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Sample records for inducing sterilizing immunity

  1. Steric-electronic effects in malarial peptides inducing sterile immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Is it evident that the residues position are relevant regarding of {phi} angular value. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The geometry considered for detailing the alterations undergone by HABPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inter planar interactions ruled by clashes between the atoms making them up. -- Abstract: Conserved Plasmodium falciparum high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) most relevant proteins involved in malaria parasite invasion are immunologically silent; critical binding residues must therefore be specifically replaced to render them highly immunogenic and protection-inducing. Such changes have a tremendous impact on these peptides' steric-electronic effects, such as modifications to peptide length peptide bonds and electronic orbitals' disposition, to allow a better fit into immune system MHCII molecules and better interaction with the TCR which might account for the final immunological outcome.

  2. Four-segmented Rift Valley fever virus induces sterile immunity in sheep after a single vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Kant, Jet; van Keulen, Lucien; Moormann, Rob J M; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2015-03-17

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family, causes recurrent outbreaks with severe disease in ruminants and occasionally humans. The virus comprises a segmented genome consisting of a small (S), medium (M) and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. The M-segment encodes a glycoprotein precursor (GPC) protein that is co-translationally cleaved into Gn and Gc, which are required for virus entry and fusion. Recently we developed a four-segmented RVFV (RVFV-4s) by splitting the M-genome segment, and used this virus to study RVFV genome packaging. Here we evaluated the potential of a RVFV-4s variant lacking the NSs gene (4s-ΔNSs) to induce protective immunity in sheep. Groups of seven lambs were either mock-vaccinated or vaccinated with 10(5) or 10(6) tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of 4s-ΔNSs via the intramuscular (IM) or subcutaneous (SC) route. Three weeks post-vaccination all lambs were challenged with wild-type RVFV. Mock-vaccinated lambs developed high fever and high viremia within 2 days post-challenge and three animals eventually succumbed to the infection. In contrast, none of the 4s-ΔNSs vaccinated animals developed clinical signs during the course of the experiment. Vaccination with 10(5) TCID50 via the IM route provided sterile immunity, whereas a 10(6) dose was required to induce sterile immunity via SC vaccination. Protection was strongly correlated with the presence of RVFV neutralizing antibodies. This study shows that 4s-ΔNSs is able to induce sterile immunity in the natural target species after a single vaccination, preferably administrated via the IM route.

  3. A live-attenuated Zika virus vaccine candidate induces sterilizing immunity in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Shan, Chao; Muruato, Antonio E; Nunes, Bruno T D; Luo, Huanle; Xie, Xuping; Medeiros, Daniele B A; Wakamiya, Maki; Tesh, Robert B; Barrett, Alan D; Wang, Tian; Weaver, Scott C; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Rossi, Shannan L; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2017-06-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection of pregnant women can cause a wide range of congenital abnormalities, including microcephaly, in the infant, a condition now collectively known as congenital ZIKV syndrome. A vaccine to prevent or significantly attenuate viremia in pregnant women who are residents of or travelers to epidemic or endemic regions is needed to avert congenital ZIKV syndrome, and might also help to suppress epidemic transmission. Here we report on a live-attenuated vaccine candidate that contains a 10-nucleotide deletion in the 3' untranslated region of the ZIKV genome (10-del ZIKV). The 10-del ZIKV is highly attenuated, immunogenic, and protective in type 1 interferon receptor-deficient A129 mice. Crucially, a single dose of 10-del ZIKV induced sterilizing immunity with a saturated neutralizing antibody titer, which no longer increased after challenge with an epidemic ZIKV, and completely prevented viremia. The immunized mice also developed a robust T cell response. Intracranial inoculation of 1-d-old immunocompetent CD-1 mice with 1 × 10(4) infectious focus units (IFU) of 10-del ZIKV caused no mortality, whereas infections with 10 IFU of wild-type ZIKV were lethal. Mechanistically, the attenuated virulence of 10-del ZIKV may be due to decreased viral RNA synthesis and increased sensitivity to type-1-interferon inhibition. The attenuated 10-del ZIKV was incapable of infecting mosquitoes after oral feeding of spiked-blood meals, representing an additional safety feature. Collectively, the safety and efficacy results suggest that further development of this promising, live-attenuated ZIKV vaccine candidate is warranted.

  4. Transgenic technologies to induce sterility.

    PubMed

    Catteruccia, Flaminia; Crisanti, Andrea; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2009-11-16

    The last few years have witnessed a considerable expansion in the number of tools available to perform molecular and genetic studies on the genome of Anopheles mosquitoes, the vectors of human malaria. As a consequence, knowledge of aspects of the biology of mosquitoes, such as immunity, reproduction and behaviour, that are relevant to their ability to transmit disease is rapidly increasing, and could be translated into concrete benefits for malaria control strategies. Amongst the most important scientific advances, the development of transgenic technologies for Anopheles mosquitoes provides a crucial opportunity to improve current vector control measures or design novel ones. In particular, the use of genetic modification of the mosquito genome could provide for a more effective deployment of the sterile insect technique (SIT) against vector populations in the field. Currently, SIT relies on the release of radiation sterilized males, which compete with wild males for mating with wild females. The induction of sterility in males through the genetic manipulation of the mosquito genome, already achieved in a number of other insect species, could eliminate the need for radiation and increase the efficiency of SIT-based strategies. This paper provides an overview of the mechanisms already in use for inducing sterility by transgenesis in Drosophila and other insects, and speculates on possible ways to apply similar approaches to Anopheles mosquitoes.

  5. Secretion of Protective Antigens by Tissue-Stage Nematode Larvae Revealed by Proteomic Analysis and Vaccination-Induced Sterile Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, James P.; Ivens, Al C.; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J.; McSorley, Henry J.; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  6. Atomic evidence that modification of H-bonds established with amino acids critical for host-cell binding induces sterile immunity against malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Cifuentes, Gladys; Pirajan, Camilo; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Vanegas, Magnolia

    2010-04-09

    Based on the 3D X-ray crystallographic structures of relevant proteins of the malaria parasite involved in invasion to host cells and 3D NMR structures of High Activity Binding Peptides (HABPs) and their respective analogues, it was found that HABPs are rendered into highly immunogenic and sterile immunity inducers in the Aotus experimental model by modifying those amino acids that establish H-bonds with other HABPs or binding to host's cells. This finding adds striking and novel physicochemical principles, at the atomic level, for a logical and rational vaccine development methodology against infectious disease, among them malaria.

  7. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ilin; Sedegah, Martha; Cicatelli, Susan; Spring, Michele; Polhemus, Mark; Tamminga, Cindy; Patterson, Noelle; Guerrero, Melanie; Bennett, Jason W.; McGrath, Shannon; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Farooq, Fouzia; Abot, Esteban; Banania, Jo Glenna; Huang, Jun; Newcomer, Rhonda; Rein, Lisa; Litilit, Dianne; Richie, Nancy O.; Wood, Chloe; Murphy, Jittawadee; Sauerwein, Robert; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; McCoy, Andrea J.; Kamau, Edwin; Cummings, James; Komisar, Jack; Sutamihardja, Awalludin; Shi, Meng; Epstein, Judith E.; Maiolatesi, Santina; Tosh, Donna; Limbach, Keith; Angov, Evelina; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Bruder, Joseph T.; Doolan, Denise L.; King, C. Richter; Carucci, Daniel; Dutta, Sheetij; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Richie, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA) followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad). The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1). The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea), possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3), preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27%) were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44–817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5–102) and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13–408; AMA1 348, range 88–1270) and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019). Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant. Significance The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%). Protection was

  8. Sterile inflammation induced by Carbopol elicits robust adaptive immune responses in the absence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gartlan, Kate H.; Krashias, George; Wegmann, Frank; Hillson, William R.; Scherer, Erin M.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.; Moghaddam, Amin E.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbopol is a polyanionic carbomer used in man for topical application and drug delivery purposes. However parenteral administration of Carbopol in animal models results in systemic adjuvant activity including strong pro-inflammatory type-1 T-cell (Th1) polarization. Here we investigated potential pathways of immune activation by Carbopol by comparison with other well-characterized adjuvants. Carbopol administration triggered rapid and robust leukocyte recruitment, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and antigen capture largely by inflammatory monocytes. The induction of antigen specific Th1 cells by Carbopol was found to occur via a non-canonical pathway, independent of MyD88/TRIF signaling and in the absence of pattern-recognition-receptor (PRR) activation typically associated with Th1/Ig2a induction. Using multispectral fluorescence imaging (Imagestream) and electron microscopy we demonstrated that phagocytic uptake of Carbopol particles followed by entry into the phagosomal/lysosomal pathway elicited conformational changes to the polymer and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We therefore conclude that Carbopol may mediate its adjuvant activity via novel mechanisms of antigen presenting cell activation and Th1 induction, leading to enhanced IgG2a responses independent of microbial pattern recognition. PMID:27005810

  9. An investigation of sterile immunity against toxoplasmosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Freyre, A; Falcón, J; Mendez, J; Correa, O; Morgades, D; Rodríguez, A

    2004-01-01

    The non-persistent BK strain was examined for its ability to induce sterile immunity in Wistar rats. Groups of 2-9 Wistar rats were inoculated subcutaneously with 5 x 10(4) BK strain tachyzoites per rat. Two months later, 46 rats were dosed by gavage with 2 x 10(1) cysts of the C, ME-49, Prugniaud, C-56, Elg, M-7741 or M3 strains. Another 26 rats were inoculated with 10(3) oocysts of the ME49, M7741, Bear or Hopa-Hopa strains of Toxoplasma gondii. After 2 months, the rats were euthanized and their brains screened microscopically for toxoplasma tissue cysts and bioassayed in mice if negative. As judged by bioassay, the BK strain of Toxoplasma induced statistically significant protection against reinfection only when rats were challenged with cysts of the C and Prugniaud strains or with oocysts of the ME49 strain. Nonetheless, cysts were detected microscopically only in 23% of brains of immunized rats challenged with oocysts of the Bear and Hopa-Hopa strains of Toxoplasma and none of those challenged with tissue cysts of any strain. Tissue cysts were detected in 43 and 48% of non-immunized control rats infected with tissue cysts and oocysts, respectively. The overall infection in control rats (microscopy and bioassay) was 70 and 72% for rats inoculated with cysts and oocysts, respectively. These results are consistent with the divergent results obtained by other investigators with regard to protection after challenge with different complete strains (cyst and oocysts forming) of the parasite, of rats immunized with incomplete strains.

  10. Minimal role for the circumsporozoite protein in the induction of sterile immunity by vaccination with live rodent malaria sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Mauduit, Marjorie; Tewari, Rita; Depinay, Nadya; Kayibanda, Michèle; Lallemand, Eliette; Chavatte, Jean-Marc; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Grüner, Anne Charlotte

    2010-05-01

    Immunization with live Plasmodium sporozoites under chloroquine prophylaxis (Spz plus CQ) induces sterile immunity against sporozoite challenge in rodents and, more importantly, in humans. Full protection is obtained with substantially fewer parasites than with the classic immunization with radiation-attenuated sporozoites. The sterile protection observed comprised a massive reduction in the hepatic parasite load and an additional effect at the blood stage level. Differences in the immune responses induced by the two protocols occur but are as yet little characterized. We have previously demonstrated that in mice immunized with irradiated sporozoites, immune responses against the circumsporozoite protein (CSP), the major component of the sporozoite's surface and the leading malaria vaccine candidate, were not essential for sterile protection. Here, we have employed transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites in which the endogenous CSP was replaced by that of Plasmodium yoelii, another rodent malaria species, to assess the role of CSP in the sterile protection induced by the Spz-plus-CQ protocol. The data demonstrated that this role was minor because sterile immunity was obtained irrespective of the origin of CSP expressed by the parasites in this model of protection. The immunity was obtained through a single transient exposure of the host to the immunizing parasites (preerythrocytic and erythrocytic), a dose much smaller than that required for immunization with radiation-attenuated sporozoites.

  11. Targeted Gene Silencing to Induce Permanent Sterility

    PubMed Central

    Dissen, Gregory A.; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Boudreau, Ryan L.; Chen, Yong Hong; Davidson, Beverly L.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2012-01-01

    Contents A nonsurgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed it has to meet several conditions: It needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: a) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction, and b) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  12. Sterilization.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Herbert B

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, sterilization (tubal sterilization and vasectomy) is used by more people than any other method of contraception. All techniques of tubal sterilization in widespread use in the United States have low risks of surgical complications. Although tubal sterilization is highly effective, the risk of pregnancy varies by age and method of occlusion. Pregnancies can occur many years after the procedure, and when they do, the risk of ectopic gestation is high. There is now strong evidence against the existence of a post-tubal ligation syndrome of menstrual abnormalities. Although women who have undergone tubal sterilization are more likely than other women to undergo hysterectomy subsequently, there is no known biologic basis for this relationship. Although sterilization is intended to be permanent, expressions of regret and requests for reversal are not uncommon and are much more likely to occur among women sterilized at young ages. Tubal sterilization has little or no effect on sexual function for most women. Vasectomy is less likely than tubal sterilization to result in serious complications. Minor complications, however, are not uncommon. Vasectomy does not increase the risk of heart disease, and available evidence argues against an increase in the risk of prostate cancer, testicular cancer, or overall mortality. Whether a postvasectomy pain syndrome exists remains controversial. Although the long-term effectiveness of vasectomy is less well-studied than that for tubal sterilization, it seems likely to be at least as effective. Intrauterine devices and progestin implants are long-acting, highly effective alternatives to sterilization.

  13. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-14

    Vaccination of monkeys with recombinant Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 confers protection against blood-stage malaria . Infect Immun...circumsporozoite protein partially protects healthy malaria -naive adults against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite challenge. Infect Immun 74: 5933–5942...Ballou WR, et al. (1986) Malaria transmitted to humans by mosquitoes infected from cultured Plasmodium falciparum . Am J Trop Med Hyg 35: 66–68. 37

  14. Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles involved in malarial peptide bonds determine sterile protective immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Bermudez, Adriana

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles determine sterile protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified peptide's tendency to assume a regular conformation related to a PPII{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural modifications in mHABPs induce Ab and protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mHABP backbone atom's interaction with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} is stabilised by H-bonds. -- Abstract: Modified HABP (mHABP) regions interacting with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules have a more restricted conformation and/or sequence than other mHABPs which do not fit perfectly into their peptide binding regions (PBR) and do not induce an acceptable immune response due to the critical role of their {Phi} and {Psi} torsion angles. These angle's critical role was determined in such highly immunogenic, protection-inducing response against experimental malaria using the conformers (mHABPs) obtained by {sup 1}H-NMR and superimposed into HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator }-like Aotus monkey molecules; their phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles were measured and the H-bond formation between these molecules was evaluated. The aforementioned mHABP propensity to assume a regular conformation similar to a left-handed polyproline type II helix (PPII{sub L}) led to suggesting that favouring these conformations according to their amino acid sequence would lead to high antibody titre production and sterile protective immunity induction against malaria, thereby adding new principles or rules for vaccine development, malaria being one of them.

  15. Surgical sterilization: an underutilized procedure for evaluating the merits of induced sterility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennelly, James J.; Converse, Kathryn A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite more than 4 decades of effort, development of effective wildlife damage control programs based on sterilization of target species has met with limited success. This is partly due to the fact that investigators have assumed, rather than empirically tested, whether the reproductive strategies of the target populations were vulnerable to the planned treatment. Equally important, methods selected to include sterility usually involve a chemical agent that can affect sociosexual behaviors of the nuisance population. In this report, we illustrate how surgically induced sterility circumvents both problems--how the concept without the potentially confounding secondary effects of a chemical. We assessed the merits of initiating research to develop a male chemosterilant for Norway rats, red-winged blackbirds, beaver, and Canada geese by inducing sterility surgically. The infidelity of many red-winged females to their polygynous territorial male was surprising and argued against searching for a male sterilant. On the other hand, beaver and Canada goose studies confirmed previous reports that both form par-bonds and are monogamous. Both should be vulnerable to a male chemosterilant approach, and research toward this goal is justified.

  16. [Treatment of anovulatory cycle induced sterility].

    PubMed

    Botella Llusia, J

    1983-03-01

    Of all the clinical aspects of human sterility, the anovulatory cycle is undoubtedly 1 that has produced the widest range of therapuetic successes. While in other fields progress has been very slow (male sterility or tubal obstruction), ovarian pharmacoendocrinology has shown several advances over recent years. This progress is due partly to new chemicals such as urinary menopausal gonadotropins, LH-RH, and their analogues Clomiphene and Bromocriptine. Contributing further to these good results is a greater knowledge of the etiology of anovulation and a more accurate selection of cases for treatment.

  17. Sterilization.

    PubMed

    Rioux, M H

    1979-05-01

    The history of sterilization in North America has included enactment of laws in 37 U. S. states and 2 Canadian provinces allowing the procedure to be performed to eliminate undesirable, genetically-transmitted traits. These eugenic laws applied to any of the following categories of persons: mentally regarded, mentally ill, epileptic, criminal, alcoholic, or poor people. Pressure from geneticists, lawyers, and others concerned with the implications of such laws, led to their repeal in many places. Noneugenic and nontherapeutic sterilization is today a recognized medical practice. Legally, such procedures must meet the following criteria: 1) informed consent; 2) individual benefit; and 3) performance with reasonable care and skill. If these criteria are met, doctors are protected from legal liability. The most legal, social, and ethical ambiguities arise in cases where nontherapeutic sterilization is performed on individuals unable to give consent, e.g., minors or mentally handicapped persons.

  18. Sterile Protective Immunity to Malaria is Associated with a Panel of Novel P. falciparum Antigens*

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Angela; Kayala, Matthew A.; Burk, Chad; Molina, Douglas M.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Richie, Thomas L.; Baldi, Pierre; Felgner, Philip L.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2011-01-01

    The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains a global public health priority. Less than 0.5% of the Plasmodium falciparum genome has been assessed as potential vaccine targets and candidate vaccines have been based almost exclusively on single antigens. It is possible that the failure to develop a malaria vaccine despite decades of effort might be attributed to this historic focus. To advance malaria vaccine development, we have fabricated protein microarrays representing 23% of the entire P. falciparum proteome and have probed these arrays with plasma from subjects with sterile protection or no protection after experimental immunization with radiation attenuated P. falciparum sporozoites. A panel of 19 pre-erythrocytic stage antigens was identified as strongly associated with sporozoite-induced protective immunity; 16 of these antigens were novel and 85% have been independently identified in sporozoite and/or liver stage proteomic or transcriptomic data sets. Reactivity to any individual antigen did not correlate with protection but there was a highly significant difference in the cumulative signal intensity between protected and not protected individuals. Functional annotation indicates that most of these signature proteins are involved in cell cycle/DNA processing and protein synthesis. In addition, 21 novel blood-stage specific antigens were identified. Our data provide the first evidence that sterile protective immunity against malaria is directed against a panel of novel P. falciparum antigens rather than one antigen in isolation. These results have important implications for vaccine development, suggesting that an efficacious malaria vaccine should be multivalent and targeted at a select panel of key antigens, many of which have not been previously characterized. PMID:21628511

  19. Sterile Immunity to Malaria after DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Immunization Is Associated with Effector Memory CD8+T Cells Targeting AMA1 Class I Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Kim, Yohan; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Huang, Jun; McGrath, Shannon; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Shi, Meng; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E.; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fifteen volunteers were immunized with three doses of plasmid DNA encoding P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) and boosted with human adenovirus-5 (Ad) expressing the same antigens (DNA/Ad). Four volunteers (27%) demonstrated sterile immunity to controlled human malaria infection and, overall, protection was statistically significantly associated with ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ activities to AMA1 but not CSP. DNA priming was required for protection, as 18 additional subjects immunized with Ad alone (AdCA) did not develop sterile protection. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to identify correlates of protection, recognizing that DNA-priming may induce different responses than AdCA alone. Among protected volunteers, two and three had higher ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to CSP and AMA1, respectively, than non-protected volunteers. Unexpectedly, non-protected volunteers in the AdCA trial showed ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to AMA1 equal to or higher than the protected volunteers. T cell functionality assessed by intracellular cytokine staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 likewise did not distinguish protected from non-protected volunteers across both trials. However, three of the four protected volunteers showed higher effector to central memory CD8+ T cell ratios to AMA1, and one of these to CSP, than non-protected volunteers for both antigens. These responses were focused on discrete regions of CSP and AMA1. Class I epitopes restricted by A*03 or B*58 supertypes within these regions of AMA1 strongly recalled responses in three of four protected volunteers. We hypothesize that vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells recognizing a single class I epitope can confer sterile immunity to P. falciparum in humans. Conclusions/Significance We suggest that better understanding of which epitopes within malaria antigens can confer sterile immunity and design of vaccine approaches

  20. LigB subunit vaccine confers sterile immunity against challenge in the hamster model of leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Marcelle M.; Félix, Samuel; Mendonça, Karla S.; Santos, Cleiton S.; Athanazio, Daniel A.; Medeiros, Marco A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.

    2017-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases, including zoonoses such as leptospirosis, have a major impact on rural and poor urban communities, particularly in developing countries. This has led to major investment in antipoverty vaccines that focus on diseases that influence public health and thereby productivity. While the true, global, impact of leptospirosis is unknown due to the lack of adequate laboratory diagnosis, the WHO estimates that incidence has doubled over the last 15 years to over 1 million cases that require hospitalization every year. Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. and is spread through direct contact with infected animals, their urine or contaminated water and soil. Inactivated leptospirosis vaccines, or bacterins, are approved in only a handful of countries due to the lack of heterologous protection (there are > 250 pathogenic Leptospira serovars) and the serious side-effects associated with vaccination. Currently, research has focused on recombinant vaccines, a possible solution to these problems. However, due to a lack of standardised animal models, rigorous statistical analysis and poor reproducibility, this approach has met with limited success. We evaluated a subunit vaccine preparation, based on a conserved region of the leptospiral immunoglobulin-like B protein (LigB(131–645)) and aluminium hydroxide (AH), in the hamster model of leptospirosis. The vaccine conferred significant protection (80.0–100%, P < 0.05) against mortality in vaccinated animals in seven independent experiments. The efficacy of the LigB(131–645)/AH vaccine ranged from 87.5–100% and we observed sterile immunity (87.5–100%) among the vaccinated survivors. Significant levels of IgM and IgG were induced among vaccinated animals, although they did not correlate with immunity. A mixed IgG1/IgG2 subclass profile was associated with the subunit vaccine, compared to the predominant IgG2 profile seen in bacterin vaccinated hamsters. These findings suggest that

  1. LigB subunit vaccine confers sterile immunity against challenge in the hamster model of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Neida L; Cruz McBride, Flávia W; Souza, Jéssica D; Silveira, Marcelle M; Félix, Samuel; Mendonça, Karla S; Santos, Cleiton S; Athanazio, Daniel A; Medeiros, Marco A; Reis, Mitermayer G; Dellagostin, Odir A; McBride, Alan J A

    2017-03-01

    Neglected tropical diseases, including zoonoses such as leptospirosis, have a major impact on rural and poor urban communities, particularly in developing countries. This has led to major investment in antipoverty vaccines that focus on diseases that influence public health and thereby productivity. While the true, global, impact of leptospirosis is unknown due to the lack of adequate laboratory diagnosis, the WHO estimates that incidence has doubled over the last 15 years to over 1 million cases that require hospitalization every year. Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. and is spread through direct contact with infected animals, their urine or contaminated water and soil. Inactivated leptospirosis vaccines, or bacterins, are approved in only a handful of countries due to the lack of heterologous protection (there are > 250 pathogenic Leptospira serovars) and the serious side-effects associated with vaccination. Currently, research has focused on recombinant vaccines, a possible solution to these problems. However, due to a lack of standardised animal models, rigorous statistical analysis and poor reproducibility, this approach has met with limited success. We evaluated a subunit vaccine preparation, based on a conserved region of the leptospiral immunoglobulin-like B protein (LigB(131-645)) and aluminium hydroxide (AH), in the hamster model of leptospirosis. The vaccine conferred significant protection (80.0-100%, P < 0.05) against mortality in vaccinated animals in seven independent experiments. The efficacy of the LigB(131-645)/AH vaccine ranged from 87.5-100% and we observed sterile immunity (87.5-100%) among the vaccinated survivors. Significant levels of IgM and IgG were induced among vaccinated animals, although they did not correlate with immunity. A mixed IgG1/IgG2 subclass profile was associated with the subunit vaccine, compared to the predominant IgG2 profile seen in bacterin vaccinated hamsters. These findings suggest that LigB(131

  2. The hepatitis B vaccine protects re-exposed health care workers, but does not provide sterilizing immunity.

    PubMed

    Werner, Jens M; Abdalla, Adil; Gara, Naveen; Ghany, Marc G; Rehermann, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be prevented by vaccination with HB surface (HBs) antigen, which induces HBs-specific antibodies and T cells. However, the duration of vaccine-induced protective immunity is poorly defined for health care workers who were vaccinated as adults. We investigated the immune mechanisms (antibody and T-cell responses) of long-term protection by the HBV vaccine in 90 health care workers with or without occupational exposure to HBV, 10-28 years after vaccination. Fifty-nine of 90 health care workers (65%) had levels of antibodies to HBs antigen above the cut-off (>12 mIU/mL) and 30 of 90 (33%) had HBs-specific T cells that produced interferon-gamma. Titers of antibodies to HBs antigen correlated with numbers of HBs-specific interferon-gamma-producing T cells, but not with time after vaccination. Although occupational exposure to HBV after vaccination did not induce antibodies to the HBV core protein (HBcore), the standard biomarker for HBV infection, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells against HBcore and polymerase antigens were detected. Similar numbers of HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were detected in health care workers with occupational exposure to HBV and in patients who acquired immunity via HBV infection. Most of the HBcore- and polymerase-specific T cells were CD45RO(+)CCR7(-)CD127(-) effector memory cells in exposed health care workers and in patients with acquired immunity. In contrast, most of the vaccine-induced HBs-specific T cells were CD45RO(-)CCR7(-)CD127(-) terminally differentiated cells. HBs antigen vaccine-induced immunity protects against future infection but does not provide sterilizing immunity, as evidenced by HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD8(+) T cells in vaccinated health care workers with occupational exposure to HBV. The presence of HBcore- and HBV polymerase-specific T-cell responses is a more sensitive indicator of HBV exposure than detection of HBcore-specific antibodies

  3. The Syk–NFAT–IL-2 Pathway in Dendritic Cells Is Required for Optimal Sterile Immunity Elicited by Alum Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Khameneh, Hanif Javanmard; Ho, Adrian W. S.; Spreafico, Roberto; Derks, Heidi; Quek, Hazel Q. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Despite a long history and extensive usage of insoluble aluminum salts (alum) as vaccine adjuvants, the molecular mechanisms underpinning Ag-specific immunity upon vaccination remain unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial initiators of immune responses, but little is known about the molecular pathways used by DCs to sense alum and, in turn, activate T and B cells. In this article, we show that alum adjuvanticity requires IL-2 specifically released by DCs, even when T cell secretion of IL-2 is intact. We demonstrate that alum, as well as other sterile particulates, such as uric acid crystals, induces DCs to produce IL-2 following initiation of actin-mediated phagocytosis that leads to Src and Syk kinase activation, Ca2+ mobilization, and calcineurin-dependent activation of NFAT, the master transcription factor regulating IL-2 expression. Using chimeric mice, we show that DC-derived IL-2 is required for maximal Ag-specific proliferation of CD4+ T cells and optimal humoral responses following alum-adjuvanted immunization. These data identify DC-derived IL-2 as a key mediator of alum adjuvanticity in vivo and the Src–Syk pathway as a potential leverage point in the rational design of novel adjuvants. PMID:27895176

  4. X-ray-induced sterility in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and male longevity following irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Parker, A G; Oliva, C F; Balestrino, F; Gilles, J R L

    2014-07-01

    The mosquito Aedes albopictus (Skuse, 1895) is a potent vector of several arboviral diseases, most notably chikungunya and dengue fever. In the context of the sterile insect technique (SIT), the sterilization of the male mosquitoes before their release can be achieved by gamma-ray irradiation. As gamma-ray irradiators are becoming increasingly problematic to purchase and transport, the suitability of an X-ray irradiator as an alternative for the sterilization of Ae. albopictus males was studied. The sterilization of up to 200,000 pupae at one time can be achieved with relative ease, and the sterility results obtained were comparable with those achieved by gamma irradiation, where 99% sterility is induced with a dose of 40 Gy. A significant reduction of longevity was observed in the latter stages of the males' life after irradiation treatments, especially at doses > 40 Gy, which is consistent with the negative effects on longevity induced by similar radiation doses using gamma rays. Females irradiated at 40 Gy were not only 100% sterile, but also failed to oviposit entirely, i.e., all of the females laid 0 eggs. Overall, it was found that the X-ray irradiator is generally suitable for the sterilization process for sterile insect technique programs, as it showed a high processing capacity, practicality, high effectiveness, and reproducibility.

  5. Sterilization using a microwave-induced argon plasma system at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bong Joo; Lee, D. H.; Park, J.-C.; Lee, I.-S.; Lee, K.-Y.; Hyun, S. O.; Chun, M.-S.; Chung, K.-H.

    2003-11-01

    The use of microwave plasma for sterilization is relatively new. The advantages of this method are the relatively low temperature, time-savings and its nontoxic nature, in contrast to traditional methods such as heat and gas treatment, and radiation. This study investigated the sterilization effects of microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure on materials contaminated with various microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi. A low-cost and reliable 2.45 GHz, waveguide-based applicator was designed to generate microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure. This system consisted of a 1 kW magnetron power supply, a WR-284 copper waveguide, an applicator including a tuning section, and a nozzle section. Six bacterial and fungal strains were used for the sterilization test. The results showed that regardless of the strain, all the bacteria used in this study were fully sterilized within 20 seconds and all the fungi were sterilized within 1 second. These results show that this sterilization method is easy to use, requires significantly less time than the other traditional methods and established plasma sterilization methods, and it is nontoxic. It can be used in the field of sterilization in medical and dental clinics as well as in laboratory settings.

  6. Molecular mapping of a new induced gene for nuclear male sterility in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new NMS line, NMS HA89-872, induced by mitomycin C and streptomycin carries a single recessive male-sterile gene ms6. An F2 population of 88 plants was obtained from a cross between nuclear male-sterile mutant NMS HA89-872 (msms) and male-fertile line RHA271 (MsMs). 225 SSR primers and 9 RFLP-deri...

  7. Sterilization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Cox Sterile Products, Inc.'s Rapid Heat Transfer Sterilizer employs a heat exchange process that induces rapid air movement; the air becomes the heat transfer medium, maintaining a uniform temperature of 375 degrees Fahrenheit. It features pushbutton controls for three timing cycles for different instrument loads, a six-minute cycle for standard unpackaged instruments, eight minutes for certain specialized dental/medical instruments and 12 minutes for packaged instruments which can then be stored in a drawer in sterile condition. System will stay at 375 degrees all day. Continuous operation is not expensive because of the sterilizer's very low power requirements.

  8. High temperature-induced sterility in the female Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Narayan Prasad; Bhandari, Ramji Kumar; Kobayashi, Yasuhisa; Nakamura, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    High temperature treatments induce germ cell loss in gonads of vertebrate animals, including fish. It could be a reliable source for induction of sterility if the treatments led to a permanent loss of germ cells. Here we report that heat treatment at 37 °C for 45-60 days caused a complete loss of germ cells in female Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, and that sterility was achieved in fish at all stages of their life cycle. Unlike previous observations, germ cells did not repopulate even after returning them to the water at control conditions suggesting permanent depletion of germ cells. Gonadal somatic cells immunopositive for 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) were clustered at one end of the germ cell depleted gonads close to the blood vessel. Serum level of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, and 17β-estradiol was significantly decreased in sterile fish compared to control. Body weight of sterile fish was higher than control fish at the end of experiment. Our observations of increased growth and permanent sterilization in the high temperature-treated fish suggest that this method could be an appropriate and eco-friendly tool for inducing sterility in fish with a higher thermal tolerance.

  9. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair: the role of sterile inflammation and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Williams, C. David; Ramachandran, Anup; Bajt, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity because of overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the western world. Metabolic activation of APAP and protein adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation and nuclear DNA fragmentation are critical intracellular events in hepatocytes. However, the early cell necrosis causes the release of a number of mediators such as high-mobility group box 1 protein, DNA fragments, heat shock proteins (HSPs) and others (collectively named damage-associated molecular patterns), which can be recognized by toll-like receptors on macrophages, and leads to their activation with cytokine and chemokine formation. Although pro-inflammatory mediators recruit inflammatory cells (neutrophils, monocytes) into the liver, neither the infiltrating cells nor the activated resident macrophages cause any direct cytotoxicity. In contrast, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines can directly promote intracellular injury mechanisms by inducing nitric oxide synthase or inhibit cell death mechanisms by the expression of acute-phase proteins (HSPs, heme oxygenase-1) and promote hepatocyte proliferation. In addition, the newly recruited macrophages (M2) and potentially neutrophils are involved in the removal of necrotic cell debris in preparation for tissue repair and resolution of the inflammatory response. Thus, as discussed in detail in this review, the preponderance of experimental evidence suggests that the extensive sterile inflammatory response during APAP hepatotoxicity is predominantly beneficial by limiting the formation and the impact of pro-inflammatory mediators and by promoting tissue repair. PMID:21745276

  10. Sterilization of syringes and needles for immunization programmes using a pressure cooker.

    PubMed

    Balraj, V; Sridharan, G; John, T J

    1990-04-01

    Pressure cookers are being widely used for sterilizing equipment in small clinics and hospitals and under 'field conditions' in developing countries, especially in India. In the literature there is no report on testing of pressure cookers (PC) to determine if they sterilize adequately. The use of PC for a 15-min 'holding time' after steam starts to emanate from under the weight is quite satisfactory by standard efficacy testing methods for autoclaves.

  11. Sepsis-induced immune dysfunction: can immune therapies reduce mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Delano, Matthew J.; Ward, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response induced by an infection, leading to organ dysfunction and mortality. Historically, sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and lethality were attributed to the interplay between inflammatory and antiinflammatory responses. With advances in intensive care management and goal-directed interventions, early sepsis mortality has diminished, only to surge later after “recovery” from acute events, prompting a search for sepsis-induced alterations in immune function. Sepsis is well known to alter innate and adaptive immune responses for sustained periods after clinical “recovery,” with immunosuppression being a prominent example of such alterations. Recent studies have centered on immune-modulatory therapy. These efforts are focused on defining and reversing the persistent immune cell dysfunction that is associated with mortality long after the acute events of sepsis have resolved. PMID:26727230

  12. Whole Transcriptome Analysis Using Next-Generation Sequencing of Sterile-Cultured Eisenia andrei for Immune System Research

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kuwada-Kusunose, Takao; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Kitano, Taiichi; Komiyama, Yusuke; Iwase, Takashi; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, earthworms have become a useful model for research into the immune system, and it is expected that results obtained using this model will shed light on the sophisticated vertebrate immune system and the evolution of the immune response, and additionally help identify new biomolecules with therapeutic applications. However, for earthworms to be used as a genetic model of the invertebrate immune system, basic molecular and genetic resources, such as an expressed sequence tag (EST) database, must be developed for this organism. Next-generation sequencing technologies have generated EST libraries by RNA-seq in many model species. In this study, we used Illumina RNA-sequence technology to perform a comprehensive transcriptome analysis using an RNA sample pooled from sterile-cultured Eisenia andrei. All clean reads were assembled de novo into 41,423 unigenes using the Trinity program. Using this transcriptome data, we performed BLAST analysis against the GenBank non-redundant (NR) database and obtained a total of 12,285 significant BLAST hits. Furthermore, gene ontology (GO) analysis assigned 78 unigenes to 24 immune class GO terms. In addition, we detected a unigene with high similarity to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 (GlcAT-P), which mediates a glucuronyl transfer reaction during the biosynthesis of the carbohydrate epitope HNK-1 (human natural killer-1, also known as CD57), a marker of NK cells. The identified transcripts will be used to facilitate future research into the immune system using E. andrei. PMID:25706644

  13. The sterile inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kenneth L; Latz, Eicke; Ontiveros, Fernando; Kono, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    The acute inflammatory response is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it plays a key role in initial host defense, particularly against many infections. On the other hand, its aim is imprecise, and as a consequence, when it is drawn into battle, it can cause collateral damage in tissues. In situations where the inciting stimulus is sterile, the cost-benefit ratio may be high; because of this, sterile inflammation underlies the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. Although there have been major advances in our understanding of how microbes trigger inflammation, much less has been learned about this process in sterile situations. This review focuses on a subset of the many sterile stimuli that can induce inflammation-specifically dead cells and a variety of irritant particles, including crystals, minerals, and protein aggregates. Although this subset of stimuli is structurally very diverse and might appear to be unrelated, there is accumulating evidence that the innate immune system may recognize them in similar ways and stimulate the sterile inflammatory response via common pathways. Here we review established and emerging data about these responses.

  14. Radiation-induced metabolomic changes in sterile male Μοnochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Qu, L J; Wang, L J; Zhang, Y A; Wang, Q H; Wang, Y Z; Zhao, T H; Cai, W Z

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced sterile insect technique is a biologically based, environment-friendly method for the suppression or eradication of a number of insect pests. Although the basic mechanisms underlying the technology have been well studied, little is known about the cell responses in organisms. Characterization of the metabolic shift associated with radiation exposure in sterile insects would be helpful for understanding the detailed mechanism underlying this technique and promote its practical application. In this article, a metabolomic study was performed to characterize the global metabolic changes induced by radiation using untreated and 40 Gy (60)Coγ-irradiated testes of Japanese pine sawyer, Monochamus alternatus Hope. Differential metabolites were detected and tentatively identified. Many key metabolites in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as most fatty and amino acids, were elevated in irradiated male M. alternatus, presumably resulting from depression of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, each of which are important pathways for energy generation Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) in insect spermatozoa. The findings in this article will contribute to our knowledge of the characteristic metabolic changes associated with irradiation sterility and understand the molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced sterile insect technique.

  15. Sterile-filtered saliva is a strong inducer of IL-6 and IL-8 in oral fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cvikl, Barbara; Lussi, Adrian; Moritz, Andreas; Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    Saliva has been implicated to support oral wound healing, a process that requires a transient inflammatory reaction. However, definitive proof that saliva can provoke an inflammatory response remained elusive. We investigated the ability of freshly harvested and sterile-filtered saliva to cause an inflammatory response of oral fibroblasts and epithelial cells. The expression of cytokines and chemokines was assessed by microarray, RT-PCR, immunoassays, and Luminex technology. The involvement of signaling pathways was determined by Western blot analysis and pharmacologic inhibitors. We report that sterile-filtered whole saliva was a potent inducer of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts from the gingiva, the palate, and the periodontal ligament, but not of oral epithelial cells. This strong inflammatory response requires nuclear factor-kappa B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. The pro-inflammatory capacity is heat stable and has a molecular weight of <40 kDa. Genome-wide microarrays and Luminex technology further revealed that saliva substantially increased expression of other inflammatory genes and various chemokines. To preclude that the observed pro-inflammatory activity is the result of oral bacteria, sterile-filtered parotid saliva, collected under almost aseptic conditions, was used and also increased IL-6 and IL-8 expression in gingiva fibroblasts. The inflammatory response was, furthermore, independent of MYD88, an adapter protein of the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. We conclude that saliva can provoke a robust inflammatory response in oral fibroblasts involving the classical nuclear factor-kappa B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Since fibroblasts but not epithelial cells show a strong inflammatory response, saliva may support the innate immunity of defect sites exposing the oral connective tissue.

  16. A ML29 Reassortant Virus Protects Guinea Pigs Against a Distantly-Related Nigerian Strain of Lassa Virus and can Provide Sterilizing Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L.; Johnson, Curtis; Gonzales, Monica; Moreira, Carmen R.; Ticer, Anysha; Brasky, Kathleen; Hubbard, Gene B.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Zapata, Juan; Salvato, Maria S.; Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2007-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is responsible for the deaths of thousands of people in West Africa annually. Genetic diversity among LASV strains is the highest among the Arenaviridae and represents a great challenge for vaccine development. Guinea pigs vaccinated with a ML29 reassortant vaccine experienced sterilizing immunity and complete protection when challenged on day 30 either with homologous virus or with the distantly-related Nigerian isolate. Simultaneous vaccination-challenge or challenge on day 2 after vaccination also protected 60-100% of the animals against both strains, but without sterilizing immunity. These results indicate that simultaneous replication of ML29 and LASV attenuates the virulence of LASV infection. PMID:17360080

  17. A ML29 reassortant virus protects guinea pigs against a distantly related Nigerian strain of Lassa virus and can provide sterilizing immunity.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L; Johnson, Curtis; Gonzales, Monica; Moreira, Carmen R; Ticer, Anysha; Brasky, Kathleen; Hubbard, Gene B; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Zapata, Juan; Salvato, Maria S; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2007-05-16

    Lassa virus (LASV) is responsible for the deaths of thousands of people in West Africa annually. Genetic diversity among LASV strains is the highest among the Arenaviridae and represents a great challenge for vaccine development. Guinea pigs vaccinated with a ML29 reassortant vaccine experienced sterilizing immunity and complete protection when challenged on day 30 either with homologous virus or with the distantly related Nigerian isolate. Simultaneous vaccination-challenge or challenge on day 2 after vaccination also protected 60-100% of the animals against both strains, but without sterilizing immunity. These results indicate that simultaneous replication of ML29 and LASV attenuates the virulence of LASV infection.

  18. Radiation-induced sterility for pupal and adult stages of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis

    PubMed Central

    Helinski, Michelle EH; Parker, Andrew G; Knols, Bart GJ

    2006-01-01

    Background In the context of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), radiation-induced sterility in the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) was studied. Male mosquitoes were exposed to gamma rays in the pupal or adult stage and dose-sterility curves were determined. Methods Pupae were irradiated shortly before emergence (at 22–26 hrs of age), and adults <24 hrs post emergence. Doses tested ranged between 0 and 100 Gy. The effects of irradiation on adult emergence, male survival, induced sterility and insemination capability were evaluated. Emergence and insemination data were analysed using independent t-tests against the control. Correlation analyses were performed for insemination rate and dose and insemination and fecundity. Male survival was analysed using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Finally, the calculated residual fertility values were inverse-normal transformed and linear regression analyses performed. Results Irradiation of pupae, for all doses tested, had no effect on adult emergence. Survival curves of males irradiated as pupae or adults were similar or even slightly higher than non-irradiated males. Overall, adults appeared to be slightly more susceptible to irradiation, although no significant differences for individual doses were observed. In the pupal stage, a significant negative correlation was found between insemination and dose, but the correlation-coefficient was associated with less than 25% of the total variation. A review of the literature indicated that An. arabiensis is more radiation resistant than other anopheline mosquitoes. Conclusion The optimal dose for male insects to be released in an SIT programme depends on their level of sterility and competitiveness. The use of semi-sterilizing doses to produce more competitive insects is discussed. The most convenient developmental stage for mosquito irradiation on a mass-scale are pupae, but pupal irradiation resulted in a lower insemination rate at the highest

  19. Dual-Track Clearance of Circulating Bacteria Balances Rapid Restoration of Blood Sterility with Induction of Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Broadley, Steven P; Plaumann, Ann; Coletti, Raffaele; Lehmann, Christin; Wanisch, Andreas; Seidlmeier, Amelie; Esser, Knud; Luo, Shanshan; Rämer, Patrick C; Massberg, Steffen; Busch, Dirk H; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Verschoor, Admar

    2016-07-13

    Efficient clearance of bacteremia prevents life-threatening disease. Platelet binding to intravascular bacteria, a process involving platelet glycoprotein GPIb and bacterial opsonization with activated complement C3, influences blood clearance and anti-infective immunity. Using intravital microscopy of the bloodstream of mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes, we show that bacterial clearance is not a uniform process but a "dual-track" mechanism consisting of parallel "fast" and "slow" pathways. "Slow clearance" is regulated by time-dependent bacterial opsonization, stochastic platelet binding, and capture of bacteria-platelet-complexes via the complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, CRIg. The mechanism spares some bacteria from "fast clearance" and rapid destruction in the liver via Kupffer cell scavenger receptors, keeping them available for adaptive immunity induction by splenic CD8α(+) dendritic cells. We consistently find "fast" and "slow" clearance patterns for a broad panel of other Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. Thus, dual-track clearance balances rapid restoration of blood sterility with induction of specific antibacterial immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An efferocytosis-induced, IL-4–dependent macrophage-iNKT cell circuit suppresses sterile inflammation and is defective in murine CGD

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Melody Yue; Pham, Duy; Bagaitkar, Juhi; Liu, Jianyun; Otero, Karel; Shan, Ming; Wynn, Thomas A.; Brombacher, Frank; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages following tissue injury is fundamental to the resolution of inflammation and initiation of tissue repair. Using a sterile peritonitis model in mice, we identified interleukin (IL)-4–producing efferocytosing macrophages in the peritoneum that activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to produce cytokines including IL-4, IL-13, and interferon-γ. Importantly, IL-4 from macrophages contributes to alternative activation of peritoneal exudate macrophages and augments type 2 cytokine production from NKT cells to suppress inflammation. The increased peritonitis in mice deficient in IL-4, NKT cells, or IL-4Rα expression on myeloid cells suggested that each is a key component for resolution of sterile inflammation. The reduced NAD phosphate oxidase is also critical for this model, because in mice with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) that lack oxidase subunits, activation of iNKT cells by X-CGD peritoneal exudate macrophages was impaired during sterile peritonitis, resulting in enhanced and prolonged inflammation in these mice. Therefore, efferocytosis-induced IL-4 production and activation of IL-4–producing iNKT cells by macrophages are immunomodulatory events in an innate immune circuit required to resolve sterile inflammation and promote tissue repair. PMID:23426944

  1. IMMUNE SUPPRESSION OF CHALLENGED VACCINATES AS A RIGOROUS ASSESSMENT OF STERILE PROTECTION BY LENTIVIRAL VACCINES

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Durkin, Shannon; Sturgeon, Timothy J.; Tagmyer, Tara; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported that an experimental live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, containing a mutated S2 accessory gene, provided protection from disease and detectable infection after virulent virus (EIAVPV) challenge [1,2]. To determine if attenuated EIAV vaccines actually prevent persistent infection by challenge virus, we employed a 14-day dexamethasone treatment of vaccinated horses post-challenge to suppress host immunity and amplify replication levels of any infecting EIAV. At two months post-challenge the horses were all protected from virulent-virus challenge, evidenced by a lack of EIA signs and detectable challenge plasma viral RNA. Upon immune suppression, 6/12 horses displayed clinical EIA. Post-immune suppression characterizations demonstrated that the attenuated vaccine evidently prevented detectable challenge virus infection in 50% of horses. These data highlight the utility of post-challenge immune suppression for evaluating persistent viral vaccine protective efficacy. PMID:17023099

  2. A novel screen for genes associated with pheromone-induced sterility

    PubMed Central

    Camiletti, Alison L.; Percival-Smith, Anthony; Croft, Justin R.; Thompson, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    For honey bee and other social insect colonies the ‘queen substance’ regulates colony reproduction rendering workers functionally sterile. The evolution of worker reproductive altruism is explained by inclusive fitness theory, but little is known of the genes involved or how they regulate the phenotypic expression of altruism. We previously showed that application of honeybee queen pheromone to virgin fruit flies suppresses fecundity. Here we exploit this finding to identify genes associated with the perception of an ovary-inhibiting social pheromone. Mutational and RNAi approaches in Drosophila reveal that the olfactory co-factor Orco together with receptors Or49b, Or56a and Or98a are potentially involved in the perception of queen pheromone and the suppression of fecundity. One of these, Or98a, is known to mediate female fly mating behaviour, and its predicted ligand is structurally similar to a methyl component of the queen pheromone. Our novel approach to finding genes associated with pheromone-induced sterility implies conserved reproductive regulation between social and pre-social orders, and further helps to identify candidate orthologues from the pheromone-responsive pathway that may regulate honeybee worker sterility. PMID:27786267

  3. A Mutant dec-1 Transgene Induces Dominant Female Sterility in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Spangenberg, Daniel K.; Waring, Gail L.

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila dec-1 gene produces three proproteins required for female fertility and eggshell assembly. The three proproteins are distinguished by their C termini. Fc106, the most abundant proprotein, is cleaved within the vitelline membrane to three mature derivatives in a developmentally regulated manner. To define sequences within fc106 that are critical for its function, we created wild-type and mutant versions of an fc106 cDNA transgene. The functional consequences of the mutations were assessed in dec-14, a female-sterile splicing mutant that does not produce the fc106 isoform. The fertility of dec-14 females was restored by the introduction of either a wild-type transgene or a transgene bearing a C-terminal deletion that included fc106-specific sequences. Surprisingly, the removal of internal coding sequences created an aberrant DEC-1 proprotein that induced female sterility when introduced into wild-type flies. Dominant female sterility was not associated with larger deletions that included the fc106 N terminus, suggesting that abnormal juxtaposition of N- and C-terminal sequences in the aberrant proprotein interfered with endogenous DEC-1 proteins. Changes in the fractionation behavior of the endogenous fc106 C-terminal derivative, s60, and morphological changes in the endochorion in response to expression of the aberrant proprotein support this interpretation. PMID:18039879

  4. Imprints of C P violation induced by sterile neutrinos in T2K data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klop, N.; Palazzo, A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the impact of light (˜ eV ) sterile neutrinos in the long-baseline experiment T2K. We show that, within the 3 +1 scheme, for mass-mixing parameters suggested by the short-baseline anomalies, the interference among the sterile and the atmospheric oscillation frequencies induces a new term in the νμ→νe transition probability, which has the same order of magnitude of the standard 3-flavor solar-atmospheric interference term. We show, for the first time, that current T2K data, taken together with the results of the θ13-dedicated reactor experiments, are sensitive to two of the three C P -violating phases involved in the 3 +1 scheme. Both the standard C P phase and the new one (δ13≡δ and δ14 in our parameterization choice) tend to have a common best-fit value δ13≃δ14≃-π /2 . Quite intriguingly, the inclusion of sterile neutrino effects leads to better agreement between the two estimates of θ13 obtained, respectively, from reactors and T2K, which in the 3-flavor framework are slightly different.

  5. Tumor-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, R; Wasserman, K; Horiguchi, S; Kono, K; Sjöberg, J; Pisa, P; Petersson, M

    1999-10-01

    Immune system-based approaches for the treatment of malignant disease over the past decades have often focused on cytolytic effector cells such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cells. It has also been demonstrated that tumor-bearing mice can be cured using a wide variety of approaches, some of which involve cytokine-mediated enhancement of CTL and NK cell activity. However, the apparent success in mice stands in contrast to the current situation in the clinic, wherein only a minority of patients have thus far benefited from CTL- or NK cell-based antitumor approaches. The underlying causes of tumor-associated immune suppression of CTL and NK cell activity are discussed, and features of interest shared with HIV infection, leprosy, and rheumatoid arthritis are also be mentioned. Remarkable and very recent observations have shed more light upon the causes of dysfunctional alterations in CTL and NK cells often associated with these diseases, that in turn have suggested new immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer and infectious disease.

  6. The backcross sterility technique

    Treesearch

    V. C. Mastro; A. Pellegrini-Toole

    1991-01-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) and the induced inherited (F1) sterility technique have been investigated for a number of lepidopterous pests, including the gypsy moths. Another technique, backcross sterility, which could potentially prove as or more useful for control of pest species has been developed for the control of only one lepidopteran...

  7. Characterization of chemical-induced sterile inflammation in vitro: application of the model compound ketoconazole in a human hepatic co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Wewering, Franziska; Jouy, Florent; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Gebauer, Scarlett; Blüher, Matthias; Gebhardt, Rolf; Pirow, Ralph; von Bergen, Martin; Kalkhof, Stefan; Luch, Andreas; Zellmer, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    Liver injury as a result of a sterile inflammation is closely linked to the activation of immune cells, including macrophages, by damaged hepatocytes. This interaction between immune cells and hepatocytes is as yet not considered in any of the in vitro test systems applied during the generation of new drugs. Here, we established and characterized a novel in vitro co-culture model with two human cell lines, HepG2 and differentiated THP-1. Ketoconazole, an antifungal drug known for its hepatotoxicity, was used as a model compound in the testing of the co-culture. Single cultures of HepG2 and THP-1 cells were studied as controls. Different metabolism patterns of ketoconazole were observed for the single and co-culture incubations as well as for the different cell types. The main metabolite N-deacetyl ketoconazole was found in cell pellets, but not in supernatants of cell cultures. Global proteome analysis showed that the NRF2-mediated stress response and the CXCL8 (IL-8) pathway were induced by ketoconazole treatment under co-culture conditions. The upregulation and ketoconazole-induced secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including CXCL8, TNF-α and CCL3, was observed in the co-culture system only, but not in single cell cultures. Taking together, we provide evidence that the co-culture model applied might be suitable to serve as tool for the prediction of chemical-induced sterile inflammation in liver tissue in vivo.

  8. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  9. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  10. Listeria monocytogenes-Induced Cell Death Inhibits the Generation of Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Erin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influence of cell death on adaptive immunity has been studied for decades. Despite these efforts, the intricacies of how various cell death pathways shape immune responses in the context of infection remain unclear, particularly with regard to more recently discovered pathways such as pyroptosis. The emergence of Listeria monocytogenes as a promising immunotherapeutic platform demands a thorough understanding of how cell death induced in the context of infection influences the generation of CD8+ T-cell-mediated immune responses. To begin to address this question, we designed strains of L. monocytogenes that robustly activate necrosis, apoptosis, or pyroptosis. We hypothesized that proinflammatory cell death such as necrosis would be proimmunogenic while apoptosis would be detrimental, as has previously been reported in the context of sterile cell death. Surprisingly, we found that the activation of any host cell death in the context of L. monocytogenes infection inhibited the generation of protective immunity and specifically the activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Importantly, the mechanism of attenuation was unique for each type of cell death, ranging from deficits in costimulation in the context of necrosis to a suboptimal inflammatory milieu in the case of pyroptosis. Our results suggest that cell death in the context of infection is different from sterile-environment-induced cell death and that inhibition of cell death or its downstream consequences is necessary for developing effective cell-mediated immune responses using L. monocytogenes-based immunotherapeutic platforms. PMID:27821585

  11. Injury-induced immune responses in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Yvan; Buzgariu, Wanda; Reiter, Silke; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The impact of injury-induced immune responses on animal regenerative processes is highly variable, positive or negative depending on the context. This likely reflects the complexity of the innate immune system that behaves as a sentinel in the transition from injury to regeneration. Early-branching invertebrates with high regenerative potential as Hydra provide a unique framework to dissect how injury-induced immune responses impact regeneration. A series of early cellular events likely require an efficient immune response after amputation, as antimicrobial defence, epithelial cell stretching for wound closure, migration of interstitial progenitors toward the wound, cell death, phagocytosis of cell debris, or reconstruction of the extracellular matrix. The analysis of the injury-induced transcriptomic modulations of 2636 genes annotated as immune genes in Hydra identified 43 genes showing an immediate/early pulse regulation in all regenerative contexts examined. These regulations point to an enhanced cytoprotection via ROS signaling (Nrf, C/EBP, p62/SQSMT1-l2), TNFR and TLR signaling (TNFR16-like, TRAF2l, TRAF5l, jun, fos-related, SIK2, ATF1/CREB, LRRC28, LRRC40, LRRK2), proteasomal activity (p62/SQSMT1-l1, Ced6/Gulf, NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12), stress proteins (CRYAB1, CRYAB2, HSP16.2, DnaJB9, HSP90a1), all potentially regulating NF-κB activity. Other genes encoding immune-annotated proteins such as NPYR4, GTPases, Swap70, the antiproliferative BTG1, enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (5-lipoxygenase, ACSF4), secreted clotting factors, secreted peptidases are also pulse regulated upon bisection. By contrast, metalloproteinases and antimicrobial peptide genes largely follow a context-dependent regulation, whereas the protease inhibitor α2macroglobulin gene exhibits a sustained up-regulation. Hence a complex immune response to injury is linked to wound healing and regeneration in Hydra. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  12. [Ambroxol-induced immune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Guitard, M; Giannoli, C; Bachet, P; Vial, T

    2006-10-01

    Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a rare cause of hemolytic anemia. A 68-year-old male patient developed an acute intravascular hemolysis with acute renal failure. Common causes of hemolysis were ruled out and the patient rapidly improved. An immune mechanism was confirmed by the positivity of the direct antiglobulin test with anti-IgA in the presence of ambroxol only, one of the drug the patient had received during 6 days before hospitalization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ambroxol-induced immune hemolytic anemia. This case also underlined that the direct antiglobulin test should also be performed with anti-IgA to rule out any false negative.

  13. Characterization of Immune Suppression Induced by Polyribonucleotides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    RD-0162 482 CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMUNE SUPPRESSION INDUCED Y v i POLYRIDONUCLEOTIDES(U) MINNESOTA UNIV DULUTH DEPT OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND...Polyribonucleotides by Marilyn J. Odean and Arthur G. Johnson Dept. of Medical Microbiology /Immunology University of Minnesota-Duluth 55812 DTICS ELECTE DEC 18

  14. A Single Vaccination with an Improved Nonspreading Rift Valley Fever Virus Vaccine Provides Sterile Immunity in Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Oreshkova, Nadia; van Keulen, Lucien; Kant, Jet; Moormann, Rob J. M.; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an important pathogen that affects ruminants and humans. Recently we developed a vaccine based on nonspreading RVFV (NSR) and showed that a single vaccination with this vaccine protects lambs from viremia and clinical signs. However, low levels of viral RNA were detected in the blood of vaccinated lambs shortly after challenge infection. These low levels of virus, when present in a pregnant ewe, could potentially infect the highly susceptible fetus. We therefore aimed to further improve the efficacy of the NSR vaccine. Here we report the expression of Gn, the major immunogenic protein of the virus, from the NSR genome. The resulting NSR-Gn vaccine was shown to elicit superior CD8 and CD4-restricted memory responses and improved virus neutralization titers in mice. A dose titration study in lambs revealed that the highest vaccination dose of 106.3 TCID50/ml protected all lambs from clinical signs and viremia. The lambs developed neutralizing antibodies within three weeks after vaccination and no anamnestic responses were observed following challenge. The combined results suggest that sterile immunity was achieved by a single vaccination with the NSR-Gn vaccine. PMID:24167574

  15. Stress induced neuroendocrine-immune plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liezmann, Christiane; Stock, Daniel; Peters, Eva M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Research over the past decade has revealed close interaction between the nervous and immune systems in regulation of peripheral inflammation linking psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease and aging. Moreover emerging data suggests that chronic inflammations lead to a pro-inflammatory status underlying premature aging called inflammaging. In this context, the spleen can be seen as a switch board monitoring peripherally derived neuroendocrine-immune mediators in the blood and keeping up a close communication with the central stress response via its mainly sympathetic innervation. The effect aims at balanced and well-timed stress axis activation and immune adaptation in acute peripheral inflammatory events. Constant adjustment to the needs generated by environmental and endogenous challenges is provided by neuroendocrine-immune plasticity. However, maladaptive plasticity induced e.g., by chronic stress-axis activation and excessive non-neuronal derived neuroendocrine mediators may be at the heart of the observed stress sensitivity promote inflammaging under chronic inflammatory conditions. We here review the role of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and neurotrophins as stress mediators modulating the immune response in the spleen and their potential role in inflammaging. PMID:23467333

  16. Expression of a pathogen-induced cysteine protease (AdCP) in tapetum results in male sterility in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pawan; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Dilip; Vijayan, Sambasivam; Ahmed, Israr; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2014-06-01

    Usable male sterility systems have immense potential in developing hybrid varieties in crop plants, which can also be used as a biological safety containment to prevent horizontal transgene flow. Barnase-Barstar system developed earlier was the first approach to engineer male sterility in plants. In an analogous situation, we have evolved a system of inducing pollen abortion and male sterility in transgenic tobacco by expressing a plant gene coding for a protein with known developmental function in contrast to the Barnase-Barstar system, which deploys genes of prokaryotic origin, i.e., from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. We have used a plant pathogen-induced gene, cysteine protease for inducing male sterility. This gene was identified in the wild peanut, Arachis diogoi differentially expressed when it was challenged with the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata. Arachis diogoi cysteine protease (AdCP) was expressed under the strong tapetum-specific promoter (TA29) and tobacco transformants were generated. Morphological and histological analysis of AdCP transgenic plants showed ablated tapetum and complete pollen abortion in three transgenic lines. Furthermore, transcript analysis displayed the expression of cysteine protease in these male sterile lines and the expression of the protein was identified in western blot analysis using its polyclonal antibody raised in the rabbit system.

  17. De Novo Assembly and Transcriptome Analysis of Wheat with Male Sterility Induced by the Chemical Hybridizing Agent SQ-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaisheng; Ju, Lan; Zhang, Jiao; Yu, Yongang; Niu, Na; Wang, Junwei; Ma, Shoucai

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), one of the world’s most important food crops, is a strictly autogamous (self-pollinating) species with exclusively perfect flowers. Male sterility induced by chemical hybridizing agents has increasingly attracted attention as a tool for hybrid seed production in wheat; however, the molecular mechanisms of male sterility induced by the agent SQ-1 remain poorly understood due to limited whole transcriptome data. Therefore, a comparative analysis of wheat anther transcriptomes for male fertile wheat and SQ-1–induced male sterile wheat was carried out using next-generation sequencing technology. In all, 42,634,123 sequence reads were generated and were assembled into 82,356 high-quality unigenes with an average length of 724 bp. Of these, 1,088 unigenes were significantly differentially expressed in the fertile and sterile wheat anthers, including 643 up-regulated unigenes and 445 down-regulated unigenes. The differentially expressed unigenes with functional annotations were mapped onto 60 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. They were mainly involved in coding for the components of ribosomes, photosynthesis, respiration, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, RNA transport and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species metabolism, mRNA surveillance pathways, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, protein export, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. This study is the first to provide a systematic overview comparing wheat anther transcriptomes of male fertile wheat with those of SQ-1–induced male sterile wheat and is a valuable source of data for future research in SQ-1–induced wheat male sterility. PMID:25898130

  18. Sedimentation rapidly induces an immune response and depletes energy stores in a hard coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, C.; Grosjean, Ph.; Leblud, J.; Palmer, C. V.; Kushmaro, A.; Eeckhaut, I.

    2014-12-01

    High sedimentation rates have been linked to reduced coral health within multiple systems; however, whether this is a direct result of compromised coral immunity has not been previously investigated. The potential effects of sedimentation on immunity of the hard coral Montipora patula were examined by comparing physiological responses of coral fragments inoculated with sterilized marine sediments and those under control conditions. Sediments were collected from terrestrial runoff-affected reefs in SW Madagascar and applied cyclically for a total of 24 h at a rate observed during precipitation-induced sedimentation events. Coral health was determined 24 h after the onset of the sedimentation stress through measuring metabolic proxies of O2 budget and lipid ratios. Immune response of the melanin synthesis pathway was measured by quantifying phenoloxidase activity and melanin deposits. Sedimentation induced both immune and metabolic responses in M. patula. Both phenoloxidase activity and melanin deposition were significantly higher in the sediment treatment compared to controls, indicating an induced immune response. Sediment-treated corals also showed a tendency towards increased respiration (during the night) and decreased photosynthesis (during the day) and a significant depletion of energy reserves as compared to controls. These data highlight that short-term (24 h) sedimentation, free of live microorganisms, compromises the health of M. patula. The energetically costly immune response, potentially elicited by residual endotoxins and other inflammatory particles associated with the sterile sediments, likely contributes to the energy depletion. Overall, exposure to sedimentation adversely affects coral health and continued exposure may lead to resource depletion and an increased susceptibility to disease.

  19. Postpartum Sterilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is postpartum sterilization performed? • What kind of anesthesia is used for postpartum sterilization? • How long does ... with stitches and a bandage. What kind of anesthesia is used for postpartum sterilization? Often, the type ...

  20. Xenotransplantation exposes the etiology of azoospermia factor (AZF) induced male sterility.

    PubMed

    Barr, Justinn; Gordon, Daniel; Schedl, Paul; Deshpande, Girish

    2015-03-01

    Ramathal et al. have employed an elegant xenotransplantation technique to study the fate of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from fertile males and from males carrying Y chromosome deletions of the azoospermia factor (AZF) region. When placed in a mouse testis niche, hiPSCs from fertile males differentiate into germ cell-like cells (GCLCs). Highlighting the crucial role of cell autonomous factors in male sterility, hiPSCs derived from azoospermic males prove to be less successful under similar circumstances. Their studies argue that the agametic "Sertoli cell only" phenotype of two of the AZF deletions likely arises from a defect in the maintenance of germline stem cells (GSCs) rather than from a defect in their specification. These observations underscore the importance of the dialogue between the somatic niche and its inhabitant stem cells, and open up interesting questions concerning the functioning of the somatic niche and how it communicates to the GSCs. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Influence of sterilization on the mineralization of titanium implants induced by incubation in various biological model fluids.

    PubMed

    Serro, A P; Saramago, B

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the sterilization processes on the mineralization of titanium implants induced by incubation in various biological model fluids. Titanium samples were submitted to the following sterilization processes used for implant materials: steam autoclaving, glow discharge Ar plasma treatment and gamma-irradiation. The modification of the treated surfaces was evaluated by contact angle determinations, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser profilometry and X-ray diffraction. The most significant modifications were detected on the wettability: while the samples treated with Ar plasma became highly hydrophilic (water contact angle approximately 0 degrees), gamma-irradiation and steam sterilization induced an increase in the hydrophobicity. After being sterilized, the samples were incubated for one week in three biological model fluids: Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution, Kokubo's simulated body fluid (SBF) and a fluid, designated by SBF0, with the same composition of SBF but without buffer TRIS. The level of mineralization of the incubated Ti samples, assessed by dynamic contact angle analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive spectroscopy and XPS, indicated that the early stages of mineralization are essentially independent of the sterilization method. In contrast, the incubating fluid plays a determinant role, SBFO being the most efficient medium for biomineralization of titanium.

  2. Antitumor Immunity Induced after α Irradiation123

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Ménager, Jérémie; Gouard, Sébastien; Maurel, Catherine; Guilloux, Yannick; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Gaschet, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a therapeutic modality that allows delivering of ionizing radiation directly to targeted cancer cells. Conventional RIT uses β-emitting radioisotopes, but recently, a growing interest has emerged for the clinical development of α particles. α emitters are ideal for killing isolated or small clusters of tumor cells, thanks to their specific characteristics (high linear energy transfer and short path in the tissue), and their effect is less dependent on dose rate, tissue oxygenation, or cell cycle status than γ and X rays. Several studies have been performed to describe α emitter radiobiology and cell death mechanisms induced after α irradiation. But so far, no investigation has been undertaken to analyze the impact of α particles on the immune system, when several studies have shown that external irradiation, using γ and X rays, can foster an antitumor immune response. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the immunogenicity of murine adenocarcinoma MC-38 after bismuth-213 (213Bi) irradiation using a vaccination approach. In vivo studies performed in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice induced a protective antitumor response that is mediated by tumor-specific T cells. The molecular mechanisms potentially involved in the activation of adaptative immunity were also investigated by in vitro studies. We observed that 213Bi-treated MC-38 cells release “danger signals” and activate dendritic cells. Our results demonstrate that α irradiation can stimulate adaptive immunity, elicits an efficient antitumor protection, and therefore is an immunogenic cell death inducer, which provides an attractive complement to its direct cytolytic effect on tumor cells. PMID:24862758

  3. Cytological and comparative proteomic analyses on male sterility in Brassica napus L. induced by the chemical hybridization agent monosulphuron ester sodium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Male sterility induced by a chemical hybridization agent (CHA) is an important tool for utilizing crop heterosis. Monosulphuron ester sodium (MES), a new acetolactate synthase-inhibitor herbicide belonging to the sulphonylurea family, has been developed as an effective CHA to induce male sterility i...

  4. [Inheritance of reversions to male fertility in male-sterile sorghum hybrids with 9E cytoplasm male sterility induced by environmental conditions].

    PubMed

    Elkonin, L A; Gerashchenkov, G A; Domanina, I V; Rozhnova, N A

    2015-03-01

    sorghum hybrids in the 9E cytoplasm. These data demonstrate that methylation of nuclear genes in sterility-inducing cytoplasm may be one of mechanisms causing the CMS phenomenon.

  5. Drug-induced immune neutropenia/agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant white blood cell in blood and play a critical role in preventing infections as part of the innate immune system. Reduction in neutrophils below an absolute count of 500 cells/pL is termed severe neutropenia or agranulocytosis. Drug-induced immune neutropenia (DIIN) occurs when drug-dependent antibodies form against neutrophil membrane glycoproteins and cause neutrophil destruction. Affected patients have fever, chills, and infections; severe infections left untreated can result in death. Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor can hasten neutrophil recovery. Cumulative data show that severe neutropenia or agranulocytosis associated with exposure to nonchemotherapy drugs ranges from approximately 1.6 to 15.4 cases per million population per year. Drugs most often associated with neutropenia or agranulocytosis include dipyrone, diclofenac, ticlopidine, calcium dobesilate, spironolactone, antithyroid drugs (e.g., propylthiouracil), carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole- trimethoprim, [3-lactam antibiotics, clozapine, levamisole, and vancomycin. Assays used for detection of neutrophil drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) include flow cytometry, monoclonal antibody immobilization of granulocyte antigens, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, granulocyte agglutination, and granulocytotoxicity. However, testing for neutrophil DDAbs is rarely performed owing to its complexity and lack of availability. Mechanisms proposed for DIIN have not been rigorously studied, but those that have been studied include drug- or hapten-induced antibody formation and autoantibody production against drug metabolite or protein adducts covalently attached to neutrophil membrane proteins. This review will address acute, severe neutropenia caused by neutrophil-reactive antibodies induced by nonchemotherapy drugs-DIIN

  6. Asbestos induces reduction of tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Maeda, Megumi; Chen, Ying; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2011-01-01

    Asbestos-related cancers such as malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer are an important issue in the world. There are many conflicts concerning economical considerations and medical evidence for these cancers and much confusion regarding details of the pathological mechanisms of asbestos-induced cancers. For example, there is uncertainty concerning the degree of danger of the iron-absent chrysotile compared with iron-containing crocidolite and amosite. However, regarding bad prognosis of mesothelioma, medical approaches to ensure the recognition of the biological effects of asbestos and the pathological mechanisms of asbestos-induced carcinogenesis, as well as clinical trials to detect the early stage of mesothelioma, should result in better preventions and the cure of these malignancies. We have been investigating the immunological effects of asbestos in relation to the reduction of tumor immunity. In this paper, cellular and molecular approaches to clarify the immunological effects of asbestos are described, and all the findings indicate that the reduction of tumor immunity is caused by asbestos exposure and involvement in asbestos-induced cancers. These investigations may not only allow the clear recognition of the biological effects of asbestos, but also present a novel procedure for early detection of previous asbestos exposure and the presence of mesothelioma as well as the chemoprevention of asbestos-related cancers.

  7. Lead-induced oxidative damage in steriled seedlings of Nymphoides peltatum.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xuqiang; Shi, Guoxin; Chen, Lin; Tian, Xiuli; Xu, Xiaoying

    2013-07-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of lead (Pb) on Pb accumulation and its influence on nutrient elements, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, generation of superoxide anion (O2(-·)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content, antioxidant enzymes activities, soluble protein, and photosynthetic pigment, as well as chloroplast ultrastructure in steriled seedlings of Nymphoides peltata (S. G. Gmel.) Kuntze were investigated in order to understand Pb-induced toxicity. The accumulation of Pb was found to increase in a concentration-dependent manner. Nutrient elements (Ca, K, Fe, Mn, and Mo) were also affected. MDA content and O2(-·) generation rate increased progressively, while H2O2 content first boosted up at a low Pb concentration of 12.5 μM but then declined. Guaiacol peroxidase and catalase activities increased alternately, while superoxide dismutase activity gradually fell. Negative correlations were found between Pb and soluble protein and photosynthetic pigment. Moreover, Pb exposure resulted in a significant damage of chloroplasts. Taken together, these findings supported the hypothesis that Nymphoides peltatum underwent oxidative stress induced by Pb. In addition, both the disorder of nutrient elements and the damage to the ultrastructure of chloroplasts were indicative of general disarray in the cellular functions exerted by Pb.

  8. Necrosis-Induced Sterile Inflammation Mediated by Interleukin-1α in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Orita, Tomoko; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous danger signals released from necrotic cells contribute to retinal inflammation. We have now investigated the effects of necrotic cell extracts prepared from ARPE-19 human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ANCE) on the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by healthy ARPE-19 cells. ANCE were prepared by subjection of ARPE-19 cells to freeze-thaw cycles. The release of various cytokines and chemokines from ARPE-19 cells was measured with a multiplex assay system or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The expression of interleukin (IL)–1α and the phosphorylation and degradation of the endogenous nuclear factor–κB (NF-κB) inhibitor IκB-α were examined by immunoblot analysis. Among the various cytokines and chemokines examined, we found that ANCE markedly stimulated the release of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and the chemokines IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)–1 by ARPE-19 cells. ANCE-induced IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 release was inhibited by IL-1 receptor antagonist and by an IKK2 inhibitor (a blocker of NF-κB signaling) in a concentration-dependent manner, but was not affected by a pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK). Recombinant IL-1α also induced the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 from ARPE-19 cells, and IL-1α was detected in ANCE. Furthermore, ANCE induced the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α in ARPE-19 cells. Our findings thus suggest that IL-1α is an important danger signal that is released from necrotic retinal pigment epithelial cells and triggers proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine secretion from intact cells in a manner dependent on NF-κB signaling. IL-1α is therefore a potential therapeutic target for amelioration of sterile inflammation in the retina. PMID:26641100

  9. Bulbophyllum sterile petroleum ether fraction induces apoptosis in vitro and ameliorates tumor progression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subhankar; Pardeshi, Rashmi; Reddy, Neetinkumar D; Shoja, Muhammed Haneefa; Nayak, Pawan G; Setty, M Manjunath; Pai, K Sreedhara R

    2016-12-01

    Orchids of the genus Bulbophyllum have been reported to possess antitumor activity. Present study investigated the possible antitumor activity of the active fraction of bulb and root of Bulbophyllum sterile. Alcoholic extract along with petroleum ether, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions were subjected to SRB assay in HCT-116, MDA-MB-231 and A549 cell lines. The active fractions were further evaluated for apoptosis, expression of apoptotic signaling proteins, comet assay and cell cycle analysis. Furthermore, they were assessed for in vivo antitumor activity in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma model. Petroleum fraction of bulbs (PFB) and roots (PFR) was found to be most active in HCT-116 cell lines with IC50 value of 94.2±6.0 and 75.7±9.8, respectively. Apoptosis was evident from acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining along with the expression of phospho-p53 and phospho-Bad. Both PFB and PFR arrested G2/M phase of the cell cycle with 32.6% and 49.4% arrest, respectively compared to 17.5% arrest with control. An increase in mean life span and hepatic antioxidant levels was observed with PFB and PFR treatment in EAC inoculated mice. The results suggested that the active fractions of bulbs and roots possess anticancer activity likely by inducing apoptosis through phospho-p53 dependent pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. N2O induces mitotic polyploidization in anther somatic cells and restores fertility in sterile interspecific hybrid lilies

    PubMed Central

    Nukui, Shotarou; Kitamura, Satomi; Hioki, Tomoyo; Ootsuka, Hideaki; Miyoshi, Kazumitsu; Satou, Takao; Takatori, Yuka; Oomiya, Tomo; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Fertile plants undergoing male gametogenesis can be treated with nitrous oxide (N2O) gas to obtain 2n male gametes. N2O treatment is also expected to restore the fertility of interspecific hybrids through meiotic restitution or mitotic amphidiploidization. However, this technique has few applications to date, and it is un-known how N2O treatment restores fertility in sterile hybrids. To establish optimal N2O treatment conditions and determine its cytological mechanism of action, we treated various sized floral buds with N2O gas at different anther developmental stages from fertile and sterile hybrid lilies. N2O treatment using the optimal 1–4 mm floral buds induced mitotic polyploidization of male archesporial cells to produce 2n pollen in fertile hybrid lilies. In sterile hybrid lilies, N2O treatment doubled the chromosome number in male archesporial cells followed by homologous chromosome pairing and normal meiosis in pollen mother cells (PMC), resulting in restoration of pollen fertility. Backcrossing the resultant fertile pollen to Lilium × formolongi produced many triploid BC1 plants. Thus N2O treatment at the archesporial cell proliferating stage effectively overcame pollen sterility in hybrid lilies, resulting in fertile, 2n pollen grains that could produce progeny. The procedure presented here will promote interspecific or interploidy hybridization of lilies. PMID:23136469

  11. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  12. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  13. Mechanisms of protective immune responses induced by the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein-based, self-assembling protein nanoparticle vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A lack of defined correlates of immunity for malaria, combined with the inability to induce long-lived sterile immune responses in a human host, demonstrate a need for improved understanding of potentially protective immune mechanisms for enhanced vaccine efficacy. Protective sterile immunity (>90%) against the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) has been achieved using a transgenically modified Plasmodium berghei sporozoite (Tg-Pb/PfCSP) and a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN) vaccine presenting CSP epitopes (PfCSP-SAPN). Here, several possible mechanisms involved in the independently protective humoral and cellular responses induced following SAPN immunization are described. Methods Inbred mice were vaccinated with PfCSP-SAPN in PBS. Serum antibodies were harvested and effects on P. falciparum sporozoites mobility and integrity were examined using phase contrast microscopy. The functionality of SAPN-induced antibodies on inhibition of sporozoite invasion and growth within primary human hepatocytes was also examined. The internal processing of SAPN by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDDC), using organelle-specific, fluorescent-tagged antibody or gold-encapsulated SAPN, was observed using confocal or electron microscopy, respectively. Results The results of this work demonstrate that PfCSP-SAPN induces epitope-specific antibody titers, predominantly of the Th2 isotype IgG1, and that serum antibodies from PfCSP-SAPN-immunized mice appear to target P. falciparum sporozoites via the classical pathway of complement. This results in sporozoite death as indicated by cessation of motility and the circumsporozoite precipitation reaction. Moreover, PfCSP-SAPN-induced antibodies are able to inhibit wild-type P. falciparum sporozoite invasion and growth within cultured primary human hepatocytes. In addition, the observation that PfCSP-SAPN are processed (and presented) to the immune system by dendritic cells in a slow and continuous

  14. Role of the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced sterile inflammation and liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Antoine, Daniel J.; Shaw, Patrick J.; Benson, Craig; Farhood, Anwar; Williams, Dominic P.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Park, B. Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and UK. Recent studies implied that APAP-induced injury is partially mediated by interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), which can activate and recruit neutrophils, exacerbating injury. Mature IL-1{beta} is formed by caspase-1, dependent on inflammasome activation. The objective of this invetstigation was to evaluate the role of the Nalp3 inflammasome on release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), hepatic neutrophil accumulation and liver injury (ALT, necrosis) after APAP overdose. Mice deficient for each component of the Nalp3 inflammasome (caspase-1, ASC and Nalp3) were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP for 24 h; these mice had similar neutrophil recruitment and liver injury as APAP-treated C57Bl/6 wildtype animals. In addition, plasma levels of DAMPs (DNA fragments, keratin-18, hypo- and hyper-acetylated forms of high mobility group box-1 protein) were similarly elevated with no significant difference between wildtype and gene knockout mice. In addition, aspirin treatment, which has been postulated to attenuate cytokine formation and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome after APAP, had no effect on release of DAMPs, hepatic neutrophil accumulation or liver injury. Together, these data confirm the release of DAMPs and a sterile inflammatory response after APAP overdose. However, as previously reported minor endogenous formation of IL-1{beta} and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome have little impact on APAP hepatotoxicity. It appears that the Nalp3 inflammasome is not a promising therapeutic target to treat APAP overdose.

  15. Unique transcriptional profile of liver-resident memory CD8+ T cells induced by immunization with malaria sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Sze-Wah; Cockburn, Ian A.; Zhang, Hao; Scott, Alan L.; Zavala, Fidel

    2013-01-01

    Sterile immunity against live Plasmodium infection can be achieved by immunization with radiation attenuated sporozoites. This protection is known to be mediated in part by antigen-specific memory CD8+ T cells, presumably those residing in the liver. We characterized and compared the transcriptional profile of parasite-specific memory CD8+ T cells residing in the liver and spleen after immunization of mice with irradiated sporozoites. Microarray-based expression analysis of these memory CD8+ T cells indicated that liver resident memory cells display a distinct gene expression profile. We found major differences in the expression of immune function genes as well as genes involved in the cell cycle, cell trafficking, transcription and intracellular signaling. Importantly, the malaria parasite-induced liver resident CD8+ T cells display a transcriptional profile different to that described for CD8+ T cells following other microbial challenges. PMID:23594961

  16. Can VHS Virus Bypass the Protective Immunity Induced by DNA Vaccination in Rainbow Trout?

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus to serum neutralization, suggesting that the passaging did not promote the selection of virus populations able to bypass the neutralization by serum antibodies. Also, in the in vivo approach, where virus was passaged several times in vaccinated fish, no increased virulence nor increased persistence in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non-sterile. It is consequently important not to consider vaccinated fish as virus free in veterinary terms.

  17. Can VHS Virus Bypass the Protective Immunity Induced by DNA Vaccination in Rainbow Trout?

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus to serum neutralization, suggesting that the passaging did not promote the selection of virus populations able to bypass the neutralization by serum antibodies. Also, in the in vivo approach, where virus was passaged several times in vaccinated fish, no increased virulence nor increased persistence in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non-sterile. It is consequently important not to consider vaccinated fish as virus free in veterinary terms. PMID:27054895

  18. Overexpression of phytosulfokine-α induces male sterility and cell growth by regulating cell wall development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liangliang; Liu, Yan; Liu, Yumin; Li, Qiong; Tang, Guirong; Luo, Li

    2016-12-01

    Over-production of functional PSK-α in Arabidopsis caused increases in both plant cell growth and biomass and induced male sterility by regulating cell wall development. Phytosulfokine-α (PSK-α) is a novel disulfated pentapeptide hormone that is involved in promoting plant cell growth. Although a role for PSK-α in stimulating protoplast expansion has been suggested, how PSK-α regulates cell growth in planta remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that overexpression of the normal PSK-α precursor gene AtPSK4, which resulted in high levels of PSK-α, caused longer roots and larger leaves with enlarged cells. As expected, these changes were not observed in transgenic plants overexpressing mutated AtPSK4, which generated unsulfated PSK-α. These findings confirmed the role of PSK-α in promoting plant cell growth. Furthermore, we found that overexpressing AtPSK4, but not mutated AtPSK4, induced a phenotype of male sterility that resulted from the failure of fibrous cell wall development in the endothecium. In addition, overexpressing AtPSK4 enhanced expression of a number of genes encoding expansins, which are involved in cell wall loosening. Accordingly, in addition to its role in cell growth, we propose a novel function for PSK-α signaling in the modulation of plant male sterility via regulation of cell wall development.

  19. Key role for neutrophils in radiation-induced antitumor immune responses: Potentiation with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Pop, Laurentiu M.; Laine, Aaron; Iyengar, Puneeth; Vitetta, Ellen S.; Hannan, Raquibul

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT), a major modality for treating localized tumors, can induce tumor regression outside the radiation field through an abscopal effect that is thought to involve the immune system. Our studies were designed to understand the early immunological effects of RT in the tumor microenvironment using several syngeneic mouse tumor models. We observed that RT induced sterile inflammation with a rapid and transient infiltration of CD11b+Gr-1high+ neutrophils into the tumors. RT-recruited tumor-associated neutrophils (RT-Ns) exhibited an increased production of reactive oxygen species and induced apoptosis of tumor cells. Tumor infiltration of RT-Ns resulted in sterile inflammation and, eventually, the activation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells, their recruitment into the tumor site, and tumor regression. Finally, the concurrent administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced RT-mediated antitumor activity by activating RT-Ns. Our results suggest that the combination of RT and G-CSF should be further evaluated in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:27651484

  20. Ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Gal; Boodhan, Sabrina; Wurman, Ilana; Koren, Gideon; Bitnun, Ari; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Ito, Shinya

    2014-12-01

    To describe a case of ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia (CIIHA) in a 6 year-old boy with sickle cell disease (SCD) and perform a systematic literature review to delineate the clinical and laboratory features of this condition. EMBASE (1947-January 2014), MEDLINE (1946-January 2014), and databases from the US Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada were searched, using anemia, hemolytic anemia, hemolysis, and ceftriaxone as search terms. Additional references were identified from a review of literature citations. All case reports and observational studies describing clinical and laboratory features of CIIHA were included. A total of 37 eligible reports of CIIHA were identified, including our index case, and 70% were children. Mortality was 30% in all age groups and 64% in children. The majority of patients had underlying conditions (70%), of which SCD was most commonly reported. Previous ceftriaxone exposure was reported in 65%. Common features included elevated lactate dehydrogenase (70%); early, new-onset hemoglobinuria (59%); acute renal failure (46%); positive direct antibody testing (70%); and anticeftriaxone antibodies (68%). Also, 32% had a preceding, unrecognized, hemolytic episode associated with ceftriaxone. Given the common use of ceftriaxone worldwide, knowledge of CIIHA, which often goes undiagnosed until late in the course, is essential for clinicians. Based on the findings of this review, we suggest obtaining past history of ceftriaxone exposures and screening for new-onset hemoglobinuria during ceftriaxone therapy in selected patients as potential methods for early diagnosis of this rare but potentially fatal condition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Reversal of hepatitis B virus-induced systemic immune tolerance by intrinsic innate immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiuju; Lan, Peixiang; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-08-01

    Systemic immune tolerance induced by chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a significant question, but the mechanism of which remains unclear. In this mini-review, we summarize the impaired innate and adaptive immune responses involved in immune tolerance in chronic HBV infection. Furthermore, we delineate a novel dual functional small RNA to inhibit HBV replication and stimulate innate immunity against HBV, which proposed a promising immunotherapeutic intervention to interrupt HBV-induced immunotolerance. A mouse model of HBV persistence was established and used to observe the immune tolerant to HBV vaccination, the cell-intrinsic immune tolerance of which might be reversed by chemically synthesized dual functional small RNA (3p-hepatitis B Virus X gene [HBx]-small interfering RNA) in vitro experiments and by biologically constructed dual functional vector (single-stranded RNA-HBx- short hairpin RNA) in vivo experiment using HBV-carrier mice.

  2. Evaluation of potential induced radioactivity in medical products as a function of electron energy in electron beam sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial sterilization of medical devices may be performed using electron beam irradiators at various electron energies. The potential for activating components of the devices has been discussed, with current standards stating that electron energy greater than 10 MeV requires assessment of potential induced radioactivity. This paper evaluates the potential for induced activity in medical products sterilized in electron beam as a function of the electron maximum energy. Monte Carlo simulation of a surrogate medical device was used to calculate photon and neutron fields resulting from electron irradiation, which were used to calculate concentrations for several radionuclides. The experiments confirmed that 10 MeV is a conservative assumption for limiting induced radioactivity. However, under the conditions as evaluated, which is a limited total quantity of metal in the material being irradiated and absent a limited number of elements; the amount of induced activity at 12 MeV could also be considered insignificant. The comparison of the sum-of-fractions to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission exempt concentration limits is less than unity for all energies below 12.1 MeV, which suggests that there is minimal probability of significant induced activity at energies above the 10 MeV upper energy limit.

  3. Cytological and Comparative Proteomic Analyses on Male Sterility in Brassica napus L. Induced by the Chemical Hybridization Agent Monosulphuron Ester Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhanjie; Cui, Jianmin; Hu, Shengwu; Zhao, Huixian; Chen, Mingshun

    2013-01-01

    Male sterility induced by a chemical hybridization agent (CHA) is an important tool for utilizing crop heterosis. Monosulphuron ester sodium (MES), a new acetolactate synthase-inhibitor herbicide belonging to the sulphonylurea family, has been developed as an effective CHA to induce male sterility in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.). To understand MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed better, comparative cytological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Cytological analysis indicated that defective tapetal cells and abnormal microspores were gradually generated in the developing anthers of MES-treated plants at various development stages, resulting in unviable microspores and male sterility. A total of 141 differentially expressed proteins between the MES-treated and control plants were revealed, and 131 of them were further identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Most of these proteins decreased in abundance in tissues of MES-treated rapeseed plants, and only a few increased. Notably, some proteins were absent or induced in developing anthers after MES treatment. These proteins were involved in several processes that may be crucial for tapetum and microspore development. Down-regulation of these proteins may disrupt the coordination of developmental and metabolic processes, resulting in defective tapetum and abnormal microspores that lead to male sterility in MES-treated plants. Accordingly, a simple model of CHA-MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed was established. This study is the first cytological and dynamic proteomic investigation on CHA-MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed, and the results provide new insights into the molecular events of male sterility. PMID:24244648

  4. Cytological and comparative proteomic analyses on male sterility in Brassica napus L. induced by the chemical hybridization agent monosulphuron ester sodium.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yufeng; Wang, Qian; Li, Zhanjie; Cui, Jianmin; Hu, Shengwu; Zhao, Huixian; Chen, Mingshun

    2013-01-01

    Male sterility induced by a chemical hybridization agent (CHA) is an important tool for utilizing crop heterosis. Monosulphuron ester sodium (MES), a new acetolactate synthase-inhibitor herbicide belonging to the sulphonylurea family, has been developed as an effective CHA to induce male sterility in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.). To understand MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed better, comparative cytological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Cytological analysis indicated that defective tapetal cells and abnormal microspores were gradually generated in the developing anthers of MES-treated plants at various development stages, resulting in unviable microspores and male sterility. A total of 141 differentially expressed proteins between the MES-treated and control plants were revealed, and 131 of them were further identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Most of these proteins decreased in abundance in tissues of MES-treated rapeseed plants, and only a few increased. Notably, some proteins were absent or induced in developing anthers after MES treatment. These proteins were involved in several processes that may be crucial for tapetum and microspore development. Down-regulation of these proteins may disrupt the coordination of developmental and metabolic processes, resulting in defective tapetum and abnormal microspores that lead to male sterility in MES-treated plants. Accordingly, a simple model of CHA-MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed was established. This study is the first cytological and dynamic proteomic investigation on CHA-MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed, and the results provide new insights into the molecular events of male sterility.

  5. Fatal or harmless: extreme bistability induced by sterilizing, sexually transmitted pathogens.

    PubMed

    Berec, Luděk; Maxin, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Models of sexually transmitted infections have become a fixture of mathematical epidemiology. A common attribute of all these models is treating reproduction and mating, and hence pathogen transmission, as uncoupled events. This is fine for humans, for example, where only a tiny fraction of sexual intercourses ends up with having a baby. But it can be a deficiency for animals in which mating and giving birth are tightly coupled, and mating thus mediates both reproduction and pathogen transmission. Here, we model dynamics of sterilizing, sexually transmitted infections in such animals, assuming structural consistency between the processes of reproduction and pathogen transmission. We show that highly sterilizing, sexually transmitted pathogens trigger bistability in the host population. In particular, the host population can end up in two extreme alternative states, disease-free persistence and pathogen-driven extinction, depending on its initial state. Given that sterilizing, sexually transmitted infections that affect animals are abundant, our results might implicate an effective pest control tactic that consists of releasing the corresponding pathogens, possibly after genetically enhancing their sterilization power.

  6. Specific panicle responses resulting from MSMA-induced straighthead sterility in rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Straighthead is a physiological disorder of rice causing sterility. A particular characteristic of straighthead is panicles that remain upright because of the light weight of the unfilled grains and hulls which may be distorted into a crescent or parrot-beak shape. Monosodium acid methanearsonate (M...

  7. Genetic Screen Reveals Link between the Maternal Effect Sterile Gene mes-1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiuli; Cao, Xiou; Yan, Dong; Wang, Dayong; Aballay, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that immune responses to microbial infections may contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of Caenorhabditis elegans causes a number of neural changes that are hallmarks of neurodegeneration. Using an unbiased genetic screen to identify genes involved in the control of P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration, we identified mes-1, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein that is required for unequal cell divisions in the early embryonic germ line. We showed that sterile but not fertile mes-1 animals were resistant to neurodegeneration induced by P. aeruginosa infection. Similar results were observed using animals carrying a mutation in the maternal effect gene pgl-1, which is required for postembryonic germ line development, and the germ line-deficient strains glp-1 and glp-4. Additional studies indicated that the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is required for resistance to P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration in germ line-deficient strains. Thus, our results demonstrate that P. aeruginosa infection results in neurodegeneration phenotypes in C. elegans that are controlled by the germ line in a cell-nonautonomous manner. PMID:26475858

  8. Genetic Screen Reveals Link between the Maternal Effect Sterile Gene mes-1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuli; Cao, Xiou; Yan, Dong; Wang, Dayong; Aballay, Alejandro

    2015-12-04

    Increasing evidence indicates that immune responses to microbial infections may contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of Caenorhabditis elegans causes a number of neural changes that are hallmarks of neurodegeneration. Using an unbiased genetic screen to identify genes involved in the control of P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration, we identified mes-1, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein that is required for unequal cell divisions in the early embryonic germ line. We showed that sterile but not fertile mes-1 animals were resistant to neurodegeneration induced by P. aeruginosa infection. Similar results were observed using animals carrying a mutation in the maternal effect gene pgl-1, which is required for postembryonic germ line development, and the germ line-deficient strains glp-1 and glp-4. Additional studies indicated that the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is required for resistance to P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration in germ line-deficient strains. Thus, our results demonstrate that P. aeruginosa infection results in neurodegeneration phenotypes in C. elegans that are controlled by the germ line in a cell-nonautonomous manner. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Effect of chronic inflammation and immune response on regeneration induced by decellularized bovine pericardium.

    PubMed

    Umashankar, P R; Arun, T; Kumary, T V

    2013-08-01

    Decellularised tissue produces a variety of host responses ranging from constructive remodeling to scarring on account of its differences in the source of tissue, processing or sterilization methods. In this study, in vivo regeneration induced by decellularised bovine pericardium with or without mild glutaraldehyde crosslinking was studied in relation to its immune and inflammatory response using rat abdominal regeneration model. Mild glutaraldehyde crosslinking was done to subdue inflammatory and immune response without compromising host cell incorporation and graft remodeling. Evaluations were done at both 21 and 90 days. Un-crosslinked decellularised bovine pericardium showed more intense macrophage response predominantly of M2 phenotype at 90 days indicating chronic inflammatory response compared to mildly crosslinked group. This group also showed significant increase in plasma cell and lymphocyte count indicating immune stimulation. Lymphocyte transformation test detected presence of bovine pericardial antigen sensitized lymphocytes at both periods in un-crosslinked group. Lymphocytes from mildly crosslinked group failed to respond in this test at both periods. Significantly higher antibody response was also noted at both periods in un-crosslinked group. However, abdominal wall regeneration was observed only in animals implanted with un-crosslinked decellularised bovine pericardium at 90 days. From the above findings, it is inferred that un-crosslinked decellularised bovine pericardium produced significant chronic inflammatory response at 90 days and stimulated both humoral and cell mediated immune response in comparison to mildly crosslinked decellularised bovine pericardium. Yet this group produced skeletal muscle formation within graft at 90 days. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Protective immunity induced by a DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella rhomboid against homologous challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingli; Zheng, Jun; Li, Jianhua; Gong, Pengtao; Zhang, Xichen

    2013-01-01

    Rhomboid protein in Apicomplexa was associated with the process of host cell invasion. To evaluate the potential of the protein in eliciting protective immunity against challenge, a DNA vaccine pVAX1-Rho encoding Eimeria tenella rhomboid was constructed. Recombinant protein was expressed in Hela cells and verified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting analysis. In vivo experiments, 1-week-old chickens were randomly divided into three groups. Experimental group of chickens were immunized with DNA vaccines while control group of chickens were injected with pVAX1 plasmid alone or sterile water. Two weeks following the booster dose, all chickens were inoculated orally with 5 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. The host immunity and protective efficacy of this vaccine against E. tenella challenge in broilers were evaluated. Results showed that specific antibody, the levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte cells were significantly increased in the pVAX1-Rho group. Challenge experiments demonstrated that pVAX1-Rho vaccination could reduce oocyst excretion, decrease cecal lesion, increase bodyweight gains and provide chickens with oocysts decrease ratio around 75.8 %. These results suggest that the pVAX1-Rho was able to induce humoral and cellular responses and generate protective immunity against E. tenella infection.

  11. Beyond dsRNA: Toll-like receptor 3 signalling in RNA-induced immune responses.

    PubMed

    Tatematsu, Megumi; Seya, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Misako

    2014-03-01

    The innate immune system recognizes pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns using pattern-recognition receptors that activate a wide range of signalling cascades to maintain host homoeostasis against infection and inflammation. Endosomal TLR3 (Toll-like receptor 3), a type I transmembrane protein, senses RNAs derived from cells with viral infection or sterile tissue damage, leading to the induction of type I interferon and cytokine production, as well as dendritic cell maturation. It has been accepted that TLR3 recognizes perfect dsRNA, but little has been addressed experimentally with regard to the structural features of virus- or host-derived RNAs that activate TLR3. Recently, a TLR3 agonist was identified, which was a virus-derived 'structured' RNA with incomplete stem structures. Both dsRNA and structured RNA are similarly internalized through clathrin- and raftlin-dependent endocytosis and delivered to endosomal TLR3. The dsRNA uptake machinery, in addition to TLR3, is critical for extracellular viral RNA-induced immune responses. A wide spectrum of TLR3 ligand structures beyond dsRNA and their delivery systems provide new insights into the physiological role of TLR3 in virus- or host-derived RNA-induced immune responses. In the present paper, we focus on the system for extracellular recognition of RNA and its delivery to TLR3.

  12. Mathematical models of immune-induced cancer dormancy and the emergence of immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Kathleen P.; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Cancer dormancy, a state in which cancer cells persist in a host without significant growth, is a natural forestallment of progression to manifest disease and is thus of great clinical interest. Experimental work in mice suggests that in immune-induced dormancy, the longer a cancer remains dormant in a host, the more resistant the cancer cells become to cytotoxic T-cell-mediated killing. In this work, mathematical models are used to analyse the possible causative mechanisms of cancer escape from immune-induced dormancy. Using a data-driven approach, both decaying efficacy in immune predation and immune recruitment are analysed with results suggesting that decline in recruitment is a stronger determinant of escape than increased resistance to predation. Using a mechanistic approach, the existence of an immune-resistant cancer cell subpopulation is considered, and the effects on cancer dormancy and potential immunoediting mechanisms of cancer escape are analysed and discussed. The immunoediting mechanism assumes that the immune system selectively prunes the cancer of immune-sensitive cells, which is shown to cause an initially heterogeneous population to become a more homogeneous, and more resistant, population. The fact that this selection may result in the appearance of decreasing efficacy in T-cell cytotoxic effect with time in dormancy is also demonstrated. This work suggests that through actions that temporarily delay cancer growth through the targeted removal of immune-sensitive subpopulations, the immune response may actually progress the cancer to a more aggressive state. PMID:24511375

  13. PDT-apoptotic tumor cells induce macrophage immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fei-fan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) functions as a cancer therapy through two major cell death mechanisms: apoptosis and necrosis. Immunological responses induced by PDT has been mainly associated with necrosis while apoptosis associated immune responses have not fully investigated. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in regulating immune responses. In present study, we studied whether apoptotic tumor cells could induce immune response and how the HSP70 regulates immune response. The endocytosis of tumor cells by the activated macrophages was observed at single cell level by LSM. The TNF-α release of macrophages induced by co-incubated with PDT-apoptotic tumor cells was detected by ELISA. We found that apoptotic tumor cells treated by PDT could activate the macrophages, and the immune effect decreased evidently when HSP70 was blocked. These findings not only show that apoptosis can induce immunological responses, but also show HSP70 may serves as a danger signal for immune cells and induce immune responses to regulate the efficacy of PDT.

  14. BASICS OF STERILE COMPOUNDING: Sterilization Methods in Sterile Product Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Akers, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Sterilization methods to produce sterile preparations include heat, gas, radiation, and filtration. This article focuses on heat, gas, and radiation sterilization, plus a brief introduction to bright-light sterilization. Microbiology basics and microbial death kinetics, key to understanding why these sterilization methods work, will also be briefly discussed. Filtration sterilization will be covered in a separate article.

  15. Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Prophylaxis During Live Malaria Sporozoite Immunization Induces Long-Lived, Homologous, and Heterologous Protective Immunity Against Sporozoite Challenge.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Charlotte V; Anderson, Charles; Neal, Jillian; Sahu, Tejram; Conteh, Solomon; Voza, Tatiana; Langhorne, Jean; Borkowsky, William; Duffy, Patrick E

    2017-01-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) is widely used in malaria-endemic areas in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and HIV-uninfected, HIV-exposed children as opportunistic infection prophylaxis. Despite the known effects that TMP-SMX has in reducing clinical malaria, its impact on development of malaria-specific immunity in these children remains poorly understood. Using rodent malaria models, we previously showed that TMP-SMX, at prophylactic doses, can arrest liver stage development of malaria parasites and speculated that TMP-SMX prophylaxis during repeated malaria exposures would induce protective long-lived sterile immunity targeting pre-erythrocytic stage parasites in mice. Using the same models, we now demonstrate that repeated exposures to malaria parasites during TMP-SMX administration induces stage-specific and long-lived pre-erythrocytic protective anti-malarial immunity, mediated primarily by CD8(+) T-cells. Given the HIV infection and malaria coepidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, clinical studies aimed at determining the optimum duration of TMP-SMX prophylaxis in HIV-infected or HIV-exposed children must account for the potential anti-infection immunity effect of TMP-SMX prophylaxis. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals carbohydrate and lipid metabolism blocks in Brassica napus L. male sterility induced by the chemical hybridization agent monosulfuron ester sodium.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhanjie; Cheng, Yufeng; Cui, Jianmin; Zhang, Peipei; Zhao, Huixian; Hu, Shengwu

    2015-03-17

    Chemical hybridization agents (CHAs) are often used to induce male sterility for the production of hybrid seeds. We previously discovered that monosulfuron ester sodium (MES), an acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor of the herbicide sulfonylurea family, can induce rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) male sterility at approximately 1% concentration required for its herbicidal activity. To find some clues to the mechanism of MES inducing male sterility, the ultrastructural cytology observations, comparative transcriptome analysis, and physiological analysis on carbohydrate content were carried out in leaves and anthers at different developmental stages between the MES-treated and mock-treated rapeseed plants. Cytological analysis revealed that the plastid ultrastructure was abnormal in pollen mother cells and tapetal cells in male sterility anthers induced by MES treatment, with less material accumulation in it. However, starch granules were observed in chloroplastids of the epidermis cells in male sterility anthers. Comparative transcriptome analysis identified 1501 differentially expressed transcripts (DETs) in leaves and anthers at different developmental stages, most of these DETs being localized in plastid and mitochondrion. Transcripts involved in metabolism, especially in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and cellular transport were differentially expressed. Pathway visualization showed that the tightly regulated gene network for metabolism was reprogrammed to respond to MES treatment. The results of cytological observation and transcriptome analysis in the MES-treated rapeseed plants were mirrored by carbohydrate content analysis. MES treatment led to decrease in soluble sugars content in leaves and early stage buds, but increase in soluble sugars content and decrease in starch content in middle stage buds. Our integrative results suggested that carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were influenced by CHA-MES treatment during rapeseed anther development, which might

  17. IL-1α is a DNA damage sensor linking genotoxic stress signaling to sterile inflammation and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Idan, Cohen; Peleg, Rider; Elena, Voronov; Martin, Tomas; Cicerone, Tudor; Mareike, Wegner; Lydia, Brondani; Marina, Freudenberg; Gerhard, Mittler; Elisa, Ferrando-May; Dinarello, Charles A.; Ron, Apte N.; Robert, Schneider

    2015-01-01

    Environmental signals can be translated into chromatin changes, which alter gene expression. Here we report a novel concept that cells can signal chromatin damage from the nucleus back to the surrounding tissue through the cytokine interleukin-1alpha (IL-1α). Thus, in addition to its role as a danger signal, which occurs when the cytokine is passively released by cell necrosis, IL-1α could directly sense DNA damage and act as signal for genotoxic stress without loss of cell integrity. Here we demonstrate localization of the cytokine to DNA-damage sites and its subsequent secretion. Interestingly, its nucleo-cytosolic shuttling after DNA damage sensing is regulated by histone deacetylases (HDAC) and IL-1α acetylation. To demonstrate the physiological significance of this newly discovered mechanism, we used IL-1α knockout mice and show that IL-1α signaling after UV skin irradiation and DNA damage is important for triggering a sterile inflammatory cascade in vivo that contributes to efficient tissue repair and wound healing. PMID:26439902

  18. IL-1α is a DNA damage sensor linking genotoxic stress signaling to sterile inflammation and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Idan; Idan, Cohen; Rider, Peleg; Peleg, Rider; Vornov, Elena; Elena, Voronov; Tomas, Martin; Martin, Tomas; Tudor, Cicerone; Cicerone, Tudor; Wegner, Mareike; Mareike, Wegner; Brondani, Lydia; Lydia, Brondani; Freudenberg, Marina; Marina, Freudenberg; Mittler, Gerhard; Gerhard, Mittler; Ferrando-May, Elisa; Elisa, Ferrando-May; Dinarello, Charles A; Apte, Ron N; Ron, Apte N; Schneider, Robert; Robert, Schneider

    2015-10-06

    Environmental signals can be translated into chromatin changes, which alter gene expression. Here we report a novel concept that cells can signal chromatin damage from the nucleus back to the surrounding tissue through the cytokine interleukin-1alpha (IL-1α). Thus, in addition to its role as a danger signal, which occurs when the cytokine is passively released by cell necrosis, IL-1α could directly sense DNA damage and act as signal for genotoxic stress without loss of cell integrity. Here we demonstrate localization of the cytokine to DNA-damage sites and its subsequent secretion. Interestingly, its nucleo-cytosolic shuttling after DNA damage sensing is regulated by histone deacetylases (HDAC) and IL-1α acetylation. To demonstrate the physiological significance of this newly discovered mechanism, we used IL-1α knockout mice and show that IL-1α signaling after UV skin irradiation and DNA damage is important for triggering a sterile inflammatory cascade in vivo that contributes to efficient tissue repair and wound healing.

  19. Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Several anomalies recorded in short-baseline neutrino experiments suggest the possibility that the standard 3-flavor framework may be incomplete and point towards a manifestation of new physics. Light sterile neutrinos provide a credible solution to these puzzling results. Here, we present a concise review of the status of the neutrino oscillations within the 3+1 scheme, the minimal extension of the standard 3-flavor framework endowed with one sterile neutrino species. We emphasize the potential role of LBL experiments in the searches of CP violation related to sterile neutrinos and their complementarity with the SBL experiments.

  20. Radiation Induced Immune Response in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    immune effector cells. Glucose Regulated Protein-78 (GRP78), and Tax interacting protein-1 (TIP1) are overexpressed in cancer and participate in the...vivo. KEY WORDS: Glucose Regulated Protein-78 (GRP78) Tax interacting protein-1 (TIP1) IgG antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC

  1. Active immunization by a dengue virus-induced cytokine.

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, U C; Mukerjee, R; Dhawan, R

    1994-01-01

    Dengue type 2 virus (DV)-induced cytotoxic factor (CF) is capable of reproducing various pathological lesions in mice that are seen in human dengue. The present study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of active immunization of mice with CF. Mice were immunized with 5 microgram of CF and prevention of CF-induced increase in capillary permeability and damage to the blood-brain barrier were studied at weekly intervals, up to 48 weeks, by challenging with 3 microgram of CF. Maximum protection against increase in capillary permeability and damage to the blood-brain barrier was observed in week 4 after immunization. A breakthrough in the protection occurred with higher doses of CF in a dose-dependent manner. Challenge with a lethal intracerebral (i.c.) dose of DV showed significantly prolonged mean survival time and delayed onset of symptoms of sickness in the immunized mice compared with the normal mice, but the titre of the virus in the brain was similar in the two groups. On i.p. challenge with the virus the protection against damage to the blood-brain barrier was 86 +/- 7% at week 4 and 17 +/- 4% at week 26 after immunization. Sera obtained from the immunized mice showed the presence of CF-specific antibodies by ELISA, Western blot, and by neutralization of the cytotoxic activity of CF in vitro. The present study describes successful prevention of a cytokine-induced pathology by specific active immunization. PMID:8187327

  2. Tubal Sterilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy. Tubal sterilization is a permanent form of birth control. It is one of the most effective options for preventing pregnancy. But it is difficult to reverse. It doesn’t protect against sexually ...

  3. Postpartum Sterilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a few hours or days following delivery. For women who have had a cesarean delivery, it is done right after the baby is born. How is postpartum sterilization performed? For women who have had a vaginal delivery, a small ...

  4. Measles virus-induced suppression of immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Diane E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Measles is an important cause of child mortality that has a seemingly paradoxical interaction with the immune system. In most individuals, the immune response is successful in eventually clearing measles virus (MV) infection and in establishing life-long immunity. However, infection is also associated with persistence of viral RNA and several weeks of immune suppression, including loss of delayed type hypersensitivity responses and increased susceptibility to secondary infections. The initial T-cell response includes CD8+ and T-helper 1 CD4+ T cells important for control of infectious virus. As viral RNA persists, there is a shift to a T-helper 2 CD4+ T-cell response that likely promotes B-cell maturation and durable antibody responses but may suppress macrophage activation and T-helper 1 responses to new infections. Suppression of mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation can be induced by lymphocyte infection with MV or by lymphocyte exposure to a complex of the hemagglutinin and fusion surface glycoproteins without infection. Dendritic cells are susceptible to infection and can transmit infection to lymphocytes. MV-infected dendritic cells are unable to stimulate a mixed lymphocyte reaction and can induce lymphocyte unresponsiveness through expression of MV glycoproteins. Thus, multiple factors may contribute both to measles-induced immune suppression and to the establishment of durable protective immunity. PMID:20636817

  5. Nasal immunization with Lactococcus lactis expressing the pneumococcal protective protein A induces protective immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Medina, Marcela; Villena, Julio; Vintiñi, Elisa; Hebert, Elvira María; Raya, Raúl; Alvarez, Susana

    2008-06-01

    Nisin-controlled gene expression was used to develop a recombinant strain of Lactococcus lactis that is able to express the pneumococcal protective protein A (PppA) on its surface. Immunodetection assays confirmed that after the induction with nisin, the PppA antigen was predictably and efficiently displayed on the cell surface of the recombinant strain, which was termed L. lactis PppA. The production of mucosal and systemically specific antibodies in adult and young mice was evaluated after mice were nasally immunized with L. lactis PppA. Immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgG, and IgA anti-PppA antibodies were detected in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of adult and young mice, which showed that PppA expressed in L. lactis was able to induce a strong mucosal and systemic immune response. Challenge survival experiments demonstrated that immunization with L. lactis PppA was able to increase resistance to systemic and respiratory infection with different pneumococcal serotypes, and passive immunization assays of naïve young mice demonstrated a direct correlation between anti-PppA antibodies and protection. The results presented in this study demonstrate three major characteristics of the effectiveness of nasal immunization with PppA expressed as a protein anchored to the cell wall of L. lactis: it elicited cross-protective immunity against different pneumococcal serotypes, it afforded protection against both systemic and respiratory challenges, and it induced protective immunity in mice of different ages.

  6. Sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, J.; Machado, P. A. N.

    2016-06-21

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  7. Sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, J.; Machado, P. A. N.; Maltoni, M.; Schwetz, T.

    2016-06-01

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  8. Neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 induced by immunization

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Most neutralizing antibodies act at the earliest steps of viral infection and block interaction of the virus with cellular receptors to prevent entry into host cells. The inability to induce neutralizing antibodies to HIV has been a major obstacle to HIV vaccine research since the early days of the epidemic. However, in the past three years, the definition of a neutralizing antibody against HIV has been revolutionized by the isolation of extremely broad and potent neutralizing antibodies from HIV-infected individuals. Considerable hurdles remain for inducing neutralizing antibodies to a protective level after immunization. Meanwhile, novel technologies to bypass the induction of antibodies are being explored to provide prophylactic antibody-based interventions. This review addresses the challenge of inducing HIV neutralizing antibodies upon immunization and considers notable recent advances in the field. A greater understanding of the successes and failures for inducing a neutralizing response upon immunization is required to accelerate the development of an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:23401570

  9. Radiation-Induced Hemopoietic and Immune Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    with a povidone -iodine scrub and an alcohol rinse. Marrow cells obtained six days, after TBI were used as antigen for the immunization of mice. At this...detected by FACS analysis after treatment with antibody and complement. Recovery of white blood cells an1 platelet counts was comparable to the recovery...in triplicate in CFU-GM assay. Each point represents the cumulative number of weekly CFU-GM. need to be autologous compared to the cells of the

  10. The role of d-dimer as first marker of thrombophilia in women affected by sterility: implications in pathophysiology and diagnosis of thrombophilia induced sterility

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Pierpaolo; D'Uva, Maristella; Strina, Ida; Mollo, Antonio; Amato, Valeria; Niglio, Alferio; De Placido, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Background D-dimer is considered a marker of hypercoagulable state and of endogenous fibrinolysis, so increased d-dimer is detectable in patients affected by thrombosis. Yet, several studies showed that also infertility, in particular secondary infertility due to recurrent fetal losses, has been often related to thrombotic events, in particular in women carrying thrombotic risk factors such as inherited thrombophilia (MTHFRC677T, PTHRA20210G, Factor V Leiden polimorphisms and/or inhAfter this screening we selected 39erited protein C, protein S, AT III deficiency) or acquired thrombophilia (primary antiphospholipid syndrome, acquired protein C, protein S, AT III deficiency, drugs induced thrombophilia). However, because its high predictive negative value in case of suspected thrombosis, increased d-dimer has been often associated to subclinical thrombophilia. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of d-dimer as first marker of thrombophilia in women affected by unexplained infertility and subsequently to search the cause of increased d-dimer, such as inherited and/or acquired thrombophilia. Patients and Methods We selected 79 patients with unexplained primary or secondary infertility. We excluded 40 patients affected by hydrosalpinx, uterine fibroids, uterine malformations, endocrinological and immunological diseases, luteal insufficiency, cytogenetical alterations. All remaining 39 patients were tested for d-dimer and divided in two groups: the patients of group A (25 patients) showed increased plasma d-dimer, in group B were included 14 patients with normal plasma level of d-dimer. After this step all 39 patients were screened for MTHFRC677T, PTHRA20210G, Factor V Leiden polimorphisms, protein C, protein S, AT III, anticardiolipin IgM and IgG, lupus anticoagulant. In the control group were included 15 age matched women without sterility problems referred to our outpatient's section of vascular medicine for suspected deep venous thrombosis. Statistical

  11. A Nonhuman Primate Scrub Typhus Model: Protective Immune Responses Induced by pKarp47 DNA Vaccination in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S.; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Richards, Allen L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi–specific, IFN-γ–producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine-induced

  12. Healing after death: antitumor immunity induced by oncolytic adenoviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Fueyo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We recently evaluated the capacity of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus to trigger an antitumor immune response in a syngeneic mouse glioma model. This virotherapy elicited immunity against both tumor-associated antigens and viral antigens. An immunogenic cell death accompanied by pathogen- or damage- associated patterns (PAMPs and DAMPs) induced by the virus may be responsible for the adenoviral-mediated antitumor effect. PMID:25954598

  13. Reversing Breast Cancer-Induced Immune Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    4], prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) [5], IL-1β [6, 7], IL-6 [8], S100A8/A9 [9, 10], the complement component C5a [11], and endotoxin [12] induce the...by complement. Nat Immunol, 2008. 9(11): p. 1225-35. 9 12. De Wilde, V., et al., Endotoxin -induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit

  14. Reversing Breast Cancer-Induced Immune Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    6, 7], IL-6 [8], S100A8/A9 [9, 10], the complement component C5a [11], and endotoxin [12] induce the accumulation of MDSC. MDSC block adaptive anti...11 12. De Wilde, V., et al., Endotoxin -induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit alloimmune responses via heme oxygenase-1. Am J

  15. CRISPR-Induced Distributed Immunity in Microbial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mark J.; Weitz, Joshua S.; Whitaker, Rachel J.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria and archaea, viruses are the primary infectious agents, acting as virulent, often deadly pathogens. A form of adaptive immune defense known as CRISPR-Cas enables microbial cells to acquire immunity to viral pathogens by recognizing specific sequences encoded in viral genomes. The unique biology of this system results in evolutionary dynamics of host and viral diversity that cannot be fully explained by the traditional models used to describe microbe-virus coevolutionary dynamics. Here, we show how the CRISPR-mediated adaptive immune response of hosts to invading viruses facilitates the emergence of an evolutionary mode we call distributed immunity - the coexistence of multiple, equally-fit immune alleles among individuals in a microbial population. We use an eco-evolutionary modeling framework to quantify distributed immunity and demonstrate how it emerges and fluctuates in multi-strain communities of hosts and viruses as a consequence of CRISPR-induced coevolution under conditions of low viral mutation and high relative numbers of viral protospacers. We demonstrate that distributed immunity promotes sustained diversity and stability in host communities and decreased viral population density that can lead to viral extinction. We analyze sequence diversity of experimentally coevolving populations of Streptococcus thermophilus and their viruses where CRISPR-Cas is active, and find the rapid emergence of distributed immunity in the host population, demonstrating the importance of this emergent phenomenon in evolving microbial communities. PMID:25000306

  16. A genetic resource for early-morning flowering trait of wild rice Oryza officinalis to mitigate high temperature-induced spikelet sterility at anthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Tsutomu; Hirabayashi, Hideyuki; Ida, Masashi; Takai, Toshiyuki; San-Oh, Yumiko A.; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Ando, Ikuo; Ogawa, Tsugufumi; Kondo, Motohiko

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims High temperatures over 32–36 °C at anthesis induce spikelet sterility in rice. The use of a germplasm with an early-morning flowering (EMF) trait has been hypothesized as a way of avoiding this problem. In this study, the effect of the EMF trait on avoiding high temperature-induced sterility at anthesis by flowering at a cooler temperature in the early morning was evaluated. Methods The EMF trait was introgressed from wild rice (Oryza officinalis) into the rice cultivar ‘Koshihikari’ (O. sativa). First, spikelets of the EMF line and Koshihikari were subjected to rising temperatures during the daytime in the greenhouse to test for differences in spikelet sterility. Secondly, spikelets of both plants were exposed to 26, 34 and 38 °C at anthesis and to 38 °C beginning at least 1 h after flowering, in the growth chambers at 70 % relative humidity, to test for differences in tolerance to high temperatures. Key Results Spikelets of the EMF line started and completed flowering a few hours earlier than Koshihikari. In a greenhouse experiment, spikelets of Koshihikari opened after the air temperature reached 35 °C, but those of the EMF line could open at cooler temperatures. Under these conditions, spikelet sterility significantly increased in Koshihikari, but did not in the EMF line. The number of sterile spikelets increased as their flowering time was delayed in Koshihikari. Furthermore, the chamber experiments revealed that 60 % of the spikelets from both lines were sterile when exposed to 38 °C at anthesis, indicating that tolerance of high temperature was similar in both genotypes. Conclusions Reduced sterility in the EMF line subjected to rising temperatures at anthesis in the greenhouse was attributed to an earlier flowering time compared with Koshihikari. The EMF trait of wild rice is effective in mitigating anticipated yield loss due to global warming by escaping high-temperature stress at anthesis during the daytime. PMID:20566680

  17. Macrophages are involved in hexachlorobenzene-induced adverse immune effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ezendam, Janine . E-mail: Janine.Ezendam@rivm.nl; Kosterman, Kevin; Spijkerboer, Henneke; Bleumink, Rob; Hassing, Ine; Rooijen, Nico van; Vos, Joseph G.; Pieters, Raymond

    2005-11-15

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a persistent environmental pollutant that causes adverse immune effects in man and rat. The Brown Norway (BN) rat is very susceptible to HCB-induced immunopathology and oral exposure causes inflammatory skin and lung lesions, splenomegaly, lymph node (LN) enlargement, and increased serum levels of IgE and anti-ssDNA IgM. T cells play an important role but do not account for all adverse effects induced by HCB. Macrophages are probably also important and the relationship between macrophages and T cells was further investigated. To eliminate macrophages clodronate-liposomes were used. Furthermore, a kinetic study was performed to obtain insight in the early phase of the HCB-induced immune response. Also, experiments were performed to detect specific memory T cells. Therefore, an adoptive transfer study was performed. Our results indicate that macrophages are indeed involved in HCB-induced skin lesions, lung eosinophilia, and elevation of IgM against ssDNA. Kinetics showed that both skin and lung lesions appeared early after exposure. Moreover, immune effects could not be adaptively transferred. Thus, both macrophages and T cells are involved in HCB-induced immune effects but HCB exposure does not lead to specific T cell sensitization. Presumably, HCB exposure induces macrophage activation, thereby generating adjuvant signals that polyclonally stimulate T cells. Together, these events may lead to the observed immunopathology in BN rats.

  18. [Immune-regulating effect of phenibut under lipopolysaccharide-induced immune stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Samotrueva, M A; Tiurenkov, I N; Teplyĭ, D L; Kuleshevskaia, N R; Khlebtsova, E V

    2010-05-01

    The immunoregulating effect of phenibut has been demonstrated on the model of immune stress caused by the injection of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The degree of expression of the specific (in a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and passive hemagglutination) and nonspecific (phagocytic activity of neutrophils) links of immunomodulation was studied. The formation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced immune stress is characterized by the increase of the indicated parameters of immunity. It is found that phenibut (under intraabdominal injection of 25 mg/kg within 5 days) removes the manifestations of hyperreactivity of the cellular link of immunity, and also restores the amount of phagocytic cells, which is evidence of the immunomodulating properties of the drug under conditions of hyperimmunization.

  19. Multiple sclerosis: Skin-induced antigen-specific immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wildner, Paula; Selmaj, Krzysztof W

    2017-10-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a highly prevalent demyelinating disorder, presumed to be driven by an autoimmune response toward the central nervous system (CNS) components. All currently available treatments modulate the immune system globally and besides the reduction of disease activity, they may also impose considerable disturbances on the immune protective mechanisms. Thus, induction of antigen-specific immune tolerance remains the ultimate goal of MS therapy. Such approach carries promising therapeutic perspectives and, above all, a desirable safety profile. Several studies have been performed to evaluate highly selective, antigen-induced, therapies for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and MS. These trials have also indicated the importance of the antigen administration route. The continued efforts to develop efficient and safe MS therapy gave rise to the idea of incorporating the skin immune system in order to modulate autoimmunity in MS. Skin is the largest immunological organ of human body, and thus provides ample opportunities to modify immune responses. Skin dendritic cells have a significant ability to modulate the immune reactions, promoting either immunity or tolerance. Their capacity to induce tolerance has already been described in several experimental models of MS. In a one-year, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study assessing the effectiveness of transdermal myelin peptides patches, significant changes in the morphology of Langerhans cells (LCs) and shifts in the dendritic cell (DC) populations in the draining lymph nodes have been observed. In addition, patients treated with myelin patches showed a decreased brain inflammatory activity on MRI and a reduced relapse rate. In this review, we further discuss the potential to use skin-induced immune tolerance for MS treatment, with a particular focus on dermal DCs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Hysteroscopic sterilization.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J M

    1992-06-01

    After a brief history of sterilization, this article is devoted to hysteroscopic techniques and instrumentation, and a presentation of hysteroscopic sterilization techniques: electrocoagulation techniques, hysteroscopic injection of chemicals, and hysteroscopically directed placement of intratubal mechanical devices (ceramic plugs, polyethylene plugs, preformed silicone plugs, nylon intratubal plugs, and formed-in-place silicone rubber plugs. Problems are identified that are common to all hysteroscopic sterilization techniques. There are also practical considerations which limit the development of hysteroscopic sterilization techniques, and these considerations are presented. Various means have been used historically to block the tubal ostia, including the insertion of nitric acid in 1984, but it was not until 1927 that the hysteroscope was used for sterilization. Hysteroscopy itself was discovered in 1869 for diagnosis of intrauterine diseases. Even with the hysteroscope and the 1934 procedure of using an electric current in the tubal ostia, hysteroscopic sterilization was little used. In 1973 a convention was convened to discuss the use of the procedure and the ramifications. Currently, the hysteroscope is a modified cytoscope with a 4 mm wide telescope with a fore-oblique lens, a 7 mm wide metallic sheath, a fiberoptic bundle for transmission of light, and additional instruments for intrauterine manipulation or surgical intervention. Under local anesthesia, sterilization is effected by 1) destruction of the interstitial portion of the oviduct by thermal energy, 2) injection techniques for the delivery of sclerosing substances or tissue adhesives, or 3) mechanical occlusive devices or plugs to block the oviduct. Recent uterine, cervical, or adnexal infections and pregnancy prevent the performance of sterilization, because infections are exacerbated by the procedure. Uterine perforation is a complication. Other complications involve allergic reactions to the

  1. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses.

  2. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  3. Immunization with Toxoplasma gondii peroxiredoxin 1 induces protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fereig, Ragab M.; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    To develop a vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii, a vaccine antigen with immune-stimulating activity is required. In the present study, we investigated the immunogenicity and prophylactic potential of T. gondii peroxiredoxin 1 (TgPrx1). The TgPrx1 was detected in the ascitic fluid of mice 6 days postinfection, while specific antibody levels were low in the sera of chronically infected mice. Treatment of murine peritoneal macrophages with recombinant TgPrx1 triggered IL-12p40 and IL-6 production, but not IL-10 production. In response to TgPrx1, activation of NF-kB and IL-6 production were confirmed in mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7). These results suggest the immune-stimulating potentials of TgPrx1. Immunization of mice with recombinant TgPrx1 stimulated specific antibody production (IgG1 and IgG2c). Moreover, spleen cell proliferation and interferon-gamma production significantly increased in the TgPrx1- sensitized cells from mice immunized with the same antigen. Immunization with TgPrx1 also increased mouse survival and decreased cerebral parasite burden against lethal T. gondii infection. Thus, our results suggest that TgPrx1 efficiently induces humoral and cellular immune responses and is useful as a new vaccine antigen against toxoplasmosis. PMID:28448521

  4. Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Lefkovits, I.; Troup, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response has been shown to occur both in vivo and in vitro. Evidence is presented to implicate injury to an extremely radiosensitive T cell in the expression of this phenomenon. Experiments are outlined which could be employed to support or reflect this hypothesis.

  5. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    postulate that radiation-induced TNFR I probably acts as a “ brake ” on immunity. Because of the high risk of the proposed experiment and high...the rest of body shielded. Tumor diameters were measured in three mutually orthogonal dimensions at 2–3 day intervals with a vernier caliper and the

  6. Sterile connector.

    PubMed

    Tenczar, F J

    1976-01-01

    Fabrication of a sterile connector for joining a supply source to an independent delivery location through a contaminated environment requires four design steps: 1) alignment of connector housings; 2) exclusion of the contaminated environment; 3) sterilization of the excluded region; and 4) penetration within the sterilized area followed by coupling of the protected internal conduits. Protective covers for connectors now in use may be modified to provide penetrable terminal barrier membranes that can be joined to exclude the environment. An adhesive containing an antimicrobiologic agent would set the stage for a controlled mechanical penetration of the decontaminated fused barriers. In another design concept, plastic barrier membranes without preliminary adhesions are simultaneously fused, sterilized, and penetrated by a nichrome wire heated to approximately 288 C. A system can be designed that is compatible, at the option of the user, with either of these methods. The more economical mechanical approach could then be used for parenteral fluid therapy while the nichrome wire technique would be reserved for more complex processing methods (frozen erythrocytes) or when storage of the resulting component is a factor.

  7. A Novel Small Molecule Enantiomeric Analogue of Traditional (−)-morphinans has Specific TLR9 Antagonist Properties and Reduces Sterile Inflammation Induced Organ Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Rafaz; Farooq, Ahmad; Malik, Ahsan; Trawick, Bobby N.; Berberich, David W.; McClurg, Joseph P.; Galen, Karen P.; Mehal, Wajahat

    2013-01-01

    TLR9 is a key determinant of the innate immune responses in both infectious and sterile injury. Specific antagonism of TLR9 is of great clinical interest to reduce tissue damage in a wide range of pathologies, and has been approached by modification of nucleic acids, the recognized ligand for TLR9. Such oligonucleotide-derived pharmacotherapeutics have limitations in specificity for nucleic acid receptors, significant potential for immunologic recognition with generation of innate and adaptive immune responses, and limited bioavailability. We have identified enantiomeric analogues of traditional (−)-morphinans as having TLR9 antagonist properties on reporter cell lines. One of these analogues (COV08-0064) is demonstrated to be a novel small molecule antagonist of TLR9 with greater specificity for TLR9 than oligo based antagonists. COV08-0064 has wide bioavailability, including the subcutaneous and per oral route. It specifically inhibits the action of TLR9 antagonists on reporter cells lines and the production of cytokines by TLR9 agonists from primary cells. It also has efficacy in limiting TLR9 mediated sterile inflammation in in vivo models of acute liver injury and acute pancreatitis. The identification of a morphinan based novel small molecule structure with TLR9 antagonism is a significant step in expanding therapeutic strategies in the field of sterile inflammatory injury. PMID:23509352

  8. A novel small-molecule enantiomeric analogue of traditional (-)-morphinans has specific TLR9 antagonist properties and reduces sterile inflammation-induced organ damage.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Rafaz; Farooq, Ahmad; Malik, Ahsan; Trawick, Bobby N; Berberich, David W; McClurg, Joseph P; Galen, Karen P; Mehal, Wajahat

    2013-04-15

    TLR9 is a key determinant of the innate immune responses in both infectious and sterile injury. Specific antagonism of TLR9 is of great clinical interest to reduce tissue damage in a wide range of pathologies, and has been approached by modification of nucleic acids, the recognized ligand for TLR9. Such oligonucleotide-derived pharmacotherapeutics have limitations in specificity for nucleic acid receptors, significant potential for immunologic recognition with generation of innate and adaptive immune responses, and limited bioavailability. We have identified enantiomeric analogues of traditional (-)-morphinans as having TLR9 antagonist properties on reporter cell lines. One of these analogues (COV08-0064) is demonstrated to be a novel small-molecule antagonist of TLR9 with greater specificity for TLR9 than oligo-based antagonists. COV08-0064 has wide bioavailability, including the s.c. and oral routes. It specifically inhibits the action of TLR9 antagonists on reporter cells lines and the production of cytokines by TLR9 agonists from primary cells. It also has efficacy in limiting TLR9-mediated sterile inflammation in in vivo models of acute liver injury and acute pancreatitis. The identification of a morphinan-based novel small-molecule structure with TLR9 antagonism is a significant step in expanding therapeutic strategies in the field of sterile inflammatory injury.

  9. Could an experimental dengue virus infection fail to induce solid immunity against homologous viral challenge in non-human primates?

    PubMed

    Valdés, Iris; Gil, Lázaro; Lazo, Laura; Marcos, Ernesto; Martín, Jorge; Suzarte, Edith; Castro, Jorge; Romero, Yaremis; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-02-01

    There are several dengue vaccine candidates at advanced stages of development, but none of them are licensed. Despite the reactogenicity and immunogenicity profile in humans of the tetravalent ChimeriVax™ dengue vaccine candidate, in efficacy trials, it has failed to confer complete protection against dengue virus (DENV)-1 and DENV-2. However, full protection against the four serotypes had been observed previously in monkeys immunized with this vaccine candidate. Some authors have tried to explain this contradiction by hypothesizing that protection rates in non-human primates (NHPs) are associated with a lack of post-challenge anamnestic immune responses. Here, we studied the protection and anamnestic response patterns after homologous challenge in NHPs previously infected with DENV-2. Two immunization schemes were used, varying the viral doses and the intervals between them. Animals developed immunity against DENV-2 that provided full protection against reinfection with a homologous virus. However, all monkeys showed a significant increase in antiviral and neutralizing antibody titers after challenge. Our results suggest that sterilizing immunity could not be induced by infection with the virus despite the lack of detectable viremia in some animals in which an increase in antibody titer was observed. For this reason, we propose that the lack of an anamnestic neutralizing antibody response after challenge, as suggested by some authors, should be carefully reviewed as a criterion for evaluating the functionality of vaccine candidates.

  10. Specific humoral and cellular immunity induced by Trypanosoma cruzi DNA immunization in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease has a high incidence in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Because one of the most important known methods of prevention is vector control, which has been effective only in certain areas of South America, the development of a vaccine to protect people at risk has been proposed. In this study, we assessed the cellular and humoral immune response generated following immunization with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids containing the genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (present in all three forms of T. cruzi) and an amastigote specific glycoprotein, respectively, in a canine model. Thirty-five beagle dogs were divided randomly into 5 groups (n = 7) and were immunized twice intramuscularly with 500 μg of pBCSSP4, pBCSP, pBk-CMV (empty plasmid) or saline solution. Fifteen days after the last immunization the 4 groups were infected intraperitoneally with 500 000 metacyclic trypomastigotes. The fifth group was unimmunized/infected. The parasitaemia in the immunized/infected dogs was for a shorter period (14 vs. 29 days) and the parasite load was lower. The concentration of IgG1 (0.612 ± 0.019 O.D.) and IgG2 (1.167 ± 0.097 O.D.) subclasses was measured (absorbance) 15 days after the last immunization with both recombinant plasmids, the majority of which were IgG2. The treatment of parasites using the serum from dogs immunized with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids produced 54% (± 11.8) and 68% (± 21.4) complement-mediated lysis, respectively. At 12 h post immunization, an increase in cytokines was not observed; however, vaccination with pBCSSP4 significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-10 at 9 months post-infection. The recombinant plasmid immunization stimulated the spleen cell proliferation showing a positive stimulatory index above 2.0. In conclusion, immunization using both genes effectively induces a humoral and cellular immune response. PMID:23497041

  11. Metabolism-associated danger signal-induced immune response and reverse immune checkpoint-activated CD40(+) monocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Fang, Pu; Saredy, Jason; Xi, Hang; Ramon, Cueto; Yang, William; Choi, Eric T; Ji, Yong; Mao, Wei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong

    2017-07-24

    Adaptive immunity is critical for disease progression and modulates T cell (TC) and antigen-presenting cell (APC) functions. Three signals were initially proposed for adaptive immune activation: signal 1 antigen recognition, signal 2 co-stimulation or co-inhibition, and signal 3 cytokine stimulation. In this article, we propose to term signal 2 as an immune checkpoint, which describes interactions of paired molecules leading to stimulation (stimulatory immune checkpoint) or inhibition (inhibitory immune checkpoint) of an immune response. We classify immune checkpoint into two categories: one-way immune checkpoint for forward signaling towards TC only, and two-way immune checkpoint for both forward and reverse signaling towards TC and APC, respectively. Recently, we and others provided evidence suggesting that metabolic risk factors (RF) activate innate and adaptive immunity, involving the induction of immune checkpoint molecules. We summarize these findings and suggest a novel theory, metabolism-associated danger signal (MADS) recognition, by which metabolic RF activate innate and adaptive immunity. We emphasize that MADS activates the reverse immune checkpoint which leads to APC inflammation in innate and adaptive immunity. Our recent evidence is shown that metabolic RF, such as uremic toxin or hyperhomocysteinemia, induced immune checkpoint molecule CD40 expression in monocytes (MC) and elevated serum soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) resulting in CD40(+) MC differentiation. We propose that CD40(+) MC is a novel pro-inflammatory MC subset and a reliable biomarker for chronic kidney disease severity. We summarize that CD40:CD40L immune checkpoint can induce TC and APC activation via forward stimulatory, reverse stimulatory, and TC contact-independent immune checkpoints. Finally, we modeled metabolic RF-induced two-way stimulatory immune checkpoint amplification and discussed potential signaling pathways including AP-1, NF-κB, NFAT, STAT, and DNA methylation and their

  12. Inducible immune proteins in the dampwood termite Zootermopsis angusticollis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Cornelisse, Tara; Guschanski, Katerina; Traniello, James F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Dampwood termites, Zootermopsis angusticollis (Isoptera: Termopsidae), mount an immune response to resist microbial infection. Here we report on results of a novel analysis that allowed us to electrophoretically assess changes in hemolymph proteins in the same individual before and after exposure to a pathogen. We demonstrate that contact with a sublethal concentration of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycotina:Hypomycetes) induces the production of protective proteins in nymphs, pseudergates (false workers), and soldiers. Termites exposed to an immunizing dosage of fungal conidia consistently showed an enhancement of constitutive proteins (62-85 kDa) in the hemolymph as well as an induction of novel proteins (28-48 kDa) relative to preimmunization levels. No significant differences in protein banding patterns relative to baseline levels in control and naïve termites were observed. Incubating excised and eluted induced proteins produced by immunized pseudergates or immunized soldiers with conidia significantly reduced the germination of the fungus. The fungistatic effect of eluted proteins differed significantly among five colonies examined. Our results show that the upregulation of protective proteins in the hemolymph underscores the in vivo immune response we previously recorded in Z. angusticollis.

  13. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Hauling, Thomas; Krautz, Robert; Markus, Robert; Volkenhoff, Anne; Kucerova, Lucie; Theopold, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12), both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria), which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity. PMID:24659248

  14. Interferon-inducible GTPases in cell autonomous and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Detection and clearance of invading pathogens requires a coordinated response of the adaptive and innate immune system. Host cell, however, also features different mechanisms that restrict pathogen replication in a cell-intrinsic manner, collectively referred to as cell-autonomous immunity. In immune cells, the ability to unleash those mechanisms strongly depends on the activation state of the cell, which is controlled by cytokines or the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors. The interferon (IFN) class of cytokines is one of the strongest inducers of antimicrobial effector mechanisms and acts against viral, bacterial and parasitic intracellular pathogens. This has been linked to the upregulation of several hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, among them the so-called IFN-inducible GTPases. Two subfamilies of IFN-inducible GTPases, the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), have gained attention due to their exceptional ability to specifically target intracellular vacuolar pathogens and restrict their replication by destroying their vacuolar compartment. Their repertoire has recently been expanded to the regulation of inflammasome complexes, which are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that control an inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis and the release of cytokines like interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the function, the targeting and regulation of IRG and GBP proteins during microbial infections.

  15. Penicillin-induced immunohemolytic anemia associated with circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Funicella, T; Weinger, R S; Moake, J L; Spruell, M; Rossen, R D

    1977-01-01

    Eleven days after administration of multiple penicillin analogs, a 55-year-old female developed a Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. The patient's erythrocytes were coated with IgG, complement components (C4/C3) and her serum contained elevated 125I-Clq binding activity (a measure of the presence of immune complexes). Her serum, in the presence of fresh complement and penicillin, induced complement sensitization of normal erythrocytes. Immune complex-mediated complement activation and the haptene type of erythrocyte sensitization accounted for accelerated red blood cell destruction in this patient.

  16. Designing a program to assess potential induced radioactivity in electron beam sterilization of medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark; Logar, John; Vrain, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    ISO 11137-1:2006 requires that the potential for induced radioactivity be evaluated for medical devices irradiated with electrons with energy more than 10 MeV. For a manufacturing operation where new devices are being developed, a practical program for making such an evaluation needs to be engrained in the process. A program was developed such that the induced radioactivity evaluation is imbedded in the development of the irradiation process.

  17. Trifluoroethanol-induced conformational transition of the C-terminal sterile alpha motif (SAM) of human p73.

    PubMed

    Neira, José L; Cámara-Artigas, Ana

    2017-04-01

    The alpha splice variant of p73 (p73α), a homologue of the tumour suppressor p53, has at its C terminus a sterile alpha motif (SAM); this domain, SAMp73, is involved in lipid binding and it is thought to mediate in protein-protein interactions. As SAMp73 is a 68-residue-long helical bundle, it could be a good model to study the (2,2,2-trifluoroethanol) TFE-induced conformational transitions of α-helical proteins. Furthermore, as SAMp73 binds to lipids through a well-known polypeptide patch, we can test whether TFE is a good mimic of lipids and membranes. To address those questions, we used several biophysical probes, namely, fluorescence, circular dichroism, 1D, 2D and 3D-NMR spectroscopies, and dynamic light scattering. The TFE-induced conformational transition of SAMp73 was complex, involving several species as detected by the biophysical probes. The last TFE-induced transition occurred at a concentration of TFE of ∼20% (v/v), where the protein lost its compactness. None of those TFE-induced species accumulated during the two-state folding of SAMp73 in aqueous solution. The final state at 40% TFE was highly helical, but its structure was not rigid. For SAMp73, TFE did not properly mimic a membrane-like environment, since at very low TFE concentrations, other residues, together with those known to interact with lipids, were also affected by the co-solvent. Comparison with studies on isolated peptides, comprising the helical regions of SAMp73, suggests that peptides were good models of the intact protein in TFE.

  18. Temporary sterility induced by intrascrotal deposition of silastic-polyvinylpyrrolidone-prostaglandin F2alpha tubes in the rabbit: effect on fetal survival after regain of fertility.

    PubMed

    Saksena, S K; Lau, I F

    1979-09-01

    In male rabbits of proven fertility, the intrascrotal deposition of two Silastic-polyvinylpyrrolidone tubes containing 3 mg of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha)/tube induced within 2 to 4 weeks temporary sterility which lasted for 10 to 14 weeks. Associated with induced sterility were reduction in testicular weight, increase in abnormal spermatozoa (8% to 78% versus 0 to 3.7%), and reduction in sperm motility along the reproductive tract and in the semen for a period of 6 to 7 weeks. During the period of temporary sterility the weight of the epididymis, the sexual drive, and semen volume remained unaltered. Normal fertility was associated with an increase in testicular weight, reduction in the proportion of abnormal sperm, and improved sperm motility. In addition to an altered spermatogenesis, the integrity of mature spermatozoa seemed to be severely affected after PGF2alpha treatment. The reduced number of viable young sired by males that recovered from temporary sterility (pregnancy wastage 35%) as compared with sham-treated controls (pregnancy wastage 3%) suggests that a small percentage of spermatozoa might still be defective at the time of testing. A longer waiting period might be needed to ensure a completely normal reproductive process.

  19. The humoral immune response induced by snake venom toxins.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Wilmar Dias; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2011-10-01

    This review summarizes the key contributions to our knowledge regarding the immune response induced by snake venom toxins, focusing particularly on the production of antibodies and their venom-neutralizing effects. We cover the past and present state of the art of anti-snake venom production, followed by an overview of the venomous snakes and their venoms. The toxic properties of relevant snake venom toxins are approached in some details, with particular emphasis on the molecular domains responsible for binding to cells or plasma components in victims. The interactions of these domains are also reviewed, particularly the putatively relevant epitopes, along with the immune system and the resulting antibodies. We also review trials aimed at reducing the quantities of non-relevant antibodies in the antivenoms by substituting whole venoms with purified toxins to immunize animals, or the immunogenicity of the heterologous antivenom antibodies by humanizing their molecules.

  20. Recent progress in HIV vaccines inducing mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pavot, Vincent; Rochereau, Nicolas; Lawrence, Philip; Girard, Marc P; Genin, Christian; Verrier, Bernard; Paul, Stéphane

    2014-07-31

    In spite of several attempts over many years at developing a HIV vaccine based on classical strategies, none has convincingly succeeded to date. As HIV is transmitted primarily by the mucosal route, particularly through sexual intercourse, understanding antiviral immunity at mucosal sites is of major importance. An ideal vaccine should elicit HIV-specific antibodies and mucosal CD8⁺ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) as a first line of defense at a very early stage of HIV infection, before the virus can disseminate into the secondary lymphoid organs in mucosal and systemic tissues. A primary focus of HIV preventive vaccine research is therefore the induction of protective immune responses in these crucial early stages of HIV infection. Numerous approaches are being studied in the field, including building upon the recent RV144 clinical trial. In this article, we will review current strategies and briefly discuss the use of adjuvants in designing HIV vaccines that induce mucosal immune responses.

  1. The role of probiotics and prebiotics in inducing gut immunity.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Angélica T; Teixeira, Mauro M; Martins, Flaviano S

    2013-12-12

    The gut immune system is influenced by many factors, including dietary components and commensal bacteria. Nutrients that affect gut immunity and strategies that restore a healthy gut microbial community by affecting the microbial composition are being developed as new therapeutic approaches to treat several inflammatory diseases. Although probiotics (live microorganisms) and prebiotics (food components) have shown promise as treatments for several diseases in both clinical and animal studies, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the direct and indirect effects on the gut immune response will facilitate better and possibly more efficient therapy for diseases. In this review, we will first describe the concept of prebiotics, probiotics, and symbiotics and cover the most recently well-established scientific findings regarding the direct and indirect mechanisms by which these dietary approaches can influence gut immunity. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of diet, the microbiota, and the gut immune system. Second, we will highlight recent results from our group, which suggest a new dietary manipulation that includes the use of nutrient products (organic selenium and Lithothamnium muelleri) and probiotics (Saccharomyces boulardii UFMG 905 and Bifidobacterium sp.) that can stimulate and manipulate the gut immune response, inducing intestinal homeostasis. Furthermore, the purpose of this review is to discuss and translate all of this knowledge into therapeutic strategies and into treatment for extra-intestinal compartment pathologies. We will conclude by discussing perspectives and molecular advances regarding the use of prebiotics or probiotics as new therapeutic strategies that manipulate the microbial composition and the gut immune responses of the host.

  2. AUTOLOGOUS IMMUNE COMPLEX NEPHRITIS INDUCED WITH RENAL TUBULAR ANTIGEN

    PubMed Central

    Glassock, Richard J.; Edgington, Thomas S.; Watson, J. Ian; Dixon, Frank J.

    1968-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanism involved in a form of experimental allergic glomerulonephritis induced by immunization of rats with renal tubular antigen has been investigated. A single immunization with less than a milligram of a crude renal tubular preparation, probably containing less than 25 µg of the specific nephritogenic antigen, is effective in the induction of this form of chronic membranous glomerulonephritis. In the nephritic kidney autologous nephritogenic tubular antigen is found in the glomerular deposits along with γ-globulin and complement. When large amounts of antigen are injected during induction of the disease the exogenous immunizing antigen can also be detected in the glomerular deposits. It appears that this disease results from the formation of circulating antibodies capable of reacting with autologous renal tubular antigen(s) and the deposition of these antibodies and antigen(s) plus complement apparently as immune complexes in the glomeruli. This pathogenetic system has been termed an autologous immune complex disease and the resultant glomerulonephritis has been similarly designated. PMID:4169966

  3. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions.

  4. Flagella-induced immunity against experimental cholera in adult rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, R J; Willis, D L; Berry, L J

    1979-01-01

    The adult rabbit ligated ileal loop model was used to evaluate the prophylactic potential of a crude flagellar (CF) vaccine produced from the classical. Inaba strain CA401. A greater than 1,000-fold increase in the challenge inoculum was required to induce an intestinal fluid response in actively immunized adult rabbits equivalent to that produced in unimmunized animals. Similar protection was afforded against challenge with classical and El Tor biotypes of both Inaba and Ogawa serotypes. Highly virulent 35S-labeled vibrios were inhibited in their ability to associated with the intestinal mucosa of CF-immunized rabbits. The protection conferred by CF immunization was found to be superior to that of a commercial bivalent vaccine and also to that of glutaraldehyde-treated cholera toxoid. The critical immunogenic component of CF appears to be a flagella-derived protein. The immunogenicity of CF was destroyed by heat treatment, and absorption of CF-immune serum with aflagellated mutant vibrios did not diminish its ability to confer a high level of passive protection. The intestinal protection of CF-immunized rabbits was completely reversed by the introduction of both goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulins A and G, but by neither alone. PMID:478635

  5. Environmental Toxicants-Induced Immune Responses in the Olfactory Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Fumiaki; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are the receptor cells for the sense of smell. Although cell bodies are located in the olfactory mucosa (OM) of the nasal cavity, OSN axons directly project to the olfactory bulb (OB) that is a component of the central nervous system (CNS). Because of this direct and short connection from this peripheral tissue to the CNS, the olfactory system has attracted attention as a port-of-entry for environmental toxicants that may cause neurological dysfunction. Selected viruses can enter the OB via the OM and directly affect the CNS. On the other hand, environmental toxicants may induce inflammatory responses in the OM, including infiltration of immune cells and production of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, these inflammatory responses cause the loss of OSNs that are then replaced with newly generated OSNs that re-connect to the OB after inflammation has subsided. It is now known that immune cells and cytokines in the OM play important roles in both degeneration and regeneration of OSNs. Thus, the olfactory system is a unique neuroimmune interface where interaction between nervous and immune systems in the periphery significantly affects the structure, neuronal circuitry, and immunological status of the CNS. The mechanisms by which immune cells regulate OSN loss and the generation of new OSNs are, however, largely unknown. To help develop a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, we have provided a review of key research that has investigated how the immune response in the OM affects the pathophysiology of OSNs. PMID:27867383

  6. Environmental Toxicants-Induced Immune Responses in the Olfactory Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Fumiaki; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are the receptor cells for the sense of smell. Although cell bodies are located in the olfactory mucosa (OM) of the nasal cavity, OSN axons directly project to the olfactory bulb (OB) that is a component of the central nervous system (CNS). Because of this direct and short connection from this peripheral tissue to the CNS, the olfactory system has attracted attention as a port-of-entry for environmental toxicants that may cause neurological dysfunction. Selected viruses can enter the OB via the OM and directly affect the CNS. On the other hand, environmental toxicants may induce inflammatory responses in the OM, including infiltration of immune cells and production of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, these inflammatory responses cause the loss of OSNs that are then replaced with newly generated OSNs that re-connect to the OB after inflammation has subsided. It is now known that immune cells and cytokines in the OM play important roles in both degeneration and regeneration of OSNs. Thus, the olfactory system is a unique neuroimmune interface where interaction between nervous and immune systems in the periphery significantly affects the structure, neuronal circuitry, and immunological status of the CNS. The mechanisms by which immune cells regulate OSN loss and the generation of new OSNs are, however, largely unknown. To help develop a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, we have provided a review of key research that has investigated how the immune response in the OM affects the pathophysiology of OSNs.

  7. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system.

    PubMed

    García, Ana V; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity.

  8. Tumor-induced immune dysfunctions caused by myeloid suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Bronte, V; Serafini, P; Apolloni, E; Zanovello, P

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1970s, several findings suggested that accessory cells distinct from lymphocytes might suppress immune reactivity in tumor-bearing hosts. Studies in animal models and patients later confirmed that cells driven to act as dominant immune suppressors by growing cancers could subvert the immune system. These cells have also been termed natural suppressors, a functional definition connoting their ability to hamper various T- and B-lymphocyte responses without prior activation and independently from antigen and MHC restriction. These properties were attributed to distinct cell populations. The phenotypic discrepancies, together with the lack of antigen specificity, have generated serious restraints to research on tumor-induced suppression. Recent evidence indicates that suppressor cells are closely related to immature myeloid precursors and can be found in several situations that can exert adverse effects on the immunotherapy of cancer. The present review is an attempt to address the nature and properties of immature myeloid suppressors and their relationship to dendritic cells and macrophages, with the aim of clarifying the complex network of tumor-induced, negative regulators of the immune system.

  9. Requirements for innate immune pathways in environmentally induced autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that environmental triggers in combination with genetic and stochastic factors play an important role in spontaneous autoimmune disease. Although the specific environmental agents and how they promote autoimmunity remain largely unknown, in part because of diverse etiologies, environmentally induced autoimmune models can provide insights into potential mechanisms. Studies of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity show that they are mediated by common adaptive immune response genes. By contrast, although the innate immune system is indispensable for autoimmunity, there are clear differences in the molecular and cellular innate components that mediate specific systemic autoimmune diseases, suggesting distinct autoimmune-promoting pathways. Some of these differences may be related to the bifurcation of toll-like receptor signaling that distinguishes interferon regulatory factor 7-mediated type I interferon production from nuclear factor-κB-driven proinflammatory cytokine expression. Accordingly, idiopathic and pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity require both type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines whereas the less aggressive mercury-induced autoimmunity, although dependent on nucleic acid-binding toll-like receptors, does not require type I interferon but needs proinflammatory cytokines. Scavenger receptors and the inflammasome may contribute to silica-induced autoimmunity. Greater understanding of the innate mechanisms responsible for idiopathic and environmentally induced autoimmunity should yield new information into the processes that instigate and drive systemic autoimmunity. PMID:23557436

  10. A Case of Fenofibrate-Induced Immune Thrombocytopenia: First Report.

    PubMed

    Agapakis, Dimitris I; Massa, Eleni V

    2015-09-01

    Fenofibrate is widely prescribed as a hypolipidemic drug and is well tolerated by most patients. We present the case of a 40-year-old woman who developed severe immune thrombocytopenia while on fenofibrate treatment. Clinical features included spontaneous bruising on the feet and hands, a purpuric rash, and menorrhagia. All the laboratory results were normal except for the finding of isolated thrombocytopenia. The subsequent evolution was favorable after fenofibrate removal and with the administration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) plus corticosteroids. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia is briefly reviewed, and a possible mechanism responsible for causing this side effect of fenofibrate is suggested. This is the first reported case of fenofibrate-induced immune thrombocytopenia.

  11. Radiation sterilization of ketoprofen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katušin-Ražem, Branka; Hamitouche, Katia; Maltar-Strmečki, Nadica; Kos, Karmen; Pucić, Irina; Britvić-Budicin, Smiljana; Ražem, Dušan

    2005-06-01

    Radiation sterilization of ketoprofen (KP) dry powder was investigated by selected physico-chemical methods. High-performance liquid chromatography, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and electron spin resonance spectroscopy did not show any significant degradation at sterilization dose 25 kGy. To determine the nature, extent and direction of radiation-induced changes, KP was irradiated to extremely high doses, much higher than necessary to achieve sterility. The irradiated KP did not show any difference of XRD patterns up to 200 kGy; with DSC and IR some changes were detected only above 1000 and 2000 kGy, respectively; HPLC has shown about 5% destruction at 2000 kGy. Acetyl benzophenon (AcBph) was generated by irradiation with G(AcBph)=(1.6±0.1)×10 -8 mol J -1. Ames test has shown no mutagenicity of KP irradiated with 3000 kGy or of the oily mixure of radiolytic products isolated from it. Solid KP has proven to be very stable on irradiation, and irradiation has been found to be a suitable method for its sterilization.

  12. Immunization with Brugia malayi Myosin as Heterologous DNA Prime Protein Boost Induces Protective Immunity against B. malayi Infection in Mastomys coucha

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jyoti; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2016-01-01

    The current control strategies employing chemotherapy with diethylcarbamazine, ivermectin and albendazole have reduced transmission in some filaria-endemic areas, there is growing interest for complementary approaches, such as vaccines especially in light of threat of parasite developing resistance to mainstay drugs. We earlier demonstrated recombinant heavy chain myosin of B. malayi (Bm-Myo) as a potent vaccine candidate whose efficacy was enhanced by heterologous DNA prime/protein boost (Myo-pcD+Bm-Myo) vaccination in BALB/c mice. BALB/c mouse though does not support the full developmental cycle of B. malayi, however, the degree of protection may be studied in terms of transformation of challenged infective larvae (L3) to next stage (L4) with an ease of delineating the generated immunological response of host. In the current investigation, DNA vaccination with Bm-Myo was therefore undertaken in susceptible rodent host, Mastomys coucha (M. coucha) which sustains the challenged L3 and facilitates their further development to sexually mature adult parasites with patent microfilaraemia. Immunization schedule consisted of Myo-pcD and Myo-pcD+Bm-Myo followed by B. malayi L3 challenge and the degree of protection was evaluated by observing microfilaraemia as well as adult worm establishment. Myo-pcD+Bm-Myo immunized animals not only developed 78.5% reduced blood microfilarial density but also decreased adult worm establishment by 75.3%. In addition, 75.4% of the recovered live females revealed sterilization over those of respective control animals. Myo-pcD+Bm-Myo triggered higher production of specific IgG and its isotypes which induced marked cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to microfilariae (mf) and L3 in vitro. Both Th1 and Th2 cytokines were significantly up-regulated displaying a mixed immune response conferring considerable protection against B. malayi establishment by engendering a long-lasting effective immune response and therefore emerges as a

  13. Rennet-induced aggregation and curd formation from skimmed milk powders prepared under different sterilizing conditions.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuka; Matsumiya, Kentaro; Kubouchi, Hiroaki; Noda, Masayuki; Nishimura, Kimio; Matsumura, Yasuki

    2009-09-01

    Heat treatment during the production of skimmed milk powder causes denaturation of proteins, thereby affecting the physicochemical properties of the skimmed milk powder. To understand the effects of heat treatment on the sensitivity of the casein micelles in skimmed milk powders, low heating type (L), normal heating type (N), high heating type (H), and super-high heating type (SH), to reaction with rennet, rennet-induced curd formation was investigated. A well-developed network structure with wide spaces was observed only in the curd derived from the solution of type L skimmed milk powder. SDS-PAGE suggested that there was no difference in the amount of glycomacropeptide generated from kappa-casein in the four types of skimmed milk powder, but casein micelles in the solution of type L skimmed milk powder formed aggregates most effectively. These results are discussed with respect to the thermal denaturation of proteins in skimmed milk powder.

  14. Immunization with truncated envelope protein of Zika virus induces protective immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-Feng; Qiu, Yang; Yu, Jiu-Yang; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Sun, Han-Xiao; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2017-08-30

    The global spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) as well as its unexpected link to infant microcephaly have resulted in serious public health concerns. No antiviral drugs against ZIKV is currently available, and vaccine development is of high priority to prepare for potential ZIKV pandemic. In the present study, a truncated E protein with the N-terminal 90% region reserved (E90) from a contemporary ZIKV strain was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by a Ni-NTA column, and characterized by Western blotting assays. Immunization with recombinant E90 induced robust ZIKV-specific humoral response in adult BALB/c mice. Passive transfer of the antisera from E90-immunized mice conferred full protection against lethal ZIKV challenge in a neonatal mice model. Our results indicate that recombinant ZIKV E90 described here represents as a promising ZIKV subunit vaccine that deserves further clinical development.

  15. Inducible Sterilization of Zebrafish by Disruption of Primordial Germ Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ten-Tsao; Collodi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    During zebrafish development, a gradient of stromal-derived factor 1a (Sdf1a) provides the directional cue that guides the migration of the primordial germ cells (PGCs) to the gonadal tissue. Here we describe a method to produce large numbers of infertile fish by inducing ubiquitous expression of Sdf1a in zebrafish embryos resulting in disruption of the normal PGC migration pattern. A transgenic line of zebrafish, Tg(hsp70:sdf1a-nanos3, EGFP), was generated that expresses Sdf1a under the control of the heat-shock protein 70 (hsp70) promoter and nanos3 3?UTR. To better visualize the PGCs, the Tg(hsp70:sdf1a-nanos3, EGFP) fish were crossed with another transgenic line, Tg(kop:DsRed-nanos3), that expresses DsRed driven by the PGC-specific kop promoter. Heat treatment of the transgenic embryos caused an induction of Sdf1a expression throughout the embryo resulting in the disruption of their normal migration. Optimal embryo survival and disruption of PGC migration was achieved when transgenic embryos at the 4- to 8-cell stage were incubated at 34.5°C for 18 hours. Under these conditions, disruption of PGC migration was observed in 100% of the embryos. Sixty-four adult fish were developed from three separate batches of heat-treated embryos and all were found to be infertile males. When each male was paired with a wild-type female, only unfertilized eggs were produced and histological examination revealed that each of the adult male fish possessed severely under-developed gonads that lacked gametes. The results demonstrate that inducible Sdf1a expression is an efficient and reliable strategy to produce infertile fish. This approach makes it convenient to generate large numbers of infertile adult fish while also providing the capability to maintain a fertile brood stock. PMID:23826390

  16. Immune disorders induced by exposure to pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Skolarczyk, Justyna; Pekar, Joanna; Nieradko-Iwanicka, Barbara

    2017-06-08

    Pyrethroids are biocides, which belong to the third generation of insecticides. They are used as biocides, insecticides and medicines. These agents react selectively, because they are less harmful to birds and mammals (due to poor intestinal absorption and rapid detoxification in the body of homeothermic organisms) and they are poisonous for fish and insects. The aim of the article is to present the current state of knowledge on the effects of pyrethroids on the immune system based on the latest scientific research. The mechanism of action of pyrethroids include the delaying closure of voltage- sensitive sodium and chloride channels (including GABA- dependent channels). These compounds are neurotoxic. Studies have shown that they cause numerous immune disorders contributing to lowering of immunity in humans and animals. Exposure to pyrethroids can cause inhibition of proliferation of peripheral blood leukocytes and reducing the concentration of IgG immunolgobulines. They also cause reduced macrophages and decrease in interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin 8 (IL-8), interleukin 12p70 (IL-12p70), and interferon γ (IFN-γ). Some of these compounds cause increase of liver weight and increase of bone marrow cellularity, and may induce apoptosis of the thymus. Pyrethroids can cause allergies and asthma. Their immunosuppressive effects can impair host resistance against infections. Exposure to these compounds can also contribute to induction of the cancer, especially in patients with impaired immune function.

  17. Prenatal diazepam induced persisting depression of cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Schlumpf, M; Ramseier, H; Lichtensteiger, W

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of pregnant Long Evans rats with a low dose of diazepam (1.25 mg/kg per day s.c.) from gestational day (GD) 14 to 20 resulted in severe and long lasting depression of cellular immune responses in male and female offspring. T lymphocyte proliferation, induced by allogeneic stimulation in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) or geneic stimulation in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) or mitogenic stimulation (concanavalin A), decreased by 50 % or more over a postnatal period of about 2 months. Treatment of the pregnant dam during the early fetal period, from GD 12 to GD 16, did not significantly affect these immune parameters, whereas treatment during later gestation, from GD 16 to 20, significantly affected T lymphocyte function. Clonazepam, a benzodiazepine with high affinity for the central type benzodiazepine site, also affected cellular immune response in offspring. Our data indicate that benzodiazepine treatment during the fetal period may result in persistent postnatal deficiency of cellular immune responses. The relative role of central and peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor and possible interactions with maternal and fetal pituitary - adrenocortical systems are discussed.

  18. Endocrine side effects induced by immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Barnabei, Agnese; Marchetti, Paolo; De Vecchis, Liana; Salvatori, Roberto; Torino, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, progress has been made in cancer immunotherapy by the development of drugs acting as modulators of immune checkpoint proteins, such as the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1), two co-inhibitory receptors that are expressed on T cells upon activation. These molecules play crucial roles in maintaining immune homeostasis by down-regulating T-cell signaling, thereby preventing unbridled T-cell proliferation while maintaining tolerance to self-antigens, such as tumor-associated antigens. CTLA4 blockade through systemic administration of the CTLA4-blocking antibody ipilimumab was shown to confer significant survival benefit and prolonged stable disease in patients affected by advanced cutaneous melanoma. Other immune checkpoint inhibitors are under clinical evaluation. However, immune checkpoint blockade can lead to the breaking of immune self-tolerance, thereby inducing a novel syndrome of autoimmune/autoinflammatory side effects, designated as "immune-related adverse events," mainly including rash, colitis, hepatitis, and endocrinopathies. We searched the medical literature using the words "hypophysitis," "hypopituitarism," "thyroid," "adrenal insufficiency," and "endocrine adverse events" in association with "immune checkpoint inhibitors," "ipilimumab," "tremelimumab," "PD-1," and "PD-1-L." The spectrum of endocrine disease experienced by patients treated with ipilimumab includes most commonly hypophysitis, more rarely thyroid disease or abnormalities in thyroid function tests, and occasionally primary adrenal insufficiency. Hypophysitis has emerged as a distinctive side effect of CTLA4-blocking antibodies, establishing a new form of autoimmune pituitary disease. This condition, if not promptly recognized, may be life-threatening (due to secondary hypoadrenalism). Hypopituitarism caused by these agents is rarely reversible, and prolonged or lifelong substitutive hormonal treatment is often required. The precise

  19. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on the

  20. Regulatory T Cells in γ Irradiation-Induced Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Hugh I.; Puig, Montserrat; Grajkowska, Lucja T.; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Lee, Jay P.; Mason, Karen P.; Verthelyi, Daniela; Rosenberg, Amy S.

    2012-01-01

    Sublethal total body γ irradiation (TBI) of mammals causes generalized immunosuppression, in part by induction of lymphocyte apoptosis. Here, we provide evidence that a part of this immune suppression may be attributable to dysfunction of immune regulation. We investigated the effects of sublethal TBI on T cell memory responses to gain insight into the potential for loss of vaccine immunity following such exposure. We show that in mice primed to an MHC class I alloantigen, the accelerated graft rejection T memory response is specifically lost several weeks following TBI, whereas identically treated naïve mice at the same time point had completely recovered normal rejection kinetics. Depletion in vivo with anti-CD4 or anti-CD25 showed that the mechanism involved cells consistent with a regulatory T cell (T reg) phenotype. The loss of the T memory response following TBI was associated with a relative increase of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ expressing T regs, as compared to the CD8+ T effector cells requisite for skin graft rejection. The radiation-induced T memory suppression was shown to be antigen-specific in that a third party ipsilateral graft rejected with normal kinetics. Remarkably, following the eventual rejection of the first MHC class I disparate skin graft, the suppressive environment was maintained, with markedly prolonged survival of a second identical allograft. These findings have potential importance as regards the immunologic status of T memory responses in victims of ionizing radiation exposure and apoptosis-inducing therapies. PMID:22723935

  1. Hysteroscopic Sterilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep-like state to prevent pain during surgery. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Hysterosalpingography (HSG): ...

  2. Hysteroscopic Sterilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep-like state to prevent pain during surgery. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Hysterosalpingography (HSG): ...

  3. Male-sterile and cleistogamous phenotypes in tall fescue induced by chimeric repressors of SUPERWOMAN1 and OsMADS58.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroko; Yoshida, Kouki; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Takamizo, Tadashi

    2012-02-01

    Since tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is an anemophilous (wind-pollinated) grass species, male sterility is strongly desired for transgenic tall fescue to prevent pollen dispersal. To create male-sterile tall fescue, we applied Chimeric REpressor gene-Silencing Technology (CRES-T) based on rice APETALA3 (AP3) and AGAMOUS (AG) orthologues that specify the formation of stamens. We fused the coding regions of rice AP3 orthologue SUPERWOMAN1 (SPW1), and rice AG orthologues, Os12g0207000, Os01g0886200 and OsMADS58, respectively with the artificial sequence encoding the modified EAR-like motif repression domain (SRDX). We first introduced Os12g0207000SRDX, Os01g0886200SRDX and OsMADS58SRDX into rice for evaluation of their abilities to induce male sterility. The transgenic rice expressing OsMADS58SRDX had reiterated formation of lodicule-like organs instead of stamens and carpel, a typical phenotype of ag mutant. Thus, we found that OsMADS58SRDX was most suitable for our purpose. Next, we introduced SPW1SRDX and OsMADS58SRDX into tall fescue. Although the transgenic tall fescue did not have the stamen alterations seen in SPW1SRDX and OsMADS58SRDX rice, they either produced no pollen or produced immature pollen; thus, the anthers were not dehiscent and the plants were male-sterile. In addition to the male sterility, SPW1SRDX tall fescue showed a cleistogamous (closed) phenotype in which anthers were not observed outside the glumes, with thin, abnormally elongated lodicules. Some lines of OsMADS58SRDX tall fescue showed a cleistogamous phenotype in which the lodicules were homeotically transformed into lemma-like organs. In both cases, cleistogamous phenotype was associated with morphological changes to the lodicules. We also obtained a mild phenotype of OsMADS58SRDX tall fescue, which exhibited only the male sterility. In this study, we produced novel male-sterile phenotypes using chimeric repressors and thus suggest CRES-T as a tool for transgenic improvement

  4. Sterile Inflammation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Shaukat, Zeeshan; Liu, Dawei; Gregory, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The study of immune responses in Drosophila has already yielded significant results with impacts on our understanding of vertebrate immunity, such as the characterization of the Toll receptor. Several recent papers have focused on the humoral response to damage signals rather than pathogens, particularly damage signals from tumour-like tissues generated by loss of cell polarity or chromosomal instability. Both the triggers that generate this sterile inflammation and the systemic and local effects of it are only just beginning to be characterized in Drosophila. Here we review the molecular mechanisms that are known that give rise to the recruitment of Drosophila phagocytes, called hemocytes, as well as the signals, such as TNFα, that stimulated hemocytes emit at sites of perceived damage. The signalling consequences of inflammation, such as the activation of JNK, and the potential for modifying this response are also discussed. PMID:25948885

  5. Sterilizing Immunity Elicited by Neisseria meningitidis Carriage Shows Broader Protection than Predicted by Serum Antibody Cross-Reactivity in CEACAM1-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    McCaw, Shannon E.; Strobel, Lea; Frosch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis asymptomatically colonizes the human upper respiratory tract but is also the cause of meningitis and severe septicemia. Carriage or disease evokes an immune response against the infecting strain. Hitherto, we have known little about the breadth of immunity induced by natural carriage of a single strain or its implications for subsequent infectious challenge. In this study, we establish that transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM1 support nasal colonization by a variety of strains of different capsular types. Next, we nasally challenged these mice with either of the N. meningitidis strains H44/76 (serogroup B, ST-32) and 90/18311 (serogroup C, ST-11), while following the induction of strain-specific immunoglobulin. When these antisera were tested for reactivity with a diverse panel of N. meningitidis strains, very low levels of antibody were detected against all meningococcal strains, yet a mutually exclusive “fingerprint” of high-level cross-reactivity toward certain strains became apparent. To test the efficacy of these responses for protection against subsequent challenge, CEACAM1-humanized mice exposed to strain 90/18311 were then rechallenged with different N. meningitidis strains. As expected, the mice were immune to challenge with the same strain and with a closely related ST-11 strain, 38VI, while H44/76 (ST-32) could still colonize these animals. Notably, however, despite the paucity of detectable humoral response against strain 196/87 (ST-32), this strain was unable to colonize the 90/18311-exposed mice. Combined, our data suggest that current approaches may underestimate the actual breadth of mucosal protection gained through natural exposure to N. meningitidis strains. PMID:25368118

  6. The role of cytokines in immune changes induced by spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Miller, E. S.

    1993-01-01

    It has become apparent that spaceflight alters many immune responses. Among the regulatory components of the immune response that have been shown to be affected by spaceflight is the cytokine network. Spaceflight, as well as model systems of spaceflight, have been shown to affect the production and action of various cytokines including interferons, interleukins, colony stimulating factors, and tumor necrosis factors. These changes have been shown not to involve a general shutdown of the cytokine network but, rather, to involve selective alterations of specific cytokine functions by spaceflight. The full breadth of changes in cytokines induced by spaceflight, as well as mechanisms, duration, adaptation, reversibility, and significance to resistance to infection and neoplastic diseases, remains to be established.

  7. Interferon-inducible effector mechanisms in cell-autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2012-04-25

    Interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of hundreds of genes as part of an elaborate antimicrobial programme designed to combat infection in all nucleated cells - a process termed cell-autonomous immunity. As described in this Review, recent genomic and subgenomic analyses have begun to assign functional properties to novel IFN-inducible effector proteins that restrict bacteria, protozoa and viruses in different subcellular compartments and at different stages of the pathogen life cycle. Several newly described host defence factors also participate in canonical oxidative and autophagic pathways by spatially coordinating their activities to enhance microbial killing. Together, these IFN-induced effector networks help to confer vertebrate host resistance to a vast and complex microbial world.

  8. Immune response to uv-induced tumors: transplantation immunity and lymphocyte populations exhibiting anti-tumor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-induced murine skin tumors were analyzed for their ability to induce tumor-specific and cross-protective transplantation immunity in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. These studies revealed that progressor UV-tumors, like regressor UV-tumors, possess tumor-specific transplantation antigens. Cross-protective transplantation immunity to UV-tumors, however, was associated with sensitization to the serum used to culture the tumor lines rather than to cross-reactive or common determinants on UV-tumors. An analysis of the cytolytic activity of lymphocytes from the spleens of mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors revealed a striking difference between the two immune splenocyte populations. From regressor tumor-immune animals, cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes with specificity for the immunizing tumor were found. However, the analysis of splenic lymphocytes from progressor tumor immune animals revealed no such effector cells. To more effectively examine those lymphocytes exhibiting cytolytic activity in vitro, T lymphocyte cloning technology was used as a means of isolating homogeneous lymphocyte populations with the effector activities described above. The mechanisms where NK cells and other nonspecific effector cells could be induced in tumor-immune animals are discussed in the context of class II restricted immune responses.

  9. Effect of Corneal Nerve Ablation on Immune Tolerance Induced by Corneal Allografts, Oral Immunization, or Anterior Chamber Injection of Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Juan; Neelam, Sudha; Mellon, Jessamee; Brown, Joseph R.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Severing corneal nerves during corneal transplantation does not affect first corneal transplants, but abolishes immune privilege of subsequent corneal allografts. This abrogation of immune privilege is attributable to the disabling of T regulatory cells (T regs) induced by corneal transplantation. The goal of this study was to determine if severing corneal nerves induces the development of contrasuppressor (CS) cells, which disable T regs that impair other forms of immune tolerance. Methods Effect of corneal nerve ablation on immune tolerance was assessed in four forms of immune tolerance: anterior chamber–associated immune deviation (ACAID); oral tolerance; corneal transplantation, and intravenously (IV) induced immune tolerance. T regulatory cell activity was assessed by adoptive transfer and by local adoptive transfer (LAT) of suppression assays. Results Corneal nerve ablation prevented ACAID and oral tolerance, but did not affect IV-induced immune tolerance. Contrasuppressor cells blocked the action of T regs that were generated by anterior chamber injection, oral tolerance, or orthotopic corneal transplantation. The neuropeptide substance P (SP) was crucial for contrasuppressor activity as CS cells could not be induced in SP−/− mice and the SP receptor inhibitor, Spantide II, prevented the expression of CS cell activity in vivo. Contrasuppressor cells expressed CD11c surface marker that identifies dendritic cells (DC). Conclusions The loss of immune privilege produced by corneal nerve ablation following corneal transplantation extends beyond the eye and also affects immune tolerance induced through mucosal surfaces and appears to be mediated by a novel cell population of CD11c+ CS cells that disables T regs. PMID:28114571

  10. Insect immunity: expression of the two major inducible antibacterial peptides, defensin and diptericin, in Phormia terranovae.

    PubMed Central

    Dimarcq, J L; Zachary, D; Hoffmann, J A; Hoffmann, D; Reichhart, J M

    1990-01-01

    Injections of low doses of bacteria into larvae of Phormia terranovae induce the appearance of potent bactericidal peptides in the blood, among which predominate the anti-Gram positive insect defensins and the anti-Gram negative diptericins. Insect defensins show significant homologies to mammalian (including human) microbicidal peptides present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. We report the molecular cloning of cDNAs and primer extension studies which indicate that insect defensin is produced as a prepro-peptide yielding mature defensin A (40 residues) after cleavage of a putative signal peptide (23 residues) and a prosequence (34 residues). Previous studies have established that diptericin (82 residues) is matured from a pre-peptide by cleavage of a putative signal peptide (19 residues) and C-terminal amidation. Using oligonucleotide probes complementary to the sequences of the mRNAs for defensin and diptericin, we show by in situ hybridization that both antibacterial peptides are concomitantly synthesized by the same cells: thrombocytoids, a specialized blood cell type, and adipocytes. Transcriptional studies based on hybridization of RNAs to cDNAs of defensin and diptericin indicate that the transcription of both genes is induced regardless of the nature of the stimulus (injection of Gram positive or Gram negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharides). Even a sterile injury applied to axenically raised larvae is efficient in inducing the transcription of both genes suggesting that the local disruption of the integument aspecifically initiates a signalling mechanism which the thrombocytoids and the adipocytes are able to interpret. The transcription of immune genes is relatively short lived and a second challenge yields a response similar to that of the first stimulus, indicating that the experimental insects do not keep a 'memory' of their first injection. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2369900

  11. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yaling; Fu, Binqing; Sun, Rui; Li, Wenting; Hu, Wanfu; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK) cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27), influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular)+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  12. Diffuse traumatic brain injury induces prolonged immune dysregulation and potentiates hyperalgesia following a peripheral immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Rachel K; Ellis, Gavin I; Harrison, Jordan L; Bachstetter, Adam D; Corder, Gregory F; Van Eldik, Linda J; Taylor, Bradley K; Marti, Francesc; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Nociceptive and neuropathic pain occurs as part of the disease process after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Central and peripheral inflammation, a major secondary injury process initiated by the traumatic brain injury event, has been implicated in the potentiation of peripheral nociceptive pain. We hypothesized that the inflammatory response to diffuse traumatic brain injury potentiates persistent pain through prolonged immune dysregulation. To test this, adult, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to midline fluid percussion brain injury or to sham procedure. One cohort of mice was analyzed for inflammation-related cytokine levels in cortical biopsies and serum along an acute time course. In a second cohort, peripheral inflammation was induced seven days after surgery/injury with an intraplantar injection of carrageenan. This was followed by measurement of mechanical hyperalgesia, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba1 immunohistochemical analysis of neuroinflammation in the brain, and flow cytometric analysis of T-cell differentiation in mucosal lymph. Traumatic brain injury increased interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 1 levels in the cortex and serum that peaked within 1-9 h and then resolved. Intraplantar carrageenan produced mechanical hyperalgesia that was potentiated by traumatic brain injury. Further, mucosal T cells from brain-injured mice showed a distinct deficiency in the ability to differentiate into inflammation-suppressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). We conclude that traumatic brain injury increased the inflammatory pain associated with cutaneous inflammation by contributing to systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells are immune suppressors and failure of T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells leads to unregulated cytokine production which may contribute to the potentiation of peripheral pain through the excitation of peripheral sensory neurons. In addition, regulatory T cells are identified as a potential target for

  13. Persistence of the immune response induced by BCG vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Rosemary E; Gorak-Stolinska, Patricia; Floyd, Sian; Lalor, Maeve K; Stenson, Sally; Branson, Keith; Blitz, Rose; Ben-Smith, Anne; Fine, Paul EM; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2008-01-01

    Background Although BCG vaccination is recommended in most countries of the world, little is known of the persistence of BCG-induced immune responses. As novel TB vaccines may be given to boost the immunity induced by neonatal BCG vaccination, evidence concerning the persistence of the BCG vaccine-induced response would help inform decisions about when such boosting would be most effective. Methods A randomised control study of UK adolescents was carried out to investigate persistence of BCG immune responses. Adolescents were tested for interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (M.tb PPD) in a whole blood assay before, 3 months, 12 months (n = 148) and 3 years (n = 19) after receiving teenage BCG vaccination or 14 years after receiving infant BCG vaccination (n = 16). Results A gradual reduction in magnitude of response was evident from 3 months to 1 year and from 1 year to 3 years following teenage vaccination, but responses 3 years after vaccination were still on average 6 times higher than before vaccination among vaccinees. Some individuals (11/86; 13%) failed to make a detectable antigen-specific response three months after vaccination, or lost the response after 1 (11/86; 13%) or 3 (3/19; 16%) years. IFN-γ response to Ag85 was measured in a subgroup of adolescents and appeared to be better maintained with no decline from 3 to 12 months. A smaller group of adolescents were tested 14 years after receiving infant BCG vaccination and 13/16 (81%) made a detectable IFN-γ response to M.tb PPD 14 years after infant vaccination as compared to 6/16 (38%) matched unvaccinated controls (p = 0.012); teenagers vaccinated in infancy were 19 times more likely to make an IFN-γ response of > 500 pg/ml than unvaccinated teenagers. Conclusion BCG vaccination in infancy and adolescence induces immunological memory to mycobacterial antigens that is still present and measurable for at least 14 years in the majority of vaccinees

  14. Persistence of the immune response induced by BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Weir, Rosemary E; Gorak-Stolinska, Patricia; Floyd, Sian; Lalor, Maeve K; Stenson, Sally; Branson, Keith; Blitz, Rose; Ben-Smith, Anne; Fine, Paul E M; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2008-01-25

    Although BCG vaccination is recommended in most countries of the world, little is known of the persistence of BCG-induced immune responses. As novel TB vaccines may be given to boost the immunity induced by neonatal BCG vaccination, evidence concerning the persistence of the BCG vaccine-induced response would help inform decisions about when such boosting would be most effective. A randomised control study of UK adolescents was carried out to investigate persistence of BCG immune responses. Adolescents were tested for interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (M.tb PPD) in a whole blood assay before, 3 months, 12 months (n = 148) and 3 years (n = 19) after receiving teenage BCG vaccination or 14 years after receiving infant BCG vaccination (n = 16). A gradual reduction in magnitude of response was evident from 3 months to 1 year and from 1 year to 3 years following teenage vaccination, but responses 3 years after vaccination were still on average 6 times higher than before vaccination among vaccinees. Some individuals (11/86; 13%) failed to make a detectable antigen-specific response three months after vaccination, or lost the response after 1 (11/86; 13%) or 3 (3/19; 16%) years. IFN-gamma response to Ag85 was measured in a subgroup of adolescents and appeared to be better maintained with no decline from 3 to 12 months. A smaller group of adolescents were tested 14 years after receiving infant BCG vaccination and 13/16 (81%) made a detectable IFN-gamma response to M.tb PPD 14 years after infant vaccination as compared to 6/16 (38%) matched unvaccinated controls (p = 0.012); teenagers vaccinated in infancy were 19 times more likely to make an IFN-gamma response of > 500 pg/ml than unvaccinated teenagers. BCG vaccination in infancy and adolescence induces immunological memory to mycobacterial antigens that is still present and measurable for at least 14 years in the majority of vaccinees, although the magnitude of

  15. Intravaginal immunization with viral subunit protein plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides induces protective immunity against HSV-2.

    PubMed

    Kwant, Amanda; Rosenthal, Kenneth L

    2004-08-13

    Although the genital tract has been considered a poor inductive site for immunization with non-replicating antigens, genital immunization may be important for protection against sexually transmitted infections. Recently, we and others showed that CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) serve as potent adjuvants for mucosal immunization. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intravaginal (IVAG) immunization with recombinant glycoprotein B (rgB) of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) plus CpG ODN can induce specific immunity and protect against genital HSV-2 challenge. C57BL/6 mice were immunized IVAG with rgB plus CpG ODN, rgB plus non-CpG ODN, or rgB alone and challenged IVAG with HSV-2. Mice immunized with rgB + CpG had higher levels of anti-gB IgA and IgG in the vaginal washes and serum compared to mice immunized with rgB alone. Mice immunized with rgB + CpG also had the highest levels of gB-specific IgG in the nasal washes, however no specific IgA was detected in the nasal washes of any group. Mice immunized IVAG with rgB + CpG showed higher survival and lower pathology scores following genital HSV-2 challenge than mice immunized with rgB + non-CpG ODN or rgB alone. Additionally, vaginal viral titers were lower in the rgB + CpG group after infection. These results clearly show that the genital tract is capable of generating a protective immune response after local intravaginal immunization and that a non-replicating antigen is able to induce such a response when administered with an appropriate adjuvant.

  16. An Engineered Herpesvirus Activates Dendritic Cells and Induces Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yijie; Chen, Min; Jin, Huali; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; He, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are human pathogens that switch between lytic and latent infection. While attenuated HSV is explored for vaccine, the underlying event remains poorly defined. Here we report that recombinant HSV-1 with a mutation in the γ134.5 protein, a virulence factor, stimulates dendritic cell (DC) maturation which is dependent on TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). When exposed to CD11+ DCs, the mutant virus that lacks the amino terminus of γ134.5 undergoes temporal replication without production of infectious virus. Mechanistically, this leads to sequential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and p65/RelA. In correlation, DCs up-regulate the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. However, selective inhibition of TBK1 precludes phosphorylation of IRF3 and subsequent DC activation by the γ134.5 mutant. Herein, the γ134.5 mutant is immune-stimulatory and non-destructive to DCs. Remarkably, upon immunization the γ134.5 mutant induces protection against lethal challenge by the wild type virus, indicative of its vaccine potential. Furthermore, CD11+ DCs primed by the γ134.5 mutant in vivo mediate protection upon adoptive transfer. These results suggest that activation of TBK1 by engineered HSV is crucial for DC maturation, which may contribute to protective immunity. PMID:28150813

  17. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease.

  18. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease. PMID:26858964

  19. Harnessing the exosome-induced immune response for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gehrmann, Ulf; Näslund, Tanja I; Hiltbrunner, Stefanie; Larssen, Pia; Gabrielsson, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    In recent years exosomes have emerged as potent stimulators of immune responses and as agents for cancer therapy. Exosomes can carry a broad variety of immunostimulatory molecules depending on the cell of origin and in vitro culture conditions. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes (dexosomes) have been shown to carry NK cell activating ligands and can be loaded with antigen to activate invariant NKT cells and to induce antigen-specific T and B cell responses. Dexosomes have been investigated as therapeutic agents against cancer in two phase I clinical trials, with a phase II clinical trial currently ongoing. Dexosomes were well tolerated but therapeutic success and immune activation were limited. Several reports suggest that multiple factors need to be considered in order to improve exosomal immunogenicity for cancer immunotherapy. These include antigen-loading strategies, exosome composition and exosomal trafficking in vivo. Hence, a better understanding of how to engineer and deliver exosomes to specific cells is crucial to generate strong immune responses and to improve the immunotherapeutic potential of exosomes.

  20. Radiation-induced immune responses: mechanisms and therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hoibin; Bok, Seoyeon; Hong, Beom-Ju; Choi, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancement in the radiotherapy technology has allowed conformal delivery of high doses of ionizing radiation precisely to the tumors while sparing large volume of the normal tissues, which have led to better clinical responses. Despite this technological advancement many advanced tumors often recur and they do so within the previously irradiated regions. How could tumors recur after receiving such high ablative doses of radiation? In this review, we outlined how radiation can elicit anti-tumor responses by introducing some of the cytokines that can be induced by ionizing radiation. We then discuss how tumor hypoxia, a major limiting factor responsible for failure of radiotherapy, may also negatively impact the anti-tumor responses. In addition, we highlight how there may be other populations of immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that can be recruited to tumors interfering with the anti-tumor immunity. Finally, the impact of irradiation on tumor hypoxia and the immune responses according to different radiotherapy regimen is also delineated. It is indeed an exciting time to see that radiotherapy is being combined with immunotherapy in the clinic and we hope that this review can add an excitement to the field. PMID:27722125

  1. The "drought-inducible" histone H1s of tobacco play no role in male sterility linked to alterations in H1 variants.

    PubMed

    Przewloka, Marcin R; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T; Slusarczyk, Joanna; Kuraś, Mieczyslaw; Grasser, Klaus D; Stemmer, Christian; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2002-07-01

    Tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.) has two major H1 variants (H1A and H1B), which account for over 80% of chromatin linker histones, and four minor variants: H1C, H1D, H1E and H1F. We have shown previously [M. Prymakowska-Bosak et al. (1999) Plant Cell 11:2317-2329] that reversal of the natural proportion of major to minor H1 variants in transgenic tobacco plants results in a characteristic male-sterility phenotype identical to that occurring in many plant species subjected to water deficit at the time of male meiosis. It has been proposed by others that the drought-induced arrest of male gametophyte development is linked to decreased sugar delivery to reproductive tissues. Within the family of angiosperm H1s there is a well-defined class of minor H1 variants named "drought inducible" because some of its members have been shown to be induced by water deficit. We have identified and cloned the tobacco H1C gene, which, based on sequence similarity, represents a "drought-inducible" minor H1 variant. Analysis of the un-translated mRNA and promoter regions of H1C suggests a regulation by sucrose concentration. Antisense silencing of H1C and its close homologue H1D in plants that do not express H1A and H1B does not affect the characteristic H1A(-)/ H1B(-) male-sterility phenotype. Silencing of H1C and H1D also has no effect on growth and development of plants. Our findings demonstrate that H1C and H1D are dispensable for normal growth and development of tobacco, and that the compensatory up-regulation of "drought-inducible" H1s observed in H1A(-)/ H1B(-) plants is not the direct cause of male sterility linked to alterations in H1 variants.

  2. Candesartan Ameliorates Impaired Fear Extinction Induced by Innate Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, María M.; Maldonado, Lizette; Velazquez, Bethzaly; Porter, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to show signs of a relatively increased inflammatory state suggesting that activation of the immune system may contribute to the development of PTSD. In the present study, we tested whether activation of the innate immune system can disrupt acquisition or recall of auditory fear extinction using an animal model of PTSD. Male adolescent rats received auditory fear conditioning in context A. The next day, an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) prior to auditory fear extinction in context B impaired acquisition and recall of extinction. LPS (100 μg/kg) given after extinction training did not impair extinction recall suggesting that LPS did not affect consolidation of extinction. In contrast to cued fear extinction, contextual fear extinction was not affected by prior injection of LPS (100 μg/kg). Although LPS also reduced locomotion, we could dissociate the effects of LPS on extinction and locomotion by using a lower dose of LPS (50 μg/kg) which impaired locomotion without affecting extinction. In addition, 15 hrs after an injection of 250 μg/kg LPS in adult rats, extinction learning and recall were impaired without affecting locomotion. A sub-chronic treatment with candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevented the LPS-induced impairment of extinction in adult rats. Our results demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system can disrupt auditory fear extinction in adolescent and adult animals. These findings also provide direction for clinical studies of novel treatments that modulate the innate immune system for stress-related disorders like PTSD. PMID:26520214

  3. Candesartan ameliorates impaired fear extinction induced by innate immune activation.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, María M; Maldonado, Lizette; Velazquez, Bethzaly; Porter, James T

    2016-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to show signs of a relatively increased inflammatory state suggesting that activation of the immune system may contribute to the development of PTSD. In the present study, we tested whether activation of the innate immune system can disrupt acquisition or recall of auditory fear extinction using an animal model of PTSD. Male adolescent rats received auditory fear conditioning in context A. The next day, an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) prior to auditory fear extinction in context B impaired acquisition and recall of extinction. LPS (100 μg/kg) given after extinction training did not impair extinction recall suggesting that LPS did not affect consolidation of extinction. In contrast to cued fear extinction, contextual fear extinction was not affected by prior injection of LPS (100 μg/kg). Although LPS also reduced locomotion, we could dissociate the effects of LPS on extinction and locomotion by using a lower dose of LPS (50 μg/kg) which impaired locomotion without affecting extinction. In addition, 15 h after an injection of 250 μg/kg LPS in adult rats, extinction learning and recall were impaired without affecting locomotion. A sub-chronic treatment with candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevented the LPS-induced impairment of extinction in adult rats. Our results demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system can disrupt auditory fear extinction in adolescent and adult animals. These findings also provide direction for clinical studies of novel treatments that modulate the innate immune system for stress-related disorders like PTSD.

  4. Neuro-immune interactions in chemical-induced airway hyperreactivity.

    PubMed

    Devos, Fien C; Boonen, Brett; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Maes, Tania; Hox, Valérie; Seys, Sven; Pollaris, Lore; Liston, Adrian; Nemery, Benoit; Talavera, Karel; Hoet, Peter H M; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J

    2016-08-01

    Asthma may be induced by chemical sensitisers, via mechanisms that are still poorly understood. This type of asthma is characterised by airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and little airway inflammation. Since potent chemical sensitisers, such as toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI), are also sensory irritants, it is suggested that chemical-induced asthma relies on neuro-immune mechanisms.We investigated the involvement of transient receptor potential channels (TRP) A1 and V1, major chemosensors in the airways, and mast cells, known for their ability to communicate with sensory nerves, in chemical-induced AHR.In vitro intracellular calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings in TRPA1- and TRPV1-expressing Chinese hamster ovarian cells showed that TDI activates murine TRPA1, but not TRPV1. Using an in vivo model, in which an airway challenge with TDI induces AHR in TDI-sensitised C57Bl/6 mice, we demonstrated that AHR does not develop, despite successful sensitisation, in Trpa1 and Trpv1 knockout mice, and wild-type mice pretreated with a TRPA1 blocker or a substance P receptor antagonist. TDI-induced AHR was also abolished in mast cell deficient Kit(Wsh) (/Wsh) mice, and in wild-type mice pretreated with the mast cell stabiliser ketotifen, without changes in immunological parameters.These data demonstrate that TRPA1, TRPV1 and mast cells play an indispensable role in the development of TDI-elicited AHR. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  5. IFN-inducible GTPases and immunity to intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2004-11-01

    By eliciting host antimicrobial programs in nearly all nucleated cells interferons (IFNs) help orchestrate the innate immune response of mammals to a diverse array of microbial pathogens. Recent work has highlighted the complexity of this transcriptional repertoire and the emergence of several families of IFN-inducible guanosine 5' triphosphatases (GTPases)--p47, guanylate-binding protein (GBP), Mx and very large inducible GTPases (VLIG)--that subsume pathogen-specific roles. Such specificity arises from a combination of both the type and timing of inductive stimuli, target-cell population, subcellular binding partners and the infectious agent encountered. Evolution of different GTPase families to combat compartmentalized versus cytosolic pathogens reveals a hitherto unexpected level of intracellular discrimination during vertebrate host defense.

  6. Innate immunity drives xenobiotic-induced murine autoimmune cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C-H; Chen, Y-C; Yu, Y-H; Tao, M-H; Leung, P S C; Ansari, A A; Gershwin, M E; Chuang, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    Although primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is considered a model autoimmune disease, it has not responded therapeutically to traditional immunosuppressive agents. In addition, PBC may recur following liver transplantation, despite the absence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matching, in sharp contrast to the well-known paradigm of MHC restriction. We have suggested previously that invariant natural killer T (iNK T) cells are critical to the initiation of PBC. In this study we have taken advantage of our ability to induce autoimmune cholangitis with 2-octynoic acid, a common component of cosmetics, conjugated to bovine serum albumin (2-OA–BSA), and studied the natural history of pathology in mice genetically deleted for CD4 or CD8 following immunization with 2-OA–BSA in the presence or absence of α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer). In particular, we address whether autoimmune cholangitis can be induced in the absence of traditional CD4 and CD8 responses. We report herein that CD4 and CD8 knock-out mice immunized with 2-OA–BSA/PBS or 2-OA–BSA/α-GalCer develop anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMAs), portal infiltrates and fibrosis. Indeed, our data suggest that the innate immunity is critical for immunopathology and that the pathology is exacerbated in the presence of α-GalCer. In conclusion, these data provide not only an explanation for the recurrence of PBC following liver transplantation in the absence of MHC compatibility, but also suggest that effective therapies for PBC must include blocking of both innate and adaptive pathways. PMID:24547942

  7. Evaluation of the Contribution of Multiple DAMPs and DAMP Receptors in Cell Death-Induced Sterile Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Zubin; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    When cells die by necrosis in vivo they stimulate an inflammatory response. It is thought that this response is triggered when the injured cells expose proinflammatory molecules, collectively referred to as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by cells or soluble molecules of the innate or adaptive immune system. Several putative DAMPs and/or their receptors have been identified, but whether and how much they participate in responses in vivo is incompletely understood, and they have not previously been compared side-by-side in the same models. This study focuses on evaluating the contribution of multiple mechanisms that have been proposed to or potentially could participate in cell death-induced inflammation: The third component of complement (C3), ATP (and its receptor P2X7), antibodies, the C-type lectin receptor Mincle (Clec4e), and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). We investigate the role of these factors in cell death-induced inflammation to dead cells in the peritoneum and acetaminophen-induced liver damage. We find that mice deficient in antibody, C3 or PAR2 have impaired inflammatory responses to dying cells. In contrast there was no reduction in inflammation to cell death in the peritoneum or liver of mice that genetically lack Mincle, the P2X7 receptor or that were treated with apyrase to deplete ATP. These results indicate that antibody, complement and PAR2 contribute to cell death-induced inflammation but that Mincle and ATP- P2X7 receptor are not required for this response in at least 2 different in vivo models. PMID:25127469

  8. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation.

  9. [Optimal terms for sterilization].

    PubMed

    Ribic-Pucelj, M

    1980-01-01

    Sterilization can be performed in the immediate postpartum, post abortion, or as an interval procedure. Traditionally, postpartum sterilization should be performed within the first two days after delivery, thereafter the risk for infection is believed to increase. Sterilization and artificial abortion are performed as concomitant procedures, while interval sterilization is carried out at least six weeks after the termination of pregnancy. Though many authors consider the sterilization in the immediate postpartum and postabortion period safe enough, the comparative studies show that interval sterilization has less complications. Postpartum (postabortion) sterilization has much more disadvantages than advantages in comparison to interval sterilization. The main advantage of postpartum sterilization is only one hospitalization while disadvantages are the increased risk of hemorrhage, uterine perforation, thromboembolic disease, infection, technical difficulties, and psychological problems. For these reasons interval sterilization is recommended.

  10. Antitumor immune responses induced by photodynamic immunotherapy in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Robinson, Karen E.; Adams, Robert L.; Singhal, Anil K.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1998-05-01

    A new laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic mammary rat tumors. This new modality consists of three components: a near-infrared diode laser, a photosensitizer, and an immunoadjuvant. The sensitizer-adjuvant solution was injected directly to the tumor, followed by a non-invasive laser application. The new method resulted in total eradication of the treated primary tumors and eradication of untreated metastases at remote sites. Observed was the long-term survival of treated tumor-bearing rats: up to 120 days after tumor inoculation, a 300% increase in survival length compared with untreated control tumor-bearing rats. In addition, the successfully treated rats were refractory to tumor rechallenge with 10 times of the original tumor dose. Fluorescein and peroxidase immunochemical assays were also performed using sera from cured rats as the primary antibody. Strong antibody binding to both live and preserved tumor cells was observed. Western blot analysis, using the cured rat serum as primary antibody also showed distinctive protein binding, suggesting the induction of tumor-specific humoral immune response. These results indicated that an immune response was induced by the treatment of laser, photosensitizer and immunoadjuvant.

  11. Immunizations, neonatal jaundice and animal-induced injuries.

    PubMed

    Post, Jennifer N

    2006-06-01

    To review the literature published within the last year on three topics essential to clinical pediatrics: immunizations, neonatal jaundice, and animal-induced injuries. New vaccines that protect against meningococcus, pertussis and rotavirus are safe, effective and recommended for routine immunization. Young children remain a high priority for influenza vaccination while the world awaits further developments of avian influenza. Pneumococcal and varicella vaccinations have benefited many. Debate exists on how to screen for hyperbilirubinemia in neonates and new strategies are emerging to prevent it. There seems to be no link between hyperbilirubinemia and autism spectrum disorders. We have learned that rabies can be transmitted by transplantation; it remains a global public health problem and its incidence is frequently underestimated in developing nations. Lastly, brown recluse spider bites are often misdiagnosed. The face of pediatric infectious disease is changing as we incorporate new vaccines into our routine practice. Rotavirus vaccine has significant implications for the health of children across the globe. The management strategy for neonatal jaundice continues to focus on screening and prevention. We need to devote more energy to combating rabies in countries where it is endemic.

  12. Selective Induced Altered Coccidians to Immunize and Prevent Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Microbiomic flora in digestive tract is pivotal to the state of our health and disease. Antibiotics affect GI, control composition of microbiome, and shift equilibrium from health into disease status. Coccidiosis causes gastrointestinal inflammation. Antibiotic additives contaminate animal products and enter food chain, consumed by humans with possible allergic, antibiotic resistance and enigmatic side effects. Purposed study induced nonpathogenic, immunogenic organisms to protect against disease and abolish antibiotics' use in food animals and side effects in man. Diverse species of Coccidia were used as model. Immature organisms were treated with serial purification procedure prior to developmental stages to obtain altered strains. Chicks received oral gavage immunized with serial low doses of normal or altered organisms or sham treatment and were challenged with high infective normal organisms to compare pathogenicity and immunogenicity. Mature induced altered forms of E. tenella and E. necatrix lacked developmental stage of “sporocysts” and contained free sporozoites. In contrast, E. maxima progressed to normal forms or did not mature at all. Animals that received altered forms were considerably protected with higher weight gain and antibody titers against challenge infection compared to those that received normal organisms (p < 0.05). This is the first report to induce selected protective altered organisms for possible preventive measures to minimize antibiotic use in food animals. PMID:27721824

  13. Innate Immune Cells Induce Hemorrhage in Tumors during Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit; Carbo, Carla; Demers, Mélanie; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Goerge, Tobias; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets are crucial regulators of tumor vascular homeostasis and continuously prevent tumor hemorrhage through secretion of their granules. However, the reason for tumor bleeding in the absence of platelets remains unknown. Tumors are associated with inflammation, a cause of hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia. Here, we investigated the role of the inflamed tumor microenvironment in the induction of tumor vessel injury in thrombocytopenic mice. Using s.c. injections of vascular endothelial growth factor or tumor necrosis factor-α combined with depletion of neutrophils, we demonstrate that enhancing the opening of endothelial cell junctions was not sufficient to cause bleeding in the absence of platelets; instead, induction of tissue hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia required recruitment of leukocytes. Immunohistology revealed that thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage occurs at sites of macrophage and neutrophil accumulation. Mice deficient in β2 or β3 integrins, which have decreased neutrophil and/or macrophage infiltration in their tumor stroma, were protected from thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage, indicating that, in the absence of platelets, stroma-infiltrating leukocytes induced tumor vessel injury. This injury was independent of reactive oxygen species generation and of complement activation, as suggested by the persistence of tumor hemorrhage in C3- and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-deficient thrombocytopenic mice. Our results show that platelets counteract tumor-associated inflammation and that the absence of this platelet function elicits vascular injuries by tumor-infiltrating innate immune cells. PMID:19729481

  14. UV – INDUCED SYNTHESIS OF AMINO ACIDS FROM AQUEOUS STERILIZED SOLUTION OF AMMONIUM FORMATE AND AMMONIA UNDER HETROGENEOUS CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, G.; Bisht, L. S.

    1990-01-01

    Irradiation of sterilized aqueous solution of ammonium formate and ammonia with UV light in the presence and or absence of certain inorganic sensitizers for 25 hrs. gave six ninhydrin positive products in appreciable amounts. Out of the six products observed fiver were characterized as lysine, serine, glutemic acid, n-amino butyric acid and leucine. The sensitizing effect of additives on ammonium formate was observed in the order; uranium oxide > ammonium formate > ferric oxide > arsenic oxide. PMID:22556511

  15. The second intron of AGAMOUS drives carpel- and stamen-specific expression sufficient to induce complete sterility in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongrang; Liu, Zhongchi

    2008-05-01

    Gene containment technologies that prevent transgene dispersal through pollen, fruit and seed are in immediate demand to address concerns of gene flow from transgenic crops into wild species or close relatives. In this study, we isolated the enhancer element of Arabidopsis AGAMOUS that drives gene expression specifically in stamens and carpels. By fusing this AG enhancer to a minimal 35S promoter fragment, two tissue-specific promoters, fAGIP and rAGIP in forward and reverse orientations, respectively, were created and fused to the GUS reporter. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants harboring either fAGIP::GUS or rAGIP::GUS displayed similar GUS expression specifically in carpel and stamen tissues and their primordial cells. To test their utility for engineering sterility, the promoters were fused to the Diphtheria toxin A (DT-A) gene coding for a ribosome inactivating protein as well as the Barnase gene coding for an extracellular ribonuclease, and tested for tissue-specific ablation. Over 89% of AGIP::DT-A and 68% of AGIP::Barnase transgenic plants displayed specific and precise ablation of stamens and carpels and are completely sterile. These transgenic plants showed normal vegetative development with prolonged vegetative growth. To evaluate the stability of the sterile phenotype, 16 AGIP::DT-A lines underwent two consecutive cutback generations and showed no reversion of the floral phenotype. This study demonstrates a simple, precise and efficient approach to achieve absolute sterility through irreversible ablation of both male and female floral organs. This approach should have a practical application for transgene containment in ornamental, landscaping, and woody species, whose seeds and fruits are of no economic value.

  16. Drug-induced immune haemolytic anaemia caused by levofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Sukhal, Shashvat; Gupta, Shweta

    2014-08-01

    Drug-induced immune haemolytic anaemia (DIIHA) is extremely rare. We herein report a case of life-threatening DIIHA due to levofloxacin. This is the second case reported in the literature. A 51-year-old woman presented with complaints of fatigue after 4-5 days of levofloxacin therapy for a lung infection. At presentation, she was found to have haemolysis with a positive Coombs test and IgG autoantibodies. Levofloxacin was identified as the probable culprit, using the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale. Upon discontinuation of the drug and initiation of steroids, the patient's haematological parameters stabilised. Diagnosis of DIIHA is made through a history of intake of levofloxacin, clinical and laboratory features of haemolysis and a positive Coombs test. An autoantibody screen is most commonly positive for warm antibodies (IgG type). It is essential for clinicians to recognise this rare complication caused by a commonly prescribed medication, discontinue the offending drug and initiate treatment.

  17. Polar Lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei Induce Different Host Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Mima, Naoko; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Bowen, Richard A.; Dascher, Kyle; Mwangi, Waithaka; Eckstein, Torsten M.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs) and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor) molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster. PMID:24260378

  18. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  19. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  20. Analysis of differential immune responses induced by innate and adaptive immunity following transplantation

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongzhen; Stone, James R; Perkins, David L

    2003-01-01

    The roles of innate and adaptive immunity in allograft rejection remain incompletely understood. Previous studies analysing lymphocyte deficient or syngeneic graft recipients have identified subsets of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines induced by antigen independent mechanisms. In the current study, we analysed a panel of 60 inflammatory parameters including serum cytokines, intragraft chemokines and cytokines, receptors, and cellular markers. Our results confirmed the up-regulation of a subset of markers by innate mechanisms and also identified a subset of parameters up-regulated only in the context of an adaptive response. Thus, we successfully differentiated markers of the innate and adaptive phases of rejection. Current paradigms emphasize that innate signals can promote a subsequent adaptive response. Interestingly, in our studies, expression of the markers induced by innate mechanisms was markedly amplified in the allogeneic, but not syngeneic or lymphocyte deficient, recipients. These results suggest that inflammatory mediators can have functional overlap between the innate and adaptive responses, and that the adaptive component of the rejection process amplifies the innate response by positive feedback regulation. PMID:12757613

  1. Immune defense of rats immunized with fennel honey, propolis, and bee venom against induced staphylococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Sayed, S M; Abou El-Ella, Ghada A; Wahba, Nahed M; El Nisr, Neveen A; Raddad, Khaled; Abd El Rahman, M F; Abd El Hafeez, M M; Abd El Fattah Aamer, Ahmed

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the potency of bee product-immunized rats to overcome an induced Staphylococcus aureus infection. Forty rats were divided to eight groups: T1, T3, and T5 received, respectively, fennel honey, ethanol, and aqueous propolis extracts orally, and T2, T4, and T6 were administered the respective materials intraperitoneally; T7 received bee venom by the bee sting technique; and T8 was the control group. All groups were challenged by a bovine clinical mastitis isolate of S. aureus. Each rat received 2 mL of broth inoculated with 1 x 10(5) colony-forming units/mL intraperitoneally. Two weeks post-induced infection all rats were sacrificed and eviscerated for postmortem inspection and histopathological study. Three rats from T8 and one rat from T7 died before sacrifice. Another two rats, one each in T4 and T5, had morbidity manifestations. The remaining experimental animals showed apparently healthy conditions until time of sacrifice. Postmortem inspection revealed that all T8 rats showed different degrees of skeletal muscle and internal organ paleness with scattered focal pus nodules mainly on lungs and livers. All rats of the treated groups showed normal postmortem features except three rats. A dead rat in group T7 showed focal pus nodules on the lung surface only, whereas the affected two rats in groups T4 and T5 appeared normal except with some pus nodules, but much smaller than in the control, scattered on the hepatic surface and mesentery. Histopathological studies revealed that T8 rats had typical suppurative bronchopneumonia and or severe degenerative and necrobiotic changes in hepatic tissues. Three affected rats of the treated groups showed slight bronchopneumonia or degenerative hepatic changes only. The other animals of the treated groups showed completely normal parenchymatous organs with stimulated lymphatic tissues. It was concluded that all tested previously bee product-immunized rats could significantly challenge

  2. Spatiotemporally restricted arenavirus replication induces immune surveillance and type I interferon-dependent tumour regression

    PubMed Central

    Kalkavan, Halime; Sharma, Piyush; Kasper, Stefan; Helfrich, Iris; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Gassa, Asmae; Virchow, Isabel; Flatz, Lukas; Brandenburg, Tim; Namineni, Sukumar; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Höchst, Bastian; Knolle, Percy A.; Wollmann, Guido; von Laer, Dorothee; Drexler, Ingo; Rathbun, Jessica; Cannon, Paula M.; Scheu, Stefanie; Bauer, Jens; Chauhan, Jagat; Häussinger, Dieter; Willimsky, Gerald; Löhning, Max; Schadendorf, Dirk; Brandau, Sven; Schuler, Martin; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2017-01-01

    Immune-mediated effector molecules can limit cancer growth, but lack of sustained immune activation in the tumour microenvironment restricts antitumour immunity. New therapeutic approaches that induce a strong and prolonged immune activation would represent a major immunotherapeutic advance. Here we show that the arenaviruses lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the clinically used Junin virus vaccine (Candid#1) preferentially replicate in tumour cells in a variety of murine and human cancer models. Viral replication leads to prolonged local immune activation, rapid regression of localized and metastatic cancers, and long-term disease control. Mechanistically, LCMV induces antitumour immunity, which depends on the recruitment of interferon-producing Ly6C+ monocytes and additionally enhances tumour-specific CD8+ T cells. In comparison with other clinically evaluated oncolytic viruses and to PD-1 blockade, LCMV treatment shows promising antitumoural benefits. In conclusion, therapeutically administered arenavirus replicates in cancer cells and induces tumour regression by enhancing local immune responses. PMID:28248314

  3. Mechanistic Differences Leading to Infectious and Sterile Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Faranak; Sheller, Samantha; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a physiologic component of pregnancy and parturition. Overwhelming intrauterine inflammatory load promotes quiescent feto-maternal tissues into a contractile phenotype. Like inflammation, oxidative stress is an inevitable component of both pregnancy and parturition. Pathologic activation of host innate immune response to adverse pregnancy conditions can lead to premature activation of inflammatory and oxidative stress. Inflammation and oxidative stress markers seen with both sterile and infectious inflammation are often similar; therefore, it is difficult to understand causality of conditions like spontaneous preterm birth. This review demonstrates potential mechanistic pathways of activation of sterile and infectious inflammation. We demonstrate the activation of two unique pathways of inflammation by factors that are well-documented proxies for oxidative stress (cigarette smoke extract) and infection (lipopolysaccharide). Sterile inflammation seen after exposure to an oxidative stress inducer is due to cellular elemental damage resulting in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced cellular senescence. Infectious inflammation is through activation of transcription factor NF-κB and independent of oxidative stress-associated damages and p38 MAPK-induced senescence. Understanding the differences in the inflammatory pathway activation by various risk factors is important to design better screening, diagnostic and intervention strategies to reduce the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  4. Unveiling Unexpected Immune Activities Induced by Your Pneumococcal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Julia L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In modern-day vaccine design, a good pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine is measured by its ability to induce opsonic antibodies. These antibodies label bacteria for phagocytosis by neutrophils and thereby overcome the capsule’s barrier function. Doyle and Pirofski have raised a serious challenge to the current paradigm by describing anti-capsular antibodies that are highly protective but nonopsonic [C.R. Doyle and L. Pirofski, mBio 7(1):e02260-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.02260-15]. In fact, some functions are not related to neutrophils or phagocytosis at all. An increased awareness of these activities is critical not only for accurate comparisons of vaccine candidates but also for improvements in vaccination outcomes in settings of neutropenia. When vaccine developers select a single gatekeeper assay (e.g., an opsonophagocytic assay for bacteria or a neutralization assay for viruses), promising vaccine candidates may be missed. Doyle and Pirofski stress that multiple functions, not just one, should be investigated to enhance discovery of antibody mechanisms and to best assess vaccine-induced correlates of immune protection. PMID:26908576

  5. Sulfur Mustard Induces Immune Sensitization in Hairless Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Neerad C.; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; March, Thomas; Weber, Waylon; Benson, Janet; Jaramillo, Richard; Seagrave, Jean-Clare; Schultz, Gregory; Grotendorst, Gary; Sopori, Mohan

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide) is a well known chemical warfare agent that may cause long-term debilitating injury. Because of the ease of production and storage, it has a strong potential for chemical terrorism; however, the mechanism by which SM causes chronic tissue damage is essentially unknown. SM is a potent protein alkylating agent, and we tested the possibility that SM modifies cellular antigens, leading to an immunological response to “altered self” and a potential long-term injury. To that end, in this communication, we show that dermal exposure of euthymic hairless guinea pigs induced infiltration of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into the SM-exposed skin and strong upregulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-8) in distal tissues such as the lung and the lymph nodes. Moreover, we present evidence for the first time that SM induces a specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response that is associated with splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and proliferation of cells in these tissues. These results clearly suggest that dermal exposure to SM leads to immune activation, infiltration of T cells into the SM-exposed skin, delayed-type hypersensitivity response, and molecular imprints of inflammation in tissues distal from the site of SM exposure. These immunological responses may contribute to the long-term sequelae of SM toxicity. PMID:19887117

  6. Sulfur mustard induces immune sensitization in hairless guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neerad C; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; March, Thomas; Weber, Waylon; Benson, Janet; Jaramillo, Richard; Seagrave, Jean-Clare; Schultz, Gregory; Grotendorst, Gary; Sopori, Mohan

    2010-02-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide) is a well known chemical warfare agent that may cause long-term debilitating injury. Because of the ease of production and storage, it has a strong potential for chemical terrorism; however, the mechanism by which SM causes chronic tissue damage is essentially unknown. SM is a potent protein alkylating agent, and we tested the possibility that SM modifies cellular antigens, leading to an immunological response to "altered self" and a potential long-term injury. To that end, in this communication, we show that dermal exposure of euthymic hairless guinea pigs induced infiltration of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells into the SM-exposed skin and strong upregulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and IL-8) in distal tissues such as the lung and the lymph nodes. Moreover, we present evidence for the first time that SM induces a specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response that is associated with splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and proliferation of cells in these tissues. These results clearly suggest that dermal exposure to SM leads to immune activation, infiltration of T cells into the SM-exposed skin, delayed-type hypersensitivity response, and molecular imprints of inflammation in tissues distal from the site of SM exposure. These immunological responses may contribute to the long-term sequelae of SM toxicity.

  7. Inducing immune tolerance: a focus on Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Prasad, Suchitra; Miller, Stephen D

    2013-09-01

    Tolerogenic strategies that specifically target diabetogenic immune cells in the absence of complications of immunosuppression are the desired treatment for the prevention or even reversal of Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Antigen (Ag)-based therapies must not only suppress disease-initiating diabetogenic T cells that are already activated, but, more importantly, prevent activation of naive auto-Ag-specific T cells that may become autoreactive through epitope spreading as a result of Ag liberation from damaged islet cells. Therefore, identification of auto-Ags relevant to T1D initiation and progression is critical to the design of effective Ag-specific therapies. Animal models of T1D have been successfully employed to identify potential diabetogenic Ags, and have further facilitated translation of Ag-specific tolerance strategies into human clinical trials. In this review, we highlight important advances using animal models in Ag-specific T1D immunotherapies, and the application of the preclinical findings to human subjects. We provide an up-to-date overview of the strengths and weaknesses of various tolerance-inducing strategies, including infusion of soluble Ags/peptides by various routes of delivery, genetic vaccinations, cell- and inert particle-based tolerogenic approaches, and various other strategies that target distinct tolerance-inducing pathways.

  8. Immunizations, neonatal jaundice, and animal-induced injuries.

    PubMed

    Morris, Shaine A; Bernstein, Henry H

    2004-08-01

    Published studies during the past year about three topics important to the pediatric clinician-- immunizations, neonatal jaundice, and animal-induced injuries-are concisely reviewed. Recent updates regarding vaccines including the questionable link with autism, implementation of universal influenza vaccination for young children, the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine against invasive disease, and new information on pertussis, varicella, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, measles, and rotavirus vaccination are discussed. No association between measles/mumps/rubella vaccine or thimerosal-containing pertussis vaccine and autism is evident. Universal influenza vaccination for children 6 to 23 months of age will be recommended for the 2004-2005 flu season, and this implementation should reduce significant school absenteeism as well as complications seen last year including encephalopathy, seizures, respiratory failure, and pneumonia. Pneumococcal vaccine significantly reduces rates of invasive pneumococcal vaccine in healthy and HIV-infected children, although it does not appear to greatly affect otitis media rates. A reduction in post-vaccine febrile seizures appears to be present since the introduction of acellular pertussis vaccine. Multiple outbreaks in varicella have been reported since the introduction of the varicella vaccine, and a booster vaccination may be necessary in the future. Methods for detecting and preventing severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia are reviewed, as well as anticipated recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics for the detection and management of hyperbilirubinemia. High bilirubin levels in preterm infants may result in hearing dysfunction and developmental impairment. The American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended a higher level of monitoring for newborn jaundice and treatment of hyperbilirubinemia in an effort to prevent kernicterus and sequelae from elevated bilirubin levels, including post-discharge follow-up appointment by day 3

  9. Sterilization of glycerin.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Susan V

    2008-06-15

    The sterilization of glycerin is described. Glycerin is used in a wide variety of pharmaceutical formulations, including oral, otic, ophthalmic, topical, and parenteral preparations. Of the myriad uses for glycerin, some require a sterile solution. Due to the nature of dry heat sterilization with resulting equipment and validation needs, sterile filtration is the preferred sterilization method for glycerin at the Mayo Clinic Pharmacy Services Production Laboratory in Rochester, Minnesota. A practical procedure was attained with the use of a chemically compatible 0.22-microm capsule filter, peristaltic pump, and sterile tubing. The sterile tubing is attached firmly, with a twisting motion, to the hose barb ends of the filter. The peristaltic pump is set at minimum speed, and a sterile syringe is used to capture the sterile glycerin filtrate. After filtration, filter integrity testing using the bubble point test is performed on the filter used to sterilize the solution. Packaging was then completed by placing glycerin aliquots into unit-of-use sterile syringes, placing a sterile tip cap on each syringe, and labeling the syringe. End testing is needed for preparations, such as sterile glycerin, that are made from nonsterile components, regardless of sterilization technique. This quality-control testing includes but is not limited to visual checks, pH checks, and tests for bacterial endotoxins, particulate matter, and sterility. Beyond-use dating is then assigned based on chemical, physical, microbiological, and packaging considerations. A practical method for sterilization of glycerin by compounding pharmacists is attainable through the use of membrane filtration. Sterility assurance is achieved through appropriate validation, and quality-control checks must be completed before release of the injectable preparation.

  10. Variations in the structure and transcription of the mitochondrial atp and cox genes in wild Solanum species that induce male sterility in eggplant (S. melongena).

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, M; Kitamura, Y; Isshiki, S; Saito, T; Yasumoto, K; Terachi, T; Yamagishi, H

    2013-07-01

    In order to determine the molecular basis of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in alloplasmic lines of eggplant, the genomic structures and transcription patterns of mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit (atp) and cytochrome oxidase subunit (cox) genes were studied for wild and cultivated eggplants. Alloplasmic eggplant lines with cytoplasms of wild Solanum species showing either anther indehiscent type of CMS or non-pollen production type of CMS were studied with the cultivated eggplant Solanum melongena, used as a control. Southern hybridization of the mitochondrial genes indicated the difference between the two types of CMS and showed complete identity within each type. The cytoplasmic patterns of all wild species differed from that of the cultivated eggplant. Thus, the cytoplasm of the six wild eggplants and the one cultivated eggplant was classified into three groups. Male sterile plants of both types of CMS showed novel transcription patterns of atp1, whereas a different transcription pattern of cox2 was observed only in the anther indehiscent type. Based on these differences, we determined the DNA sequences of about a 4 kbp segment in the atp1 region. Although the coding and 3' flanking regions were almost identical among the cytoplasms, the 5' flanking region was completely different and novel open reading frames (orfs) were found for each of the CMS types and the cultivated eggplant. The cytoplasm of Solanum kurzii inducing the anther indehiscent type CMS had orf312, and those of Solanum aethiopicum and Solanum grandifolium of non-pollen production type CMS had orf218. The correspondence between the transcription patterns of these orfs and phenotypic expression of male sterility strongly suggests that these orfs are causal genes for each type of CMS.

  11. Sterilizing the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Sheila M.

    1977-01-01

    Suggests that freedom for the middle classes may mean vulnerability for the poor. The enthusiasm for sterilization may be so intense as to deprive the poor of their right not to be sterilized. (Author/AM)

  12. [Complications of tubal sterilization].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, W E

    1986-05-01

    In Europe and the US, tubal sterilization by laparoscopy has become the most widely used technique for female sterilization. The overall rate of intra- and postoperative complications differs between 0.145% and 0.85% in the numerous studies which have been done. This means 1 severe complication in 120-700 laparoscopic sterilizations. The lethality of tubal sterilization by laparoscopy lies between 3-10 deaths/100,000 interventions. The so-called "post-tubal ligation syndrome" is a rare complication. The overall pregnancy rate after tubal sterilization is 3-10/1000 women. The rate of ectopic pregnancy is very high and varies between 13.6% and 90%. Only 5% of the sterilized women show dissatisfaction. Several factors are relevant with regard to psychological sequelae and must be considered before tubal sterilization can be performed. 1 of the most important is the individual comprehensive counselling of the female or the couple prior to the sterilization.

  13. Apparatus Circulates Sterilizing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H.; Schwarz, Ray P.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus circulates sterilizing gas containing ethylene oxide and chlorofluorocarbon through laboratory or medical equipment. Confines sterilizing gas, circulating it only through parts to be treated. Consists of two units. One delivers ethylene oxide/chlorofluorocarbon gas mixture and removes gas after treatment. Other warms, humidifies, and circulates gas through equipment to be treated. Process provides reliable sterilization with negligible residual toxicity from ethylene oxide. Particularly suitable for sterilization of interiors of bioreactors, heart/lung machines, dialyzers, or other equipment including complicated tubing.

  14. Plasma-Based Sterilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-20

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014940 TITLE: Plasma-Based Sterilization DISTRIBUTION: Approved for...compilation report: ADP014936 thru ADP015049 UNCLASSIFIED Plasma-Based Sterilization Mounir Laroussi Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Old...Dominion University Norfolk, VA 23529 Rapid, safe, and effective sterilization is of the utmost importance when it comes to protecting the public in

  15. IAP antagonists induce anti-tumor immunity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Chesi, Marta; Mirza, Noweeda N.; Garbitt, Victoria M.; Sharik, Meaghen E.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Asmann, Yan W.; Akhmetzyanova, Ilseyar; Kosiorek, Heidi E.; Calcinotto, Arianna; Riggs, Daniel L.; Keane, Niamh; Ahmann, Greg J.; Morrison, Kevin M.; Fonseca, Rafael; Lacy, Martha Q.; Dingli, David; Kumar, Shaji K.; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Dispenzieri, Angela; Buadi, Francis; Gertz, Morie A.; Reeder, Craig B.; Lin, Yi; Chanan-Khan, Asher Alban; Stewart, A. Keith; Fooksman, David; Bergsagel, P. Leif

    2017-01-01

    The cellular inhibitor of apoptosis cIAP1 and −2 are amplified in about 3% of cancers, and were identified in multiple malignancies as potential therapeutic targets due to their role in evasion of apoptosis. Consequently, small molecule IAP antagonists, like LCL161, have entered clinical trials for their ability to induce TNF-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells. However, cIAP1 and −2 are recurrently homozygously deleted in multiple myeloma resulting in constitutive activation of the non-canonical NFkB pathway. It was therefore counterintuitive to observe a robust in vivo anti-myeloma activity of LCL161 in a transgenic myeloma mouse model and patients with relapsed-refractory myeloma, where addition of cyclophosphamide resulted in a median progression free survival of 10 months. This effect is not due to direct induction of tumor cell death, but rather to upregulation of a tumor cell autonomous type I interferon signaling and a strong inflammatory response with activation of macrophages and dendritic cells resulting in phagocytosis of tumor cells. Treatment with LCL161 established long-term anti-tumor protection and cure in a fraction of transgenic Vk*MYC mice. Remarkably, combination of LCL161 with the immune-checkpoint inhibitor anti-PD1 was curative in all treated mice. PMID:27841872

  16. Insect Immunity I. Characteristics of an Inducible Cell-Free Antibacterial Reaction in Hemolymph of Samia cynthia Pupae

    PubMed Central

    Boman, Hans G.; Nilsson-Faye, Ingrid; Paul, Kerstin; Rasmuson, Torgny

    1974-01-01

    Pupae of the silk moth, Samia cynthia, were found to contain an inducible antibacterial activity in their hemolymph. This immunity response was provoked by primary infections with either Escherichia coli K-12 or Enterobacter cloacae. In both cases the antibacterial activity was directed chiefly towards E. coli. During standard conditions, 1% of hemolymph could kill 103 to 104 viable E. coli, strain D31, within 5 min. A lower level of antibacterial activity was induced by injections of a sterile salt solution. The killing of strain D31 followed single-hit kinetics, and increasing rate constants were obtained for increasing amounts of hemolymph. The reaction was sensitive to pretreatment with trypsin and it was protected by reducing agents. The activity was inhibited by microgram quantities of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prepared from certain LPS mutants of E. coli K-12. A comparison of the susceptibility showed that “heptose-less” LPS mutants were more sensitive to killing than other strains. During standard conditions hemolymph will lyse both E. coli and Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Lysis of E. coli followed a multi-hit kinetics and it was inhibited by LPS, whereas lysis of M. lysodeikticus was unaffected by LPS. Hemolymph was fractionated on Sephadex G-200, and the lytic activities were recovered in partly overlapping peaks. Reconstitution with pooled fractions gave synergistic effects with the killing assay. PMID:4210336

  17. Demethylating agent decitabine disrupts tumor-induced immune tolerance by depleting myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jihao; Yao, Yushi; Shen, Qi; Li, Guoqiang; Hu, Lina; Zhang, Xinyou

    2017-08-01

    The immunoregulatory effect of demethylating agent decitabine (DAC) has been recognized recently. However, little is known about its impact on immune tolerance. In this study, we aimed to determine the impact of DAC on the immune tolerance induced by tumor cells. The effects of DAC on immune cells in vivo were measured by flow cytometry. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were sorted using magnetic beads and cultured in vitro. The mixed lymphocyte reaction was used to determine the immunoregulatory effect of DAC in vitro. An adoptive transfusion mouse model was established to evaluate the effect in vivo. We found that DAC treatment significantly depleted MDSCs in vivo by inducing MDSCs apoptosis. When given at a low dose, the immune effector cells were less affected by the treatment, except for MDSCs. The mixed lymphocyte reaction in vitro showed that T-cell responses were enhanced when MDSCs were depleted. Supplementation of MDSCs would attenuate this T-cell activation effect. Using an adoptive transfusion mouse model, we further demonstrated in vivo that DAC treatment could induce autologous anti-tumor immune response by depleting MDSCs. This study is the first to illustrate DAC's immunoregulatory effect on immune tolerance. The disruption of immune tolerance is due to MDSCs depletion that induces an autologous immune response in vivo. By depleting MDSCs, DAC treatment removes one of the obstacles affecting anti-tumor immune activation and warrants further experimental and clinical studies to explore its potential utility in combination with various anti-tumor immunotherapies in the future.

  18. Stress and host immunity amplify Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypic heterogeneity and induce nongrowing metabolically active forms.

    PubMed

    Manina, Giulia; Dhar, Neeraj; McKinney, John D

    2015-01-14

    Nonreplicating and metabolically quiescent bacteria are implicated in latent tuberculosis infections and relapses following "sterilizing" chemotherapy. However, evidence linking bacterial dormancy and persistence in vivo is largely inconclusive. Here we measure the single-cell dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication and ribosomal activity using quantitative time-lapse microscopy and a reporter of ribosomal RNA gene expression. Single-cell dynamics exhibit heterogeneity under standard growth conditions, which is amplified by stressful conditions such as nutrient limitation, stationary phase, intracellular replication, and growth in mouse lungs. Additionally, the lungs of chronically infected mice harbor a subpopulation of nongrowing but metabolically active bacteria, which are absent in mice lacking interferon-γ, a cytokine essential for antituberculosis immunity. These cryptic bacterial forms are prominent in mice treated with the antituberculosis drug isoniazid, suggesting a role in postchemotherapeutic relapses. Thus, amplification of bacterial phenotypic heterogeneity in response to host immunity and drug pressure may contribute to tuberculosis persistence.

  19. Human amniotic fluid stem cells have a potential to recover ovarian function in mice with chemotherapy-induced sterility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs) may differentiate into multiple cell lineages and thus have a great potential to become a donor cell source for regenerative medicine. The ability of hAFCs to differentiate into germ cell and oocyte-like cells has been previously documented. Herein we report the potential use of hAFCs to help restore follicles in clinical condition involving premature ovarian failure. Results Human amniotic fluid was obtained via amniocentesis, yielding a subpopulation of cloned hAFCs that was able to form embryoid bodies (EBs) and differentiate into three embryonic germ layers. Moreover, culture of EBs in medium containing human follicular fluid (HFF) or a germ cell maturation factor cocktail (FAC), expressed germ cells markers such as BLIMP1, STELLA, DAZL, VASA, STRA8, SCP3, SCP1, and GDF9. Furthermore, one cell line was grown from clone cells transfected with lentivirus-GFP and displaying morphological characteristics of mesenchymal cells, had the ability to restore ovarian morphology following cell injection into the ovaries of mice sterilized by intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide and busulphan. Restored ovaries displayed many follicle-enclosed oocytes at all stages of development, but no oocytes or follicles were observed in sterilized mice whose ovaries had been injected with medium only (control). Notably, identification of GFP-labeled cells and immunostaining with anti–human antigen-specific antibodies demonstrated that grafted hAFCs survived and differentiated into granulosa cells which directed oocyte maturation. Furthermore, labeling of ovarian tissue for anti-Müllerian hormone expression, a functional marker of folliculogenesis, was strong in hAFCs-transplanted ovaries but inexistent in negative controls. Conclusion These findings highlight the possibility of using human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells in regenerative medicine, in particular in the area of reproductive health. PMID:24006896

  20. Concerted Activity of IgG1 Antibodies and IL-4/IL-25-Dependent Effector Cells Trap Helminth Larvae in the Tissues following Vaccination with Defined Secreted Antigens, Providing Sterile Immunity to Challenge Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, James P.; Filbey, Kara J.; Esser-von Bieren, Julia; Camberis, Mali; Schwartz, Christian; Murray, Janice; Reynolds, Lisa A.; Blair, Natalie; Robertson, Elaine; Harcus, Yvonne; Boon, Louis; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Yang, Lihua; Tu, Yizheng; Miller, Mark J.; Voehringer, David; Le Gros, Graham; Harris, Nicola; Maizels, Rick M.

    2015-01-01

    Over 25% of the world's population are infected with helminth parasites, the majority of which colonise the gastrointestinal tract. However, no vaccine is yet available for human use, and mechanisms of protective immunity remain unclear. In the mouse model of Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection, vaccination with excretory-secretory (HES) antigens from adult parasites elicits sterilising immunity. Notably, three purified HES antigens (VAL-1, -2 and -3) are sufficient for effective vaccination. Protection is fully dependent upon specific IgG1 antibodies, but passive transfer confers only partial immunity to infection, indicating that cellular components are also required. Moreover, immune mice show greater cellular infiltration associated with trapping of larvae in the gut wall prior to their maturation. Intra-vital imaging of infected intestinal tissue revealed a four-fold increase in extravasation by LysM+GFP+ myeloid cells in vaccinated mice, and the massing of these cells around immature larvae. Mice deficient in FcRγ chain or C3 complement component remain fully immune, suggesting that in the presence of antibodies that directly neutralise parasite molecules, the myeloid compartment may attack larvae more quickly and effectively. Immunity to challenge infection was compromised in IL-4Rα- and IL-25-deficient mice, despite levels of specific antibody comparable to immune wild-type controls, while deficiencies in basophils, eosinophils or mast cells or CCR2-dependent inflammatory monocytes did not diminish immunity. Finally, we identify a suite of previously uncharacterised heat-labile vaccine antigens with homologs in human and veterinary parasites that together promote full immunity. Taken together, these data indicate that vaccine-induced immunity to intestinal helminths involves IgG1 antibodies directed against secreted proteins acting in concert with IL-25-dependent Type 2 myeloid effector populations. PMID:25816012

  1. Picornavirus-Induced Airway Mucosa Immune Profile in Asymptomatic Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Wolsk, Helene M.; Følsgaard, Nilofar V.; Birch, Sune; Brix, Susanne; Hansel, Trevor T.; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Kebadze, Tatiana; Chawes, Bo L.; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bacterial airway colonization is known to alter the airway mucosa immune response in neonates whereas the impact of viruses is unknown. The objective was therefore to examine the effect of respiratory viruses on the immune signature in the airways of asymptomatic neonates. Methods. Nasal aspirates from 571 asymptomatic 1-month-old neonates from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2010 birth cohort were investigated for respiratory viruses. Simultaneously, unstimulated airway mucosal lining fluid was obtained and quantified for levels of 20 immune mediators related to type 1, type 2, type 17, and regulatory immune paths. The association between immune mediator levels and viruses was tested by conventional statistics and partial least square discriminant analysis. Results. Picornaviruses were detected in 58 neonates (10.2%) and other viruses in 10 (1.8%). A general up-regulation of immune mediators was found in the neonates with picornavirus (P < .0001; partial least square discriminant analysis). The association was pronounced for type 1– and type 2–related markers and was unaffected by comprehensive confounder adjustment. Detection of picornavirus and bacteria was associated with an additive general up-regulating effect. Conclusions. Asymptomatic presence of picornavirus in the neonatal airway is a potent activator of the topical immune response. This is relevant to understanding the immune potentiating effect of early life exposure to viruses. PMID:26655299

  2. Inducible viral receptor, A possible concept to induce viral protection in primitive immune animals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A pseudolysogen (PL) is derived from the lysogenic Vibrio harveyi (VH) which is infected with the VHS1 (Vibrio harveyi Siphoviridae-like 1) bacteriophage. The lysogenic Vibrio harveyi undergoes an unequivalent division of the extra-chromosomal VHS1 phage genome and its VH host chromosome and produces a true lysogen (TL) and pseudolysogen (PL). The PL is tolerant to super-infection of VHS1, as is of the true lysogen (TL), but the PL does not contain the VHS1 phage genome while the TL does. However, the PL can become susceptible to VHS1 phage infection if the physiological state of the PL is changed. It is postulated that this is due to a phage receptor molecule which can be inducible to an on-and-off regulation influence by an alternating condition of the bacterial host cell. This characteristic of the PL leads to speculate that this phenomenon can also occur in high organisms with low immunity such as shrimp. This article proposes a hypothesis that the viral receptor molecule on the target cell can play a crucial role in which the invertebrate aquaculture animals can become tolerant to viral infection. A possible mechanism may be that the target cell disrupts the viral receptor molecule to prevent super infection. This concept can explain a mechanism for the prevention of viral infection in invertebrate animals which do not have acquired immunity in response to pathogens. It can guide us to develop a mechanism of immunity to viral infection in low-evolved-immune animals. Also, it can be an additional mechanism that exists in high immune organism, as in human for the prevention of viral infection PMID:21711515

  3. H. hepaticus-induced liver tumor promotion is associated with increased serum bile acid and a persistent microbial-induced immune response

    PubMed Central

    García, Alexis; Zeng, Yu; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Potter, Amanda; Mobley, Melissa W.; Boussahmain, Chakib; Feng, Yan; Wishnok, John S.; Fox, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic microbial infection influence cancer progression but the mechanisms that link them remain unclear. Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates enzymes involved in endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism. CAR activation is a mechanism of xenobiotic tumor promotion, however, the effects of chronic microbial infection on tumor promotion have not been studied in the context of CAR function. Here we report that CAR limits the effects of chronic infection-associated progression of liver cancer. CAR knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) male mice were treated or not with the tumor initiator diethylnitrosamine (DEN) at 5 weeks of age and then orally inoculated with Helicobacter hepaticus (Hh) or sterile media at 8 weeks of age. At 50 weeks postinoculation mice were euthanized for histopathological, microbiological, molecular, and metabolomic analyses. Hh infection induced comparable hepatitis in WT and KO mice with or without DEN that correlated with significant upregulation of Tnfα and toll receptor Tlr2. Notably, DEN-treated Hh-infected KO mice exhibited increased numbers of liver lobes with dysplasia and neoplasia, as well as increased multiplicity of neoplasia, relative to similarly treated WT mice. Enhanced tumor promotion was associated with decreased hepatic expression of P450 enzymes Cyp2b10 and Cyp3a11, increased expression of Camp, and increased serum concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid. Together, our findings suggest that liver tumor promotion is enhanced by an impaired metabolic detoxification of endobiotics and a persistent microbial-induced immune response. PMID:21335546

  4. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen.

  5. Fermentation of non-sterilized fish biomass with a mixed culture of film-forming yeasts and lactobacilli and its effect on innate and adaptive immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shigeaki; Suzuki-Utsunomiya, Kyoko; Komori, Yukako; Kamijo, Akemi; Yumura, Isao; Tanabe, Koudai; Miyawaki, Ayumi; Koga, Kunimasa

    2013-12-01

    Non-sterilized fish waste containing fish bones was fermented using combined starter cultures of film-forming yeast (Candida ethanolica) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB; Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus) in order to obtain a liquefied fermented broth without spoiling. During the entire fermentation, the number of LAB cells was maintained at a high level (6 × 10(8)-5 × 10(7) cells/ml). Although the number of general bacteria was 10(6)cell/ml after adding non-sterilized fish biomass, its growth was suppressed to be 1-3 × 10(4) cells/ml. The entire biomass had completely liquefied and the fermented broth contained all 20 α-amino acids composed of protein and also various kinds of minerals in abundance. The weight of mice group fed the fermented broth content feed (sample feed) for 31 days significantly increased compared with that fed no broth feed (control feed) (21.37 g vs 20.76 g (p < 0.05). No abnormal behavior and appearance were observed. All internal organs (the heart, the liver, the lung, the intestines, and the spleen) of both groups were confirmed to be normal by visual observation. In peripheral blood, the percentages of NK cells and CD8+ T cells of the mice in the sample feed group increased significantly relative to those in the control feed group (NK cells: 19% vs 11%, CD8+ T cells: 9% vs 5%, p < 0.05). In the spleen, the percentage of NK cells in the sample feed group also increased significantly compared to that in the control feed group (p < 0.05). The fermented fish biomass is expected to be effective for innate and adaptive immunity and thus fit for animal feed. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Complement is a central mediator of radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and clinical response.

    PubMed

    Surace, Laura; Lysenko, Veronika; Fontana, Andrea Orlando; Cecconi, Virginia; Janssen, Hans; Bicvic, Antonela; Okoniewski, Michal; Pruschy, Martin; Dummer, Reinhard; Neefjes, Jacques; Knuth, Alexander; Gupta, Anurag; van den Broek, Maries

    2015-04-21

    Radiotherapy induces DNA damage and cell death, but recent data suggest that concomitant immune stimulation is an integral part of the therapeutic action of ionizing radiation. It is poorly understood how radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. Here we report that radiotherapy induced tumor cell death and transiently activated complement both in murine and human tumors. The local production of pro-inflammatory anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a was crucial to the tumor response to radiotherapy and concomitant stimulation of tumor-specific immunity. Dexamethasone, a drug frequently given during radiotherapy, limited complement activation and the anti-tumor effects of the immune system. Overall, our findings indicate that anaphylatoxins are key players in radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and the ensuing clinical responses.

  7. Ocular and generalized myasthenia gravis induced by human acetylcholine receptor γ subunit immunization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaorong; Tuzun, Erdem; Li, Jing; Xiao, Tianlin; Saini, Shamsher S; Qi, Huibin; Allman, Windy; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2012-02-01

    HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice develop ocular myasthenia gravis (oMG), which then progresses to generalized MG (gMG) when immunized with the human acetylcholine receptor (H-AChR) α subunit. Because the fetal AChR γ subunit is expressed in adult extraocular muscles, we anticipated that γ subunit immunization would generate an immune response to mouse AChR and induce MG in mice. H-AChR γ subunit immunization in HLA-DQ8 mice induced an autoimmune response to mouse AChR and led to the destruction of AChR in the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) by anti-AChR antibody and complement activation, and it triggered upregulation of AChR gene transcription. Our findings indicate that oMG may be induced by immunity to the AChR γ subunit. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Protective T cell immunity against respiratory syncytial virus is efficiently induced by recombinant BCG

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Susan M.; González, Pablo A.; Cautivo, Kelly M.; Mora, Jorge E.; Leiva, Eduardo D.; Tobar, Hugo E.; Fennelly, Glenn J.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Jacobs, William R.; Riedel, Claudia A.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of childhood hospitalization and a major health burden worldwide. Unfortunately, because of an inefficient immunological memory, RSV infection provides limited immune protection against reinfection. Furthermore, RSV can induce an inadequate Th2-type immune response that causes severe respiratory tract inflammation and obstruction. It is thought that effective RSV clearance requires the induction of balanced Th1-type immunity, involving the activation of IFN-γ-secreting cytotoxic T cells. A recognized inducer of Th1 immunity is Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), which has been used in newborns for decades in several countries as a tuberculosis vaccine. Here, we show that immunization with recombinant BCG strains expressing RSV antigens promotes protective Th1-type immunity against RSV in mice. Activation of RSV-specific T cells producing IFN-γ and IL-2 was efficiently obtained after immunization with recombinant BCG. This type of T cell immunity was protective against RSV challenge and caused a significant reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration in the airways. Furthermore, mice immunized with recombinant BCG showed no weight loss and reduced lung viral loads. These data strongly support recombinant BCG as an efficient vaccine against RSV because of its capacity to promote protective Th1 immunity. PMID:19075247

  9. Hypofractionated Irradiation Has Immune Stimulatory Potential and Induces a Timely Restricted Infiltration of Immune Cells in Colon Cancer Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Benjamin; Rückert, Michael; Weber, Julia; Mayr, Xaver; Derer, Anja; Lotter, Michael; Bert, Christoph; Rödel, Franz; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.

    2017-01-01

    In addition to locally controlling the tumor, hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) particularly aims to activate immune cells in the RT-modified microenvironment. Therefore, we examined whether hypofractionated RT can activate dendritic cells (DCs), induce immune cell infiltration in tumors, and how the chronology of immune cell migration into tumors occurs to gain knowledge for future definition of radiation breaks and inclusion of immunotherapy. Colorectal cancer treatments offer only limited survival benefit, and immunobiological principles for additional therapies need to be explored with preclinical models. The impact of hypofractionated RT on CT26 colon cancer tumor cell death, migration of DCs toward supernatants (SN) of tumor cells, and activation of DCs by SN were analyzed. The subcutaneous tumor of a BALB/c-CT26 mouse model was locally irradiated with 2 × 5 Gy, the tumor volume was monitored, and the infiltration of immune cells in the tumor was determined by flow cytometry daily. Hypofractionated RT induced a mixture of apoptotic and necrotic CT26 cells, which is known to be in particular immunogenic. DCs that migrated toward SN of CT26 cells particularly upregulated the activation markers CD80 and CD86 when in contact with SN of irradiated tumor cells. After hypofractionated RT, the tumor outgrowth was significantly retarded and in the irradiated tumors an increased infiltration of macrophages (CD11bhigh/F4-80+) and DCs (MHC-II+), but only between day 5 and 10 after the first irradiation, takes place. While CD4+ T cells migrated into non-irradiated and irradiated tumors, CD8+ T cells were only found in tumors that had been irradiated and they were highly increased at day 8 after the first irradiation. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells show regular turnover in irradiated and non-irradiated tumors. Tumor cell-specific anti-IgM antibodies were enhanced in the serum of animals with irradiated tumors. We conclude that

  10. Hypofractionated Irradiation Has Immune Stimulatory Potential and Induces a Timely Restricted Infiltration of Immune Cells in Colon Cancer Tumors.

    PubMed

    Frey, Benjamin; Rückert, Michael; Weber, Julia; Mayr, Xaver; Derer, Anja; Lotter, Michael; Bert, Christoph; Rödel, Franz; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2017-01-01

    In addition to locally controlling the tumor, hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) particularly aims to activate immune cells in the RT-modified microenvironment. Therefore, we examined whether hypofractionated RT can activate dendritic cells (DCs), induce immune cell infiltration in tumors, and how the chronology of immune cell migration into tumors occurs to gain knowledge for future definition of radiation breaks and inclusion of immunotherapy. Colorectal cancer treatments offer only limited survival benefit, and immunobiological principles for additional therapies need to be explored with preclinical models. The impact of hypofractionated RT on CT26 colon cancer tumor cell death, migration of DCs toward supernatants (SN) of tumor cells, and activation of DCs by SN were analyzed. The subcutaneous tumor of a BALB/c-CT26 mouse model was locally irradiated with 2 × 5 Gy, the tumor volume was monitored, and the infiltration of immune cells in the tumor was determined by flow cytometry daily. Hypofractionated RT induced a mixture of apoptotic and necrotic CT26 cells, which is known to be in particular immunogenic. DCs that migrated toward SN of CT26 cells particularly upregulated the activation markers CD80 and CD86 when in contact with SN of irradiated tumor cells. After hypofractionated RT, the tumor outgrowth was significantly retarded and in the irradiated tumors an increased infiltration of macrophages (CD11b(high)/F4-80(+)) and DCs (MHC-II(+)), but only between day 5 and 10 after the first irradiation, takes place. While CD4(+) T cells migrated into non-irradiated and irradiated tumors, CD8(+) T cells were only found in tumors that had been irradiated and they were highly increased at day 8 after the first irradiation. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells show regular turnover in irradiated and non-irradiated tumors. Tumor cell-specific anti-IgM antibodies were enhanced in the serum of animals with irradiated tumors. We conclude that

  11. Sterilization of endoscopic instruments.

    PubMed

    Sabnis, Ravindra B; Bhattu, Amit; Vijaykumar, Mohankumar

    2014-03-01

    Sterilization of endoscopic instruments is an important but often ignored topic. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the sterilization of endoscopic instruments and elaborate on the appropriate sterilization practices. Autoclaving is an economic and excellent method of sterilizing the instruments that are not heat sensitive. Heat sensitive instruments may get damaged with hot sterilization methods. Several new endoscopic instruments such as flexible ureteroscopes, chip on tip endoscopes, are added in urologists armamentarium. Many of these instruments are heat sensitive and hence alternative efficacious methods of sterilization are necessary. Although ethylene oxide and hydrogen peroxide are excellent methods of sterilization, they have some drawbacks. Gamma irradiation is mainly for disposable items. Various chemical agents are widely used even though they achieve high-level disinfection rather than sterilization. This article reviews various methods of endoscopic instrument sterilization with their advantages and drawbacks. If appropriate sterilization methods are adopted, then it not only will protect patients from procedure-related infections but prevent hypersensitive allergic reactions. It will also protect instruments from damage and increase its longevity.

  12. Another look at sterilization.

    PubMed

    Willson, P D

    1977-03-01

    R.T. Ravenhol, Director of Office of Population at the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID), reports that voluntary sterilization is currently the foremost means of fertility control in the world. According to AID estimates, 65,000,000 couples had chosen voluntary sterilization by the end of 1975. In order to expand its support for voluntary sterilization, AID wants to offer more of its resources to services, equipment, biomedical research, physician training, and public education. The International Project of the Association for Voluntary Sterilization has been most active in the provision of voluntary sterilization. Funded by AID it has spent over $6 million on voluntary sterilization services, equipment, physician training, and conferences in over 50 countries since it was established in 1972. There is concern that the current acceptance of voluntary sterilization maybe jeopardized by lack of understanding about and sensitivity to sterilization's use. Voluntary and compulsory sterilization are at opposite ends of a spectrum, and for those involved in family planning in developing countries, there is the question of whether there is really massive demand for voluntary sterilization in developing countries and whether sterilization is truly voluntary. There has also been concern about voluntarism and informed consent in the U.S. domestic programs, and this has affected international projects. To stress the importance of voluntarism, AID contracts and grants, effective 1977, must include an extensive statement regarding voluntarism to ensure compliance with the court decision prohibiting federally funded sterilizations for minors and mental or legal incompetents. Additionally, AID contracts must require documented informed consent, and individuals choosing sterilizations need to receive a description of the risks and benefits as well as a statement that the procedure is irreversible.

  13. Effect of Scoparia dulcis on noise stress induced adaptive immunity and cytokine response in immunized Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sundareswaran, Loganathan; Srinivasan, Sakthivel; Wankhar, Wankupar; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy

    Noise acts as a stressor and is reported to have impact on individual health depending on nature, type, intensity and perception. Modern medicine has no effective drugs or cure to prevent its consequences. Being an environmental stressor noise cannot be avoided; instead minimizing its exposure or consuming anti-stressor and adaptogens from plants can be considered. The present study was carried out to evaluate the anti-stressor, adaptogen and immunostimulatory activity of Scoparia dulcis against noise-induced stress in Wistar rat models. Noise stress in rats was created by broadband white noise generator, 100 dB A/4 h daily/15 days and S. dulcis (200 mg/kg b.w.) was administered orally. 8 groups of rats were used consisting of 6 animals each; 4 groups for unimmunized and 4 groups for immunized. For immunization, sheep red blood cells (5 × 10(9) cells/ml) were injected intraperitoneally. Sub-acute noise exposed rats showed a significant increase in corticosterone and IL-4 levels in both immunized and unimmunized rats whereas lymphocytes, antibody titration, soluble immune complex, IL-4 showed a marked increase with a significant decrease in IL-2, TNF-α, IFN-γ cytokines only in unimmunized rats. Immunized noise exposed rats presented increased leukocyte migration index and decreased foot pad thickness, IL-2, TNF-α, IFN-γ with no changes in the lymphocytes. S. dulcis (SD) has normalized and prevented the noise induced changes in cell-mediated and humoral immunity and it could be the presence of anti-stressor and immuno stimulant activity of the plant. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Impaired toll like receptor-7 and 9 induced immune activation in chronic spinal cord injured patients contributes to immune dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Bilgi; Kahraman, Tamer; Gursel, Mayda; Yilmaz, Bilge

    2017-01-01

    Reduced immune activation or immunosuppression is seen in patients withneurological diseases. Urinary and respiratory infections mainly manifested as septicemia and pneumonia are the most frequent complications following spinal cord injuries and they account for the majority of deaths. The underlying reason of these losses is believed to arise due to impaired immune responses to pathogens. Here, we hypothesized that susceptibility to infections of chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients might be due to impairment in recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns and subsequently declining innate and adaptive immune responses that lead to immune dysfunction. We tested our hypothesis on healthy and chronic SCI patients with a level of injury above T-6. Donor PBMCs were isolated and stimulated with different toll like receptor ligands and T-cell inducers aiming to investigate whether chronic SCI patients display differential immune activation to multiple innate and adaptive immune cell stimulants. We demonstrate that SCI patients' B-cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cells retain their functionality in response to TLR7 and TLR9 ligand stimulation as they secreted similar levels of IL6 and IFNα. The immune dysfunction is not probably due to impaired T-cell function, since neither CD4+ T-cell dependent IFNγ producing cell number nor IL10 producing regulatory T-cells resulted different outcomes in response to PMA-Ionomycin and PHA-LPS stimulation, respectively. We showed that TLR7 dependent IFNγ and IP10 levels and TLR9 mediated APC function reduced substantially in SCI patients compared to healthy subjects. More importantly, IP10 producing monocytes were significantly fewer compared to healthy subjects in response to TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation of SCI PBMCs. When taken together this work implicated that these defects could contribute to persistent complications due to increased susceptibility to infections of chronic SCI patients. PMID:28170444

  15. Tumor Presence Induces Global Immune Changes and Enhances Nanoparticle Clearance.

    PubMed

    Kai, Marc P; Brighton, Hailey E; Fromen, Catherine A; Shen, Tammy W; Luft, J Christopher; Luft, Yancey E; Keeler, Amanda W; Robbins, Gregory R; Ting, Jenny P Y; Zamboni, William C; Bear, James E; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2016-01-26

    Long-circulating nanoparticles are essential for increasing tumor accumulation to provide therapeutic efficacy. While it is known that tumor presence can alter the immune system, very few studies have explored this impact on nanoparticle circulation. In this report, we demonstrate how the presence of a tumor can change the local and global immune system, which dramatically increases particle clearance. We found that tumor presence significantly increased clearance of PRINT hydrogel nanoparticles from the circulation, resulting in increased accumulation in the liver and spleen, due to an increase in M2-like macrophages. Our findings highlight the need to better understand interactions between immune status and nanoparticle clearance, and suggest that further consideration of immune function is required for success in preclinical and clinical nanoparticle studies.

  16. BCG-induced protection: effects on innate immune memory.

    PubMed

    Netea, Mihai G; van Crevel, Reinout

    2014-12-01

    The Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine is the only vaccine proved to be effective against tuberculosis and it remains the most commonly used vaccine worldwide. In addition to its effects on mycobacterial diseases, an increasing body of epidemiological evidence accumulated since its introduction in 1921 shows that BCG also exerts beneficial non-specific effects ranging from protection against non-mycobacterial diseases, decreased incidence of allergic diseases, and treatment of certain malignancies. The biological substrate of these effects is mediated partly by heterologous effects on adaptive immunity, but also on the potentiation of innate immune responses through epigenetic mechanisms, a process termed 'trained immunity'. The process of trained immunity may also play a role in the beneficial effects of BCG against tuberculosis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and this could have important consequences for our quest for improving vaccination strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Block Copolymers Have Differing Adjuvant Effects on the Primary Immune Response Elicited by Genetic Immunization and on Further Induced Allergy▿

    PubMed Central

    Adel-Patient, Karine; Pothelune, Laetitia; Ah-Leung, Sandrine; Wal, Jean-Michel; Créminon, Christophe; Chatel, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Block copolymers were recently used to promote gene delivery in various tissues. Using a plasmid encoding a food allergen, bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG), we studied the effects of block copolymers on gene expression levels and primary immune response and on further induced allergy. Block copolymers (i.e., Tetronic 304, 908, and 1107) and various quantities of DNA were injected into the tibialis muscles of BALB/c mice. The BLG levels in injected muscle and the BLG-specific induced immune response were analyzed after injection. DNA-immunized mice were further experimentally sensitized with BLG, and the effects of block copolymer and DNA doses on allergic sensitization and elicitation were compared. Tetronic 304 induced a 12-fold increase in BLG production, while Tetronic 1107 increased the duration of BLG expression. Different Th1 primary specific immune responses were observed, either strong humoral and cellular (304), only cellular (1107), or weak cellular and humoral (908) responses. After BLG sensitization, increased BLG-specific IgG2a production was observed in all groups of mice independently of the presence and nature of the block copolymer. Increased BLG-specific IgG1 production was also detected after sensitization, except with Tetronic 1107. Compared with naked DNA, Tetronic 304 was the only block polymer that decreased BLG-specific IgE concentrations. However, after allergen challenge, Tetronic 1107 was the only block copolymer to reduce eosinophils and Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Tetronic 304 amplified local inflammation. Each block copolymer elicited a different immune response, although always Th1 specific, in BALB/c mice. PMID:19923567

  18. Block copolymers have differing adjuvant effects on the primary immune response elicited by genetic immunization and on further induced allergy.

    PubMed

    Adel-Patient, Karine; Pothelune, Laetitia; Ah-Leung, Sandrine; Wal, Jean-Michel; Créminon, Christophe; Chatel, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Block copolymers were recently used to promote gene delivery in various tissues. Using a plasmid encoding a food allergen, bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), we studied the effects of block copolymers on gene expression levels and primary immune response and on further induced allergy. Block copolymers (i.e., Tetronic 304, 908, and 1107) and various quantities of DNA were injected into the tibialis muscles of BALB/c mice. The BLG levels in injected muscle and the BLG-specific induced immune response were analyzed after injection. DNA-immunized mice were further experimentally sensitized with BLG, and the effects of block copolymer and DNA doses on allergic sensitization and elicitation were compared. Tetronic 304 induced a 12-fold increase in BLG production, while Tetronic 1107 increased the duration of BLG expression. Different Th1 primary specific immune responses were observed, either strong humoral and cellular (304), only cellular (1107), or weak cellular and humoral (908) responses. After BLG sensitization, increased BLG-specific IgG2a production was observed in all groups of mice independently of the presence and nature of the block copolymer. Increased BLG-specific IgG1 production was also detected after sensitization, except with Tetronic 1107. Compared with naked DNA, Tetronic 304 was the only block polymer that decreased BLG-specific IgE concentrations. However, after allergen challenge, Tetronic 1107 was the only block copolymer to reduce eosinophils and Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Tetronic 304 amplified local inflammation. Each block copolymer elicited a different immune response, although always Th1 specific, in BALB/c mice.

  19. Ciprofloxacin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia: No cross-reactivity with gemifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Sim, D W; Yu, J E; Jeong, J; Koh, Y-I

    2017-08-08

    Fluoroquinolone-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia is uncommon, and no reports of cross-reactivity among fluoroquinolones exist. Here, we describe a case of ciprofloxacin-induced immune thrombocytopenia with no cross-reactivity with gemifloxacin. A 77-year-old woman showed profound thrombocytopenia immediately after two ciprofloxacin injections for pneumonia. Platelet counts recovered rapidly after ciprofloxacin discontinuation. She had experienced thrombocytopenia after ciprofloxacin administration 4 years earlier, which was assumed to be ciprofloxacin-induced immune-related. Interestingly, no thrombocytopenia occurred following the subsequent exposure to another fluoroquinolone, gemifloxacin. No cross-reactivity occurred between ciprofloxacin and gemifloxacin in this fluoroquinolone-induced immune thrombocytopenia case. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Intranasal DNA Vaccination Induces Potent Mucosal and Systemic Immune Responses and Cross-protective Immunity Against Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Torrieri-Dramard, Lea; Lambrecht, Bénédicte; Ferreira, Helena Lage; Van den Berg, Thierry; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    The induction of potent virus-specific immune responses at mucosal surfaces where virus transmission occurs is a major challenge for vaccination strategies. In the case of influenza vaccination, this has been achieved only by intranasal delivery of live-attenuated vaccines that otherwise pose safety problems. Here, we demonstrate that potent mucosal and systemic immune responses, both cellular and humoral, are induced by intranasal immunization using formulated DNA. We show that formulation with the DNA carrier polyethylenimine (PEI) improved by a 1,000-fold the efficiency of gene transfer in the respiratory track following intranasal administration of luciferase-coding DNA. Using PEI formulation, intranasal vaccination with DNA-encoding hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza A H5N1 or (H1N1)2009 viruses induced high levels of HA-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies that were detected in bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) and the serum. No mucosal responses could be detected after parenteral or intranasal immunization with naked-DNA. Furthermore, intranasal DNA vaccination with HA from a given H5N1 virus elicited full protection against the parental strain and partial cross-protection against a distinct highly pathogenic H5N1 strain that could be improved by adding neuraminidase (NA) DNA plasmids. Our observations warrant further investigation of intranasal DNA as an effective vaccination route. PMID:20959813

  1. Fecundity compensation and tolerance to a sterilizing pathogen in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Vale, P F; Little, T J

    2012-09-01

    Hosts are armed with several lines of defence in the battle against parasites: they may prevent the establishment of infection, reduce parasite growth once infected or persevere through mechanisms that reduce the damage caused by infection, called tolerance. Studies on tolerance in animals have focused on mortality, and sterility tolerance has not been investigated experimentally. Here, we tested for genetic variation in the multiple steps of defence when the invertebrate Daphnia magna is infected with the sterilizing bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa: anti-infection resistance, anti-growth resistance and the ability to tolerate sterilization once infected. When exposed to nine doses of a genetically diverse pathogen inoculum, six host genotypes varied in their average susceptibility to infection and in their parasite loads once infected. How host fecundity changed with increasing parasite loads did not vary between genotypes, indicating that there was no genetic variation for this measure of fecundity tolerance. However, genotypes differed in their level of fecundity compensation under infection, and we discuss how, by increasing host fitness without targeting parasite densities, fecundity compensation is consistent with the functional definition of tolerance. Such infection-induced life-history shifts are not traditionally considered to be part of the immune response, but may crucially reduce harm (in terms of fitness loss) caused by disease, and are a distinct source of selection on pathogens.

  2. Fecundity compensation and tolerance to a sterilizing pathogen in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Vale, P F; Little, T J

    2012-01-01

    Hosts are armed with several lines of defence in the battle against parasites: they may prevent the establishment of infection, reduce parasite growth once infected or persevere through mechanisms that reduce the damage caused by infection, called tolerance. Studies on tolerance in animals have focused on mortality, and sterility tolerance has not been investigated experimentally. Here, we tested for genetic variation in the multiple steps of defence when the invertebrate Daphnia magna is infected with the sterilizing bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa: anti-infection resistance, anti-growth resistance and the ability to tolerate sterilization once infected. When exposed to nine doses of a genetically diverse pathogen inoculum, six host genotypes varied in their average susceptibility to infection and in their parasite loads once infected. How host fecundity changed with increasing parasite loads did not vary between genotypes, indicating that there was no genetic variation for this measure of fecundity tolerance. However, genotypes differed in their level of fecundity compensation under infection, and we discuss how, by increasing host fitness without targeting parasite densities, fecundity compensation is consistent with the functional definition of tolerance. Such infection-induced life-history shifts are not traditionally considered to be part of the immune response, but may crucially reduce harm (in terms of fitness loss) caused by disease, and are a distinct source of selection on pathogens. PMID:22856460

  3. New sterilization technologies alternative to ethylene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizian, Maryam; Lerouge, Sophie; Debrie, Anne; Yahia, L'Hocine

    1997-06-01

    Sterilization of biomedical devices may induce bulk and surface modification, responsible for the decrease or loss of their biofunctionality. Pure ethylene oxide (EO) at low temperature and new alternative techniques such as cold gas plasma sterilization have been developed for heat-sensitive polymers. There is a lack of the knowledge concerning their safety in terms of materials damage and consequences on the biofunctionality of sterilized devices. The objective of our work consists in studying bulk and surface changes in biomedical devices induced by these two sterilization techniques. Samples from PVC, Polyurethane, Polyacrylate and Polyethylene-based medical devices are subjected to 1, 5, and 10 sterilization cycles by Steri-Vac-3M (pure EO), Sterrad-100$TM, J&J (gas plasma + H2O2), and studied by X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy. Preliminary results show an increasing in Oxygen/Carbon ratio by a factor of 1.3 to 4.4 between the first and tenth cycle indicating the surface oxidation by gas plasma sterilization processes. Some changes in C-C chemical bounding are associated with EO sterilization.

  4. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific.

  5. Inducing a humoral immune response to pancreatic cancer antigen.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Michael; Seifert, Gabriel; Wolff-Vorbeck, Guido; Langenmair, Elia; Hopt, Ulrich T; Wittel, Uwe A

    2016-12-01

    Patients with pancreatic carcinoma have a grim prognosis. Here, we examine the induction of an in vitro antibody response of human B cells to pancreatic carcinoma antigens. Cells of five cultured pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma lines were lysed and their plasma membrane fragments isolated in an aqueous two-phase-system. The plasma membrane fragments were then added to cultures of isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers for 14 days to act as a tumor antigen. Also, we added combinations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-21, anti-CD40 mAb and varying protein concentrations of the plasma membrane fragments to these cultures. We then tested characteristics and binding of resulting IgG and IgM against aforementioned tumor plasma membrane fragments and their respective cells using ELISAs. The combination of IL-2, IL-4 and anti-CD40 mAb elicited IgM production showing significant binding (p<0.05) to plasma membrane fragments. PANC-1 antigen and the combination of IL-4, IL-21 and anti-CD40 mAb was able to produce a significant and specific IgG formation against PANC-1 plasma membrane fragments (p<0.05). Tumor antigen, interleukins and anti-CD40 mAb had a significant impact on the binding capacity of these antibodies (p<0.05). IgG binding pancreatic carcinoma cells was observed when the tumor antigen concentration was increased during stimulation (p<0.05). BxPC3 plasma membrane fragments showed inhibitory effects on IgG binding BxPC3 antigens (p<0.05). A human anti-tumor antibody formation can be induced in vitro using PANC-1 antigens and B cell stimulating agents. This response has the potential to generate antibodies specific to PANC-1 antigens. PRéCIS: The concept presented is novel and a promising approach to eliciting a specific B cell response to tumor antigen. The method may prove useful in understanding and developing anti-tumor immunity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Sterilization of women].

    PubMed

    Hirsch, H A

    1984-09-01

    Voluntary sterilization is a permanent method of contraception. Therefore medical counseling of patients desiring sterilization is of utmost importance and should include documented incidence of failure (i.e., pregancy), complication risks, and if necessary, the various factors influencing successful reversal, although it should be emphasized that reversal can never be guaranteed. Laproscopic sterilization has proven very successful. Comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of the most used methods appears in Table 7. The most commonly used method is bipolar electrocoagulation in the isthmic tubal section. Unipolar electrocoagulation should not be used. Hysterectomy is too major an operation to be used solely for sterilization purposes, and is indicated only when other procedures have been eliminated. Pregnancy in failed sterilizations is approximately 8-10/1000 using the current methods, and an overwhelming number of these pregnancies are extrauterine. The rate of complications is lowest in laparoscopic interval sterilizations using local anesthesia. Approximately 1% of sterilized women desired reversal, despite preoperative counseling. The success rate of reversal is most favorable when the sterilization was perfomed in the isthmic tubal section with little destruction of tissue (by the clip method), the tubal segments are long, and the time since sterilization is less than 5 years. Reversal is not possible after fimbriectomy.

  7. Do entheogen-induced mystical experiences boost the immune system? Psychedelics, peak experiences, and wellness.

    PubMed

    Roberts, T B

    1999-01-01

    Daily events that boost the immune system (as indicated by levels of salivary immunoglobulin A), some instances of spontaneous remission, and mystical experiences seem to share a similar cluster of thoughts, feelings, moods, perceptions, and behaviors. Entheogens--psychedelic drugs used in a religious context--can also produce mystical experiences (peak experiences, states of unitive consciousness, intense primary religious experiences) with the same cluster of effects. When this happens, is it also possible that such entheogen-induced mystical experiences strengthen the immune system? Might spontaneous remissions occur more frequently under such conditions? This article advances the so called "Emxis hypothesis"--that entheogen-induced mystical experiences influence the immune system.

  8. RNA Interference-Induced Innate Immunity, Off-Target Effect, or Immune Adjuvant?

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhongji; Lu, Mengji

    2017-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural cellular mechanism that inhibits gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. In the last decade, RNAi has become a cornerstone in basic biological systems research and drug development efforts. The RNAi-based manipulation of mammalian cells facilitates target identification and validation; assists in identifying human disease etiologies; and expedites the development of treatments for infectious diseases, cancer, and other conditions. Several RNAi-based approaches are currently undergoing assessment in phase I and II clinical trials. However, RNAi-associated immune stimulation might act as a hurdle to safe and effective RNAi, particularly in clinical applications. The induction of innate immunity may originate from small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequence-dependent delivery vehicles and even the RNAi process itself. However, in the case of antagonistic cancers and viral infection, immune activation is beneficial; thus, immunostimulatory small interfering RNAs were designed to create bifunctional small molecules with RNAi and immunostimulatory activities. This review summarizes the research studies of RNAi-associated immune stimulation and the approaches for manipulating immunostimulatory activities. PMID:28386261

  9. Tumor-induced perturbations of cytokines and immune cell networks.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Brett; Huang, Ren-Yu; Burgess, Rob; Luo, Shuhong; Jones, Valerie Sloane; Zhang, Wenji; Lv, Zhi-Qiang; Gao, Chang-Yu; Wang, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2014-04-01

    Until recently, the intrinsically high level of cross-talk between immune cells, the complexity of immune cell development, and the pleiotropic nature of cytokine signaling have hampered progress in understanding the mechanisms of immunosuppression by which tumor cells circumvent native and adaptive immune responses. One technology that has helped to shed light on this complex signaling network is the cytokine antibody array, which facilitates simultaneous screening of dozens to hundreds of secreted signal proteins in complex biological samples. The combined applications of traditional methods of molecular and cell biology with the high-content, high-throughput screening capabilities of cytokine antibody arrays and other multiplexed immunoassays have revealed a complex mechanism that involves multiple cytokine signals contributed not just by tumor cells but by stromal cells and a wide spectrum of immune cell types. This review will summarize the interactions among cancerous and immune cell types, as well as the key cytokine signals that are required for tumors to survive immunoediting in a dormant state or to grow and spread by escaping it. Additionally, it will present examples of how probing secreted cell-cell signal networks in the tumor microenvironment (TME) with cytokine screens have contributed to our current understanding of these processes and discuss the implications of this understanding to antitumor therapies. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Stress-induced immune changes in the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, Arnaud; Malham, Shelagh K; Gélébart, Florence; Cueff, Anne; Poulet, Serge A

    2002-01-01

    Information concerning the effect of stress on invertebrate immune functions are scarce. The present study investigated the consequences of a 15-min mechanical disturbance on immune parameters in oysters Crassostrea gigas. As indicated by noradrenaline and dopamine measurements, the mechanical disturbance caused a transient state of stress in oysters. The number of circulating hemocytes, the migratory and phagocytic activities and reactive oxygen species production of hemocytes were measured before, during and after application of the stressor. Results show that all immune functions were significantly downregulated during stress and a transient period of immunostimulation was observed 30-240 min after the end of the disturbance. Taken together, these results suggest that stress can exert a profound influence on oyster immune functions and they may explain why stress and the outbreak of disease are often linked in shellfish culture. Furthermore, the present study strongly suggests that checking the stress status of animals may be necessary to avoid biases when studying oyster immune responses in vivo.

  11. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses.

  12. Utility of Clostridium difficile toxin B for inducing anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tuxiong; Li, Shan; Li, Guangchao; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Haiying; Shi, Lianfa; Perez-Cordon, Gregorio; Mao, Li; Wang, Xiaoning; Wang, Jufang; Feng, Hanping

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin B (TcdB) is a key virulence factor of bacterium and induces intestinal inflammatory disease. Because of its potent cytotoxic and proinflammatory activities, we investigated the utility of TcdB in developing anti-tumor immunity. TcdB induced cell death in mouse colorectal cancer CT26 cells, and the intoxicated cells stimulated the activation of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and subsequent T cell activation in vitro. Immunization of BALB/c mice with toxin-treated CT26 cells elicited potent anti-tumor immunity that protected mice from a lethal challenge of the same tumor cells and rejected pre-injected tumors. The anti-tumor immunity generated was cell-mediated, long-term, and tumor-specific. Further experiments demonstrated that the intact cell bodies were important for the immunogenicity since lysing the toxin-treated tumor cells reduced their ability to induce antitumor immunity. Finally, we showed that TcdB is able to induce potent anti-tumor immunity in B16-F10 melanoma model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the utility of C. difficile toxin B for developing anti-tumor immunity.

  13. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. PMID:21631497

  14. A Nonintegrative Lentiviral Vector-Based Vaccine Provides Long-Term Sterile Protection against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Coutant, Frédéric; Sanchez David, Raul Yusef; Félix, Tristan; Boulay, Aude; Caleechurn, Laxmee; Souque, Philippe; Thouvenot, Catherine; Bourgouin, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Trials testing the RTS,S candidate malaria vaccine and radiation-attenuated sporozoites (RAS) have shown that protective immunity against malaria can be induced and that an effective vaccine is not out of reach. However, longer-term protection and higher protection rates are required to eradicate malaria from the endemic regions. It implies that there is still a need to explore new vaccine strategies. Lentiviral vectors are very potent at inducing strong immunological memory. However their integrative status challenges their safety profile. Eliminating the integration step obviates the risk of insertional oncogenesis. Providing they confer sterile immunity, nonintegrative lentiviral vectors (NILV) hold promise as mass pediatric vaccine by meeting high safety standards. In this study, we have assessed the protective efficacy of NILV against malaria in a robust pre-clinical model. Mice were immunized with NILV encoding Plasmodium yoelii Circumsporozoite Protein (Py CSP) and challenged with sporozoites one month later. In two independent protective efficacy studies, 50% (37.5–62.5) of the animals were fully protected (p = 0.0072 and p = 0.0008 respectively when compared to naive mice). The remaining mice with detectable parasitized red blood cells exhibited a prolonged patency and reduced parasitemia. Moreover, protection was long-lasting with 42.8% sterile protection six months after the last immunization (p = 0.0042). Post-challenge CD8+ T cells to CSP, in contrast to anti-CSP antibodies, were associated with protection (r = −0.6615 and p = 0.0004 between the frequency of IFN-g secreting specific T cells in spleen and parasitemia). However, while NILV and RAS immunizations elicited comparable immunity to CSP, only RAS conferred 100% of sterile protection. Given that a better protection can be anticipated from a multi-antigen vaccine and an optimized vector design, NILV appear as a promising malaria vaccine. PMID:23133649

  15. Metabolic mechanisms of cancer-induced inhibition of immune responses.

    PubMed

    Viola, Antonella; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-08-01

    During progression, tumors become refractory to the offensive weapons of the immune system. It has been known for a long time that the tumor microenvironment presents a profound modification in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and amino acids such as l-triptophan and l-arginine. However, only in the last decade we have started to appreciate how these changes might cause dysfunctions in cells of both adaptive and innate immune system. The knowledge of these complex and partially interconnected metabolic pathways is offering new targets for an integrated pharmacological approach aiming at freeing tumor-specific T lymphocytes from the latches of cancer influence.

  16. Sterilization. Disciplined microbial control.

    PubMed

    Miller, C H

    1991-04-01

    The goal of instrument processing is to protect patients by preventing cross-contamination from instruments. The processing involves a series of sequential steps aimed at removing and killing microbes on contaminated instruments and maintaining those instruments in an aseptic state until they are reused. These steps must be conducted carefully to assure success and to reduce chances of disease spread or physical injury to those handling the contaminated instruments. Presoaking begins the cleaning process and facilitates terminal cleaning by ultrasonic or manual scrubbing. If instruments are not properly cleaned, subsequent sterilization may be jeopardized by insulation of blood- or saliva-coated microbes from the sterilizing agent. Items that would be destroyed by heat should be cleaned and sterilized in a properly prepared glutaraldehyde solution. Cleaned instruments must be packaged prior to heat sterilization to protect them from recontamination after sterilization and before reuse. Sterilization of cleaned, packaged instruments in steam, chemical vapor, or dry heat sterilizers must involve proper loading, processing, drying, and cooling. Routine use of spore tests and chemical indicators will provide quality assessment of packaging procedures and operation of the sterilizer, as well as assist in identifying processed packages during distribution. Using the results of sterilization monitoring to adjust procedures as a means of assuring sterilization provides quality assurance to the office staff and to the patients that the instruments have been properly processed. Carefully handling storage and distribution of the sterilized instrument packs or trays reduces the chances for recontamination until the instruments are reused. Instrument processing is a major part of the office infection control program. It must be performed in a controlled manner with proper monitoring to achieve the desired outcome of patient protection.

  17. Perturbation of gut bacteria induces a coordinated cellular immune response in the purple sea urchin larva.

    PubMed

    Ch Ho, Eric; Buckley, Katherine M; Schrankel, Catherine S; Schuh, Nicholas W; Hibino, Taku; Solek, Cynthia M; Bae, Koeun; Wang, Guizhi; Rast, Jonathan P

    2016-10-01

    The purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) genome sequence contains a complex repertoire of genes encoding innate immune recognition proteins and homologs of important vertebrate immune regulatory factors. To characterize how this immune system is deployed within an experimentally tractable, intact animal, we investigate the immune capability of the larval stage. Sea urchin embryos and larvae are morphologically simple and transparent, providing an organism-wide model to view immune response at cellular resolution. Here we present evidence for immune function in five mesenchymal cell types based on morphology, behavior and gene expression. Two cell types are phagocytic; the others interact at sites of microbial detection or injury. We characterize immune-associated gene markers for three cell types, including a perforin-like molecule, a scavenger receptor, a complement-like thioester-containing protein and the echinoderm-specific immune response factor 185/333. We elicit larval immune responses by (1) bacterial injection into the blastocoel and (2) seawater exposure to the marine bacterium Vibrio diazotrophicus to perturb immune state in the gut. Exposure at the epithelium induces a strong response in which pigment cells (one type of immune cell) migrate from the ectoderm to interact with the gut epithelium. Bacteria that accumulate in the gut later invade the blastocoel, where they are cleared by phagocytic and granular immune cells. The complexity of this coordinated, dynamic inflammatory program within the simple larval morphology provides a system in which to characterize processes that direct both aspects of the echinoderm-specific immune response as well as those that are shared with other deuterostomes, including vertebrates.

  18. Perturbation of gut bacteria induces a coordinated cellular immune response in the purple sea urchin larva

    PubMed Central

    CH Ho, Eric; Buckley, Katherine M; Schrankel, Catherine S; Schuh, Nicholas W; Hibino, Taku; Solek, Cynthia M; Bae, Koeun; Wang, Guizhi; Rast, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    The purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) genome sequence contains a complex repertoire of genes encoding innate immune recognition proteins and homologs of important vertebrate immune regulatory factors. To characterize how this immune system is deployed within an experimentally tractable, intact animal, we investigate the immune capability of the larval stage. Sea urchin embryos and larvae are morphologically simple and transparent, providing an organism-wide model to view immune response at cellular resolution. Here we present evidence for immune function in five mesenchymal cell types based on morphology, behavior and gene expression. Two cell types are phagocytic; the others interact at sites of microbial detection or injury. We characterize immune-associated gene markers for three cell types, including a perforin-like molecule, a scavenger receptor, a complement-like thioester-containing protein and the echinoderm-specific immune response factor 185/333. We elicit larval immune responses by (1) bacterial injection into the blastocoel and (2) seawater exposure to the marine bacterium Vibrio diazotrophicus to perturb immune state in the gut. Exposure at the epithelium induces a strong response in which pigment cells (one type of immune cell) migrate from the ectoderm to interact with the gut epithelium. Bacteria that accumulate in the gut later invade the blastocoel, where they are cleared by phagocytic and granular immune cells. The complexity of this coordinated, dynamic inflammatory program within the simple larval morphology provides a system in which to characterize processes that direct both aspects of the echinoderm-specific immune response as well as those that are shared with other deuterostomes, including vertebrates. PMID:27192936

  19. Non-Mendelian Female Sterility in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER: Influence of Aging and Thermic Treatments. III. Cumulative Effects Induced by These Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bucheton, Alain

    1979-01-01

    Crosses between various strains of Drosophila melanogaster may give rise to a female sterility of non-Mendelian determination. Reduced fertility is observed in females, known as SF females, bred from crosses between females of "reactive" strains and males of "inducer" strains. The reduced fertility of the SF females is the result of an interaction between an extrachromosomal property, the reactivity, and a chromosomal factor, I. The extrachromosomal property varies considerably in its ability to reduce fertility. The fertility reduction of the SF females corresponds to what is known as the reactivity level of their reactive mothers. Two nongenetic factors can modify the level of reactivity: aging and temperature. The action of aging is cumulative. When the flies of a reactive strain are submitted at each generation to the action of this factor, the level of reactivity of this strain is gradually modified. The modifications induced are reversible. Indeed, when such a modified strain is returned to standard breeding conditions, the reactivity returns progressively to its initial level. The effect of thermic treatments also seems to be cumulative and reversible. PMID:121289

  20. Genetic Immunization With In Vivo Dendritic Cell-targeting Liposomal DNA Vaccine Carrier Induces Long-lasting Antitumor Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Garu, Arup; Moku, Gopikrishna; Gulla, Suresh Kumar; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2016-01-01

    A major limiting factor retarding the clinical success of dendritic cell (DC)-based genetic immunizations (DNA vaccination) is the scarcity of biologically safe and effective carrier systems for targeting the antigen-encoded DNA vaccines to DCs under in vivo settings. Herein, we report on a potent, mannose receptor selective in vivo DC-targeting liposomes of a novel cationic amphiphile with mannose-mimicking shikimoyl head-group. Flow cytometric experiments with cells isolated from draining lymph nodes of mice s.c. immunized with lipoplexes of pGFP plasmid (model DNA vaccine) using anti-CD11c antibody-labeled magnetic beads revealed in vivo DC-targeting properties of the presently described liposomal DNA vaccine carrier. Importantly, s.c. immunizations of mice with electrostatic complex of the in vivo DC-targeting liposome and melanoma antigen-encoded DNA vaccine (p-CMV-MART1) induced long-lasting antimelanoma immune response (100 days post melanoma tumor challenge) with remarkable memory response (more than 6 months after the second tumor challenge). The presently described direct in vivo DC-targeting liposomal DNA vaccine carrier is expected to find future exploitations toward designing effective vaccines for various infectious diseases and cancers. PMID:26666450

  1. Influenza-induced innate immunity: regulators of viral replication, respiratory tract pathology & adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Oslund, Karen L; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Influenza virus infections usually cause mild to moderately severe respiratory disease, however some infections, like those involving the avian H5N1 virus, can cause massive viral pneumonia, systemic disease and death. The innate immune response of respiratory tract resident cells is the first line of defense and limits virus replication. Enhanced cytokine and chemokine production following infection, however, appears to underlie much of the pathology that develops after infection with highly pathogenic strains. A so-called `cytokine storm' can damage the lung tissue and cause systemic disease, despite the control of viral replication. By summarizing current knowledge of the innate responses mounted to influenza infection, this review highlights the importance of the respiratory tract epithelial cells as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity to influenza virus. PMID:21909336

  2. Targeting Epigenetic Processes in Photodynamic Therapy-Induced Anticancer Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wachowska, Malgorzata; Muchowicz, Angelika; Golab, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer is an approved therapeutic procedure that generates oxidative stress leading to cell death of tumor and stromal cells. Cell death resulting from oxidative damage to intracellular components leads to the release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that trigger robust inflammatory response and creates local conditions for effective sampling of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) by antigen-presenting cells. The latter can trigger development of TAA-specific adaptive immune response. However, due to a number of mechanisms, including epigenetic regulation of TAA expression, tumor cells evade immune recognition. Therefore, numerous approaches are being developed to combine PDT with immunotherapies to allow development of systemic immunity. In this review, we describe immunoregulatory mechanisms of epigenetic treatments that were shown to restore the expression of epigenetically silenced or down-regulated major histocompatibility complex molecules as well as TAA. We also discuss the results of our recent studies showing that epigenetic treatments based on administration of methyltransferase inhibitors in combination with PDT can release effective mechanisms leading to development of antitumor immunity and potentiated antitumor effects. PMID:26284197

  3. Duration of immunity induced by companion animal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Roth, James A; Spickler, Anna Rovid

    2010-12-01

    Concerns about possible adverse effects from annual vaccination have prompted the reanalysis of vaccine protocols for cats and dogs. In the last decade, several veterinary advisory groups have published protocols that recommend extended revaccination intervals for certain 'core' vaccines. In addition, practicing veterinarians have been asked to consider vaccination as an individualized medical procedure, based on an analysis of risks and benefits for each vaccine in an individual animal. The calls for extended revaccination intervals prompted considerable debate in USA and internationally. Areas of concern include the amount of evidence to support prolonged immunity from various vaccines, the risk of poor responses in individual animals and the possible effects on population immunity. This review examines how the duration of immunity (DOI) to a vaccine is established in animals and humans. It reviews factors that can affect the DOI in an individual animal, including the types of immune defenses stimulated by the pathogen, and the vaccine, host factors such as age and the level of exposure to the pathogen. In addition, it examines DOI studies that were published for canine and feline core vaccines.

  4. A mechanism for trauma induced muscle wasting and immune dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihally, S.; Toner, M.; Yarmush, M.; Mitchell, R.

    A diverse physiological conditions lead to a hypercatabolic state marked by the loss of proteins, primarily derived from skeletal muscle. The sustained loss of proteins results in loss of muscle mass and strength, poor healing, and long-term hospitalization. These problems are further compounded by the deterioration of immunity to infection which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of traumatic patients. In an attempt to understand the signal propagation mechanism(s), we tested the role of Interferon-? (IFN-? ) in an animal burn injury model; IFN-? is best conceptualized as a macrophage activating protein and known to modulate a variety of intracellular processes potentially relevant to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Mice congenitally -deficient in IFN-? , and IFN-? -Receptor, and wild type (WT) animals treated with IFN-? neutralizing antibody received either a 20% total body surface area burn or a control sham treatment. At days 1, 2, and 7 following treatment, skeletal muscle, peripheral blood, and spleen were harvested from both groups. Overall body weight, protein turnovers, changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations and alterations in the major histocompatibility complex I expression (MHC I) and proliferation capacity of lymphocytes was measured using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). These results indicate that we can prevent both muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Based on these observations and our previous other animal model results (using insulin therapy), a novel mechanism of interactions leading to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction will be discussed. Further, implications of these findings on future research and clinical therapies will be discussed in detail.

  5. FAP positive fibroblasts induce immune checkpoint blockade resistance in colorectal cancer via promoting immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingling; Qiu, Xiangting; Wang, Xinhua; He, Jian

    2017-03-14

    Immune checkpoint blockades that significantly prolonged survival of melanoma patients have been less effective on colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Growing evidence suggested that fibroblast activation protein-alpha (FAP) on cancer associate fibroblasts (CAFs) has critical roles in regulating antitumor immune response by inducing tumor-promoting inflammation. In this study, we explored the roles of FAP in regulating the tumor immunity and immune checkpoint blockades resistance in CRC experimental systems. We found that CAFs with high FAP expression could induce immune checkpoint blockade resistance in CRC mouse model. Mechanistically, CAFs with high FAP expression promoted immunosuppression in the CRC tumor immune microenvironment by up-regulating CCL2 secretion, recruiting myeloid cells, and decreasing T-cell activity. In human CRC samples, FAP expression was proportional to myeloid cells number, but inversely related to T-cell number. High FAP expression also predicted poor survival of CRC patients. Taken together, our study suggested that high FAP expression in CAFs is one reason leading to immune checkpoint blockades resistance in CRC patients and FAP is an optional target for reversing immune checkpoint blockades resistance.

  6. Sublingual immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding SARS-CoV spike protein induces systemic and mucosal immunity without redirection of the virus to the brain.

    PubMed

    Shim, Byoung-Shik; Stadler, Konrad; Nguyen, Huan Huu; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Kim, Dong Wook; Chang, Jun; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Song, Man Ki

    2012-09-21

    Sublingual (s.l.) administration of soluble protein antigens, inactivated viruses, or virus-like particles has been shown to induce broad immune responses in mucosal and extra-mucosal tissues. Recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors (rADVs) infect mucosa surface and therefore can serve as a mucosal antigen delivery vehicle. In this study we examined whether s.l. immunization with rADV encoding spike protein (S) (rADV-S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) induces protective immunity against SARS-CoV and could serve as a safe mucosal route for delivery of rADV. Here, we show that s.l. administration of rADV-S induced serum SARS-CoV neutralizing and airway IgA antibodies in mice. These antibody responses are comparable to those induced by intranasal (i.n.) administration. In addition, s.l. immunization induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs that are superior to those induced by intramuscular immunization. Importantly, unlike i.n. administration, s.l. immunization with rADV did not redirect the rADV vector to the olfactory bulb. Our study indicates that s.l. immunization with rADV-S is safe and effective in induction of a broad spectrum of immune responses and presumably protection against infection with SARS-CoV.

  7. Sublingual immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding SARS-CoV spike protein induces systemic and mucosal immunity without redirection of the virus to the brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sublingual (s.l.) administration of soluble protein antigens, inactivated viruses, or virus-like particles has been shown to induce broad immune responses in mucosal and extra-mucosal tissues. Recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors (rADVs) infect mucosa surface and therefore can serve as a mucosal antigen delivery vehicle. In this study we examined whether s.l. immunization with rADV encoding spike protein (S) (rADV-S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) induces protective immunity against SARS-CoV and could serve as a safe mucosal route for delivery of rADV. Results Here, we show that s.l. administration of rADV-S induced serum SARS-CoV neutralizing and airway IgA antibodies in mice. These antibody responses are comparable to those induced by intranasal (i.n.) administration. In addition, s.l. immunization induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs that are superior to those induced by intramuscular immunization. Importantly, unlike i.n. administration, s.l. immunization with rADV did not redirect the rADV vector to the olfactory bulb. Conclusion Our study indicates that s.l. immunization with rADV-S is safe and effective in induction of a broad spectrum of immune responses and presumably protection against infection with SARS-CoV. PMID:22995185

  8. Trends in Vaccine-induced Immunity to Hepatitis B among Canadian Street-involved Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Marie-Line; Rossi, Miriam F.; Haase, David; Wright, Judith; Sicard, Nadine; Beaudoin, Carole; Taylor, Darlene; Gratrix, Jennifer; Belzak, Lisa; Wong, Tom; Jayaraman, Gayatri

    2010-01-01

    In Canada, universal and publicly funded hepatitis B immunization programs have been available since 1998 in all provinces and territories. This present study estimates the proportion of having vaccine-induced immunity to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its associated determinants among street-involved youth aged at 15–24 years old in Canada using the data collected by the Enhanced Surveillance of Canadian Street Youth. Vaccine-induced immunity was identified by blood test results of anti-HBc negative and anti-HBs positive. Of the 4,035 participants included in this study, the overall proportion of those with vaccine-induced immunity to HBV was 51.7% during the study period compared to over 90% among the general adolescent population. The proportion of street-involved youth immunized with HBV vaccine increased from 34.7% in 1999 to 64.4% in 2005. Immunity was higher among females (aOR = 1.43, 1.17–1.75) and among those with a reported history of sexually transmitted infection (aOR = 1.30, 1.03–1.63). The proportion of youth with the immunity decreased as age increased (aOR = 0.78, 0.76–0.81, per year increase). Despite an overall increase in the proportion of Canadian street-involved youth with vaccine-induced immunity to HBV, the proportion was still significantly lower than that observed in the general adolescent population. This highlights the need to improve the access to basic health care and the immunization programs to HBV for street-involved youth through creative outreach programs and other multi-faceted approaches. PMID:20174878

  9. DAMP Signaling is a Key Pathway Inducing Immune Modulation after Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dalpke, Alexander; Mracsko, Eva; Antoine, Daniel J.; Roth, Stefan; Zhou, Wei; Yang, Huan; Na, Shin-Young; Akhisaroglu, Mustafa; Fleming, Thomas; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Nawroth, Peter P.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain lesions induce profound alterations of the peripheral immune response comprising the opposing phenomena of early immune activation and subsequent immunosuppression. The mechanisms underlying this brain-immune signaling are largely unknown. We used animal models for experimental brain ischemia as a paradigm of acute brain lesions and additionally investigated a large cohort of stroke patients. We analyzed release of HMGB1 isoforms by mass spectrometry and investigated its inflammatory potency and signaling pathways by immunological in vivo and in vitro techniques. Features of the complex behavioral sickness behavior syndrome were characterized by homecage behavior analysis. HMGB1 downstream signaling, particularly with RAGE, was studied in various transgenic animal models and by pharmacological blockade. Our results indicate that the cytokine-inducing, fully reduced isoform of HMGB1 was released from the ischemic brain in the hyperacute phase of stroke in mice and patients. Cytokines secreted in the periphery in response to brain injury induced sickness behavior, which could be abrogated by inhibition of the HMGB1-RAGE pathway or direct cytokine neutralization. Subsequently, HMGB1-release induced bone marrow egress and splenic proliferation of bone marrow-derived suppressor cells, inhibiting the adaptive immune responses in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, HMGB1-RAGE signaling resulted in functional exhaustion of mature monocytes and lymphopenia, the hallmarks of immune suppression after extensive ischemia. This study introduces the HMGB1-RAGE-mediated pathway as a key mechanism explaining the complex postischemic brain-immune interactions. PMID:25589753

  10. Nanovectorized radiotherapy: a new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Hindré, François

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental findings show that activation of the host immune system is required for the success of chemo- and radiotherapy. However, clinically apparent tumors have already developed multiple mechanisms to escape anti-tumor immunity. The fact that tumors are able to induce a state of tolerance and immunosuppression is a major obstacle in immunotherapy. Hence, there is an overwhelming need to develop new strategies that overcome this state of immune tolerance and induce an anti-tumor immune response both at primary and metastatic sites. Nanovectorized radiotherapy that combines ionizing radiation and nanodevices, is one strategy that could boost the quality and magnitude of an immune response in a predictable and designable fashion. The potential benefits of this emerging treatment may be based on the unique combination of immunostimulatory properties of nanoparticles with the ability of ionizing radiation to induce immunogenic tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss available data and propose that the nanovectorized radiotherapy could be a powerful new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity required for positive patient outcome. PMID:23087900

  11. Nanovectorized radiotherapy: a new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Hindré, François

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental findings show that activation of the host immune system is required for the success of chemo- and radiotherapy. However, clinically apparent tumors have already developed multiple mechanisms to escape anti-tumor immunity. The fact that tumors are able to induce a state of tolerance and immunosuppression is a major obstacle in immunotherapy. Hence, there is an overwhelming need to develop new strategies that overcome this state of immune tolerance and induce an anti-tumor immune response both at primary and metastatic sites. Nanovectorized radiotherapy that combines ionizing radiation and nanodevices, is one strategy that could boost the quality and magnitude of an immune response in a predictable and designable fashion. The potential benefits of this emerging treatment may be based on the unique combination of immunostimulatory properties of nanoparticles with the ability of ionizing radiation to induce immunogenic tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss available data and propose that the nanovectorized radiotherapy could be a powerful new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity required for positive patient outcome.

  12. Retnla (Relma/Fizz1) suppresses helminth-induced Th2-Type immunity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Retnla (Resistin-like molecule alpha/FIZZ1) is induced during Th2 cytokine immune responses. Using Retnla deficient (-/-) mice and three helminth models, we show that Retnla functions as a negative regulator of Th2 responses. Pulmonary granuloma formation induced by the eggs of the helminth parasite...

  13. Immune Responses in Rhinovirus-Induced Asthma Exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Steinke, John W; Borish, Larry

    2016-11-01

    Acute asthma exacerbations are responsible for urgent care visits and hospitalizations; they interfere with school and work productivity, thereby driving much of the morbidity and mortality associated with asthma. Approximately 80 to 85 % of asthma exacerbations in children, adolescents, and less frequently adults are associated with viral upper respiratory tract viral infections, and rhinovirus (RV) accounts for ∼60-70 % of these virus-associated exacerbations. Evidence suggests that it is not the virus itself but the nature of the immune response to RV that drives this untoward response. In particular, evidence supports the concept that RV acts to exacerbate an ongoing allergic inflammatory response to environmental allergens present at the time of the infection. The interaction of the ongoing IgE- and T cell-mediated response to allergen superimposed on the innate and adaptive immune responses to the virus and how this leads to triggering of an asthma exacerbation is discussed.

  14. Immunization with Attenuated Equine Herpesvirus 1 Strain KyA Induces Innate Immune Responses That Protect Mice from Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Akhalesh K.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is a major pathogen affecting equines worldwide. The virus causes respiratory disease, abortion, and, in some cases, neurological disease. EHV-1 strain KyA is attenuated in the mouse and equine, whereas wild-type strain RacL11 induces severe inflammation of the lung, causing infected mice to succumb at 4 to 6 days postinfection. Our previous results showed that KyA immunization protected CBA mice from pathogenic RacL11 challenge at 2 and 4 weeks postimmunization and that KyA infection elicited protective humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. To investigate the protective mechanisms of innate immune responses to KyA, KyA-immunized mice were challenged with RacL11 at various times postvaccination. KyA immunization protected mice from RacL11 challenge at 1 to 7 days postimmunization. Immunized mice lost less than 10% of their body weight and rapidly regained weight. Virus titers in the lungs of KyA-immunized mice were 1,000-fold lower at 2 days post-RacL11 challenge than virus titers in the lungs of nonimmunized mice, indicating accelerated virus clearance. Affymetrix microarray analysis revealed that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and 16 antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) were upregulated 3.1- to 48.2-fold at 8 h postchallenge in the lungs of RacL11-challenged mice that had been immunized with KyA. Murine IFN-γ inhibited EHV-1 infection of murine alveolar macrophages and protected mice against lethal EHV-1 challenge, suggesting that IFN-γ expression is important in mediating the protection elicited by KyA immunization. These results suggest that EHV-1 KyA may be used as a live attenuated EHV-1 vaccine as well as a prophylactic agent in horses. IMPORTANCE Viral infection of cells initiates a signal cascade of events that ultimately attempts to limit viral replication and prevent infection through the expression of host antiviral proteins. In this study, we show that EHV-1 KyA immunization effectively protected CBA

  15. PD-1 blockade induces responses by inhibiting adaptive immune resistance.

    PubMed

    Tumeh, Paul C; Harview, Christina L; Yearley, Jennifer H; Shintaku, I Peter; Taylor, Emma J M; Robert, Lidia; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Spasic, Marko; Henry, Gina; Ciobanu, Voicu; West, Alisha N; Carmona, Manuel; Kivork, Christine; Seja, Elizabeth; Cherry, Grace; Gutierrez, Antonio J; Grogan, Tristan R; Mateus, Christine; Tomasic, Gorana; Glaspy, John A; Emerson, Ryan O; Robins, Harlan; Pierce, Robert H; Elashoff, David A; Robert, Caroline; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-11-27

    Therapies that target the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor have shown unprecedented rates of durable clinical responses in patients with various cancer types. One mechanism by which cancer tissues limit the host immune response is via upregulation of PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) and its ligation to PD-1 on antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells (termed adaptive immune resistance). Here we show that pre-existing CD8(+) T cells distinctly located at the invasive tumour margin are associated with expression of the PD-1/PD-L1 immune inhibitory axis and may predict response to therapy. We analysed samples from 46 patients with metastatic melanoma obtained before and during anti-PD-1 therapy (pembrolizumab) using quantitative immunohistochemistry, quantitative multiplex immunofluorescence, and next-generation sequencing for T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs). In serially sampled tumours, patients responding to treatment showed proliferation of intratumoral CD8(+) T cells that directly correlated with radiographic reduction in tumour size. Pre-treatment samples obtained from responding patients showed higher numbers of CD8-, PD-1- and PD-L1-expressing cells at the invasive tumour margin and inside tumours, with close proximity between PD-1 and PD-L1, and a more clonal TCR repertoire. Using multivariate analysis, we established a predictive model based on CD8 expression at the invasive margin and validated the model in an independent cohort of 15 patients. Our findings indicate that tumour regression after therapeutic PD-1 blockade requires pre-existing CD8(+) T cells that are negatively regulated by PD-1/PD-L1-mediated adaptive immune resistance.

  16. PD-1 blockade induces responses by inhibiting adaptive immune resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tumeh, Paul C.; Harview, Christina L.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Shintaku, I. Peter; Taylor, Emma J. M.; Robert, Lidia; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Spasic, Marko; Henry, Gina; Ciobanu, Voicu; West, Alisha N.; Carmona, Manuel; Kivork, Christine; Seja, Elizabeth; Cherry, Grace; Gutierrez, Antonio; Grogan, Tristan R.; Mateus, Christine; Tomasic, Gorana; Glaspy, John A.; Emerson, Ryan O.; Robins, Harlan; Pierce, Robert H.; Elashoff, David A.; Robert, Caroline; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Therapies that target the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor have shown unprecedented rates of durable clinical responses in patients with various cancer types.1–5 One mechanism by which cancer tissues limit the host immune response is via upregulation of PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) and its ligation to PD-1 on antigen-specific CD8 T-cells (termed adaptive immune resistance).6,7 Here we show that pre-existing CD8 T-cells distinctly located at the invasive tumour margin are associated with expression of the PD-1/PD-L1 immune inhibitory axis and may predict response to therapy. We analyzed samples from 46 patients with metastatic melanoma obtained before and during anti-PD1 therapy (pembrolizumab) using quantitative immunohistochemistry, quantitative multiplex immunofluorescence, and next generation sequencing for T-cell receptors (TCR). In serially sampled tumours, responding patients showed proliferation of intratumoural CD8+ T-cells that directly correlated with radiographic reduction in tumour size. Pre-treatment samples obtained from responding patients showed higher numbers of CD8, PD1, and PD-L1 expressing cells at the invasive tumour margin and inside tumours, with close proximity between PD-1 and PD-L1, and a more clonal TCR repertoire. Using multivariate analysis, we established a predictive model based on CD8 expression at the invasive margin and validated the model in an independent cohort of 15 patients. Our findings indicate that tumour regression following therapeutic PD-1 blockade requires pre-existing CD8+ T cells that are negatively regulated by PD-1/PD-L1 mediated adaptive immune resistance. PMID:25428505

  17. [Immune response induced by phosphofructokinase from E. histolytica in hamsters].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Cardoso, J M; Jiménez, E; Kumate, J

    1991-01-01

    The enzymatic activity of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) dependent phosphofructokinase became manifest in the supernatant obtained by centrifugation in a homogenate of E. histolytica strain HMI-IMSS at 700,000 g. Partial purification of the enzyme was achieved by column chromatography with Ultrogel AcA-34. Ten protein elution spikes were obtained: five showed enzymatic activity. Elution spikes I and II attained the highest values of specific enzymatic activity 6.45 and 6.98 U/mg of protein, respectively. Next were spikes X and III with similar values 2.55 and 2.63 U/mg of protein, and spike IV presented the lowest value of 0.86 U/mg of protein. The five spikes were used to immunize hamsters which were challenged intrahepatically, four weeks later, with 3 x 10(5) trophozoites of E. histolytica. A control group of animals not immunized underwent intrahepatic challenge with the same number of amebae. The proteins with enzymatic activity contained in elution spikes I and II conferred immunologic protection in 100% of the animals, while elution spikes X and III were protective in 50 to 63%, and spike IV gave the lowest value of 37%. It can be assumed that there is an antienzyme antibody responsible for the absence of hepatic abscesses in the immunized hamsters.

  18. Vector transmission of leishmania abrogates vaccine-induced protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Nathan C; Kimblin, Nicola; Secundino, Nagila; Kamhawi, Shaden; Lawyer, Phillip; Sacks, David L

    2009-06-01

    Numerous experimental vaccines have been developed to protect against the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis caused by infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Leishmania, but a human vaccine still does not exist. Remarkably, the efficacy of anti-Leishmania vaccines has never been fully evaluated under experimental conditions following natural vector transmission by infected sand fly bite. The only immunization strategy known to protect humans against natural exposure is "leishmanization," in which viable L. major parasites are intentionally inoculated into a selected site in the skin. We employed mice with healed L. major infections to mimic leishmanization, and found tissue-seeking, cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Leishmania at the site of challenge by infected sand fly bite within 24 hours, and these mice were highly resistant to sand fly transmitted infection. In contrast, mice vaccinated with a killed vaccine comprised of autoclaved L. major antigen (ALM)+CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that protected against needle inoculation of parasites, showed delayed expression of protective immunity and failed to protect against infected sand fly challenge. Two-photon intra-vital microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that sand fly, but not needle challenge, resulted in the maintenance of a localized neutrophilic response at the inoculation site, and removal of neutrophils following vector transmission led to increased parasite-specific immune responses and promoted the efficacy of the killed vaccine. These observations identify the critical immunological factors influencing vaccine efficacy following natural transmission of Leishmania.

  19. T-cell mediated immunity and the role of TRAIL in sepsis-induced immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Condotta, Stephanie A.; Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in most intensive care units, and the death of septic patients usually does not result from the initial septic event but rather from subsequent nosocomial infections. Patients who survive severe sepsis often display severely compromised immune function. Not only is there significant apoptosis of lymphoid and myeloid cells that depletes critical components of the immune system during sepsis, there is also decreased function of the remaining immune cells. Studies in animals and humans suggest the immune defects that occur during sepsis may be critical to the pathogenesis and subsequent mortality. This review is focused on sepsis-induced alterations with the CD8 T-cell compartment that can affect the control of secondary heterologous infections. Understanding how a septic event directly influences CD8 T-cell populations through apoptotic death and homeostatic proliferation and indirectly by immune-mediated suppression will provide valuable starting points for developing new treatment options. PMID:23510024

  20. Theoretical evaluation of induced radioactivity in food products by electron — or X-ray beam sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboutet, H.; Aucouturier, J.

    We evaluate first the energy density for electrons or X-ray beams necessary to produce a reference level of 1 kilogray at the maximum of dose, as a function of energy, for electrons and bremsstrahlung photons ( BX rays), based on experimental data obtained on radio-therapy beams, from 4 to 32 MeV, and irradiation beams from production plant CARIC. Then from the production of neutrons on the tungsten target and from (γ n) reactions on the deuterium content of the irradiated food, the slowing down and capture of these neutrons is estimated. Radioisotopes can be produced by (γ n) reactions on iodine, and to a lesser extent on tin, lead, barium, etc., but the major contribution is neutron activation, where the more critical elements are sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium. Induced activity is compared to natural activity coming from potassium 40, carbon 14 and radium, contained in all foods. We conclude that for electrons up to 1 Mrad the induced activity remains of the order of a few percent of natural activity, for energies below 10-11 MeV. Bremsstrahlung X-ray irradiations can give comparable levels as soon as the energy of the generating electron beam is above 3 MeV. The induced activity decays within a few days. There is only a small increase of induced activity as the energy changes from 5 to 10 MeV, for the same total applied dose.

  1. Persistent Low-Level Replication of SIVΔnef Drives Maturation of Antibody and CD8 T Cell Responses to Induce Protective Immunity against Vaginal SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Jacqueline; Wong, Fay E.; Yu, Yi; Camp, Jeremy V.; Li, Qingsheng; Connole, Michelle; Li, Yuan; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Li, Wenjun; Keele, Brandon F.; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Haase, Ashley T.

    2016-01-01

    Defining the correlates of immune protection conferred by SIVΔnef, the most effective vaccine against SIV challenge, could enable the design of a protective vaccine against HIV infection. Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of immune responses that protect against SIV infection through detailed analyses of cellular and humoral immune responses in the blood and tissues of rhesus macaques vaccinated with SIVΔnef and then vaginally challenged with wild-type SIV. Despite the presence of robust cellular immune responses, animals at 5 weeks after vaccination displayed only transient viral suppression of challenge virus, whereas all macaques challenged at weeks 20 and 40 post-SIVΔnef vaccination were protected, as defined by either apparent sterile protection or significant suppression of viremia in infected animals. Multiple parameters of CD8 T cell function temporally correlated with maturation of protection, including polyfunctionality, phenotypic differentiation, and redistribution to gut and lymphoid tissues. Importantly, we also demonstrate the induction of a tissue-resident memory population of SIV-specific CD8 T cells in the vaginal mucosa, which was dependent on ongoing low-level antigenic stimulation. Moreover, we show that vaginal and serum antibody titers inversely correlated with post-challenge peak viral load, and we correlate the accumulation and affinity maturation of the antibody response to the duration of the vaccination period as well as to the SIVΔnef antigenic load. In conclusion, maturation of SIVΔnef-induced CD8 T cell and antibody responses, both propelled by viral persistence in the gut mucosa and secondary lymphoid tissues, results in protective immune responses that are able to interrupt viral transmission at mucosal portals of entry as well as potential sites of viral dissemination. PMID:27959961

  2. Intratumoral DNA electroporation induces anti-tumor immunity and tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Radkevich-Brown, Olga; Piechocki, Marie P; Back, Jessica B; Weise, Amy M; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2010-03-01

    In situ expression of a foreign antigen and an immune-modulating cytokine by intratumoral DNA electroporation was tested as a cancer therapy regimen. Transgene expression in the tumors was sustained for 2-3 weeks after intratumoral electroporation with mammalian expression plasmid containing firefly luciferase cDNA. Electroporation with cDNA encoding tetanus toxin fragment C (TetC) induced tetanus toxin-binding antibody, demonstrating immune recognition of the transgene product. Intratumoral electroporation with TetC and IL-12 cDNA after mice were treated with CD25 mAb to remove regulatory T cells induced IFN-gamma producing T-cell response to tumor-associated antigen, heavy inflammatory infiltration, regression of established tumors and immune memory to protect mice from repeated tumor challenge. Intratumoral expression of immune-modulating molecules may be most suitable in the neoadjuvant setting to enhance the therapeutic efficacy and provide long-term protection.

  3. Comparison of structural changes in skin and amnion tissue grafts for transplantation induced by gamma and electron beam irradiation for sterilization.

    PubMed

    Mrázová, H; Koller, J; Kubišová, K; Fujeríková, G; Klincová, E; Babál, P

    2016-06-01

    Sterilization is an important step in the preparation of biological material for transplantation. The aim of the study is to compare morphological changes in three types of biological tissues induced by different doses of gamma and electron beam radiation. Frozen biological tissues (porcine skin xenografts, human skin allografts and human amnion) were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays (12.5, 25, 35, 50 kGy) and electron beam (15, 25, 50 kGy). Not irradiated specimens served as controls. The tissue samples were then thawn and fixed in 10 % formalin, processed by routine paraffin technique and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, alcian blue at pH 2.5, orcein, periodic acid Schiff reaction, phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin, Sirius red and silver impregnation. The staining with hematoxylin and eosin showed vacuolar cytoplasmic changes of epidermal cells mainly in the samples of xenografts irradiated by the lowest doses of gamma and electron beam radiation. The staining with orcein revealed damage of fine elastic fibers in the xenograft dermis at the dose of 25 kGy of both radiation types. Disintegration of epithelial basement membrane, especially in the xenografts, was induced by the dose of 15 kGy of electron beam radiation. The silver impregnation disclosed nuclear chromatin condensation mainly in human amnion at the lowest doses of both radiation types and disintegration of the fine collagen fibers in the papillary dermis induced by the lowest dose of electron beam and by the higher doses of gamma radiation. Irradiation by both, gamma rays and the electron beam, causes similar changes on cells and extracellular matrix, with significant damage of the basement membrane and of the fine and elastic and collagen fibers in the papillary dermis, the last caused already by low dose electron beam radiation.

  4. Single-layer tungsten oxide as intelligent photo-responsive nanoagents for permanent male sterilization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Xianjun; Ran, Xiang; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    Permanent male sterilization has been recognized as useful tools for the development of neuter experimental animals and fattening livestock, as well as efficient control of pet overpopulation. Traditional routes such as surgical ways, chemical injections, and anti-fertility vaccines have addressed these crucial problems with idea outcomes. However, these routes usually bring out serious pain and infection towards animals, as well as induce long-term adverse reaction and immune suppression. Thus, a convenient, but non-surgical strategy for male sterilization under a mild manner is highly desirable. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate a novel platform for male sterilization by using single-layer WO2.72 nanosheets as smart photo-responsive sterilants. Upon a 980 nm irradiation, these nanoagents can possess intrinsic NIR-induced hyperthermia and sensitize the formation of singlet oxygen due to the cooperation of photothermal and photodynamic effects. Mechanism of cellular injury can be attributed to the denaturation of protein and apoptosis-related death. Moreover, long-term toxicity and possible metabolism route after testicular injection are discussed, indicating the neglectable systemic toxicity and high bio-compatibility of our nanoagents. Overall, our strategy can extremely overcome the shortcomings in various routine routes and suggest the new biological application of nanomaterials.

  5. An alphavirus vector-based tetravalent dengue vaccine induces a rapid and protective immune response in macaques that differs qualitatively from immunity induced by live virus infection.

    PubMed

    White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; Mattocks, Melissa D; Wahala M P B, Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V; Martinez, Melween I; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans.

  6. An Alphavirus Vector-Based Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Induces a Rapid and Protective Immune Response in Macaques That Differs Qualitatively from Immunity Induced by Live Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sariol, Carlos A.; Mattocks, Melissa D.; Wahala M. P. B., Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L.; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V.; Martinez, Melween I.; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans. PMID:23302884

  7. Distinct Pathways of Humoral and Cellular Immunity Induced with the Mucosal Administration of a Nanoemulsion Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Makidon, Paul E.; Janczak, Katarzyna W.; Blanco, Luz P.; Swanson, Benjamin; Smith, Douglas M.; Pham, Tiffany; Szabo, Zsuzsanna; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F.; Baker, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Nasal administration of an oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NE) adjuvant W805EC produces potent systemic and mucosal, Th-1– and Th-17–balanced cellular responses. However, its molecular mechanism of action has not been fully characterized and is of particular interest because NE does not contain specific ligands for innate immune receptors. In these studies, we demonstrate that W805EC NE adjuvant activates innate immunity, induces specific gene transcription, and modulates NF-κB activity via TLR2 and TLR4 by a mechanism that appears to be distinct from typical TLR agonists. Nasal immunization with NE-based vaccine showed that the TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 pathways and IL-12 and IL-12Rβ1 expression are not required for an Ab response, but they are essential for the induction of balanced Th-1 polarization and Th-17 cellular immunity. NE adjuvant induces MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 costimulatory molecule expression and dendritic cell maturation. Further, upon immunization with NE, adjuvant mice deficient in the CD86 receptor had normal Ab responses but significantly reduced Th-1 cellular responses, whereas animals deficient in both CD80 and CD86 or lacking CD40 failed to produce either humoral or cellular immunity. Overall, our data show that intranasal administration of Ag with NE induces TLR2 and TLR4 activation along with a MyD88-independent Ab response and a MyD88-dependent Th-1 and Th-17 cell–mediated immune response. These findings suggest that the unique properties of NE adjuvant may offer novel opportunities for understanding previously unrecognized mechanisms of immune activation important for generating effective mucosal and systemic immune responses. PMID:24532579

  8. Mumps virus-induced innate immune responses in mouse Sertoli and Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han; Shi, Lili; Wang, Qing; Cheng, Lijing; Zhao, Xiang; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Jiang, Qian; Feng, Min; Li, Qihan; Han, Daishu

    2016-01-18

    Mumps virus (MuV) infection frequently causes orchitis and impairs male fertility. However, the mechanisms underlying the innate immune responses to MuV infection in the testis have yet to be investigated. This study showed that MuV induced innate immune responses in mouse Sertoli and Leydig cells through TLR2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling, which result in the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, MCP-1, CXCL10, and type 1 interferons (IFN-α and IFN-β). By contrast, MuV did not induce the cytokine production in male germ cells. In response to MuV infection, Sertoli cells produced higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines but lower levels of type 1 IFNs than Leydig cells did. The MuV-induced cytokine production by Sertoli and Leydig cells was significantly reduced by the knockout of TLR2 or the knockdown of RIG-I signaling. The local injection of MuV into the testis triggered the testicular innate immune responses in vivo. Moreover, MuV infection suppressed testosterone synthesis by Leydig cells. This is the first study examining the innate immune responses to MuV infection in testicular cells. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the MuV-induced innate immune responses in the testis.

  9. Mumps virus-induced innate immune responses in mouse Sertoli and Leydig cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han; Shi, Lili; Wang, Qing; Cheng, Lijing; Zhao, Xiang; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Jiang, Qian; Feng, Min; Li, Qihan; Han, Daishu

    2016-01-01

    Mumps virus (MuV) infection frequently causes orchitis and impairs male fertility. However, the mechanisms underlying the innate immune responses to MuV infection in the testis have yet to be investigated. This study showed that MuV induced innate immune responses in mouse Sertoli and Leydig cells through TLR2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling, which result in the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, MCP-1, CXCL10, and type 1 interferons (IFN-α and IFN-β). By contrast, MuV did not induce the cytokine production in male germ cells. In response to MuV infection, Sertoli cells produced higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines but lower levels of type 1 IFNs than Leydig cells did. The MuV-induced cytokine production by Sertoli and Leydig cells was significantly reduced by the knockout of TLR2 or the knockdown of RIG-I signaling. The local injection of MuV into the testis triggered the testicular innate immune responses in vivo. Moreover, MuV infection suppressed testosterone synthesis by Leydig cells. This is the first study examining the innate immune responses to MuV infection in testicular cells. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the MuV-induced innate immune responses in the testis. PMID:26776505

  10. Comparison of different types of phacoemulsification tips. II. Morphologic alterations induced by multiple steam sterilization cycles with and without use of enzyme detergents.

    PubMed

    Tsaousis, Konstantinos T; Werner, Liliana; Reiter, Nicholas; Perez, Jesus Paulo; Li, He J; Guan, Jia J; Mamalis, Nick

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the alterations in the morphology and elemental composition of reusable phacoemulsification tips after cleaning and sterilization. John A. Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Experimental study. For the main experiment, 2 types of reusable phacoemulsification needles were studied. One tip of each type underwent 1, 2, and 3 autoclave sterilizations with the use of detergents followed by thorough rinsing with sterile water between cycles. Another set of tips underwent the same procedure but without rinsing. Subsequently, phaco tips were examined through scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to assess morphologic changes and surface deposits. In a second experiment, tips of 8 different types (both reusable and single use) underwent 10 sterilization autoclave cycles without detergents. Residues, mostly comprised of carbon-containing material, were found in extensive areas of tips that were sterilization with enzymes and without rinsing. Smaller and fewer residues were found in tips after sterilization with the use of enzymes and thorough rinsing. Tips that underwent autoclave sterilization without detergents had no bulky deposits on their surface; they mostly had thin layers of sodium and chloride or material discoloration. Rinsing the phaco tips significantly reduced the size and number of residues after use of enzymatic detergents. However, detergent residues were detected on phaco tip surfaces even after thorough rinsing with sterile water. No major noticeable changes were observed in either single-use or reusable phaco tips after 10 cycles of sterilization without detergents. None of the authors has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Sterilization and eugenics].

    PubMed

    Shasha, Shaul M

    2011-04-01

    The term "eugenics" was coined by Francis Galton in 1883 and was defined as the science of the improvement of the human race by better breeding. "Positive eugenics" referred to methods of encouraging the "most fit" to reproduce more often, while "negative eugenics" was related to ways of discouraging or preventing the "less fit" from reproducing by birth control and sterilization. Many western countries adopted eugenics programs including Britain, Canada, Norway, Australia, Switzerland and others. In Sweden more then 62,000 "unfits" were forcibly sterilized. Many states in the U.S.A. had adopted marriage laws with eugenics criteria including forced sterilization. Approximately 64,000 individuals were sterilized. Eugenics considerations also lay behind the adoption of the Immigration Restriction Act of 1924. The Largest plan on eugenics was adopted by the Nazi regime in Germany. Hundreds of thousands of people, who were viewed as being "unfit", were forcibly sterilized by different methods: Surgical sterilization or castration with severe complications and high mortality rates. X-ray irradiation. The method was suggested by Brack, and tested by Schuman using prisoners in Block No. 10 in Auschwitz and Birkenau. Experiments were also performed by Brack on prisoners using the "window method". "Klauberg method"--injection of irritating materials into the uterus. Experiments were conducted using the plant Caladium Seguinum which was believed to have sterilization and castration properties.

  12. [Research advances of anti-tumor immune response induced by pulse electric field ablation].

    PubMed

    Cui, Guang-ying; Diao, Hong-yan

    2015-11-01

    As a novel tumor therapy, pulse electric field has shown a clinical perspective. This paper reviews the characteristics of tumor ablation by microsecond pulse and nanosecond pulse electric field, and the research advances of anti-tumor immune response induced by pulse electric field ablation. Recent researches indicate that the pulse electric field not only leads to a complete ablation of local tumor, but also stimulates a protective immune response, thereby inhibiting tumor recurrence and metastasis. These unique advantages will show an extensive clinical application in the future. However, the mechanism of anti-tumor immune response and the development of related tumor vaccine need further studies.

  13. white anther: A Petunia Mutant That Abolishes Pollen Flavonol Accumulation, Induces Male Sterility, and Is Complemented by a Chalcone Synthase Transgene1

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Carolyn A.; Fahy, Deirdre; Wang, Huai-Yu; Taylor, Loverine P.

    1999-01-01

    A mutation in an inbred line of petunia (Petunia hybrida) produces a reduction in the deep-purple corolla pigmentation and changes the anther color from yellow to white. In addition, the mutant, designated white anther (wha), is functionally male sterile. The inability of pollen from wha plants to germinate in vitro provides a physiological basis for the lack of seed set observed in self-crosses of the mutant. Biochemical complementation with nanomolar amounts of kaempferol, a flavonol aglycone, confirms that the inability of the wha pollen to germinate is due to a lack of this essential compound. Transgenic complementation with a functional ChsA (Chalcone synthase A) cDNA suggests that the genetic lesion responsible for the wha phenotype is in Chs, the gene for the first enzyme in the flavonol biosynthesis pathway. The genetic background of the parental line, as well as the pollen phenotype, allowed us to deduce that the wha mutation is in ChsA. To our knowledge, wha is the first induced, nontransgenic Chs mutant described in petunia, and analysis of the mutation confirms earlier molecular and genetic observations that only two Chs genes (A and J) are expressed in reproductive tissues and that they are differentially regulated in corolla and anther. PMID:10364414

  14. white anther: A petunia mutant that abolishes pollen flavonol accumulation, induces male sterility, and is complemented by a chalcone synthase transgene

    PubMed

    Napoli; Fahy; Wang; Taylor

    1999-06-01

    A mutation in an inbred line of petunia (Petunia hybrida) produces a reduction in the deep-purple corolla pigmentation and changes the anther color from yellow to white. In addition, the mutant, designated white anther (wha), is functionally male sterile. The inability of pollen from wha plants to germinate in vitro provides a physiological basis for the lack of seed set observed in self-crosses of the mutant. Biochemical complementation with nanomolar amounts of kaempferol, a flavonol aglycone, confirms that the inability of the wha pollen to germinate is due to a lack of this essential compound. Transgenic complementation with a functional ChsA (Chalcone synthase A) cDNA suggests that the genetic lesion responsible for the wha phenotype is in Chs, the gene for the first enzyme in the flavonol biosynthesis pathway. The genetic background of the parental line, as well as the pollen phenotype, allowed us to deduce that the wha mutation is in ChsA. To our knowledge, wha is the first induced, nontransgenic Chs mutant described in petunia, and analysis of the mutation confirms earlier molecular and genetic observations that only two Chs genes (A and J) are expressed in reproductive tissues and that they are differentially regulated in corolla and anther.

  15. Sterile post-traumatic immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Nahidul; Bradley, Benjamin A; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-01-01

    After major trauma, the human immune system initiates a series of inflammatory events at the injury site that is later followed by suppression of local inflammation favoring the repair and remodeling of the damaged tissues. This local immune response involves complex interactions between resident cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, soluble mediators such as cytokines and chemokines, and recruited cells such as neutrophils, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells. If of sufficient magnitude, these initial immune responses nevertheless have systemic consequences resulting in a state called post-traumatic immunosuppression (PTI). However, controversy exists regarding the exact immunological changes occurring in systemic compartments triggered by these local immune responses. PTI is one of the leading causes of post-surgical mortality and makes patients vulnerable to hospital-acquired infections, multiple organ failure and many other complications. In addition, hemorrhage, blood transfusion, immunesenescence and immunosuppressant drugs aggravate PTI. PTI has been intensively studied, but published results are frequently cloudy. The purpose of this review is to focus on the contributions made by different responsive modalities to immunosuppression following sterile trauma and to try to integrate these into an overall scheme of PTI. PMID:27195120

  16. The Skin Microbiome: Is It Affected by UV-induced Immune Suppression?

    PubMed Central

    Patra, VijayKumar; Byrne, Scott N.; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human skin apart from functioning as a physical barricade to stop the entry of pathogens, also hosts innumerable commensal organisms. The skin cells and the immune system constantly interact with microbes, to maintain cutaneous homeostasis, despite the challenges offered by various environmental factors. A major environmental factor affecting the skin is ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) from sunlight. UV-R is well known to modulate the immune system, which can be both beneficial and deleterious. By targeting the cells and molecules within skin, UV-R can trigger the production and release of antimicrobial peptides, affect the innate immune system and ultimately suppress the adaptive cellular immune response. This can contribute to skin carcinogenesis and the promotion of infectious agents such as herpes simplex virus and possibly others. On the other hand, a UV-established immunosuppressive environment may protect against the induction of immunologically mediated skin diseases including some of photodermatoses such as polymorphic light eruption. In this article, we share our perspective about the possibility that UV-induced immune suppression may alter the landscape of the skin’s microbiome and its components. Alternatively, or in concert with this, direct UV-induced DNA and membrane damage to the microbiome may result in pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that interfere with UV-induced immune suppression. PMID:27559331

  17. Hepatitis C virus single-stranded RNA induces innate immunity via Toll-like receptor 7.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Liang; Guo, Ying-Jun; Bin Li; Sun, Shu-Han

    2009-07-01

    Innate immune responses to HCV infection are triggered through host recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Interferons are critical for the protection against HCV infection. However, the pathways linking virus recognition to IFN induction remain poorly understood. Immune cells and Huh-7 cells were infected with HCV cell culture (HCVcc) or transfected with HCV-derived immunostimulatory RNA oligonucleotides (ORNs), and immune activation was assessed. We found that HCVcc suppressed immune responses because the HCVcc protein impaired the PBMC and pDC responses. However, HCVcc genomic RNA had an immunostimulatory effect. HCV encodes G/U-rich ssRNA TLR7 ligands that significantly activate innate immunity, and induced IFN-alpha production. Moreover, HCV-derived ORNs also activated IRF7 and NF-kappaB in Huh-7 cells. In particular, the HCV 3'-UTR strongly induced cytokine production. Different lengths of polyuridine tract in the 3'-UTR of different HCV strains induced IFN-alpha production. These data demonstrate that the HCV-specific G/U fragment is a motif sequence, and is recognized by TLR7 as a PAMP. The requirement for TLR7 to recognize HCV RNA was confirmed using specific inhibitors, RNAi and by TLR7overexpression. These results provide an insight into the development of immune adjuvant for vaccines and for the production of new antiviral drugs.

  18. Plasma-Aided Sterilization*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Rader, Mark; Dyer, Fred; Dever, Maureen; Alexeff, Igor

    1996-11-01

    The use of plasma as a sterilization agent was known for some time.In this paper we present recent work using atmospheric pressure plasmas to sterilize liquid and solid matter: The plasma can be a glow discharge or a corona discharge. The results show that sterilization occurs with treatment times which vary from a few seconds to a few minutes. The forseen applications of this method are in the medical, pharmaceutical, and food packaging industry. *Work supported in part by The Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  19. Food irradiation and sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephson, Edward S.

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25-70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning is achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70-80°C (bacon to 53°C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40°C to -20°C). Radappertozed foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for "wholesomeness" (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effecys of radappertization on the "wholesomeness" characteristics of these foods.

  20. Mechanisms of tumor-induced T cell immune suppression and therapeutics to counter those effects.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inkyu; Nguyen, Nguyet

    2015-08-01

    The theory of tumor immune surveillance states that the host immune system has means to recognize transformed cells and kills them to prevent growth and spreading of those cells. Nevertheless, cancer cells often survive and outgrow to form a tumor mass and metastasize to other tissues or organs. During the stage of immune evasion of tumor, various changes takes place both in the tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment to divert the anti-tumor immune responses by T cells and natural killer cells. Advances in the basic science in tumor immunology have led to development of many creative strategies to overcome the immune suppression imposed during tumor progression, a few of which have been approved for the treatment of cancer patients in the clinic. In the first part of this review, mechanisms of tumor-induced T cell immune suppression resulting in immune evasion of tumors will be discussed. In the second part, emerging methods to harness the immune responses against tumors will be introduced.

  1. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Research Society, Denver, CO, 2004. Dörthe Schaue, Yu-Pei Liao, Begonya Comin-Anduix, Antoni Ribas , Annelies Debucquoy, Karin Haustermans, and William H...Submitted, 2006. Schaue, D., Y. Liao, B. Comin-Anduix, A. Ribas , D.C. Altieri, A. Debucquoy, K. Haustermans and W.H. McBride: The Effect of Radiation...Comin-Anduix, A. Ribas , D.C. Altieri, A. Debucquoy, K. Haustermans and W.H. McBride: The Effect of Radiation Therapy on Tumor-Specific Immune Responses

  2. Heterologous prime-boost oral immunization with GK-1 peptide from Taenia crassiceps cysticerci induces protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Gladis; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Santana, M Angélica; Bobes, Raul J; Hernández, Beatriz; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Segura, René; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Sciutto, Edda; Rosas, Gabriela

    2011-07-01

    Oral immunization is a goal in vaccine development, particularly for pathogens that enter the host through the mucosal system. This study was designed to explore the immunogenic properties of the Taenia crassiceps protective peptide GK-1 administered orally. Mice were orally immunized with the synthetic GK-1 peptide in its linear form with or without the Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS) protein adjuvant or as a chimera recombinantly bound to BLS (BLS-GK-1). Mice were boosted twice with GK-1 only at 15-day intervals. A significant rate of protection of 64.7% was achieved in GK-1-immunized mice, and that rate significantly increased to 91.8 and 96% when mice were primed with GK-1 coadministered with BLS as an adjuvant and BLS as a carrier, respectively. Specific antibodies and T cell activation and proliferation accompanied the protection induced, revealing the potent immunogenicity of GK-1. Through immunohistochemical studies, GK-1 was detected in T and B cell zones of the Peyer's patches (PP) and mesenteric lymph nodes. In the latter, abundant proliferating cells were detected by 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. No proliferation was detected in PP. Altogether, these results portray the potent immunogenic properties of GK-1 administered orally and reinforce the usefulness of BLS as an adjuvant and adequate vaccine delivery system for oral vaccines.

  3. Immune surveillance of the CNS following infection and injury

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Matthew; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) contains a sophisticated neural network that must be constantly surveyed in order to detect and mitigate a diverse array of challenges. The innate and adaptive immune systems actively participate in this surveillance, which is critical for the maintenance of CNS homeostasis and can facilitate the resolution of infections, degeneration, and tissue damage. Infections and sterile injuries represent two common challenges imposed on the CNS that require a prompt immune response. While the inducers of these two challenges differ in origin, the resultant responses orchestrated by the CNS share some overlapping features. Here, we review how the CNS immunologically discriminates between pathogens and sterile injuries, mobilizes an immune reaction, and, ultimately, regulates local and peripherally-derived immune cells to provide a supportive milieu for tissue repair. PMID:26431941

  4. Does Infection-Induced Immune Activation Contribute to Dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Goularte, Jessica A; Collodel, Allan; Pitcher, Meagan R; Simões, Lutiana R; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is protected by a complex blood-brain barrier system; however, a broad diversity of virus, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa can gain access and cause illness. As pathogens replicate, they release molecules that can be recognized by innate immune cells. These molecules are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) and they are identified by pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) expressed on antigen-presenting cells. Examples of PRR include toll-like receptors (TLR), receptors for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), nucleotide binding oligomerisation domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLR), c-type lectin receptors (CLR), RIG-I-like receptors (RLR), and intra-cytosolic DNA sensors. The reciprocal action between PAMP and PRR triggers the release of inflammatory mediators that regulate the elimination of invasive pathogens. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) are endogenous constituents released from damaged cells that also have the ability to activate the innate immune response. An increase of RAGE expression levels on neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and endothelial cells could be responsible for the accumulation of αβ-amyloid in dementia and related to the chronic inflammatory state that is found in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26425389

  5. Heavy oil fractions induce negative influences on mouse immune system.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Sogo; Kanda, Kota; Yamawaki, Manami; Okabe, Masaaki; Akiyama, Koichi; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Sugahara, Takuya

    2009-10-01

    It is well known that heavy oil such as pollutant caused serious influences on the marine ecosystem. We may suffer from various disorders in our body via intake of marine foods polluted with heavy oil. However the influences of heavy oil on our immune system have not yet been clarified. Here we show the effects of heavy oil extracts, water-soluble fraction (WSF), methanol-soluble fraction (MSF) and ethanol-soluble fraction (ESF), on immunoglobulin production of mouse splenocytes. All extracts increased IgA productivity of splenocytes. In oral administration, shrinkage of the immune organs such as spleen or thymus was observed in only WSF-administrated mice at least during 7 days. The amount of IgG production level in splenocytes cultured medium and sera were reduced by each extract administration. A flowcytometry method, to monitor splenocytes of WSF-administrated mice, has been set up using double staining with B and T cell-specific surface antibody. The results from cell population analysis indicated that B cells, including plasma cells producing antibody were reduced. The decrease in IgG level in sera was caused by reduction of plasma cells in spleen. Hence, it is suggested that reduction of Ig production was affected by the chemical compounds contained in WSF possibly such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) through the estrogen receptor expressed in lymphocytes.

  6. Photodynamic therapy induces an immune response against a bacterial pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Vecchio, Daniela; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the triple combination of photosensitizers, visible light and ambient oxygen. When PDT is used for cancer, it has been observed that both arms of the host immune system (innate and adaptive) are activated. When PDT is used for infectious disease, however, it has been assumed that the direct antimicrobial PDT effect dominates. Murine arthritis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the knee failed to respond to PDT with intravenously injected Photofrin®. PDT with intra-articular Photofrin produced a biphasic dose response that killed bacteria without destroying host neutrophils. Methylene blue was the optimum photosensitizer to kill bacteria while preserving neutrophils. We used bioluminescence imaging to noninvasively monitor murine bacterial arthritis and found that PDT with intra-articular methylene blue was not only effective, but when used before infection, could protect the mice against a subsequent bacterial challenge. The data emphasize the importance of considering the host immune response in PDT for infectious disease. PMID:22882222

  7. Efficient loading of dendritic cells following cryo and radiofrequency ablation in combination with immune modulation induces anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    den Brok, M H M G M; Sutmuller, R P M; Nierkens, S; Bennink, E J; Frielink, C; Toonen, L W J; Boerman, O C; Figdor, C G; Ruers, T J M; Adema, G J

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells that play a pivotal role in the induction of immunity. Ex vivo-generated, tumour antigen-loaded mature DC are currently exploited as cancer vaccines in clinical studies. However, antigen loading and maturation of DC directly in vivo would greatly facilitate the application of DC-based vaccines. We formerly showed in murine models that radiofrequency-mediated tumour destruction can provide an antigen source for the in vivo induction of anti-tumour immunity, and we explored the role of DC herein. In this paper we evaluate radiofrequency and cryo ablation for their ability to provide an antigen source for DC and compare this with an ex vivo-loaded DC vaccine. The data obtained with model antigens demonstrate that upon tumour destruction by radiofrequency ablation, up to 7% of the total draining lymph node (LN) DC contained antigen, whereas only few DC from the conventional vaccine reached the LN. Interestingly, following cryo ablation the amount of antigen-loaded DC is almost doubled. Analysis of surface markers revealed that both destruction methods were able to induce DC maturation. Finally, we show that in situ tumour ablation can be efficiently combined with immune modulation by anti-CTLA-4 antibodies or regulatory T-cell depletion. These combination treatments protected mice from the outgrowth of tumour challenges, and led to in vivo enhancement of tumour-specific T-cell numbers, which produced more IFN-γ upon activation. Therefore, in situ tumour destruction in combination with immune modulation creates a unique, ‘in situ DC-vaccine' that is readily applicable in the clinic without prior knowledge of tumour antigens. PMID:16953240

  8. Inducible Defenses Stay Up Late: Temporal Patterns of Immune Gene Expression in Tenebrio molitor

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Paul R; Makarova, Olga; Rolff, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The course of microbial infection in insects is shaped by a two-stage process of immune defense. Constitutive defenses, such as engulfment and melanization, act immediately and are followed by inducible defenses, archetypically the production of antimicrobial peptides, which eliminate or suppress the remaining microbes. By applying RNAseq across a 7-day time course, we sought to characterize the long-lasting immune response to bacterial challenge in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor, a model for the biochemistry of insect immunity and persistent bacterial infection. By annotating a hybrid de novo assembly of RNAseq data, we were able to identify putative orthologs for the majority of components of the conserved insect immune system. Compared with Tribolium castaneum, the most closely related species with a reference genome sequence and a manually curated immune system annotation, the T. molitor immune gene count was lower, with lineage-specific expansions of genes encoding serine proteases and their countervailing inhibitors accounting for the majority of the deficit. Quantitative mapping of RNAseq reads to the reference assembly showed that expression of genes with predicted functions in cellular immunity, wound healing, melanization, and the production of reactive oxygen species was transiently induced immediately after immune challenge. In contrast, expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides or components of the Toll signaling pathway and iron sequestration response remained elevated for at least 7 days. Numerous genes involved in metabolism and nutrient storage were repressed, indicating a possible cost of immune induction. Strikingly, the expression of almost all antibacterial peptides followed the same pattern of long-lasting induction, regardless of their spectra of activity, signaling possible interactive roles in vivo. PMID:24318927

  9. Inducible defenses stay up late: temporal patterns of immune gene expression in Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Paul R; Makarova, Olga; Rolff, Jens

    2013-12-06

    The course of microbial infection in insects is shaped by a two-stage process of immune defense. Constitutive defenses, such as engulfment and melanization, act immediately and are followed by inducible defenses, archetypically the production of antimicrobial peptides, which eliminate or suppress the remaining microbes. By applying RNAseq across a 7-day time course, we sought to characterize the long-lasting immune response to bacterial challenge in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor, a model for the biochemistry of insect immunity and persistent bacterial infection. By annotating a hybrid de novo assembly of RNAseq data, we were able to identify putative orthologs for the majority of components of the conserved insect immune system. Compared with Tribolium castaneum, the most closely related species with a reference genome sequence and a manually curated immune system annotation, the T. molitor immune gene count was lower, with lineage-specific expansions of genes encoding serine proteases and their countervailing inhibitors accounting for the majority of the deficit. Quantitative mapping of RNAseq reads to the reference assembly showed that expression of genes with predicted functions in cellular immunity, wound healing, melanization, and the production of reactive oxygen species was transiently induced immediately after immune challenge. In contrast, expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides or components of the Toll signaling pathway and iron sequestration response remained elevated for at least 7 days. Numerous genes involved in metabolism and nutrient storage were repressed, indicating a possible cost of immune induction. Strikingly, the expression of almost all antibacterial peptides followed the same pattern of long-lasting induction, regardless of their spectra of activity, signaling possible interactive roles in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Johnston et al.

  10. Polycation-decorated PLA microspheres induce robust immune responses via commonly used parenteral administration routes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Wang, Lianyan; Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Weifeng; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Recombinant viral subunit-based vaccines have gained increasing attention due to their enhanced safety over the classic live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines. The low immunogenicity of the subunit antigen alone, however, requires the addition of an adjuvant to induce immunity. Particulate-based delivery systems have great potential for developing new vaccine adjuvants, compared to traditional aluminum-based saline adjuvants. The physicochemical properties of particulate vaccines have been extensively investigated; however, few studies have focused on how the administration route of various adjuvant-antigen combinations impacts the efficacy of the immune response. Here, for the first time, the viral Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was combined with aluminum-based or cationic-microsphere (MP) based adjuvants to investigate the characteristics of immune responses elicited after immunization via the subcutaneous, intramuscular, or intraperitoneal routes respectively. In vitro, the MP-based vaccine significantly increased dendritic cell (DC) activation with up-regulated CD40 and CD80 expression and IL-12 production compared to alum-based vaccine. After immunization, both MP and alum-based vaccines produced increased IgG titers in mice. The administration route of these vaccines did influenced immune responses. The MP-based vaccine delivered via the intramuscular route yielded the highest levels of the IgG2a isotype. The alum-based vaccine, delivered via the same route, produced an IgG1-dominated humoral immune response. Moreover, subcutaneous and intramuscular immunizations with MP-based vaccine augmented Granzyme B, Th1-type cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ), and Th2 cytokine IL-4 secretions. These results demonstrate that MP-based vaccines have the capacity to induce higher cellular and humoral immune response especially via an intramuscular administration route than an alum-based vaccine.

  11. Sterilization of space hardware.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pflug, I. J.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of various techniques of sterilization of space flight hardware using either destructive heating or the action of chemicals. Factors considered in the dry-heat destruction of microorganisms include the effects of microbial water content, temperature, the physicochemical properties of the microorganism and adjacent support, and nature of the surrounding gas atmosphere. Dry-heat destruction rates of microorganisms on the surface, between mated surface areas, or buried in the solid material of space vehicle hardware are reviewed, along with alternative dry-heat sterilization cycles, thermodynamic considerations, and considerations of final sterilization-process design. Discussed sterilization chemicals include ethylene oxide, formaldehyde, methyl bromide, dimethyl sulfoxide, peracetic acid, and beta-propiolactone.

  12. Sterilization of space hardware.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pflug, I. J.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of various techniques of sterilization of space flight hardware using either destructive heating or the action of chemicals. Factors considered in the dry-heat destruction of microorganisms include the effects of microbial water content, temperature, the physicochemical properties of the microorganism and adjacent support, and nature of the surrounding gas atmosphere. Dry-heat destruction rates of microorganisms on the surface, between mated surface areas, or buried in the solid material of space vehicle hardware are reviewed, along with alternative dry-heat sterilization cycles, thermodynamic considerations, and considerations of final sterilization-process design. Discussed sterilization chemicals include ethylene oxide, formaldehyde, methyl bromide, dimethyl sulfoxide, peracetic acid, and beta-propiolactone.

  13. Female Sterilization (Tubal Ligation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when you want to have it done. Some women are sterilized right after they have a baby or an abortion, ... videos on Youtube © 1998-2017 | Center for Young Women's Health, Boston Children's Hospital. All rights reserved.

  14. Protective immune response induced by co-immunization with the Trichinella spiralis recombinant Ts87 protein and a Ts87 DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaping; Yang, Xiaodi; Gu, Yuan; Wang, Yunyun; Zhao, Xi; Zhu, Xinping

    2013-05-20

    Ts87 is an immunodominant antigen that induces protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis larval challenge in mice. To determine if a combination of recombinant Ts87 protein and its coding DNA induces a stronger immune response in female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with 100 μg of recombinant Ts87 protein plus its coding DNA cloned in vector pVAX1, or the same amount of recombinant protein or DNA only. Mouse subclass IgG responses showed that both co-immunized and single-immunized mice produced a balanced IgG2a/IgG1 (Th1/Th2) response. T-cell proliferation in co-immunized animals was significantly higher than in single-immunized mice. Cytokine profiling in the co-immunization group showed a significant increase in the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ in the splenocytes of mice upon stimulation with the recombinant Ts87 protein; however, the expression of IL-17 was down-regulated. Challenge results showed that mice immunized with the recombinant Ts87 protein and its coding DNA produced reduced the muscle larval burden to a greater extent (43.8%) than the groups immunized with only the protein (39.7%) or the DNA (9.7%). A better Th1/Th2 immune response and consequent protection induced by co-immunization with the recombinant Ts87 protein and its coding DNA may result from an adjuvant effect of DNA and a specific persistent expression of Ts87.

  15. Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Induces an Innate Immune Response In vivo via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Yun; Strange, Daniel P; Wong, Teri Ann S; Lehrer, Axel T; Verma, Saguna

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the Filoviridae family, causes the most severe form of viral hemorrhagic fever. Although no FDA licensed vaccine or treatment against Ebola virus disease (EVD) is currently available, Ebola virus glycoprotein (GP) is the major antigen used in all candidate Ebola vaccines. Recent reports of protection as quickly as within 6 days of administration of the rVSV-based vaccine expressing EBOV GP before robust humoral responses were generated suggests that the innate immune responses elicited early after vaccination may contribute to the protection. However, the innate immune responses induced by EBOV GP in the absence of viral vectors or adjuvants have not been fully characterized in vivo. Our recent studies demonstrated that immunization with highly purified recombinant GP in the absence of adjuvants induced a robust IgG response and partial protection against EBOV infection suggesting that GP alone can induce protective immunity. In this study we investigated the early immune response to purified EBOV GP alone in vitro and in vivo. We show that GP was efficiently internalized by antigen presenting cells and subsequently induced production of key inflammatory cytokines. In vivo, immunization of mice with EBOV GP triggered the production of key Th1 and Th2 innate immune cytokines and chemokines, which directly governed the recruitment of CD11b(+) macrophages and CD11c(+) dendritic cells to the draining lymph nodes (DLNs). Pre-treatment of mice with a TLR4 antagonist inhibited GP-induced cytokine production and recruitment of immune cells to the DLN. EBOV GP also upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecules in bone marrow derived macrophages suggesting its ability to enhance APC stimulatory capacity, which is critical for the induction of effective antigen-specific adaptive immunity. Collectively, these results provide the first in vivo evidence that early innate immune responses to EBOV GP are mediated via the TLR4 pathway and are

  16. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  17. Hydralazine-induced pauci-immune glomerulonephritis: intriguing case series with misleading diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Faizan; Posner, Jeffery N.; Obah, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine has been used since the 1950s for the management of hypertension. Evidence for hydralazine-associated vasculitis dates to pre-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) era. This abstract describes two cases of ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) in challenging scenarios where diagnosis was misconstrued. A comprehensive literature review was done to understand the pathogenesis of drug-induced pauci-immune GN. We have described key diagnostic features that are helpful in distinguishing idiopathic ANCA vasculitis from drug-induced vasculitis. Additionally, we have also described different treatments meant to provide therapy options with the least side effects. PMID:27124161

  18. Hydralazine-induced pauci-immune glomerulonephritis: intriguing case series with misleading diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Babar, Faizan; Posner, Jeffery N; Obah, Eugene A

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine has been used since the 1950s for the management of hypertension. Evidence for hydralazine-associated vasculitis dates to pre-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) era. This abstract describes two cases of ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) in challenging scenarios where diagnosis was misconstrued. A comprehensive literature review was done to understand the pathogenesis of drug-induced pauci-immune GN. We have described key diagnostic features that are helpful in distinguishing idiopathic ANCA vasculitis from drug-induced vasculitis. Additionally, we have also described different treatments meant to provide therapy options with the least side effects.

  19. Neonatal Immunization with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoprotein Fragment Induces Protective Immunity in the Presence of Maternal Antibodies in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Youran; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Cheon, In Su; Rho, Semi; Kim, Hee Joo; Choi, Youngjoo; Kang, Chang-Yuil; Chang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in infants and the elderly worldwide. The significant morbidity and mortality associated with this infection underscores the urgent need for development of RSV vaccine. In this study, we first show that intranasal administration of RSV glycoprotein core fragment (Gcf) to neonatal mice can induce systemic humoral immune responses and protective immunity against RSV without causing lung eosinophilia, although antibody response was shifted to a Th2 response. Next, we examined whether the presence of maternal anti-RSV antibodies would affect the responsiveness and protection efficacy of Gcf in newborn mice, since infants can possess RSV-specific maternal antibodies due to frequent RSV re-infections to adults. Intranasal administration of Gcf induced antibody response and increased IFNγ secretion and protected mice against RSV challenge without severe lung eosinophilia, even in the presence of high levels of RSV-specific maternal antibodies. Thus, our findings suggest that Gcf may be an effective and safe RSV vaccine during the neonatal period. PMID:23869549

  20. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor of Sciaenops ocellatus regulates immune cell trafficking and is involved in pathogen-induced immune response.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Reng; Li, Jun; Xiao, Zhi-Zhong; Sun, Li

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multi-functional cytokine involved in immunoregulation and inflammation. In this study, we examined the expression and biological function of a MIF, SoMIF, from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. SoMIF is composed of 115 residues and shares 85-99% overall sequence identities with the MIF of a number of teleost. SoMIF expression was detected in a wide range of tissues and upregulated by bacterial and viral infection in a time-dependent manner. In head kidney (HK) leukocytes, pathogen infection induced SoMIF expression, and the expressed SoMIF was secreted into the extracellular milieu. Recombinant SoMIF (rSoMIF) purified from Escherichia coli inhibited the migration of both HK monocytes and lymphocytes, and this inhibitory effect was abolished by the presence of anti-rSoMIF antibodies. When rSoMIF was administered into red drum, it stimulated the production of reactive oxygen species in HK monocytes both in the presence and absence of pathogen infection. In vivo infection study showed that compared to untreated fish, fish pre-treated with rSoMIF before bacterial infection exhibited significantly lower bacterial loads in blood, kidney, spleen, and liver. Taken together, these results indicate that SoMIF is a secreted protein that regulates immune cell trafficking and is involved in pathogen-induced immune response.

  1. Peptides derived from cardiovascular G-protein-coupled receptors induce morphological cardiomyopathic changes in immunized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Matsui, S; Fu, M L; Katsuda, S; Hayase, M; Yamaguchi, N; Teraoka, K; Kurihara, T; Takekoshi, N; Murakami, E; Hoebeke, J; Hjalmarson, A

    1997-02-01

    An experimental model of early-stage cardiomyopathy was created by immunizing rabbits for 1 year with synthetic peptides corresponding to the sequence of the second extracellular loop of either beta-adrenoceptors or M2-muscarinic receptors. Thirty male rabbits were used and divided into three groups: a control group (n = 10), a group immunized with the peptide corresponding to the beta-adrenoceptor (beta 1 group) (n = 10) and a group immunized with the peptide corresponding to the M2-muscarinic receptor (M2 group) (n = 10). If the sera from both groups of immunized rabbits high-titres of anti-peptide antibodies were found throughout the study period but not in the sera from control rabbits or in the preimmune sera of immunized rabbits. No significant cross-reaction with peptides other than those used for immunization was found. The myocardial receptor density of both immunized groups displayed a strong trend toward receptor up-regulation. This was significant in the beta 1 group but not in the M2 group. Both groups of immunized rabbits displayed significantly enlarged ventricles and thinner walls, as compared with the control group. However, in contrast to the beta 1 group, which showed enlarged cavities in both left and right ventricles, the M2 group was mainly affected in the right ventricles. Moreover, morphological examinations of the hearts of rabbits from both immunized groups demonstrated focal myofibrillar lysis, loss of myofilament, mitochondrial swelling and condensation, sarcoplasmic vacuolation, deposition of dense granules in the sarcoplasm and the myofibrils. One of the sex control rabbit hearts which were examined showed mild degenerative changes in the myocardium and scant mononuclear cell infiltration. However, when all the control rabbit hearts were examined by electron microscopy, no significant alterations were found. These results suggest that immunization by peptides, corresponding to the target sequences for anti-receptor autoantibodies in

  2. Pertussis immunity and epidemiology: mode and duration of vaccine-induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Magpantay, F M G; Domenech DE Cellès, M; Rohani, P; King, A A

    2016-06-01

    The resurgence of pertussis in some countries that maintain high vaccination coverage has drawn attention to gaps in our understanding of the epidemiological effects of pertussis vaccines. In particular, major questions surround the nature, degree and durability of vaccine protection. To address these questions, we used mechanistic transmission models to examine regional time series incidence data from Italy in the period immediately following the introduction of acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine. Our results concur with recent animal-challenge experiments wherein infections in aP-vaccinated individuals proved as transmissible as those in naive individuals but much less symptomatic. On the other hand, the data provide evidence for vaccine-driven reduction in susceptibility, which we quantify via a synthetic measure of vaccine impact. As to the precise nature of vaccine failure, the data do not allow us to distinguish between leakiness and waning of vaccine immunity, or some combination of these. Across the range of well-supported models, the nature and duration of vaccine protection, the age profile of incidence and the range of projected epidemiological futures differ substantially, underscoring the importance of the remaining unknowns. We identify key data gaps: sources of data that can supply the information needed to eliminate these remaining uncertainties.

  3. RNAi Induces Innate Immunity through Multiple Cellular Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Pei, Rongjuan; Xu, Yang; Yang, Dongliang; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Mengji

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Our previous results showed that the knockdown of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by RNA interference (RNAi) led to upregulation of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) in primary hepatocytes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the cellular signaling pathways recognizing RNA molecules may be involved the ISG stimulation by RNAi. Methods Primary murine hepatocytes (PMHs) from wild type mice and WHV transgenic (Tg) mice were prepared and treated with defined siRNAs. The mRNA levels of target genes and ISGs were detected by real-time RT-PCR. The involvement of the signaling pathways including RIG-I/MDA5, PKR, and TLR3/7/8/9 was examined by specific inhibition and the analysis of their activation by Western blotting. Results In PMHs from WHV Tg mice, specific siRNAs targeting WHV, mouse β-actin, and GAPDH reduced the levels of targeted mRNAs and increased the mRNA expression of IFN-β, MxA, and IP-10. The enhanced ISG expression by siRNA transfection were abolished by siRNA-specific 2′-O-methyl antisense RNA and the inhibitors 2-AP and chloroquine blocking PKR and other TLR-mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, Western blotting revealed that RNAi results in an increase in PKR phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 and NF-êB, indicating the possible role of IRF3 in the RNAi-directed induction of ISGs. In contrast, silencing of RIG-I and MDA5 failed to block RNAi-mediated MxA induction. Conclusions RNAi is capable of enhancing innate immune responses through the PKR- and TLR-dependent signaling pathways in primary hepatocytes. The immune stimulation by RNAi may contribute to the antiviral activity of siRNAs in vivo. PMID:23700487

  4. Simulating sterilization, vaccination, and test-and-remove as brucellosis control measures in bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebinger, M.; Cross, P.; Wallen, Rick; White, P.J.; Treanor, John

    2011-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, infects wildlife, cattle, and humans worldwide, but management of the disease is often hindered by the logistics of controlling its prevalence in wildlife reservoirs. We used an individually based epidemiological model to assess the relative efficacies of three management interventions (sterilization, vaccination, and test-and-remove). The model was parameterized with demographic and epidemiological data from bison in Yellowstone National Park, USA. Sterilization and test-and-remove were most successful at reducing seroprevalence when they were targeted at young seropositive animals, which are the most likely age and sex category to be infectious. However, these approaches also required the most effort to implement. Vaccination was less effective (even with a perfect vaccine) but also required less effort to implement. For the treatment efforts we explored (50–100 individuals per year or 2.5–5% of the female population), sterilization had little impact upon the bison population growth rate when selectively applied. The population growth rate usually increased by year 25 due to the reduced number of Brucella-induced abortions. Initial declines in seroprevalence followed by rapid increases (>15% increase in 5 years) occurred in 3–13% of simulations with sterilization and test-and-remove, but not vaccination. We believe this is due to the interaction of superspreading events and the loss of herd immunity in the later stages of control efforts as disease prevalence declines. Sterilization provided a mechanism for achieving large disease reductions while simultaneously limiting population growth, which may be advantageous in some management scenarios. However, the field effort required to find the small segment of the population that is infectious rather than susceptible or recovered will likely limit the utility of this approach in many free-ranging wildlife populations. Nevertheless, we encourage

  5. Cyclophosphamide induces a type I interferon-associated sterile inflammatory response signature in cancer patients' blood cells: implications for cancer chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moschella, Federica; Torelli, Giovanni Fernando; Valentini, Mara; Urbani, Francesca; Buccione, Carla; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Natalino, Fiammetta; Belardelli, Filippo; Foà, Robin; Proietti, Enrico

    2013-08-01

    Certain chemotherapeutics, particularly cyclophosphamide, can enhance the antitumor efficacy of immunotherapy. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of cyclophosphamide-mediated immunomodulation is needed to improve the efficacy of chemoimmunotherapy. Transcript profiling and flow cytometry were used to explore cyclophosphamide-induced immunoadjuvanticity in patients with hematologic malignancies. A single high-dose treatment rapidly (1-2 days) induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) transcriptional modulation, leading to reduction of cell-cycle and biosynthetic/metabolic processes and augmentation of DNA damage and cell death pathways (p53 signaling pathway), death-related scavenger receptors, antigen processing/presentation mediators, T-cell activation markers and, noticeably, a type I IFN (IFN-I) signature (OAS1, CXCL10, BAFF, IFITM2, IFI6, IRF5, IRF7, STAT2, UBE2L6, UNC93B1, ISG20L1, TYK2). Moreover, IFN-I-induced proinflammatory mediators (CXCL10, CCL2, IL-8, and BAFF) were increased in patients' plasma. Accordingly, cyclophosphamide induced the expansion/activation of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes, of HLA-DR(+), IL-8RA(+), and MARCO(+) monocytes/dendritic cells, and of CD69(+), OX40(+), and IL-8RA(+) lymphocytes. Altogether, these data identify the cyclophosphamide-induced immunomodulatory factors in humans and indicate that preconditioning chemotherapy may stimulate immunity as a consequence of danger perception associated with blood cell death, through p53 and IFN-I-related mechanisms. ©2013 AACR.

  6. Hysteroscopic Tubal Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    McMartin, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Hysteroscopic tubal sterilization is a minimally invasive alternative to laparoscopic tubal ligation for women who want permanent contraception. The procedures involves non-surgical placement of permanent microinserts into both fallopian tubes. Patients must use alternative contraception for at least 3 months postprocedure until tubal occlusion is confirmed. Compared to tubal ligation, potential advantages of the hysteroscopic procedure are that it can be performed in 10 minutes in an office setting without the use of general or even local anesthesia. Objective The objective of this analysis was to determine the effectiveness and safety of hysteroscopic tubal sterilization compared with tubal ligation for permanent female sterilization. Data Sources A standard systematic literature search was conducted for studies published from January 1, 2008, until December 11, 2012. Review Methods Observational studies, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews and meta-analyses with 1 month or more of follow-up were examined. Outcomes included failure/pregnancy rates, adverse events, and patient satisfaction. Results No RCTs were identified. Two systematic reviews covered 22 observational studies of hysteroscopic sterilization. Only 1 (N = 93) of these 22 studies compared hysteroscopic sterilization to laparoscopic tubal ligation. Two other noncomparative case series not included in the systematic reviews were also identified. In the absence of comparative studies, data on tubal ligation were derived for this analysis from the CREST study, a large, multicentre, prospective, noncomparative observational study in the United States (GRADE low). Overall, hysteroscopic sterilization is associated with lower pregnancy rates and lower complication rates compared to tubal ligation. No deaths have been reported for hysteroscopic sterilization. Limitations A lack of long-term follow-up for hysteroscopic sterilization and a paucity of studies that directly

  7. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis: Chemoprevention by dietary botanical agents

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of immune-suppressed transplant recipients and patients with biopsy-proven skin cancer have confirmed that ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for the development of skin cancer in humans. UV radiation suppresses the immune system in several ways. The UVB spectrum inhibits antigen presentation, induces the release of immunosuppressive cytokines, and elicits DNA damage that is a molecular trigger of UV-mediated immunosuppression. It is therefore important to elucidate the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immunosuppression as a basis for developing strategies to protect individuals from this effect and subsequent development of skin cancer. Dietary botanicals are of particular interest as they have been shown to inhibit UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the most recent investigations and mechanistic studies regarding the photoprotective efficacy of selected dietary agents, including, green tea polyphenols, grape seed proanthocyanidins and silymarin. We present evidence that these chemopreventive agents prevent UVB-induced immunosuppression and photocarcinogenesis through: (i) The induction of immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-12; (ii) IL-12-dependent DNA repair; and (iii) Stimulation of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor microenvironment. The new information regarding the mechanisms of action of these agents supports their potential use as adjuncts in the prevention of photocarcinogenesis. PMID:17382466

  9. UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis: chemoprevention by dietary botanical agents.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2007-09-18

    Studies of immune-suppressed transplant recipients and patients with biopsy-proven skin cancer have confirmed that ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for the development of skin cancer in humans. UV radiation suppresses the immune system in several ways. The UVB spectrum inhibits antigen presentation, induces the release of immunosuppressive cytokines, and elicits DNA damage that is a molecular trigger of UV-mediated immunosuppression. It is therefore important to elucidate the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immunosuppression as a basis for developing strategies to protect individuals from this effect and subsequent development of skin cancer. Dietary botanicals are of particular interest as they have been shown to inhibit UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the most recent investigations and mechanistic studies regarding the photoprotective efficacy of selected dietary agents, including, green tea polyphenols, grape seed proanthocyanidins and silymarin. We present evidence that these chemopreventive agents prevent UVB-induced immunosuppression and photocarcinogenesis through: (i) the induction of immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-12; (ii) IL-12-dependent DNA repair; and (iii) stimulation of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor microenvironment. The new information regarding the mechanisms of action of these agents supports their potential use as adjuncts in the prevention of photocarcinogenesis.

  10. Manipulation of the immune evasive properties of circulating cathodic antigen induces protective immunity against Schistosomiasis mansoni in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Abdeen, Sherif H

    2010-01-01

    Schistosome circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) has been hypothesized to take part in immune evasion mechanisms that protect against host's immunity. To dissect its immunogenicity, lymphoproliferative responses of splenocytes were assessed in C57BL/6 mice immunized with recombinant plasmid constructs expressing full-length and truncated fragments of CCA cDNA, before and after challenge infection with S. mansoni cercariae. Prior to challenge, splenocytes of immunized mice showed low responses to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and high responses to native CCA, compared to controls. After challenge, PHA-responses increased on day 3 through day 7 and subsequently declined. On the other hand, CCA-induced responses increased on day 3 post-challenge then declined in mice immunized with CCA fragments lacking the N-terminus (-N CCA). Whereas, mice immunized with full-length or CCA fragment lacking the C-terminus (-C CCA) showed a delayed increase of CCA-induced responses that maximize on day 25. Interestingly, animals immunized with -N CCA showed a significant reduction in worm burden between 42-51%, while, mice immunized with full-length or -C CCA showed lower protection levels of about 15 and 37%, respectively. These findings suggest that CCA may contain immunosuppressive epitopes on the N-terminus. Abrogation of these epitopes could disrupt the immune evasion mechanism orchestrated by CCA, which could aid the development of an alternative vaccination approach.

  11. Intranasal immunization with novel EspA-Tir-M fusion protein induces protective immunity against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruqin; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Yiduo; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fachao; Long, Beiguo; Li, Yawen; Wu, Yuhua; Wu, Xianbo; Fan, Hongying

    2017-04-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Due to the risks associated with antibiotic treatment against EHEC O157:H7 infection, vaccines represent a promising method for prevention of EHEC O157:H7 infection. Therefore, we constructed the novel bivalent antigen EspA-Tir-M as a candidate EHEC O157:H7 subunit vaccine. We then evaluated the immunogenicity of this novel EHEC O157:H7 subunit vaccine. Immune responses to the fusion protein administered by intranasal and subcutaneous routes were compared in mice. Results showed higher levels of specific mucosal and systemic antibody responses induced by intranasal as compared to subcutaneous immunization. Intranasal immunization enhanced the concentration of interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and interferon-γ, while subcutaneous immunization enhanced only the latter two. In addition, intranasal immunization protected against EHEC O157:H7 colonization and infection in mice at a rate of 90%.Histopathological analysis revealed that vaccination reduced colon damage, especially when administered intranasally. In contrast, subcutaneous immunization elicited a weak immune response and exhibited a low protection rate. These findings demonstrate that intranasal immunization with the fusion protein induces both humoral and cellular immune (Th1/Th2) responses in mice. The novel EspA-Tir-M novel fusion protein therefore represents a promising subunit vaccine against EHEC O157:H7 infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Virus-associated activation of innate immunity induces rapid disruption of Peyer's patches in mice.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Anz, David; Stephan, Nicolas; Bohn, Bernadette; Herbst, Tina; Fendler, Wolfgang Peter; Suhartha, Nina; Sandholzer, Nadja; Kobold, Sebastian; Hotz, Christian; Eisenächer, Katharina; Radtke-Schuller, Susanne; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole

    2013-10-10

    Early in the course of infection, detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by innate immune receptors can shape the subsequent adaptive immune response. Here we investigate the influence of virus-associated innate immune activation on lymphocyte distribution in secondary lymphoid organs. We show for the first time that virus infection of mice induces rapid disruption of the Peyer's patches but not of other secondary lymphoid organs. The observed effect was not dependent on an active infectious process, but due to innate immune activation and could be mimicked by virus-associated molecular patterns such as the synthetic double-stranded RNA poly(I:C). Profound histomorphologic changes in Peyer's patches were associated with depletion of organ cellularity, most prominent among the B-cell subset. We demonstrate that the disruption is entirely dependent on type I interferon (IFN). At the cellular level, we show that virus-associated immune activation by IFN-α blocks B-cell trafficking to the Peyer's patches by downregulating expression of the homing molecule α4β7-integrin. In summary, our data identify a mechanism that results in type I IFN-dependent rapid but reversible disruption of intestinal lymphoid organs during systemic viral immune activation. We propose that such rerouted lymphocyte trafficking may impact the development of B-cell immunity to systemic viral pathogens.

  13. Intranasal immunization with protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis induces a long-term immunological memory response.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun-Je; Kang, Seok-Seong; Park, Sung-Moo; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Although intranasal vaccination has been shown to be effective for the protection against inhalational anthrax, establishment of long-term immunity has yet to be achieved. Here, we investigated whether intranasal immunization with recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of Bacillus anthracis induces immunological memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments. Intranasal immunization with rPA plus cholera toxin (CT) sustained PA-specific antibody responses for 6 months in lung, nasal washes, and vaginal washes as well as serum. A significant induction of PA-specific memory B cells was observed in spleen, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) and lung after booster immunization. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT remarkably generated effector memory CD4(+) T cells in the lung. PA-specific CD4(+) T cells preferentially increased the expression of Th1- and Th17-type cytokines in lung, but not in spleen or CLNs. Collectively, the intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT promoted immunologic memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments, providing long-term immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Longitudinal study of circulating immune complexes in a patient with Staphylococcus albus-induced shunt nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Harkiss, G D; Brown, D L; Evans, D B

    1979-01-01

    The direct measurement and partial characterization of circulating immune complexes has been performed in a longitudinal study of a patient with Staphylococcus albus-induced shunt nephritis. The high levels of immune complexes were associated with cryoglobulinaemia and hypocomplementaemia. The activation of complement was found to be via the classical pathway, but the functioning of the alternative pathway may have been impaired in vivo due to very low levels of C3. The host response to the infection was also characterized by the production of a marked macroglobulinaemia, high titres of rheumatoid factor and a typical acute phase increase in the C-reactive protein level. Immune complex levels were persistently elevated many months after the removal of the focus of the infection. A possible explanation for this surprising finding may lie in the nature of the antigens in the immune complexes. It was found that the immune complexes contained both antibodies to and antigens from Staphlococcus albus. In particular, glycerol teichoic acid and staphylococcal nuclease were identified as components of the immune complexes present during the acute phase. Glycerol teichoic acid was also identified in the immune complexes found later although other Staphylococcus albus antigens as yet unidentified were also present and persisted in the circulation for several months. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:115626

  15. Waning of vaccine-induced immunity to measles in kidney transplanted children.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Salvatore; Santilli, Veronica; Cotugno, Nicola; Concato, Carlo; Manno, Emma Concetta; Nocentini, Giulia; Macchiarulo, Giulia; Cancrini, Caterina; Finocchi, Andrea; Guzzo, Isabella; Dello Strologo, Luca; Palma, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients who undergo immunosuppression after transplantation. Data on immune responses and long-term maintenance after vaccinations in such population are still limited.We cross-sectionally evaluated the maintenance of immune response to measles vaccine in kidney transplanted children on immunosuppressive therapy. Measles-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and B-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot were performed in 74 kidney transplant patients (Tps) and in 23 healthy controls (HCs) previously vaccinated and tested for humoral protection against measles. The quality of measles antibody response was measured by avidity test. B-cell phenotype, investigated via flow cytometry, was further correlated to the ability of Tps to maintain protective humoral responses to measles over time.We observed the loss of vaccine-induced immunity against measles in 19% of Tps. Nonseroprotected children showed signs of impaired B-cell distribution as well as immune senescence and lower antibody avidity. We further reported as time elapsed between vaccination and transplantation, as well as the vaccine administration during dialysis are clinical factors affecting the maintenance of the immune memory response against measles.Tps present both quantitative and qualitative alterations in the maintenance of protective immunity to measles vaccine. Prospective studies are needed to optimize the vaccination schedules in kidney transplant recipients in order to increase the immunization coverage over time in this population.

  16. Prevention effects of Schisandra polysaccharide on radiation-induced immune system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lian-Mei; Jia, Yun-Long; Ma, Ming; Duan, Yu-Qing; Liu, Li-Hua

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the efficacy of SP (Schisandra polysaccharide) in prevention of radiation-induced immune dysfunction and discussed the underlying mechanisms with a Bal/bc mouse model. The data demonstrated that SP could reverse the decreases in the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) and complement C3 in blood serum were all decreased after radiation and SP could restore this radiation disorder. Furthermore, SP could reverse the deregulation of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell subsets in peripheral blood and thymus of mice after radiotherapy. We also performed terminal dexynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) to investigate the apoptosis and underlying mechanisms of SP in thymus. Data showed that radiation-induced apoptosis of thymocytes could be reversed by SP through inducing upregulation of Bcl-2 expression and downregulation of Fas and Bax levels. Furthermore, SP has no any side-effects on immunity of normal mice. In conclusion, our results indicated that SP could effectively prevent immune injury during radiotherapy by protecting the immune system. This valuable information should be of assistance in choosing a rational design for therapeutic interventions of prevention immune system damage in the radiation treatment.

  17. Commonly administered bacille Calmette-Guerin strains induce comparable immune response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Fang; Dai, Fu-Ying; Gong, Xue-Li; Bao, Lang

    2015-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is currently the only available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), but its protective efficacy in adults is highly variable. This study aimed to compare the immune response induced by two widely used BCG strains: BCG China strain (derivative of BCG Danish strain) in DU2-III group and BCG Pasteur in DU2 -IV group. Healthy BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG China strain or BCG Pasteur strain. Specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a antibodies titers, the proliferation of splenocytes, the percentages of splenocyte subsets and the concentrations of induced IFN-γ and IL-4 at 6th, 8th, 10th, and 12th weeks after the immunization were detected. We found that BCG Pasteur strain induced higher specific IgG and IgG1 titers, higher proliferation of splenocytes, higher percentages of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, and higher concentration of secreted IFN-γ than BCG China strain. However, there were no significant differences in IgG2a titer and IL-4 concentration between both strains. In conclusion, our study shows that immune responses to BCG vaccine differ by strain, which may account for variable outcomes of BCG immunization. PMID:26629084

  18. Human Pappilomavirus (HPV) induced cancers and prevention by immunization.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Sheikh Abdul; Shyum Naqvi, Syed Baqir; Fatima, Anab

    2012-10-01

    Incidences of different types of cancer are increasing in Pakistan, among which cancer of Cervix and Respiratory pappilomatosis are of great concern because of their association with human Pappilomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancers typically distress women of middle age or older; however it may affect women in any age after the puberty. Two serotypes of HPV (16 & 18) accounts 70% of cervical cancer cases, while HPV (6 & 11) are considered low-risk viruses associated with genital warts (Condyloma acuminata) and Respiratory pappilomatosis in both gender. Generally, there is transient role of HPV in human body and are removed by immune system in or around 1 year. Data from different Pakistani hospitals provides sound evidence for increasing trends of cervical cancer, which is, being developing country imperative for us. As the cost of cancer management is increasing day by day with poor survival rate and its burden is borne by patient, their family or society in-large, so if screening or prevention is possible then there would be need to identify target population for screening and vaccination. By quality adjusted life year (QALY) measurement, the data from different sources indicates that adolescent age is the appropriate target population and is cost effective for vaccination. Two vaccines manufactured by recombinant DNA technology are licensed in some parts of the world for prevention of HPV related cancers, however both have certain advantage over another, as one of the vaccines contains viral like proteins of two HPV serotypes 16 & 18 and provide additional cross protection against HPV type 13 and 45 with 100% seroprotection, while the other vaccine, being quadrivalent offers protection against four serotypes 6, 11, 16 and 18. Both vaccines tolerability and safety profiles are similar and acceptable, however bivalent vaccine appears to provide long-lasting immunity by the development of memory B-cells hypothetically due to difference of adsorbing agent used by

  19. Global threshold dynamics of an SIVS model with waning vaccine-induced immunity and nonlinear incidence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junyuan; Martcheva, Maia; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing the spread of infectious diseases. For many diseases, vaccine-induced immunity is not life long and the duration of immunity is not always fixed. In this paper, we propose an SIVS model taking the waning of vaccine-induced immunity and general nonlinear incidence into consideration. Our analysis shows that the model exhibits global threshold dynamics in the sense that if the basic reproduction number is less than 1, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable implying the disease dies out; while if the basic reproduction number is larger than 1, then the endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable indicating that the disease persists. This global threshold result indicates that if the vaccination coverage rate is below a critical value, then the disease always persists and only if the vaccination coverage rate is above the critical value, the disease can be eradicated.

  20. Steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in immune thrombocytopenia treatment with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios Ch; Mouzopoulos, George; Floros, Themistoklis; Tzurbakis, Matthaios

    2015-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a devastating complication of steroid administration and has rarely been observed in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia. The treatment of osteochondral defects in advanced stages of avascular necrosis (AVN), characterized by collapse of the subchondral bone, remains an unsolved burden in orthopedic surgery. In this report, we present a case of a 19-year-old female that was admitted in the Emergency Department with walking disability and painful hip joint movement due to steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis. Two years before she was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia, for which she received pulse steroid therapy with high dose of dexamethasone and underwent a splenectomy. This case report is the first to describe the use of osteochondral autograft transplantation as a treatment of steroid-induced AVN of the femoral head due to immune thrombocytopenia at the age of 19 years with very good clinical and radiological results 3 years postoperatively.

  1. A VACCINE STRATEGY THAT INDUCES PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY AGAINST HEROIN

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, G. Neil; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Edwards, Scott; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Schulteis, Gery; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Zakhari, Joseph S.; Koob, George F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2011-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a wide-reaching problem with a spectrum of damaging social consequences. A vaccine capable of blocking heroin's effects could provide a long-lasting and sustainable adjunct to heroin addiction therapy. Heroin, however, presents a particularly challenging immunotherapeutic target as it is metabolized to multiple psychoactive molecules. To reconcile this dilemma we examined the idea of a singular vaccine with the potential to display multiple drug-like antigens; thus two haptens were synthesized, one heroin-like and another morphine-like in chemical structure. A key feature in this approach is that immunopresentation with the heroin-like hapten is thought to be immunochemically dynamic such that multiple haptens are simultaneously presented to the immune system. We demonstrate the significance of this approach though the extremely rapid generation of robust polyclonal antibody titers with remarkable specificity. Importantly, both the antinociceptive effects of heroin and acquisition of heroin self-administration were blocked in rats vaccinated using the heroin-like hapten. PMID:21692508

  2. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Dohi, Makoto

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  3. Compositional analysis of grain and forage from MON 87427, an inducible male sterile and tissue selective glyphosate-tolerant maize product for hybrid seed production.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Tyamagondlu V; Breeze, Matthew L; Liu, Kang; Harrigan, George G; Culler, Angela H

    2014-02-26

    Conventional maize hybrid seed production has historically relied upon detasseling using either manual methods or semiautomated processes to ensure the purity of the hybrid cross. Monsanto Co. has developed biotechnology-derived MON 87427 maize with tissue-selective glyphosate tolerance to facilitate the production of hybrid maize seed. MON 87427 utilizes a specific promoter and intron combination to drive expression of CP4 EPSPS protein in vegetative and female reproductive tissues, conferring tolerance to glyphosate. This specific combination of regulatory elements also results in limited or no production of CP4 EPSPS protein in two key male reproductive tissues: pollen microspores, which develop into pollen grains, and tapetum cells that supply nutrients to the pollen. Thus, MON 87427 induces a male sterile phenotype after appropriately timed glyphosate applications. To confer additional benefits of herbicide tolerance and/or insect resistance, MON 87427 was combined with MON 89034 and NK603 by conventional breeding to develop MON 87427 × MON 89034 × NK603. The work described here is an assessment of the nutrient, antinutrient, and secondary metabolite levels in grain and forage tissues of MON 87427 and MON 87427 × MON 89034 × NK603. Results demonstrated that MON 87427 is compositionally equivalent to a near-isogenic conventional comparator. Results from this analysis established that the compositional equivalence observed for the single-event product MON 87427 is extendable to the combined-trait product, MON 87427 × MON 89034 × NK603. With increasing global demand for food production, the development of more efficient seed production strategies is important to sustainable agriculture. The study reported here demonstrated that biotechnology can be applied to simplify hybrid maize seed production without affecting crop composition.

  4. Montanide ISA™ 201 adjuvanted FMD vaccine induces improved immune responses and protection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Dar, Pervaiz; Kalaivanan, Ramya; Sied, Nuru; Mamo, Bedaso; Kishore, Subodh; Suryanarayana, V V S; Kondabattula, Ganesh

    2013-07-18

    Despite significant advancements in modern vaccinology, inactivated whole virus vaccines for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remain the mainstay for prophylactic and emergency uses. Many efforts are currently devoted to improve the immune responses and protective efficacy of these vaccines. Adjuvants, which are often used to potentiate immune responses, provide an excellent mean to improve the efficacy of FMD vaccines. This study aimed to evaluate three oil adjuvants namely: Montanide ISA-201, ISA-206 (SEPPIC, France) and GAHOL (an in-house developed oil-adjuvant) for adjuvant potential in inactivated FMD vaccine. Groups of cattle (n=6) were immunized once intramuscularly with monovalent FMDV 'O' vaccine formulated in these adjuvants, and humoral (serum neutralizing antibody, IgG1 and IgG2) and cellular (lymphoproliferation) responses were measured. Montanide ISA-201 adjuvanted vaccine induced earlier and higher neutralizing antibody responses as compared to the two other adjuvants. All the adjuvants induced mainly serum IgG1 isotype antibody responses against FMDV. However, Montanide ISA-201 induced relatively higher IgG2 responses than the other two adjuvants. Lymphoproliferative responses to recall FMDV antigen were relatively higher with Montanide ISA-201, although not always statistically significant. On homologous FMDV challenge at 30 days post-vaccination, 100% (6/6) of the cattle immunized with Montanide-201 adjuvanted vaccine were protected, which was superior to those immunized with ISA-206 (66.6%, 4/6) or GAHOL adjuvanted vaccine (50%, 3/6). Virus replication following challenge infection, as determined by presence of the viral genome in oropharynx and non-structural protein serology, was lowest with Montanide ISA-201 adjuvant. Collectively, these results indicate that the Montanide ISA-201 adjuvanted FMD vaccine induces enhanced immune responses and protective efficacy in cattle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation-Induce Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Riverside, CA Invited Seminar: "The Proteasome as a Senor of Stress " 3/17/04 UCLA Department of Dentistry Monthly Seminar, Los Angeles, CA Invited...affects protective antitutnor imnmunity induced by Chymotrypsin-like activity was measured using 100 pM SucLLVY-7- AdVMARTI/DC vaccination amido -4...adjuvant activity was heightened if the cells were first stressed by radiation, indicating that injury can modulate this effect. In situ induction of

  6. Breast milk immune complexes are potent inducers of oral tolerance in neonates and prevent asthma development.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, E; Rekima, A; Seitz-Polski, B; Kanda, A; Fleury, S; Tissandie, E; Monteiro, R; Dombrowicz, D D; Julia, V; Glaichenhaus, N; Verhasselt, V

    2010-09-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic lung disease resulting from an inappropriate T helper (Th)-2 response to environmental antigens. Early tolerance induction is an attractive approach for primary prevention of asthma. Here, we found that breastfeeding by antigen-sensitized mothers exposed to antigen aerosols during lactation induced a robust and long-lasting antigen-specific protection from asthma. Protection was more profound and persistent than the one induced by antigen-exposed non-sensitized mothers. Milk from antigen-exposed sensitized mothers contained antigen-immunoglobulin (Ig) G immune complexes that were transferred to the newborn through the neonatal Fc receptor resulting in the induction of antigen-specific FoxP3(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells. The induction of oral tolerance by milk immune complexes did not require the presence of transforming growth factor-beta in milk in contrast to tolerance induced by milk-borne free antigen. Furthermore, neither the presence of IgA in milk nor the expression of the inhibitory FcgammaRIIb in the newborn was required for tolerance induction. This study provides new insights on the mechanisms of tolerance induction in neonates and highlights that IgG immune complexes found in breast milk are potent inducers of oral tolerance. These observations may pave the way for the identification of key factors for primary prevention of immune-mediated diseases such as asthma.

  7. Turkey origin reovirus-induced immune dysfunction in specific-pathogen free and commercial turkey poults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, pathogenesis studies using genetically distinct turkey-origin reoviruses (TRVs) revealed that poults infected with certain TRV isolates had moderate to severe bursal atrophy, suggesting virus-induced immune dysfunction. In order to characterize the effect of TRV infection on the turkey imm...

  8. Glycerol-3-phosphate is a critical mobile inducer of systemic immunity in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important metabolite that contributes to the growth and disease-related physiologies of prokaryotes, plants, animals and humans alike. Here we show that G3P serves as the inducer of an important form of broad-spectrum immunity in plants, termed systemic acquired resi...

  9. Fungal innate immunity induced by bacterial microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plants and animals detect bacterial presence through Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns (MAMPs) which induce an innate immune response. The field of fungal-bacterial interaction at the molecular level is still in its infancy and very little is known about fungal molecular responses to bacteria, a...

  10. Role of NK cells in vaccine-induced immunity against Marek’s disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The antiviral activity of vaccine-induced immunity that markedly reduces the level of early cytolytic infection, production of cell-free infectious virus particles in the FFE, and lymphoma formation by interrupting the normal cascade of pathogenic events is a significant factor in protective efficac...

  11. Co-adjuvant effects of retinoic acid and IL-15 induce inflammatory immunity to dietary antigens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Under physiological conditions the gut-associated lymphoid tissues not only prevent the induction of a local inflammatory immune response, but also induce systemic tolerance to fed antigens. A notable exception is coeliac disease, where genetically susceptible individuals expressing human leukocyte...

  12. Relish2 mediates bursicon homodimer-induced prophylactic immunity in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bursicon is a neuropeptide hormone consisting of two cystine-knot proteins (burs a and burs ß), responsible for cuticle tanning and other developmental processes in insects. Recent studies show that each bursicon subunit forms homodimers that induce prophylactic immunity in Drosophila melanogaster. ...

  13. Marek's Disease Virus-Induced Immunosuppression: Array Analysis of Chicken Immune Response Gene Expression Profiling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4+ T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to...

  14. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Macrophages to Modulate Host Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Candia, Enzo; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastian; Villegas-Valdes, Bélgica; Neira, Tanya; Lopez, Mercedes; Maisey, Kevin; Tempio, Fabián; Ríos, Miguel; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the etiological agent of gonorrhoea, which is a sexually transmitted disease widespread throughout the world. N. gonorrhoeae does not improve immune response in patients with reinfection, suggesting that gonococcus displays several mechanisms to evade immune response and survive in the host. N. gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and dendritic cells. In this study, we determined whether N. gonorrhoeae directly conditions the phenotype of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line and its response. We established that gonococcus was effectively phagocytosed by the RAW 264.7 cells and upregulates production of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β1) but not the production of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, indicating that gonococcus induces a shift towards anti-inflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, N. gonorrhoeae did not induce significant upregulation of costimulatory CD86 and MHC class II molecules. We also showed that N. gonorrhoeae infected macrophage cell line fails to elicit proliferative CD4+ response. This implies that macrophage that can phagocytose gonococcus do not display proper antigen-presenting functions. These results indicate that N. gonorrhoeae induces a tolerogenic phenotype in antigen-presenting cells, which seems to be one of the mechanisms to induce evasion of immune response. PMID:24204097

  15. Immune-mediated competition in rodent malaria is most likely caused by induced changes in innate immune clearance of merozoites.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Jayanthi; Råberg, Lars; Read, Andrew F; Savill, Nicholas Jon

    2014-01-01

    Malarial infections are often genetically diverse, leading to competitive interactions between parasites. A quantitative understanding of the competition between strains is essential to understand a wide range of issues, including the evolution of virulence and drug resistance. In this study, we use dynamical-model based Bayesian inference to investigate the cause of competitive suppression of an avirulent clone of Plasmodium chabaudi (AS) by a virulent clone (AJ) in immuno-deficient and competent mice. We test whether competitive suppression is caused by clone-specific differences in one or more of the following processes: adaptive immune clearance of merozoites and parasitised red blood cells (RBCs), background loss of merozoites and parasitised RBCs, RBC age preference, RBC infection rate, burst size, and within-RBC interference. These processes were parameterised in dynamical mathematical models and fitted to experimental data. We found that just one parameter μ, the ratio of background loss rate of merozoites to invasion rate of mature RBCs, needed to be clone-specific to predict the data. Interestingly, μ was found to be the same for both clones in single-clone infections, but different between the clones in mixed infections. The size of this difference was largest in immuno-competent mice and smallest in immuno-deficient mice. This explains why competitive suppression was alleviated in immuno-deficient mice. We found that competitive suppression acts early in infection, even before the day of peak parasitaemia. These results lead us to argue that the innate immune response clearing merozoites is the most likely, but not necessarily the only, mediator of competitive interactions between virulent and avirulent clones. Moreover, in mixed infections we predict there to be an interaction between the clones and the innate immune response which induces changes in the strength of its clearance of merozoites. What this interaction is unknown, but future refinement

  16. Sterile Neutrinos in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Benjamin J.P.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of neutrino oscillations at short baselines contain an intriguing set of experimental anomalies that may be suggestive of new physics such as the existence of sterile neutrinos. This three-part thesis presents research directed towards understanding these anomalies and searching for sterile neutrino oscillations. Part I contains a theoretical discussion of neutrino coherence properties. The open-quantum-system picture of neutrino beams, which allows a rigorous prediction of coherence distances for accelerator neutrinos, is presented. Validity of the standard treatment of active and sterile neutrino oscillations at short baselines is verified, and non-standard coherence loss effects at longer baselines are predicted. Part II concerns liquid argon detector development for the MicroBooNE experiment, which will search for short-baseline oscillations in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. Topics include characterization and installation of the MicroBooNE optical system; test-stand measurements of liquid argon optical properties with dissolved impurities; optimization of wavelength-shifting coatings for liquid argon scintillation light detection; testing and deployment of high-voltage surge arrestors to protect TPC field cages; and software development for optical and TPC simulation and reconstruction. Part III presents a search for sterile neutrinos using the IceCube neutrino telescope, which has collected a large sample of atmospheric-neutrino-induced events in the 1-10 TeV energy range. Sterile neutrinos would modify the detected neutrino flux shape via MSW-resonant oscillations. Following a careful treatment of systematic uncertainties in the sample, no evidence for MSW-resonant oscillations is observed, and exclusion limits on 3+1 model parameter space are derived. Under the mixing assumptions made, the 90% confidence level exclusion limit extends to sin224 ≤ 0.02 at m2 ~ 0.3 eV2, and the LSND and Mini

  17. Community deworming alleviates geohelminth-induced immune hyporesponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wammes, Linda J.; Hamid, Firdaus; May, Linda; Kaisar, Maria M. M.; Prasetyani-Gieseler, Margaretta A.; Djuardi, Yenny; Wibowo, Heri; Kruize, Yvonne C. M.; Verweij, Jaco J.; Tsonaka, Roula; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Sartono, Erliyani; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Supali, Taniawati; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In cross-sectional studies, chronic helminth infections have been associated with immunological hyporesponsiveness that can affect responses to unrelated antigens. To study the immunological effects of deworming, we conducted a cluster-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in Indonesia and assigned 954 households to receive albendazole or placebo once every 3 mo for 2 y. Helminth-specific and nonspecific whole-blood cytokine responses were assessed in 1,059 subjects of all ages, whereas phenotyping of regulatory molecules was undertaken in 121 school-aged children. All measurements were performed before and at 9 and 21 mo after initiation of treatment. Anthelmintic treatment resulted in significant increases in proinflammatory cytokine responses to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (PfRBCs) and mitogen, with the largest effect on TNF responses to PfRBCs at 9 mo—estimate [95% confidence interval], 0.37 [0.21–0.53], P value over time (Ptime) < 0.0001. Although the frequency of regulatory T cells did not change after treatment, there was a significant decline in the expression of the inhibitory molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) on CD4+ T cells of albendazole-treated individuals, –0.060 [–0.107 to –0.013] and –0.057 [–0.105 to –0.008] at 9 and 21 mo, respectively; Ptime = 0.017. This trial shows the capacity of helminths to up-regulate inhibitory molecules and to suppress proinflammatory immune responses in humans. This could help to explain the inferior immunological responses to vaccines and lower prevalence of inflammatory diseases in low- compared with high-income countries. PMID:27791067

  18. Feline leukemia virus immunity induced by whole inactivated virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Torres, Andrea N; O'Halloran, Kevin P; Larson, Laurie J; Schultz, Ronald D; Hoover, Edward A

    2010-03-15

    A fraction of cats exposed to feline leukemia virus (FeLV) effectively contain virus and resist persistent antigenemia/viremia. Using real-time PCR (qPCR) to quantitate circulating viral DNA levels, previously we detected persistent FeLV DNA in blood cells of non-antigenemic cats considered to have resisted FeLV challenge. In addition, previously we used RNA qPCR to quantitate circulating viral RNA levels and determined that the vast majority of viral DNA is transcriptionally active, even in the absence of antigenemia. A single comparison of all USDA-licensed commercially available FeLV vaccines using these modern sensitive methods has not been reported. To determine whether FeLV vaccination would prevent nucleic acid persistence, we assayed circulating viral DNA, RNA, antigen, infectious virus, and virus neutralizing (VN) antibody in vaccinated and unvaccinated cats challenged with infectious FeLV. We identified challenged vaccinates with undetectable antigenemia and viremia concomitant with persistent FeLV DNA and/or RNA. Moreover, these studies demonstrated that two whole inactivated virus (WIV) adjuvanted FeLV vaccines (Fort Dodge Animal Health's Fel-O-Vax Lv-K) and Schering-Plough Animal Health's FEVAXYN FeLV) provided effective protection against FeLV challenge. In nearly every recipient of these vaccines, neither viral DNA, RNA, antigen, nor infectious virus could be detected in blood after FeLV challenge. Interestingly, this effective viral containment occurred despite a weak to undetectable VN antibody response. The above findings reinforce the precept of FeLV infection as a unique model of effective retroviral immunity elicited by WIV vaccination, and as such holds valuable insights into retroviral immunoprevention and therapy.

  19. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-03-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes.

  20. Inflammation Mediated Metastasis: Immune Induced Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Evan N; Gao, Hui; Anfossi, Simone; Mego, Michal; Reddy, Neelima G; Debeb, Bisrat; Giordano, Antonio; Tin, Sanda; Wu, Qiong; Garza, Raul J; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Mani, Sendurai A; Croix, Denise A; Ueno, Naoto T; Woodward, Wendy A; Luthra, Raja; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Reuben, James M

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most insidious form of locally advanced breast cancer; about a third of patients have distant metastasis at initial staging. Emerging evidence suggests that host factors in the tumor microenvironment may interact with underlying IBC cells to make them aggressive. It is unknown whether immune cells associated to the IBC microenvironment play a role in this scenario to transiently promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in these cells. We hypothesized that soluble factors secreted by activated immune cells can induce an EMT in IBC and thus promote metastasis. In a pilot study of 16 breast cancer patients, TNF-α production by peripheral blood T cells was correlated with the detection of circulating tumor cells expressing EMT markers. In a variety of IBC model cell lines, soluble factors from activated T cells induced expression of EMT-related genes, including FN1, VIM, TGM2, ZEB1. Interestingly, although IBC cells exhibited increased invasion and migration following exposure to immune factors, the expression of E-cadherin (CDH1), a cell adhesion molecule, increased uniquely in IBC cell lines but not in non-IBC cell lines. A combination of TNF-α, IL-6, and TGF-β was able to recapitulate EMT induction in IBC, and conditioned media preloaded with neutralizing antibodies against these factors exhibited decreased EMT. These data suggest that release of cytokines by activated immune cells may contribute to the aggressiveness of IBC and highlight these factors as potential target mediators of immune-IBC interaction.

  1. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa.

  2. Recurrent sterile abscesses following aluminium adjuvant-containing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Nicola P; Edwards, Kathryn M; Sparks, Robert C; Dekker, Cornelia L

    2009-01-01

    Abscess formation following immunisation is a previously reported complication, generally associated with microbial contamination of the vaccine. Less commonly, such abscesses have been sterile. Here we describe two children evaluated in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) network who developed recurrent sterile abscesses after administration of vaccines containing aluminium adjuvant, either individually or in combination. Although the abscesses healed without sequelae, these occurrences support an association between receipt of aluminium adjuvant and sterile abscesses in susceptible patients. For patients with similar symptoms, clinicians may wish to choose a vaccine formulation containing the least amount of aluminium adjuvant.

  3. A micro-sterile inflammation array as an adjuvant for influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wang; Shah, Dilip; Chen, Xinyuan; Anderson, R. Rox; Wu, Mei X.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need of adjuvants for cutaneous vaccination. Here we report that micro-sterile inflammation induced at inoculation sites can augment immune responses to influenza vaccines in animal models. The inoculation site is briefly illuminated with a handheld, non-ablative fractional laser before the vaccine is intradermally administered, which creates an array of self-healing microthermal zones (MTZs) in the skin. The dying cells in the MTZs send “danger” signals that attract a large number of antigen-presenting cells, in particular, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) around each MTZ forming a micro-sterile inflammation array. A pivotal role for pDCs in the adjuvanticity is ascertained by significant abrogation of the immunity after systemic depletion of pDCs, local application of a TNF-α inhibitor, or null mutation of IFN regulatory factor7 (IRF7). In contrast to conventional adjuvants that cause persistent inflammation and skin lesions, micro-sterile inflammation enhances efficacy of influenza vaccines, yet with diminished adverse effects. PMID:25033973

  4. Papanicolaou smears induce partial immunity against sexually transmitted viral infections.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Samuel; Hoffman, Margaret; Constant, Deborah; Rosenberg, Lynn; Carrara, Henri; Allan, Bruce Rider; Marais, Dianne Jean; Passmore, Jo-Ann Shelley; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2007-11-01

    In a case-control study of hormonal contraceptives and invasive cervical cancer, an unexpected finding was a substantial decline in the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection according to the lifetime number of Pap smears received. Here we assess the risk of 3 sexually transmitted viral infections -- herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2), HPV, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) 1 and 2 -- in relation to the lifetime receipt of Pap smears. Stored sera taken from 1540 controls were tested for HSV2 and HIV; cervical scrapings were tested for HPV. Confounder-adjusted odds ratios for the lifetime receipt of Pap smears were estimated, relative to never having had a Papanicolau test. For ever-receipt of a Papanicolau test, the odds ratios for HSV2 and HPV were 0.7 (95% confidence interval = 0.5-0.9) and 0.5 (0.3-0.7), respectively, and there were dose-response trends according to the lifetime number of Pap smears received (test for trend P = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). For HSV2 the odds ratios according to last receipt declined from 0.8 for 10 or more years previously to 0.4 for <1 year previously (trend P = 0.002). For HPV the ORs were 0.4 (0.3-0.7) for last receipt 5-9 years previously and 0.5 (0.4-0.8) for less than 5 years previously; for HIV the odds ratio for last receipt less than 5 years previously was 0.4 (0.3-0.9). For HSV2 and HIV the crude odds ratio estimates were systematically lower than the adjusted estimates, and residual confounding cannot be ruled out. In particular, the true number of sexual partners may have been under-reported, and there was no information on the sexual activity of the male partners, or on other health behaviors of the women or their partners. We hypothesize that Pap smears may provoke a short-term immune response against sexually transmitted viral infections.

  5. Brief Report: Immune Microenvironment Determines the Immunogenicity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Dilyana; Kim, Jinchul; Hamzeinejad, Sara; He, Jingjin; Xu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    The breakthrough of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has raised the possibility that patient-specific iPSCs can provide autologous cells for cell therapy without the concern for immune rejection. However, the immunogenicity of iPSC-derived cells remains controversial. Using syngeneic C57BL/6 (B6) mouse transplantation model, several studies indicate that B6 iPSC-derived cells exhibit some levels of immunogenicity when transplanted into B6 mice subcutaneously. In contrast, one recent study has concluded that various lineages of B6 iPSC-derived cells exhibit no immunogenicity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of B6 mice. To resolve the controversy concerning this critical issue of iPSC biology, we used the same B6 transplantation model to demonstrate that the immune response toward antigens is dependent on the immune environment of the transplantation site. Immunogenic antigen-expressing B6 embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as well as B6 iPSCs and their terminally differentiated cells survived under the kidney capsule but are immune rejected when transplanted subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The cotransplantation of mature B6 dendritic cells under the kidney capsule leads to immune rejection of B6 iPSC-derived grafts but not B6 ESC-derived grafts, indicating that the lack of detectable immune response to iPSC-derived grafts under the kidney capsule is due to the lack of functional antigen presenting cells.

  6. The Cytokine-mRNA Increase Induced by Withdrawal from Chronic Ethanol in the Sterile Environment of Brain is mediated by CRF and HMGB1 Release

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Buddy A.; Knapp, Darin J.; Werner, David F.; Crews, Fulton T.; Breese, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many neurobiological factors may initiate and sustain alcoholism. Recently, dysregulation of the neuroimmune-system by chronic-ethanol (CE) has implicated toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)-activation. Even though TLR4s are linked to CE-initiation of brain cytokine-mRNAs, the means by which CE influences neuroimmune signaling in the sterile environment of brain remains uncertain. Therefore, the hypothesis is tested that release of an endogenous TLR4 agonist, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and/or CRF during CE-withdrawal are responsible for CE-protocols increasing cytokine-mRNAs. Methods Acute-ethanol 2.75g/kg) and acute-LPS (lipopolysaccharide)(250μg/kg) dosing on cytokine-mRNAs are first compared. Then, the effects of chronic-LPS exposure (250 μg/kg for 10-days) on cytokine-mRNAs are compared to changes induced by CE-protocols [15-days of continuous 7% ethanol-diet (CE-protocol) or three-intermittent 5-day cycles of 7%-ethanol-diet (CIE-protocol)]. Additionally, TLR4-, HMGB1- and down-stream effector mRNAs are assessed after CE, CIE, and chronic-LPS. To test whether HMGB1 and/or CRF support the CE-withdrawal increase in cytokine-mRNAs, the HMGB1-antagonists, glycyrrhizin and ethyl-pyruvate, and a CRF1-receptor-antagonist (CRF1RA) are administered during 24-hours of CE-withdrawal. Results While cytokine-mRNAs were not increased following acute-ethanol, acute-LPS increased all cytokine-mRNAs 4-hours after injection. CE produced no change in cytokine-mRNAs prior to CE-removal; however, the CE- and CIE-protocols increased cytokine-mRNAs by 24-hours after withdrawal. In contrast, chronic-LPS produced no cytokine-mRNA changes 24-hours after LPS-dosing. TLR4-mRNA was elevated 24-hours following both CE-protocols and chronic-LPS exposure. While chronic-LPS had no effect on HMGB1-mRNA, withdrawal from CE-protocols significantly elevated HMGB1-mRNA. Systemic administration of HMGB1-antagonists or a CRF1RA significantly reduced the cytokine-mRNA increase following

  7. Repeated stress-induced stimulation of catecholamine response is not followed by altered immune cell redistribution.

    PubMed

    Imrich, Richard; Tibenska, Elena; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Bergendiova-Sedlackova, Katarina; Blazicek, Pavol; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    Stress response is considered an important factor in the modulation of immune function. Neuroendocrine hormones, including catecholamines, affect the process of immune cell redistribution, important for cell-mediated immunity. This longitudinal investigation was aimed at evaluating the effect of repeated stress-induced elevation of catecholamines on immune cell redistribution and expression of adhesive molecules. We assessed the responses of epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), cortisol, changes in lymphocytes subpopulations, and percentages of CD11a+, CD11b+, and CD62L+ lymphocytes to a 20-min treadmill exercise of an intensity equal to 80% of the individual's Vo(2)max. The exercise was performed before and after 6 weeks of endurance training consisting of a 1-h run 4 times a week (ET) and after 5 days of bed rest (HDBR) in 10 healthy males. We did not observe any significant changes in the basal levels of EPI, NE, and cortisol in the plasma, nor in the immune parameters after ET and HDBR. The exercise test led to a significant (P <.001) elevation of EPI and NE levels after both ET and HDBR, a significant elevation (P <.01) of cortisol after HDBR, an increase in the absolute numbers of leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocytes, percentage of CD11a+ and CD11b+ lymphocytes, and to a decrease of CD62L1 before, after ET, and after HDBR. We found comparable changes in all measured immune parameters after ET and HDBR. In conclusion, repeated stress-induced elevation of EPI and NE was not associated with an alteration in immune cell redistribution found in response to the single bout of exercise.

  8. Gene expression profiling of Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammation in human whole blood: The role of complement and CD14-mediated innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corinna; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-09-01

    Non-sterile pathogen-induced sepsis and sterile inflammation like in trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury may both coincide with the life threatening systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multi-organ failure. Consequently, there is an urgent need for specific biomarkers in order to distinguish sepsis from sterile conditions. The overall aim of this study was to uncover putative sepsis biomarkers and biomarker pathways, as well as to test the efficacy of combined inhibition of innate immunity key players complement and Toll-like receptor co-receptor CD14 as a possible therapeutic regimen for sepsis. We performed whole blood gene expression analyses using microarray in order to profile Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammatory responses in an ex vivo human whole blood model. The experiments were performed in the presence or absence of inhibitors of complement proteins (C3 and CD88 (C5a receptor 1)) and CD14, alone or in combination. In addition, we used blood from a C5-deficient donor. Anti-coagulated whole blood was challenged with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli for 2 h, total RNA was isolated and microarray analyses were performed on the Affymetrix GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST Array platform. The initial experiments were performed in duplicates using blood from two healthy donors. C5-deficiency is very rare, and only one donor could be recruited. In order to increase statistical power, a technical replicate of the C5-deficient samples was run. Subsequently, log2-transformed intensities were processed by robust multichip analysis and filtered using a threshold of four. In total, 73 microarray chips were run and analyzed. The normalized and filtered raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and are accessible with GEO Series accession number GSE55537. Linear models for microarray data were applied to estimate fold changes between data sets and the respective multiple testing adjusted p-values (FDR q-values). The interpretation of the

  9. Outer membrane vesicles of Gallibacterium anatis induce protective immunity in egg-laying hens.

    PubMed

    Pors, Susanne E; Pedersen, Ida J; Skjerning, Ragnhild Bager; Thøfner, Ida C N; Persson, Gry; Bojesen, Anders M

    2016-11-15

    Gallibacterium anatis causes infections in the reproductive tract of egg-laying hens and induce increased mortality and decreased egg production. New prophylactic measures are needed in order to improve animal welfare and production efficiency. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have previously shown promising results in protection against infections and we hypothesized that OMVs could serve as an immunogen to protect egg-laying hens against G. anatis. To investigate the immunogenic potential of G. anatis OMVs, two in vivo studies in egg-laying hens were made. The trials assessedthe degree of protection provided by immunization with G. anatis OMV against challenge and the IgY responses in serum after immunization and challenge, respectively. A total of 64 egg-laying hens were included in the trials. OMVs for immunization were produced and purified from a high-producing G. anatis ΔtolR mutant. Challenge was done with G. anatis 12656-12 and evaluated by scoring lesions and bacterial re-isolation rates from peritoneum. Finally, levels of OMV-specific IgY in sera were assayed by ELISA. Immunization with OMVs decreased the lesions scores significantly, while the bacterial re-isolation remained unchanged. Furthermore, a high OMV-specific IgY response was induced by immunization and subsequent challenge of the hens. The results strongly indicate that immunization with G. anatis OMVs provides significant protection against G. anatis challenge and induces specific antibody responses with high titers of OMV-specific IgY in serum. The results therefore show great promise for OMV based vaccines aiming at providing protecting against G. anatis in egg-laying hens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A peptide mimotope of type 8 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide induces a protective immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Ulrike K; Lees, Andrew; Steinitz, Michael; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2005-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and a rising patient population at risk for infection due to impaired immunity underscore the importance of vaccination against pneumococci. However, available capsular polysaccharide vaccines are often poorly immunogenic in patients at risk for pneumococcal disease. The goal of this study was to explore the potential of peptide mimotopes to function as alternative vaccine antigens to elicit a type-specific antibody response to pneumococci. We used a human monoclonal immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody (NAD) to type 8 Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide (type 8 PS) to screen a phage display library, and the phage PUB1 displaying the peptide FHLPYNHNWFAL was selected after three rounds of biopanning. Inhibition studies with phage-displayed peptide or the peptide PUB1 and type 8 PS showed that PUB1 is a mimetic of type 8 PS. PUB1 conjugated to tetanus toxoid (PUB1-TT) induced a type 8 PS-specific antibody response in BALB/c mice, further defining it as a mimotope of type 8 PS. The administration of immune sera obtained from PUB1-TT-immunized mice earlier (days 14 and 21) and later (days 87 and 100) after primary and reimmunization resulted in a highly significant prolongation of the survival of naive mice after pneumococcal challenge compared to controls. The survival of PUB1-TT-immunized mice was also prolonged after pneumococcal challenge nearly 4 months after primary immunization. The efficacy of PUB1-TT-induced immune sera provides proof of principle that a mimotope-induced antibody response can protect against pneumococci and suggests that peptide mimotopes selected by type-specific human antibodies could hold promise as immunogens for pneumococci.

  11. Karlson ozone sterilizer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.

    1984-05-07

    The authors have a functional sterilization system employing ozone as a sterilization agent. This final report covers the work that led to the first medical sterilizer using ozone as the sterilizing agent. The specifications and the final design were set by hospital operating room personnel and public safety standards. Work on kill tests using bacteria, viruses and fungi determined the necessary time and concentration of ozone necessary for sterilization. These data were used in the Karlson Ozone Sterilizer to determine the length of the steps of the operating cycle and the concentration of ozone to be used. 27 references.

  12. Sterilization by dry heat

    PubMed Central

    Darmady, E. M.; Hughes, K. E. A.; Jones, J. D.; Prince, D.; Tuke, Winifred

    1961-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of three forms of dry heat sterilization are discussed. In addition a fourth method, consisting of heating by infrared rays in vacuo, is described. This method is particularly suitable for instruments used in the operating theatre, since it can replace an autoclave where a supply of steam is not available. Recommended times and temperatures for dry heat sterilization are detailed, and are related to the thermal death point of Cl. tetani. The dangers of recontamination during the cooling process are discussed. PMID:13719782

  13. Effect of millimeter waves on cyclophosphamide induced suppression of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Logani, Mahendra K; Anga, Altaf; Szabo, Imre; Agelan, Alexis; Irizarry, Armando R; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2002-12-01

    The effect of millimeter electromagnetic waves (MWs) on cyclophosphamide (CPA) induced toxicity to leukocytes, bone marrow cells, and T-cell-mediated immunity was examined. For studying the effect of MWs on CPA induced leukopenia and myelosuppression, BALB/C mice were irradiated for 3 days, 30 min each day, prior to administration of CPA (200 mg/kg). MWs were produced with a Russian made YAV-1 generator. The device produced 42.2 +/- 0.2 GHz modulated wave radiation through a 10 mm x 20 mm rectangular output horn. The animals were irradiated on the nose area. Peak SAR and incident power density were measured as 622 +/- 100 W/kg and 31 +/- 5 mW/cm(2), respectively. For studying the effect of MWs on CPA induced suppression of T-cell mediated immunity, a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) assay in mouse skin was used. The DTH reaction in mouse skin was induced by topical application of dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and quantified by measuring the increase in ear thickness and by histological examination. Treatment of animals with CPA significantly (P < 0.05) reduced leukocyte and bone marrow cell population, but MW irradiation did not show any significant protection from the immunosuppressive effects of CPA. Furthermore, MW irradiation did not protect the animals from CPA induced suppression of T-cell mediated immunity.

  14. TLR 9 involvement in early protection induced by immunization with rPb27 against Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Morais, Elis Araujo; Chame, Daniela Ferreira; Melo, Eliza Mathias; de Carvalho Oliveira, Junnia Alvarenga; de Paula, Ana Cláudia Chagas; Peixoto, Andiara Cardoso; da Silva Santos, Lílian; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Russo, Remo Castro; de Goes, Alfredo Miranda

    2016-02-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is caused by fungi of the Paracoccidioides genus and constitutes the most prevalent deep mycosis in Latin America. Toll-like receptors promote immune response against infectious agents. Recently, it was reported that TLR9 is crucial for mice survival during the first 48 h of P. brasiliensis infection. In this study, we used CPG oligodeoxynucleotide motif as an adjuvant with and without rPb27 to immunize mice against Paracoccidioidomycosis. CPG adjuvant induced differential recruitment of lymphocytes in the inflammatory process and a lower recruitment of neutrophils. In addition, CPG induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12; increased phagocytic ability and microbicidal activity by macrophages; and induced differential production of lgG2a and lgG2b, subtypes of Ig. Knockout mice for TLR9 and IL-12 showed higher fungal loads and rates of mortality compared to control mice after 30 days of infection. The association between CPG and rPb27 induced a high level of protection against Paracoccidioidomycosis after the first 30 days of infection but not at 60 days. Our findings demonstrate that TLR 9 plays a role in the protection induced by immunization with rPb27 and confirms the importance of TLR9 in the initial protection against Paracoccidioidomycosis.

  15. Two distinct EF-Tu epitopes induce immune responses in rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takehito; Inagaki, Hiroaki; Takai, Ryota; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Che, Fang-Sik

    2014-02-01

    Plants sense potential pathogens by recognizing conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that cause PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). We previously reported that rice recognizes flagellin from the rice-incompatible N1141 strain of Acidovorax avenae and subsequently induces immune responses. Cell extracts isolated from flagellin-deficient N1141 (Δfla1141) still induced PTI responses, suggesting that Δfla1141 possesses an additional PAMP distinct from flagellin. Here, we show that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), one of the most abundant bacterial proteins, acts as a PAMP in rice and causes several PTI responses. In Brassicaceae species, EF-Tu and an N-acetylated peptide comprising the first 18 amino acids of the N-terminus, termed elf18, are fully active as inducers of PTI responses. By contrast, elf18 did not cause any immune responses in rice, whereas an EF-Tu middle region comprising Lys176 to Gly225, termed EFa50, is fully active as a PAMP in rice. In the leaves of rice plants, EF-Tu induced H2O2 generation and callose deposition, and also triggered resistance to coinfection with pathogenic bacteria. Taken together, these data demonstrate that rice recognizes EFa50, which is distinct from elf18, and that this epitope induces PTI responses.

  16. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline.

  17. PPS nanoparticles as versatile delivery system to induce systemic and broad mucosal immunity after intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Stano, Armando; van der Vlies, André J; Martino, Mikael M; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Simeoni, Eleonora

    2011-01-17

    Degradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs, 50 nm) based on polypropylene sulfide (PPS) were conjugated to thiolated antigen and adjuvant proteins by reversible disulfide bonds and evaluated in mucosal vaccination. Ovalbumin was used as a model antigen, and antigen-conjugated NPs were administered intranasally in the mouse. We show penetration of nasal mucosae, transit via M cells, and uptake by antigen-presenting cells in the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. Ovalbumin-conjugated NPs induced cytotoxic T lymphocytic responses in lung and spleen tissues, as well as humoral response in mucosal airways. Co-conjugation of the TLR5 ligand flagellin further enhanced humoral responses in the airways as well as in the distant vaginal and rectal mucosal compartments and induced cellular immune responses with a Th1 bias, in contrast with free flagellin. The PPS NP platform thus appears interesting as a platform for intranasally-administered mucosal vaccination for inducing broad mucosal immunity.

  18. Rationale and design of the pediatric critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Carcillo, Joseph; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J Michael; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L; Anand, K J S; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J L; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F; Nicholson, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Despite implementation of CDC recommendations and bundled interventions for preventing catheter-associated blood stream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, or urinary catheter-associated infections, nosocomial infections and sepsis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Recent studies suggest that acquired critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) plays a role in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis. This condition can be related to inadequate zinc, selenium, and glutamine levels, as well as hypoprolactinemia, leading to stress-induced lymphopenia, a predominant T(H)2 monocyte/macrophage state, and subsequent immune suppression. Prolonged immune dysfunction increases the likelihood of nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices. Although strategies to prevent common complications of critical illness are routinely employed (eg, prophylaxis for gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombophlebitis), no prophylactic strategy is used to prevent stress-induced immune suppression. This is the authors' rationale for the pediatric CRISIS prevention trial (NCT00395161), designed as a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical investigation to determine if daily enteral supplementation with zinc, selenium, and glutamine as well as parenteral metoclopramide (a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist that reverses hypoprolactinemia) prolongs the time until onset of nosocomial infection or sepsis in critically ill children compared to enteral supplementation with whey protein. If effective, this combined nutritional and pharmacologic approach may lessen the excess morbidity and mortality as well as resource utilization associated with nosocomial infections and sepsis in this population. The authors present the design and analytic plan for the CRISIS prevention trial.

  19. Protective immunity against Leishmania major induced by Leishmania tropica infection of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh-Niknam, Hamid; Kiaei, Simin Sadat; Iravani, Davood

    2011-02-01

    Leishmania (L.) tropica is a causative agent of human cutaneous and viscerotropic leishmaniasis. Immune response to L. tropica in humans and experimental animals are not well understood. We previously established that L. tropica infection induces partial protective immunity against subsequent challenge infection with Leishmania major in BALB/c mice. Aim of the present study was to study immunologic mechanisms of protective immunity induced by L. tropica infection, as a live parasite vaccine, in BALB/c mouse model. Mice were infected by L. tropica, and after establishment of the infection, they were challenged by L. major. Our findings shows that L. tropica infection resulted in protection against L. major challenge in BALB/c mice and this protective immunity is associated with: (1) a DTH response, (2) higher IFN-γ and lower IL-10 response at one week post-challenge, (3) lower percentage of CD4(+) lymphocyte at one month post-challenge, and (4) the source of IFN-γ and IL-10 were mainly CD4(-) lymphocyte up to one month post-challenge suggesting that CD4(-) lymphocytes may be responsible for protection induced by L. tropica infection in the studied intervals.

  20. Allogenic iPSC-derived RPE cell transplants induce immune response in pigs: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Elliott H; Jiao, Chunhua; Kaalberg, Emily; Cranston, Cathryn; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2015-07-03

    Stem cell strategies focused on replacement of RPE cells for the treatment of geographic atrophy are under intense investigation. Although the eye has long been considered immune privileged, there is limited information about the immune response to transplanted cells in the subretinal space of large animals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the survival of allogenic induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE cells (iPSC-RPE) delivered to the subretinal space of the pig as well as determine whether these cells induce an immune response in non-diseased eyes. GFP positive iPSC-RPE, generated from outbred domestic swine, were injected into the subretinal space of vitrectomized miniature swine. Control eyes received vehicle only. GFP positive iPSC-RPE cells were identified in the subretinal space 3 weeks after injection in 5 of 6 eyes. Accompanying GFP-negative cells positive for IgG, CD45 and macrophage markers were also identified in close proximity to the injected iPSC-RPE cells. All subretinal cells were negative for GFAP as well as cell cycle markers. We found that subretinal injection of allogenic iPSC-RPE cells into wild-type mini-pigs can induce the innate immune response. These findings suggest that immunologically matched or autologous donor cells should be considered for clinical RPE cell replacement.

  1. Rationale and Design of the Pediatric Critical Illness Stress-Induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carcillo, Joseph; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J. Michael; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L.; Anand, K. J. S.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of CDC recommendations and bundled interventions for preventing catheter-associated blood stream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, or urinary catheter–associated infections, nosocomial infections and sepsis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Recent studies suggest that acquired critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) plays a role in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis. This condition can be related to inadequate zinc, selenium, and glutamine levels, as well as hypoprolactinemia, leading to stress-induced lymphopenia, a predominant TH2 monocyte/macrophage state, and subsequent immune suppression. Prolonged immune dysfunction increases the likelihood of nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices. Although strategies to prevent common complications of critical illness are routinely employed (eg, prophylaxis for gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombophlebitis), no prophylactic strategy is used to prevent stress-induced immune suppression. This is the authors’ rationale for the pediatric CRISIS prevention trial (NCT00395161), designed as a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical investigation to determine if daily enteral supplementation with zinc, selenium, and glutamine as well as parenteral metoclopramide (a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist that reverses hypoprolactinemia) prolongs the time until onset of nosocomial infection or sepsis in critically ill children compared to enteral supplementation with whey protein. If effective, this combined nutritional and pharmacologic approach may lessen the excess morbidity and mortality as well as resource utilization associated with nosocomial infections and sepsis in this population. The authors present the design and analytic plan for the CRISIS prevention trial. PMID:19380753

  2. Essential role of IL-10/STAT3 in chronic stress-induced immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Wan, Lei; Chen, Michael; Caudle, Yi; LeSage, Gene; Li, Qinchuan; Yin, Deling

    2013-01-01

    Stress can either enhance or suppress immune functions depending on a variety of factors such as duration of stressful condition. Chronic stress has been demonstrated to exert a significant suppressive effect on immune function. However, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. Here, male C57BL/6 mice were placed in a 50-ml conical centrifuge tube with multiple punctures to establish a chronic restraint stress model. Serum IL-10 levels, IL-10 production by the splenocytes, and activation of STAT3 in the mouse spleen were assessed. We demonstrate that IL-10/STAT3 axis was remarkably activated following chronic stress. Moreover, TLR4 and p38 MAPK play a pivotal role in the activation of IL-10/STAT3 signaling cascade. Interestingly, blocking antibody against IL-10 receptor and inhibition of STAT3 by STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201 attenuates stress-induced lymphocyte apoptosis. Inhibition of IL-10/STAT3 dramatically inhibits stress-induced reduction in IL-12 production. Furthermore, disequilibrium of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance caused by chronic stress was also rescued by blocking IL-10/STAT3 axis. These results yield insight into a new mechanism by which chronic stress regulates immune functions. IL-10/STAT3 pathway provides a novel relevant target for the manipulation of chronic stress-induced immune suppression. PMID:24513872

  3. Essential role of IL-10/STAT3 in chronic stress-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Wan, Lei; Chen, Michael; Caudle, Yi; LeSage, Gene; Li, Qinchuan; Yin, Deling

    2014-02-01

    Stress can either enhance or suppress immune functions depending on a variety of factors such as duration of stressful condition. Chronic stress has been demonstrated to exert a significant suppressive effect on immune function. However, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. Here, male C57BL/6 mice were placed in a 50-ml conical centrifuge tube with multiple punctures to establish a chronic restraint stress model. Serum IL-10 levels, IL-10 production by the splenocytes, and activation of STAT3 in the mouse spleen were assessed. We demonstrate that IL-10/STAT3 axis was remarkably activated following chronic stress. Moreover, TLR4 and p38 MAPK play a pivotal role in the activation of IL-10/STAT3 signaling cascade. Interestingly, blocking antibody against IL-10 receptor and inhibition of STAT3 by STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201 attenuates stress-induced lymphocyte apoptosis. Inhibition of IL-10/STAT3 dramatically inhibits stress-induced reduction in IL-12 production. Furthermore, disequilibrium of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance caused by chronic stress was also rescued by blocking IL-10/STAT3 axis. These results yield insight into a new mechanism by which chronic stress regulates immune functions. IL-10/STAT3 pathway provides a novel relevant target for the manipulation of chronic stress-induced immune suppression.

  4. CD4+ lymphoid tissue inducer cells promote innate immunity in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Elloso, M. Merle; Fouser, Lynette A.; Artis, David

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Fetal CD4+ lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells play a critical role in the development of lymphoid-tissues. Recent studies identified that LTi cells persist in adults and are related to a heterogeneous population of innate lymphoid cells that have been implicated in inflammatory responses. However, whether LTi cells contribute to protective immunity remains poorly defined. We demonstrate that following infection with Citrobacter rodentium, CD4+ LTi cells were a dominant source of interleukin-22 (IL-22) early during infection. Infection-induced CD4+ LTi cell responses were IL-23-dependent, and ablation of IL-23 impaired innate immunity. Further, depletion of CD4+ LTi cells abrogated infection-induced expression of IL-22 and anti-microbial peptides, resulting in exacerbated host mortality. LTi cells were also found to be essential for host protective immunity in lymphocyte-replete hosts. Collectively these data demonstrate that adult CD4+ LTi cells are a critical source of IL-22 and identify a previously unrecognized function for CD4+ LTi cells in promoting innate immunity in the intestine. PMID:21194981

  5. Inhibition of the interleukin-6 signaling pathway: a strategy to induce immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Xing-Hua

    2014-10-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is multifunctional, with multifaceted effects. IL-6 signaling plays a vital role in the control of the differentiation and activation of T lymphocytes by inducing different pathways. In particular, IL-6 controls the balance between Th17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. An imbalance between Treg and Th17 cells is thought to play a pathological role in various immune-mediated diseases. Deregulated IL-6 production and signaling are associated with immune tolerance. Therefore, methods of inhibiting IL-6 production, receptors, and signaling pathways are strategies that are currently being widely pursued to develop novel therapies that induce immune tolerance. This survey aims to provide an updated account of why IL-6 inhibitors are becoming a vital class of drugs that are potentially useful for inducing immune tolerance as a treatment for autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. In addition, we discuss the effect of targeting IL-6 in recent experimental and clinical studies on autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection.

  6. The role of autophagy in asparaginase-induced immune suppression of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Wang, Ziyu; Zhang, Xuyao; Fan, Jiajun; Li, Yubin; Chen, Qicheng; Wang, Shaofei; Liu, Peipei; Luan, Jingyun; Ye, Li; Ju, Dianwen

    2017-03-30

    Erwinia asparaginase, a bacteria-derived enzyme drug, has been used in the treatment of various cancers, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). One of the most significant side effects associated with asparaginase administration is immune suppression, which limits its application in clinic. Macrophages are phagocytic immune cells and have a central role in inflammation and host defense. We reported here that asparaginase disturbed the function of macrophages including phagocytosis, proliferation, ROS and nitric oxide secretion, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) secretion, and major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) molecule expression, thus induced immune suppression in interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. We also observed that asparaginase inhibited autophagy in macrophages via activating Akt/mTOR and suppressing Erk1/2 signaling pathway as evidenced by less formation of autophagosomes, downregulation of autophagy-related protein LC3-II, and decreased number of autophagy-like vacuoles. Further study discovered that treatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-MA in place of asparaginase on activated macrophages could also downregulate phagocytosis, cytokine secretion, and MHC-II expression. Moreover, incubation with autophagy inducer trehalose restored the capacity of phagocytosis, IL-6 and TNF-α secretion, and MHC-II expression in macrophages. These results prove the important role of autophagy in the function of macrophages, and activation of autophagy can overcome asparaginase-induced immune suppression in macrophages.

  7. Polysaccharides Isolated from Açaí Fruit Induce Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Holderness, Jeff; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Freedman, Brett; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Quinn, Mark T.; Hedges, Jodi F.; Jutila, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The Açaí (Acai) fruit is a popular nutritional supplement that purportedly enhances immune system function. These anecdotal claims are supported by limited studies describing immune responses to the Acai polyphenol fraction. Previously, we characterized γδ T cell responses to both polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions from several plant-derived nutritional supplements. Similar polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions are found in Acai fruit. Thus, we hypothesized that one or both of these fractions could activate γδ T cells. Contrary to previous reports, we did not identify agonist activity in the polyphenol fraction; however, the Acai polysaccharide fraction induced robust γδ T cell stimulatory activity in human, mouse, and bovine PBMC cultures. To characterize the immune response to Acai polysaccharides, we fractionated the crude polysaccharide preparation and tested these fractions for activity in human PBMC cultures. The largest Acai polysaccharides were the most active in vitro as indicated by activation of myeloid and γδ T cells. When delivered in vivo, Acai polysaccharide induced myeloid cell recruitment and IL-12 production. These results define innate immune responses induced by the polysaccharide component of Acai and have implications for the treatment of asthma and infectious disease. PMID:21386979

  8. [Protective Activity of Prion Protein Fragments after Immunization of Annimals with Experimentally Induced Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Volpina, O M; Volkova, T D; Medvinskaya, N I; Kamynina, A V; Zaporozhskaya, Y V; Aleksandrova, I J; Koroev, D O; Samokhin, A N; Nesterova, I V; Deygin, V I; Bobkova, N V

    2015-01-01

    The prion protein is considered as one of the membrane targets of neurotoxic beta-amyloid during Alzheimer's disease development. We have chosen and synthesized 17-33, 23-33, 95-110 and 101-115 prion fragments involved in beta-amyloid binding. The effect of immunization with the peptides on the features of Alzheimer's disease was investigated in animals with an experimentally induced form of the disease. It was shown that immunization either with peptide 17-33 or with protein conjugates of peptides 23-33 and 101-115 increases the level of brain beta-amyloid and improves morfofunctional state of the brain.

  9. Immune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia resulting from preceding exposure to heparin catheter flushes.

    PubMed

    Muslimani, Alaa A; Ricaurte, Basma; Daw, Hamed A

    2007-07-01

    Immune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a life-threatening adverse effect of heparin. It can result from any type of heparin exposure and by any route of administration; however only a few cases are reported after exposures to small quantities of heparin from catheter flushes. The major clinical problem associated with HIT is thrombosis. Early detection and institution of alternative, non-heparin anticoagulation are important. We report a patient with HIT associated with use of therapeutic-dose unfractionated heparin in whom immune sensitization to heparin was triggered by two 500-unit exposure to UFH associated with intravascular catheter flushing for antineoplastic chemotherapy in a patient with colon adenocarcinoma.

  10. CsBAFF, a Teleost B Cell Activating Factor, Promotes Pathogen-Induced Innate Immunity and Vaccine-Induced Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Sun, Li

    2015-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that is known to play an important role in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation in mammals. However, studies of BAFF in teleosts are very limited and its function, in particular that under in vivo conditions, is essentially unknown. In this study, we conducted in vivo as well as in vitro functional analyses of a BAFF homologue (CsBAFF) from the teleost fish tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). CsBAFF is composed of 261 residues and shares moderate sequence identities with known BAFFs of other teleosts. CsBAFF expression was most abundant in immune organs and was upregulated during bacterial infection. Purified recombinant CsBAFF (rCsBAFF) bound to tongue sole lymphocytes and promoted cellular proliferation and survival. The results of an in vivo study showed that CsBAFF overexpression in tongue sole significantly enhanced macrophage activation and reduced bacterial infection in fish tissues, whereas knockdown of CsBAFF expression resulted in increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Furthermore, vaccination studies showed that CsBAFF enhanced the immunoprotection of a DNA vaccine and augmented the production of specific serum antibodies. Taken together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence to indicate that teleost BAFF is an immunostimulator that significantly contributes to the innate antibacterial immune response and vaccine-induced adaptive immune response. PMID:26295165

  11. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner.

  12. Defensin-induced adaptive immunity in mice and its potential in preventing periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Brogden, K A; Heidari, M; Sacco, R E; Palmquist, D; Guthmiller, J M; Johnson, G K; Jia, H P; Tack, B F; McCray, P B

    2003-04-01

    The severity of periodontal disease is dependent on a combination of host, microbial agent and environmental factors. One strong correlate related to periodontal disease pathogenesis is the immune status of the host. Here we show that human neutrophil peptide (HNP) defensins or human beta-defensins (HBD), co-administered intranasally with the antigen ovalbumin (OVA), induce unique immune responses that if used with microbial antigens may have the potential to hinder the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. C57BL/6 mice were immunized intranasally with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) containing 1 micro g HNP-1, HNP-2, HBD1 or HBD2 with and without 50 microg OVA. At 21 days, isotypes and subclasses of OVA-specific antibodies were determined in saliva, serum, nasal wash, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and fecal extracts. OVA-stimulated splenic lymphoid cell cultures from immunized mice were assessed for interferon (IFN)-gamma, Interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10. In comparison with mice immunized with only OVA, HNP-1 and HBD2 induced significantly higher (P < 0.05) OVA-specific serum IgG, lower, but not significant, serum IgM and significantly lower (P < 0.05) IFN-gamma. In contrast, HNP-2 induced low OVA-specific serum IgG and higher, but not significant, serum IgM. HBD1 induced significantly higher (P < 0.05) OVA-specific serum IgG, higher, but not significant, serum IgM, and significantly higher (P < 0.05) IL-10. The elevated serum IgG subclasses contained IgG1 and IgG2b.

  13. Mechanisms Of Hypoxia-Induced Immune Escape In Cancer And Their Regulation By Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Graham, Charles; Barsoum, Ivraym; Kim, Judy; Black, Madison; Siemens, Robert D

    2015-08-01

    The acquired ability of tumour cells to avoid destruction by immune effector mechanisms (immune escape) is important for malignant progression. Also associated with malignant progression is tumour hypoxia, which induces aggressive phenotypes such as invasion, metastasis and drug resistance in cancer cells. Our studies revealed that hypoxia contributes to escape from innate immunity by increasing tumour cell expression of the metalloproteinase ADAM10 in a manner dependent on accumulation of the alpha subunit of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α). Increased ADAM10 expression leads to shedding of the NK cell-activating ligand, MICA, from the surface of tumour cells, thereby resulting in resistance to NK cell-mediated lysis. Our more recent studies demonstrated that hypoxia, also via HIF-1α accumulation, increases the expression of the inhibitory co-stimulatory ligand PD-L1 on tumour cells. Elevated PD-L1 expression leads to escape from adaptive immunity via increased apoptosis of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Accumulating evidence indicates that hypoxia-induced acquisition of malignant phenotypes, including immune escape, is in part due to impaired nitric oxide (NO)-mediated activation of cGMP signalling and that restoration of cGMP signalling prevents such hypoxic responses. We have shown that NO/cGMP signalling inhibits hypoxia-induced malignant phenotypes likely in part by interfering with HIF-1α accumulation via a mechanism involving calpain. These findings indicate that activation of NO/cGMP signalling may have useful applications in cancer therapy.

  14. The contribution of type I interferon signaling to immunity induced by alphavirus replicon vaccines.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is critical for protecting the mammalian host from numerous virus infections and plays a key role in shaping the antiviral adaptive immune response. In this report, the importance of type I IFN signaling was assessed in a mouse model of alphavirus-induced humoral immune induction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from influenza virus (HA-VRP) were used to vaccinate both wildtype (wt) and IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout (RKO) mice. HA-VRP vaccination induced equivalent levels of flu-specific systemic IgG, mucosal IgG, and systemic IgA antibodies in both wt and IFN RKO mice. In contrast, HA-VRP vaccination of IFN RKO mice failed to induce significant levels of flu-specific mucosal IgA antibodies at multiple mucosal surfaces. In the VRP adjuvant system, co-delivery of null VRP with ovalbumin (OVA) protein significantly increased the levels of OVA-specific serum IgG, fecal IgG, and fecal IgA antibodies in both wt and RKO mice, suggesting that type I IFN signaling plays a less significant role in the VRP adjuvant effect. Taken together, these results suggest that (1) at least in regard to IFN signaling, the mechanisms which regulate alphavirus-induced immunity differ when VRP are utilized as expression vectors as opposed to adjuvants, and (2) type I IFN signaling is required for the induction of mucosal IgA antibodies directed against VRP-expressed antigen. These results shed new light on the regulatory networks which promote immune induction, and specifically mucosal immune induction, with alphavirus vaccine vectors.

  15. THE CONTRIBUTION OF TYPE I INTERFERON SIGNALING TO IMMUNITY INDUCED BY ALPHAVIRUS REPLICON VACCINES

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is critical for protecting the mammalian host from numerous virus infections and plays a key role in shaping the anti-viral adaptive immune response. In this report, the importance of type I IFN signaling was assessed in a mouse model of alphavirus-induced humoral immune induction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from influenza virus (HA-VRP) were used to vaccinate both wildtype (wt) and IFN α/β receptor knockout (RKO) mice. HA-VRP vaccination induced equivalent levels of flu-specific systemic IgG, mucosal IgG, and systemic IgA antibodies in both wt and IFN RKO mice. In contrast, HA-VRP vaccination of IFN RKO mice failed to induce significant levels of flu-specific mucosal IgA antibodies at multiple mucosal surfaces. In the VRP adjuvant system, co-delivery of null VRP with ovalbumin (OVA) protein significantly increased the levels of OVA-specific serum IgG, fecal IgG, and fecal IgA antibodies in both wt and RKO mice, suggesting that type I IFN signaling plays a less significant role in the VRP adjuvant effect. Taken together, these results suggest that, 1) at least in regard to IFN signaling, the mechanisms which regulate VRP-induced immunity differ when VRP are utilized as expression vectors as opposed to adjuvants, and 2) type I IFN signaling is required for the induction of mucosal IgA antibodies directed against VRP-expressed antigen. These results potentially shed new light on the regulatory networks which promote immune induction, and specifically mucosal immune induction, with alphavirus vaccine vectors. PMID:18656518

  16. Tumor immunotherapy: drug-induced neoantigens (xenogenization) and immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Franzese, Ornella; Torino, Francesco; Fuggetta, Maria Pia; Aquino, Angelo; Roselli, Mario; Bonmassar, Enzo; Giuliani, Anna; D’Atri, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, we discovered that novel transplantation antigens can be induced in vivo or in vitro by treating murine leukemia with dacarbazine. Years later, this phenomenon that we called “Chemical Xenogenization” (CX) and more recently, “Drug-Induced Xenogenization” (DIX), was reproduced by Thierry Boon with a mutagenic/carcinogenic compound (i.e. N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine). In both cases, the molecular bases of DIX rely on mutagenesis induced by methyl adducts to oxygen-6 of DNA guanine. In the present review we illustrate the main DIX-related immune-pharmacodynamic properties of triazene compounds of clinical use (i.e. dacarbazine and temozolomide). In recent years, tumor immunotherapy has come back to the stage with the discovery of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICpI) that show an extraordinary immune-enhancing activity. Here we illustrate the salient biochemical features of some of the most interesting ICpI and the up-to-day status of their clinical use. Moreover, we illustrate the literature showing the direct relationship between somatic mutation burden and susceptibility of cancer cells to host’s immune responses. When DIX was discovered, we were not able to satisfactorily exploit the possible presence of triazene-induced neoantigens in malignant cells since no device was available to adequately enhance host’s immune responses in clinical settings. Today, ICpI show unprecedented efficacy in terms of survival times, especially when elevated mutation load is associated with cancer cells. Therefore, in the future, mutation-dependent neoantigens obtained by appropriate pharmacological intervention appear to disclose a novel approach for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of ICpI in cancer patients. PMID:28404974

  17. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level

    PubMed Central

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A.; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J.; Finkenstaedt, Felix W.; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient’s environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS (‘immune paralysis’), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  18. Intranasal immunization of young mice with a multigene HIV-1 vaccine in combination with the N3 adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Bråve, Andreas; Hallengärd, David; Schröder, Ulf; Blomberg, Pontus; Wahren, Britta; Hinkula, Jorma

    2008-09-19

    One of the major challenges for the development of an HIV vaccine is to induce potent virus-specific immune responses at the mucosal surfaces where transmission of virus occurs. Intranasal delivery of classical vaccines has been shown to induce good mucosal antibody responses, but so far for genetic vaccines the success has been limited. This study shows that young individuals are sensitive to nasal immunization with a genetic vaccine delivered in a formulation of a lipid adjuvant, the Eurocine N3. Intranasal delivery of a multiclade/multigene HIV-1 genetic vaccine gave rise to vaginal and rectal IgA responses as well as systemic humoral and cellular responses. As electroporation might become the preferred means of delivering genetic vaccines for systemic HIV immunity, nasal delivery by droplet formulation in a lipid adjuvant might become a means of priming or boosting the mucosal immunity.

  19. Beryllium-induced immune response in C3H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Bice, D.E.; Nikula, K.J.

    1995-12-01

    Studies conducted at ITRI over the past several years have investigated whether Beagle dogs, monkeys, and mice are suitable models for human chronic beryllium-induced lung disease (CBD). Recent studies have focused on the histopathological and immunopathological changes occurring in A/J and C3H/HeJ mice acutely exposed by inhalation to Be metal. Lung lesions in both strains of mice included focal lymphocyte aggregates comprised primarily of B lymphocytes and lesser amounts of T-helper lymphocytes and microgranulomas consisting chiefly of macrophages and T-helper lymphocytes. The distribution of proliferating cells within the microgranulomas was similar to the distribution of T-helper cells. These results strongly suggested that A/J and C3H/HeJ mice responded to inhaled Be metal in a fashion similar to humans in terms of pulmonary lesions and the apparent in situ proliferation of T-helper cells. Results of these studies confirm lymphocyte involvement in the pulmonary response to inhaled Be metal.

  20. Short day lengths augment stress-induced leukocyte trafficking and stress-induced enhancement of skin immune function.

    PubMed

    Bilbo, Staci D; Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Viswanathan, Kavitha; Saul, Alison; Yellon, Steven M; Nelson, Randy J

    2002-03-19

    Environmental conditions influence the onset and severity of infection and disease. Stressful conditions during winter may weaken immune function and further compromise survival by means of hypothermia, starvation, or shock. To test the hypothesis that animals may use photoperiod to anticipate the onset of seasonal stressors and adjust immune function, we evaluated glucocorticoids and the distribution of blood leukocytes in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) exposed to long day lengths (i.e., summer) or short day (SD) lengths (i.e., winter) at baseline and during acute stress. We also investigated the influence of photoperiod and acute stress on a delayed-type hypersensitivity response in the skin. SDs increased glucocorticoid concentrations and the absolute number of circulating blood leukocytes, lymphocytes, T cells, and natural killer cells at baseline in hamsters. During stressful challenges, it appears beneficial for immune cells to exit the blood and move to primary immune defense areas such as the skin, in preparation for potential injury or infection. Acute (2 h) restraint stress induced trafficking of lymphocytes and monocytes out of the blood. This trafficking occurred more rapidly in SDs compared to long days. Baseline delayed-type hypersensitivity responses were enhanced during SDs; this effect was augmented by acute stress and likely reflected more rapid redistribution of leukocytes out of the blood and into the skin. These results suggest that photoperiod may provide a useful cue by which stressors in the environment may be anticipated to adjust the repertoire of available immune cells and increase survival likelihood.

  1. Hantavirus-induced pathogenesis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    PubMed

    Kobak, Lidija; Raftery, Martin J; Voigt, Sebastian; Kühl, Anja A; Kilic, Ergin; Kurth, Andreas; Witkowski, Peter; Hofmann, Jörg; Nitsche, Andreas; Schaade, Lars; Krüger, Detlev H; Schönrich, Günther

    2015-06-01

    Hantaviruses are emerging zoonotic pathogens that can cause severe disease in humans. Clinical observations suggest that human immune components contribute to hantavirus-induced pathology. To address this issue we generated mice with a humanized immune system. Hantavirus infection of these animals resulted in systemic infection associated with weight loss, decreased activity, ruffled fur and inflammatory infiltrates of lung tissue. Intriguingly, after infection, humanized mice harbouring human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted human CD8+ T cells started to lose weight earlier (day 10) than HLA class I-negative humanized mice (day 15). Moreover, in these mice the number of human platelets dropped by 77 % whereas the number of murine platelets did not change, illustrating how differences between rodent and human haemato-lymphoid systems may contribute to disease development. To our knowledge this is the first description of a humanized mouse model of hantavirus infection, and our results indicate a role for human immune cells in hantaviral pathogenesis.

  2. Tumor-induced tolerance and immune suppression by myeloid derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Serafini, Paolo; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2008-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the Achilles' heel of cancer immunotherapies is often the complex interplay of tumor-derived factors and deviant host properties, which involve a wide range of immune elements in the lymphoid and myeloid compartments. Regulatory lymphocytes, tumor-conditioned myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), tumor-associated macrophages, and dysfunctional and immature dendritic cells take part in a complex immunoregulatory network. Despite the fact that some mechanisms governing tumor-induced immune tolerance and suppression are starting to be better understood and their complexity dissected, little is known about the diachronic picture of immune tolerance. Based on observations of MDSCs, we present a time-structured and topologically consistent idea of tumor-dependent tolerance progression in tumor-bearing hosts.

  3. Role of immune cells in obesity induced low grade inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Ambreen; Sheikh, Nadeem

    2017-05-01

    The frequency of obesity is enormously growing worldwide. Obesity results when energy intake exceeds, energy expenditure. Excess adiposity is a major risk factor in the progress of various metabolic disorders accounting insulin resistance, hypertension, Type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovarian disease and several types of cancers. Obesity is characterized by pro-inflammatory condition in which hypertrophied adipose tissue along with immune cells contribute to increase the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Immune cells are the key players in inducing low grade chronic inflammation in obesity and are main factor responsible for pathogenesis of insulin resistance resulting Type 2 diabetes. The current review is aimed to investigate the mechanism of pro-inflammatory responses and insulin resistance involving immune cells and their products in obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular Components of the Sporothrix schenckii Complex that Induce Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; López-Romero, Everardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal disease caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex that includes species such as S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii sensu stricto, S. globosa, S. luriei, S. mexicana, and S. pallida, which exhibit different potentially antigenic molecular components. The immune response of susceptible hosts to control infection and disease caused by these fungi has been little studied. Besides, the fungus-host interaction induces the activation of different types of immune response. This mini-review analyzes and discusses existing reports on the identification and functional characterization of molecules from species of the S. schenckii complex with clinical relevance, and the mechanisms that mediate the type and magnitude of the immune response in experimental models in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge is expected to contribute to the development of protective and therapeutic strategies against sporotrichosis and other mycoses.

  5. The protective immune response against infectious bronchitis virus induced by multi-epitope based peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tai; Wang, Hong-Ning; Wang, Xue; Tang, Jun-Ni; Lu, Dan; Zhang, Yun-Fei; Guo, Zi-Cheng; Li, Yu-Ling; Gao, Rong; Kang, Run-Min

    2009-07-01

    Peptide vaccine was found to be an effective and powerful approach to a variety of pathogens. To explore multi-epitope based peptide vaccines against infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), the immunogenic peptides were fused to the 3' terminal of glutathione S transferase gene (GST) and expressed in Escherichia coli. ELISA and Western blot analysis showed that the purified fusion proteins had excellent immune activity with chicken anti-IBV serum. During the vaccination course, the candidate peptide vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular response, and provided up to 80.0% immune protection, while all non-immunized chickens in the negative control group manifested obvious typical symptoms and died after virus challenge. Our finding provides a new way to develop multi-epitope based peptide vaccine against IBV.

  6. Interleukin-22-producing natural killer cells and lymphoid tissue inducer-like cells in mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Marco

    2009-07-17

    Blood, lymphoid tissues, and placenta contain diverse subpopulations of natural killer (NK) cells that possess distinct immune functions. Recent studies have shown that human and mouse gut-associated lymphoid tissues harbor a unique NK cell subset that specializes in production of interleukin (IL)-22. This cytokine plays a role in host defense of mucosal barriers, although dysregulated secretion may cause autoimmune disease. In parallel, human fetal lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and mouse adult LTi-like cells in secondary lymphoid tissues were found to release IL-22, as well as IL-17, a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates host defense against extracellular pathogens. Here, we compare these recently identified immune cells, reviewing what is known about their anatomical location, differentiation requirements, function, and potential involvement in host defense and autoimmunity. Finally, we discuss the challenges faced in furthering our understanding of the developmental relationships and role of NK and LTi-like cells in mucosal immune responses.

  7. Wolbachia Do Not Induce Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Immune Pathway Activation in Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Jennifer C.; Sinkins, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes albopictus is a major vector of dengue (DENV) and chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses, causing millions of infections annually. It naturally carries, at high frequency, the intracellular inherited bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia strains wAlbA and wAlbB; transinfection with the higher-density Wolbachia strain wMel from Drosophila melanogaster led to transmission blocking of both arboviruses. The hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced immune activation plays a role in arbovirus inhibition in this species was examined. In contrast to previous observations in Ae. aegypti, elevation of ROS levels was not observed in either cell lines or mosquito lines carrying the wild-type Wolbachia or higher-density Drosophila Wolbachia strains. There was also no upregulation of genes controlling innate immune pathways or with antioxidant/ROS-producing functions. These data suggest that ROS-mediated immune activation is not an important component of the viral transmission-blocking phenotype in this species. PMID:26287231

  8. Heat sterilization of wood

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions should be considered in heat sterilizing solid wood materials: First, what temperature–time regime is required to kill a particular pest? Second, how much time is required to heat the center of any wood configuration to the kill temperature? The entomology research on the first question has facilitated the development of international standards...

  9. Sterilization of Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillingham, Brint

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. State Department's Agency for International Development (AID) is spending more than $143 million this year for population control measures in over 70 nations around the world and it is estimated that as much as $10 million was spent in one year for surgical sterilization procedures. (JC)

  10. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, David Jason

    2009-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the v μ→ Vτ transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling ~2.5 x 1020 protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  11. Sterilization surgery - making a decision

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002138.htm Sterilization surgery - making a decision To use the sharing features on this page, ... about all the options available to you before making the decision to have a sterilization procedure. Alternative Names Deciding ...

  12. Vitamin D improves immune function in immunosuppressant mice induced by glucocorticoid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zongye; Wang, Ying; Xu, Bingxin; Liu, Junli; Ren, Ye; Dai, Zhuojie; Cui, Di; Su, Xiaoming; Si, Shaoyan; Song, Shu Jun

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D is an essential fat-soluble vitamin with multiple functions. Vitamin D receptor has been shown to be expressed in several types of immune cells suggesting vitamin D may have immune regulatory roles. Vitamin D insufficiency has been suggested to increase the risk of autoimmune diseases. However, little is known regarding its immunomodulatory effects in the condition of immune suppression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulatory effects of vitamin D on immune function in immunosuppressant mice. An immunosuppressant mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection with glucocorticiod for 3 days. Immunosuppressant mice were intragastrically administered with 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3; 0,4, 6 or 10 IU/g body weight] for 7 days. On day 8, the mice were decapitated. The body weight and the weights of thymus and spleen were measured. Thymus and spleen indexes were calculated. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, proliferation and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production of spleen T lymphocytes was detected. Compared with the mice in the control group, the body weight, thymus and spleen indexes, the ratios of CD4+/CD8+ in peripheral blood and IL-2 production and proliferation of spleen T lymphocytes were decreased in immunosuppressant mice induced by glucocorticiod. However, in vitamin D-treated mice, the thymus indexes, the ratios of CD4+/CD8+, secretion of IL-2 and the proliferation index of spleen T lymphocytes were significantly increased (P<0.05). Among the three doses of 1,25(OH)2D3, 6 IU/g was most effective in improving the immune function. These results indicate that vitamin D supplementation can improve immune recovery in immunosuppressant mice by stimulating T-cell proliferation and elevating IL-2 production. PMID:28123720

  13. Nasal immunization with major epitope-containing ApxIIA toxin fragment induces protective immunity against challenge infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ki-Weon; Kim, Sae-Hae; Park, Jisang; Son, Youngok; Yoo, Han Sang; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2013-01-15

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is an infective agent that leads to porcine pleuropneumonia, a disease that causes severe economic losses in the swine industry. Based on the fact that the respiratory tract is the primary site for bacterial infection, it has been suggested that bacterial exclusion in the respiratory tract through mucosal immune induction is the most effective disease prevention strategy. ApxIIA is a vaccine candidate against A. pleuropneumoniae infection, and fragment #5 (aa. 439-801) of ApxIIA contains the major epitopes for effective vaccination. In this study, we used mice to verify the efficacy of intranasal immunization with fragment #5 in the induction of protective immunity against nasal challenge with A. pleuropneumoniae and compared its efficacy with that of subcutaneous immunization. Intranasal immunization of the fragment induced significantly higher systemic and mucosal immune responses measured at the levels of antigen-specific antibodies, cytokine-secreting cells after antigen exposure, and antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation. Intranasal immunization not only efficiently inhibited the bacterial colonization in respiratory organs, but also prevented alveolar tissue damage in infectious condition similar to that of a contaminated pig. Moreover, intranasal immunization with fragment #5 provided acquired protective immunity against intranasal challenge with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2. In addition, it conferred cross-protection against serotype 5, a heterologous pathogen that causes severe disease by ApxI and ApxII secretion. Collectively, intranasal immunization with fragment #5 of ApxIIA can be considered an efficient protective immunization procedure against A. pleuropneumoniae infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation and Purification of an Antibacterial Protein from Immune Induced Haemolymph of American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Basseri, Hamid Reza; Dadi-Khoeni, Amir; Bakhtiari, Ronak; Abolhassani, Mandan; Hajihosseini-Baghdadabadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial peptides play a role as effectors substances in the immunity of vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In the current study, antimicrobial peptide was isolated from the haemolymph of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Methods: Micrococcus luteus as Gram-positive bacteria and Escherichia coli as Gram-negative bacteria were candidate for injection. Induction was done by injecting both bacteria into the abdominal cavity of two groups of cockroaches separately. The haemolymphs were collected 24 hours after post injection and initially tested against both bacteria. Subsequently, the immune induced haemolymph was purified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate the proteins responsible for the antibacterial activity. Results: The non-induced haemolymph did not show any activity against both bacteria whereas induced haemolymph exhibited high activity against M. luteus but did less against E. coli. Two fractions showed antibacterial activity against M. luteus. Finally the molecular weight of the isolated antibacterial proteins were determined as 72 kDa and 62 kDa using SDS-PAGE. Conclusion: Induced haemolymph of American cockroaches has the ability to produce peptides to combat against Gram-positive bacteria when an immune challenge is mounted. Further work has to be done to sequence of the protein, which it would be advantageous. PMID:28032104

  15. The evolutionarily dynamic IFN-inducible GTPase proteins play conserved immune functions in vertebrates and cephalochordates.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Zhang, Juyong; Sun, Yi; Wang, Hua; Wang, Yiquan

    2009-07-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible GTPases currently include four families of proteins: myxovirus resistant proteins (Mxs), guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), immunity-related GTPase proteins (IRGs), and very large inducible GTPase proteins (VLIGs). They are all under conserved regulation by IFNs in humans and mice and play a critical role in preventing microbial infections. However, differences between vertebrates are poorly characterized, and their evolutionary origins have not been studied in detail. In this study, we performed comparative genomic analysis of the four families in 18 representative animals that yielded several unexpected results. Firstly, we found that Mx, GBP, and IRG protein families arose before the divergence of chordate subphyla, but VLIG emerged solely in vertebrates. Secondly, IRG, GBP, and VLIG families have experienced a high rate of gene gain and loss during the evolution, with the GBP family being lost entirely in two pufferfish and VLIG family lost in primates and carnivores. Thirdly, the regulation of these genes by IFNs is highly conserved throughout vertebrates although the VLIG protein sequences in fish have lost the first 870 amino acid residues. Finally, amphioxus IFN-inducible GTPase genes are all highly expressed in immune-related organs such as gill, liver, and intestine and are upregulated after challenge with PolyI:C and pathogens, although no IFNs or their receptors were detected in the current amphioxus genome database. These results suggest that IFN-inducible GTPase genes play conserved immune functions both in vertebrates and in cephalochordates.

  16. Evidence of a Redox-Dependent Regulation of Immune Responses to Exercise-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sakelliou, Alexandra; Athanailidis, Ioannis; Tsoukas, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Draganidis, Dimitris; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Liacos, Christina; Mandalidis, Dimitrios; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Mitrakou, Asimina

    2016-01-01

    We used thiol-based antioxidant supplementation (n-acetylcysteine, NAC) to determine whether immune mobilisation following skeletal muscle microtrauma induced by exercise is redox-sensitive in healthy humans. According to a two-trial, double-blind, crossover, repeated measures design, 10 young men received either placebo or NAC (20 mg/kg/day) immediately after a muscle-damaging exercise protocol (300 eccentric contractions) and for eight consecutive days. Blood sampling and performance assessments were performed before exercise, after exercise, and daily throughout recovery. NAC reduced the decline of reduced glutathione in erythrocytes and the increase of plasma protein carbonyls, serum TAC and erythrocyte oxidized glutathione, and TBARS and catalase activity during recovery thereby altering postexercise redox status. The rise of muscle damage and inflammatory markers (muscle strength, creatine kinase activity, CRP, proinflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules) was less pronounced in NAC during the first phase of recovery. The rise of leukocyte and neutrophil count was decreased by NAC after exercise. Results on immune cell subpopulations obtained by flow cytometry indicated that NAC ingestion reduced the exercise-induced rise of total macrophages, HLA+ macrophages, and 11B+ macrophages and abolished the exercise-induced upregulation of B lymphocytes. Natural killer cells declined only in PLA immediately after exercise. These results indicate that thiol-based antioxidant supplementation blunts immune cell mobilisation in response to exercise-induced inflammation suggesting that leukocyte mobilization may be under redox-dependent regulation. PMID:27974950

  17. Evidence of a Redox-Dependent Regulation of Immune Responses to Exercise-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sakelliou, Alexandra; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Athanailidis, Ioannis; Tsoukas, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Draganidis, Dimitris; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Liacos, Christina; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Mandalidis, Dimitrios; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Mitrakou, Asimina

    2016-01-01

    We used thiol-based antioxidant supplementation (n-acetylcysteine, NAC) to determine whether immune mobilisation following skeletal muscle microtrauma induced by exercise is redox-sensitive in healthy humans. According to a two-trial, double-blind, crossover, repeated measures design, 10 young men received either placebo or NAC (20 mg/kg/day) immediately after a muscle-damaging exercise protocol (300 eccentric contractions) and for eight consecutive days. Blood sampling and performance assessments were performed before exercise, after exercise, and daily throughout recovery. NAC reduced the decline of reduced glutathione in erythrocytes and the increase of plasma protein carbonyls, serum TAC and erythrocyte oxidized glutathione, and TBARS and catalase activity during recovery thereby altering postexercise redox status. The rise of muscle damage and inflammatory markers (muscle strength, creatine kinase activity, CRP, proinflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules) was less pronounced in NAC during the first phase of recovery. The rise of leukocyte and neutrophil count was decreased by NAC after exercise. Results on immune cell subpopulations obtained by flow cytometry indicated that NAC ingestion reduced the exercise-induced rise of total macrophages, HLA(+) macrophages, and 11B(+) macrophages and abolished the exercise-induced upregulation of B lymphocytes. Natural killer cells declined only in PLA immediately after exercise. These results indicate that thiol-based antioxidant supplementation blunts immune cell mobilisation in response to exercise-induced inflammation suggesting that leukocyte mobilization may be under redox-dependent regulation.

  18. Red blood cells as innovative antigen carrier to induce specific immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cremel, Magali; Guérin, Nathalie; Horand, Françoise; Banz, Alice; Godfrin, Yann

    2013-02-25

    The route of administration, the dose of antigen as well as the type of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) targeted are important factors to induce immune tolerance. Despite encouraging results obtained in animal models, intravenous injection of soluble antigen is unsuccessful in human clinical trials on autoimmune disease due to inefficient antigen delivery. To improve antigen delivery, we used mouse red blood cells (RBCs) as antigen vehicles to specifically target APCs which are responsible for removal of senescent RBCs after phagocytosis. In this study, we demonstrated that antigen-delivery by RBCs induced a strong decrease in the humoral response compared with the ovalbumin (OVA) free form in mice. In addition, OVA-loaded RBC treated with [bis(sulphosuccinimidyl)] suberate (BS3), a chemical compound known to enhance RBC phagocytosis, induced an inhibition of antigen-specific T cell responses and an increase in the percentage of regulatory T cells. The state of tolerance induced is long lasting, antigen-specific and sufficiently robust to withstand immunization with antigen mixed with cholera toxin adjuvant. This RBC strategy, which does not abolish the immune system, constitutes an attractive approach for induction of tolerance compared to systemic immunosuppressant therapies already in use.

  19. Immune activation is required for NT-3-induced axonal plasticity in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Smith, George M.; Shine, H. David

    2009-01-01

    After an unilateral lesion of the corticospinal tract (CST) at the level of the medulla over-expression of Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in lumbar spinal cord motoneurons induced axonal sprouting of the intact CST in the acutely injured but not uninjured or chronically injured spinal cord in rats. This suggested that processes associated with immune-mediated wound healing may act with NT-3 to induce neuroplasticity. To test whether immune processes were involved we measured NT-3 induced axonal sprouting in immunosuppressed compared to immunocompetent rats. Rats were immunosuppressed with anti-leukocyte antibodies 1 day before receiving a CST lesion and then 2 weeks later NT-3 was over-expressed in the lumbar spinal motoneurons with an adenoviral vector carrying the NT-3 gene targeted to the motoneurons by retrograde transport. At 35 days post-lesion no axonal sprouting was measured in immunosuppressed rats whereas axonal sprouting was measured in the immunocompetent rats. We then tested whether re-evoking an immune response in chronically lesioned rats would induce neuroplasticity. Rats received CST lesions and then 4 months later were treated with systemic injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 7 days before NT-3 was over-expressed in the lumbar spinal motoneurons. Axonal sprouting was observed in the LPS treated rats but not in control animals that were not treated with LPS. Further studies showed that lesioning the CST activated and LPS re-activated microglia and CD4+ T-cells in the acutely lesioned and chronically lesioned rats, respectively. However, immunosuppression only decreased the number of activated CD4+ T-cells suggesting they were responsible for the support of axonal growth. These observations demonstrate that processes associated with immune-mediated wound healing play a role in NT-3 induced neuroplasticity after injury. PMID:18191837

  20. In vivo delivery of antigens by adenovirus dodecahedron induces cellular and humoral immune responses to elicit antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Mendez, Ana; Garin, Marina I; Pineda-Molina, Estela; Veratti, Eugenia; Bueren, Juan A; Fender, Pascal; Lenormand, Jean-Luc

    2010-05-01

    Cancer vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) vectors may offer many advantages over other antigen-delivery systems and represent an alternative to the ex vivo cell therapy approach. In this study, we describe the use of penton-dodecahedron (Pt-Dd) VLPs from human adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) as cancer vaccine vehicle for specific antigens, based on its unique cellular internalization properties. WW domains from the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 serve as an adapter to bind the antigen to Pt-Dd. By engineering fusion partners of WW with the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), Pt-Dd can efficiently deliver WW-OVA in vitro and the Pt-Dd/WW complex can be readily internalized by dendritic cells (DCs). Immunization with WW-OVA/Pt-Dd results in 90% protection against B16-OVA melanoma implantation in syngeneic mice. This high level of protection correlates with the development of OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, vaccination with WW-OVA Pt-Dd induces robust humoral responses in mice as shown by the high levels of anti-OVA antibodies (Abs) detected in serum. Importantly, treatment of mice bearing B16-OVA tumors with WW-OVA/Pt-Dd results in complete tumor regression in 100% of cases. Thus, our data supports a dual role of Pt-Dd as antigen-delivery vector and natural adjuvant, able to generate integrated cellular and humoral responses of broad immunogenic complexity to elicit specific antitumor immunity. Antigen delivery by Pt-Dd vector is a promising novel strategy for development of cancer vaccines with important clinical applications.

  1. In Vivo Delivery of Antigens by Adenovirus Dodecahedron Induces Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses to Elicit Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Mendez, Ana; Garin, Marina I; Pineda-Molina, Estela; Veratti, Eugenia; Bueren, Juan A; Fender, Pascal; Lenormand, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Cancer vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) vectors may offer many advantages over other antigen-delivery systems and represent an alternative to the ex vivo cell therapy approach. In this study, we describe the use of penton-dodecahedron (Pt-Dd) VLPs from human adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) as cancer vaccine vehicle for specific antigens, based on its unique cellular internalization properties. WW domains from the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 serve as an adapter to bind the antigen to Pt-Dd. By engineering fusion partners of WW with the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), Pt-Dd can efficiently deliver WW-OVA in vitro and the Pt-Dd/WW complex can be readily internalized by dendritic cells (DCs). Immunization with WW-OVA/Pt-Dd results in 90% protection against B16-OVA melanoma implantation in syngeneic mice. This high level of protection correlates with the development of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, vaccination with WW-OVA Pt-Dd induces robust humoral responses in mice as shown by the high levels of anti-OVA antibodies (Abs) detected in serum. Importantly, treatment of mice bearing B16-OVA tumors with WW-OVA/Pt-Dd results in complete tumor regression in 100% of cases. Thus, our data supports a dual role of Pt-Dd as antigen-delivery vector and natural adjuvant, able to generate integrated cellular and humoral responses of broad immunogenic complexity to elicit specific antitumor immunity. Antigen delivery by Pt-Dd vector is a promising novel strategy for development of cancer vaccines with important clinical applications. PMID:20179681

  2. Surfactant protein D induces immune quiescence and apoptosis of mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Hrishikesh; Thakur, Gargi; Koippallil Gopalakrishnan, Aghila Rani; Dodagatta-Marri, Eswari; Patil, Anushree; Kishore, Uday; Madan, Taruna

    2016-02-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an integral molecule of the innate immunity secreted by epithelial cells lining the mucosal surfaces. The C-type lectin domain of SP-D performs pattern recognition functions while it binds to putative receptors on immune cells to modify cellular functions. Activation of immune cells and increased serum SP-D is observed in a range of patho-physiological conditions including infections. We speculated if SP-D can modulate systemic immune response via direct interaction with activated PBMCs. In this study, we examined interaction of a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D) on PHA-activated PBMCs. We report a significant downregulation of activation receptors such as TLR2, TLR4, CD11c and CD69 upon rhSP-D treatment. rhSP-D inhibited production of Th1 (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17A) cytokines along with IL-6. Interestingly, levels of IL-2, Th2 (IL-4) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines remained unaltered. Analysis of co-stimulatory CD28 and co-inhibitory CTLA4 receptors along with their ligands CD80 and CD86 revealed a selective up-regulation of CTLA4 in the lymphocyte subset. rhSP-D induced apoptosis in the activated but not in non-activated lymphocytes. Blockade of CTLA4 inhibited rhSP-D mediated apoptosis of activated lymphocytes, confirming involvement of CTLA4. We conclude that SP-D restores immune homeostasis. It regulates expression of immunomodulatory receptors and cytokines, which is followed by induction of apoptosis in activated lymphocytes. These findings suggest a critical role of SP-D in immune surveillance against activated immune cells.

  3. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children.

    PubMed

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-04-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers were measured in plasma samples obtained at 36 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3-5 days and at 4 and 18 months of age were analyzed for T- and B-cell numbers, proportions of naive and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells. Multivariate factor analyses show that higher anti-MMR antibody titers were associated with a lower degree of adaptive immune maturation, that is, lower proportions of memory T cells and a lower capacity of mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, but with higher proportions of putative regulatory T cells. Further, children born by cesarean section (CS) had significantly higher anti-measles titers than vaginally-born children; and CS was found to be associated with delayed adaptive immunity. Also, girls presented with significantly higher anti-mumps and anti-rubella antibody levels than boys at 36 months of age. These results indicate that delayed adaptive immune maturation before and in close proximity to immunization seems to be advantageous for the ability of children to respond with higher anti-MMR antibody levels after vaccination.

  4. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children

    PubMed Central

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles–mumps–rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers were measured in plasma samples obtained at 36 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3–5 days and at 4 and 18 months of age were analyzed for T- and B-cell numbers, proportions of naive and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells. Multivariate factor analyses show that higher anti-MMR antibody titers were associated with a lower degree of adaptive immune maturation, that is, lower proportions of memory T cells and a lower capacity of mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, but with higher proportions of putative regulatory T cells. Further, children born by cesarean section (CS) had significantly higher anti-measles titers than vaginally-born children; and CS was found to be associated with delayed adaptive immunity. Also, girls presented with significantly higher anti-mumps and anti-rubella antibody levels than boys at 36 months of age. These results indicate that delayed adaptive immune maturation before and in close proximity to immunization seems to be advantageous for the ability of children to respond with higher anti-MMR antibody levels after vaccination. PMID:27195118

  5. STAT3, a Key Parameter of Cytokine-Driven Tissue Protection during Sterile Inflammation – the Case of Experimental Acetaminophen (Paracetamol)-Induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mühl, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, or paracetamol) overdosing is a prevalent cause of acute liver injury. While clinical disease is initiated by overt parenchymal hepatocyte necrosis in response to the analgetic, course of intoxication is substantially influenced by associated activation of innate immunity. This process is supposed to be set in motion by release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) from dying hepatocytes and is accompanied by an inflammatory cytokine response. Murine models of APAP-induced liver injury emphasize the complex role that DAMPs and cytokines play in promoting either hepatic pathogenesis or resolution and recovery from intoxication. Whereas the function of key inflammatory cytokines is controversially discussed, a subclass of specific cytokines capable of efficiently activating the hepatocyte signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 pathway stands out as being consistently protective in murine models of APAP intoxication. Those include foremost interleukin (IL)-6, IL-11, IL-13, and IL-22. Above all, activation of STAT3 under the influence of these cytokines has the capability to drive hepatocyte compensatory proliferation, a key principle of the regenerating liver. Herein, the role of these specific cytokines during experimental APAP-induced liver injury is highlighted and discussed in a broader perspective. In hard-to-treat or at-risk patients, standard therapy may fail and APAP intoxication can proceed toward a fatal condition. Focused administration of recombinant STAT3-activating cytokines may evolve as novel therapeutic approach under those ill-fated conditions. PMID:27199988

  6. Identification of immune inducible genes from the velvet worm Epiperipatus biolleyi (Onychophora).

    PubMed

    Altincicek, Boran; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Onychophora are the next relatives of Arthropoda and, hence, represent an important taxon to unravel relationships among Insecta, Crustacea, Arachnida, and Myriapoda. Here, we screened for immune inducible genes from the onychophoran Epiperipatus biolleyi (Peripatidae) by injecting crude bacterial LPS and applying the suppression subtractive hybridization technique. Our analysis of 288 cDNAs resulted in identification of 36 novel genes in E. biolleyi whose potential homologues from other animals are known to mediate immune-related signaling (e.g. mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and immunoglobulin enhancer binding protein), to be involved in cellular processes (e.g. perilipin and myosin light chain), or to act as immune effector molecules (e.g. lysosomal beta-galactosidase, a putative antimicrobial peptide and a potential thiolester containing protein). Comparisons with homologous genes from other animals including the two most favored ecdysozoan model organisms of innate immunity research, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, provide further insights into the origin and evolution of Arthropoda immunity.

  7. Efficient Qualitative and Quantitative Determination of Antigen-induced Immune Responses*

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of immunization strategies used in therapeutic antibody or vaccine development, it is critical to assess the quality of immunization-induced polyclonal antibody responses. Here, we developed a workflow that uses sensitive methods to quantitatively and qualitatively assess immune responses against foreign antigens with regard to antibody binding affinity and epitope diversity. The application of such detailed assessments throughout an immunization campaign can significantly reduce the resources required to generate highly specific antibodies. Our workflow consists of the following two steps: 1) the use of surface plasmon resonance to quantify antigen-specific antibodies and evaluate their apparent binding affinities, and 2) the recovery of serum IgGs using an automated small scale purification system, followed by the determination of their epitope diversity using hydrogen deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry. We showed that these methods were sensitive enough to detect antigen-specific IgGs in the nanogram/μl range and that they provided information for differentiating the antibody responses of the various immunized animals that could not be obtained by conventional methods. We also showed that this workflow can guide the selection of an animal that produces high affinity antibodies with a desired epitope coverage profile, resulting in the generation of potential therapeutic monoclonal antibody clones with desirable functional profiles. We postulate that this workflow will be an important tool in the development of effective vaccines to combat the highly sophisticated evasion mechanisms of pathogens. PMID:27288409

  8. Tetranychus urticae mites do not mount an induced immune response against bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Matos, Gonçalo; Wybouw, Nicky; Martins, Nelson E.; Zélé, Flore; Riga, Maria; Leitão, Alexandre B.; Vontas, John; Grbić, Miodrag; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Magalhães, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The genome of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae, a herbivore, is missing important elements of the canonical Drosophila immune pathways necessary to fight bacterial infections. However, it is not known whether spider mites can mount an immune response and survive bacterial infection. In other chelicerates, bacterial infection elicits a response mediated by immune effectors leading to the survival of infected organisms. In T. urticae, infection by either Escherichia coli or Bacillus megaterium did not elicit a response as assessed through genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. In line with this, spider mites died within days even upon injection with low doses of bacteria that are non-pathogenic to Drosophila. Moreover, bacterial populations grew exponentially inside the infected spider mites. By contrast, Sancassania berlesei, a litter-dwelling mite, controlled bacterial proliferation and resisted infections with both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria lethal to T. urticae. This differential mortality between mite species was absent when mites were infected with heat-killed bacteria. Also, we found that spider mites harbour in their gut 1000-fold less bacteria than S. berlesei. We show that T. urticae has lost the capacity to mount an induced immune response against bacteria, in contrast to other mites and chelicerates but similarly to the phloem feeding aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Hence, our results reinforce the putative evolutionary link between ecological conditions regarding exposure to bacteria and the architecture of the immune response. PMID:28592670

  9. Tetranychus urticae mites do not mount an induced immune response against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Santos-Matos, Gonçalo; Wybouw, Nicky; Martins, Nelson E; Zélé, Flore; Riga, Maria; Leitão, Alexandre B; Vontas, John; Grbić, Miodrag; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Magalhães, Sara; Sucena, Élio

    2017-06-14

    The genome of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae, a herbivore, is missing important elements of the canonical Drosophila immune pathways necessary to fight bacterial infections. However, it is not known whether spider mites can mount an immune response and survive bacterial infection. In other chelicerates, bacterial infection elicits a response mediated by immune effectors leading to the survival of infected organisms. In T. urticae, infection by either Escherichia coli or Bacillus megaterium did not elicit a response as assessed through genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. In line with this, spider mites died within days even upon injection with low doses of bacteria that are non-pathogenic to Drosophila Moreover, bacterial populations grew exponentially inside the infected spider mites. By contrast, Sancassania berlesei, a litter-dwelling mite, controlled bacterial proliferation and resisted infections with both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria lethal to T. urticae This differential mortality between mite species was absent when mites were infected with heat-killed bacteria. Also, we found that spider mites harbour in their gut 1000-fold less bacteria than S. berlesei We show that T. urticae has lost the capacity to mount an induced immune response against bacteria, in contrast to other mites and chelicerates but similarly to the phloem feeding aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Hence, our results reinforce the putative evolutionary link between ecological conditions regarding exposure to bacteria and the architecture of the immune response. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Hypoxia-inducible factors in regulation of immune responses in tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxia is one of the hallmarks of the tumour microenvironment. It is the result of insufficient blood supply to support proliferating tumour cells. In response to hypoxia, the cellular machinery uses mechanisms whereby the low level of oxygen is sensed and counterbalanced by changing the transcription of numerous genes. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular responses to hypoxia. In recent years ample evidence has indicated that HIF play a prominent role in tumour immune responses. Up-regulation of HIF1α promotes immune suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressive cells (MDSC) and tumour-associated macrophages (TAM) and rapid differentiation of MDSC to TAM. HIF1α does not affect MDSC differentiation to dendritic cells (DC) but instead causes DC activation. HIF inhibit effector functions of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. HIF1α inhibits regulatory T (Treg) cell development by switching the balance towards T helper type 17 cells. However, as a major part of Treg cell differentiation does not take place in the tumour site, a functionally more important role of HIF1α is in the promotion of Treg cell recruitment to the tumour site in response to chemokines. As a result, the presence of Treg cells inside tumours is increased. Hence, HIF play a largely negative role in the regulation of immune responses inside tumours. It appears that therapeutic strategies targeting HIF in the immune system could be beneficial for anti-tumour immune responses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Taenia solium oncosphere antigens induce immunity in pigs against experimental cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Manuela; Gilman, Robert H; Gonzales, Armando; Garcia, Hector Hugo; Gavidia, Cesar; Falcon, Nestor; Bernal, Teresa; Arana, Yanina; Tsang, Victor C W

    2002-08-30

    Immunity to Taenia solium infection was investigated using an experimental intramuscular oncosphere infection assay (IMOA) model in pigs. Three naturally infected pigs with cysticercosis were treated with oxfendazole (OFZ), a drug demonstrated to kill cysts in porcine muscle. These animals were then challenged with oncospheres but did not develop any cysts while three uninfected pigs that were similarly challenged, did develop intramuscular cysts. In another study, two groups of three pigs each were immunized with crude T. solium oncosphere and metacestode antigens, respectively, and tested with the IMOA. Immunization with crude oncosphere antigens (OAs) induced 100% protection, while metacestode antigens provided only partial protection. Immunoblots showed that pigs with complete immune protection to oncosphere intramuscular challenge had antibodies to two OAs at 31.3 and 22.5 kDa, respectively. Antibody to these two antigens was absent in pigs immunized with metacestodes or in uninfected control pigs. This study demonstrated the presence of two antigens that are unique to the oncosphere. Although, antibody to these two antigens is consistently present in pigs that are protected from an oncosphere intramuscular challenge their role in preventing infection by T. solium larval cysts is still hypothetical.

  12. DNA Alkylating Therapy Induces Tumor Regression through an HMGB1-Mediated Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Jennifer L.; Ditsworth, Dara; Catanzaro, Joseph M.; Sabino, Gregory; Furie, Martha B.; Kew, Richard R.; Crawford, Howard C.; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of apoptosis is associated with the development of human cancer and resistance to anticancer therapy. We have previously shown in tumor xenografts that DNA alkylating agents induce sporadic cell necrosis and regression of apoptosis-deficient tumors. Sporadic tumor cell necrosis is associated with extracellular release of cellular content such as the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein and subsequent recruitment of innate immune cells into the tumor tissue. It remained unclear whether HMGB1 and the activation of innate immunity played a role in tumor response to chemotherapy. In this study, we show that whereas DNA alkylating therapy leads to a complete tumor regression in an athymic mouse tumor xenograft model, it fails to do so in tumors deficient in HMGB1. The HMGB1-deficient tumors have an impaired ability to recruit innate immune cells including macrophages, neutrophils, and NK cells into the treated tumor tissue. Cytokine array analysis reveals that whereas DNA alkylating treatment leads to suppression of protumor cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13, loss of HMGB1 leads to elevated levels of these cytokines upon treatment. Suppression of innate immunity and HMGB1 using depleting Abs leads to a failure in tumor regression. Taken together, these results indicate that HMGB1 plays an essential role in activation of innate immunity and tumor clearance in response to DNA alkylating agents. PMID:21300822

  13. Marek's disease virus-induced immunosuppression: array analysis of chicken immune response gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad; Sarson, Aimie J; Huebner, Marianne; Sharif, Shayan; Kireev, Dmitry; Zhou, Huaijun

    2010-06-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4(+) T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to infection, and transcriptional profiling of chicken gene expression in MD are poorly understood. In this study we conducted a global host gene expression analysis in the splenocytes of MDV-infected chickens using oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays. These arrays contain probes for more than 32,000 chicken transcripts and most of the known MDV genes and open reading frames. Two-week-old MD-susceptible chickens were inoculated with an oncogenic strain of MDV, and spleen samples were collected 5 and 15 days post-infection (dpi) for RNA isolation and microarray analysis. Array results displayed a significant differential pattern of immune response transcriptome between the two phases of MDV infection. The expression levels of more than 22 immune-response and related genes were downregulated, while the expression levels of at least 58 genes were increased at 5 dpi (cytolytic infection), compared to age-matched control birds. In comparison, out of 73 immune-response and related genes, 67 genes were downregulated, with only 6 genes having higher expression levels at 15 dpi (latency infection). Cytokines, chemokines, MHC molecules and related receptors, and adhesion molecules were among the many MDV-induced downregulated genes that are critical for an effective antiviral immune response. In addition, several apoptosis-associated genes were decreased in expression during latent infection, suggesting an MDV-induced blocking of initiation or progression of programmed cell death processes. These chicken arrays are valuable tools in understanding the molecular mechanisms behind viral pathogenesis and chicken gene expression patterns, and associated

  14. Tim-3 induces Th2-biased immunity and alternative macrophage activation during Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuang; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule 3 (Tim-3) has been regarded as an important regulatory factor in both adaptive and innate immunity. Recently, Tim-3 was reported to be involved in Th2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum, but the exact mechanism behind the involvement of Tim-3 remains unknown. The present study aims to understand the role of Tim-3 in the immune response against S. japonicum infection. Tim-3 expression was determined by flow cytometry, and increased Tim-3 expression was observed on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, NK1.1(+) cells, and CD11b(+) cells from the livers of S. japonicum-infected mice. However, the increased level of Tim-3 was lower in the spleen than in the liver, and no increase in Tim-3 expression was observed on splenic CD8(+) T cells or CD11b(+) cells. The schistosome-induced upregulation of Tim-3 on natural killer (NK) cells was accompanied by reduced NK cell numbers in vitro and in vivo. Tim-3 antibody blockade led to upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and interleukin-12 (IL-12) mRNA in CD11b(+) cells cocultured with soluble egg antigen and downregulation of Arg1 and IL-10, which are markers of M2 macrophages. In summary, we observed schistosome-induced expression of Tim-3 on critical immune cell populations, which may be involved in the Th2-biased immune response and alternative activation of macrophages during infection.

  15. Antigen-conjugated N-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan nanoparticles induce strong immune responses after nasal administration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingfeng; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Zhang, Chi; Shao, Xiayan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2015-01-01

    Antigens were conjugated on the surface of N-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles to induce systemic and mucosal immune responses after nasal immunization. TMC was synthesized by free radical polymerization and blank nanoparticles were prepared by ionic crosslinking of TMC and sodium tripolyphosphate. The model antigen (ovalbumin) was conjugated on the surface of blank nanoparticles (OVA-NP) through thioester bond formation. The cellular uptake of OVA-NP was investigated in Raw 264.7 macrophages and biodistribution of antigens was studied by the radioiodine labeling method. The immunological effects were evaluated by nasal administration of OVA-NP to Balb/C mice. The transport mechanism and nasal toxicity of OVA-NP were studied in rats. The cellular uptake of OVA-NP was significantly higher than that of ovalbumin-encapsulated nanoparticles (NPe) after 30 min. Nasally administered OVA-NP showed higher transport of antigens to cervical lymph nodes with higher targeting efficiency than all other groups. Compared with NPe, OVA-NP induced much higher levels of systemic and mucosal immune responses in Balb/C mice after three nasal immunizations. Ex vivo culturing of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) confirmed its participation in nasal immunization. The transport mechanism study revealed that OVA-NP can be transported across the nasal epithelium through glands and may be taken up in NALT through M cells. OVA-NP did not induce obvious toxicity to nasal mucosa or hemolysis in animals. The present study demonstrated that the conjugation of TMC nanoparticles with antigens is an effective strategy for nasal vaccination.

  16. Tim-3 Induces Th2-Biased Immunity and Alternative Macrophage Activation during Schistosoma japonicum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuang

    2015-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule 3 (Tim-3) has been regarded as an important regulatory factor in both adaptive and innate immunity. Recently, Tim-3 was reported to be involved in Th2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum, but the exact mechanism behind the involvement of Tim-3 remains unknown. The present study aims to understand the role of Tim-3 in the immune response against S. japonicum infection. Tim-3 expression was determined by flow cytometry, and increased Tim-3 expression was observed on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, NK1.1+ cells, and CD11b+ cells from the livers of S. japonicum-infected mice. However, the increased level of Tim-3 was lower in the spleen than in the liver, and no increase in Tim-3 expression was observed on splenic CD8+ T cells or CD11b+ cells. The schistosome-induced upregulation of Tim-3 on natural killer (NK) cells was accompanied by reduced NK cell numbers in vitro and in vivo. Tim-3 antibody blockade led to upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and interleukin-12 (IL-12) mRNA in CD11b+ cells cocultured with soluble egg antigen and downregulation of Arg1 and IL-10, which are markers of M2 macrophages. In summary, we observed schistosome-induced expression of Tim-3 on critical immune cell populations, which may be involved in the Th2-biased immune response and alternative activation of macrophages during infection. PMID:25987707

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen 85A Induces Th-1 Immune Responses in Systemic Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Rana; Sato, Hiroe; Carlisle, James; Nadaf, Michele T.; Evans, Whitney; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Miller, Robert F.; Kalams, Spyros A.; Drake, Wonder Puryear

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology, characterized by a Th-1 immunophenotype. Although humoral immune responses by sarcoidosis subjects to mycobacterial proteins have been detected, mycobacterial antigens capable of inducing cellular immune responses in sarcoidosis subjects have not been reported. We used the enzyme-linked immunospot assay to assess for recognition of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolyl transferase, Antigen 85A, by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 25 sarcoidosis subjects, 22 PPD− (purified protein derivative) healthy volunteers, and 16 PPD+ healthy subjects. Reactivity to Ag85A whole protein was observed in 15 of 25 sarcoidosis subjects compared to 2 of 22 PPD− subjects (p = 0.0006, Fisher’s exact test) and to 14 of 16 PPD+ subjects (p = 0.084, Fisher’s exact test). Monoclonal antibody against HLA-DR inhibited recognition. In addition to immune recognition of Ag85A whole protein, peptide-mapping studies identified four immunogenic Ag85A peptides, which induced Th-1 immune responses in individual sarcoidosis subjects, suggesting that multiple epitopes from a mycobacterial protein may have a role in sarcoidosis immunopathogenesis. PMID:17357846

  18. The Power and the Promise of Restimulation-Induced Cell Death in Human Immune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Andrew L.; Pandiyan, Pushpa; Zheng, Lixin; Krummey, Scott M.; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Controlled expansion and contraction of lymphocytes both during and after an adaptive immune response is imperative to sustaining a healthy immune system. Both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of lymphocyte apoptosis are programmed to eliminate cells at the proper time to ensure immune homeostasis. Genetic disorders of apoptosis described in mice and humans have established Fas and Bim as critical pro-apoptotic molecules responsible for T-cell death in response to T-cell receptor restimulation and cytokine withdrawal, respectively. Emerging evidence prompts revision of this classic paradigm, especially for our understanding of restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) and its physiological purpose. Recent work indicates that RICD employs both Fas and Bim for T-cell deletion, dispelling the notion that these molecules are assigned to mutually exclusive apoptotic pathways. Furthermore, new mouse model data combined with our discovery of defective RICD in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) patient T cells suggest RICD is essential for precluding excess T-cell accumulation and associated immunopathology during the course of certain infections. Here we review how these advances offer a refreshing new perspective on the phenomenon of T-cell apoptosis induced through antigen restimulation, including its relevance to immune homeostasis and potential for therapeutic interventions. PMID:20636809

  19. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N.; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy. PMID:25609199

  20. Inducible factors with antimicrobial activity after immune challenge in the haemolymph of Red Palm Weevil (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Mastore, Maristella; Binda Rossetti, Simona; Giovannardi, Stefano; Scarì, Giorgio; Brivio, Maurizio F

    2015-05-01

    Insects are capable of innate immune responses elicited after microbial infection. In this process, the receptor-mediated recognition of foreign bodies and the subsequent activation of immunocompetent cells lead to the synthesis ex novo of a peptide pool with antimicrobial activity. We investigated the inducible immune response of a coleopteran, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, challenged with both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. After immunization, we evaluated the presence of antimicrobial peptides using either biochemical analyses or microbiological techniques. The antimicrobial properties of the newly synthesized protein pool, detectable in haemolymph fractions of low molecular mass, showed strong antibacterial activity against various bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp. OX1, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus). In addition to the preliminary study of the mechanism of action of the pool of antimicrobial peptides, we also investigated its effects on bacterial cell walls by means of fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The data suggest that the main effects seem to be directed at destabilizing and damaging the bacterial wall. This study provides data that help us to understand some aspects of the inducible innate immunity in a system model that lacks anticipatory responses. However, the weevil has finely tuned its defensive strategies to counteract effectively microbial infection. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Immune System Modifications Induced in a Mouse Model of Chronic Exposure to (90)Sr.

    PubMed

    Synhaeve, Nicholas; Musilli, Stefania; Stefani, Johanna; Nicolas, Nour; Delissen, Olivia; Dublineau, Isabelle; Bertho, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    Strontium 90 ((90)Sr) remains in the environment long after a major nuclear disaster occurs. As a result, populations living on contaminated land are potentially exposed to daily ingesting of low quantities of (90)Sr. The potential long-term health effects of such chronic contamination are unknown. In this study, we used a mouse model to evaluate the effects of (90)Sr ingestion on the immune system, the animals were chronically exposed to (90)Sr in drinking water at a concentration of 20 kBq/l, for a daily ingestion of 80-100 Bq/day. This resulted in a reduced number of CD19(+) B lymphocytes in the bone marrow and spleen in steady-state conditions. In contrast, the results from a vaccine experiment performed as a functional test of the immune system showed that in response to T-dependent antigens, there was a reduction in IgG specific to tetanus toxin (TT), a balanced Th1/Th2 response inducer antigen, but not to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), a strong Th2 response inducer antigen. This was accompanied by a reduction in Th1 cells in the spleen, consistent with the observed reduction in specific IgG concentration. The precise mechanisms by which (90)Sr acts on the immune system remain to be elucidated. However, our results suggest that (90)Sr ingestion may be responsible for some of the reported effects of internal contamination on the immune system in civilian populations exposed to the Chernobyl fallout.

  2. Chitin Induces Tissue Accumulation of Innate Immune Cells Associated with Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Tiffany A.; Liang, Hong-Erh; Tager, AndrewN M.; Luster, Andrew D.; Van Rooijen, Nico; Voehringer, David; Locksley, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Allergic and parasitic helminth immunity is characterized by infiltration of tissues with IL-4- and IL-13-expressing cells, including Th2 cells, eosinophils and basophils1. Tissue macrophages assume a distinct phenotype, designated alternatively activated macrophages2. Relatively little is known regarding factors that trigger these host responses. Chitin, a widespread environmental biopolymer of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine, confers structural rigidity to fungi, crustaceans, helminths and insects3. Here, we show that chitin induces the tissue accumulation of IL-4-expressing innate immune cells, including eosinophils and basophils, when given to mice. Tissue infiltration was unaffected by the absence of Toll-like receptor-mediated LPS recognition and was abolished by treatment of chitin with the IL-4- and IL-13-inducible mammalian chitinase, AMCase4, or by injection into mice that over-expressed AMCase. Chitin mediated alternative macrophage activation in vivo and production of leukotriene B4, which was required for optimal immune cell recruitment. Chitin is a recognition element for tissue infiltration by innate cells implicated in allergic and helminth immunity and this process can be negatively regulated by a vertebrate chitinase. PMID:17450126

  3. Diet‐induced obese mice exhibit altered immune responses to acute lung injury induced by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Taomei; Yuan, Guiqiang; Ren, Yi; Wang, Zhengyi; Jia, Yiping; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Deng, Junliang; Yu, Shumin; Hu, Yanchun; Shen, Liuhong; Ma, Xiaoping; Wang, Ya; Ren, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity has been associated with impaired immunity and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. It also exerts protective effects against mortality secondary to acute lung injury. The effects of obesity on immune responses to acute lung injury induced by Escherichia coli were investigated to determine if the above‐mentioned differences in its effects were related to infection severity. Methods Diet‐induced obesity (DIO) and lean control mice received intranasal instillations of 109 or 1010 CFUs of E. coli. The immune responses were examined at 0 h (uninfected), 24 h, and 96 h postinfection. Results Following infection, the DIO mice exhibited higher leukocyte, interleukin (IL)−10, IL‐6, and tumor necrosis factor‐α levels and more severe lung injury than the lean mice. Following inoculation with 1010 CFUs of E. coli, the DIO mice exhibited higher mortality and more severe inflammation‐induced injury than the lean mice, but no differences in E. coli counts were noted between the two groups. However, inoculated with 109 CFUs of E. coli, the DIO mice exhibited smaller E. coli burdens at 24 h and 96 h after infection, as well as lower concentrations of IL‐10 and tumor necrosis factor‐α and less severe lung injury at 96 h after infection. Conclusions The results support the emerging view that obesity may be beneficial in the setting of milder infection but detrimental in the setting of more severe infection. PMID:27558300

  4. The PorB porin from commensal Neisseria lactamica induces Th1 and Th2 immune responses to ovalbumin in mice and is a potential immune adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuping; Wetzler, Lee M; Massari, Paola

    2008-02-06

    Porins from pathogenic Neisseriae are among several bacterial products with immune adjuvant activity. Neisseria meningitidis (Nme) PorB, has been shown to induce immune cells activation in a TLR2-dependent manner and acts as a vaccine immune adjuvant. The PorB porin from Neisseria lactamica (Nlac), a common nasopharyngeal commensal, shares significant structural and functional similarities with Nme PorB. In this work we ask whether the immune adjuvant ability of porins from pathogenic Neisserial strains is a characteristic shared with porins from non-pathogenic Neisserial species or whether it is unique for bacterial products derived from microorganisms capable of inducing inflammation and disease. We evaluated the potential immune adjuvant effect of Nlac PorB in mice using ovalbumin (OVA) as a prototype antigen. Immunization with Nlac PorB/OVA induced high OVA-specific IgG and IgM titers compared to OVA alone, similar to other adjuvants such as Nme PorB and alum. High titers of IgG1 and IgG2b were detected as well as production of IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and INF-gamma in response to Nlac PorB, consistent with induction of both a Th1-type and a Th2-type immune response. OVA-specific proliferation was also determined in splenocytes from Nlac PorB/OVA-immunized mice. In addition, B cell activation in vitro and cytokine production in response to Nlac PorB was found to be mediated by TLR2, in a similar manner to Nme PorB.

  5. Nonimmunogenic radiation-induced lymphoma: immunity induction by a somatic cell hybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Yefenof, E.; Goldapfel, M.; Ber, R.

    1982-05-01

    The cell line designated PIR-2 is a nonimmunogenic X-ray-induced thymoma of C57BL/6 origin that is unable to induce antitumor immunity in syngeneic lymphocytes in vitro and in mice in vivo. Fusion of PIR-2 with an allogeneic universal fuser A9HT (clone 3c) resulted in the establishment of a somatic cell hybrid designated A9/PIR. C57BL/6 lymphocytes sensitized in vitro with A9/PIR could lyse parental PIR-2 cells, as well as other syngeneic tumors. However, immunization of mice with the hybrid significantly enhanced PIR-2 tumor takes while it partially protected the animals against a challenge with unrelated syngeneic tumors. The results imply that somatic cell hybridization can increase the immunogenicity of an otherwise nonimmunogenic tumor. However, in view of the enhancing effects of hybrid preimmunization on parental tumor cell growth, the possible application of this approach for immunotherapy is questionable.

  6. Intracerebral Mycobacterium bovis bacilli Calmette-Guerin infection-induced immune responses in the CNS 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JangEun; Ling, Changying; Kosmalski, Michelle M.; Hulseberg, Paul; Schreiber, Heidi A.; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    To study whether cerebral mycobacterial infection induces granuloma and protective immunity similar to systemic infection, we intracerebrally infected mice with Mycobacterium bovis bacilli Calmette-Guerin. Granuloma and IFN-γ+CD4+ T cell responses are induced in the central nervous system (CNS) similar to periphery, but the presence of IFN-γIL-17 double-positive CD4+ T cells is unique to the CNS. The major CNS source of TNF-α is microglia, with modest production by CD4+ T cells and macrophage. Protective immunity is accompanied by accumulation of Foxp3+CD4+ T cells and PD-L2+ dendritic cells, suggesting that both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses develop in the CNS following mycobacterial infection. PMID:19535154

  7. White spot syndrome virus strains of different virulence induce distinct immune response in Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meiling; Li, Fang; Xu, Limei; Zhu, Xiaoming

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we identified three white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) strains (WSSV-CN01, WSSV-CN02 and WSSV-CN03) with significant differences in virulence. Among them, WSSV-CN01 caused significant higher and earlier mortality in redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, thus was determined as high-virulent, while WSSV-CN02 and WSSV-CN03 were moderate-virulent and low-virulent. By investigating the total number of the circulating haemocytes and the activity of immune relative enzymes, we demonstrated that the different virulent WSSV strains induced distinct immune response in the host. Notably, a dramatic reduction of circulating haemocytes was observed in the crayfish infected with WSSV-CN01 and WSSV-CN02 but not WSSV-CN03. Further analysis revealed that cell death induced by WSSV-CN01 and WSSV-CN02 might be responsible for the decrease of circulating haemocytes.

  8. Experimental Vaccine Induces Th1-driven Immune Responses and Resistance to Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infection in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingru; Hammer, Laura A.; Liu, Wensheng; Hobbs, Marcia M.; Zielke, Ryszard A.; Sikora, Aleksandra E.; Jerse, Ann E.; Egilmez, Nejat K.; Russell, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Female mice were immunized intravaginally with gonococcal outer membrane vesicles (OMV) plus microencapsulated IL-12, and challenged using an established model of genital infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Whereas sham-immunized and control animals cleared the infection in 10–13 days, those immunized with OMV plus IL-12 cleared infection with homologous gonococcal strains in 6–9 days. Significant protection was also seen after challenge with antigenically distinct strains of N. gonorrhoeae, and protective anamnestic immunity persisted for at least 6 months after immunization. Serum and vaginal IgG and IgA antibodies were generated against antigens expressed by homologous and heterologous strains. Iliac lymph node CD4+ T cells secreted IFNγ, but not IL-4, in response to immunization, and produced IL-17 in response to challenge regardless of immunization. Antigens recognized by immunized mouse serum included several shared between gonococcal strains, including two identified by immunoproteomics approaches as EF-Tu and PotF3. Experiments with immunodeficient mice showed that protective immunity depended upon IFNγ and B cells, presumably to generate antibodies. The results demonstrated that immunity to gonococcal infection can be induced by immunization with a non-living gonococcal antigen, and suggest that efforts to develop a human vaccine should focus on strategies to generate Th1-driven immune responses in the genital tract. PMID:28272393

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    PubMed

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth. © 2015 UICC.

  10. Irradiation of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) revisited: optimizing sterility induction.

    PubMed

    Rull, Juan; Diaz-Fleischer, Francisco; Arredondo, Jose

    2007-08-01

    Irradiation doses currently applied to sterilize Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), for release under the sterile insect technique eradication campaign in Mexico, were reviewed in an effort to increase sterile male performance in the field. A dose maximizing sterility induction into wild populations was sought by balancing somatic fitness with genetic sterility. Doses of 40, 60, and 80 Gy induced 95% or more sterility in all males, which in turn induced similar degrees of sterility into a cohort of wild flies in the laboratory. However, a low dose of 40 Gy was sufficient to completely suppress egg production in females. Similarly, a mild carryover of genetic damage might have been transferred to the F1 progeny of males irradiated at 40 Gy crossed with fertile wild females. Our results suggest that the 80-Gy dose currently applied in Mexico can be lowered substantially without jeopardizing program goals. This view could be strengthened by comparing performance of males irradiated at different doses under more natural settings. In general, we discuss the value of determining irradiation doses for pest species where females are more radiosensitive than males, by selecting the dose that causes 100% sterility in females.

  11. Native cellulose nanofibrills induce immune tolerance in vitro by acting on dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, Sergej; Kokol, Vanja; Mihajlović, Dušan; Mirčić, Aleksandar; Čolić, Miodrag

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose nanofibrills (CNFs) are attractive biocompatible, natural nanomaterials for wide biomedical applications. However, the immunological mechanisms of CNFs have been poorly investigated. Considering that dendritic cells (DCs) are the key immune regulatory cells in response to nanomaterials, our aim was to investigate the immunological mechanisms of CNFs in a model of DC-mediated immune response. We found that non-toxic concentrations of CNFs impaired the differentiation, and subsequent maturation of human monocyte-derived (mo)-DCs. In a co-culture with CD4+T cells, CNF-treated mo-DCs possessed a weaker allostimulatory and T helper (Th)1 and Th17 polarizing capacity, but a stronger capacity to induce Th2 cells and CD4+CD25hiFoxP3hi regulatory T cells. This correlated with an increased immunoglobulin-like transcript-4 and indolamine dioxygenase-1 expression by CNF-treated mo-DCs, following the partial internalization of CNFs and the accumulation of CD209 and actin bundles at the place of contacts with CNFs. Cumulatively, we showed that CNFs are able to induce an active immune tolerance by inducing tolerogenic DCs, which could be beneficial for the application of CNFs in wound healing and chronic inflammation therapies.

  12. Relish2 mediates bursicon homodimer-induced prophylactic immunity in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Dong, Shengzhang; Chen, Xi; Stanley, David; Beerntsen, Brenda; Feng, Qili; Song, Qisheng

    2017-01-01

    Bursicon is a neuropeptide hormone consisting of two cystine-knot proteins (burs α and burs β), responsible for cuticle tanning and other developmental processes in insects. Recent studies show that each bursicon subunit forms homodimers that induce prophylactic immunity in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that bursicon homodimers act in prophylactic immunity in insects, and possibly arthropods, generally, using the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. We found that burs α and burs β are expressed in larvae, pupae and newly emerged adults. Treating newly emerged Ae. aegypti and D. melanogaster adults with recombinant bursicon (r-bursicon) heterodimer led to cuticle tanning in both species. Treating larvae and adults with r-bursicon homodimers led to up-regulation of five anti-microbial peptide (AMP) genes, noting the possibility that bursicon heterodimers also lead to up-regulation of these genes can not been excluded. The induced AMPs effectively suppressed the growth of bacteria in vitro. RNAi knock-down of the transcriptional factor Relish2 abolished the influence of r-bursicon homodimers on AMP production. We infer the bursicon homodimers induce expression of AMP genes via Relish2 in Ae. aegypti, as prophylactic immunity to protect mosquitoes during the vulnerable stages of each molt. PMID:28225068