham and exposure groups; (iii) reorganized actin filaments and increased pseudopodial extensions without promoting cell migration; and (iv) enhanced cell apoptosis when autophagy was blocked by Bafilomycin A1. These results implied that DNA damage was not directly involved in the autophagy induced by a 0.4mT 50Hz EMF. In addition, an EMF induced autophagy balanced the cellular homeostasis to protect the cells from severe adverse biological consequences. PMID:27177844

  10. Effect of aspirin on chromosome aberration and DNA damage induced by X-rays in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikawa, M.; Chuuriki, K.; Shibuya, K.; Seo, M.; Nagase, H.

    In order to reveal the anticlastogenic potency of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray. Aspirin at doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally or orally at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation. The anticlastogenic activity of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray was determined in the mouse micronucleus test and alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) assay in vivo. The frequency by polychromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei (MNPCEs) was decreased by about 19-61% at 0.5 h after and about 23-62% at 0.5 h before the X-ray irradiation. DNA damage by X-ray was significantly decreased by oral administration of aspirin at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation for the SCG assay. We consider aspirin can be used as preventive agents against exposure of X-ray.

  11. Acute DNA damage activates the tumour suppressor p53 to promote radiation-induced lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Castle, Katherine D.; Moding, Everett J.; Blum, Jordan M.; Williams, Nerissa; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Borst, Luke B.; Kim, Yongbaek; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic cancer therapies, such as chemoradiation, cause haematological toxicity primarily by activating the tumour suppressor p53. While inhibiting p53-mediated cell death during cancer therapy ameliorates haematologic toxicity, whether it also impacts carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of inducible p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that temporarily blocking p53 during total-body irradiation (TBI) not only ameliorates acute toxicity, but also improves long-term survival by preventing lymphoma development. Using KrasLA1 mice, we show that TBI promotes the expansion of a rare population of thymocytes that express oncogenic KrasG12D. However, blocking p53 during TBI significantly suppresses the expansion of KrasG12D-expressing thymocytes. Mechanistically, bone marrow transplant experiments demonstrate that TBI activates p53 to decrease the ability of bone marrow cells to suppress lymphoma development through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism. Together, our results demonstrate that the p53 response to acute DNA damage promotes the development of radiation-induced lymphoma. PMID:26399548

  12. Endogenous c-Myc is essential for p53-induced apoptosis in response to DNA damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phesse, T J; Myant, K B; Cole, A M; Ridgway, R A; Pearson, H; Muncan, V; van den Brink, G R; Vousden, K H; Sears, R; Vassilev, L T; Clarke, A R; Sansom, O J

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that C-MYC may be an excellent therapeutic cancer target and a number of new agents targeting C-MYC are in preclinical development. Given most therapeutic regimes would combine C-MYC inhibition with genotoxic damage, it is important to assess the importance of C-MYC function for DNA damage signalling in vivo. In this study, we have conditionally deleted the c-Myc gene in the adult murine intestine and investigated the apoptotic response of intestinal enterocytes to DNA damage. Remarkably, c-Myc deletion completely abrogated the immediate wave of apoptosis following both ionizing irradiation and cisplatin treatment, recapitulating the phenotype of p53 deficiency in the intestine. Consistent with this, c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes did not upregulate p53. Mechanistically, this was linked to an upregulation of the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which targets p53 for degradation in c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes. Further, low level overexpression of c-Myc, which does not impact on basal levels of apoptosis, elicited sustained apoptosis in response to DNA damage, suggesting c-Myc activity acts as a crucial cell survival rheostat following DNA damage. We also identify the importance of MYC during DNA damage-induced apoptosis in several other tissues, including the thymus and spleen, using systemic deletion of c-Myc throughout the adult mouse. Together, we have elucidated for the first time in vivo an essential role for endogenous c-Myc in signalling DNA damage-induced apoptosis through the control of the p53 tumour suppressor protein.

  13. Cytotoxicity, apoptosis and DNA damage induced by Alpinia galanga rhizome extract.

    PubMed

    Muangnoi, P; Lu, M; Lee, J; Thepouyporn, A; Mirzayans, R; Le, X C; Weinfeld, M; Changbumrung, S

    2007-07-01

    Alpinia galanga, or galangal, has been a popular condiment used in Thai and Asian cuisine for many years. However, relatively little is known of the potential beneficial or adverse health effects of this spice. This study was conducted to analyze the capacity of galangal extract to induce cytotoxicity and DNA damage in six different human cell lines including normal and p53-inactive fibroblasts, normal epithelial and tumour mammary cells and a lung adenocarcinoma cell line. We deliberately focused on treatment with the crude aqueous extract of galangal rhizomes, rather than compounds extracted into an organic solvent, to more closely reflect the mode of dietary consumption of galangal. The cell lines displayed a broad range of cytotoxicity. There was no evidence for preferential cytotoxicity of tumour cells, but there was an indication that p53-active cell lines may be more sensitive than their p53-inactive counterparts. The contribution of apoptosis to total cell killing was only appreciable after exposure to 300 microg/mL of extract. Apoptosis appeared to be independent of p53 expression. Exposure to as little as 100 microg/mL galangal extract generated a significant level of DNA single-strand breaks as judged by the single-cell gel electrophoresis technique (comet assay). The three major UV-absorbing compounds in the aqueous extract were identified by mass spectrometry as 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate and its deacetylated derivatives. However, when tested in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells, these compounds were not responsible for the cytotoxicity induced by the complete aqueous extract.

  14. Synthesis of PLGA nanoparticles of tea polyphenols and their strong in vivo protective effect against chemically induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Singh, Madhulika; Mishra, Sanjay; Kumar, Pradeep; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2013-01-01

    In spite of proficient results of several phytochemicals in preclinical settings, the conversion rate from bench to bedside is not very encouraging. Many reasons are attributed to this limited success, including inefficient systemic delivery and bioavailability under in vivo conditions. To achieve improved efficacy, polyphenolic constituents of black (theaflavin [TF]) and green (epigallocatechin-3-gallate [EGCG]) tea in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA-NPs) were entrapped with entrapment efficacy of ~18% and 26%, respectively. Further, their preventive potential against 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced DNA damage in mouse skin using DNA alkaline unwinding assay was evaluated. Pretreatment (topically) of mouse skin with either TF or EGCG (100 μg/mouse) doses exhibits protection of 45.34% and 28.32%, respectively, against DMBA-induced DNA damage. However, pretreatment with TF-loaded PLGA-NPs protects against DNA damage 64.41% by 1/20th dose of bulk, 71.79% by 1/10th dose of bulk, and 72.46% by 1/5th dose of bulk. Similarly, 51.28% (1/20th of bulk), 57.63% (1/10th of bulk), and 63.14% (1/5th of bulk) prevention was noted using EGCG-loaded PLGA-NP doses. These results showed that tea polyphenol-loaded PLGA-NPs have ~30-fold dose-advantage than bulk TF or EGCG doses. Additionally, TF- or EGCG-loaded PLGA-NPs showed significant potential for induction of DNA repair genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, and ERCC3) and suppression of DNA damage responsive genes (p53, p21, MDM2, GADD45α, and COX-2) as compared with respective bulk TF or EGCG doses. Taken together, TF- or EGCG-loaded PLGA-NPs showed a superior ability to prevent DMBA-induced DNA damage at much lower concentrations, thus opening a new dimension in chemoprevention research. PMID:23717041

  15. UV-induced DNA damage promotes resistance to the biotrophic pathogen Hyaloperonospora parasitica in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Bernard A; Dando, Paige K; Grice, Desma M; Mohr, Peter G; Schenk, Peer M; Cahill, David M

    2008-10-01

    Plant innate immunity to pathogenic microorganisms is activated in response to recognition of extracellular or intracellular pathogen molecules by transmembrane receptors or resistance proteins, respectively. The defense signaling pathways share components with those involved in plant responses to UV radiation, which can induce expression of plant genes important for pathogen resistance. Such intriguing links suggest that UV treatment might activate resistance to pathogens in normally susceptible host plants. Here, we demonstrate that pre-inoculative UV (254 nm) irradiation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) susceptible to infection by the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica, the causative agent of downy mildew, induces dose- and time-dependent resistance to the pathogen detectable up to 7 d after UV exposure. Limiting repair of UV photoproducts by postirradiation incubation in the dark, or mutational inactivation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase, (6-4) photoproduct photolyase, or nucleotide excision repair increased the magnitude of UV-induced pathogen resistance. In the absence of treatment with 254-nm UV, plant nucleotide excision repair mutants also defective for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer or (6-4) photoproduct photolyase displayed resistance to H. parasitica, partially attributable to short wavelength UV-B (280-320 nm) radiation emitted by incubator lights. These results indicate UV irradiation can initiate the development of resistance to H. parasitica in plants normally susceptible to the pathogen and point to a key role for UV-induced DNA damage. They also suggest UV treatment can circumvent the requirement for recognition of H. parasitica molecules by Arabidopsis proteins to activate an immune response.

  16. Inhibition of autophagy enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis by disrupting CHK1-dependent S phase arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, Jong-Shian; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yen, Wen-Yen; Tang, Yu-Shuan; Kakadiya, Rajesh B.; Su, Tsann-Long; Yih, Ling-Huei

    2014-08-01

    DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, but the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cell fate is not fully understood. BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene, is a potent DNA interstrand cross-linking agent with anticancer activity. In this study, BO-1012 was found to reduce DNA synthesis, inhibit S phase progression, and induce phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) exclusively in S phase cells. Both CHK1 and CHK2 were phosphorylated in response to BO-1012 treatment, but only depletion of CHK1, but not CHK2, impaired BO-1012-induced S phase arrest and facilitated the entry of γH2AX-positive cells into G2 phase. CHK1 depletion also significantly enhanced BO-1012-induced cell death and apoptosis. These results indicate that BO-1012-induced S phase arrest is a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. BO-1012 also resulted in marked induction of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing and redistribution, features characteristic of autophagy. Depletion of ATG7 or co-treatment of cells with BO-1012 and either 3-methyladenine or bafilomycin A1, two inhibitors of autophagy, not only reduced CHK1 phosphorylation and disrupted S phase arrest, but also increased cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP, and cell death. These results suggest that cells initiate S phase arrest and autophagy as pro-survival responses to BO-1012-induced DNA damage, and that suppression of autophagy enhances BO-1012-induced apoptosis via disruption of CHK1-dependent S phase arrest. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibitors enhanced the cytotoxicity of a DNA alkylating agent, BO-1012. • BO-1012-induced S phase arrest was a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. • Autophagy inhibition enhanced BO-1012 cytotoxicity via disrupting the S phase arrest.

  17. L-tyrosine induces DNA damage in brain and blood of rats.

    PubMed

    De Prá, Samira D T; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Vieira, Júlia S; Scaini, Giselli; Leffa, Daniela D; Fagundes, Gabriela E; Bristot, Bruno N; Borges, Gabriela D; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Andrade, Vanessa M; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene have been identified to cause tyrosinemia type II which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Studies have demonstrated that an excessive production of ROS can lead to reactions with macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Considering that the L-tyrosine may promote oxidative stress, the main objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of L-tyrosine on DNA damage determined by the alkaline comet assay, in brain and blood of rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. For chronic administration, the animals received two subcutaneous injections of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg, 12-h intervals) or saline administered for 24 days starting at postnatal day (PD) 7 (last injection at PD 31), 12 h after the last injection, the animals were killed by decapitation. We observed that acute administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. Moreover, we observed that chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in hippocampus, striatum, cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated that DNA damage can be encountered in brain from animal models of hypertyrosinemia, DNA alterations may represent a further means to explain neurological dysfunction in this inherited metabolic disorder and to reinforce the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of tyrosinemia type II. PMID:24297753

  18. L-tyrosine induces DNA damage in brain and blood of rats.

    PubMed

    De Prá, Samira D T; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Vieira, Júlia S; Scaini, Giselli; Leffa, Daniela D; Fagundes, Gabriela E; Bristot, Bruno N; Borges, Gabriela D; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Andrade, Vanessa M; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene have been identified to cause tyrosinemia type II which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Studies have demonstrated that an excessive production of ROS can lead to reactions with macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Considering that the L-tyrosine may promote oxidative stress, the main objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of L-tyrosine on DNA damage determined by the alkaline comet assay, in brain and blood of rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. For chronic administration, the animals received two subcutaneous injections of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg, 12-h intervals) or saline administered for 24 days starting at postnatal day (PD) 7 (last injection at PD 31), 12 h after the last injection, the animals were killed by decapitation. We observed that acute administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. Moreover, we observed that chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in hippocampus, striatum, cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated that DNA damage can be encountered in brain from animal models of hypertyrosinemia, DNA alterations may represent a further means to explain neurological dysfunction in this inherited metabolic disorder and to reinforce the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of tyrosinemia type II.

  19. In vitro studies on organophosphate pesticides induced oxidative DNA damage in rat lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ojha, A; Srivastava, N

    2014-02-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticides are widely used for agricultural and household pest control. We studied the genotoxicity of the commonly used OP pesticides chlorpyrifos (CPF), methyl parathion (MPT), and malathion (MLT), individually and in combination, in Wistar rat peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. DNA single-strand and double-strand breaks were measured by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; comet assay). To test whether the DNA lesions were caused by oxidative stress, the DNA repair enzymes formamidoaminopyrimidineglycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease (Endo III), which convert base damages to strand breaks, were used. Significant increases in strand breaks and in levels of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide were observed in lymphocytes treated with pesticides. MPT exposure caused the greatest DNA damage and ROS production, followed by CPF and ML. Our results demonstrate genotoxic potential of these OP pesticides.

  20. The impact of lymphocyte isolation on induced DNA damage in human blood samples measured by the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The comet assay is frequently used in human biomonitoring for the detection of exposure to genotoxic agents. Peripheral blood samples are most frequently used and tested either as whole blood or after isolation of lymphocytes (i.e. peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMC). To investigate a potential impact of lymphocyte isolation on induced DNA damage in human blood samples, we exposed blood ex vivo to mutagens with different modes of genotoxic action. The comet assay was performed either directly with whole blood at the end of the exposure period or with lymphocytes isolated directly after exposure. In addition to the recommended standard protocol for lymphocyte isolation, a shortened protocol was established to optimise the isolation procedure. The results indicate that the effects of induced DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites induced by ionising radiation and alkylants, respectively, are significantly reduced in isolated lymphocytes. In contrast, oxidative DNA base damage (induced by potassium bromate) and stable bulky adducts (induced by benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide; BPDE) seem to be less affected. Our findings suggest that in vivo-induced DNA damage might also be reduced in isolated lymphocytes in comparison with the whole blood depending of the types of DNA damage induced. Because only small genotoxic effects can generally be expected in human biomonitoring studies with the comet assay after occupational and environmental exposure to genotoxic agents, any loss might be relevant and should be avoided. The possibility of such effects and their potential impact on variability of comet assay results in human biomonitoring should be considered when performing or evaluating such kind of studies.

  1. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  2. Ordered conformational changes in damaged DNA induced by nucleotide excision repair factors.

    PubMed

    Tapias, Angels; Auriol, Jerome; Forget, Diane; Enzlin, Jacqueline H; Schärer, Orlando D; Coin, Frederic; Coulombe, Benoit; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2004-04-30

    In response to genotoxic attacks, cells activate sophisticated DNA repair pathways such as nucleotide excision repair (NER), which consists of damage removal via dual incision and DNA resynthesis. Using permanganate footprinting as well as highly purified factors, we show that NER is a dynamic process that takes place in a number of successive steps during which the DNA is remodeled around the lesion in response to the various NER factors. XPC/HR23B first recognizes the damaged structure and initiates the opening of the helix from position -3 to +6. TFIIH is then recruited and, in the presence of ATP, extends the opening from position -6 to +6; it also displaces XPC downstream from the lesion, thereby providing the topological structure for recruiting XPA and RPA, which will enlarge the opening. Once targeted by XPG, the damaged DNA is further melted from position -19 to +8. XPG and XPF/ERCC1 endonucleases then cut the damaged DNA at the limit of the opened structure that was previously "labeled" by the positioning of XPC/HR23B and TFIIH. PMID:14981083

  3. Ordered Conformational Changes in Damaged DNA Induced by Nucleotide Excision Repair Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Tapias, Angels; Auriol, Jerome; Forget, Diane; Enzlin, Jacqueline H.; Schärer, Orlando D; Coin, Frederic; Coulombe, Benoit; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    In response to genotoxic attacks, cells activate sophisticated DNA repair pathways such as nucleotide excision repair (NER), which consists of damage removal via dual incision and DNA resynthesis. Using permanganate footprinting as well as highly purified factors, we show that NER is a dynamic process that takes place in a number of successive steps during which the DNA is remodeled around the lesion in response to the various NER factors. XPC/HR23B first recognizes the damaged structure and initiates the opening of the helix from position −3 to +6. TFIIH is then recruited and, in the presence of ATP, extends the opening from position −6 to +6; it also displaces XPC downstream from the lesion, thereby providing the topological structure for recruiting XPA and RPA, which will enlarge the opening. Once targeted by XPG, the damaged DNA is further melted from position −19 to +8. XPG and XPF/ERCC1 endo-nucleases then cut the damaged DNA at the limit of the opened structure that was previously “labeled” by the positioning of XPC/HR23B and TFIIH. PMID:14981083

  4. Assessment of gamma ray-induced DNA damage in Lasioderma serricorne using the comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Imamura, Taro; Todoriki, Setsuko

    2012-03-01

    We attempted a DNA comet assay under alkaline conditions to verify the irradiation treatment of pests. Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius) were chosen as test insects and irradiated with gamma rays from a 60Co source at 1 kGy. We conducted the comet assay immediately after irradiation and over time for 7 day. Severe DNA fragmentation in L. serricorne cells was observed just after irradiation and the damage was repaired during the post-irradiation period in a time-dependent manner. The parameters of the comet image analysis were calculated, and the degree of DNA damage and repair were evaluated. Values for the Ratio (a percentage determined by fluorescence in the damaged area to overall luminance, including intact DNA and the damaged area of a comet image) of individual cells showed that no cells in the irradiated group were included in the Ratio<0.1 category, the lowest grade. This finding was observed consistently throughout the 7-day post-irradiation period. We suggest that the Ratio values of individual cells can be used as an index of irradiation history and conclude that the DNA comet assay under alkaline conditions, combined with comet image analysis, can be used to identify irradiation history.

  5. Gene 33/Mig6 inhibits hexavalent chromium-induced DNA damage and cell transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyoung; Li, Cen; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Xu, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human lung carcinogens and environmental/occupational hazards. The molecular mechanisms of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis appear to be complex and are poorly defined. In this study, we investigated the potential role of Gene 33 (ERRFI1, Mig6), a multifunctional adaptor protein, in Cr(VI)-mediated lung carcinogenesis. We show that the level of Gene 33 protein is suppressed by both acute and chronic Cr(VI) treatments in a dose- and time-dependent fashion in BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells. The inhibition also occurs in A549 lung bronchial carcinoma cells. Cr(VI) suppresses Gene 33 expression mainly through post-transcriptional mechanisms, although the mRNA level of gene 33 also tends to be lower upon Cr(VI) treatments. Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage appears primarily in the S phases of the cell cycle despite the high basal DNA damage signals at the G2M phase. Knockdown of Gene 33 with siRNA significantly elevates Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage in both BEAS-2B and A549 cells. Depletion of Gene 33 also promotes Cr(VI)-induced micronucleus (MN) formation and cell transformation in BEAS-2B cells. Our results reveal a novel function of Gene 33 in Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage and lung epithelial cell transformation. We propose that in addition to its role in the canonical EGFR signaling pathway and other signaling pathways, Gene 33 may also inhibit Cr(VI)-induced lung carcinogenesis by reducing DNA damage triggered by Cr(VI). PMID:26760771

  6. Sequence-specific DNA damage induced by ultraviolet A-irradiated folic acid via its photolysis product.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2003-02-15

    DNA damage mediated by photosensitizers participates in solar carcinogenesis. Fluorescence measurement and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that photoirradiated folic acid, one of the photosensitizers in cells, generates pterine-6-carboxylic acid (PCA). Experiments using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from a human gene showed that ultraviolet A-irradiated folic acid or PCA caused DNA cleavage specifically at consecutive G residues in double-stranded DNA after Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase or piperidine treatment. The amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2(')-deoxyguanosine formed through this DNA photoreaction in double-stranded DNA exceeded that in single-stranded DNA. Kinetic studies suggested that DNA damage is caused mainly by photoexcited PCA generated from folic acid rather than by folic acid itself. In conclusion, photoirradiated folic acid generates PCA, which induces DNA photooxidation specifically at consecutive G residues through electron transfer. Excess intake of folic acid supplements may increase a risk of skin cancer by solar ultraviolet light. PMID:12573286

  7. Analogs of the novel phytohormone, strigolactone, trigger apoptosis and synergize with PARP inhibitors by inducing DNA damage and inhibiting DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Colin P.; Wang, Victor S.; Lapier, Jennifer; Schlarbaum, Jamie P.; Dayani, Yaron; Artuso, Emma; Prandi, Cristina; Koltai, Hinanit; Agama, Keli; Pommier, Yves; Chen, Yu; Tricoli, Lucas; LaRocque, Jeannine R.; Albanese, Christopher; Yarden, Ronit I.

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones are a novel class of plant hormones produced in roots that regulate shoot and root development. We previously reported that strigolactone analogs (SLs) induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth of human breast cancer xenografts in mice. SLs had no significant influences on non-transformed cells. Here we report for the first time that SLs induce DNA damage in the form of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and activate the DNA damage response signaling by inducing phosphorylation of ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs and co-localization of the DNA damage signaling protein, 53BP1, with γH2AX nuclear foci. We further report that in addition to DSBs induction, SLs simultaneously impair DSBs repair, mostly homology-directed repair (HDR) and to a lesser extent non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In response to SLs, RAD51, the homologous DSB repair protein, is ubiquitinated and targeted for proteasomal degradation and it fails to co-localize with γH2AX foci. Interestingly, SLs synergize with DNA damaging agents-based therapeutics. The combination of PARP inhibitors and SLs showed an especially potent synergy, but only in BRCA1-proficient cells. No synergy was observed between SLs and PARP inhibitors in BRCA1-deficient cells, supporting a role for SLs in HDR impairment. Together, our data suggest that SLs increase genome instability and cell death by a unique mechanism of inducing DNA damage and inhibiting DNA repair. PMID:26910887

  8. Protective effect of Nigella sativa and thymoquinone on serum/glucose deprivation-induced DNA damage in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Babazadeh, Beheshteh; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Safarpour Kapurchal, Elham; Parsaee, Heydar; Nasri, Sima; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The discovery and development of natural products with potent antioxidant properties has been one of the most interesting and promising approaches in the search for treatment of CNS injuries. The most significant consequence of the oxidative stress is thought to be the DNA modifications, which can become permanent via the formation of mutations and other types of genomic instability resulting cellular dysfunction. Serum/glucose deprivation (SGD) has served as an excellent in vitro model for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal damage during ischemia and for the development of neuroprotective drugs against ischemia-induced brain injury. Nigella sativa (N. sativa) seeds and thymoquinone (TQ), its most abundant constituent, have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, chemopreventive and anti-neoplastic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, in this study we investigated genoprotective effects of N. sativa and TQ on DNA damage of PC12 cells under SGD condition. Materials and Methods: PC12 cells were cultured in DMEM medium containing 10% (v/v) fetal bovine serum, 100 units/ml penicillin, and 100 µg/ml streptomycin. Initially cells were pretreated with different concentrations of N. sativa extract (NSE), (10, 50, 250 µg/ml) and TQ (1, 5, 10 µg/ml) for 6 h and then deprived of serum/glucose (SGD) for 18 h. The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate the effect of these compounds on DNA damage following ischemic insult. The amount of DNA in the comet tail (% tail DNA) was measured as an indicator of DNA damage. Results: A significant increase in the % tail DNA was seen in nuclei of cells following SGD induced DNA damage (p<0.001). In the control groups, no significant difference was found in the % tail DNA between NSE- or TQ-pretreated and vehicle-pretreated PC12 cells (p>0.05). NSE and TQ pretreatment resulted in a significant decrease in DNA damage following ischemic insult (p<0.001). This suppression of DNA

  9. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Mantena, Sudheer K; Meeran, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells.

  10. Reversal of DNA damage induced Topoisomerase 2 DNA–protein crosslinks by Tdp2

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Perera, Lalith; Strom, Christina N.; Waters, Crystal A.; Monian, Brinda; Appel, C. Denise; Vilas, Caroline K.; Williams, Jason G.; Ramsden, Dale A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (Tdp2) reverses Topoisomerase 2 (Top2) DNA–protein crosslinks triggered by Top2 engagement of DNA damage or poisoning by anticancer drugs. Tdp2 deficiencies are linked to neurological disease and cellular sensitivity to Top2 poisons. Herein, we report X-ray crystal structures of ligand-free Tdp2 and Tdp2-DNA complexes with alkylated and abasic DNA that unveil a dynamic Tdp2 active site lid and deep substrate binding trench well-suited for engaging the diverse DNA damage triggers of abortive Top2 reactions. Modeling of a proposed Tdp2 reaction coordinate, combined with mutagenesis and biochemical studies support a single Mg2+-ion mechanism assisted by a phosphotyrosyl-arginine cation-π interface. We further identify a Tdp2 active site SNP that ablates Tdp2 Mg2+ binding and catalytic activity, impairs Tdp2 mediated NHEJ of tyrosine blocked termini, and renders cells sensitive to the anticancer agent etoposide. Collectively, our results provide a structural mechanism for Tdp2 engagement of heterogeneous DNA damage that causes Top2 poisoning, and indicate that evaluation of Tdp2 status may be an important personalized medicine biomarker informing on individual sensitivities to chemotherapeutic Top2 poisons. PMID:27060144

  11. Troglitazone, but not rosiglitazone, damages mitochondrial DNA and induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rachek, Lyudmila I.; Yuzefovych, Larysa V.; LeDoux, Susan P.; Julie, Neil L.; Wilson, Glenn L.

    2009-11-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as troglitazone (TRO) and rosiglitazone (ROSI), improve insulin resistance by acting as ligands for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). TRO was withdrawn from the market because of reports of serious hepatotoxicity. A growing body of evidence suggests that TRO caused mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of apoptosis in human hepatocytes but its mechanisms of action remain unclear. We hypothesized that damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an initiating event involved in TRO-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes were exposed to TRO and ROSI. The results obtained revealed that TRO, but not ROSI at equimolar concentrations, caused a substantial increase in mtDNA damage and decreased ATP production and cellular viability. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetyl cystein (NAC), significantly diminished the TRO-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting involvement of ROS in TRO-induced hepatocyte cytotoxicity. The PPARgamma antagonist (GW9662) did not block the TRO-induced decrease in cell viability, indicating that the TRO-induced hepatotoxicity is PPARgamma-independent. Furthermore, TRO induced hepatocyte apoptosis, caspase-3 cleavage and cytochrome c release. Targeting of a DNA repair protein to mitochondria by protein transduction using a fusion protein containing the DNA repair enzyme Endonuclease III (EndoIII) from Escherichia coli, a mitochondrial translocation sequence (MTS) and the protein transduction domain (PTD) from HIV-1 TAT protein protected hepatocytes against TRO-induced toxicity. Overall, our results indicate that significant mtDNA damage caused by TRO is a prime initiator of the hepatoxicity caused by this drug.

  12. Regulation of plant MSH2 and MSH6 genes in the UV-B-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lario, Luciana D; Ramirez-Parra, Elena; Gutierrez, Crisanto; Casati, Paula; Spampinato, Claudia P

    2011-05-01

    Deleterious effects of UV-B radiation on DNA include the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs). These lesions must be repaired to maintain the integrity of DNA and provide genetic stability. Of the several repair systems involved in the recognition and removal of UV-B-induced lesions in DNA, the focus in the present study was on the mismatch repair system (MMR). The contribution of MutSα (MSH2-MSH6) to UV-induced DNA lesion repair and cell cycle regulation was investigated. MSH2 and MSH6 genes in Arabidopsis and maize are up-regulated by UV-B, indicating that MMR may have a role in UV-B-induced DNA damage responses. Analysis of promoter sequences identified MSH6 as a target of the E2F transcription factors. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, MSH6 was experimentally validated as an E2F target gene, suggesting an interaction between MMR genes and the cell cycle control. Mutations in MSH2 or MSH6 caused an increased accumulation of CPDs relative to wild-type plants. In addition, msh2 mutant plants showed a different expression pattern of cell cycle marker genes after the UV-B treatment when compared with wild-type plants. Taken together, these data provide evidence that plant MutSα is involved in a UV-B-induced DNA damage response pathway.

  13. Accumulation of DNA damage-induced chromatin alterations in tissue-specific stem cells: the driving force of aging?

    PubMed

    Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of DNA damage leading to stem cell exhaustion has been proposed to be a principal mechanism of aging. Using 53BP1-foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) in mouse epidermis were analyzed for age-related DNA damage response (DDR). We observed increasing amounts of 53BP1-foci during the natural aging process independent of telomere shortening and after protracted low-dose radiation, suggesting substantial accumulation of DSBs in HFSCs. Electron microscopy combined with immunogold-labeling showed multiple small 53BP1 clusters diffusely distributed throughout the highly compacted heterochromatin of aged HFSCs, but single large 53BP1 clusters in irradiated HFSCs. These remaining 53BP1 clusters did not colocalize with core components of non-homologous end-joining, but with heterochromatic histone modifications. Based on these results we hypothesize that these lesions were not persistently unrepaired DSBs, but may reflect chromatin rearrangements caused by the repair or misrepair of DSBs. Flow cytometry showed increased activation of repair proteins and damage-induced chromatin modifications, triggering apoptosis and cellular senescence in irradiated, but not in aged HFSCs. These results suggest that accumulation of DNA damage-induced chromatin alterations, whose structural dimensions reflect the complexity of the initial genotoxic insult, may lead to different DDR events, ultimately determining the biological outcome of HFSCs. Collectively, our findings support the hypothesis that aging might be largely the remit of structural changes to chromatin potentially leading to epigenetically induced transcriptional deregulation.

  14. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS. PMID:24482192

  15. Nuclear DNA damage-triggered NLRP3 inflammasome activation promotes UVB-induced inflammatory responses in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Nakashima, Masaya; Suzuki, Yoshiharu

    2016-08-26

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight can result in DNA damage and an inflammatory reaction of the skin commonly known as sunburn, which in turn can lead to cutaneous tissue disorders. However, little has been known about how UV-induced DNA damage mediates the release of inflammatory mediators from keratinocytes. Here, we show that UVB radiation intensity-dependently increases NLRP3 gene expression and IL-1β production in human keratinocytes. Knockdown of NLRP3 with siRNA suppresses UVB-induced production of not only IL-1β, but also other inflammatory mediators, including IL-1α, IL-6, TNF-α, and PGE2. In addition, inhibition of DNA damage repair by knockdown of XPA, which is a major component of the nucleotide excision repair system, causes accumulation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. In vivo immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that NLRP3 expression is also elevated in UV-irradiated human epidermis. Overall, our findings indicate that UVB-induced DNA damage initiates NLRP3 inflammasome activation, leading to release of various inflammatory mediators from human keratinocytes. PMID:27343554

  16. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS.

  17. The use of ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of ionizing-radiation-induced damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C P; Jirasek, A

    2009-04-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) was used to determine damage done in both calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and a short stranded DNA oligomer (SS-DNA) due to ionizing radiation from a medical (60)Co radiation therapy unit used in the treatment of cancer. Spectra were acquired at incident UV wavelengths of 248, 257, and 264 nm in order to utilize the differences in UVRR cross-sections of the bases with wavelength. Through the analysis of difference spectra between irradiated and unirradiated DNA at each of the incident UV wavelengths, damage to CT- and SS-DNA was observed and identified. Significant radiation-induced increases in the difference spectra of the CT-DNA indicated disruption of the stable, stacked structure of its bases, as well as the disruption of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds between the base pairs. Base unstacking was not as evident in the SS-DNA, while radiation-induced spectral decreases suggest disruption of the structure of the nucleotides. As demonstrated, UVRRS has the ability to highlight contributions from specific moieties with the use of varying incident UV wavelengths, thus enhancing the already information-rich content of the Raman spectra.

  18. Reduction of DNA damage induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles through Nrf2 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhiqin; Niu, Yujie; Wang, Qian; Shi, Lei; Guo, Huicai; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Yue; Liu, Shufeng; Liu, Chao; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Rong

    2015-11-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (Nano-TiO2) are widely used to additives in cosmetics, pharmaceutical, paints and foods. Recent studies have demonstrated that Nano-TiO2 induces DNA damage and increased the risk of cancer and the mechanism might relate with oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), an anti-oxidative mediator, on DNA damage induced by Nano-TiO2. Wildtype, Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2(-/-)) and tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) pre-treated HepG2 cells and mice were treated with Nano-TiO2. And then the oxidative stress and DNA damage were evaluated. Our data showed that DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and MDA content in Nano-TiO2 exposed cells were significantly increased than those of control in dose dependent manners. Nrf2/ARE droved the downstream genes including NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinine] 1(NQO1), heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) expression were significantly higher in wildtype HepG2 cells after Nano-TiO2 treatment. After treatment with Nano-TiO2, the DNA damages were significantly increased in Nrf(-/-) cells and mice whereas significantly decreased in tBHQ pre-treatment cells and mice, compared with the wildtype HepG2 cells and mice, respectively. Our results indicated that the acquired of Nrf2 leads to a decreased susceptibility to DNA damages induction by Nano-TiO2 and decreasing of risk of cancer which would provide a strategy for a more efficacious sensitization of against of Nano-TiO2 toxication.

  19. Aluminum induces oxidative burst, cell wall NADH peroxidase activity, and DNA damage in root cells of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Achary, V Mohan M; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Panda, Brahma B

    2012-08-01

    Plants under stress incur an oxidative burst that involves a rapid and transient overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS: O(2) (•-) , H(2) O(2) , (•) OH). We hypothesized that aluminum (Al), an established soil pollutant that causes plant stress, would induce an oxidative burst through the activation of cell wall-NADH peroxidase (NADH-PX) and/or plasma membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NADPH-OX), leading to DNA damage in the root cells of Allium cepa L. Growing roots of A. cepa were treated with Al(3+) (800 μM of AlCl(3) ) for 3 or 6 hr without or with the pretreatment of inhibitors specific to NADH-PX and NADPH-OX for 2 hr. At the end of the treatment, the extent of ROS generation, cell death, and DNA damage were determined. The cell wall-bound protein (CWP) fractions extracted from the untreated control and the Al-treated roots under the aforementioned experimental conditions were also subjected to in vitro studies, which measured the extent of activation of peroxidase/oxidase, generation of (•) OH, and DNA damage. Overall, the present study demonstrates that the cell wall-bound NADH-PX contributes to the Al-induced oxidative burst through the generation of ROS that lead to cell death and DNA damage in the root cells of A. cepa. Furthermore, the in vitro studies revealed that the CWP fraction by itself caused DNA damage in the presence of NADH, supporting a role for NADH-PX in the stress response. Altogether, this study underscores the crucial function of the cell wall-bound NADH-PX in the oxidative burst-mediated cell death and DNA damage in plants under Al stress.

  20. Base damage within single-strand DNA underlies in vivo hypermutability induced by a ubiquitous environmental agent.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kin; Sterling, Joan F; Roberts, Steven A; Bhagwat, Ashok S; Resnick, Michael A; Gordenin, Dmitry A

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA must be in single-strand form for important transactions such as replication, transcription, and recombination to occur. The single-strand DNA (ssDNA) is more prone to damage than double-strand DNA (dsDNA), due to greater exposure of chemically reactive moieties in the nitrogenous bases. Thus, there can be agents that damage regions of ssDNA in vivo while being inert toward dsDNA. To assess the potential hazard posed by such agents, we devised an ssDNA-specific mutagenesis reporter system in budding yeast. The reporter strains bear the cdc13-1 temperature-sensitive mutation, such that shifting to 37°C results in telomere uncapping and ensuing 5' to 3' enzymatic resection. This exposes the reporter region, containing three closely-spaced reporter genes, as a long 3' ssDNA overhang. We validated the ability of the system to detect mutagenic damage within ssDNA by expressing a modified human single-strand specific cytosine deaminase, APOBEC3G. APOBEC3G induced a high density of substitutions at cytosines in the ssDNA overhang strand, resulting in frequent, simultaneous inactivation of two reporter genes. We then examined the mutagenicity of sulfites, a class of reactive sulfur oxides to which humans are exposed frequently via respiration and food intake. Sulfites, at a concentration similar to that found in some foods, induced a high density of mutations, almost always as substitutions at cytosines in the ssDNA overhang strand, resulting in simultaneous inactivation of at least two reporter genes. Furthermore, sulfites formed a long-lived adducted 2'-deoxyuracil intermediate in DNA that was resistant to excision by uracil-DNA N-glycosylase. This intermediate was bypassed by error-prone translesion DNA synthesis, frequently involving Pol ζ, during repair synthesis. Our results suggest that sulfite-induced lesions in DNA can be particularly deleterious, since cells might not possess the means to repair or bypass such lesions accurately.

  1. The role of intracellular zinc in chromium(VI)-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Emil; Cervinka, Miroslav

    2006-09-25

    Several studies have demonstrated that zinc is required for the optimal functioning of the skin. Changes in intracellular zinc concentrations have been associated with both improved protection of skin cells against various noxious factors as well as with increased susceptibility to external stress. Still, little is known about the role of intracellular zinc in hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-induced skin injury. To address this question, the effects of zinc deficiency or supplementation on Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, DNA injury and cell death were investigated in human diploid dermal fibroblasts during 48 h. Zinc levels in fibroblasts were manipulated by pretreatment of cells with 100 microM ZnSO4 and 4 or 25 microM zinc chelator TPEN. Cr(VI) (50, 10 and 1 microM) was found to produce time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity resulting in oxidative stress, suppression of antioxidant systems and activation of p53-dependent apoptosis which is reported for the first time in this model in relation to environmental Cr(VI). Increased intracellular zinc partially attenuated Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis by enhancing cellular antioxidant systems while inhibiting Cr(VI)-dependent apoptosis by preventing the activation of caspase-3. Decreased intracellular zinc enhanced cytotoxic effects of all the tested Cr(VI) concentrations, leading to rapid loss of cell membrane integrity and nuclear dispersion--hallmarks of necrosis. These new findings suggest that Cr(VI) as a model environmental toxin may damage in deeper regions residing skin fibroblasts whose susceptibility to such toxin depends among others on their intracellular Zn levels. Further investigation of the impact of Zn status on skin cells as well as any other cell populations exposed to Cr(VI) or other heavy metals is warranted.

  2. Albendazole induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in the parasitic protozoan Giardia duodenalis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Argüello-García, Raúl; Saavedra, Emma; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The control of Giardia duodenalis infections is carried out mainly by drugs, among these albendazole (ABZ) is commonly used. Although the cytotoxic effect of ABZ usually involves binding to β-tubulin, it has been suggested that oxidative stress may also play a role in its parasiticidal mechanism. In this work the effect of ABZ in Giardia clones that are susceptible or resistant to different concentrations (1.35, 8, and 250 μM) of this drug was analyzed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were induced by ABZ in susceptible clones and this was associated with a decrease in growth that was alleviated by cysteine supplementation. Remarkably, ABZ-resistant clones exhibited partial cross-resistance to H2O2, whereas a Giardia H2O2-resistant strain can grow in the presence of ABZ. Lipid oxidation and protein carbonylation in ABZ-treated parasites did not show significant differences as compared to untreated parasites; however, ABZ induced the formation of 8OHdG adducts and DNA degradation, indicating nucleic acid oxidative damage. This was supported by observations of histone H2AX phosphorylation in ABZ-susceptible trophozoites treated with 250 μM ABZ. Flow cytometry analysis showed that ABZ partially arrested cell cycle in drug-susceptible clones at G2/M phase at the expense of cells in G1 phase. Also, ABZ treatment resulted in phosphatidylserine exposure on the parasite surface, an event related to apoptosis. All together these data suggest that ROS induced by ABZ affect Giardia genetic material through oxidative stress mechanisms and subsequent induction of apoptotic-like events. PMID:26300866

  3. Enhanced susceptibility of ovaries from obese mice to 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Nteeba, Jackson; Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-01-01

    7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) depletes ovarian follicles and induces DNA damage in extra-ovarian tissues, thus, we investigated ovarian DMBA-induced DNA damage. Additionally, since obesity is associated with increased offspring birth defect incidence, we hypothesized that a DMBA-induced DNA damage response (DDR) is compromised in ovaries from obese females. Wild type (lean) non agouti (a/a) and KK.Cg-Ay/J heterozygote (obese) mice were dosed with sesame oil or DMBA (1mg/kg; intraperitoneal injection) at 18 wks of age, for 14 days. Total ovarian RNA and protein were isolated and abundance of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm), X-ray repair complementing defective repair in chinese hamster cells 6 (Xrcc6), Breast cancer type 1 (Brca1), Rad 51 homolog (Rad51), Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (Parp1) and Protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide (Prkdc) were quantified by RT-PCR or Western blot. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) level was determined by Western blotting. Obesity decreased (P < 0.05) basal protein abundance of PRKDC and BRCA1 proteins but increased (P < 0.05) γH2AX and PARP1 proteins. Ovarian ATM, XRCC6, PRKDC, RAD51 and PARP1 proteins were increased (P < 0.05) by DMBA exposure in lean mice. A blunted DMBA-induced increase (P < 0.05) in XRCC6, PRKDC, RAD51 and BRCA1 was observed in ovaries from obese mice, relative to lean counterparts. Taken together, DMBA exposure induced γH2AX as well as the ovarian DDR, supporting that DMBA causes ovarian DNA damage. Additionally, ovarian DDR was partially attenuated in obese females raising concern that obesity may be an additive factor during chemical-induced ovotoxicity. PMID:25448685

  4. Effect of ATM and HDAC Inhibition on Etoposide-Induced DNA Damage in Porcine Early Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, HaiYang; Luo, YiBo; Lin, ZiLi; Lee, In-Won; Kwon, Jeongwoo; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte maturation and embryonic development are sensitive to DNA damage. Compared with somatic cells or oocytes, little is known about the response to DNA damage in early preimplantation embryos. In this study, we examined DNA damage checkpoints and DNA repair mechanisms in parthenogenetic preimplantation porcine embryos. We found that most of the etoposide-treated embryos showed delay in cleavage and ceased development before the blastocyst stage. In DNA-damaged embryos, the earliest positive TUNEL signals were detected on Day 5 of in vitro culture. Caffeine, which is an ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein) kinase inhibitor, and KU55933, which is an ATM kinase inhibitor, were equally effective in rescuing the etoposide-induced cell-cycle blocks. This indicates that ATM plays a central role in the regulation of the checkpoint mechanisms. Treating the embryos with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) increased embryonic development and reduced etoposide-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). The mRNA expression of genes involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways for DSB repair was reduced upon HDACi treatment in 5-day-old embryos. Furthermore, HDACi treatment increased the expression levels of pluripotency-related genes (OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG) and decreased the expression levels of apoptosis-related genes (CASP3 and BAX). These results indicate that early embryonic cleavage and development are disturbed by etoposide-induced DNA damage. ATMi (caffeine or KU55933) treatment bypasses the checkpoint while HDACi treatment improves the efficiency of DSB repair to increase the cleavage and blastocyst rate in porcine early preimplantation embryos. PMID:26556501

  5. Effect of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate on brain mitochondrial DNA damage and seizures induced by kainic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiro-aki; Mohanan, Parayanthala V

    2003-07-20

    The effects of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate on brain mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and seizures induced by kainic acid were examined both in vivo and in vitro. An intraperitoneal (ip) injection of kainic acid (45 mg/kg) produced broad-spectrum limbic and severe sustained seizures in all of the treated mice. The seizures were abolished when alpha-ketoglutarate (2 g/kg) or oxaloacetate (1 g/kg) was injected intraperitoneally in the animals 1 min before kainic acid administration. In addition, the administration of kainic acid caused damage to mtDNA in brain frontal and middle cortex of mice. These effects were completely abolished by the ip preinjection of alpha-ketoglutarate (2 g/kg) or oxaloacetate (1 g/kg). In vitro exposure of kainic acid (0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 mM) to brain homogenate inflicted damage to mtDNA in a concentration-dependent manner. The damage of mtDNA induced by 1.0 mM kainic acid was attenuated by the co-treatment with alpha-ketoglutarate (2.5 or 5.0 mM) or oxaloacetate (0.75 or 1.0 mM). Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro exposure of kainic acid elicited an increase in lipid peroxidation. However, the increased lipid peroxidation was completely inhibited by cotreatment of alpha-ketoglutarate or oxaloacetate. These results suggest that alpha-keto acids such as alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate play a role in the inhibition of seizures and subsequent mtDNA damage induced by the excitotoxic/neurotoxic agent, kainic acid.

  6. Prolonged mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response at telomeres that determines cell survival.

    PubMed

    Hain, Karolina O; Colin, Didier J; Rastogi, Shubhra; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2016-05-27

    A delay in the completion of metaphase induces a stress response that inhibits further cell proliferation or induces apoptosis. This response is thought to protect against genomic instability and is important for the effects of anti-mitotic cancer drugs. Here, we show that mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) at telomeres in non-apoptotic cells. This pathway is under the control of Mcl-1 and other Bcl-2 family proteins and requires caspase-9, caspase-3/7 and the endonuclease CAD/DFF40. The gradual caspase-dependent loss of the shelterin complex protein TRF2 from telomeres promotes a DDR that involves DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Suppression of mitotic telomere damage by enhanced expression of TRF2, or the inhibition of either caspase-3/7 or DNA-PK during mitotic arrest, promotes subsequent cell survival. Thus, we demonstrate that mitotic stress is characterised by the sub-apoptotic activation of a classical caspase pathway, which promotes telomere deprotection, activates DNA damage signalling, and determines cell fate in response to a prolonged delay in mitosis.

  7. Prolonged mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response at telomeres that determines cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Hain, Karolina O.; Colin, Didier J.; Rastogi, Shubhra; Allan, Lindsey A.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    A delay in the completion of metaphase induces a stress response that inhibits further cell proliferation or induces apoptosis. This response is thought to protect against genomic instability and is important for the effects of anti-mitotic cancer drugs. Here, we show that mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) at telomeres in non-apoptotic cells. This pathway is under the control of Mcl-1 and other Bcl-2 family proteins and requires caspase-9, caspase-3/7 and the endonuclease CAD/DFF40. The gradual caspase-dependent loss of the shelterin complex protein TRF2 from telomeres promotes a DDR that involves DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Suppression of mitotic telomere damage by enhanced expression of TRF2, or the inhibition of either caspase-3/7 or DNA-PK during mitotic arrest, promotes subsequent cell survival. Thus, we demonstrate that mitotic stress is characterised by the sub-apoptotic activation of a classical caspase pathway, which promotes telomere deprotection, activates DNA damage signalling, and determines cell fate in response to a prolonged delay in mitosis. PMID:27230693

  8. Evaluation of γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in two species of bivalves and their relative sensitivity using comet assay.

    PubMed

    Praveen Kumar, M K; Shyama, S K; Sonaye, B S; Naik, U Roshini; Kadam, S B; Bipin, P D; D'costa, A; Chaubey, R C

    2014-05-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce genetic damage in diverse groups of organisms. Under accidental situations, large quantities of radioactive elements get released into the environment and radiation emitted from these radionuclides may adversely affect both the man and the non-human biota. The present study is aimed (a) to know the genotoxic effect of gamma radiation on aquatic fauna employing two species of selected bivalves, (b) to evaluate the possible use of 'Comet assay' for detecting genetic damage in haemocytes of bivalves as a biomarker for environmental biomonitoring and also (c) to compare the relative sensitivity of two species of bivalves viz. Paphia malabarica and Meretrix casta to gamma radiation. The comet assays was optimized and validated using different concentrations (18, 32 and 56 mg/L) of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), a direct-acting reference genotoxic agent, to which the bivalves were exposed for various times (24, 48 and 72 h). Bivalves were irradiated (single acute exposure) with 5 different doses (viz. 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy) of gamma radiation and their genotoxic effects on the haemocytes were studied using the comet assay. Haemolymph was collected from the adductor muscle at 24, 48 and 72 h of both EMS-exposed and irradiated bivalves and comet assay was carried out using standard protocol. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed as indicated by an increase in % tail DNA damage at different concentrations of EMS and all the doses of gamma radiation as compared to controls in both bivalve species. This showed a dose-dependent increase of genetic damage induced in bivalves by EMS as well as gamma radiation. Further, the highest DNA damage was observed at 24h. The damage gradually decreased with time, i.e. was smaller at 48 and 72 h than at 24h post irradiation in both species of bivalves. This may indicate repair of the damaged DNA and/or loss of heavily damaged cells as the post irradiation time advanced. The present study

  9. Differential chromatin proteomics of the MMS-induced DNA damage response in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein enrichment by sub-cellular fractionation was combined with differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (DIGE) to address the detection of the low abundance chromatin proteins in the budding yeast proteome. Comparisons of whole-cell extracts and chromatin fractions were used to provide a measure of the degree of chromatin association for individual proteins, which could be compared across sample treatments. The method was applied to analyze the effect of the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) on levels of chromatin-associated proteins. Results Up-regulation of several previously characterized DNA damage checkpoint-regulated proteins, such as Rnr4, Rpa1 and Rpa2, was observed. In addition, several novel DNA damage responsive proteins were identified and assessed for genotoxic sensitivity using either DAmP (decreased abundance by mRNA perturbation) or knockout strains, including Acf2, Arp3, Bmh1, Hsp31, Lsp1, Pst2, Rnr4, Rpa1, Rpa2, Ste4, Ycp4 and Yrb1. A strain in which the expression of the Ran-GTPase binding protein Yrb1 was reduced was found to be hypersensitive to genotoxic stress. Conclusion The described method was effective at unveiling chromatin-associated proteins that are less likely to be detected in the absence of fractionation. Several novel proteins with altered chromatin abundance were identified including Yrb1, pointing to a role for this nuclear import associated protein in DNA damage response. PMID:21967861

  10. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human ATAD5 is an excellent biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATADS protein levels increase post-transcriptionally following exposure to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Here we report a novel quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-Iuciferase assay that can moni...

  11. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  12. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong-Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Yi, Joo Mi; Chung, Jin Woong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Koh, Sang Seok; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2015-06-05

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response.

  13. The mycotoxin alternariol induces DNA damage and modify macrophage phenotype and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Solhaug, A; Wisbech, C; Christoffersen, T E; Hult, L O; Lea, T; Eriksen, G S; Holme, J A

    2015-11-19

    Alternariol (AOH), a mycotoxin produced by Alternaria fungi, is frequently found as a contaminant in fruit and grain products. Here we examined if AOH could modify macrophage phenotype and inflammatory responses. In RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages AOH changed the cell morphology of from round to star-shaped cells, with increased levels of CD83, CD86, CD11b, MHCII and endocytic activity. TNFα and IL-6 were enhanced at mRNA-level, but only TNFα showed increased secretion. No changes were found in IL-10 or IL-12p40 expression. Primary human macrophages changed the cell morphology from round into elongated shapes with dendrite-like protrusions in response to AOH. The levels of CD83 and CD86 were increased, HLA-DR and CD68 were down-regulated and CD80, CD200R and CD163 remained unchanged. Increased secretion of TNFα and IL-6 were found after AOH exposure, while IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12p70 were not changed. Furthermore, AOH reduced macrophage endocytic activity and autophagosomes. AOH was also found to induce DNA damage, which is suggested to be linked to the morphological and phenotypical changes. Thus, AOH was found to change the morphology and phenotype of the two cell models, but either of them could be characterized as typical M1/M2 macrophages or as dendritic cells (DC).

  14. Plumbagin alters telomere dynamics, induces DNA damage and cell death in human brain tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Aik Kia; Sameni, Safoura; Venkatesan, Shriram; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Hande, M Prakash

    2015-11-01

    Natural plant products may possess much potential in palliative therapy and supportive strategies of current cancer treatments with lesser cytotoxicity to normal cells compared to conventional chemotherapy. In the current study, anti-cancer properties of plumbagin, a plant-derived naphthoquinone, on brain cancer cells were determined. Plumbagin treatment resulted in the induction of DNA damage, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, followed by suppression of the colony forming ability of the brain tumour cells. These effects were substantiated by upregulation of PTEN, TNFRSF1A and downregulation of E2F1 genes, along with a drop in MDM2, cyclin B1, survivin and BCL2 protein expression. Plumbagin induced elevated levels of caspase-3/7 activity as well. For the first time, we show here that plumbagin inhibits telomerase in brain tumour cells and results in telomere shortening following chronic long-term treatment. This observation implies considerable cytotoxicity of plumbagin towards cancer cells with higher telomerase activity. Collectively, our findings suggest plumbagin as a potential chemotherapeutic phytochemical in brain tumour treatment modalities.

  15. Domoic acid induces direct DNA damage and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Silva, C R Carvalho; Moukha, S; Matias, W G; Creppy, E E

    2008-12-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxin produced by sea-water phytoplankton. Shellfish feeding on the phytoplankton can bioconcentrate DA, leading to a potentially serious health hazard for people consuming the contaminated shellfish. DA is the principal toxin responsible for amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP). The toxic mechanism of DA is believed to be mediated at the level of the mitochondria, where uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation decreases membrane permeability, causing cell swelling and ultimately lysis. Literature is poor concerning data on the possible genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of DA. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of DA on a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2). Our results clearly demonstrate that DA decreased cell viability (IC(50) about 70 ng/mL), induced direct DNA damage from 15 ng/mL, and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells at 100 ng/mL. This apoptosis is likely bax-dependent and occurred only at high concentrations of DA, while lower concentrations upregulated both bax and bcl-2 at an apparent constant ratio until a sudden decrease of bcl-2 at 100 ng/mL and increase of bax. PMID:18293405

  16. The mycotoxin alternariol induces DNA damage and modify macrophage phenotype and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Solhaug, A; Wisbech, C; Christoffersen, T E; Hult, L O; Lea, T; Eriksen, G S; Holme, J A

    2015-11-19

    Alternariol (AOH), a mycotoxin produced by Alternaria fungi, is frequently found as a contaminant in fruit and grain products. Here we examined if AOH could modify macrophage phenotype and inflammatory responses. In RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages AOH changed the cell morphology of from round to star-shaped cells, with increased levels of CD83, CD86, CD11b, MHCII and endocytic activity. TNFα and IL-6 were enhanced at mRNA-level, but only TNFα showed increased secretion. No changes were found in IL-10 or IL-12p40 expression. Primary human macrophages changed the cell morphology from round into elongated shapes with dendrite-like protrusions in response to AOH. The levels of CD83 and CD86 were increased, HLA-DR and CD68 were down-regulated and CD80, CD200R and CD163 remained unchanged. Increased secretion of TNFα and IL-6 were found after AOH exposure, while IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12p70 were not changed. Furthermore, AOH reduced macrophage endocytic activity and autophagosomes. AOH was also found to induce DNA damage, which is suggested to be linked to the morphological and phenotypical changes. Thus, AOH was found to change the morphology and phenotype of the two cell models, but either of them could be characterized as typical M1/M2 macrophages or as dendritic cells (DC). PMID:26341179

  17. Bcl-2 and accelerated DNA repair mediates resistance of hair follicle bulge stem cells to DNA-damage-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A; Candi, Aurélie; Mascré, Guilhem; De Clercq, Sarah; Youssef, Khalil Kass; Lapouge, Gaelle; Dahl, Ellen; Semeraro, Claudio; Denecker, Geertrui; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Blanpain, Cédric

    2010-06-01

    Adult stem cells (SCs) are at high risk of accumulating deleterious mutations because they reside and self-renew in adult tissues for extended periods. Little is known about how adult SCs sense and respond to DNA damage within their natural niche. Here, using mouse epidermis as a model, we define the functional consequences and the molecular mechanisms by which adult SCs respond to DNA damage. We show that multipotent hair-follicle-bulge SCs have two important mechanisms for increasing their resistance to DNA-damage-induced cell death: higher expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 and transient stabilization of p53 after DNA damage in bulge SCs. The attenuated p53 activation is the consequence of a faster DNA repair activity, mediated by a higher non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) activity, induced by the key protein DNA-PK. Because NHEJ is an error-prone mechanism, this novel characteristic of adult SCs may have important implications in cancer development and ageing.

  18. Telomerase activation as a repair response to radiation-induced DNA damage in Y79 retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masaharu; Ozaki, Kohji; Kawano, Takeshi; Yamada, Osamu; Kawauchi, Kiyotaka; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Hisashi

    2013-10-28

    The molecular mechanism of telomerase activation induced by ionizing radiation (IR) remains poorly understood. We demonstrate that DNA damage induced by IR at doses of 2-5 Gy triggers activation of Akt, predominant to that of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), resulting in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) phosphorylation and increased telomerase activity in Y79 cells. DNA damage induced by IR at doses greater than 10 Gy might trigger PP2A activation, predominant to that of Akt, resulting in hTERT dephosphorylation and decreased telomerase activity. Our results suggest that differential activation of Akt and PP2A may be responsible for telomerase regulation. PMID:23850566

  19. An automated alkaline elution system: DNA damage induced by 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brunborg, G; Holme, J A; Søderlund, E J; Omichinski, J G; Dybing, E

    1988-11-01

    An automated alkaline elution system for the detection of DNA damage has been developed. After manual application of samples, which is completed within 5 min, the subsequent supply of liquids, changes in flow rates, and temperature are controlled automatically. The system operates 16 filters and may easily be expanded. The sensitivity of the fluorometric DNA determinations with the Hoechst 33258 dye is increased by using an elution buffer (20 mM Na2EDTA, pH 12.50) with low background fluorescence. DNA is determined using an automated setup similar to the one recently presented by Sterzel et al. (1985, Anal. Biochem. 147, 462-467). The most significant modification is the use of a neutralization buffer which allows variations in the pH of eluted fractions. This change increases the sensitivity of the DNA measurements. The automated alkaline elution system was evaluated using the nematocide 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) in a study of its genotoxic effects in the testes and the kidneys. Significant DNA damage was induced in testicular cells by 2.5 microM DBCP (1 h) in vitro and 85 mumol/kg DBCP ip (3 h) in vivo. The damage appeared after short treatment times (10 min in vivo). Variations in the observed DBCP response in vivo were largely due to interanimal variations. The automated alkaline elution system proved to be a sensitive assay also for the detection of DNA damage in kidney nuclei prepared from rats exposed to DBCP. Provided that kidney nuclei from untreated rats, mice, or hamster were kept ice-cold until lysing, 85-100% of their DNA was retained after 16 h of elution, indicating highly intact DNA. Under the same conditions, guinea pig DNA was rapidly degraded unless the nuclei were prepared in a buffer with a higher concentration of Na2EDTA (20 mM). PMID:3239754

  20. Evaluating the effects of galbanic acid on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kobra; Behravan, Javad; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Mehmankhah, Babak; Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Ferula szowitsiana has been widely used for medicinal purposes around the world. The anti-oxidant effect of F. szowitsiana had been proved. The current study aims to determine the protective effects of galbanic acid, a sesquiterpene coumarin from F. szowitsiana, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) - induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Human lymphocytes were incubated with H2O2 (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 µM), galbanic acid (200 and 400 µM) and a combination of galbanic acid (200 and 400 µM) and H2O2 (25 µM) at 4 C for 30 minutes. Solvents of galbanic acid without H2O2 were used as negative controls. Results: The findings of this study demonstrated that H2O2 exposure leads to a significant concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage. Galbanic acid did not cause DNA damage compared with the control cells. Data showed that galbanic acid does not have a protective effect against H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Conclusion: According to the results, it is concluded that the capability of F. szowitsiana in reducing reactive oxygen species and the anti-inflammatory property of its methanolic extract may be due to its other ingredients. PMID:25386396

  1. Hinokitiol Induces DNA Damage and Autophagy followed by Cell Cycle Arrest and Senescence in Gefitinib-Resistant Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan-Hui; Wu, Ping; Lee, Jen-Yi; Li, Pei-Rong; Hsieh, Wan-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Ho, Chen-Lung; Chen, Wan-Jiun; Wang, Chien-Chun; Yen, Muh-Yong; Yang, Shun-Min; Chen, Huei-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Despite good initial responses, drug resistance and disease recurrence remain major issues for lung adenocarcinoma patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations taking EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). To discover new strategies to overcome this issue, we investigated 40 essential oils from plants indigenous to Taiwan as alternative treatments for a wide range of illnesses. Here, we found that hinokitiol, a natural monoterpenoid from the heartwood of Calocedrus formosana, exhibited potent anticancer effects. In this study, we demonstrated that hinokitiol inhibited the proliferation and colony formation ability of lung adenocarcinoma cells as well as the EGFR-TKI-resistant lines PC9-IR and H1975. Transcriptomic analysis and pathway prediction algorithms indicated that the main implicated pathways included DNA damage, autophagy, and cell cycle. Further investigations confirmed that in lung cancer cells, hinokitiol inhibited cell proliferation by inducing the p53-independent DNA damage response, autophagy (not apoptosis), S-phase cell cycle arrest, and senescence. Furthermore, hinokitiol inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors in association with DNA damage and autophagy but exhibited fewer effects on lung stromal fibroblasts. In summary, we demonstrated novel mechanisms by which hinokitiol, an essential oil extract, acted as a promising anticancer agent to overcome EGFR-TKI resistance in lung cancer cells via inducing DNA damage, autophagy, cell cycle arrest, and senescence in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25105411

  2. Protective activity of butyrate on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in isolated human colonocytes and HT29 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Rosignoli, P; Fabiani, R; De Bartolomeo, A; Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Pelli, M A; Morozzi, G

    2001-10-01

    Epidemiological studies support the involvement of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in colon physiology and the protective role of butyrate on colon carcinogenesis. Among the possible mechanisms by which butyrate may exert its anti-carcinogenicity an antioxidant activity has been recently suggested. We investigated the effects of butyrate and mixtures of SCFA (butyrate, propionate and acetate) on DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated human colonocytes and in two human colon tumour cell lines (HT29 and HT29 19A). Human colonocytes were isolated from endoscopically obtained samples and the DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage in normal colonocytes in a dose-dependent manner which was statistically significant at concentrations over 10 microM. At 15 microM H(2)O(2) DNA damage in HT29 and HT29 19A cells was significantly lower than that observed in normal colonocytes (P < 0.01). Pre-incubation of the cells with physiological concentrations of butyrate (6.25 and 12.5 mM) reduced H(2)O(2) (15 microM) induced damage by 33 and 51% in human colonocytes, 45 and 75% in HT29 and 30 and 80% in HT29 19A, respectively. Treatment of cells with a mixture of 25 mM acetate + 10.4 mM propionate + 6.25 mM butyrate did not induce DNA damage, while a mixture of 50 mM acetate + 20.8 mM propionate + 12.5 mM butyrate was weakly genotoxic only towards normal colonocytes. However, both mixtures were able to reduce the H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by about 50% in all cell types. The reported protective effect of butyrate might be important in pathogenetic mechanisms mediated by reactive oxygen species, and aids understanding of the apparent protection toward colorectal cancer exerted by dietary fibres, which enhance the butyrate bioavailability in the colonic mucosa. PMID:11577008

  3. Implications of caspase-dependent proteolytic cleavage of cyclin A1 in DNA damage-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sang Hyeok; Seo, Sung-Keum; An, Sungkwan; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Caspase-1 mediates doxorubicin-induced downregulation of cyclin A1. • Active caspase-1 effectively cleaved cyclin A1 at D165. • Cyclin A1 expression is involved in DNA damage-induced cell death. - Abstract: Cyclin A1 is an A-type cyclin that directly binds to CDK2 to regulate cell-cycle progression. In the present study, we found that doxorubicin decreased the expression of cyclin A1 at the protein level in A549 lung cancer cells, while markedly downregulating its mRNA levels. Interestingly, doxorubicin upregulated caspase-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, and z-YAVD-fmk, a specific inhibitor of caspase-1, reversed the doxorubicin-induced decrease in cyclin A1 in A549 lung cancer and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Active caspase-1 effectively cleaved cyclin A1 at D165 into two fragments, which in vitro cleavage assays showed were further cleaved by caspase-3. Finally, we found that overexpression of cyclin A1 significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, and knockdown of cyclin A1 by RNA interference enhanced the sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation. Our data suggest a new mechanism for the downregulation of cyclin A1 by DNA-damaging stimuli that could be intimately involved in the cell death induced by DNA damage-inducing stimuli, including doxorubicin and ionizing radiation.

  4. Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B silencing induces DNA damage response via STAT3 pathway in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Fu, L; Kong, X; Xu, J; Wang, Z; Ma, X; Akiyama, Y; Chen, Y; Fang, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B (JMJD2B), directly targeted by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, maintains the histone methylation balance important for the transcriptional activation of many oncogenes. Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B has been implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression; however, the mechanism remains unclear. Methods: Immunofluorescence and western blotting detected phosphorylated histone H2AX, characteristic of double-strand breaks, and comet assay was used to investigate DNA damage, in CRC cells after JMJD2B small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. We assessed the resulting in vitro responses, that is, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and senescence coupled with JMJD2B silencing-induced DNA damage, studying the regulatory role of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). The JMJD2B silencing anti-cancer effect was determined using an in vivo CRC xenograft model. Results: Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B knockdown induced DNA damage via ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related pathway activation, resulting in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence in both normoxia and hypoxia. Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 suppression by JMJD2B silencing enhanced DNA damage. Intratumoural injection of JMJD2B siRNA suppressed tumour growth in vivo and activated the DNA damage response (DDR). Conclusions: Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B has an essential role in cancer cell survival and tumour growth via DDR mediation, which STAT3 partially regulates, suggesting that JMJD2B is a potential anti-cancer target. PMID:24473398

  5. An electrochemical DNA-sensor developed with the use of methylene blue as a redox indicator for the detection of DNA damage induced by endocrine-disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoyun; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2015-03-31

    An electrochemical biosensor capable of indirect detection of DNA damage induced by any one of the three endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) - bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (NP) and 4-t-octylphenol (OP), has been researched and developed. The methylene blue (MB) dye was used as the redox indicator. The glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified by the assembled dsDNA/graphene oxide-chitosan/gold nano-particles to produce a dsDNA/GO-CS/AuNPs/GCE sensor. It was characterized with the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The loading/release of the MB dye by the dsDNA/GO-CS/AuNPs film was investigated, and the results showed that the process was reversible. Based on this, the sensor was used to measure the difference between the loading capabilities of intact and damaged dsDNA in the films. The sensor was then successfully applied to detect DNA damage electrochemically. The differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) peak current ratio for MB, observed before and after DNA damage, increased linearly in the presence the BPA, NP or OP compounds; the treatment range was 10-60 min, and the respective damage rates were 0.0069, 0.0044 and 0.0031 min(-1), respectively. These results were confirmed by the binding constants: 2.09×10(6) M(-1) (BPA-DNA), 1.28×10(6) M(-1) (NP-DNA) and 9.33×10(5) M(-1) (OP-DNA), all of which were obtained with the use of differential pulse stripping voltammetry (DPSV).

  6. REC-2006-A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF) and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy) caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014) and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg(-1) body weight) 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair.

  7. Protective effects of guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart. var. Sorbilis) against DEN-induced DNA damage on mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Fukumasu, H; Avanzo, J L; Heidor, R; Silva, T C; Atroch, A; Moreno, F S; Dagli, M L Z

    2006-06-01

    Guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart. var. Sorbilis) is a plant originally from Brazil, which is rich in tannins. Some tannins are known to present protective effects against DNA damage. This study was performed to investigate the anti-genotoxic/cytotoxic properties of guarana in hepatocytes of mice injected with N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN). The protective effect of guarana was evaluated both by comet assay and DNA smear fragmentation technique in two month-old female BALB/c mice. These were treated previously with 2.0 mg/g bw of guarana for 16 days and then injected with DEN (160 microg/g body weight) to induce DNA damage. The DEN-only treated group presented higher comet image length than the guarana plus DEN and untreated groups (116.06+/-5.0 microm, 104.09+/-3.3 microm and 93.28+/-14.4 microm, respectively; p<0.01). Guarana treatment presented a 52.54% reduction in comet image length when animals were exposed to DEN (p<0.05). DNA samples from the guarana plus DEN group clearly showed less EtBr fluorescence intensity when compared to the DEN-only group, reinforcing the comet assay data. These results show, for the first time, that guarana has a protective effect against DEN-induced DNA damage in mouse liver.

  8. Remote limb preconditioning protects against ischemia-induced neuronal death through ameliorating neuronal oxidative DNA damage and parthanatos.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wei; Xu, Wei; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Lei; Ren, Chuancheng

    2016-07-15

    Remote limb preconditioning (RPC) ameliorates ischemia-induced cerebral infarction and promotes neurological function recovery; however, the mechanism of RPC hasn't been fully understood, which limits its clinical application. The present study aimed at exploring the underlying mechanism of RPC through testing its effects on neuronal oxidative DNA damage and parthanatos in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Infarct volume was investigated by 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, and neuronal survival was evaluated by Nissl staining. Oxidative DNA damage was investigated via analyzing the expression of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Besides, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and DNA laddering were utilized to evaluate neuronal DNA fragmentation. Moreover, we tested whether RPC regulated poly(ADP-ribose) polymer (PAR) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) pathway; thus, PAR expression, AIF translocation and AIF/histone H2AX (H2AX) interaction were investigated. The results showed that RPC exerted neuroprotective effects by ameliorating oxidative DNA damage and neuronal parthanatos; additionally, RPC suppressed PAR/AIF pathway through reducing AIF translocation and AIF/H2AX interaction. The present study further exposed neuroprotective mechanism of RPC, and provided new evidence for the research on RPC and ICS. PMID:27288768

  9. DNA damage induced by nitrous oxide: study in medical personnel of operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Wrońska-Nofer, Teresa; Palus, Jadwiga; Krajewski, Wojciech; Jajte, Jolanta; Kucharska, Małgorzata; Stetkiewicz, Jan; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Rydzyński, Konrad

    2009-06-18

    Occupational exposure to anaesthetics such as nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and halogenated hydrocarbons has been suggested to increase risk of genetic damage. However, the dose-dependency of genotoxic effects has not been unequivocally established and their relation to occupational exposure limit (OEL) remain obscure. In this study, the genotoxicity associated with occupational exposure to anaesthetics has been investigated in a group of 55 female nurses and 29 male anaesthesiologists active for at least 5 years in a working environment containing variable concentrations of N(2)O and halogenated hydrocarbons. 83 unexposed health care workers (52 female nurses and 31 male doctors) matched for age, gender, smoking habit and employment duration were included in the control group. Genotoxicity has been assessed using comet test. Concentrations of nitrous oxide, sevoflurane and isoflurane monitored by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry made possible to relate the extent of DNA damage to the level of exposure. Our results for the first time document a positive correlation between the DNA damage and the N(2)O levels in the ambient air. By contrast, no correlation has been observed between genotoxic effects and concentrations of sevoflurane and isoflurane. The extent of genetic injury was especially aggravated among nurses and anaesthesiologists exposed to N(2)O in concentrations exceeding OEL (180 mg/m(3)). We conclude that occupational exposure to N(2)O is associated with increased DNA damage and that the level of exposure plays a critical role in this regard. PMID:19439331

  10. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand 5F 203 Induces Oxidative Stress That Triggers DNA Damage in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    McLean, Lancelot S; Watkins, Cheri N; Campbell, Petreena; Zylstra, Dain; Rowland, Leah; Amis, Louisa H; Scott, Lia; Babb, Crystal E; Livingston, W Joel; Darwanto, Agus; Davis, Willie L; Senthil, Maheswari; Sowers, Lawrence C; Brantley, Eileen

    2015-05-18

    Breast tumors often show profound sensitivity to exogenous oxidative stress. Investigational agent 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203) induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated DNA damage in certain breast cancer cells. Since AhR agonists often elevate intracellular oxidative stress, we hypothesize that 5F 203 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce DNA damage, which thwarts breast cancer cell growth. We found that 5F 203 induced single-strand break formation. 5F 203 enhanced oxidative DNA damage that was specific to breast cancer cells sensitive to its cytotoxic actions, as it did not increase oxidative DNA damage or ROS formation in nontumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. In contrast, AhR agonist and procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and its metabolite, 1,6-benzo[a]pyrene quinone, induced oxidative DNA damage and ROS formation, respectively, in MCF-10A cells. In sensitive breast cancer cells, 5F 203 activated ROS-responsive kinases: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38). AhR antagonists (alpha-naphthoflavone, CH223191) or antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine, EUK-134) attenuated 5F 203-mediated JNK and p38 activation, depending on the cell type. Pharmacological inhibition of AhR, JNK, or p38 attenuated 5F 203-mediated increases in intracellular ROS, apoptosis, and single-strand break formation. 5F 203 induced the expression of cytoglobin, an oxidative stress-responsive gene and a putative tumor suppressor, which was diminished with AhR, JNK, or p38 inhibition. Additionally, 5F 203-mediated increases in ROS production and cytoglobin were suppressed in AHR100 cells (AhR ligand-unresponsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells). Our data demonstrate 5F 203 induces ROS-mediated DNA damage at least in part via AhR, JNK, or p38 activation and modulates the expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes such as cytoglobin to confer its anticancer action.

  11. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand 5F 203 Induces Oxidative Stress That Triggers DNA Damage in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Lancelot S.; Watkins, Cheri N.; Campbell, Petreena; Zylstra, Dain; Rowland, Leah; Amis, Louisa H.; Scott, Lia; Babb, Crystal E.; Livingston, W. Joel; Darwanto, Agus; Davis, Willie L.; Senthil, Maheswari; Sowers, Lawrence C.; Brantley, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Breast tumors often show profound sensitivity to exogenous oxidative stress. Investigational agent 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203) induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated DNA damage in certain breast cancer cells. Since AhR agonists often elevate intracellular oxidative stress, we hypothesize that 5F 203 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce DNA damage, which thwarts breast cancer cell growth. We found that 5F 203 induced single-strand break formation. 5F 203 enhanced oxidative DNA damage that was specific to breast cancer cells sensitive to its cytotoxic actions, as it did not increase oxidative DNA damage or ROS formation in nontumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. In contrast, AhR agonist and procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and its metabolite, 1,6-benzo[a]pyrene quinone, induced oxidative DNA damage and ROS formation, respectively, in MCF-10A cells. In sensitive breast cancer cells, 5F 203 activated ROS-responsive kinases: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38). AhR antagonists (alpha-naphthoflavone, CH223191) or antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine, EUK-134) attenuated 5F 203-mediated JNK and p38 activation, depending on the cell type. Pharmacological inhibition of AhR, JNK, or p38 attenuated 5F 203-mediated increases in intracellular ROS, apoptosis, and single-strand break formation. 5F 203 induced the expression of cytoglobin, an oxidative stress-responsive gene and a putative tumor suppressor, which was diminished with AhR, JNK, or p38 inhibition. Additionally, 5F 203-mediated increases in ROS production and cytoglobin were suppressed in AHR100 cells (AhR ligand-unresponsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells). Our data demonstrate 5F 203 induces ROS-mediated DNA damage at least in part via AhR, JNK, or p38 activation and modulates the expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes such as cytoglobin to confer its anticancer action. PMID:25781201

  12. Acute acidic exposure induces p53-mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mai, Wei-jun; Yan, Jun-lun; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Ying; Xin, Yu; Wang, Wei-na

    2010-11-01

    Acid rain and inputs of acidic effluent can result in increased acidity in aquatic ecosystems, where it is known to have a significant impact and possibly, to cause the decline of some populations of aquatic organisms. In previous studies, intracellular acid-induced oxidative stress has been shown to cause DNA damage, and cooperatively activate the expression of the p53 gene. The acute effects of acidic environments on shrimp and fish have been widely studied. However, the molecular mechanism of acid-induced injury remains largely unknown. In this study, we examined the cellular responses of tilapia to acidic exposure-induced oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme gene expression. Furthermore, we determined how acute acid stress activates the ATM-p53 signal pathway. We measured the upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, the intracellular Ca(2)(+) concentration ([Ca(2)(+)](i)), the tail DNA values, the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the blood cells and the percentage of dead and damaged blood cells. Our results suggest that oxidative stress and DNA damage occurred in tilapia in conditions where the pH was 5.3. Apoptosis was detected by Hoechst staining, which was mainly associated with changes in cell viability. The parameters that we measured were related to acid-induced DNA damage, and all parameters changed in the blood cells through time. The effects of acute acid exposure (pH 5.3) on the expression of ATM, p53, p21, Bax, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were investigated in tilapia blood cells. The results showed that acute acid stress induced upregulation of ATM, p53 and p21, associated with increasing of DNA damage and apoptosis in blood cells. Additionally, the expression of Bax was slightly increased. Moreover, consensus p53-binding sequences were identified in tilapia MnSOD and GPx gene promoter regions and increased levels of ROS in the blood cells coincided with increased mRNA expression of p53, Mn

  13. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E H; Naylor, Maria L; Dephoure, Noah; Ballif, Bryan A; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gygi, Steven P; Elledge, Stephen J

    2016-06-28

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast. PMID:27298372

  14. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  15. Optical control of filamentation-induced damage to DNA by intense, ultrashort, near-infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Kasuba, K. C.; Bharambe, H.; D'Souza, J. S.; Rathod, K. D.; Mathur, D.

    2016-06-01

    We report on damage to DNA in an aqueous medium induced by ultrashort pulses of intense laser light of 800 nm wavelength. Focusing of such pulses, using lenses of various focal lengths, induces plasma formation within the aqueous medium. Such plasma can have a spatial extent that is far in excess of the Rayleigh range. In the case of water, the resulting ionization and dissociation gives rise to in situ generation of low-energy electrons and OH-radicals. Interactions of these with plasmid DNA produce nicks in the DNA backbone: single strand breaks (SSBs) are induced as are, at higher laser intensities, double strand breaks (DSBs). Under physiological conditions, the latter are not readily amenable to repair. Systematic quantification of SSBs and DSBs at different values of incident laser energy and under different external focusing conditions reveals that damage occurs in two distinct regimes. Numerical aperture is the experimental handle that delineates the two regimes, permitting simple optical control over the extent of DNA damage.

  16. Optical control of filamentation-induced damage to DNA by intense, ultrashort, near-infrared laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Kasuba, K. C.; Bharambe, H.; D’Souza, J. S.; Rathod, K. D.; Mathur, D.

    2016-01-01

    We report on damage to DNA in an aqueous medium induced by ultrashort pulses of intense laser light of 800 nm wavelength. Focusing of such pulses, using lenses of various focal lengths, induces plasma formation within the aqueous medium. Such plasma can have a spatial extent that is far in excess of the Rayleigh range. In the case of water, the resulting ionization and dissociation gives rise to in situ generation of low-energy electrons and OH-radicals. Interactions of these with plasmid DNA produce nicks in the DNA backbone: single strand breaks (SSBs) are induced as are, at higher laser intensities, double strand breaks (DSBs). Under physiological conditions, the latter are not readily amenable to repair. Systematic quantification of SSBs and DSBs at different values of incident laser energy and under different external focusing conditions reveals that damage occurs in two distinct regimes. Numerical aperture is the experimental handle that delineates the two regimes, permitting simple optical control over the extent of DNA damage. PMID:27279565

  17. DNA fragmentation induced by fe ions in human cells: shielding influence on spatially correlated damage

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Tabocchini, M.A.

    2003-11-19

    Outside the magnetic field of the Earth, high energy heavy ions constitute a relevant part of the biologically significant dose to astronauts during the very long travels through space. The typical pattern of energy deposition in the matter by heavy ions on the microscopic scale is believed to produce spatially correlated damage in the DNA which is critical for radiobiological effects. We have investigated the influence of a lucite shielding on the initial production of very small DNA fragments in human fibroblasts irradiated with 1 GeV/u iron (Fe) ions. We also used small gamma, Greek-rays as reference radiation. Our results show: (1) a lower effect per incident ion when the shielding is used; (2) an higher DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB) induction by Fe ions than by small gamma, Greek-rays in the size range 123 kbp; (3) a non-random DNA DSB induction by Fe ions.

  18. DNA fragmentation induced by Fe ions in human cells: shielding influence on spatially correlated damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Outside the magnetic field of the Earth, high energy heavy ions constitute a relevant part of the biologically significant dose to astronauts during the very long travels through space. The typical pattern of energy deposition in the matter by heavy ions on the microscopic scale is believed to produce spatially correlated damage in the DNA which is critical for radiobiological effects. We have investigated the influence of a lucite shielding on the initial production of very small DNA fragments in human fibroblasts irradiated with 1 GeV/u iron (Fe) ions. We also used gamma rays as reference radiation. Our results show: (1) a lower effect per incident ion when the shielding is used; (2) an higher DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB) induction by Fe ions than by gamma rays in the size range 1-23 kbp; (3) a non-random DNA DSB induction by Fe ions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. PMID:26692152

  20. Anthracyclines Induce DNA Damage Response-Mediated Protection against Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Soares, Miguel P.; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J. Pedro; Huber, Tobias B.; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R.; Ferreira, João A.; Moita, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fancony Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  1. The Oxygen Rich Postnatal Environment Induces Cardiomyocyte Cell Cycle Arrest Through DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Bao N.; Kimura, Wataru; Muralidhar, Shalini A.; Moon, Jesung; Amatruda, James F.; Phelps, Kate L.; Grinsfelder, David; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Chen, Rui; Garcia, Joseph A.; Santos, Celio X.; Thet, SuWannee; Mori, Eiichiro; Kinter, Michael T.; Rindler, Paul M.; Zacchigna, Serena; Mukherjee, Shibani; Chen, David J.; Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; Giacca, Mauro; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Aroumougame, Asaithamby; Shah, Ajay M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Sadek, Hesham A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mammalian heart has a remarkable regenerative capacity for a short period of time after birth, after which the majority of cardiomyocytes permanently exit cell cycle. We sought to determine the primary post-natal event that results in cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We hypothesized that transition to the oxygen rich postnatal environment is the upstream signal that results in cell cycle arrest of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative DNA damage, and DNA damage response (DDR) markers significantly increase in the heart during the first postnatal week. Intriguingly, postnatal hypoxemia, ROS scavenging, or inhibition of DDR all prolong the postnatal proliferative window of cardiomyocytes, while hyperoxemia and ROS generators shorten it. These findings uncover a previously unrecognized protective mechanism that mediates cardiomyocyte cell cycle arrest in exchange for utilization of oxygen dependent aerobic metabolism. Reduction of mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress should be important component of cardiomyocyte proliferation-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:24766806

  2. DNA damage-responsive Drosophila melanogaster gene is also induced by heat shock

    SciTech Connect

    Vivino, A.A.; Smith, M.D.; Minton, K.W.

    1986-12-01

    A gene isolated by screening Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells for DNA damage regulation was also found to be regulated by heat shock. After UV irradiation or heat shock, induction is at the transcriptional level and results in the accumulation of a 1.0-kilobase polyadenylated transcript. The restriction map of the clone bears no resemblance to the known heat shock genes, which are shown to be uninduced by UV irradiation.

  3. Antioxidant activity of herbaceous plant extracts protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Herbaceous plants containing antioxidants can protect against DNA damage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant substances, antioxidant activity, and protection of DNA from oxidative damage in human lymphocytes induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our methods used acidic methanol and water extractions from six herbaceous plants, including Bidens alba (BA), Lycium chinense (LC), Mentha arvensis (MA), Plantago asiatica (PA), Houttuynia cordata (HC), and Centella asiatica (CA). Methods Antioxidant compounds such as flavonol and polyphenol were analyzed. Antioxidant activity was determined by the inhibition percentage of conjugated diene formation in a linoleic acid emulsion system and by trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay. Their antioxidative capacities for protecting human lymphocyte DNA from H2O2-induced strand breaks was evaluated by comet assay. Results The studied plants were found to be rich in flavonols, especially myricetin in BA, morin in MA, quercetin in HC, and kaemperol in CA. In addition, polyphenol abounded in BA and CA. The best conjugated diene formation inhibition percentage was found in the acidic methanolic extract of PA. Regarding TEAC, the best antioxidant activity was generated from the acidic methanolic extract of HC. Water and acidic methanolic extracts of MA and HC both had better inhibition percentages of tail DNA% and tail moment as compared to the rest of the tested extracts, and significantly suppressed oxidative damage to lymphocyte DNA. Conclusion Quercetin and morin are important for preventing peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA, and the leaves of MA and HC extracts may have excellent potential as functional ingredients representing potential sources of natural antioxidants. PMID:24279749

  4. Subcellular Localization of Proteins Responding to Mitoxantrone-Induced DNA Damage in Leukaemic Cells.

    PubMed

    Ćmielová, J; Lesná, M; Řezáčová, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the subcellular localization of proteins participating in the double-strand break response pathway - p53, Mdm2, p21 and Chk2. MOLT-4 cells were pre-treated with mitoxantrone in concentrations 1 nmol/l and 5 nmol/l. The trypan blue technique was used to determine cell viability and proliferation. Western blotting was used to evaluate changes in p53, Mdm2 and Chk2 protein expression and sandwich ELISA was used to evaluate changes in the p21 protein amount. After 1 nmol/l mitoxantrone cells did not die, but their ability to proliferate was decreased. The p53 protein was activated and phosphorylated at serines 15 and 392 and accumulated in the nucleus after 24 and 48 h. The Mdm2 protein was present in the cytoplasm with its maximal level after 8 and 16 h. The p21 protein was detected in the nucleus after 24 and 48 h. Increased levels of phosphorylated Chk2 at threonine 68 were observed in the cytoplasmic fraction after 24 and 48 h of mitoxantrone treatment. We used mitoxantrone as an inducer of double-strand breaks to bring new data about the subcellular distribution of proteins responding to DNA damage. In MOLT-4 cells, the p53 protein was activated. p53 was phosphorylated at serines 15 and 392 and accumulated in the nucleus. The Mdm2 protein was activated in advance to p53 and occurred in the cytoplasm. The p21 protein was present in the nucleus. Chk2 kinase was activated by the phosphorylation at threonine 68 and we observed increased levels of this protein in the cytoplasmic fraction.

  5. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation induces oxidative DNA base damage in a mouse spermatocyte-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2013-03-27

    Whether exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) emitted from mobile phones can induce DNA damage in male germ cells remains unclear. In this study, we conducted a 24h intermittent exposure (5 min on and 10 min off) of a mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line to 1800 MHz Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) signals in GSM-Talk mode at specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1 W/kg, 2 W/kg or 4 W/kg. Subsequently, through the use of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) in a modified comet assay, we determined that the extent of DNA migration was significantly increased at a SAR of 4 W/kg. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that levels of the DNA adduct 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) were also increased at a SAR of 4 W/kg. These increases were concomitant with similar increases in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); these phenomena were mitigated by co-treatment with the antioxidant α-tocopherol. However, no detectable DNA strand breakage was observed by the alkaline comet assay. Taking together, these findings may imply the novel possibility that RF-EMR with insufficient energy for the direct induction of DNA strand breaks may produce genotoxicity through oxidative DNA base damage in male germ cells.

  6. Gene Expression Profile Changes and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. In addition, DNA in space can be damaged by toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage affects the accuracy of the radiation risk assessment for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damage, confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) flown on the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB). Damages in the DNA were quantified by immunofluorescence staining for ?-H2AX, which showed similar percentages of different types of stained cells between flight and ground. However, there was a slight shift in the distribution of the ?-H2AX foci number in the flown cells with countable foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. A microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment was also performed. Comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. Similar responses at the RNA level between different gravity conditions were also observed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly

  7. Modulation of DNA-induced damage and repair capacity in humans after dietary intervention with lutein-enriched fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Barbudo, Carmen; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Pérez-Sacristán, Belén; Blanco-Navarro, Inmaculada; Herrera, Mercedes; Granado-Lorencio, Fernando; Domínguez, Gemma

    2013-01-01

    Dietary factors provide protection against several forms of DNA damage. Additionally, consumer demand for natural products favours the development of bioactive food ingredients with health benefits. Lutein is a promising biologically active component in the food industry. The EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies considers that protection from oxidative damage may be a beneficial physiological effect but that a cause and effect relationship has not been established. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the safety and potential functional effect of a lutein-enriched milk product using the Comet Assay in order to analyze the baseline, the induced DNA-damage and the repair capacity in the lymphocytes of 10 healthy donors before and after the intake of the mentioned product. Our data suggest that the regular consumption of lutein-enriched fermented milk results in a significant increase in serum lutein levels and this change is associated with an improvement in the resistance of DNA to damage and the capacity of DNA repair in lymphocytes. Our results also support the lack of a genotoxic effect at the doses supplied as well as the absence of interactions and side effects on other nutritional and biochemicals markers. PMID:24040187

  8. Squalene Inhibits ATM-Dependent Signaling in γIR-Induced DNA Damage Response through Induction of Wip1 Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Tatewaki, Naoto; Konishi, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Miyako; Saito, Masafumi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Ikekawa, Nobuo; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase plays a crucial role as a master controller in the cellular DNA damage response. Inhibition of ATM leads to inhibition of the checkpoint signaling pathway. Hence, addition of checkpoint inhibitors to anticancer therapies may be an effective targeting strategy. A recent study reported that Wip1, a protein phosphatase, de-phosphorylates serine 1981 of ATM during the DNA damage response. Squalene has been proposed to complement anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, there is little mechanistic information supporting this idea. Here, we report the inhibitory effect of squalene on ATM-dependent DNA damage signals. Squalene itself did not affect cell viability and the cell cycle of A549 cells, but it enhanced the cytotoxicity of gamma-irradiation (γIR). The in vitro kinase activity of ATM was not altered by squalene. However, squalene increased Wip1 expression in cells and suppressed ATM activation in γIR-treated cells. Consistent with the potential inhibition of ATM by squalene, IR-induced phosphorylation of ATM effectors such as p53 (Ser15) and Chk1 (Ser317) was inhibited by cell treatment with squalene. Thus, squalene inhibits the ATM-dependent signaling pathway following DNA damage through intracellular induction of Wip1 expression. PMID:26824362

  9. Prediction of cellular radiosensitivity from DNA damage induced by gamma-rays and carbon ion irradiation in canine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Seiichi; Van Khoa, Tran; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Ueno, Shunji; Ito, Nobuhiko

    2005-11-01

    Diseases of companion animals are shifting from infectious diseases to neoplasms (cancer), and since radiation therapy is one of the effective choices available for cancer treatment, the application of radiotherapy in veterinary medicine is likely to increase. However tumor tissues have different radiosensitivities, and therefore it is important to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumors in individual patients in advance of radiotherapy. We have studied the relationship between the surviving cell fraction measured by a clonogenic assay and DNA double strand breaks detected by a comet assay under neutral conditions in three canine tumor cell lines, after gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation. In all the cell lines, cell death assessed by the clonogenic assay was much higher following irradiation with carbon ions than with gamma-rays. The initial and residual (4 hr) DNA damage due to gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation were higher in a radiosensitive cell line than in a radioresistant cell line. The surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) showed a tendency for correlation with both the initial and residual DNA damage. In particular, the residual damage per Gy was significantly correlated with SF2, regardless of the type of radiation. This indicates that cellular radiosensitivity can be predicted by detection of radiation-induced residual DNA damage.

  10. Sodium fluoride induces apoptosis in the kidney of rats through caspase-mediated pathways and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo Hua; Gao, Ji Ping; Wang, Chun Fang; Chen, Chao Yang; Yan, Xiao Yan; Guo, Min; Wang, Yu; Huang, Fu Bing

    2014-09-01

    Long-term excessive sodium fluoride (NaF) intake can cause many bone diseases and nonskeletal fluorosis. The kidneys are the primary organs involved in the excretion and retention of NaF. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of NaF treatment on renal cell apoptosis, DNA damage, and the protein expression levels of cytosolic cytochrome C (Cyt C) and cleaved caspases 9, 8, and 3 in vivo. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into four groups (control, low fluoride, medium fluoride, and high fluoride) and administered 0, 50, 100, and 200 mg/L of NaF, respectively, via drinking water for 120 days. Histopathological changes in the kidneys were visualized using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Renal cell apoptosis was examined using flow cytometry, and renal cell DNA damage was detected using the comet assay. Cytosolic Cyt C and cleaved caspases 9, 8, and 3 protein expression levels were visualized using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The results showed that NaF treatment increased apoptosis and DNA damage. In addition, NaF treatment increased the protein expression levels of cytosolic Cyt C and cleaved caspases 9, 8, and 3. These results indicated that NaF induces apoptosis in the kidney of rats through caspase-mediated pathway, and DNA damage may be involved in this process.

  11. Squalene Inhibits ATM-Dependent Signaling in γIR-Induced DNA Damage Response through Induction of Wip1 Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Tatewaki, Naoto; Konishi, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Miyako; Saito, Masafumi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Ikekawa, Nobuo; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase plays a crucial role as a master controller in the cellular DNA damage response. Inhibition of ATM leads to inhibition of the checkpoint signaling pathway. Hence, addition of checkpoint inhibitors to anticancer therapies may be an effective targeting strategy. A recent study reported that Wip1, a protein phosphatase, de-phosphorylates serine 1981 of ATM during the DNA damage response. Squalene has been proposed to complement anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, there is little mechanistic information supporting this idea. Here, we report the inhibitory effect of squalene on ATM-dependent DNA damage signals. Squalene itself did not affect cell viability and the cell cycle of A549 cells, but it enhanced the cytotoxicity of gamma-irradiation (γIR). The in vitro kinase activity of ATM was not altered by squalene. However, squalene increased Wip1 expression in cells and suppressed ATM activation in γIR-treated cells. Consistent with the potential inhibition of ATM by squalene, IR-induced phosphorylation of ATM effectors such as p53 (Ser15) and Chk1 (Ser317) was inhibited by cell treatment with squalene. Thus, squalene inhibits the ATM-dependent signaling pathway following DNA damage through intracellular induction of Wip1 expression. PMID:26824362

  12. Pregnane X receptor protects HepG2 cells from BaP-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Naspinski, Christine; Gu, Xinsheng; Zhou, Guo-Dong; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U; Donnelly, Kirby C; Tian, Yanan

    2008-07-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that coordinately regulates transcriptional expression of both phase I and phase II metabolizing enzymes. PXR plays an important role in the pharmacokinetics of a broad spectrum of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and appears to have evolved in part to protect organisms from toxic xenobiotics. Metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a well-established carcinogen and ubiquitous environmental contaminant, can result in either detoxification or bioactivation to its genotoxic forms. Therefore, PXR could modulate the genotoxicity of BaP by changing the balance of the metabolic pathways in favor of BaP detoxification. To examine the role of PXR in BaP genotoxicity, BaP-DNA adduct formation was measured by 32P-postlabeling in BaP-treated parental HepG2 cells and human PXR-transfected HepG2 cells. The presence of transfected PXR significantly reduced the level of adducts relative to parental cells by 50-65% (p < 0.001), demonstrating that PXR protects liver cells from genotoxicity induced by exposure to BaP. To analyze potential PXR-regulated detoxification pathways in liver cells, a panel of genes involved in phase I and phase II metabolism and excretion was surveyed with real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The messenger RNA levels of CYP1A2, GSTA1, GSTA2, GSTM1, UGT1A6, and BCRP (ABCG2) were significantly higher in cells overexpressing PXR, independent of exposure to BaP. In addition, the total GST enzymatic activity, which favors the metabolic detoxification of BaP, was significantly increased by the presence of PXR (p < 0.001), independent of BaP exposure. Taken together, these results suggest that PXR plays an important role in protection against DNA damage by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as BaP, and that these protective effects may be through a coordinated regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism.

  13. Persistent DNA damage caused by low levels of mitomycin C induces irreversible cell senescence.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Elise; Traganos, Frank; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2012-08-15

    Mutations of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes which activate mTOR through several downstream signaling pathways are common to cancer. Activation of mTOR when combined with inhibition of cell cycle progression or DNA replication stress has previously been shown to promote cell senescence. In the present study, we examined the conditions under which human non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells can undergo senescence when treated with the DNA alkylating agent mitomycin C (MMC). While exposure of A549 cells to 0.1 or 0.5 µg/ml of MMC led to their arrest in S phase of the cell cycle and subsequent apoptosis, exposure to 0.01 or 0.02 µg/ml for 6 d resulted in induction of cell senescence and near total (0.01 µg/ml) or total (0.02 µg/ml) elimination of their reproductive potential. During exposure to these low concentrations of MMC, the cells demonstrated evidence of DNA replication stress manifested by expression of γH2AX, p21 (WAF1) and a very low level of EdU incorporation into DNA. The data are consistent with the notion that enduring DNA replication stress in cells known to have activated oncogenes leads to their senescence. It is reasonable to expect that tumors having constitutive activation of oncogenes triggering mTOR signaling may be particularly predisposed to undergoing senescence following prolonged treatment with low doses of DNA damaging drugs. PMID:22871735

  14. Extreme tolerance and developmental buffering of UV-C induced DNA damage in embryos of the annual killifish Austrofundulus limnaeus.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Josiah T; Podrabsky, Jason E

    2015-01-01

    Free-living aquatic embryos are often at risk of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV-R). Successful completion of embryonic development depends on efficient removal of DNA lesions, and thus many aquatic embryos have mechanisms to reverse DNA lesions induced by UV-R. However, little is known of how embryos that are able to enter embryonic dormancy may respond to UV-R exposure and subsequent DNA damage. Embryos of the annual killifish Austrofundulus limnaeus are unique among vertebrates because their normal embryonic development includes (1) a complete dispersion of embryonic blastomeres prior to formation of the definitive embryonic axis, and (2) entry into a state of metabolic depression and developmental arrest termed diapause. Here, we show that developing and diapausing embryos of A. limnaeus have exceptional tolerance of UV-C radiation and can successfully complete embryonic development after receiving substantial doses of UV-C, especially if allowed to recover in full-spectrum light. Recovery in full-spectrum light permits efficient removal of the most common type of DNA lesion induced by UV-R: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Interestingly, whole-mount embryo TUNEL assays suggest that apoptosis may not be a major contributor to cell death in embryos UV-C irradiated during dispersion/reaggregation or diapause. We also observed embryo mortality to be significantly delayed by several weeks in diapausing embryos irradiated and allowed to recover in the dark. These atypical responses to UV-R induced DNA damage may be due to the unique annual killifish life history and provide insight into DNA damage repair and recognition mechanisms during embryonic dormancy.

  15. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-12-01

    Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka=1.2×10(4)M(-1)) and binding capacity (n=1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2',7'-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow cytometry analysis of annexin V(-)/7-AAD(+) stained cells demonstrated substantial reduction in live population due to complete loss of cell membrane integrity. Overall the data suggested the formation of butachlor-DNA complex, as an initiating event in butachlor-induced DNA damage. The results elucidated the oxidative role of butachlor in intracellular ROS production, and

  16. Functional specialization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cytosolic thioredoxin h1 in the response to alkylation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Nandita; Lemaire, Stéphane; Wu-Scharf, Danxia; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Cerutti, Heriberto

    2005-02-01

    DNA damage occurs as a by-product of intrinsic cellular processes, like DNA replication, or as a consequence of exposure to genotoxic agents. Organisms have evolved multiple mechanisms to avoid, tolerate, or repair DNA lesions. To gain insight into these processes, we have isolated mutants hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. One mutant, Ble-1, showed decreased survival when it was treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), bleomycin, or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but behaved like the wild type when it was exposed to UVC irradiation. Ble-1 carries an extensive chromosomal deletion that includes the gene encoding cytosolic thioredoxin h1 (Trxh1). Transformation of Ble-1 with a wild-type copy of Trxh1 fully corrected the MMS hypersensitivity and partly restored the tolerance to bleomycin. Trxh1 also complemented a defect in the repair of MMS-induced DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites. In addition, a Trxh1-beta-glucuronidase fusion protein translocated to the nucleus in response to treatment with MMS. However, somewhat surprisingly, Trxh1 failed to correct the Ble-1 hypersensitivity to H2O2. Moreover, Trxh1 suppression by RNA interference in a wild-type strain resulted in enhanced sensitivity to MMS and DNA repair defects but no increased cytotoxicity to H2O2. Thioredoxins have been implicated in oxidative-stress responses in many organisms. Yet our results indicate a specific role of Chlamydomonas Trxh1 in the repair of MMS-induced DNA damage, whereas it is dispensable for the response to H2O2. These observations also suggest functional specialization among cytosolic thioredoxins since another Chlamydomonas isoform (Trxh2) does not compensate for the lack of Trxh1. PMID:15701788

  17. Telomerase-immortalized human fibroblasts retain UV-induced mutagenesis and p53-mediated DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Porter, Paul C; Clark, Denise R; McDaniel, Lisa D; McGregor, W Glenn; States, J Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Immortalized cells frequently have disruptions of p53 activity and lack p53-dependent nucleotide excision repair (NER). We hypothesized that telomerase immortalization would not alter p53-mediated ultraviolet light (UV)-induced DNA damage responses. DNA repair proficient primary diploid human fibroblasts (GM00024) were immortalized by transduction with a telomerase expressing retrovirus. Empty retrovirus transduced cells senesced after a few doublings. Telomerase transduced GM00024 cells (tGM24) were cultured continuously for 6 months (>60 doublings). Colony forming ability after UV irradiation was dose-dependent between 0 and 20J/m2 UVC (LD50=5.6J/m2). p53 accumulation was UV dose- and time-dependent as was induction of p48(XPE/DDB2), p21(CIP1/WAF1), and phosphorylation on p53-S15. UV dose-dependent apoptosis was measured by nuclear condensation. UV exposure induced UV-damaged DNA binding as monitored by electrophoretic mobility shift assays using UV irradiated radiolabeled DNA probe was inhibited by p53-specific siRNA transfection. p53-Specific siRNA transfection also prevented UV induction of p48 and improved UV survival measured by colony forming ability. Strand-specific NER of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) within DHFR was identical in tGM24 and GM00024 cells. CPD removal from the transcribed strand was nearly complete in 6h and from the non-transcribed strand was 73% complete in 24h. UV-induced HPRT mutagenesis in tGM24 was indistinguishable from primary human fibroblasts. These wide-ranging findings indicate that the UV-induced DNA damage response remains intact in telomerase-immortalized cells. Furthermore, telomerase immortalization provides permanent cell lines for testing the immediate impact on NER and mutagenesis of selective genetic manipulation without propagation to establish mutant lines.

  18. The study on space-flight induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis thaliana and the protective effect of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Liu, Min; Zhao, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known mutagen responsible for causing DNA strand breaks in all living organisms. Strand breaks thus created can be repaired by different mechanisms, including homologous recombination (HR), one of the key mechanisms maintaining genome stability. Here, we used previously generated Arabidopsis thaliana, transgenic for homologous recombination reporter system, in which homologous recombination frequency(HRF) was used as mutagenic end points. Based on the system, effect of DNA damage by space-flight during the Shenzhou-9 mission was investigated and the results showed that 13 days space-flight exposure of seedlings induced a significant increase in HRF compared with its ground-base three-dimensional clinostat controls and ground 1g controls. We also observed three-dimensional clinostat induced a significant increase in HRF compared with ground 1g controls. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has antioxidant activities by selectively reducing hydroxylradical ( •OH) and peroxynitrite(ONOO-), so we investigated the effect of hydrogen on IR-induced HRF. Treatment with hydrogen-rich water dramatically reduced the HR frequency induced by exposure of seedlings to 0 to 80 Gy 60Co radiation , suggesting that hydrogen represents a potentially novel preventative strategy for radiation-induced DNA damage in plants.

  19. c-Myc quadruplex-forming sequence Pu-27 induces extensive damage in both telomeric and nontelomeric regions of DNA.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Ashraful; Thomas, Shelia D; Murty, Vundavalli V; Sedoris, Kara J; Miller, Donald M

    2014-03-21

    Quadruplex-forming DNA sequences are present throughout the eukaryotic genome, including in telomeric DNA. We have shown that the c-Myc promoter quadruplex-forming sequence Pu-27 selectively kills transformed cells (Sedoris, K. C., Thomas, S. D., Clarkson, C. R., Muench, D., Islam, A., Singh, R., and Miller, D. M. (2012) Genomic c-Myc quadruplex DNA selectively kills leukemia. Mol. Cancer Ther. 11, 66-76). In this study, we show that Pu-27 induces profound DNA damage, resulting in striking chromosomal abnormalities in the form of chromatid or chromosomal breaks, radial formation, and telomeric DNA loss, which induces γ-H2AX in U937 cells. Pu-27 down-regulates telomeric shelterin proteins, DNA damage response mediators (RAD17 and RAD50), double-stranded break repair molecule 53BP1, G2 checkpoint regulators (CHK1 and CHK2), and anti-apoptosis gene survivin. Interestingly, there are no changes of DNA repair molecules H2AX, BRCA1, and the telomere maintenance gene, hTERT. ΔB-U937, where U937 cells stably transfected with deleted basic domain of TRF2 is partially sensitive to Pu-27 but exhibits no changes in expression of shelterin proteins. However, there is an up-regulation of CHK1, CHK2, H2AX, BRCA1, and survivin. Telomere dysfunction-induced foci assay revealed co-association of TRF1with γ-H2AX in ATM deficient cells, which are differentially sensitive to Pu-27 than ATM proficient cells. Alt (alternating lengthening of telomere) cells are relatively resistant to Pu-27, but there are no significant changes of telomerase activity in both Alt and non-Alt cells. Lastly, we show that this Pu-27-mediated sensitivity is p53-independent. The data therefore support two conclusions. First, Pu-27 induces DNA damage within both telomeric and nontelomeric regions of the genome. Second, Pu-27-mediated telomeric damage is due, at least in part, to compromise of the telomeric shelterin protein complex.

  20. Protection of cellular DNA from gamma-radiation-induced damages and enhancement in DNA repair by troxerutin.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar; Balakrishnan, Sreedevi; Salvi, Veena Prakash; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan

    2005-12-01

    The effect of troxerutin on gamma-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in different tissues of mice in vivo and formations of the micronuclei were studied in human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo and mice blood reticulocytes in vivo. Treatments with 1 mM troxerutin significantly inhibited the micronuclei induction in the human lymphocytes. Troxerutin protected the human peripheral blood leucocytes from radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in a concentration dependent manner under ex vivo condition of irradiation (2 Gy). Intraperitoneal administration of troxerutin (175 mg/kg body weight) to mice before and after whole body radiation exposure inhibited micronuclei formation in blood reticulocytes significantly. The administration of different doses (75, 125 and 175 mg/kg body weight) of troxerutin 1 h prior to 4 Gy gamma-radiation exposure showed dose-dependent decrease in the yield of DNA strand breaks in murine blood leucocytes and bone marrow cells. The dose-dependent protection was more pronounced in bone marrow cells than in blood leucocytes. Administration of 175 mg/kg body weight of the drug (i.p.) 1 h prior or immediately after whole body irradiation of mice showed that the decrease in strand breaks depended on the post-irradiation interval at which the analysis was done. The observed time-dependent decrease in the DNA strand breaks could be attributed to enhanced DNA repair in troxerutin administered animals. Thus in addition to anti-erythrocytic, anti-thrombic, fibrinolytic and oedema-protective rheological activity, troxerutin offers protection against gamma-radiation-induced micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks and enhances repair of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks.

  1. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    PubMed

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression. PMID:25950714

  2. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    PubMed

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression.

  3. Sperm DNA damage and its relation with leukocyte DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Babazadeh, Zahra; Razavi, Shahnaz; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Deemeh, Mohammad Reza; Shahidi, Maryam; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2010-01-01

    DNA fragmentation in human sperm has been related to endogenous and exogenous factors. Exogenous factors can also affect leukocyte DNA integrity. This study evaluated the relation between sperm DNA damage and leukocyte DNA integrity, as a predictor of exogenous factors. DNA damage in the sperm and leukocytes of 41 individuals undergoing ICSI were measured by Comet assay. In addition, sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) was carried out on semen samples. A positive correlation was observed between the DNA integrity of sperm with leukocytes. When patients were divided into low and high DNA exposure groups, sperm DNA fragmentation was significantly different between the two groups. Cleavage rate and embryo quality showed significant correlation with leukocyte DNA integrity. The results showed that leukocyte DNA integrity could be used to identify individuals at high risk in order to reduce the extent of DNA damage in patients before ICSI in order to improve the subsequent outcome of this procedure.

  4. Acute and chronic watercress supplementation attenuates exercise-induced peripheral mononuclear cell DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Mark C; Hughes, Ciara M; Burke, George; Brown, John C; Davison, Gareth W

    2013-01-28

    Pharmacological antioxidant vitamins have previously been investigated for a prophylactic effect against exercise-induced oxidative stress. However, large doses are often required and may lead to a state of pro-oxidation and oxidative damage. Watercress contains an array of nutritional compounds such as β-carotene and α-tocopherol which may increase protection against exercise-induced oxidative stress. The present randomised controlled investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that acute (consumption 2 h before exercise) and chronic (8 weeks consumption) watercress supplementation can attenuate exercise-induced oxidative stress. A total of ten apparently healthy male subjects (age 23 (SD 4) years, stature 179 (SD 10) cm and body mass 74 (SD 15) kg) were recruited to complete the 8-week chronic watercress intervention period (and then 8 weeks of control, with no ingestion) of the experiment before crossing over in order to compete the single-dose acute phase (with control, no ingestion). Blood samples were taken at baseline (pre-supplementation), at rest (pre-exercise) and following exercise. Each subject completed an incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion following chronic and acute watercress supplementation or control. The main findings show an exercise-induced increase in DNA damage and lipid peroxidation over both acute and chronic control supplementation phases (P< 0.05 v. supplementation), while acute and chronic watercress attenuated DNA damage and lipid peroxidation and decreased H₂O₂ accumulation following exhaustive exercise (P< 0.05 v. control). A marked increase in the main lipid-soluble antioxidants (α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol and xanthophyll) was observed following watercress supplementation (P< 0.05 v. control) in both experimental phases. These findings suggest that short- and long-term watercress ingestion has potential antioxidant effects against exercise-induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

  5. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  6. Influence of organic ions on DNA damage induced by 1 eV to 60 keV electrons.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Sanche, Léon

    2010-10-21

    We report the results of a study on the influence of organic salts on the induction of single strand breaks (SSBs) and double strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA by electrons of 1 eV to 60 keV. Plasmid DNA films are prepared with two different concentrations of organic salts, by varying the amount of the TE buffer (Tris-HCl and EDTA) in the films with ratio of 1:1 and 6:1 Tris ions to DNA nucleotide. The films are bombarded with electrons of 1, 10, 100, and 60 000 eV under vacuum. The damage to the 3197 base-pair plasmid is analyzed ex vacuo by agarose gel electrophoresis. The highest yields are reached at 100 eV and the lowest ones at 60 keV. The ratios of SSB to DSB are surprisingly low at 10 eV (∼4.3) at both salt concentrations, and comparable to the ratios measured with 100 eV electrons. At all characteristic electron energies, the yields of SSB and DSB are found to be higher for the DNA having the lowest salt concentration. However, the organic salts are more efficient at protecting DNA against the damage induced by 1 and 10 eV electrons. DNA damage and protection by organic ions are discussed in terms of mechanisms operative at each electron energy. It is suggested that these ions create additional electric fields within the groove of DNA, which modify the resonance parameter of 1 and 10 eV electrons, namely, by reducing the electron capture cross-section of basic DNA units and the lifetime of corresponding transient anions. An interstrand electron transfer mechanism is proposed to explain the low ratios for the yields of SSB to those of DSB produced by 10 eV electrons.

  7. Influence of organic ions on DNA damage induced by 1 eV to 60 keV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yi; Sanche, Leon

    2010-10-21

    We report the results of a study on the influence of organic salts on the induction of single strand breaks (SSBs) and double strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA by electrons of 1 eV to 60 keV. Plasmid DNA films are prepared with two different concentrations of organic salts, by varying the amount of the TE buffer (Tris-HCl and EDTA) in the films with ratio of 1:1 and 6:1 Tris ions to DNA nucleotide. The films are bombarded with electrons of 1, 10, 100, and 60 000 eV under vacuum. The damage to the 3197 base-pair plasmid is analyzed ex vacuo by agarose gel electrophoresis. The highest yields are reached at 100 eV and the lowest ones at 60 keV. The ratios of SSB to DSB are surprisingly low at 10 eV ({approx}4.3) at both salt concentrations, and comparable to the ratios measured with 100 eV electrons. At all characteristic electron energies, the yields of SSB and DSB are found to be higher for the DNA having the lowest salt concentration. However, the organic salts are more efficient at protecting DNA against the damage induced by 1 and 10 eV electrons. DNA damage and protection by organic ions are discussed in terms of mechanisms operative at each electron energy. It is suggested that these ions create additional electric fields within the groove of DNA, which modify the resonance parameter of 1 and 10 eV electrons, namely, by reducing the electron capture cross-section of basic DNA units and the lifetime of corresponding transient anions. An interstrand electron transfer mechanism is proposed to explain the low ratios for the yields of SSB to those of DSB produced by 10 eV electrons.

  8. Nitrative DNA damage induced by multi-walled carbon nanotube via endocytosis in human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Feiye; Ma, Ning; Horibe, Yoshiteru; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Murata, Mariko; Hiraku, Yusuke

    2012-04-15

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has a promising usage in the field of material science for industrial purposes because of its unique physicochemical property. However, intraperitoneal administration of CNT was reported to cause mesothelioma in experimental animals. Chronic inflammation may contribute to carcinogenesis induced by fibrous materials. 8-Nitroguanine is a mutagenic DNA lesion formed during inflammation and may play a role in CNT-induced carcinogenesis. In this study, we examined 8-nitroguanine formation in A549 human lung alveolar epithelial cells treated with multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) by fluorescent immunocytochemistry. Both MWCNTs with diameter of 20–30 nm (CNT20) and 40–70 nm (CNT40) significantly induced 8-nitroguanine formation at 5 and 10 μg/ml (p < 0.05), which persisted for 24 h, although there was no significant difference in DNA-damaging abilities of these MWCNTs. MWCNTs significantly induced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) for 24 h (p < 0.05). MWCNTs also significantly increased the level of nitrite, a hydrolysis product of oxidized NO, in the culture supernatant at 4 and 8 h (p < 0.05). MWCNT-induced 8-nitroguanine formation and iNOS expression were largely suppressed by inhibitors of iNOS (1400 W), nuclear factor-κB (Bay11-7082), actin polymerization (cytochalasin D), caveolae-mediated endocytosis (methyl-β-cyclodextrin, MBCD) and clathrin-mediated endocytosis (monodansylcadaverine, MDC). Electron microscopy revealed that MWCNT was mainly located in vesicular structures in the cytoplasm, and its cellular internalization was reduced by MBCD and MDC. These results suggest that MWCNT is internalized into cells via clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, leading to inflammatory reactions including iNOS expression and resulting nitrative DNA damage, which may contribute to carcinogenesis. Highlights: ►Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) caused DNA damage in A549 cells. ►MWCNT formed 8-nitroguanine, a DNA lesion

  9. Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Skin Aging: The Role of DNA Damage and Oxidative Stress in Epidermal Stem Cell Damage Mediated Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Panich, Uraiwan; Sittithumcharee, Gunya; Rathviboon, Natwarath

    2016-01-01

    Skin is the largest human organ. Skin continually reconstructs itself to ensure its viability, integrity, and ability to provide protection for the body. Some areas of skin are continuously exposed to a variety of environmental stressors that can inflict direct and indirect damage to skin cell DNA. Skin homeostasis is maintained by mesenchymal stem cells in inner layer dermis and epidermal stem cells (ESCs) in the outer layer epidermis. Reduction of skin stem cell number and function has been linked to impaired skin homeostasis (e.g., skin premature aging and skin cancers). Skin stem cells, with self-renewal capability and multipotency, are frequently affected by environment. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a major cause of stem cell DNA damage, can contribute to depletion of stem cells (ESCs and mesenchymal stem cells) and damage of stem cell niche, eventually leading to photoinduced skin aging. In this review, we discuss the role of UV-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in the skin stem cell aging in order to gain insights into the pathogenesis and develop a way to reduce photoaging of skin cells. PMID:27148370

  10. Inhibition of histone deacetylase in cancer cells slows down replication forks, activates dormant origins and induces DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Chiara; Leo, Elisabetta; Eichler, Gabriel S.; Sordet, Olivier; Martin, Melvenia M.; Fan, Angela; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Pommier, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Protein acetylation is a reversible process regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) that is often altered in human cancers. SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) is the first histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) to be approved for clinical use as an anticancer agent. Given that histone acetylation is a key determinant of chromatin structure, we investigated how SAHA may affect DNA replication and integrity to gain deeper insights into the basis for its anticancer activity. Nuclear replication factories were visualized with confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and with single-replicon analyses conducted by genome-wide molecular combing after pulse labeling with two thymidine-analogues. Additionally, nascent strand real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the human β-globin locus was used to assess the effects of SAHA on replication fork origin firing. We found that pharmacological concentrations of SAHA induce replication-mediated DNA damage, on the basis of single-cell and single-DNA molecule analyses. Molecular combing indicated slowdown in replication speed along with activation of dormant replication origins in response to SAHA. Similar results were obtained using siRNA-mediated depletion of HDAC3 expression, implicating this HDAC member as a likely target in the SAHA response. Activation of dormant origins was confirmed by molecular analyses of the β-globin locus control region. Our findings indicate that SAHA produces profound alterations in DNA replication that cause DNA damage, establishing a critical link between robust chromatin acetylation and DNA replication in human cancer cells. PMID:20460513

  11. G-quadruplex ligand-induced DNA damage response coupled with telomere dysfunction and replication stress in glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Daiki; Okabe, Sachiko; Okamoto, Keiji; Nakano, Ichiro; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-26

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an invariably fatal brain tumor in which a small subpopulation of self-renewable glioma stem cells (GSCs) contributes to tumor propagation and relapse. Targeting GSCs could therefore have a significant clinical impact for GBM. Telomestatin is a naturally-occurring compound that preferentially impairs GSC growth by perturbing transcription and inducing a DNA damage response. Telomestatin stabilizes G-quadruplexes (G4s), which are guanine-rich four-strand nucleic acid structures observed in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism underlying the GSC-selective nature of the DNA damage response remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that GSCs are more susceptible to telomestatin-induced telomere dysfunction and replication stress when compared with GSC-derived non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). Telomestatin induced dissociation of the telomere-capping protein TRF2 from telomeres, leading to telomeric DNA damage in GSCs-but not in NSGCs. BIBR1532, a telomerase catalytic inhibitor, did not preferentially inhibit GSC growth, suggesting that telomestatin promotes telomere dysfunction in a telomerase-independent manner. GSCs and NSGCs had comparable levels of G4s in their nuclei, and both responded to telomestatin with phosphorylation of RPA2 at Ser33-a hallmark of replication stress. However, activation of the checkpoint kinase Chk1, induction of a DNA damage response, and subsequent growth inhibition occurred only in telomestatin-treated GSCs. These observations suggest that telomestatin impairs GSC growth through removal of TRF2 from telomeres and potent activation of the replication stress response pathway. Therefore, a novel G4-directed therapeutic strategy could specifically target cancer stem cells in GBM.

  12. Textile industrial effluent induces mutagenicity and oxidative DNA damage and exploits oxidative stress biomarkers in rats.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Javeed, Aqeel; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures like textile effluent poses risks to animal and human health such as mutations, genotoxicity and oxidative damage. Aim of the present study was to quantify metals in industrial effluent and to determine its mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and effects on oxidative stress biomarkers in effluent exposed rats. Metal analysis revealed presence of high amounts of zinc, copper, chromium, iron, arsenic and mercury in industrial effluent. Ames test with/without enzyme activation and MTT assay showed strong association of industrial effluent with mutagenicity and cytotoxicity respectively. In-vitro comet assay revealed evidence of high oxidative DNA damage. When Wistar rats were exposed to industrial effluent in different dilutions for 60 days, then activities of total superoxide dismutase and catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration were found to be significantly lower in kidney, liver and blood/plasma of effluent exposed rats than control. Vitamin C in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day significantly reduced oxidative effects of effluent in rats. On the basis of this study it is concluded that industrial effluent may cause mutagenicity, in-vitro oxidative stress-related DNA damage and cytotoxicity and may be associated with oxidative stress in rats. Vitamin C may have ameliorating effect when exposed to effluent.

  13. Textile industrial effluent induces mutagenicity and oxidative DNA damage and exploits oxidative stress biomarkers in rats.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Javeed, Aqeel; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures like textile effluent poses risks to animal and human health such as mutations, genotoxicity and oxidative damage. Aim of the present study was to quantify metals in industrial effluent and to determine its mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and effects on oxidative stress biomarkers in effluent exposed rats. Metal analysis revealed presence of high amounts of zinc, copper, chromium, iron, arsenic and mercury in industrial effluent. Ames test with/without enzyme activation and MTT assay showed strong association of industrial effluent with mutagenicity and cytotoxicity respectively. In-vitro comet assay revealed evidence of high oxidative DNA damage. When Wistar rats were exposed to industrial effluent in different dilutions for 60 days, then activities of total superoxide dismutase and catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration were found to be significantly lower in kidney, liver and blood/plasma of effluent exposed rats than control. Vitamin C in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day significantly reduced oxidative effects of effluent in rats. On the basis of this study it is concluded that industrial effluent may cause mutagenicity, in-vitro oxidative stress-related DNA damage and cytotoxicity and may be associated with oxidative stress in rats. Vitamin C may have ameliorating effect when exposed to effluent. PMID:26710178

  14. Characterization of a novel DNA glycosylase from S. sahachiroi involved in the reduction and repair of azinomycin B induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Liu, Kai; Xiao, Le; Yang, LiYuan; Li, Hong; Zhang, FeiXue; Lei, Lei; Li, ShengQing; Feng, Xu; Li, AiYing; He, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Azinomycin B is a hybrid polyketide/nonribosomal peptide natural product and possesses antitumor activity by interacting covalently with duplex DNA and inducing interstrand crosslinks. In the biosynthetic study of azinomycin B, a gene (orf1) adjacent to the azinomycin B gene cluster was found to be essential for the survival of the producer, Streptomyces sahachiroi ATCC33158. Sequence analyses revealed that Orf1 belongs to the HTH_42 superfamily of conserved bacterial proteins which are widely distributed in pathogenic and antibiotic-producing bacteria with unknown functions. The protein exhibits a protective effect against azinomycin B when heterologously expressed in azinomycin-sensitive strains. EMSA assays showed its sequence nonspecific binding to DNA and structure-specific binding to azinomycin B-adducted sites, and ChIP assays revealed extensive association of Orf1 with chromatin in vivo. Interestingly, Orf1 not only protects target sites by protein-DNA interaction but is also capable of repairing azinomycin B-mediated DNA cross-linking. It possesses the DNA glycosylase-like activity and specifically repairs DNA damage induced by azinomycin B through removal of both adducted nitrogenous bases in the cross-link. This bifunctional protein massively binds to genomic DNA to reduce drug attack risk as a novel DNA binding protein and triggers the base excision repair system as a novel DNA glycosylase.

  15. Neuroprotective activity of Viola mandshurica extracts on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage and cell death in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Gyeong-Im; Yoon, Mi-Young; Park, Hae-Ryoung; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Park, Eunju

    2009-08-01

    This study was conducted to examine the neuroprotective effects of acetone extracts from Viola mandshurica (VME). The effect of VME on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced DNA damage in PC12 cells was evaluated by the comet assay where VME (100 and 250 microg/mL) was a dose-dependent inhibitor of DNA damage induced by 500 micromol/L of H(2)O(2). The protective effect of VME against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage on PC12 cells was investigated by an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] reduction assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays. After 3 h of cell exposure to 500 micromol/L of H(2)O(2), a marked reduction in cell survival was observed. However, the reduction was significantly prevented by 100 and 250 microg/mL of VME. H(2)O(2) also induced severe apoptosis of the PC12 cells, which was indicated by Hoechst 33342 staining. Interestingly, the H(2)O(2)-stressed PC12 cells that were incubated with 100 and 250 microg/mL of VME had greatly suppressed apoptosis. The results suggest that VME could be a new antioxidant candidate against neuronal diseases.

  16. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    PubMed

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  17. DNA damage and S phase arrest induced by Ochratoxin A in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; He, Xiaoyun; Li, Xiaohong; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Yang, Xuan; Wang, Yan; Li, Yingcong; Huang, Kunlun

    2014-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a ubiquitous mycotoxin with potential nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and immunotoxic effects. The mechanisms underlying the nephrotoxicity of OTA remain obscure. To investigate DNA damage and the changes of the cell cycle distribution induced by OTA, human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293 cells) were incubated with various concentrations of OTA for 24h in vitro. The results indicated that OTA treatment led to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to a decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). OTA-induced DNA damage in HEK 293 cells was evidenced by DNA comet tails formation and increased expression of γ-H2AX. In addition, OTA could induce cell cycle arrest at the S phase in HEK 293 cells. The expression of key cell cycle regulatory factors that were critical to the S phase, including cyclin A2, cyclin E1, and CDK2, were further detected. The expression of cyclin A2, cyclin E1, and CDK2 were significantly decreased by OTA treatment at both the mRNA and protein levels. The apoptosis of HEK 293 cells after OTA treatment was observed using Hoechst 33342 staining. The results confirmed that OTA did induce apoptosis in HEK 293 cells. In conclusion, our results provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which OTA might promote nephrotoxicity.

  18. Single-walled carbon nanotubes induce cytotoxicity and DNA damage via reactive oxygen species in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud; Verma, Ankit; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A

    2014-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are gradually used in various areas including drug delivery, nanomedicine, biosensors, and electronics. The current study aimed to explore the DNA damage and cytotoxicity due to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). Cellular proliferative assay showed the SWCNTs to exhibit a significant cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, SWCNTs induced significant intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and elevated lipid peroxidation, catalase, and superoxide dismutase in the HepG2 cells. SWCNTs also induced significant decrease in GSH and increase caspase-3 activity in HepG2 cells. DNA fragmentation analysis using the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis showed that the SWCNTs cause genotoxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Therefore, the study points towards the capability of the SWCNTs to induce oxidative stress resulting cytotoxicity and genomic instability. This study warrants more careful assessment of SWCNTs before their industrial applications.

  19. Damage induced to DNA by low-energy (0-30 eV) electrons under vacuum and atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Brun, Emilie; Cloutier, Pierre; Sicard-Roselli, Cécile; Fromm, Michel; Sanche, Léon

    2009-07-23

    In this study, we show that it is possible to obtain data on DNA damage induced by low-energy (0-30 eV) electrons under atmospheric conditions. Five monolayer films of plasmid DNA (3197 base pairs) deposited on glass and gold substrates are irradiated with 1.5 keV X-rays in ultrahigh vacuum and under atmospheric conditions. The total damage is analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The damage produced on the glass substrate is attributed to energy absorption from X-rays, whereas that produced on the gold substrate arises from energy absorption from both the X-ray beam and secondary electrons emitted from the gold surface. By analysis of the energy of these secondary electrons, 96% are found to have energies below 30 eV with a distribution peaking at 1.4 eV. The differences in damage yields recorded with the gold and glass substrates is therefore essentially attributed to the interaction of low-energy electrons with DNA under vacuum and hydrated conditions. From these results, the G values for low-energy electrons are determined to be four and six strand breaks per 100 eV, respectively.

  20. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Induced Toxicity in Human Lung Cells: Role of ROS Mediated DNA Damage and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Alok K.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have promising industrial and biomedical applications. In spite of their applications, the toxicity of these NPs in biological/physiological environment is a major concern. Present study aimed to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the toxicity of CeO2 NPs on lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. After internalization, CeO2 NPs caused significant cytotoxicity and morphological changes in A549 cells. Further, the cell death was found to be apoptotic as shown by loss in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in annexin-V positive cells and confirmed by immunoblot analysis of BAX, BCl-2, Cyt C, AIF, caspase-3, and caspase-9. A significant increase in oxidative DNA damage was found which was confirmed by phosphorylation of p53 gene and presence of cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). This damage could be attributed to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with concomitant decrease in antioxidant “glutathione (GSH)” level. DNA damage and cell death were attenuated by the application of ROS and apoptosis inhibitors N-acetyl-L- cysteine (NAC) and Z-DEVD-fmk, respectively. Our study concludes that ROS mediated DNA damage and cell cycle arrest play a major role in CeO2 NPs induced apoptotic cell death in A549 cells. Apart from beneficial applications, these NPs also impart potential harmful effects which should be properly evaluated prior to their use. PMID:24987704

  1. Aldosterone induces fibrosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage in livers of male rats independent of blood pressure changes

    SciTech Connect

    Queisser, Nina; Happ, Kathrin; Link, Samuel; Jahn, Daniel; Zimnol, Anna; Geier, Andreas; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor blockers show antifibrotic potential in hepatic fibrosis. The mechanism of this protective effect is not known yet, although reactive oxygen species seem to play an important role. Here, we investigated the effects of elevated levels of aldosterone (Ald), the primary ligand of the mineralocorticoid receptor, on livers of rats in a hyperaldosteronism model: aldosterone-induced hypertension. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were treated for 4 weeks with aldosterone. To distinguish if damage caused in the liver depended on increased blood pressure or on increased Ald levels, the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone was given in a subtherapeutic dose, not normalizing blood pressure. To investigate the impact of oxidative stress, the antioxidant tempol was administered. Aldosterone induced fibrosis, detected histopathologically, and by expression analysis of the fibrosis marker, α-smooth muscle actin. Further, the mRNA amount of the profibrotic cytokine TGF-β was increased significantly. Fibrosis could be reduced by scavenging reactive oxygen species, and also by blocking the mineralocorticoid receptor. Furthermore, aldosterone treatment caused oxidative stress and DNA double strand breaks in livers, as well as the elevation of DNA repair activity. An increase of the transcription factor Nrf2, the main regulator of the antioxidative response could be observed, and of its target genes heme oxygenase-1 and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. All these effects of aldosterone were prevented by spironolactone and tempol. Already after 4 weeks of treatment, aldosteroneinfusion induced fibrosis in the liver. This effect was independent of elevated blood pressure. DNA damage caused by aldosterone might contribute to fibrosis progression when aldosterone is chronically increased. - Highlights: • Aldosterone has direct profibrotic effects on the liver independent of blood pressure. • Fibrosis is mediated by the mineralocorticoid receptor and

  2. Pharmacological effect of carvacrol on D: -galactosamine-induced mitochondrial enzymes and DNA damage by single-cell gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Aristatile, Balakrishnan; Al-Numair, Khalid S; Al-Assaf, Abdullah H; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2011-07-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the effect of carvacrol on hepatic mitochondrial enzyme activities and DNA damage in D: -galactosamine (D: -GalN)-induced hepatotoxicity in male albino Wistar rats. The activities of hepatic mitochondrial enzymes such as isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, NADPH dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase significantly decreased in D: -GalN-hepatotoxic rats, and administration of carvacrol brought these parameters towards normality. In D: -GalN-hepatotoxic rats, the hepatic mitochondrial concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances significantly increased, and administration of carvacrol significantly reduced them towards normality. Furthermore, the activities of enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E and reduced glutathione decreased significantly in the liver mitochondria. Administration of carvacrol returned the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants towards normality. D: -GalN-hepatotoxic rats had increased DNA damage, which administration of carvacrol significantly decreased. These results suggest that carvacrol has liver mitochondrial antioxidant properties and possesses a defensive effect against mitochondrial enzymes and DNA damage in D: -GalN-induced rats.

  3. Protein kinase C{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Protein kinase C-eta (PKC{eta}) is an upstream regulator of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway. {yields} PKC{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in non-stressed conditions and in response to DNA damage. {yields} PKC{eta} regulates NF-{kappa}B by activating I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and inducing I{kappa}B degradation. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-{kappa}B in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-{kappa}B regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKC{eta}) regulates NF-{kappa}B upstream signaling by activating the I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and the degradation of I{kappa}B. Furthermore, PKC{eta} enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-{kappa}B under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKC{eta} confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKC{eta} is involved in NF-{kappa}B signaling leading to drug resistance.

  4. Methacryloxylethyl Cetyl Ammonium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Human Dental Pulp Cells via Generation of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Sun, Jinlong; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    The polymerizable antibacterial monomer methacryloxylethyl cetyl ammonium chloride (DMAE-CB) has provided an effective strategy to combat dental caries. However, the application of such material raises the question about the biological safety and the question remains open. The mechanism of this toxic action, however, is not yet clearly understood. The present study aims at providing novel insight into the possible causal link between cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as apoptosis in human dental pulp cells exposed to DMAE-CB. The enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of glutathione, as well as differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in DMAE-CB-treated cells indicated oxidative stress. By using substances that can alter GSH synthesis, we found that GSH was the key component in the regulation of cell response towards oxidative stress induced by DMAE-CB. The increase in oxidative stress-sensitive 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content, formation of γ-H2AX and cell cycle G1 phase arrest indicated that DNA damage occurred as a result of the interaction between DNA base and ROS beyond the capacities of antioxidant mechanisms in cells exposed to DMAE-CB. Such oxidative DNA damage thus triggers the activation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signaling, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and destruction of mitochondrial morphology and function. PMID:27143955

  5. Methacryloxylethyl Cetyl Ammonium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Human Dental Pulp Cells via Generation of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Sun, Jinlong; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    The polymerizable antibacterial monomer methacryloxylethyl cetyl ammonium chloride (DMAE-CB) has provided an effective strategy to combat dental caries. However, the application of such material raises the question about the biological safety and the question remains open. The mechanism of this toxic action, however, is not yet clearly understood. The present study aims at providing novel insight into the possible causal link between cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as apoptosis in human dental pulp cells exposed to DMAE-CB. The enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of glutathione, as well as differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in DMAE-CB-treated cells indicated oxidative stress. By using substances that can alter GSH synthesis, we found that GSH was the key component in the regulation of cell response towards oxidative stress induced by DMAE-CB. The increase in oxidative stress-sensitive 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content, formation of γ-H2AX and cell cycle G1 phase arrest indicated that DNA damage occurred as a result of the interaction between DNA base and ROS beyond the capacities of antioxidant mechanisms in cells exposed to DMAE-CB. Such oxidative DNA damage thus triggers the activation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signaling, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and destruction of mitochondrial morphology and function. PMID:27143955

  6. BRCA1 is Required for Post-replication Repair After UV-induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shailja; Nguyen, Jenna; Hill, Sarah J.; Scully, Ralph; Feunteun, Jean; Livingston, David M.

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 contributes to the response to UV irradiation. Utilizing its BRCT motifs, it is recruited during S/G2 to UV-damaged sites in a DNA replication-dependent, but nucleotide excision repair- independent manner. More specifically, at UV- stalled replication forks, it promotes photoproduct excision, suppression of translesion synthesis, and the localization and activation of replication factor C complex (RFC) subunits. The last function, in turn, triggers post-UV checkpoint activation and post- replicative repair. These BRCA1 functions differ from those required for DSBR. PMID:21963239

  7. Transformations of the macromolecular landscape at mitochondria during DNA-damage-induced apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Yadav, N; Pliss, A; Kuzmin, A; Rapali, P; Sun, L; Prasad, P; Chandra, D

    2014-10-09

    Apoptosis is a dynamic process regulated by mitochondrion critical for cellular respiration and survival. Execution of apoptosis is mediated by multiple protein signaling events at mitochondria. Initiation and progression of apoptosis require numerous apoptogenic factors that are either released from or sequestered in mitochondria, which may transform the biomolecular makeup of the organelle. In this communication, using Raman microspectroscopy, we demonstrate that transformation in biomolecular composition of mitochondrion may be used as apoptosis marker in an individual cell. For the first time, we show that significant changes occur in the concentrations of RNA, DNA, protein, and lipid constituents of mitochondria during apoptosis. The structural analysis of proteins on mitochondria demonstrated a decrease in α-helix secondary structure content, and an increase in the levels of random coils and β-sheets on mitochondria. This may represent an additional hallmark of apoptosis. Strikingly, we observed nearly identical changes in macromolecular content of mitochondria both in the presence and absence of a key proapoptotic protein, Bax (Bcl-2-associated X protein). Increased DNA level in mitochondria corresponded with higher mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial ROS production. Upregulation of polymerase-γ (POLG), mitochondrial helicase Twinkle, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in response to DNA damage correlated with increased mtDNA and RNA synthesis. Elevated activity of oxidative phosphorylation complexes supports functional mitochondrial respiration during apoptosis. Thus, we define previously unknown dynamic correlation of macromolecular structure of mitochondria and apoptosis progression in the presence and absence of Bax protein. These findings open up a new approach for monitoring physiological status of cells by non invasive single-cell method.

  8. Protective Effect of Thymoquinone against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis through Inhibiting DNA Damage and Upregulation of Nrf2 Expression.

    PubMed

    Gore, Prashant R; Prajapati, Chaitali P; Mahajan, Umesh B; Goyal, Sameer N; Belemkar, Sateesh; Ojha, Shreesh; Patil, Chandragouda R

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CYP) induced hemorrhagic cystitis is a dose-limiting side effect involving increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and suppressed activity of nuclear factor related erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). Thymoquinone (TQ), an active constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, is reported to increase the expression of Nrf2, exert antioxidant action, and anti-inflammatory effects in the experimental animals. The present study was designed to explore the effects of TQ on CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in Balb/c mice. Cystitis was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of CYP (200 mg/kg). TQ was administered intraperitoneally at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg doses twice a day, for three days before and three days after the CYP administration. The efficacy of TQ was determined in terms of the protection against the CYP-induced histological perturbations in the bladder tissue, reduction in the oxidative stress, and inhibition of the DNA fragmentation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of Nrf2. TQ protected against CYP-induced oxidative stress was evident from significant reduction in the lipid peroxidation, restoration of the levels of reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. TQ treatment significantly reduced the DNA damage evident as reduced DNA fragmentation. A significant decrease in the cellular infiltration, edema, epithelial denudation and hemorrhage were observed in the histological observations. There was restoration and rise in the Nrf2 expression in the bladder tissues of mice treated with TQ. These results confirm that, TQ ameliorates the CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in mice through reduction in the oxidative stress, inhibition of the DNA damage and through increased expression of Nrf2 in the bladder tissues. PMID:27489498

  9. Protective Effect of Thymoquinone against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis through Inhibiting DNA Damage and Upregulation of Nrf2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    G