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Sample records for induction heating stress

  1. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  2. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  3. Induction of a chicken small heat shock (stress) protein: evidence of multilevel posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Edington, B V; Hightower, L E

    1990-01-01

    A novel form of regulation of expression of a vertebrate heat shock gene is described. A cDNA clone encoding human Hsp27 was shown to specifically recognize chicken Hsp23 RNA by Northern (RNA) blot analysis and hybrid-select translation. This probe was then used to measure chicken hsp23 gene activity in control and heat-stressed cells. The hsp23 gene(s) was transcriptionally active in non-heat-stressed cells, and its rate of transcription did not increase significantly upon heat shock. Cytoplasmic Hsp23 mRNA, which was metabolically very stable in nonstressed cells, underwent a fourfold increase in amount after a 1-h heat shock, resulting in a twofold increase in Hsp23 mRNA in polysomes. Hsp23 mRNA was relatively abundant and translationally active even in non-heat-shocked cells. Taken together, these data implicated posttranscriptional nuclear events as an important control point for induction of Hsp23 RNA transcripts. The protein half-life of Hsp23 increased from approximately 2 h in control cultures to 13 h in heat-shocked cells, revealing a second major control point. Hsp23 which was synthesized prior to heat shock also increased in stability and contributed to the overall accumulation of Hsp23 in heat-shocked cells. Cycloheximide had no effect on this change in Hsp23 half-life, while dactinomycin blocked the stabilization of Hsp23, suggesting a need for newly synthesized RNA. These data indicated that stabilization of Hsp23 protein and posttranscriptional nuclear events resulting in increased production of Hsp23 mRNA were primarily responsible for a 13-fold increase in the accumulation of newly synthesized Hsp23 after 1 h of heat shock. The regulation of the hsp23 gene is discussed in comparison with several other posttranscriptionally regulated genes, including the proto-oncogene c-fos, the developmentally regulated chicken delta-crystallin gene, and regulation of cellular gene expression by the proto-oncogene c-myc. Images PMID:2388629

  4. Induction of Rhizopus oryzae germination under starvation using host metabolites increases spore susceptibility to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Turgeman, Tidhar; Kakongi, Nathan; Schneider, Avishai; Vinokur, Yakov; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Carmeli, Shmuel; Levy, Maggie; Skory, Christopher D; Lichter, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2014-03-01

    Sweetpotato is a nutritional source worldwide. Soft rot caused by Rhizopus spp. is a major limiting factor in the storage of produce, rendering it potentially unsafe for human consumption. In this study, Rhizopus oryzae was used to develop a concept of postharvest disease control by weakening the pathogen through induction of spore germination under starvation conditions. We isolated the sweetpotato active fractions (SPAFs) that induce spore germination and used them at a low dose to enhance spore weakening caused by starvation. Germination in SPAF at 1 mg/ml weakened the pathogen spores by delaying their ability to form colonies on rich media and by increasing their sensitivity to heat stress. The weakening effect was also supported by reduced metabolic activity, as detected by Alarmar Blue fluorescent dye assays. Spores incubated with SPAF at 1 mg/ml showed DNA fragmentation in some of their nuclei, as observed by TUNEL assay. In addition, these spores exhibited changes in ultrastructural morphology (i.e., shrinkage of germ tubes, nucleus deformation, and vacuole formation) which are hallmarks of programmed cell death. We suggest that induction of spore germination under starvation conditions increases their susceptibility to stress and, therefore, might be considered a new strategy for pathogen control.

  5. Induction Heating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Induction heating technology, a magnetic non-deforming process, was developed by Langley researchers to join plastic and composite components in space. Under NASA license, Inductron Corporation uses the process to produce induction heating systems and equipment for numerous applications. The Torobonder, a portable system, comes with a number of interchangeable heads for aircraft repair. Other developments are the E Heating Head, the Toroid Joining Gun, and the Torobrazer. These products perform bonding applications more quickly, safely and efficiently than previous methods.

  6. Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stress Learn some tips to protect workers including: acclimatization, rest breaks, and fluid recommendations. NIOSH Workplace Solution: ... Blog: Adjusting to Work in the Heat: Why Acclimatization Matters The natural adaptation to the heat takes ...

  7. Induction heating coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor); Buckley, John D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardely beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  8. Molecular responses of Escherichia coli caused by heat stress and recombinant protein production during temperature induction.

    PubMed

    Valdez-Cruz, Norma A; Ramírez, Octavio T; Trujillo-Roldán, Mauricio A

    2011-01-01

    In a recent review, we discussed the extensively used temperature-inducible expression system, based on the pL and/or pR phage lambda promoters that are finely regulated by the thermo-labile cI857 repressor. In this system, an increase in temperature induces the heterologous protein production and activates the heat shock response, as well as the stringent and SOS responses. The same responses are activated just by the overproduction of recombinant protein. All such responses result in a metabolic burden to the cells, a decrease in the specific growth rate, and alterations in the central carbon metabolism. Altogether, these effects can alter the quantity and quality of the produced foreign protein. Here, we compare and discuss the transcription of selected genes, and the concomitant synthesis of heat-shock proteins (hsp) soon after thermal induction, in relation to the responses that occur in other expression systems that also trigger the heat-shock response.

  9. Flexible heating head for induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An induction heating head includes a length of wire having first and second opposite ends and being wound in a flat spiral shape to form an induction coil, a capacitor connected to the first and second ends of the wire, the induction coil and capacitor defining a tank circuit, and a flexible, elastomeric body molded to encase the induction coil. When a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the body, and the tank circuit is powered, the susceptor is inductively heated.

  10. Induction of Heat-Shock Protein 70 Expression by Geranylgeranylacetone Shows Cytoprotective Effects in Cardiomyocytes of Mice under Humid Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowu; Yuan, Binbin; Dong, Wenpeng; Yang, Bo; Yang, Yongchao; Lin, Xi; Gong, Gu

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence has revealed that humid heat stress (HHS) causes considerable damage to human health. The cardiovascular system has been suggested to be the primary target of heat stress, which results in serious cardiovascular diseases. However, there is still a lack of effective approaches for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases induced by HHS. Objective Heat-shock proteins (Hsps), especially Hsp70, are reported to provide effective cytoprotection under various stress stimuli. In the present study, we evaluated the cytoprotective effect of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), which was previously been reported to induce Hsp70 expression in cardiomyocytes under HHS. Methods and Principal Findings Using a mouse model of HHS, we showed that the pretreatment of GGA enhanced Hsp70 expression under HHS, as examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. We then examined the effect of GGA pretreatment on the cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by HHS using terminal-deoxynucleoitidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and found that GGA pretreatment inhibited mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. GGA pretreatment could reverse the effect of HHS on cell apoptosis by increasing expression of Bcl-2, decreasing cytochrome c in cytosol, and increasing cytochrome c in mitochondria. However, GGA pretreatment had no effect on the oxidative stress induced by HHS as determined by levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH). Conclusion We have demonstrated that GGA pretreatment suppressed HHS-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes through the induction of Hsp70 overexpression. PMID:24695789

  11. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  12. Induction of heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL, and GroES by salt stress in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Kilstrup, M; Jacobsen, S; Hammer, K; Vogensen, F K

    1997-01-01

    The bacterium Lactococcus lactis has become a model organism in studies of growth physiology and membrane transport, as a result of its simple fermentative metabolism. It is also used as a model for studying the importance of specific genes and functions during life in excess nutrients, by comparison of prototrophic wild-type strains and auxotrophic domesticated (dairy) strains. In a study of the capacity of domesticated strains to perform directed responses toward various stress conditions, we have analyzed the heat and salt stress response in the established L. lactis subsp. cremoris laboratory strain MG1363, which was originally derived from a dairy strain. After two-dimensional separation of proteins, the DnaK, GroEL, and GroES heat shock proteins, the HrcA (Orf1) heat shock repressor, and the glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase, glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase were identified by a combination of Western blotting and direct N-terminal amino acid sequencing of proteins from the gels. Of 400 to 500 visible proteins, 17 were induced more than twofold during heat stress. Two classes of heat stress proteins were identified from their temporal induction pattern. The fast-induced proteins (including DnaK) showed an abruptly increased rate of synthesis during the first 10 min, declining to intermediate levels after 15 min. GroEL and GroES, which also belong to this group, maintained a high rate of synthesis after 15 min. The class of slowly induced proteins exhibited a gradual increase in the rate of synthesis after the onset of stress. Unlike other organisms, all salt stress-induced proteins in L. lactis were also subjected to heat stress induction. DnaK, GroEL, and GroES showed similar temporal patterns of induction during salt stress, resembling the timing during heat stress although at a lower induction level. These data indicate an overlap between the heat shock and salt stress responses in L. lactis. PMID:9143115

  13. Population-specificity of heat stress gene induction in northern and southern eelgrass Zostera marina populations under simulated global warming.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nina; Winters, Gidon; Rauch, Gisep; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Gu, Jenny; Nelle, Peter; Fricke, Birgit; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2010-07-01

    Summer heat waves have already resulted in mortality of coastal communities, including ecologically important seagrass meadows. Gene expression studies from controlled experiments can provide important insight as to how species/genotypes react to extreme events that will increase under global warming. In a common stress garden, we exposed three populations of eelgrass, Zostera marina, to extreme sea surface temperatures, simulating the 2003-European heat wave. Populations came from locations widely differing in their thermal regime, two northern European locations [Ebeltoft (Kattegat), Doverodde (Limfjord, Baltic Sea)], and one southern population from Gabicce Mare (Adriatic Sea), allowing to test for population specificity in the response to a realistic heat stress event. Eelgrass survival and growth as well as the expression of 12 stress associated candidate genes were assessed during and after the heat wave. Contrary to expectations, all populations suffered equally from 3 weeks of heat stress in terms of shoot loss. In contrast, populations markedly differed in multivariate measures of gene expression. While the gene expression profiles converged to pre-stress values directly after the heat wave, stress correlated genes were upregulated again 4 weeks later, in line with the observed delay in shoot loss. Target genes had to be selected based on functional knowledge in terrestrial plants, nevertheless, 10/12 genes were induced relative to the control treatment at least once during the heat wave in the fully marine plant Z. marina. This study underlines the importance of realistic stress and recovery scenarios in studying the impact of predicted climate change.

  14. Induction heating coupler and annealer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having- two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardly beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to a magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  15. Virulence increasing of Salmonella typhimurium in Balb/c mice after heat-stress induction of phage shock protein A.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Alireza Shoae; Amirmozafari, Nour; Ghaemi, Amir

    2009-10-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a potentially intracellular pathogen and is responsible for thousands of reported cases of acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea each year. Although many successful physiological and genetic approaches have been taken to conclude the key virulence determinants encoded by this organism, the total number of uncharacterized reading frames observed within the S. typhimurium genome suggests that many virulence factors remain to be discovered. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of heat induced phage shock protein A (PspA), in the pathogenicity of S. typhimurium. The stress proteins detected on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were identified specifically by immunoblotting with polyclonal antibody against PspA. PspA was produced in response to heat stress at 45 degrees C and it was over-expressed at 65 degrees C. At this temperature, the stressed bacterial cells producing PspA were more virulent (16 folds greater) to female 6-8 week-old Balb/c mice. Correspondency between decrease in LD(50) and increase in PspA production during heat stress and lower pathogenicity in non-producing cells that emerged during stress at 55 degrees C represents PspA as an important virulence factor in heat stressed S. typhimurium.

  16. Specific induction of the 70-kD heat stress proteins by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin-A protects rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. A new pharmacological route to stress protein expression?

    PubMed Central

    Morris, S D; Cumming, D V; Latchman, D S; Yellon, D M

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock protein (hsp) induction by stressful stimuli such as heat and ischemia is known to protect cardiac cells from severe stress. The ability to induce hsp's in the heart directly by "nonstressful" means would potentially have important clinical implications. In noncardiac cells, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin-A has been shown to induce the 72-kD hsp. We therefore examined whether herbimycin-A and another tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, could induce 70-kD hsp's in primary cultures of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, and whether these treatments protect against severe stress. Primary cardiomyocytes were incubated with herbimycin-A or genistein. hsp induction was measured 16-20 h later by Western blotting. Cell survival after subsequent lethal heat stress or simulated ischemia was assessed using trypan blue exclusion and released lactate dehydrogenase activity. Our results indicate that, in cardiac cells, herbimycin-A induces 70-kD hsp's but not hsp90, -60, -25, or glucose-regulated protein 78, whereas genistein has no effect on hsp's. Moreover, hsp induction correlated with the ability of herbimycin-A to protect cells against severe stress, whereas genistein has no protective effects. This suggests that herbimycin-A may induce 70-kD hsp's via a tyrosine kinase-independent mechanism. These results indicate the possibility of a pharmacological approach to HSP70 induction and cardiac protection, which may ultimately be of clinical relevance. PMID:8609226

  17. Plasma-heating by induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, K.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Induction-heated plasma torch operates with an input of 1 Mw of direct current of which 71 percent is transferred to the plasma and the remainder is consumed by electrical losses in the system. Continuous operation of the torch should be possible for as long as 5,000 hours.

  18. Channel catfish hemoglobin genes: identification, phylogenetic and syntenic analysis, and specific induction in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianbin; Liu, Shikai; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Ruijia; Zhang, Jiaren; Jiang, Yanliang; Li, Chao; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Li, Jiale; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2014-03-01

    Hemoglobins transport oxygen from gill to inner organs in fish, and this process is affected by temperature, one of the major environmental factors for fish. The hemoglobin gene clusters have been well studied in humans and several model fish species, but remain largely unknown in catfish. Here, eight α- and six β-hemoglobin genes were identified and characterized in channel catfish. Genomic synteny analysis showed that these hemoglobin genes were separated into two unlinked clusters, the MN cluster containing six α- and six β-hemoglobin genes, and the LA cluster consisting of two α-hemoglobin genes. Channel catfish hemoglobin genes were ubiquitously expressed in all the 10 tested tissues from healthy fish, but exhibited higher expression level in spleen, head kidney, and trunk kidney. In response to heat stress, hemoglobin genes, especially MN Hbα4, MN Hbα5, MN Hbα6, MN Hbβ4, MN Hbβ5, MN Hbβ6, LA Hbα1, and LA Hbα2, presumably the embryonic hemoglobin genes, were drastically up-regulated in the gill and head kidney of heat-tolerant fishes, but not in these tissues of the heat-intolerant fish, suggesting the importance of the embryonic hemoglobin genes in coping with the low oxygen conditions under heat stress.

  19. Stress and Distortion Evolution During Induction Case Hardening of Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemkov, Valentin; Goldstein, Robert; Jackowski, John; Ferguson, Lynn; Li, Zhichao

    2013-07-01

    Simulation of stresses during heat treatment relates usually to furnace heating. Induction heating provides a very different evolution of temperature in the part and therefore different stresses. This may be positive for service properties or negative, reducing component strength or even causing cracks. A method of coupled simulation between electromagnetic, thermal, structural, stress, and deformation phenomena during induction tube hardening is described. Commercial software package ELTA is used to calculate the power density distribution in the load resulting from the induction heating process. The program DANTE is used to predict temperature distribution, phase transformations, stress state, and deformation during heating and quenching. Analyses of stress and deformation evolution were made on a simple case of induction hardening of external (1st case) and internal (2nd case) surfaces of a thick-walled tubular body.

  20. Impact of osmotic/matric stress and heat shock on environmental tolerance induction of bacterial biocontrol agents against Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Melina; Nesci, Andrea; Etcheverry, Miriam

    2010-10-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Microbacterium oleovorans reduced the Fusarium verticillioides count and significantly decreased fumonisin B(1) and B(2) levels in maize grains. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of water stress tolerance and heat shock survival upon cells of the biocontrol agents B. amyloliquefaciens and M. oleovorans. The a(w) of solid and liquid media and tryptic soy medium was modified to 0.99, 0.98, 0.97 and 0.96 by addition of ionic solute NaCl and non-ionic solutes such as glycerol and glucose. The non-ionic solute polyethylene glycol 600 (PEG 600) was used to modify matrically solid media. Bacterial incubation was at 30 °C. After 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation, samples from liquid media were spread-plate on nutrient agar medium and incubated for 24 h to determine the number of viable cells. The bacterial cells were harvested by centrifugation and heat treatment carried out in a water bath at 45 °C for 30 min. The viability of cells from different incubation times in liquid media showed statistically significant differences. Cells of B. amyloliquefaciens grown in liquid media amended with glycerol showed better tolerance at low a(w) and high survival under heat stress. These results could have important implications for optimizing and improving formulations.

  1. Early and efficient induction of antioxidant defense system in Mytilus galloprovincialis embryos exposed to metals and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Boukadida, Khouloud; Cachot, Jérôme; Clérandeaux, Christelle; Gourves, Pierre-Yves; Banni, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    The present study aims to elucidate the stress response of early life stages of Mytilus galloprovincialis to the combine effects of selected metals and elevated temperature. For this purpose, we investigated the response of a large panel of oxidative stress markers such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substrates (TBARS) concentration) and metallothionein accumulation (MT) as well as selected gene transcription level and metal accumulation in mussels larvae exposed to a sub-lethal concentration of Cu (9.54µg/L), Ag (2.55µg/L) and mixture of the two metals (Cu (6.67µg/L)+Ag (1.47µg/L)) along with a temperature gradient (18, 20 and 22°C) for 48h. Cu and Ag applied as single or mixture were differentially accumulated in mussel larvae according to the exposure temperature. Sod, cat, gst and mt-10 gene transcription levels showed an important increase in larvae exposed to Cu, Ag or to the mix compared to the control condition at 18°C. The same pattern but with higher induction levels was recorded in larvae co-exposed to metals at 20°C. At 22°C, a significant decrease in mRNA abundance of cat, gst and sod and a significant up-regulation of mts targets (mt10 and mt20) were observed.

  2. The role of intracellular oxidation in death induction (apoptosis and necrosis) in human promonocytic cells treated with stress inducers (cadmium, heat, X-rays).

    PubMed

    Galán, A; García-Bermejo, L; Troyano, A; Vilaboa, N E; Fernández, C; de Blas, E; Aller, P

    2001-04-01

    Treatment of U-937 human promonocytic cells with the stress inducers cadmium chloride (2 h at 200 microM), heat (2 h at 42.5 C) or X-rays (20 Gy), followed by recovery, caused death by apoptosis and stimulated caspase-3 activity. In addition, all stress agents caused intracellular oxidation, as measured by peroxide and/or anion superoxide accumulation. However, while pre-incubation with antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine or butylated hydroxyanisole) inhibited the induction of apoptosis by cadmium and X-rays, it did not affect the induction by heat-shock. Pre-incubation for 24 h with the GSH-depleting agent L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) switched the mode of death from apoptosis to necrosis in cadmium-treated cells. By contrast, BSO only caused minor modifacions in the rate of apoptosis without affecting the mode of death in heat- and X-rays-treated cells. BSO potentiated peroxide accumulation in cells treated with both cadmium and X-rays. However, while the accumulation of peroxides was stable in the case of cadmium, it was transient in the case of X-rays. Moreover, the administration of antioxidants during the recovery period sufficed to prevent necrosis and restore apoptosis in BSO plus cadmium-treated cells. Cadmium and X-rays caused a decrease in intracellular ATP levels, but the decrease was similar in both apoptotic and necrotic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that (i) stress inducers cause intracellular oxidation, but oxidation is not a general requirement for apoptosis; and (ii) the duration of the oxidant state seems to be critical in determining the mode of death.

  3. Imaging of fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curve (OJIP) parameters, applied in a screening study with wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) genotypes under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Jedmowski, Christoph; Brüggemann, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    We quantified the influence of heat stress (HS) on PSII by imaging of parameters of the fast chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) induction (OJIP) kinetic of 20 genotypes of wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) covering a broad geographical spectrum. We developed a standardised screening procedure, allowing a repetitive fluorescence measurement of leaf segments. The impact of HS was quantified by calculating a Heat Resistance Index (HRI), derived from the decrease of the Performance Index (PI) caused by HS treatment and following recovery. For the genotype showing the lowest HRI, reduced maximum quantum yield (φP0) and increased relative variable fluorescence of the O-J phase (K-Peak) were detected after HS, whereas the basal fluorescence (F0) remained stable. An additional feature was a lowered fraction of active (QA-reducing) reaction centres (RCs). The disturbances disappeared after one day of recovery. Spatial heterogeneities of fluorescence parameters were detected, as the negative effect of HS was stronger in the leaf areas close to the leaf tip. The results of this study prove that chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (CFI) is suitable for the detection of HS symptoms and that imaging of JIP-Test parameters should be considered in future screening and phenotyping studies aiming for the characterisation of plant genotypes.

  4. Cytotoxicity of withaferin A in glioblastomas involves induction of an oxidative stress-mediated heat shock response while altering Akt/mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Patrick T; Sleder, Kristina D; Samadi, Abbas K; Zhang, Huaping; Timmermann, Barbara N; Cohen, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone derived from the plant Vassobia breviflora, has been reported to have anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-angiogenic properties against cancer growth. In this study, we identified several key underlying mechanisms of anticancer action of WA in glioblastoma cells. WA was found to inhibit proliferation by inducing a dose-dependent G2/M cell cycle arrest and promoting cell death through both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. This was accompanied by an inhibitory shift in the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway which included diminished expression and/or phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, p70 S6K, and p85 S6K with increased activation of AMPKα and the tumor suppressor tuberin/TSC2. Alterations in proteins of the MAPK pathway and cell surface receptors like EGFR, Her2/ErbB2, and c-Met were also observed. WA induced an N-acetyl-L-cysteine-repressible enhancement in cellular oxidative potential/stress with subsequent induction of a heat shock stress response primarily through HSP70, HSP32, and HSP27 upregulation and HSF1 downregulation. Taken together, we suggest that WA may represent a promising chemotherapeutic candidate in glioblastoma therapy warranting further translational evaluation.

  5. Stress and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lachenbrunch, A.H.; McGarr, A.

    1990-01-01

    As the Pacific plate slides northward past the North American plate along the San Andreas fault, the frictional stress that resists plate motion there is overcome to cause earthquakes. However, the frictional heating predicted for the process has never been detected. Thus, in spite of its importance to an understanding of both plate motion and earthquakes, the size of this frictional stress is still uncertain, even in order of magnitude.

  6. Ion plating with an induction heating source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Brainard, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Induction heating is introduced as an evaporation heat source in ion plating. A bare induction coil without shielding can be directly used in the glow discharge region with no arcing. The only requirement is to utilize an rf inductive generator with low operating frequency of 75 kHz. Mechanical simplicity of the ion plating apparatus and ease of operation is a great asset for industrial applications; practically any metal such as nickel, iron, and the high temperature refractories can be evaporated and ion plated.

  7. Protecting Workers from Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... temperatures are high and the job involves physical work. Risk Factors for Heat Illness • High temperature and humidity, ... heat or those that have been away from work to adapt to working in the heat (acclimatization). • Routinely check workers who are at risk of heat stress due to protective clothing and ...

  8. Modeling a Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes

    2003-06-01

    FIDAP has been used to simulate melting of radioactive waste glass in a cold crucible induction heated melter. A model has been created that couples the magnetic vector potential (real and imaginary) to a transient startup of the melting process. This magnetic field is coupled to the mass, momentum, and energy equations that vary with time and position as the melt grows. The coupling occurs with the electrical conductivity of the glass as it rises above the melt temperature of the glass and heat is generated. Natural convection within the molten glass helps determine the shape of the melt as it progresses in time. An electromagnetic force is also implemented that is dependent on the electrical properties and frequency of the coil. This study shows the progression of the melt shape with time along with temperatures, power input, velocities, and magnetic vector potential. A power controller is implemented that controls the primary coil current and power.

  9. Verification and validation for induction heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Kin; Tippetts, Trevor B; Allen, David W

    2008-01-01

    Truchas is a software package being developed at LANL within the Telluride project for predicting the complex physical processes in metal alloy casting. The software was designed to be massively parallel, multi-material, multi-physics, and to run on 3D, fully unstructured meshes. This work describes a Verification and Validation assessment of Truchas for simulating the induction heating phase of a casting process. We used existing data from a simple experiment involving the induction heating of a graphite cylinder, as graphite is a common material used for mold assemblies. Because we do not have complete knowledge of all the conditions and properties in this experiment (as is the case in many other experiments), we performed a parameter sensitivity study, modeled the uncertainties of the most sensitive parameters, and quantified how these uncertainties propagate to the Truchas output response. A verification analysis produced estimates of the numerical error of the Truchas solution to our computational model. The outputs from Truchas runs with randomly sampled parameter values were used for the validation study.

  10. Improved Heat-Stress Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Fehn, Steven

    2007-01-01

    NASA Dryden presents an improved and automated site-specific algorithm for heat-stress approximation using standard atmospheric measurements routinely obtained from the Edwards Air Force Base weather detachment. Heat stress, which is the net heat load a worker may be exposed to, is officially measured using a thermal-environment monitoring system to calculate the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT). This instrument uses three independent thermometers to measure wet-bulb, dry-bulb, and the black-globe temperatures. By using these improvements, a more realistic WBGT estimation value can now be produced. This is extremely useful for researchers and other employees who are working on outdoor projects that are distant from the areas that the Web system monitors. Most importantly, the improved WBGT estimations will make outdoor work sites safer by reducing the likelihood of heat stress.

  11. Inductively heated particulate matter filter regeneration control system

    SciTech Connect

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore Jr., Michael J; Kirby, Kevin W; Phelps, Amanda; Gregoire, Daniel J

    2012-10-23

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and zones. The system also includes a heating element. A control module selectively activates the heating element to inductively heat one of the zones.

  12. Effects of heat stress on mammalian reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Heat stress can have large effects on most aspects of reproductive function in mammals. These include disruptions in spermatogenesis and oocyte development, oocyte maturation, early embryonic development, foetal and placental growth and lactation. These deleterious effects of heat stress are the result of either the hyperthermia associated with heat stress or the physiological adjustments made by the heat-stressed animal to regulate body temperature. Many effects of elevated temperature on gametes and the early embryo involve increased production of reactive oxygen species. Genetic adaptation to heat stress is possible both with respect to regulation of body temperature and cellular resistance to elevated temperature. PMID:19833646

  13. REEXAMINATION OF INDUCTION HEATING OF PRIMITIVE BODIES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, Raymond L.; Roberge, Wayne G. E-mail: roberw@rpi.edu

    2013-10-20

    We reexamine the unipolar induction mechanism for heating asteroids originally proposed in a classic series of papers by Sonett and collaborators. As originally conceived, induction heating is caused by the 'motional electric field' that appears in the frame of an asteroid immersed in a fully ionized, magnetized solar wind and drives currents through its interior. However, we point out that classical induction heating contains a subtle conceptual error, in consequence of which the electric field inside the asteroid was calculated incorrectly. The problem is that the motional electric field used by Sonett et al. is the electric field in the freely streaming plasma far from the asteroid; in fact, the motional field vanishes at the asteroid surface for realistic assumptions about the plasma density. In this paper we revisit and improve the induction heating scenario by (1) correcting the conceptual error by self-consistently calculating the electric field in and around the boundary layer at the asteroid-plasma interface; (2) considering weakly ionized plasmas consistent with current ideas about protoplanetary disks; and (3) considering more realistic scenarios that do not require a fully ionized, powerful T Tauri wind in the disk midplane. We present exemplary solutions for two highly idealized flows that show that the interior electric field can either vanish or be comparable to the fields predicted by classical induction depending on the flow geometry. We term the heating driven by these flows 'electrodynamic heating', calculate its upper limits, and compare them to heating produced by short-lived radionuclides.

  14. Unique Computer Modeling Approaches for Simulation of Induction Heating and Heat-Treating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnev, Valery

    2013-07-01

    In the last decade, when discussing subjects related to a computer modeling of induction heating and heat treating, the word "usefulness" has been replaced by the word "necessity." Modern computer simulation is capable of effectively simulating electromagnetic and thermal phenomena for many processes, including those that involve electromagnetic induction. This article discusses the state-of-the-art computer simulation of induction heating and heat treating providing answers to following questions: Why finite element analysis is not always the best tool for computer modeling of some induction heating applications? What are the limitations of generalized all-purpose commercial programs? What are the crucial tips that executives must know regarding computer modeling of induction heating? Several case studies will be reviewed in this article as well.

  15. ZCS High Frequency Inverter for Aluminum Vessel Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    Recent induction cooking apparatus are utilized for induction heating of ferromagnetic materials at 20-50kHz with a high efficiency. They can not, however, be applied for non-magnetic materials such as aluminum vessels. Here, we present a voltage-clamp reverse conducting ZCS high frequency inverter of half bridge type for induction heating of an aluminum vessel. The switching devices utilized for this inverter are SITs and its operating frequency is determined as 200kHz. This paper describes its circuit constitution and the obtained experimental results from a practical point of view.

  16. Computer simulation and optimal designing of energy-saving technologies of the induction heating of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidovich, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Advanced energy-saving technologies of induction heating of metals are discussed. The importance of the joint simulation of electromagnetic and temperature fields on induction heating is demonstrated. The package of specialized programs for simulating not only induction heating devices, but also technologies that employ industrial heating has been developed. An intimate connection between optimal design and control of induction heaters is shown.

  17. Immediate induction of heat shock proteins is not protective against cryopreservation in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S J; Choi, H R; Nam, K M; Na, J I; Huh, C H; Park, K C

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses, such as increased temperature. HSPs can protect cells from various cytotoxic factors by stabilizing proteins. Thus, it could be hypothesized that heat induced HSPs can provide protective effects against cryopreservation-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to determine whether induction of HSPs can increase the cell viability of normal human fibroblasts after cryopreservation. Cytotoxic effects of heat treatment were tested and the induction of HSPs was assessed by examining time-dependent HSP expression. A cell counting method using fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the viability of cells. In addition, the effects of geranylgeranylacetone were evaluated in terms of HSP expression and cytoskeleton changes. The results of this study showed that immediate induction of HSPs does not protect normal human fibroblasts against cryopreservation-induced cell death possibly by inducing cytoskeleton changes.

  18. Controlled Heat Stress Promotes Myofibrillogenesis during Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiongyu; Miller, Devin; An, Hongying; Wang, Howard; Lopez, Joseph; Lough, Denver; He, Ling; Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    strictly controlled heat stress is required to minimize the development of atrophy in myotubes. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis was enhanced following thermal induction of myoblasts, suggesting a subsequent shift toward anabolic demand requirements for energy production. This study offers a new perspective to understand and utilize the time and temperature-sensitive effects of hyperthermal therapy on muscle regeneration. PMID:27824934

  19. Controlled Heat Stress Promotes Myofibrillogenesis during Myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiongyu; Miller, Devin; An, Hongying; Wang, Howard; Lopez, Joseph; Lough, Denver; He, Ling; Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    strictly controlled heat stress is required to minimize the development of atrophy in myotubes. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis was enhanced following thermal induction of myoblasts, suggesting a subsequent shift toward anabolic demand requirements for energy production. This study offers a new perspective to understand and utilize the time and temperature-sensitive effects of hyperthermal therapy on muscle regeneration.

  20. Water Replacement Schedules in Heat Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Although early ingestion of cold water appears to lead to greater relief from heat stress during physical exertion than late ingestion, this difference is reduced toward the end of an hour's work in high heat and humidity. (CK)

  1. Heat stress interaction with shade and cooling.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, D V

    1994-07-01

    Hot weather causes heat stress in dairy cattle. Although effects are more severe in hot climates, dairy cattle in areas with relatively moderate climates also are exposed to periods of heat stress. The resultant decrease in milk production and reproductive efficiency can be offset by implementation of a program consisting of cooling through shades, ventilation and spray, and fans. The economic benefit should be determined before installation of equipment to reduce heat stress.

  2. Synthesis of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes by Inductive Heating CCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biris, A. R.; Biris, A. S.; Lupu, D.; Trigwell, S.; Rahman, Z. U.; Aldea, N.; Marginean, P.

    2005-01-01

    The CCVD syntheses of MWCNTs from acetylene on Fe:Co:CaCO 3 and Fe:Co:CaO were performed using two different methods of heating: outer furnace and inductive heating. The comparative analysis of the MWCNTs obtained by the two methods show that the tubes grown in inductive heating have smaller diameters (5-25 nm), with fewer walls and aspect ratio of the order of hundreds. The ratio of outer to inner diameter (od/id) is ranging between 2 and 2.5. Inductively assisted CCVD is a very attractive method because of the major advantages that it presents, like low energetic consumption, thinner, well crystallized and more uniform tubes.

  3. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Bass, Ronald M [Houston, TX

    2012-04-24

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  4. Wireless induction heating in a microfluidic device for cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-ki; Min, Junghong; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2010-04-07

    A wireless induction heating system in a microfluidic device was devised for cell lysis to extract DNA and RNA from Escherichia coli. The thermal responses of nickel, iron and copper heating units were studied by applying an alternating magnetic field as a function of geometry of unit, strength of magnetic field, and kind of metal. Heating units were prepared by cutting metal film using a fiber laser, and the units were integrated into a microchannel system using a soft lithographic process. Variation and distribution of temperature on the surface of the heating units was observed using a thermographic camera and temperature labels. The amount of protein released from E. coli by thermal lysis was determined by protein concentration measurement. Hemoglobin released from red blood cells was observed using colorimetric intensity measurement. Extracted DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the profile was compared with that of a positive control of ultrasonically disrupted E. coli. The stability of RNA extracted by induction heating was quantified by the measurement of 23S/16S rRNA ratio and comparison with that by normal RNA extraction kit as a gold standard. A solid-shaped nickel structure was selected as the induction heating element in the microfluidic device because of the relatively small influence of geometries and faster thermal response.The amount of protein extracted from E. coli and hemoglobin released from red blood cells by induction heating of the nickel unit in the microfluidic device was proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field. The lysis of E. coli by induction heating was as effective as lysis of DNA by the ultrasonication method because the threshold cycle values of the sample were compatible with those of the positive control as measured by ultrasonication. Thermal lysis of E. coli by induction heating represents a reasonable alternative to a commercial RNA extraction method as shown by the comparative

  5. Numerical model of induction heating of steel-tube ends

    SciTech Connect

    Garbulsky, G.D.; Marino, P.; Pignotti, A.

    1997-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of induction heating of steel-tube ends, that takes into account magnetic induction saturation and temperature dependence of material properties, is developed as an aid to process design and optimization. The model is solved by the finite difference method, and is validated by comparison with thermocouple measurements at an industrial facility at which three tubes are heated concurrently prior to an upsetting process. An example of the dependence of the final temperature distribution on geometrical parameters is discussed in detail.

  6. Joule heating of Io's ionosphere by unipolar induction currents

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, F.; Lichtenstein, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrical induction in Io's ionosphere, due to the corotating plasma bound to the Jovian magnetosphere, is one possible source for the attainment of the high temperatures suggested by the large scale height of Io's ionosphere. Unipolar induction models are constructed to calculate ionospheric joule heating numerically, whose heating rates lie between 10 to the -9th and 10 to the -8th W/cu m. The binding and coupling of the ionosphere is due to the dense, and possibly ionized, neutral SO2 atmosphere, and there appears to be no need to postulate the existence of an intrinsic Ionian magnetic field in order to retain the observed ionnosphere.

  7. Viscous effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Bose, D.

    1999-10-01

    A transport model is developed for nonlocal effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors. The model is based on the electron momentum equation derived from the Boltzmann equation, retaining anisotropic stress components which in fact are viscous stresses. The resulting model consists of transport equations for the magnitude of electron velocity oscillation and terms representing energy dissipation due to viscous stresses in the electron energy equation. In this model, electrical current is obtained in a nonlocal manner due to viscous effects, instead of Ohm's law or the electron momentum equation without viscous effects, while nonlocal heating of electrons is represented by the viscous dissipation. Computational results obtained by two-dimensional numerical simulations show that nonlocal determination of electrical current indeed is important, and viscous dissipation becomes an important electron heating mechanism at low pressures. It is suspected that viscous dissipation in inductively coupled plasma reactors in fact represents stochastic heating of electrons, and this possibility is exploited by discussing physical similarities between stochastic heating and energy dissipation due to the stress tensor.

  8. Graphene synthesis via magnetic inductive heating of copper substrates.

    PubMed

    Piner, Richard; Li, Huifeng; Kong, Xianghua; Tao, Li; Kholmanov, Iskandar N; Ji, Hengxing; Lee, Wi Hyoung; Suk, Ji Won; Ye, Jongpil; Hao, Yufeng; Chen, Shanshan; Magnuson, Carl W; Ismach, Ariel F; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2013-09-24

    Scaling graphene growth using an oven to heat large substrates becomes less energy efficient as system size is increased. We report a route to graphene synthesis in which radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inductively heat metal foils, yielding graphene of quality comparable to or higher than that of current chemical vapor deposition techniques. RF induction heating allows for rapid temperature ramp up/down, with great potential for large scale and rapid manufacturing of graphene with much better energy efficiency. Back-gated field effect transistors on a SiO2/Si substrate showed carrier mobility up to ∼14 000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) measured under ambient conditions. Many advantages of RF heating are outlined, and some fundamental aspects of this approach are discussed.

  9. Human Cardiovascular Responses to Passive Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Craig G.; Wilson, Thad E.

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur. PMID:25589263

  10. Optimum Construction of Heating Coil for Domestic Induction Cooker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Dola; Bandyopadhyay, Atanu; Sadhu, Pradip Kumar; Pal, Nitai

    2010-10-01

    The design and optimization of the parameters of heating coil is very important for the analytical analysis of high frequency inverter fed induction cooker. Moreover, accurate prediction of high frequency winding loss (i.e., losses due to skin and proximity effects) is necessary as the induction cooker used in power electronics applications. At high frequency current penetration in the induction coil circuit is very difficult for conducting wire due to skin-effect. To eradicate the skin effect heating coil is made up of bundle conductor i.e., litz wire. In this paper inductances and AC resistances of a litz-wire are calculated and optimized by considering the input parameters like wire type, shape, number of strand, number of spiral turn, number of twist per feet of heating coil and operating frequency. A high frequency half bridge series resonant mirror inverter circuit is used in this paper and taking the optimum values of inductance and ac resistance the circuit is simulated through PSPICE simulations. It has been noticed that the results are feasible enough for real implementation.

  11. A validated model for induction heating of shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Robert N.; Boyd, James G.; Hartl, Darren J.; Brown, Jonathan K.; Calkins, Frederick T.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators deliver high forces while being compact and reliable, making them ideal for consideration in aerospace applications. One disadvantage of these thermally driven actuators is their slow cyclic time response compared to conventional actuators. Induction heating has recently been proposed to quickly heat SMA components. However efforts to date have been purely empirical. The present work approachs this problem in a computational manner by developing a finite element model of induction heating in which the time-harmonic electromagnetic equations are solved for the Joule heat power field, the energy equation is solved for the temperature field, and the linear momentum equations are solved to find the stress, displacement, and internal state variable fields. The combined model was implemented in Abaqus using a Python script approach and applied to SMA torque tube and beam actuators. The model has also been used to examine magnetic flux concentrators to improve the induction systems performance. Induction heating experiments were performed using the SMA torque tube, and the model agreed well with the experiments.

  12. Protecting Yourself from Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, and can cause death or permanent disability. Symptoms ■■ High body temperature ■■ Confusion ■■ ...

  13. Induction heating apparatus and methods of operation thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, John G.

    2006-08-01

    Methods of operation of an induction melter include providing material within a cooled crucible proximate an inductor. A desired electromagnetic flux skin depth for heating the material within the crucible may be selected, and a frequency of an alternating current for energizing the inductor and for producing the desired skin depth may be selected. The alternating current frequency may be adjusted after energizing the inductor to maintain the desired electromagnetic flux skin depth. The desired skin depth may be substantially maintained as the temperature of the material varies. An induction heating apparatus includes a sensor configured to detect changes in at least one physical characteristic of a material to be heated in a crucible, and a controller configured for selectively varying a frequency of an alternating current for energizing an inductor at least partially in response to changes in the physical characteristic to be detected by the sensor.

  14. Multicharged iron ions produced by using induction heating vapor source.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Kubo, Takashi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Tanaka, Kiyokatsu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Asaji, Toyohisa; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2008-02-01

    Multiply charged Fe ions are produced from solid pure material in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating with an induction coil which is made of bare molybdenum wire partially covered by ceramic beads in vacuum and surrounding and heating directly the pure Fe rod. Heated material has no contact with insulators, so that outgas is minimized. The evaporator is installed around the mirror end plate outside of the ECR plasma with its hole grazing the ECR zone. Helium or argon gas is usually chosen for supporting gas. The multicharged Fe ions up to Fe(13+) are extracted from the opposite side of mirror and against the evaporator, and then multicharged Fe ion beam is formed. We compare production of multicharged iron ions by using this new source with our previous methods.

  15. Method for Accurate Surface Temperature Measurements During Fast Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larregain, Benjamin; Vanderesse, Nicolas; Bridier, Florent; Bocher, Philippe; Arkinson, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    A robust method is proposed for the measurement of surface temperature fields during induction heating. It is based on the original coupling of temperature-indicating lacquers and a high-speed camera system. Image analysis tools have been implemented to automatically extract the temporal evolution of isotherms. This method was applied to the fast induction treatment of a 4340 steel spur gear, allowing the full history of surface isotherms to be accurately documented for a sequential heating, i.e., a medium frequency preheating followed by a high frequency final heating. Three isotherms, i.e., 704, 816, and 927°C, were acquired every 0.3 ms with a spatial resolution of 0.04 mm per pixel. The information provided by the method is described and discussed. Finally, the transformation temperature Ac1 is linked to the temperature on specific locations of the gear tooth.

  16. Induction Heating Process: 3D Modeling and Optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naar, R.; Bay, F.

    2011-05-01

    An increasing number of problems in mechanics and physics involves multiphysics coupled problems. Among these problems, we can often find electromagnetic coupled problems. Electromagnetic couplings may be involved through the use of direct or induced currents for thermal purposes—in order to generate heat inside a work piece in order to get either a prescribed temperature field or some given mechanical or metallurgical properties through an accurate control of temperature evolution with respect to time-, or for solid or fluid mechanics purposes—in order to create magnetic forces such as in fluid mechanics (electromagnetic stirring,…) or solid mechanics (magnetoforming,…). Induction heat treatment processes is therefore quite difficult to control; trying for instance to minimize distortions generated by such a process is not easy. In order to achieve these objectives, we have developed a computational tool which includes an optimsation stage. A 3D finite element modeling tool for local quenching after induction heating processes has already been developed in our laboratory. The modeling of such a multiphysics coupled process needs taking into account electromagnetic, thermal, mechanical and metallurgical phenomenon—as well as their mutual interactions during the whole process: heating and quenching. The model developed is based on Maxwell equations, heat transfer equation, mechanical equilibrium computations, Johnson-Mehl-Avrami and Koistinen-Marburger laws. All these equations and laws may be coupled but some coupling may be neglected. In our study, we will also focus on induction heating process aiming at optimising the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). Thus problem is formalized as an optimization problem—minimizing a cost function which measures the difference between computed and optimal temperatures—along with some constraints on process parameters. The optimization algorithms may be of two kinds—either zero-order or first-order algorithms. First

  17. Association of heat shock protein 70 expression with rat myocardial cell damage during heat stress in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, H B; Zhang, X C; Cheng, Y F; Abdelnasir, A; Tang, S; Kemper, N; Hartung, J; Bao, E D

    2015-03-20

    To investigate the mechanism of sudden death as a result of stress-induced damage to heart tissue and myocardial cells and to investigate the cardioprotective role of Hsp70 during heat stress, the distribution and expression of Hsp70 was evaluated in the heart cells of heat-stressed rats in vivo and heat-stressed H9c2 cells in vitro. After exposure to heat stress at 42°C for different durations, we observed a significant induction of CK, CK-MB, and LDH as well as pathologic lesions characterized by acute degeneration, suggesting that cell damage occurs from the onset of heat stress. Immunocytochemistry showed that Hsp70 was distributed mainly in the cytoplasm of myocardial cells in vivo and in vitro. Hsp70-positive signals in the cytoplasm were more prominent in intact areas than in degenerated areas after 60 min of heat stress. Hsp70 protein levels in myocardial cells in vitro decreased from the beginning to the end of heat stress. Hsp70 protein levels in rat heart tissues in vivo decreased gradually with prolonged heat stress, with a slight increase at the beginning of heat stress. These results indicate that Hsp70 plays a role in the response of cardiac cells to heat stress and that decreased Hsp70 levels are associated with damage to rat myocardial cells in vitro and in vivo. Significant differences were found in hsp70 mRNA, which began to increase after 20 min of heat stress in vitro and after 40 min in vivo. This indicates that hysteresis is involved in mRNA expression after heat stress in vivo.

  18. Induction of Oxidative Stress in Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Emin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a critical role in the pathophysiology of several kidney diseases, and many complications of these diseases are mediated by oxidative stress, oxidative stress-related mediators, and inflammation. Several systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia; infection; antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, and radiocontrast agents; and environmental toxins, occupational chemicals, radiation, smoking, as well as alcohol consumption induce oxidative stress in kidney. We searched the literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google scholar with “oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, oxygen free radicals, kidney, renal injury, nephropathy, nephrotoxicity, and induction”. The literature search included only articles written in English language. Letters or case reports were excluded. Scientific relevance, for clinical studies target populations, and study design, for basic science studies full coverage of main topics, are eligibility criteria for articles used in this paper. PMID:22577546

  19. Satellite III non-coding RNAs show distinct and stress-specific patterns of induction

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Sonali; Parihar, Rashmi; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2009-04-24

    The heat shock response in human cells is associated with the transcription of satellite III repeats (SatIII) located in the 9q12 locus. Upon induction, the SatIII transcripts remain associated with the locus and recruit several transcription and splicing factors to form the nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). The nSBs are thought to modulate epigenetic changes during the heat shock response. We demonstrate here that the nSBs are induced by a variety of stressors and show stress-specific patterns of induction. While the transcription factor HSF1 is required for the induction of SatIII locus by the stressors tested, its specific role in the transcriptional process appears to be stress dependent. Our results suggest the existence of multiple transcriptional loci for the SatIII transcripts and that their activation might depend upon the type of stressors. Thus, induction of SatIII transcripts appears to be a generic response to a variety of stress conditions.

  20. Inductions Buffer Nurses' Job Stress, Health, and Organizational Commitment.

    PubMed

    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, Asta; Lopes, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Nurses suffer disproportionate levels of stress and are at risk of sickness-absence and turnover intentions, but there is a lack of research clarifying preventions. This study investigated the impact of inductions (job preparation courses) about mental health for nurses' job stress, general health, and organizational commitment. Data from 6,656 nurses were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), showing that mental health inductions increase nurses' job satisfaction, which reduces their occupational stress and improves their health. SEM showed that these occupational health benefits increase the nurses' commitment to the organization. Job satisfaction (feeling valued, rewarded) also had a direct effect on nurses' intentions to continue working for the organization. Mental health inductions are therefore beneficial beyond job performance: they increase occupational health in the nursing profession.

  1. Pharmacological induction of heat shock protein 68 synthesis in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R N; Dwyer, B E

    1995-12-15

    The induction of the highly inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP 70) is associated with thermotolerance and survival from many other types of stress. This investigation studied the pharmacological induction of HSP 68 (HSP 68 is the rat homolog of human HSP 70) by 1,10-phenanthroline in cultured rat astrocytes under conditions that activated heat shock transcription factor-1 without inducing HSP 68 synthesis. Two conditions that activate heat shock transcription factor-1 and promote its binding to the heat shock element without subsequent transcription of HSP 68 mRNA, intracellular acidosis and exposure to salicylate, showed synthesis of HSP 68 when 1,10-phenanthroline was added to culture medium after the activation of heat shock transcription factor-1. 1,10-phenanthroline mimicked heat shock by inducing HSP 68 mRNA and protein under both conditions. 1,10-phenanthroline added alone to culture medium did not induce the synthesis of HSP 68 or activate heat shock transcription factor-1. These findings strongly suggest a multistep activation for HSP 68 synthesis and also demonstrate that the synthesis of HSP 68 can be pharmacologically regulated.

  2. A Systems Biology Approach to Heat Stress, Heat Injury and Heat Stroke

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    A systems biology approach to heat stress, heat injury and heat stroke Jonathan D. Stallings and Danielle L. Ippolito US Army Center for...paramount importance to the military. Here, we review our recent systems biology approaches to heat stress in order to develop a 3-dimensional (3D...Transcriptomics, Proteomics, Systems biology, Protein aggregation, Metabolomics, Energetics, Computational modeling 1. HEAT ILLNESS IN THE U.S. ARMED FORCES

  3. Heat Stress in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... About CDC.gov . Natural Disasters and Severe Weather Earthquakes Being Prepared Emergency Supplies Home Hazards Indoor Safety ... Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes ...

  4. Evaluation of heat shock protein (HSP-60) induction on accumulation of carbohydrate in Isochrysis galbana

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, H.; Wolfe, M.; Tell, J.; Tjeerdema, R.

    1995-12-31

    Primary levels of the marine food chain may play an important role in the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in both chemically dispersed and un-dispersed oil spills. HSP-60 proteins, members of the chaperonin family of stress proteins, are induced in response to a wide variety of environmental agents, including UV light, heavy metals, and xenobiotics. Increased production and storage of carbohydrate in I. galbana has been associated with aging and stress. Thus, HSP-60 and carbohydrate storage were selected as sublethal endpoints of exposure to the primary producer, I. galbana, a golden brown, unicellular algae, and a significant component of the marine phytoplankton community. The authors have found that I. galbana cultures exposed to water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO), and PBCO/dispersant preparations efficiently induce HSP-60. Studies indicated that WAF produced a dose-related response in I. galbana, which increased as a function of time. Dispersant alone showed the greatest induction, while combined WAF-dispersant showed less induction, suggesting a possible competition between crude oil and algae for dispersant interaction. In addition, they have demonstrated that I. galbana accumulates carbohydrates in response to exposure to WAF and PBCO/dispersant preparations and therefore represents another index of stress in this organism. They were interested in determining if induction of stress proteins and HSP60 in particular represented an adaptive-mechanism, allowing this algae to better cope with exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons released in the marine environment during an oil spill. In an effort to determine if stress protein induction serves as a protective adaptive response to exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons they examined the effect of heat shock induction on the accumulation of carbohydrates by these organisms in response to exposure to WAF and dispersed oil preparations.

  5. Extraordinary induction heating effect near the first order Curie transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, M. R.; Selomulya, C.; Sandeman, K. G.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-10-01

    While materials with a 1st order Curie transition (TC) are known for the magnetic cooling effect due to the reversibility of their large entropy change, they also have a great potential as a candidate material for induction heating where a large loss power is required under a limited alternating magnetic field. We have carried out a proof-of-concept study on the induction heating effect in 1st order ferromagnetic materials where the temperature is self-regulated at TC. LaFe11.57Si1.43H1.75, a well-known magnetocaloric material, was employed in this study because TC of this compound (319 K) resides in the ideal temperature range for hyperthermia treatment of cancerous cells. It is found that the hysteresis loss of LaFe11.57Si1.43H1.75 increases dramatically near TC due to the magnetic phase coexistence associated with the 1st order magnetic transition. The spontaneous magnetization (Ms) shows a very abrupt decrease from 110 Am2kg-1 at 316 K to zero at 319 K. This large Ms immediately below TC along with the enhanced irreversibility of the hysteresis curve result in a specific absorption rate as large as 0.5 kWg-1 under a field of 8.8 kAm-1 at 279 kHz. This value is nearly an order of magnitude larger than that observed under the same condition for conventional iron oxide-based materials. Moreover, the large heating effect is self-regulated at the 1st order TC (319 K). This proof-of-concept study shows that the extraordinary heating effect near the 1st order Curie point opens up a novel alloy design strategy for large, self-regulated induction heating.

  6. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, C. F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  7. Study of Variable Frequency Induction Heating in Steel Making Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutani, Kazuhiko; Umetsu, Kenji; Itou, Takeo; Isobe, Takanori; Kitahara, Tadayuki; Shimada, Ryuichi

    Induction heating technologies have been the standard technologies employed in steel making processes because they are clean, they have a high energy density, they are highly the controllable, etc. However, there is a problem in using them; in general, frequencies of the electric circuits have to be kept fixed to improve their power factors, and this constraint makes the processes inflexible. In order to overcome this problem, we have developed a new heating technique-variable frequency power supply with magnetic energy recovery switching. This technique helps us in improving the quality of steel products as well as the productivity. We have also performed numerical calculations and experiments to evaluate its effect on temperature distributions on heated steel plates. The obtained results indicate that the application of the technique in steel making processes would be advantageous.

  8. Impact of Gas Heating in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that the neutral gas in inductively coupled plasma reactors heats up significantly during processing. The resulting gas density variations across the reactor affect reaction rates, radical densities, plasma characteristics, and uniformity within the reactor. A self-consistent model that couples the plasma generation and transport to the gas flow and heating has been developed and used to study CF4 discharges. A Langmuir probe has been used to measure radial profiles of electron density and temperature. The model predictions agree well with the experimental results. As a result of these comparisons along with the poorer performance of the model without the gas-plasma coupling, the importance of gas heating in plasma processing has been verified.

  9. Promoted-Combustion Chamber with Induction Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Erin; Hagood, Richard; Lowery, Freida; Herald, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    An improved promoted-combustion system has been developed for studying the effects of elevated temperatures on the flammability of metals in pure oxygen. In prior promoted-combustion chambers, initial temperatures of metal specimens in experiments have been limited to the temperatures of gas supplies, usually near room temperature. Although limited elevated temperature promoted-combustion chambers have been developed using water-cooled induction coils for preheating specimens, these designs have been limited to low-pressure operation due to the hollow induction coil. In contrast, the improved promoted-combustion chamber can sustain a pressure up to 10 kpsi (69 MPa) and, through utilization of a solid induction coil, is capable of preheating a metal specimen up to its melting point [potentially in excess of 2,000 F (approximately equal to 1,100 C)]. Hence, the improved promoted combustion chamber makes a greater range of physical conditions and material properties accessible for experimentation. The chamber consists of a vertical cylindrical housing with an inner diameter of 8 in. (20.32 cm) and an inner height of 20.4 in. (51.81 cm). A threaded, sealing cover at one end of the housing can be unscrewed to gain access for installing a specimen. Inlet and outlet ports for gases are provided. Six openings arranged in a helical pattern in the chamber wall contain sealed sapphire windows for viewing an experiment in progress. The base of the chamber contains pressure-sealed electrical connectors for supplying power to the induction coil. The connectors feature a unique design that prevents induction heating of the housing and the pressure sealing surfaces; this is important because if such spurious induction heating were allowed to occur, chamber pressure could be lost. The induction coil is 10 in. (25.4 cm) long and is fitted with a specimen holder at its upper end. At its lower end, the induction coil is mounted on a ceramic base, which affords thermal insulation to

  10. Stress response in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: transcriptional profiling of genes for the heat shock protein 70 chaperone system under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Tetsuya; Munakata, Takeo; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Satoh, Nori; Wada, Shuichi

    2010-03-01

    The genome of Ciona intestinalis contains eight genes for HSP70 superfamily proteins, 36 genes for J-proteins, a gene for a J-like protein, and three genes for BAG family proteins. To understand the stress responses of genes in the HSP70 chaperone system comprehensively, the transcriptional profiles of these 48 genes under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were studied using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Heat stress treatment increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of six HSP70 superfamily genes, eight J-protein family genes, and two BAG family genes. In the cytoplasmic group of the DnaK subfamily of the HSP70 family, Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like was the only heat-inducible gene and Ci-HSPA2/8 was the only constitutively active gene which showed striking simplicity in comparison with other animals that have been examined genome-wide so far. Analyses of the time course and temperature dependency of the heat stress responses showed that the induction of Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like expression rises to a peak after heat stress treatment at 28 degrees C (10 degrees C upshift from control temperature) for 1 h. ER stress treatment with Brefeldin A, a drug that is known to act as ER stress inducer, increased the mRNA levels of four HSP70 superfamily genes and four J-protein family genes. Most stress-inducible genes are conserved between Ciona and vertebrates, as expected from a close evolutionary relationship between them. The present study characterized the stress responses of HSP70 chaperone system genes in Ciona for the first time and provides essential data for comprehensive understanding of the functions of the HSP70 chaperone system.

  11. Purinergic Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Odorant-Induced Heat Shock Protein 25 Induction in Mouse Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hegg, Colleen C.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulate in cells exposed to a variety of physiological and environmental factors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, toxicants, and odorants. Ischemic, stressed, and injured cells release ATP in large amounts. Our hypothesis is that noxious stimulation (in this case, strong odorant) evokes the release of ATP in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Extracellular ATP, a signal of cellular stress, induces the expression of HSPs via purinergic receptors. In the present study, in vivo odorant exposure (heptanal or r-carvone) led to a selective induction of HSP25 in glia-like sustentacular cells in the Swiss Webster mouse OE, as previously shown in rats (Carr et al., 2001). Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo administration of purinergic receptor antagonists suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid (PPADS) blocked the expression of HSP25 immunoreactivity in sustentacular cells. ATP released by acutely injured cells could act as an early signal of cell and tissue damage, causing HSP expression and initiating a stress signaling cascade to protect against further damage. Sustentacular cells have a high capacity to detoxify xenobiotics and thereby protect the olfactory epithelium from airborne pollutants. Thus, the robust, rapid induction of HSPs in sustentacular cells may help maintain the integrity of the OE during exposure to toxicants. PMID:16206165

  12. Effect of Quenching Rate on Distortion and Residual Stresses During Induction Hardening of a Full-Float Truck Axle Shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichao; Ferguson, B. Lynn; Nemkov, Valentin; Goldstein, Robert; Jackowski, John; Fett, Greg

    2014-12-01

    Computer simulation is used to predict the residual stresses and distortion of a full-float truck axle shaft that has been induction scan hardened. Flux2D® is used to model the electromagnetic behavior and the power distributions inside the axle shaft in terms of time. The power distributions are imported and mapped into DANTE® model for thermal, phase transformation, and stress analysis. The truck axle shaft has three main geometrical regions: the flange/filet, the shaft, and the spline. Both induction heating and spray quenching processes have significant effect on the quenching results: distortion and residual stress distributions. In this study, the effects of spray quenching severity on residual stresses and distortion are investigated using modeling. The spray quenching rate can be adjusted by spray nozzle design, ratio of polymer solution, and quenchant flow rate. Different quenching rates are modeled by assigning different heat transfer coefficients as thermal boundary conditions during spray quenching. In this paper, three heat transfer coefficients, 5, 12, and 25 kW/(m2 °C), are applied while keeping all other conditions constant. With the understanding of effects of heating and quenching on residual stresses and distortion of induction hardened parts, the induction hardening process can be optimized for improved part performance.

  13. Influence of heating and cyclic tension on the induction of heat shock proteins and bone-related proteins by MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eunna; Sampson, Alana Cherrell; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Stress conditioning (e.g., thermal, shear, and tensile stress) of bone cells has been shown to enhance healing. However, prior studies have not investigated whether combined stress could synergistically promote bone regeneration. This study explored the impact of combined thermal and tensile stress on the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and bone-related proteins by a murine preosteoblast cell line (MC3T3-E1). Cells were exposed to thermal stress using a water bath (44°C for 4 or 8 minutes) with postheating incubation (37°C for 4 hours) followed by exposure to cyclic strain (equibiaxial 3%, 0.2 Hz, cycle of 10-second tensile stress followed by 10-second rest). Combined thermal stress and tensile stress induced mRNA expression of HSP27 (1.41 relative fold induction (RFI) compared to sham-treated control), HSP70 (5.55 RFI), and osteopontin (1.44 RFI) but suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-9 (0.6 RFI) compared to the control. Combined thermal and tensile stress increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion into the culture supernatant (1.54-fold increase compared to the control). Therefore, combined thermal and mechanical stress preconditioning can enhance HSP induction and influence protein expression important for bone tissue healing.

  14. Experimental Observations and Numerical Prediction of Induction Heating in a Graphite Test Article

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, Todd A; Johnson, Debra P; Jurney, James D; Freer, Jerry E; Dougherty, Lisa M; Stout, Stephen A

    2009-01-01

    The induction heating coils used in the plutonium casting furnaces at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are studied here. A cylindrical graphite test article has been built, instrumented with thermocouples, and heated in the induction coil that is normally used to preheat the molds during casting operations. Preliminary results of experiments aimed at understanding the induction heating process in the mold portion of the furnaces are reported. The experiments have been modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics and the numerical and experimental results are compared to one another. These comparisons provide insight into the heating process and provide a benchmark for COMSOL calculations of induction heating in the mold portion of the plutonium casting furnaces.

  15. Ice melting properties of steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures with induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hao; Sun, Yihan; Liu, Quantao; Li, Bin; Wu, Shaopeng; Tang, Jin

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the ice melting performance of asphalt concrete with steel fibers was studied. Steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures were prepared, five different fiber amount of steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures were mixed to study their induction heating rate. The samples covered with different thickness of ice were heated with induction heating to study their ice melting efficency. It was proved that the induction heating of steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures could significantly improve their ice melting efficency compared with the natural condition. And it was found that the thickness of the ice had little influence on the induction heating rate of the asphalt concrete.

  16. SIGNAL MEDIATORS AT INDUCTION OF HEAT RESISTANCE OF WHEAT PLANTLETS BY SHORT-TERM HEATING.

    PubMed

    Karpets, Yu V; Kolupaev, Yu E; Yastreb, T O

    2015-01-01

    The effects of functional interplay of calcium ions, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the cells of wheat plantlets roots (Triticum aestivum L.) at the induction of their heat resistance by a short-term influence of hyperthermia (heating at the temperature of 42 degrees C during 1 minute) have been investigated. The transitional increase of NO and H2O2 content, invoked by heating, was suppressed by the treatment of plantlets with the antagonists of calcium EGTA (chelator of exocellular calcium), lanthanum chloride (blocker of calcium channels of various types) and neomycin (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-dependent phospholipase C). The rise of hydrogen peroxide content, caused by hardening, was partially suppressed by the action of inhibitors of nitrate reductase (sodium wolframate) and NO-synthase (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester--L-NAME), and the increasing of nitric oxide content was suppressed by the treatment of plants with the antioxidant ionol and with the scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (dimethylthiourea). These compounds and antagonists of calcium also partially removed the effect of the rise of plantlets' heat resistance, invoked by hardening heating. The conclusion on calcium's role in the activation of enzymatic systems, generating reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, and on the functional interplay of these signal mediators at the induction of heat resistance of plantlets by hardening heating is made.

  17. Induction Heating of Hypervelocity Impact Samples to 2500 Degrees Centigrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Joshua; Pardo, Art; Henderson, Don; Rodriguez, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory (RHTL) at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was asked to heat samples up to 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) to simulate reentry scenarios of crafts where heated shields are impacted with single small particles ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 millimeters (.008 to.039 inches) of various materials. The team decided an electromagnetic induction (induction heater) was the best method to achieve and control the temperatures in a rapid manner. The samples consisted of three-dimensional carbon-carbon and two-dimensional carbon-phenolic, which are both electrically conductive. After several attempts the team was able to achieve over 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) in ambient atmosphere. When the system was moved to the target chamber and the vacuum system evacuated down to 250 millitorr, arcing occurred between the bus bars and tank, the feedthrough fittings that carried the coolant and current, and between the target sample and coil. To overcome this arcing, conformal coatings, room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone, and other non-conductive materials were used to isolate the electromagnetic fields.

  18. Heat Stress Effects on Growing-Finishing Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the factors that create heat stress, the response of the animals while under heat stress, and the signs of heat-stressed swine are essential to making rational decisions for the selection, design, and management of their environments. Heat stressors include combinations of environment...

  19. Residual stress relaxation and fatigue behavior of an induction hardened microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Ana Luisa Rivas De

    The thermal and mechanical relaxation of compressive residual stresses during tempering and cyclic loading of an induction hardened vanadium microalloyed steel has been evaluated. A microstructural analysis was also carried out on the microalloyed steel to correlate the residual stress relaxation behavior with microstructural characteristics of the material. Vanadium carbide particle size and distribution were analyzed as well as how these characteristics are affected by the application of normalizing and induction hardening heat treatments. To determine the effect of vanadium carbide particles on the residual stress relaxation response of the microalloyed steel a parallel study was conducted on a 1530 steel which is similar in chemistry to the microalloyed steel, but without the vanadium. The thermal relaxation of compressive residual stresses due to tempering for 2 hours after induction hardening was evaluated for a range of tempering temperatures from 177sp° C\\ (350sp° F) to 579sp° C\\ (1075sp° F). Mechanical residual stress relaxation was evaluated by subjecting specimens to cyclic loading conditions. For this part of the work a special type of specimen was designed. The specimen had an overall C-shape with a T-shaped cross section. This specimen geometry generates higher levels of stresses in the induction hardened outer layer than in the soft core material along the inner layer of the C-shaped geometry. The compressive residual stresses were generated by the phase transformation that occurs during hardening heat treatments and also by mechanical means. Additional compressive stresses were put into the outer surface region of the hardened C-shaped specimens by pre-straining them plastically through the application of compressive loads. Fine vanadium carbide precipitates were observed in the microalloyed steel in the as-forged condition. The application of a normalizing and induction hardening heat treatments caused coarsening of the vanadium carbide

  20. Induction of systemic stress tolerance by brassinosteroid in Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Jian; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Ding, Ju; Shi, Kai; Asami, Tadao; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2011-08-01

    • Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a new class of plant hormones that are essential for plant growth and development. Here, the involvement of BRs in plant systemic tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses was studied. • The effects of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) on plant stress tolerance were studied through the assessment of symptoms of photooxidative stress by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging pulse amplitude modulation, the analysis of gene expression using quantitative real-time PCR and the measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) production using a spectrophotometric assay or confocal laser scanning microscopy. • Treatment of primary leaves with EBR induced systemic tolerance to photooxidative stress in untreated upper and lower leaves. This was accompanied by the systemic accumulation of H₂O₂ and the systemic induction of genes associated with stress responses. Foliar treatment of EBR also enhanced root resistance to Fusarium wilt pathogen. Pharmacological study showed that EBR-induced systemic tolerance was dependent on local and systemic H₂O₂ accumulation. The expression of BR biosynthetic genes was repressed in EBR-treated leaves, but elevated significantly in untreated systemic leaves. Further analysis indicated that EBR-induced systemic induction of BR biosynthetic genes was mediated by systemically elevated H₂O₂. • These results strongly argue that local EBR treatment can activate the continuous production of H₂O₂, and the autopropagative nature of the reactive oxygen species signal, in turn, mediates EBR-induced systemic tolerance.

  1. Hysteresis heating based induction bonding of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwanwatana, Witchuda

    The viability of using magnetic particulate susceptor materials for induction heating during bonding of polymer matrix composites is well established in this work. The unique ability to offer localized heating, geometric flexibility, and self-controlled temperature is the major advantage of this technique. Hysteresis heating is tailored through careful design of the microstructure of nickel particulate polymer films (Ni/PSU). An excellent heating rate can be attained in the frequency range of 1 to 10 MHz for particle volume fraction below percolation of 0.26. The diameter of nickel particle should be kept between 65 nm to 10 mum to ensure multi-domain heating, Curie temperature control, negligible shielding effect, minimum eddy current, and slight particle oxidation. The hysteresis heating behavior of the Ni/PSU films is found to be volumetric in nature and proportional to the cube of applied magnetic field. On the other hand, heat generation is inversely proportional to the size of the multi-domain particles. The frequency effect; however, provide maximum heat generation at the domain wall resonance frequency. Curie temperature control is observed when sufficiently high magnetic fields (˜138 Oe) are applied. The master curves of AC heat generation in Ni/PSU films are established and show a strong particle size effect. Hysteresis fusion bonding of glass/polyphenylene sulfide thermoplastic composites using a magnetic film as the thermoplastic adhesive shows that the bond strength of hysteresis-welded materials is comparable to that of autoclave-welded materials while offering an order of magnitude reduction in cycle time. The relative contribution of the intimate contact and healing mechanisms to the fusion bonding process indicates that hysteresis bonding is controlled by intimate contact. The macroscopic failure modes vary from mostly adhesive composite/film (low bond strength) to a combination of adhesive composite/film, cohesive film, cohesive composite and

  2. Occupational heat stress in Australian workplaces

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Ollie; Brotherhood, John R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this review was to summarize the current state of knowledge on heat stress risk within typical Australian occupational settings. We assessed identified occupations (mining, agriculture, construction, emergency services) for heat production and heat loss potential, and resultant levels of physiological heat strain. A total of 29 reports were identified that assessed in-situ work settings in Northern Territory, South Australia, Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, that measured physiological responses and characterized the thermal environment. Despite workers across all industries being regularly exposed to high ambient temperatures (32–42°C) often coupled with high absolute humidity (max: 33 hPa), physiological strain is generally low in terms of core temperature (<38°C) and dehydration (<1 % reduction in mass) by virtue of the low energy demands of many tasks, and self-regulated pacing of work possible in most jobs. Heat stress risk is higher in specific jobs in agriculture (e.g. sheep shearing), deep underground mining, and emergency services (e.g., search/rescue and bushfire fighting). Heat strain was greatest in military-related activities, particularly externally-paced marching with carried loads which resulted in core temperatures often exceeding 39.5°C despite being carried out in cooler environments. The principal driver of core temperature elevations in most jobs is the rate of metabolic heat production. A standardized approach to evaluating the risk of occupational heat strain in Australian workplaces is recommended defining the individual parameters that alter human heat balance. Future research should also more closely examine female workers and occupational activities within the forestry and agriculture/horticulture sector. PMID:28349081

  3. Effect of heat stress on oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and some stress parameters in broilers.

    PubMed

    Altan, O; Pabuçcuoğlu, A; Altan, A; Konyalioğlu, S; Bayraktar, H

    2003-09-01

    1. This study was conducted to determine the effects of heat stress on fearfulness, leucocyte components, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in two commercial broiler strains, Cobb (C) and Ross (R). 2. At 36 and 37 d of age birds were exposed to 38 +/- 1 degree C for 3 h. Rectal temperatures, duration of tonic immobility (TI), haematocrit values, proportions of leucocyte components (heterophil, lymphocyte, basophil, eosinophil, monocyte), malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activities (CAT, SOD, GPx) of all the birds were determined, before and after heat treatment. 3. Rectal temperatures increased and haematocrit values decreased in birds exposed to heat stress. Heat stress caused a significant increase in heterophil/lymphocyte and in basophil ratios. 4. Exposing birds to heat stress increased duration of TI, suggesting heat-stressed birds tended to be more fearful. 5. Heat stress resulted in a significant Genotype x Treatment interaction for MDA concentration. CAT, SOD and GPx activities; MDA concentrations in heat-stressed R strain birds were greater than in heat-stressed C strain birds.

  4. Deformation behavior of SS400 Thick plate by high-frequency-induction-heating-based line heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwang Seok; Eom, Deuk Ha; Lee, Jung-Hwan

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the line heating-induced permanent deformation behavior of an SS400 thick plate was investigated through both numerical analysis and experimental testing by applying high-frequency induction heating after generating dual-curvature by secondary line heating. First, an approach based on electromagnetic-thermal-structural coupling numerical analysis was adopted for predicting the temperature distribution and subsequent permanent deformation over the SS400 carbon steel plate. Experimental line heating was also carried out to validate the feasibility of the numerical analysis by applying newly designed laboratory-scale high-frequency (HF) induction-heating (IH) equipment. It was found that the shape of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) generated by HF IH and the subsequent microstructure of the SS400 carbon steel plate within the HAZ were strongly dependent on the input power. Permanent vertical deformation increased with an increase in the input power, regardless of the shape of the doubly curved plates (concave- or saddle-type plates). Transverse curvature determined in both the simulation and the experiment were investigated and compared.

  5. Design and construction of a hyperthermia system with improved interaction of magnetic induction-heating.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Fang; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lo, Wei-Hung

    2010-01-01

    For the applications of localized hyperthermia, an improved magnetic induction-heating system is described. The associated components of this system, for example, coils for generating magnetic field, magnetic circuit for flux path, and ferrite needles for generating heat by magnetic induction, all have been explained. An animal experiment of induction-heating hyperthermia for rat's liver is also carried out, and the consequent pathology of Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain and NADPH oxidase activity assay are also conducted for evaluation.

  6. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  7. Sensing the Heat Stress by Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The heat-shock response network controls the adaptation and survival of the cell against environmental stress. This network is highly conserved and is connected with many other signaling pathways. A key element of the heat-shock network is the heat-shock transcription factor-1 (HSF), which is transiently activated by elevated temperatures. HSF translocates to the nucleus upon elevated temperatures, forming homotrimeric complexes. The HSF homotrimers bind to the heat shock element on the DNA and control the expression of the hsp70 gene. The Hsp70 proteins protect cells from thermal stress. Thermal stress causes the unfolding of proteins, perturbing thus the pathways under their control. By binding to these proteins, Hsp70 allows them to refold and prevents their aggregation. The modulation of the activity of the hsp70-promoter by the intensity of the input stress is thus critical for cell's survival. The promoter activity starts from a basal level and rapidly increases once the stress is applied, reaches a maximum level and attenuates slowely back to the basal level. This phenomenon is the hallmark of many experimental studies and of all computational network analysis. Results The molecular construct used as a measure of the response to thermal stress is a Hsp70-GFP fusion gene transfected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The time profile of the GFP protein depends on the transient activity, Transient(t), of the heat shock system. The function Transient(t) depends on hsp70 promoter activity, transcriptional regulation and the translation initiation effects elicited by the heat stress. The GFP time profile is recorded using flow cytometry measurements, a technique that allows a quantitative measurement of the fluorescence of a large number of cells (104). The GFP responses to one and two heat shocks were measured for 261 conditions of different temperatures and durations. We found that: (i) the response of the cell to two consecutive shocks (i.e., no

  8. Metallothionein-I induction by stress in specific brain areas.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, J; Campmany, L; Martí, O; Armario, A

    1991-10-01

    The distribution of metallothionein-I (MT) in several areas of the brain and its induction by immobilization stress has been studied in the rat. MT content was highest in hippocampus and midbrain and lowest in frontal cortex and pons plus medulla oblongata. Immobilization stress for 18 hours (which was accompanied by food and water deprivation) significantly increased MT levels in the frontal cortex, pons plus medulla oblongata and hypothalamus, but not in midbrain and hippocampus. The effect of stress on MT levels was specific as food and water deprivation along had no significant effect on MT levels in any of the brain areas studied. The effect of stress on MT levels was independent of changes in cytosolic Zn content; this was generally unaffected by stress or food and water deprivation but decreased in pons plus medulla oblongata from stressed rats. The results suggest that MT is induced more significantly in the brain areas that are usually involved in the response of animals to stress.

  9. Protective effects of ectoine on heat-stressed Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Adam, Bownik; Zofia, Stępniewska; Tadeusz, Skowroński

    2014-12-01

    Ectoine (ECT) is an amino acid produced and accumulated by halophilic bacteria in stressful conditions in order to prevent the loss of water from the cell. There is a lack of knowledge on the effects of ECT in heat-stressed aquatic animals. The purpose of our study was to determine the influence of ECT on Daphnia magna subjected to heat stress with two temperature gradients: 1 and 0.1 °C/min in the range of 23-42 °C. Time to immobilisation, survival during recovery, swimming performance, heart rate, thoracic limb movement and the levels of heat shock protein 70 kDa 1A (HSP70 1A), catalase (CAT) and nitric oxide species (NOx) were determined in ECT-exposed and unexposed daphnids; we showed protective effects of ECT on Daphnia magna subjected to heat stress. Time to immobilisation of daphnids exposed to ECT was longer when compared to the unexposed animals. Also, survival rate during the recovery of daphnids previously treated with ECT was higher. ECT significantly attenuated a rapid increase of mean swimming velocity which was elevated in the unexposed daphnids. Moreover, we observed elevation of thoracic limb movement and modulation of heart rate in ECT-exposed animals. HSP70 1A and CAT levels were reduced in the presence of ECT. On the other hand, NOx level was slightly elevated in both ECT-treated and unexposed daphnids, however slightly higher NOx level was found in ECT-treated animals. We conclude that the exposure to ectoine has thermoprotective effects on Daphnia magna, however their mechanisms are not associated with the induction of HSP70 1A.

  10. Examination of Coil Arrangement for Higher Quality Heating of the Induction Heating Cooker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Kawata, Kohei; Hara, Takehisa; Ujiie, Satoshi; Joto, Takaya; Masuda, Tadashi

    This paper proposes effective and practical design method of higher quality heating for induction-heating cooker. The IH cooker which has the simple pancake-shaped coil arrangement produces slightly nonuniform temperature distribution along the heating plate. The object of this research is to achieve the better heating performance by adjusting the arrangement of the coil. Easiness of coil winding is added to the evaluation basis. Eddy current analysis is made by the finite element method for calculating the heat distribution of the heating plate. After this, heat transfer analysis is made by the finite element method for calculating the temperature distribution of the heating plate. Multi-objective genetic algorithm is employed for obtaining the optimum arrangement of the coil. The two objectives that mean the uniformity of temperature distribution and the easiness of coil winding are both evaluated. By using the proposed method, we could obtain the expected coil arrangement easily. The temperature distribution approaches closer to uniform distribution by using the obtained coil arrangement which is not difficult to wind.

  11. Toroid Joining Gun. [thermoplastic welding system using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Fox, R. L.; Swaim, R J.

    1985-01-01

    The Toroid Joining Gun is a low cost, self-contained, portable low powered (100-400 watts) thermoplastic welding system developed at Langley Research Center for joining plastic and composite parts using an induction heating technique. The device developed for use in the fabrication of large space sructures (LSST Program) can be used in any atmosphere or in a vacuum. Components can be joined in situ, whether on earth or on a space platform. The expanded application of this welding gun is in the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials. Its low-power requirements, light weight, rapid response, low cost, portability, and effective joining make it a candidate for solving many varied and unique bonding tasks.

  12. [Induction of the NO synthesis in lactobacilli under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Smolentseva, O A; Iarullina, D R; Il'inskaia, O N

    2012-01-01

    An increase in the nitric oxide (NO) biosynthesis in Lactobacillus plantarum 8P-A3 cells takes place under strong stress influence, which leads to a considerable decrease in the microbial cell viability: heating at 70 degrees C and 80 degrees C, prolonged cultivation, toxic effect of hexylresorcinol. The factors, which do not lead to cell death, such as heating at 60 degrees C, 50 microg/ml homoserine lactone, Bacillus intermedius 7P ribonuclease (binase) in concentrations up to 300 microg/ml, do not induce NO synthesis. The activation of the NO biosynthesis in response to stress treatment evidences to universality of key-mechanisms of stress response in cells differing in the level of their organization as well as to important role of nitric oxide in them.

  13. Regulation of Heat Stress by HSF1 and GR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    integrity is central to resistance of muscle cells against heat-induced injury. 15. SUBJECT TERMS heat adaptation , heat tolerance, skeletal muscle...Keywords hyperthermia, heat shock, heat injury, heat adaptation , rodent, skeletal muscle, C2C12, myotube, hsp, inflammation, cytokines, oxidative stress

  14. Prompt protein glycosylation during acute heat stress.

    PubMed

    Henle, K J; Kaushal, G P; Nagle, W A; Nolen, G T

    1993-08-01

    Constitutive patterns of protein synthesis and protein glycosylation are severely disrupted by acute heat stress. Stressed cells respond by preferential synthesis of specific proteins, e.g., the well-known family of heat shock proteins. We observed another response that rapidly occurs during heating periods as short as 10 min at 45 degrees C. During that period, CHO cells began to glycosylate specific proteins, designated as "prompt" stress glycoproteins (P-SG), while constitutive protein glycosylation ceased. Labeling of P-SGs showed a dose response with time and with temperature and appeared regardless of the label used (D-[3H]mannose or D-[3H]glucose). On SDS-PAGE, the major P-SG was characterized by M(r) approximately 67 kDa (P-SG67) and pI = 5.1. Other less prominent P-SGs appeared at M(r) 160, 100, 64, 60, and 47 kDa; incorporated label showed little turnover during 24 h at 37 degrees C. Prompt glycosylation was inhibited by tunicamycin, and label incorporated into P-SGs was sensitive to N-glycosidase F, but not to O-glycosidase. Analysis of enzymatically digested P-SG67 indicated that label had been incorporated into both high-mannose (Man9GlcNAc) and complex-type oligosaccharides. Brefeldin A did not eliminate P-SG67 labeling, but caused the further appearance of novel, Brefeldin-associated P-SGs. Labeling of P-SG67 oligosaccharides occurred without significant concomitant protein synthesis, suggesting that addition of labeled oligosaccharides largely occurred on mature, rather than nascent proteins. The functional significance of prompt glycosylation remains to be defined, but we propose that this novel phenomenon is an integral part of the cellular heat stress response.

  15. Lipocalin 2 regulation by thermal stresses: Protective role of Lcn2/NGAL against cold and heat stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Halabian, Raheleh; Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Masroori, Nasser; Ebrahimi, Majid; Nikogoftar, Mahin; Rouhbakhsh, Mehdi; Bahmani, Parisa; Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2009-11-01

    Environmental temperature variations are the most common stresses experienced by a wide range of organisms. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2/NGAL) is expressed in various normal and pathologic conditions. However, its precise functions have not been fully determined. Here we report the induction of Lcn2 by thermal stresses in vivo, and its role following exposure to cold and heat stresses in vitro. Induction of Lcn2 in liver, heart and kidney was detected by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry following exposure of mice to heat and cold stresses. When CHO and HEK293T cells overexpressing NGAL were exposed to cold stress, cell proliferation was higher compared to controls. Down-regulatrion of NGAL by siRNA in A549 cells resulted in less proliferation when exposed to cold stress compared to control cells. The number of apoptotic cells and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins were lower in the NGAL overexpressing CHO and HEK293T cells, but were higher in the siRNA-transfected A549 cells compared to controls, indicating that NGAL protects cells against cold stress. Following exposure of the cells to heat stress, ectopic expression of NGAL protected cells while addition of exogenous recombinant NGAL to the cell culture medium exacerbated the toxicity of heat stress specially when there was low or no endogenous expression of NGAL. It had a dual effect on apoptosis following heat stress. NGAL also increased the expression of HO-1. Lcn2/NGAL may have the potential to improve cell proliferation and preservation particularly to prevent cold ischemia injury of transplanted organs or for treatment of some cancers by hyperthermia.

  16. Quantitative thermal diffusivity imaging of disbonds in thermal protective coatings using inductive heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    An inductive heating technique for making thermal diffusivity images of disbonds between thermal protective coatings and their substrates is presented. Any flaw in the bonding of the coating and the substrate shows as an area of lowered values in the diffusivity image. The benefits of the inductive heating approach lie in its ability to heat the conductive substrate without directly heating the dielectric coating. Results are provided for a series of samples with fabricated disbonds, for a range of coating thicknesses.

  17. Osmotic and Heat Stress Effects on Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Julian

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate embryonic development, early skin, muscle, and bone progenitor populations organize into segments known as somites. Defects in this conserved process of segmentation lead to skeletal and muscular deformities, such as congenital scoliosis, a curvature of the spine caused by vertebral defects. Environmental stresses such as hypoxia or heat shock produce segmentation defects, and significantly increase the penetrance and severity of vertebral defects in genetically susceptible individuals. Here we show that a brief exposure to a high osmolarity solution causes reproducible segmentation defects in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Both osmotic shock and heat shock produce border defects in a dose-dependent manner, with an increase in both frequency and severity of defects. We also show that osmotic treatment has a delayed effect on somite development, similar to that observed in heat shocked embryos. Our results establish osmotic shock as an alternate experimental model for stress, affecting segmentation in a manner comparable to other known environmental stressors. The similar effects of these two distinct environmental stressors support a model in which a variety of cellular stresses act through a related response pathway that leads to disturbances in the segmentation process. PMID:28006008

  18. Tank waste remediation system heat stress control program report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carls, D.R.

    1995-09-28

    Protecting employees from heat stress within tank farms during the summer months is challenging. Work constraints typically experienced in tank farms complicate the measures taken to protect employees from heat stress. TWRS-Industrial Hygiene (IH) has endeavored to control heat stress injuries by anticipating, recognizing, evaluating and controlling the factors which lead or contribute to heat stress in Tank Farms. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program covers such areas as: employee and PIC training, communication of daily heat stress alerts to tank farm personnel, setting work/rest regimens, and the use of engineering and personal protective controls when applicable. The program has increased worker awareness of heat stress and prevention, established provisions for worker rest periods, increased drinking water availability to help ensure worker hydration, and allowed for the increased use of other protective controls to combat heat stress. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program is the cornerstone for controlling heat stress among tank farm employees. The program has made great strides since it`s inception during the summer of 1994. Some improvements can still be made to enhance the program for the summer of 1996, such as: (1) procurement and use of personal heat stress monitoring equipment to ensure appropriate application of administrative controls, (2) decrease the need for use of containment tents and anti-contamination clothing, and (3) providing a wider variety of engineering and personal protective controls for heat stress prevention

  19. Comparison of the heat stress induced variations in DNA methylation between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive rapeseed seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guizhen; Li, Jun; Li, Hao; Li, Feng; Xu, Kun; Yan, Guixin; Chen, Biyun; Qiao, Jiangwei; Wu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is responsive to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Heat stress is a serious threat to crop growth and development worldwide. Heat stress results in an array of morphological, physiological and biochemical changes in plants. The relationship between DNA methylation and heat stress in crops is relatively unknown. We investigated the differences in methylation levels and changes in the cytosine methylation patterns in seedlings of two rapeseed genotypes (heat-sensitive and heat-tolerant) under heat stress. Our results revealed that the methylation levels were different between a heat-tolerant genotype and a heat-sensitive one under control conditions. Under heat treatment, methylation increased more in the heat-sensitive genotype than in the heat-tolerant genotype. More DNA demethylation events occurred in the heat-tolerant genotype, while more DNA methylation occurred in the heat-sensitive genotype. A large and diverse set of genes were affected by heat stress via cytosine methylation changes, suggesting that these genes likely play important roles in the response and adaption to heat stress in Brassica napus L. This study indicated that the changes in DNA methylation differed between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive genotypes of B. napus in response to heat stress, which further illuminates the molecular mechanisms of the adaption to heat stress in B. napus. PMID:24987298

  20. How specialized volatiles respond to chronic and short-term physiological and shock heat stress in Brassica nigra.

    PubMed

    Kask, Kaia; Kännaste, Astrid; Talts, Eero; Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-09-01

    Brassicales release volatile glucosinolate breakdown products upon tissue mechanical damage, but it is unclear how the release of glucosinolate volatiles responds to abiotic stresses such as heat stress. We used three different heat treatments, simulating different dynamic temperature conditions in the field to gain insight into stress-dependent changes in volatile blends and photosynthetic characteristics in the annual herb Brassica nigra (L.) Koch. Heat stress was applied by either heating leaves through temperature response curve measurements from 20 to 40 °C (mild stress), exposing plants for 4 h to temperatures 25-44 °C (long-term stress) or shock-heating leaves to 45-50 °C. Photosynthetic reduction through temperature response curves was associated with decreased stomatal conductance, while the reduction due to long-term stress and collapse of photosynthetic activity after heat shock stress were associated with non-stomatal processes. Mild stress decreased constitutive monoterpene emissions, while long-term stress and shock stress resulted in emissions of the lipoxygenase pathway and glucosinolate volatiles. Glucosinolate volatile release was more strongly elicited by long-term stress and lipoxygenase product released by heat shock. These results demonstrate that glucosinolate volatiles constitute a major part of emission blend in heat-stressed B. nigra plants, especially upon chronic stress that leads to induction responses.

  1. Investigation of Urban Heat Stress from Satellite Atmospheric Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Brunsell, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Heat stress is the leading cause of weather-related human mortality in the United States and in many countries world-wide. Heat stress is usually enhanced by the urban heat island effect. Here, we investigate the ability to use remotely sensed atmospheric profiles to detect and monitor heat stress in the urban environment. MODIS atmospheric profiles at 5 km are used to quantify the spatial distribution of heat stress across Chicago during summer periods from 2003-2013. Four heat stress indices are investigated (Discomfort Index (DI), NWS Heat Index (HI), Humidex, and Simplified Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (SWBGT)) from the near-surface temperature and humidity observed at ground sites and retrieved from satellite atmospheric profiles. The heat stress climatology indicates that the urban effects are similar to the heat stress in top 5% hot days and 11 summers during the daytime. There is a lack of relationship between urban fraction and the heat stress on the warmest nights. The nighttime heat stress in the hottest 5% suggests a larger stress compared to the normal conditions during 11 summers. A case study of the heat wave in 2012 is assessed to identify the key pre-heat wave spatial patterns, which may potentially apply to predict future high heat-stress events. In addition, the role of the temporal persistence on the spatial dynamics of the heat wave is also examined. This research illustrates the spatial heat pattern under normal and heat wave conditions, which may help to make public heat health protection strategies. Also, the remotely sensed temperature and humidity information are invaluable to assess urban heat island impact spatially and temporally.

  2. The effects of stress on induction, differential permeability and Barkhausen count in a ferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Maylin, M.G.; Squire, P.T. . School of Physics)

    1993-11-01

    The induction changes caused by the application of tensile and compressive stress cycles from points on the initial curve and major loop of a 0.2% carbon, 3% nickel steel have been measured using a pneumatic stressing mechanism. The magnitudes of the irreversible induction changes are compared to the specimen iso-stress permeability and Barkhausen profiles. Results suggest that the complexity of the induction-stress process limits the suitability of either profile as a suitable response function for the prediction of subsequent stress-induced induction changes.

  3. Method and device for determining bond separation strength using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes an induction heating gun which includes a housing, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart opposite ends defining a gap there between, the U-shaped pole piece being mounted in one end of the housing, and a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil. A power source is connected to the tank circuit. A pull test machine is provided having a stationary chuck and a movable chuck, the two chucks holding two test pieces bonded together at a bond region. The heating gun is mounted on the pull test machine in close proximity to the bond region of the two test pieces, whereby when the tank circuit is energized, the two test pieces are heated by induction heating while a tension load is applied to the two test pieces by the pull test machine to determine separation strength of the bond region.

  4. Comparative decomposition kinetics of neutral monosaccharides by microwave and induction heating treatments.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Shuntaro; Oono, Kiriyo; Onda, Ayumu; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Azuma, Jun-ichi

    2013-06-28

    The stabilities of five neutral monosaccharides (glucose, galactose, mannose, arabinose, and xylose) were kinetically compared after the molecules were submitted to microwave heating (internal heating) and induction heating (external heating) under completely identical thermal histories by employing PID (proportional, integral, and derivative) temperature controlled ovens and homogeneous mixing. By heating in water at 200°C, the rate constants for the decomposition reactions varied from 2.13×10(-4) to 3.87×10(-4)s(-1) for microwave heating; however, the values increased by 1.1- to 1.5-fold for induction heating. Similarly, in a dilute (0.8%) sulfuric acid solution, the decomposition rate constants varied from 0.61×10(-3) to 2.00×10(-3)s(-1) for microwave heating; however, the values increased by 1.5- to 2.2-fold for induction heating. The results show that microwave heating imparts greater stability to neutral monosaccharides than does induction heating. The undesirable decomposition of monosaccharides at the surface boundary of reactor walls may have increased the probability of monosaccharide decomposition during induction heating.

  5. Simulation of Stress and Strain for Induction-Hardening Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitry; Markegård, Leif; Asperheim, John Inge; Kristoffersen, Hans

    2013-11-01

    The possibility to manage stress and strain in hardened parts might be beneficial for a number of induction-hardening applications. The most important of these benefits are the improvement of fatigue strength, avoidance of cracks, and minimization of distortion. An appropriate and powerful way to take the stress and strain into account during the development of a process is to make use of computer simulations. In-house developed and commercial software packages have been coupled to incorporate the electromagnetic task into the calculations. The simulations have been performed followed by analysis of the results. The influences of two different values of quenching intensity, strength of initial material structure, strength of austenite, surface power density-frequency-time combination, and workpiece diameter on the residual stress are studied. The influence of quenching intensity is confirmed by the series of experiments representing the external hardening of a cylinder with eight variations of quenching intensity. Measured by x-rays, the values of surface tangential stress are used as a dataset for verification of the model being used for analyses.

  6. Induction of oxidative stress in rat brain by acrylonitrile (ACN).

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Xu, Y; Klaunig, J E

    1998-12-01

    Chronic treatment with acrylonitrile (ACN) has been shown to produce a dose-related increase in glial cell tumors (astrocytomas) in rats. The mechanism(s) for ACN-induced carcinogenicity remains unclear. While ACN has been reported to induce DNA damage in a number of short-term systems, evidence for a genotoxic mechanism of tumor induction is the brain is not strong. Other toxic mechanisms appear to participate in the induction of tumor or induce the astrocytomas solely. In particular, nongenotoxic mechanisms of carcinogen induction have been implicated in this ACN-induced carcinogenic effect in the rat brain. One major pathway of ACN metabolism is through glutathione (GSH) conjugation. Extensive utilization and depletion of GSH, an important intracellular antioxidant, by ACN may lead to cellular oxidative stress. The present study examined the ability of ACN to induce oxidative stress in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were administered ACN at concentrations of 0, 5, 10, 100, or 200 ppm in the drinking water and sampled after 14, 28, or 90 days of continuous treatment. Oxidative DNA damage indicated by the presence of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (OH8dG) and lipid peroxidation indicated by the presence of malondialdehyde (MDA), a lipid peroxidation product, in rat brains and livers were examined. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also determined in different rat tissues. Both the levels of nonenzymatic antioxidants (GSH, vitamin E) and the activities of enzymatic antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) in rat brains and livers were measured. Increased levels of OH8dG, MDA, and ROS were found in the brains of ACN-treated rats. Decreased levels of GSH and activities of catalase and SOD were also observed in the brains of ACN-treated rats compared to the control group. Interestingly, there were no changes of these indicators of oxidative stress in the livers of ACN-treated rats. Rat liver is not a target for ACN

  7. Contrasting urban and rural heat stress responses to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. M.; Oleson, K. W.; Lawrence, D. M.

    2012-02-01

    Hot temperatures in combination with high humidity cause human discomfort and may increase morbidity and mortality. A global climate model with an embedded urban model is used to explore the urban-rural contrast in the wet-bulb globe temperature, a heat stress index accounting for temperature and humidity. Wet-bulb globe temperatures are calculated at each model time step to resolve the heat stress diurnal cycle. The model simulates substantially higher heat stress in urban areas compared to neighbouring rural areas. Urban humidity deficit only weakly offsets the enhanced heat stress due to the large night-time urban heat island. The urban-rural contrast in heat stress is most pronounced at night and over mid-latitudes and subtropics. During heatwaves, the urban heat stress amplification is particularly pronounced. Heat stress strongly increases with doubled CO2 concentrations over both urban and rural surfaces. The tropics experience the greatest increase in number of high-heat-stress nights, despite a relatively weak ˜2°C warming. Given the lack of a distinct annual cycle and high relative humidity, the modest tropical warming leads to exceedance of the present-day record levels during more than half of the year in tropical regions, where adaptive capacity is often low. While the absolute urban and rural heat stress response to 2 × CO2 is similar, the occurrence of nights with extremely high heat stress increases more in cities than surrounding rural areas.

  8. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rothe, S.; Savonen, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A.

    2015-12-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary 107Ag21+ ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z 94Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  9. Design of a superconducting 20 MJ induction heating coil

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Ibrahim, E.A.; Gaberson, P.C.; Eckels, P.W.; Jarabak, A.J.; Rogers, J.D.; Thullen, P.; Walker, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A pancake-wound, low-loss, superconducting, induction-heating coil has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of superconducting polaidal system for the Tokamak reactors, to provide confidence in application of superconductivity to actual reactors, and to provide the opportunity to solve specific engineering problems to support the fusion pulsed coil program. the coil is designed to store 20 MJ at 50 kA. The superconductor material is NbTi for a 7.5 tesla maximum field. The coil is designed to survive at least 100,000 cycles of full bipolar half cycle sinusoidal operation from +7.5 tesla to -7.5 telsa fields in one second. The coil is natural convection immersion-cooled at 4.5/sup 0/K in liquid helium bath. The design demonstrates confidence in an advanced design, low-loss, cryostable conductor, along with safety, reliability and the operating life of the coil of more than 100,000 cycles.

  10. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D. Pohjalainen, I.; Savonen, M.; Voss, A.; Rothe, S.; Sonnenschein, V.

    2015-12-15

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary {sup 107}Ag{sup 21+} ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z {sup 94}Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  11. Dietary chromium methionine supplementation could alleviate immunosuppressive effects of heat stress in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jahanian, R; Rasouli, E

    2015-07-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of chromium methionine (CrMet) on performance, immune responses, and stress status of broiler chicks subjected to heat-stress conditions. A total of 450 day-old Ross 308 broiler chicks were randomly distributed between 5 replicate pens (15 birds each) of 6 experimental treatments according to a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments including 2 temperature conditions (thermoneutral and heat stress) and 3 supplemental Cr levels (0, 500, and 1,000 μg/kg as CrMet). For induction of heat stress, the house temperature was set at 35 ± 2°C from 15 to 42 d of age. Results showed that the chicks subjected to heat-stress condition had lower (P < 0.01) feed intake, BW gain, and deteriorated (P < 0.05) feed conversion values compared with those kept in the thermoneutral house. Dietary supplementation with CrMet increased (P < 0.01) feed intake and improved (P < 0.01) weight gain and feed efficiency. There were significant Cr level × temperature interactions, so that inclusion of CrMet into the diets was more effective in heat-stressed chicks. Exposure to heat stress suppressed (P < 0.01) cutaneous hypersensivity response to phytohemagglutinin-P injection at 30 d of age, and dietary supplementation of 500 μg Cr/kg induced (P < 0.05) this response, with the greater impacts in heat-stressed chicks, resulting in a significant (P < 0.01) Cr × temperature interaction. Antibody responses against Newcastle and infectious bronchitis disease viruses were diminished (P < 0.01) in heat-stressed chicks. Dietary inclusion of CrMet improved (P < 0.05) antibody responses to different immunostimulants, and this effect was more pronounced in heat-stressed chicks. Exposure to heat stress caused a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the proportion of helper (CD4+) T lymphocytes and increased cytotoxic (CD8+) T lymphocytes, resulting in a decreased (P < 0.01) CD4+ to CD8+ ratio in peripheral blood

  12. A single, mild, transient scrotal heat stress causes hypoxia and oxidative stress in mouse testes, which induces germ cell death.

    PubMed

    Paul, Catriona; Teng, Serena; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2009-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a temperature-dependent process, and increases in scrotal temperature can disrupt its progression. We previously showed that heat stress causes DNA damage in germ cells, an increase in germ cell death (as seen on TUNEL staining), and subfertility. The present study evaluated the stress response in mouse testes following a single mild transient scrotal heat exposure (40 degrees C or 42 degrees C for 30 min). We investigated markers of three types of stress response, namely, hypoxia, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Heat stress caused an increase in expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1a) mRNA expression and translocation of HIF1A protein to the germ cell nucleus, consistent with hypoxic stress. Increased expression of heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) and the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) and glutathione S-transferase alpha (GSTA) was consistent with a robust oxidative stress response. Germ cell death was associated with an increase in expression of the effector caspase cleaved caspase 3 and a decrease in expression of the protein inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD). Reduced expression of ICAD contributes to increased activity of caspase-activated DNase and is consistent with the increased rates of DNA fragmentation that have been detected previously using TUNEL staining. These studies confirmed that transient mild testicular hyperthermia results in temperature-dependent germ cell death and demonstrated that elevated temperature results in a complex stress response, including induction of genes associated with oxidative stress and hypoxia.

  13. Collisionless electron heating by radio frequency bias in low gas pressure inductive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-12-10

    We show experimental observations of collisionless electron heating by the combinations of the capacitive radio frequency (RF) bias power and the inductive power in low argon gas pressure RF biased inductively coupled plasma (ICP). With small RF bias powers in the ICP, the electron energy distribution (EED) evolved from bi-Maxwellian distribution to Maxwellian distribution by enhanced plasma bulk heating and the collisionless sheath heating was weak. In the capacitive RF bias dominant regime, however, high energy electrons by the RF bias were heated on the EEDs in the presence of the ICP. The collisionless heating mechanism of the high energy electrons transited from collisionless inductive heating to capacitive coupled collisionless heating by the electron bounce resonance in the RF biased ICP.

  14. An Induction Heating Method with Traveling Magnetic Field for Long Structure Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Takamitsu; Tomita, Hideo; Obata, Shuji; Saito, Yukio

    A novel dismantlable adhesion method for recycling operation of interior materials is proposed. This method is applied a high frequency induction heating and a thermoplastic adhesive. For an adhesion of interior material to long steel stud, a conventional spiral coil as like IH cooking heater gives inadequateness for uniform heating to the stud. Therefore, we have proposed an induction heating method with traveling magnetic field for perfect long structures bonding. In this paper, we describe on the new adhesion method using the 20kHz, three-phase 200V inverter and linear induction coil. From induction heating characteristics to thin steel plates and long studs, the method is cleared the usefulness for uniform heating to long structures.

  15. Temporal variations of Hsp60 and HSF-1 in primary rat myocardial cells in vitro under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Buriro, R; Lv, Y J; Ali, I; Tang, S; Liu, Z J; Zhang, M; Adem, A; Hartung, J; Bao, E D

    2013-08-20

    The mechanisms involved in sudden animal death due to acute heart failure during heat stress are not well understood. We examined the relationship between heat stress-induced variations of protective Hsp60 and expression of its regulatory factor, HSF-1, in heat-stressed primary myocardial cells of neonatal rats in vitro through cardiac enzyme detection, immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, and qPCR. Increases in cardiac damage-related enzyme levels demonstrated injury to myocardial cells after heat exposure at 42°C. Hsp60 expression levels fluctuated during heat stress; they decreased significantly after 20 min, then increased at 120 min and decreased again at 360 min after initiation of heat stress. The highest levels of Hsp60 were observed at 240 min, while the lowest were at 60 min. Damage to myocardial cells was characterized by increases in cardiac enzyme levels and low levels of Hsp60 due to functional disorder of myocardial cells at early stages of heat stress. However, the significant induction of hsp60 mRNA levels from the beginning up to 240 min of heat stress was not consistent with the classic regulatory mechanisms that link transcription and translation, suggesting that Hsp60 expression is delayed due to loss of Hsp60 during the early stages of heat stress. hsf-1 mRNA levels were significantly increased from 10 min of heat stress; however, HSF-1 protein levels did not simultaneously increase, indicating that HSF-1 is not the sole regulator of Hsp60 expression.

  16. Sprint performance under heat stress: A review.

    PubMed

    Girard, O; Brocherie, F; Bishop, D J

    2015-06-01

    Training and competition in major track-and-field events, and for many team or racquet sports, often require the completion of maximal sprints in hot (>30 °C) ambient conditions. Enhanced short-term (<30 s) power output or single-sprint performance, resulting from transient heat exposure (muscle temperature rise), can be attributed to improved muscle contractility. Under heat stress, elevations in skin/core temperatures are associated with increased cardiovascular and metabolic loads in addition to decreasing voluntary muscle activation; there is also compelling evidence to suggest that large performance decrements occur when repeated-sprint exercise (consisting of brief recovery periods between sprints, usually <60 s) is performed in hot compared with cool conditions. Conversely, poorer intermittent-sprint performance (recovery periods long enough to allow near complete recovery, usually 60-300 s) in hotter conditions is solely observed when exercise induces marked hyperthermia (core temperature >39 °C). Here we also discuss strategies (heat acclimatization, precooling, hydration strategies) employed by "sprint" athletes to mitigate the negative influence of higher environmental temperatures.

  17. High-frequency induction heated sintering of ball milled Fe-WC nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, M.; Zanganeh, T.; Najafi, A.

    2013-07-01

    Fe-WC nanocomposites were successfully fabricated by high-frequency induction heated sintering of ball milled nanostructure powders. The ball milled powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Density measurements by the Archimedes method show that all sintered samples have the relative density higher than 95%. Studies on the effects of WC content, milling speed, and milling time indicate that a higher milling speed and a more WC content lead to the improvement of mechanical properties. There is a very good distribution of WC particles in the Fe matrix at the milling speed of 650 r/min. For the sintered sample 20-5-650 (20wt% WC, milling time of 5 h, and milled speed of 650 r/min), the maximum Brinell hardness and yield stress are obtained to be 3.25 GPa and 858 MPa, respectively. All sintered samples have brittle fracture during compression test except the sample 20-5-650.

  18. Numerical design of induction heating in the PVT growth of SiC crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Juan; Chen, Xuejiang; Li, Yuan

    2014-09-01

    A 2-D numerical global model was applied to study effects of induction heating system on silicon carbide single crystal growth by a finite element method. Models with different coil radii and different electrical frequencies were carried out to investigate the relationship between coil design and SiC crystal growth process while the temperature of the monitoring point was fixed at about 2300 K. The predicted growth rate along the substrate surface was also compared and discussed. The results showed that the temperature distribution inside the furnace and the growth rate were affected by coil radius and electrical frequency. Finally, based on the analysis of simulation results, one reasonable range of coil radius and electrical frequency compromising a balance between higher growth rate, lower electrical power consumption, lower thermal stress in grown crystals and more stable operation of SiC powder was obtained.

  19. Inductive heating kills cells that contribute to plaque: a proof-of-concept.

    PubMed

    Gaitas, Angelo; Kim, Gwangseong

    2015-01-01

    Inducing cell death by heating targeted particles shows promise in cancer treatment. Here, we aim to demonstrate the feasibility of extending the use of this technique to treat and remove vascular deposits and thrombosis. We used induction heating of macrophages, which are key contributors to atherosclerosis and have demonstrated clear feasibility for heating and destroying these cells using ferromagnetic and pure iron particles. Specifically, iron particles achieved maximum temperatures of 51 ± 0.5 °C and spherical particles achieved a maximum temperature of 43.9 ± 0.2 °C (N = 6) after 30 min of inductive heating. Two days of subsequent observation demonstrated that inductive heating led to a significant reduction in cell number. Prior to induction heating, cell density was 105,000 ± 20,820 cells/ml (N = 3). This number was reduced to 6,666 ± 4,410 cells/ml for the spherical particles and 16,666 ± 9,280 cells/ml for the iron particles 24 h after inductive heating. Though cell density increased on the second day following inductive heating, the growth was minimal. Cells grew to 26,667 ± 6,670 cells/ml and 30,000 ± 15,280 cells/ml respectively. Compared to cell cultures with iron and spherical particles that were not subjected to induction heating, we observed a 97% reduction in cell count for the spherical particles and a 91% reduction for the iron particles after the first 24 h. After 48 h we observed a 95% reduction in cell growth for both spherical and iron particles. Induction heating of microparticles was thus highly effective in reducing the macrophage population and preventing their growth. These results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting cells involved in atherosclerosis and warrant further research into potential clinical applications.

  20. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  1. Heat stress-induced life span extension in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shama, S; Lai, C Y; Antoniazzi, J M; Jiang, J C; Jazwinski, S M

    1998-12-15

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a limited life span that can be measured by the number of times individual cells divide. Several genetic manipulations have been shown to prolong the yeast life span. However, environmental effects that extend longevity have been largely ignored. We have found that mild, nonlethal heat stress extended yeast life span when it was administered transiently early in life. The increased longevity was due to a reduction in the mortality rate that persisted over many cell divisions (generations) but was not permanent. The genes RAS1 and RAS2 were necessary to observe this effect of heat stress. The RAS2 gene is consistently required for maintenance of life span when heat stress is chronic or in its extension when heat stress is transient or absent altogether. RAS1, on the other hand, appears to have a role in signaling life extension induced by transient, mild heat stress, which is distinct from its life-span-curtailing effect in the absence of stress and its lack of involvement in the response to chronic heat stress. This distinction between the RAS genes may be partially related to their different effects on growth-promoting genes and stress-responsive genes. The ras2 mutation clearly hindered resumption of growth and recovery from stress, while the ras1 mutation did not. The HSP104 gene, which is largely responsible for induced thermotolerance in yeast, was necessary for life extension induced by transient heat stress. An interaction between mitochondrial petite mutations and heat stress was found, suggesting that mitochondria may be necessary for life extension by transient heat stress. The results raise the possibility that the RAS genes and mitochondria may play a role in the epigenetic inheritance of reduced mortality rate afforded by transient, mild heat stress.

  2. Stress induction of the spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase by a post-transcriptional mechanism in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gerner, E W; Kurtts, T A; Fuller, D J; Casero, R A

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock and diethyldithiocarbamate stimulate polyamine catabolism in animal cells by a mechanism involving the induction of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (N1-SSAT) activity. Steady-state levels of RNA encoding this enzyme remain essentially unchanged during periods after these stresses when N1-SSAT activity is increased by 3.5-10-fold or more in three different cell lines of hamster and human origin. Depletion of intracellular spermidine pools by alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) inhibits stress induction of N1-SSAT activity. Exogenous spermidine can restore stress inducibility of N1-SSAT to DFMO-treated cells, and induce this enzyme activity in non-heat-shocked but polyamine-depleted cells. Acetylation at N1 suppresses the ability of spermidine to induce N1-SSAT activity, relative to this same modification at N8. Fluorinated spermidine analogues, which decrease the pKa values of the amine groups at positions 4 and 8, neither induce nor inhibit N1-SSAT activity in DFMO-treated cells. These data demonstrate that certain stresses induce N1-SSAT by a spermidine-dependent post-transcriptional mechanism. The mode of induction is affected by both the propyl and butyl moieties of spermidine. Images Figure 2 PMID:8396915

  3. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, D.R.; Frost, C.A.; Kahle, P.M.; Kelley, J.B.; Stanton, S.L.

    1997-05-20

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part. 6 figs.

  4. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Frost, Charles A.; Kahle, Philip M.; Kelley, J. Bruce; Stanton, Suzanne L.

    1997-01-01

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part.

  5. Boechera Species Exhibit Species-Specific Responses to Combined Heat and High Light Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gallas, Genna; Waters, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants must be able to complete their life cycle in place and therefore tolerance to abiotic stress has had a major role in shaping biogeographical patterns. However, much of what we know about plant tolerance to abiotic stresses is based on studies of just a few plant species, most notably the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study we examine natural variation in the stress responses of five diverse Boechera (Brassicaceae) species. Boechera plants were exposed to basal and acquired combined heat and high light stress. Plant response to these stresses was evaluated based on chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, induction of leaf chlorosis, and gene expression. Many of the Boechera species were more tolerant to heat and high light stress than A. thaliana. Gene expression data indicates that two important marker genes for stress responses: APX2 (Ascorbate peroxidase 2) and HsfA2 (Heat shock transcription factor A2) have distinct species-specific expression patterns. The findings of species-specific responses and tolerance to stress indicate that stress pathways are evolutionarily labile even among closely related species. PMID:26030823

  6. Boechera species exhibit species-specific responses to combined heat and high light stress.

    PubMed

    Gallas, Genna; Waters, Elizabeth R

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants must be able to complete their life cycle in place and therefore tolerance to abiotic stress has had a major role in shaping biogeographical patterns. However, much of what we know about plant tolerance to abiotic stresses is based on studies of just a few plant species, most notably the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study we examine natural variation in the stress responses of five diverse Boechera (Brassicaceae) species. Boechera plants were exposed to basal and acquired combined heat and high light stress. Plant response to these stresses was evaluated based on chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, induction of leaf chlorosis, and gene expression. Many of the Boechera species were more tolerant to heat and high light stress than A. thaliana. Gene expression data indicates that two important marker genes for stress responses: APX2 (Ascorbate peroxidase 2) and HsfA2 (Heat shock transcription factor A2) have distinct species-specific expression patterns. The findings of species-specific responses and tolerance to stress indicate that stress pathways are evolutionarily labile even among closely related species.

  7. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure. PMID:27493511

  8. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure.

  9. Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Spheroidized 1045 Steel by Induction Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwook; Shin, Jung-Ho; Choi, Young; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2016-04-01

    The effects of induction heat treatment on the formation of carbide particles and mechanical properties of spheroidized 1045 steel were investigated by means of microstructural analysis and tensile testing. The induction spheroidization accelerated the formation of spherical cementite particles and effectively softened the steel. The volume fraction of cementite was found to be a key factor that affected the mechanical properties of spheroidized steels. Further tests showed that sequential spheroidization by induction and furnace heat treatments enhanced elongation within a short spheroidization time, resulting in better mechanical properties. This was due to the higher volume fraction of spherical cementite particles that had less diffusion time for particle coarsening.

  10. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperature (heat stress). We hypothesized that endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible relation...

  11. Electromagnetic induction heating for single crystal graphene growth: morphology control by rapid heating and quenching.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoxing; Li, Fushan; Chen, Wei; Veeramalai, Chandrasekar Perumal; Ooi, Poh Choon; Guo, Tailiang

    2015-03-12

    The direct observation of single crystal graphene growth and its shape evolution is of fundamental importance to the understanding of graphene growth physicochemical mechanisms and the achievement of wafer-scale single crystalline graphene. Here we demonstrate the controlled formation of single crystal graphene with varying shapes, and directly observe the shape evolution of single crystal graphene by developing a localized-heating and rapid-quenching chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system based on electromagnetic induction heating. Importantly, rational control of circular, hexagonal, and dendritic single crystalline graphene domains can be readily obtained for the first time by changing the growth condition. Systematic studies suggest that the graphene nucleation only occurs during the initial stage, while the domain density is independent of the growth temperatures due to the surface-limiting effect. In addition, the direct observation of graphene domain shape evolution is employed for the identification of competing growth mechanisms including diffusion-limited, attachment-limited, and detachment-limited processes. Our study not only provides a novel method for morphology-controlled graphene synthesis, but also offers fundamental insights into the kinetics of single crystal graphene growth.

  12. Induction of heat-shock protein synthesis in chondrocytes at physiological temperatures.

    PubMed

    Madreperla, S A; Louwerenburg, B; Mann, R W; Towle, C A; Mankin, H J; Treadwell, B V

    1985-01-01

    Induction of heat-shock protein (HSP) synthesis is demonstrated in cultured calf-chondrocytes at temperatures shown to occur in normal human cartilage during experiments subjecting intact cadaverous hip joints to the parameters of level walking. A 70,000 MW heat-shock protein (HSP-70) is synthesized by chondrocytes at temperatures above 39 degrees C, while induction of synthesis of a 110,000 MW HSP only occurs at temperatures of 45 degrees C or greater. These differences in critical temperatures for induction, and data showing differences in kinetics of induction and repression of synthesis, suggest that there are differences in the mechanism of induction of the two HSPs. The duration of HSP synthesis and inhibition of synthesis of normal cellular proteins is directly proportional to the duration and magnitude of the temperature rise. Possible relationships between these new findings and the initiation and progression of degenerative joint disease are discussed.

  13. System and method of adjusting the equilibrium temperature of an inductively-heated susceptor

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R; Negley, Mark A; Geren, William Preston

    2015-02-24

    A system for inductively heating a workpiece may include an induction coil, at least one susceptor face sheet, and a current controller coupled. The induction coil may be configured to conduct an alternating current and generate a magnetic field in response to the alternating current. The susceptor face sheet may be configured to have a workpiece positioned therewith. The susceptor face sheet may be formed of a ferromagnetic alloy having a Curie temperature and being inductively heatable to an equilibrium temperature approaching the Curie temperature in response to the magnetic field. The current controller may be coupled to the induction coil and may be configured to adjust the alternating current in a manner causing a change in at least one heating parameter of the susceptor face sheet.

  14. Quantifying Livestock Heat Stress Impacts in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broman, D.; Rajagopalan, B.; Hopson, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Livestock heat stress, especially in regions of the developing world with limited adaptive capacity, has a largely unquantified impact on food supply. Though dominated by ambient air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation all affect heat stress, which can decrease livestock growth, milk production, reproduction rates, and mortality. Indices like the thermal-humidity index (THI) are used to quantify the heat stress experienced from climate variables. Livestock experience differing impacts at different index critical thresholds that are empirically determined and specific to species and breed. This lack of understanding has been highlighted in several studies with a limited knowledge of the critical thresholds of heat stress in native livestock breeds, as well as the current and future impact of heat stress,. As adaptation and mitigation strategies to climate change depend on a solid quantitative foundation, this knowledge gap has limited such efforts. To address the lack of study, we have investigated heat stress impacts in the pastoral system of Sub-Saharan West Africa. We used a stochastic weather generator to quantify both the historic and future variability of heat stress. This approach models temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation, the climate variables controlling heat stress. Incorporating large-scale climate as covariates into this framework provides a better historical fit and allows us to include future CMIP5 GCM projections to examine the climate change impacts on heat stress. Health and production data allow us to examine the influence of this variability on livestock directly, and are considered in conjunction with the confounding impacts of fodder and water access. This understanding provides useful information to decision makers looking to mitigate the impacts of climate change and can provide useful seasonal forecasts of heat stress risk. A comparison of the current and future heat stress conditions based on

  15. Complex of automated equipment and technologies for waveguides soldering using induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murygin, A. V.; Tynchenko, V. S.; Laptenok, V. D.; Emilova, O. A.; Bocharov, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    The article deals with the problem of designing complex automated equipment for soldering waveguides based on induction heating technology. A theoretical analysis of the problem, allowing to form a model of the «inductor-waveguide» system and to carry out studies to determine the form of inducing wire, creating a narrow and concentrated heat zone in the area of the solder joint. Also solves the problem of the choice of the temperature control means, the information from which is used later to generate the effective management of induction soldering process. Designed hardware complex in conjunction with the developed software system is a system of automatic control, allowing to manage the process of induction heating, to prevent overheating and destruction of the soldered products, improve the stability of induction soldering process, to improve the quality of products, thereby reducing time and material costs for the production.

  16. Heat stress increases insulin sensitivity in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sanz Fernandez, M Victoria; Stoakes, Sara K; Abuajamieh, Mohannad; Seibert, Jacob T; Johnson, Jay S; Horst, Erin A; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H

    2015-01-01

    Proper insulin homeostasis appears critical for adapting to and surviving a heat load. Further, heat stress (HS) induces phenotypic changes in livestock that suggest an increase in insulin action. The current study objective was to evaluate the effects of HS on whole-body insulin sensitivity. Female pigs (57 ± 4 kg body weight) were subjected to two experimental periods. During period 1, all pigs remained in thermoneutral conditions (TN; 21°C) and were fed ad libitum. During period 2, pigs were exposed to: (i) constant HS conditions (32°C) and fed ad libitum (n = 6), or (ii) TN conditions and pair-fed (PFTN; n = 6) to eliminate the confounding effects of dissimilar feed intake. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) was conducted on d3 of both periods; and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies were collected prior to and after an insulin tolerance test (ITT) on d5 of period 2. During the HEC, insulin infusion increased circulating insulin and decreased plasma C-peptide and nonesterified fatty acids, similarly between treatments. From period 1 to 2, the rate of glucose infusion in response to the HEC remained similar in HS pigs while it decreased (36%) in PFTN controls. Prior to the ITT, HS increased (41%) skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 protein abundance, but did not affect protein kinase B or their phosphorylated forms. In adipose tissue, HS did not alter any of the basal or stimulated measured insulin signaling markers. In summary, HS increases whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:26243213

  17. Linking physiological and cellular responses to thermal stress: β-adrenergic blockade reduces the heat shock response in fish.

    PubMed

    Templeman, Nicole M; LeBlanc, Sacha; Perry, Steve F; Currie, Suzanne

    2014-08-01

    When faced with stress, animals use physiological and cellular strategies to preserve homeostasis. We were interested in how these high-level stress responses are integrated at the level of the whole animal. Here, we investigated the capacity of the physiological stress response, and specifically the β-adrenergic response, to affect the induction of the cellular heat shock proteins, HSPs, following a thermal stress in vivo. We predicted that blocking β-adrenergic stimulation during an acute heat stress in the whole animal would result in reduced levels of HSPs in red blood cells (RBCs) of rainbow trout compared to animals where adrenergic signaling remained intact. We first determined that a 1 h heat shock at 25 °C in trout acclimated to 13 °C resulted in RBC adrenergic stimulation as determined by a significant increase in cell swelling, a hallmark of the β-adrenergic response. A whole animal injection with the β2-adrenergic antagonist, ICI-118,551, successfully reduced this heat-induced RBC swelling. The acute heat shock caused a significant induction of HSP70 in RBCs of 13 °C-acclimated trout as well as a significant increase in plasma catecholamines. When heat-shocked fish were treated with ICI-118,551, we observed a significant attenuation of the HSP70 response. We conclude that circulating catecholamines influence the cellular heat shock response in rainbow trout RBCs, demonstrating physiological/hormonal control of the cellular stress response.

  18. Induction Tempering vs Conventional Tempering of a Heat-Treatable Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Zuber, Michael; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    An induction heat treatment is favorable compared to a conventional one mainly due to significant time and cost savings. Therefore, in this study, the microstructure property relationships during induction and conventional heat treatment of a heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 is investigated. The yield strength and hardness is slightly higher for the conventionally heat-treated steel, whereas the induction heat-treated condition exhibits a roughly 30 J/cm2 higher impact energy. In a previous investigation of the authors, it has been proved that the difference in yield strength originates from the smaller block size of the conventionally heat-treated steel, which was already present after hardening. In the present work, it can be shown that during tempering the martensitic blocks become equi-axed ferrite grains due to recrystallization as revealed by electron back scatter diffraction. Nevertheless, a larger grain size usually is less favorable for the impact toughness of steels. Therefore, another mechanism is responsible for the higher impact energy of the induction hardened and tempered steel. With the aid of transmission electron microscopy a finer distribution of cementite was observed in the induction heat-treated samples. The delay of recovery is the reason for the presence of finer cementite in case of the induction heat-treated steel. Here, the higher heating rates and shorter process times reduce the annihilation of dislocation and as a consequence provide more nucleation sites for precipitation of cementite during tempering. From the obtained experimental results, it is believed that the finer distribution of carbides causes the observed higher impact toughness.

  19. Application of induction heating in food processing and cooking: A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induction heating is an electromagnetic heating technology that has several advantages such as high safety, scalability, and high energy efficiency. It has been applied for a long time in metal processing, medical applications, and cooking. However, the application of this technology in the food pro...

  20. Resveratrol protects quail hepatocytes against heat stress: modulation of the Nrf2 transcription factor and heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Sahin, K; Orhan, C; Akdemir, F; Tuzcu, M; Iben, C; Sahin, N

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, the effects of dietary resveratrol on the induction of heat shock proteins, transcription factors and antioxidative enzyme system in liver of quails under heat stress were investigated. A total of 180 (55-day-old) female Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were reared either at 22 °C for 24 h/day (thermoneutral, TN) or 34 °C for 8 h/day (heat stress, HS; 09:00-17:00 hours) for 12 weeks. Birds in both environments were randomly fed one of three diets: basal diet and basal diet added with either 200 or 400 mg of resveratrol per kg of diet. The results showed that exposure to high ambient temperature induced decreases in feed intake, egg production, and hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities but increases in hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations (p < 0.001). Liver Hsp70, Hsp90 and NF-κB expression was greater while Nrf2 expression was lower for quails reared under the heat stress than for those reared under the TN environment (p < 0.0001). There were linear increases in feed intake, egg production, hepatic SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities as well as Nrf2 expression, but linear decreases in hepatic MDA concentrations and Hsp70, Hsp90, and NF-κB expressions with increasing supplemental resveratrol level (p < 0.0001). Two-way treatment interactions revealed that the degree of restorations in all response variables was more notable under the high ambient temperature than that of the TN environment as dietary resveratrol concentration was increased. The results of the present study suggest that supplemental resveratrol reduces oxidative stress in heat-stressed quails through modulating the hepatic heat shock proteins and nuclear transcription factors.

  1. Effect of acute heat stress on plant nutrient metabolism proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abrupt heating decreased the levels (per unit total root protein) of all but one of the nutrient metabolism proteins examined, and for most of the proteins, effects were greater for severe vs. moderate heat stress. For many of the nutrient metabolism proteins, initial effects of heat (1 d) were r...

  2. Acoustic sensor for real-time control for the inductive heating process

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, John Bruce; Lu, Wei-Yang; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-09-30

    Disclosed is a system and method for providing closed-loop control of the heating of a workpiece by an induction heating machine, including generating an acoustic wave in the workpiece with a pulsed laser; optically measuring displacements of the surface of the workpiece in response to the acoustic wave; calculating a sub-surface material property by analyzing the measured surface displacements; creating an error signal by comparing an attribute of the calculated sub-surface material properties with a desired attribute; and reducing the error signal below an acceptable limit by adjusting, in real-time, as often as necessary, the operation of the inductive heating machine.

  3. Vacuum-Induction, Vacuum-Arc, and Air-Induction Melting of a Complex Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. F.; Rowe, John P.; Freeman, J. W.

    1959-01-01

    The relative hot-workability and creep-rupture properties at 1600 F of a complex 55Ni-20Cr-15Co-4Mo-3Ti-3Al alloy were evaluated for vacuum-induction, vacuum-arc, and air-induction melting. A limited study of the role of oxygen and nitrogen and the structural effects in the alloy associated with the melting process was carried out. The results showed that the level of boron and/or zirconium was far more influential on properties than the melting method. Vacuum melting did reduce corner cracking and improve surface during hot-rolling. It also resulted in more uniform properties within heats. The creep-rupture properties were slightly superior in vacuum heats at low boron plus zirconium or in heats with zirconium. There was little advantage at high boron levels and air heats were superior at high levels of boron plus zirconium. Vacuum heats also had fewer oxide and carbonitride inclusions although this was a function of the opportunity for separation of the inclusions from high oxygen plus nitrogen heats. The removal of phosphorous by vacuum melting was not found to be related to properties. Oxygen plus nitrogen appeared to increase ductility in creep-rupture tests suggesting that vacuum melting removes unidentified elements detrimental to ductility. Oxides and carbonitrides in themselves did not initiate microcracks. Carbonitrides in the grain boundaries of air heats did initiate microcracks. The role of microcracking from this source and as a function of oxygen and nitrogen content was not clear. Oxygen and nitrogen did intensify corner cracking during hot-rolling but were not responsible for poor surface which resulted from rolling heats melted in air.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of the plant heat stress response

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Ai-Li; Ding, Yan-Fei; Jiang, Qiong; Zhu, Cheng

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► This review elaborates the response networks of heat stress in plants. ► It elaborates proteins responding to heat stress in special physiological period. ► The proteins and pathways have formed a basic network of the heat stress response. ► Achievements of the various technologies are also combined. -- Abstract: High temperature has become a global concern, which seriously affects the growth and production of plants, particularly crops. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the heat stress response and breeding of heat-tolerant plants is necessary to protect food production and ensure crop safety. This review elaborates on the response networks of heat stress in plants, including the Hsf and Hsp response pathways, the response of ROS and the network of the hormones. In addition, the production of heat stress response elements during particular physiological periods of the plant is described. We also discuss the existing problems and future prospects concerning the molecular mechanisms of the heat stress response in plants.

  5. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S.; Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-01-01

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers’ perceived health and productivity impacts from heat stress. A total of 442 workers from 18 Indian workplaces participated (22% and 78% from the organized and unorganized sector, respectively). Overall 82% and 42% of workers were exposed to higher than recommended WBGT during hotter and cooler periods, respectively. Workers with heavy workloads reported more heat-related health issues (chi square = 23.67, p ≤ 0.001) and reduced productivity (chi square = 15.82, p ≤ 0.001), especially the outdoor workers. Heat-rashes, dehydration, heat-syncope and urinogenital symptoms were self-reported health issues. Cited reasons for productivity losses were: extended-work hours due to fatigue/exhaustion, sickness/hospitalization and wages lost. Reducing workplace heat stress will benefit industries and workers via improving worker health and productivity. Adaptation and mitigation measures to tackle heat stress are imperative to protect the present and future workforce as climate change progresses. PMID:26729144

  6. Noninvasive induction implant heating: an approach for contactless altering of mechanical properties of shape memory implants.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Ronny; Hustedt, Michael; Wesling, Volker; Hurschler, Christoph; Olender, Gavin; Mach, Martin; Gösling, Thomas; Müller, Christian W

    2013-01-01

    This article shows an approach to change the properties of an orthopaedic shape memory implant within biological tissue, using contactless induction heating. Due to inducing the one way-memory effect, triggered by the rise of temperature within the implant, the geometry and hence the mechanical properties of the implant itself, are altered. The power uptake of the implant, depending on the induction parameters as well as on its position within the induction coil, is shown. Thermographic measurements are carried out in order to determine the surface temperature distribution of the implant. In order to simulate biological tissue, the implant was embedded in agarose gel. Suitable heating parameters, in terms of a short heating process in combination with a reduced heat impact on the surrounding environment, were determined.

  7. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Priya; Rajiva, Ajit; Andhare, Dileep; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Tiwari, Abhiyant; Sheffield, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. Materials and Methods: This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219) and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmental measurements of heat stress exposure at a construction site. Survey data was collected in two seasons i.e., summer and winter months, and heat illness and symptoms were compared between the two time periods. Thematic coding of focus group data was used to identify vulnerability factors and coping mechanisms of the workers. Heat stress, recorded using a wet bulb globe temperature monitor, was compared to international safety standards. Results: The survey findings suggest that heat-related symptoms increased in summer; 59% of all reports in summer were positive for symptoms (from Mild to Severe) as compared to 41% in winter. Focus groups revealed four dominant themes: (1) Non-occupational stressors compound work stressors; (2) workers were particularly attuned to the impact of heat on their health; (3) workers were aware of heat-related preventive measures; and (4) few resources were currently available to protect workers from heat stress. Working conditions often exceed international heat stress safety thresholds. Female workers and new employees might be at increased risk of illness or injury. Conclusion: This study suggests significant health impacts on construction workers from heat stress exposure in the workplace, showed that heat stress levels were higher than those prescribed by international standards and highlights the need for revision of work practices, increased protective measures, and possible development of indigenous work safety standards for heat exposure

  8. Fluorescence imaging of heat-stress induced mitochondrial long-term depolarization in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dressler, Cathrin; Beuthan, Juergen; Mueller, Gerhard; Zabarylo, Urszula; Minet, Olaf

    2006-09-01

    Various thermotherapies are based on the induction of lethal heat in target tissues. Spatial and temporal instabilities of elevated temperatures induced in therapy targets require optimized treatment protocols and reliable temperature control methods during thermotherapies. Heat-stress induced effects on mitochondrial transmembrane potentials were analyzed in breast cancer cells, species MX1, using the potential sensor JC-1 (Molecular Probes, Invitrogen, Germany). Potential dependant labeling of heat-stressed cells was imaged and evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and compared with control cells. JC-1 stains mitochondria in cells with high mitochondrial potentials by forming orange-red fluorescent J-aggregates while in cells with depolarized or damaged mitochondria the sensor dye exists as green fluorescent monomers. In MX1 cells orange-red and green fluorescence intensities were correlated with each other after various heat-stress treatments and states of mitochondrial membrane potentials were deduced from the image data. With increasing stress temperatures the intensity of red fluorescent J-aggregates decreased while the green fluorescence intensity of JC-1 monomers increased. This heat-stress response happened in a nonlinear manner with increasing temperatures resulting in a nonlinear increase of red/green fluorescence ratios. These data indicated that mitochondria in MX1 cells were increasingly depolarized in response to increasing ambient temperatures.

  9. Heat stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in bubaline ( Bubalus bubalis) oocytes during in vitro maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waiz, Syma Ashraf; Raies-ul-Haq, Mohammad; Dhanda, Suman; Kumar, Anil; Goud, T. Sridhar; Chauhan, M. S.; Upadhyay, R. C.

    2016-09-01

    In vitro environments like heat stress usually increase the production of reactive oxygen species in bubaline oocytes which have been implicated as one of the major causes for reduced developmental competence. Oocytes during meiotic maturation are sensitive to oxidative stress, and heat stress accelerates cellular metabolism, resulting in the higher production of free radicals. Therefore, the aim of present work was to assess the impact of heat stress during meiotic maturation on bubaline cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC), denuded oocytes (DO), and cumulus cell mass in terms of their oxidative status. Accordingly, for control group, COC were matured at 38.5 °C for complete 24 h of meiotic maturation and heat stress of 40.5 and 41.5 °C was applied to COC during the first 12 h of maturation and then moved to 38.5 °C for rest of the 12 h. In another group, COC after maturation were denuded from the surrounding cumulus cells by manual pipetting. Results indicated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides, and nitric oxide (NO) was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in the oocytes subjected to heat stress (40.5 and 41.5 °C) during meiotic maturation compared to the oocytes matured under standard in vitro culture conditions (38.5 °C). Also, the antioxidant enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were significantly ( P < 0.05) increased in all the treatment groups compared to the control group. Therefore, the present study clearly establishes that heat stress ensues oxidative stress in bubaline oocytes which triggers the induction of antioxidant enzymatic defense system for scavenging the ROS.

  10. Root proteomic responses to heat stress in two Agrostis grass species contrasting in heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenping; Huang, Bingru

    2008-01-01

    Protein metabolism plays an important role in plant adaptation to heat stress. This study was designed to identify heat-responsive proteins in roots associated with thermotolerance for two C3 grass species contrasting in heat tolerance, thermal Agrostis scabra and heat-sensitive Agrostis stolonifera L. Plants were exposed to 20 degrees C (control), 30 C (moderate heat stress), or 40 degrees C (severe heat stress) in growth chambers. Roots were harvested at 2 d and 10 d after temperature treatment. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seventy protein spots were regulated by heat stress in at least one species. Under both moderate and severe heat stress, more proteins were down-regulated than were up-regulated, and thermal A. scabra roots had more up-regulated proteins than A. stolonifera roots. The sequences of 66 differentially expressed protein spots were identified using mass spectrometry. The results suggested that the up-regulation of sucrose synthase, glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, and heat shock protein Sti (stress-inducible protein) may contribute to the superior root thermotolerance of A. scabra. In addition, phosphoproteomic analysis indicated that two isoforms of fructose-biphosphate aldolase were highly phosphorylated under heat stress, and thermal A. scabra had greater phosphorylation than A. stolonifera, suggesting that the aldolase phosphorylation might be involved in root thermotolerance.

  11. Salicylic acid and heat acclimation pretreatment protects Laminaria japonica sporophyte (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, You

    2010-07-01

    Possible mediatory roles of heat acclimation and salicylic acid in protecting the sporophyte of marine macroalga Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress were studied. Heat stress resulted in oxidative injury in the kelp blades. Under heat stress significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonaldehyde (MDA), a membrane lipid peroxidation product, and a drastic decrease in chlorophyll a content were recorded. Activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system was drastically affected by heat stress. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly increased while peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were greatly inhibited and, simultaneously, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was activated while polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was inhibited. Both heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous application of salicylic acid alleviated oxidative damage in kelp blades. Blades receiving heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous salicylic acid prior to heat stress exhibited a reduced increase in H2O2 and MDA content, and a lower reduction in chlorophyll a content. Pretreatment with heat acclimation and salicylic acid elevated activities of SOD, POD, CAT, GPX and PPO. Considering these results collectively, we speculate that the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes is a possible cause of the heat-stress-induced oxidative stress in L. japonica, and enhanced thermotolerance may be associated, at least in part, with the elevated activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system.

  12. Heat stress and societal impacts in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffel, E.; Horton, R. M.; de Sherbinin, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Heat is the number-one weather related killer in the US and around the world. As a result of rising temperatures and steady or slightly rising levels of specific humidity, heat stress is projected to become increasingly severe. Here we show that heat stress as measured by two common indices -- the heat index and the wet-bulb temperature -- is projected to rapidly and dramatically increase, and that by mid-century crippling summertime conditions are possible across some of the most densely populated regions of the planet. Many of these regions are places where cooling infrastructure is scarce, adaptive capacity is low, and populations are rapidly rising. We find that by the end of the 21st century, the habitability of some regions of the planet may be questionable due to heat stress alone, and in many other regions severe impacts to human health, infrastructure, agriculture, and economic performance will create significant societal stress and necessitate rapid adaptation.

  13. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-01-01

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage. PMID:26978367

  14. An induction heating diamond anvil cell for high pressure and temperature micro-Raman spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Keiji; Noguchi, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    A new external heating configuration is presented for high-temperature diamond anvil cell instruments. The supporting rockers are thermally excited by induction from an externally mounted copper coil passing a 30 kHz alternating current. The inductive heating configuration therefore avoids the use of breakable wires, yet is capable of cell temperatures of 1100 K or higher. The diamond anvil cell has no resistive heaters, but uses a single-turn induction coil for elevating the temperature. The induction coil is placed near the diamonds and directly heats the tungsten carbide rockers that support the diamond. The temperature in the cell is determined from a temperature-power curve calibrated by the ratio between the intensities of the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman lines of silicon. The high-pressure transformation of quartz to coesite is successfully observed by micro-Raman spectroscopy using this apparatus. The induction heating diamond anvil cell is thus a useful alternative to resistively heated diamond anvil cells.

  15. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-03-11

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage.

  16. Heat stress intervention research in construction: gaps and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Chan, Albert Ping-Chuen

    2017-01-20

    Developing heat stress interventions for construction workers has received mounting concerns in recent years. However, limited efforts have been exerted to elaborate the rationale, methodology, and practicality of heat stress intervention in the construction industry. This study aims to review previous heat stress intervention research in construction, and to identify the major research gaps in methodological issues and offer detailed recommendations for future studies. A total of 35 peer-reviewed journal papers have exerted efforts to develop administrative, environmental and personal engineering controls to safeguard construction workers. It was found that methodological limitations, such as sampling methods and instruments, could be the major obstacle in undertaking heat stress intervention research. Based on the identified research gaps, this study then refined a research framework for conducting heat stress intervention studies in the construction industry. The proposed research strategy provides researchers and practitioners with fresh insights into expanding multidisciplinary research areas and solving practical problems in the management of heat stress. The proposed research framework may foster the development of heat stress intervention research in construction, which further aids researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in formulating proper intervention strategies.

  17. Climate change and occupational heat stress: methods for assessment

    PubMed Central

    Holmér, Ingvar

    2010-01-01

    Background Presumed effects of global warming on occupational heat stress aggravate conditions in many parts of the world, in particular in developing countries. In order to assess and evaluate conditions, heat stress must be described and measured correctly. Objective Assessment of heat stress using internationally recognized methods. Design Two such methods are wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT; ISO 7243) and predicted heat strain (PHS; ISO 7933). Both methods measure relevant climatic factors and provide recommendations for limit values in terms of time when heat stress becomes imminent. The WBGT as a heat stress index is empirical and widely recognized. It requires, however, special sensors for the climatic factors that can introduce significant measurement errors if prescriptions in ISO 7243 are not followed. The PHS (ISO 7933) is based on climatic factors that can easily be measured with traditional instruments. It evaluates the conditions for heat balance in a more rational way and it applies equally to all combinations of climates. Results Analyzing similar climatic conditions with WBGT and PHS indicates that WBGT provides a more conservative assessment philosophy that allows much shorter working time than predicted with PHS. Conclusions PHS prediction of physiological strain appears to fit better with published data from warm countries. Both methods should be used and validated more extensively worldwide in order to give reliable and accurate information about the actual heat stress. PMID:21139697

  18. Heat stress and protection from permanent acoustic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, N; Kristiansen, A; Liberman, M C

    1999-11-15

    The inner ear can be permanently damaged by overexposure to high-level noise; however, damage can be decreased by previous exposure to moderate level, nontraumatic noise (). The mechanism of this "protective" effect is unclear, but a role for heat shock proteins has been suggested. The aim of the present study was to directly test protective effects of heat stress in the ear. For physiological experiments, CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to an intense octave band of noise (8-16 kHz) at 100 dB SPL for 2 hr, either with or without previous whole-body heat stress (rectal temperature to 41. 5 degrees C for 15 min). The interval between heat stress and sound exposure varied in different groups from 6 to 96 hr. One week later, inner ear function was assessed in each animal via comparison of compound action potential thresholds to mean values from unexposed controls. Permanent threshold shifts (PTSs) were approximately 40 dB in the group sound-exposed without previous heat stress. Heat-stressed animals were protected from acoustic injury: mean PTS in the group with 6 hr heat-stress-trauma interval was reduced to approximately 10 dB. This heat stress protection disappeared when the treatment-trauma interval surpassed 24 hr. A parallel set of quantitative PCR experiments measured heat-shock protein mRNA in the cochlea and showed 100- to 200-fold increase over control 30 min after heat treatment, with levels returning to baseline at 6 hr after treatment. Results are consistent with the idea that upregulation of heat shock proteins protects the ear from acoustic injury.

  19. Eddy Current Analysis of Thin Metal Container in Induction Heating by Line Integral Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hagino; Ishibashi, Kazuhisa

    In recent years, induction-heating cookers have been disseminated explosively. It is wished to commercialize flexible and disposable food containers that are available for induction heating. In order to develop a good quality food container that is heated moderately, it is necessary to analyze accurately eddy currents induced in a thin metal plate. The integral equation method is widely used for solving induction-heating problems. If the plate thickness approaches zero, the surface integral equations on the upper and lower plate surfaces tend to become the same and the equations become ill conditioned. In this paper, firstly, we derive line integral equations from the boundary integral equations on the assumption that the electromagnetic fields in metal are attenuated rapidly compared with those along the metal surface. Next, so as to test validity of the line integral equations, we solve the eddy current induced in a thin metal container in induction heating and obtain power density given to the container and impedance characteristics of the heating coil. We compare computed results with those by FEM.

  20. Numerical simulations of inductive-heated float-zone growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Y. T.; Choi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    The present work provides an improved fluid flow and heat-transfer modeling of float-zone growth by introducing a RF heating model so that an ad hoc heating temperature profile is not necessary. Numerical simulations were carried out to study the high-temperature float-zone growth of titanium carbide single crystal. The numerical results showed that the thermocapillary convection occurring inside the molten zone tends to increase the convexity of the melt-crystal interface and decrease the maximum temperature of the molten zone, while the natural convection tends to reduce the stability of the molten zone by increasing its height. It was found that the increase of induced heating due to the increase of applied RF voltage is reduced by the decrease of zone diameter. Surface tension plays an important role in controlling the amount of induced heating. Finally, a comparison of the computed shape of the free surface with a digital image obtained during a growth run showed adequate agreement.

  1. Solid fossil-fuel recovery by electrical induction heating in situ - A proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, S.

    1980-04-01

    A technique, termed electrical induction heating, is proposed for in situ processes of energy production from solid fossil fuels, such as bitumen production from underground distillation of oil sand; oil by underground distillation of oil shale; petroleum from heavy oil by underground mobilization of heavy oil, from either residues of conventional liquid petroleum deposits or new deposits of viscous oil; methane and coal tar from lignite and coal deposits by underground distillation of coal; and generation of electricity by surface combustion of low calorific-value gas from underground coke gasification by combustion of the organic residue left from the underground distillation of coal by induction heating. A method of surface distillation of mined coking coal by induction heating to produce coke, methane, and coal tar is also proposed.

  2. Biophysical aspects of human thermoregulation during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Matthew N; Jay, Ollie

    2016-04-01

    Humans maintain a relatively constant core temperature through the dynamic balance between endogenous heat production and heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. In response to metabolic or environmental disturbances to heat balance, the autonomic nervous system initiates cutaneous vasodilation and eccrine sweating to facilitate higher rates of dry (primarily convection and radiation) and evaporative transfer from the body surface; however, absolute heat losses are ultimately governed by the properties of the skin and the environment. Over the duration of a heat exposure, the cumulative imbalance between heat production and heat dissipation leads to body heat storage, but the consequent change in core temperature, which has implications for health and safety in occupational and athletic settings particularly among certain clinical populations, involves a complex interaction between changes in body heat content and the body's morphological characteristics (mass, surface area, and tissue composition) that collectively determine the body's thermal inertia. The aim of this review is to highlight the biophysical aspects of human core temperature regulation by outlining the principles of human energy exchange and examining the influence of body morphology during exercise and environmental heat stress. An understanding of the biophysical factors influencing core temperature will enable researchers and practitioners to better identify and treat individuals/populations most vulnerable to heat illness and injury during exercise and extreme heat events. Further, appropriate guidelines may be developed to optimize health, safety, and work performance during heat stress.

  3. Temperature analysis of induction motors using a hybrid thermal model with distributed heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S. C.; Pal, S. K.

    1998-06-01

    The article presents a hybrid thermal model for the accurate estimation of temperature distribution of induction motors. The developed model is a combination of lumped and distributed thermal parameters which are obtained from motor dimensions and other constants such as material density, specific heats, thermal conductivity, etc. The model is especially suited for the derating of induction motors operating under distorted and unbalanced supply condition. The model have been applied to a small (2hp, 415 V, 3-phase) cage rotor induction motor. The performance of the model is confirmed by experimental temperature data from the body and the conductor inside the slots of the motor.

  4. Magnetic induction-induced resistive heating of optical fibers and gratings.

    PubMed

    Canning, John; Naqshbandi, Masood; Cook, Kevin; Huyang, George

    2013-03-15

    Magnetic induction heating of optical fibers packaged with a steel plate is studied using a fiber Bragg grating. The dependence on the induced wavelength shift with magnetic field is obtained for a commercially available induction heater. More than a 300°C temperature rise is observed within seconds. The potential of magnetic induction as an efficient and rapid means of modulating devices and as a novel approach to potential optical based magnetic field and current sensing is proposed and discussed. The extension of the ideas into micro and nanophotonics is described.

  5. Heat shock protein response in phosphorus-deficient heat-stressed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Edens, F W; Hill, C H; Wang, S

    1992-12-01

    1. During acute in vivo heat stress, a normal heat shock protein (HSP) response was not inducible in chickens deficient in inorganic phosphorus (P(i)-deficient). 2. Small quantities of HSP 70 and HSP 90 were induced, but little or no HSP 23 was induced in P(i)-deficient chickens compared to P(i)-adequate chickens. 3. Increased susceptibility of P(i)-deficient chickens to acute heat stress was attributed to their inability to produce an adequate HSP response.

  6. Differential induction of heme oxygenase and other stress proteins in cultured hippocampal astrocytes and neurons by inorganic lead.

    PubMed

    Cabell, Leigh; Ferguson, Charles; Luginbill, Deana; Kern, Marcey; Weingart, Adam; Audesirk, Gerald

    2004-07-01

    We examined the effects of exposure to inorganic lead (Pb2+) on the induction of stress proteins in cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes, with particular emphasis on the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In radiolabeled neuronal cultures, Pb2+ exposure had no significant effect on the synthesis of any protein at any concentration (up to 250 microM) or duration of exposure (up to 4 days). In radiolabeled astrocyte cultures, however, Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 100 microM; 1-4 days) increased synthesis of proteins with approximate molecular weights of 23, 32, 45, 57, 72, and 90 kDa. Immunoblot experiments showed that Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 10 microM, 1-14 days) induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes, but not in neurons; this is probably the 32-kDa protein. The other heme oxygenase isoform, HO-2, is present in both neurons and astrocytes, but is not inducible by Pb2+ at concentrations up to 100 microM. HO-1 can be induced by a variety of stimuli. We found that HO-1 induction in astrocytes is increased by combined exposure to Pb2+ and many other stresses, including heat, nitric oxide, H2O2, and superoxide. One of the stimuli that may induce HO-1 is oxidative stress. Lead exposure causes oxidative stress in many cell types, including astrocytes. Induction of HO-1 by Pb2+ is reduced by the hydroxyl radical scavengers dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and mannitol, but not by inhibitors of calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, protein kinase C, or extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). Therefore, we conclude that oxidative stress is an important mechanism by which Pb2+ induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes.

  7. Heat stress and sudden infant death syndrome--stress gene expression after exposure to moderate heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Marianne Cathrine; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Hansen, Jakob; Pedersen, Christina Bak; Schmidt, Stinne P; Gregersen, Niels; Banner, Jytte

    2013-10-10

    The aim of the present study was to investigate stress gene expression in cultured primary fibroblasts established from Achilles tendons collected during autopsies from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases, and age-matched controls (infants dying in a traumatic event). Expression of 4 stress responsive genes, HSPA1B, HSPD1, HMOX1, and SOD2, was studied by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of RNA purified from cells cultured under standard or various thermal stress conditions. The expression of all 4 genes was highly influenced by thermal stress in both SIDS and control cells. High interpersonal variance found in the SIDS group indicated that they represented a more heterogeneous group than controls. The SIDS group responded to thermal stress with a higher expression of the HSPA1B and HSPD1 genes compared to the control group, whereas no significant difference was observed in the expression of SOD2 and HMOX1 between the two groups. The differences were related to the heat shock treatment as none of the genes were expressed significantly different in SIDS at base levels at 37 °C. SOD2 and HMOX1 were up regulated in both groups, for SOD2 though the expression was lower in SIDS at all time points measured, and may be less related to heat stress. Being found dead in the prone position (a known risk factor for SIDS) was related to a lower HSPA1B up-regulation in SIDS compared to SIDS found on their side or back. The study demonstrates the potential usefulness of gene expression studies using cultured fibroblasts established from deceased individuals as a tool for molecular and pathological investigations in forensic and biomedical sciences.

  8. Surface modification of graphite and ceramics with metals using induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Imoto, Akiko; Suzumura, Akio; Katori, Mana; Yamazaki, Takahisa; Sakamoto, Masahiro; Sakimichi, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    In order to join metals to graphite or ceramics by soldering or brazing, a new surface modification method using induction heating was developed for graphite and ceramics. Such source metals as Cu, Ni, Cr, etc. were induction-heated in vacuum atmosphere and making deposited films on the deposition substrate, or the target substrate; graphite, AlN, Si3N4. The applicability of this method was investigated and the deposited layer was analysed by SEM observation, Auger electron spectrum analysis, X-ray diffractometry, and EPMA. By comparison of ambient vacuum pressure during deposition and the saturated vaopr pressure of source metals, this method was considered to utilize the sublimation phenomenon.

  9. Proteomics Analysis of Alfalfa Response to Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Wei, Zhenwu; Qiao, Zhihong; Wu, Zinian; Cheng, Lixiang; Wang, Yuyang

    2013-01-01

    The proteome responses to heat stress have not been well understood. In this study, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Huaiyin) seedlings were exposed to 25°C (control) and 40°C (heat stress) in growth chambers, and leaves were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. The morphological, physiological and proteomic processes were negatively affected under heat stress. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 81 differentially expressed proteins were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF/TOF. These proteins were categorized into nine classes: including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, protein destination/storage, transporters, intracellular traffic, cell structure, signal transduction and disease/defence. Five proteins were further analyzed for mRNA levels. The results of the proteomics analyses provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of heat-stress responses in alfalfa. PMID:24324825

  10. Telemetric heat stress monitor (THSM) spin-offs

    SciTech Connect

    Berkbigler, L.; Bradley, O.; Lopez, R.; Martinez, D.; Stampfer, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to investigate spin-offs of the telemetric heat stress monitoring system (THSM) developed at LANL. Hazardous-materials workers and firefighters wear clothing that protects them from external hazards, but the sealed environment of a protective suit makes its wearer susceptible to heat stress. Heat stress occurs when the body`s natural cooling mechanisms fail: it can cause collapse and death. The THSM warns both workers and remote monitoring personnel of incipient heat stress by monitoring and responding to elevations of workers` skin temperatures and heart rates. The technology won a 1994 R & D 100 award.

  11. Oxidative stress induction by nanoparticles in THP-1 cells with 4-HNE production: stress biomarker or oxidative stress signalling molecule?

    PubMed

    Foucaud, L; Goulaouic, S; Bennasroune, A; Laval-Gilly, P; Brown, D; Stone, V; Falla, J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether carbon black (CB) nanoparticles might induce toxicity to monocytic cells in vitro via an oxidative stress mechanism involving formation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the subsequent role of 4-HNE in inducing further cytotoxic effects. ROS production in cells by CB nanoparticles was shown by the oxidation of DCFH after a short time exposure. These particles induced the formation of 4-HNE-protein adducts and significant modification of glutathione content corresponding to an increase of oxidized glutathione form (GSSG) and a decrease of total glutathione (GSX) content. These results attest to an oxidative stress induced by the carbon black nanoparticles, although no induction of HO-1 protein expression was detected. Concerning the effects of a direct exposure to 4-HNE, our results showed that 4-HNE is not cytotoxic for concentrations lower than 12.5 microM. By contrast, it provokes a very high cytotoxicity for concentrations above 25 microM. An induction of HO-1 expression was observed from concentrations above 5 microM of 4-HNE. Finally, glutathione content decreased significantly from 5 microM of 4-HNE but no modification was observed under this concentration. The discrepancy between effects of carbon black nanoparticles and 4-HNE on the intracellular markers of oxidative stress suggests that 4-HNE is not directly implied in the signalling of oxidative toxicity of nanoparticles but is an effective biomarker of oxidative effects of nanoparticles.

  12. Demonstration of a non-contact x-ray source using an inductively heated pyroelectric accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfer, Michael; Satchouk, Vladimir; Cao, Anh; Wolowiec, Thomas; Alivov, Yahya; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-04-01

    X-ray emission from pyroelectric sources can be produced through non-contact thermal cycling using induction heating. In this study, we demonstrated a proof of concept non-contact x-ray source powered via induction heating. An induction heater operating at 62.5 kHz provided a total of 6.5 W of delivered peak thermal power with 140 V DC of driving voltage. The heat was applied to a ferrous substrate mechanically coupled to a cubic 1 cm3 Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) pyroelectric crystal maintained in a 3-12 mTorr vacuum. The maximum temperature reached was 175 °C in 86 s of heating. The cooling cycle began immediately after heating and was provided by passive radiative cooling. The total combined cycle time was 250 s. x-ray photons were produced and analyzed in both heating and cooling phases. Maximum photon energies of 59 keV and 55 keV were observed during heating and cooling, respectively. Non-contact devices such as this, may find applications in cancer therapy (brachytherapy), non-destructive testing, medical imaging, and physics education fields.

  13. Camelid heat stress: 15 cases (2003–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Piper L.; Gold, Jenifer R.; Russell, Karen E.; Schulz, Kara L.; Porter, Brian F.

    2014-01-01

    This case series describes novel findings associated with heat stress in 15 cases in South American camelids that had no pre-existing illnesses and which had clinical signs of illness after exposure to a warm environment. Novel findings include decreased packed cell volume and albumin concentration and mild spinal axonal degeneration. Heat stress should be considered in weak camelids with a history of hyperthermia. PMID:25320390

  14. A Virtual Rat for Simulating Environmental and Exertional Heat Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    A virtual rat for simulating environmental and exertional heat stress Vineet Rakesh,1 X Jonathan D. Stallings,2 and Jaques Reifman1 1Department of...Health Research, Fort Detrick, Maryland Submitted 8 July 2014; accepted in final form 18 September 2014 Rakesh V, Stallings JD, Reifman J. A virtual rat ...different heat-stress conditions. To this end, we used our previously published virtual rat , which is capable of computing the spatiotemporal

  15. Evaluation of inductively heated ferromagnetic alloy implants for therapeutic interstitial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J A; Richardson, J S; Tucker, R D; Park, J B

    1996-04-01

    Ferromagnetic alloys heated by magnetic induction have been investigated as interstitial hyperthermia delivery implants for over a decade, utilizing low Curie temperatures to provide thermal self-regulation. The minimally invasive method is attractive for fractionated thermal treatment of tumors which are not easily heated by focused microwave or ultrasound techniques. Past analyses of ferromagnetic seeds by other authors depict poor experimental correlation with theoretical heating predictions. Improvements in computer hardware and commercially available finite element analysis software have simplified the analysis of inductively heated thermal seeds considerably. This manuscript examines end effects of finite length implants and nonlinear magnetic material properties to account for previous inconsistencies. Two alloys, Ni-28 wt% Cu (NiCu) and Pd-6.15 wt% Co (PdCo), were used for comparison of theoretical and experimental calorimetric results. Length to diameter (L/d) ratios of over 20 for cylindrical seeds are necessary for minimization of end effects. Magnetic properties tested for alloys of NiCu and PdCo illustrate considerable nonlinearity of these materials in field strength ranges used for induction heating. Field strength dependent magnetic permeabilities and calorimetric data illustrate that more detailed material information must be included to accurately estimate induction power loss for these implants.

  16. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization causes oxidative stress and ferritin induction in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Carlsson, Fredrik; Laskar, Amit; Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei

    2011-02-18

    Moderate lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is an important inducer of apoptosis. Macrophages are professional scavengers and are rich in hydrolytic enzymes and iron. In the present study, we found that LMP by lysosomotropic detergent MSDH resulted in early up-regulation of lysosomal cathepsins, oxidative stress and ferritin up-regulation, and cell death. Lysosomotropic base NH(4)Cl reduced the ferritin induction and oxidative stress in apoptotic cells induced by MSDH. Cysteine cathepsin inhibitors significantly protected cell death and oxidative stress, but had less effect on ferritin induction. We conclude that oxidative stress induced by lysosomal rupture causes ferritin induction with concomitant mitochondrial damage, which are the potential target for prevention of cellular oxidative stress and cell death induced by typical lysosomotropic substances in different disorders.

  17. Thermometry, calorimetry, and mean body temperature during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Jay, Ollie

    2013-10-01

    Heat balance in humans is maintained at near constant levels through the adjustment of physiological mechanisms that attain a balance between the heat produced within the body and the heat lost to the environment. Heat balance is easily disturbed during changes in metabolic heat production due to physical activity and/or exposure to a warmer environment. Under such conditions, elevations of skin blood flow and sweating occur via a hypothalamic negative feedback loop to maintain an enhanced rate of dry and evaporative heat loss. Body heat storage and changes in core temperature are a direct result of a thermal imbalance between the rate of heat production and the rate of total heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. The derivation of the change in body heat content is of fundamental importance to the physiologist assessing the exposure of the human body to environmental conditions that result in thermal imbalance. It is generally accepted that the concurrent measurement of the total heat generated by the body and the total heat dissipated to the ambient environment is the most accurate means whereby the change in body heat content can be attained. However, in the absence of calorimetric methods, thermometry is often used to estimate the change in body heat content. This review examines heat exchange during challenges to heat balance associated with progressive elevations in environmental heat load and metabolic rate during exercise. Further, we evaluate the physiological responses associated with heat stress and discuss the thermal and nonthermal influences on the body's ability to dissipate heat from a heat balance perspective.

  18. Glucokinase of Escherichia coli: induction in response to the stress of overexpressing foreign proteins.

    PubMed

    Arora, K K; Pedersen, P L

    1995-06-01

    A variety of stressful conditions, such as heat shock, ethanol, osmotic shock, glucose deprivation, and oxidative stress, are known to induce the synthesis of specific proteins. Here, we report the induction in Escherichia coli of a protein elicited in response to a hitherto unidentified stress condition, i.e., the overexpression of foreign proteins. The induced protein identified as glucokinase (EC 2.7.1.2) is produced at a level > or = 20-fold higher than the level in wild-type E. coli when foreign proteins are expressed under the control of the alkaline phosphatase (phoA) promoter. The bacterial glucokinase is shown to have a mass of approximately 47 kDa determined by a "renaturation activity stain assay" in situ following sodium dodecyl sulfate-poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and exhibits a high specificity for the phosphorylation of glucose. The apparent Km values for glucose and ATP for the enzyme are 0.15 and 0.50 mM, respectively, indicating that the E. coli enzyme is a low Km glucose hexokinase. The enzyme cross-reacts with rabbit antisera raised against hexokinase from higher eukaryotes, implicating some sequence similarity with mammalian hexokinases. Under normal conditions, E. coli glucokinase plays a minor role in glucose metabolism. However, under anabolic stress conditions, this glycolytic enzyme may be required to supplement levels of glucose 6-phosphate. Alternatively, glucokinase, which is predicted in analogy to other hexose-utilizing kinases to have structural folds characteristic of hsp 70, may itself, or in combination with other E. coli proteins, function in the stabilization of newly synthesized proteins.

  19. Estimates of heat stress relief needs for Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Berman, A

    2005-06-01

    Estimates of environmental heat stress are required for heat stress relief measures in cattle. Heat stress is commonly assessed by the temperature-humidity index (THI), the sum of dry and wet bulb temperatures. The THI does not include an interaction between temperature and humidity, although evaporative heat loss increases with rising air temperature. Coat, air velocity, and radiation effects also are not accounted for in the THI. The Holstein dairy cow is the primary target of heat stress relief, followed by feedlot cattle. Heat stress may be estimated for a variety of conditions by thermal balance models. The models consist of animal-specific data (BW, metabolic heat production, tissue and coat insulation, skin water loss, coat depth, and minimal and maximal tidal volumes) and of general heat exchange equations. A thermal balance simulation model was modified to adapt it for Holstein cows by using Holstein data for the animal characteristics in the model, and was validated by comparing its outputs to experimental data. Model outputs include radiant, convective, skin evaporative, respiratory heat loss and rate of change of body temperature. Effects of milk production (35 and 45 kg/d), hair coat depth (3 and 6 mm), air temperature (20 to 45 degrees C), air velocity (0.2 to 2.0 m/s), air humidity (0.8 to 3.9 kPa), and exposed body surface (100, 75, and 50%) on thermal balance outputs were examined. Environmental conditions at which respiratory heat loss attained approximately 50% of its maximal value were defined as thresholds for intermediate heat stress. Air velocity increased and humidity significantly decreased threshold temperatures, particularly at higher coat depth. The effect of air velocity was amplified at high humidity. Increasing milk production from 35 to 45 kg/d decreased threshold temperature by 5 degrees C. In the lying cow, the lower air velocity in the proximity of body surface and the smaller exposed surface markedly decrease threshold

  20. Differential proteomic response to heat stress in thermal Agrostis scabra and heat-sensitive Agrostis stolonifera.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenping; Huang, Bingru

    2010-06-01

    Knowledge of heat-responsive proteins is critical for further understanding of the molecular mechanisms of heat tolerance. The objective of this study was to compare proteins differentially expressed in two C(3) grass species contrasting in heat tolerance, heat-tolerant thermal Agrostis scabra and heat-sensitive Agrostis stolonifera L., and to identify heat-responsive proteins for short- and long-term responses. Plants were exposed to 20/15 degrees C (day/night, control) or 40/35 degrees C (day/night, heat stress) in growth chambers. Leaves were harvested at 2 and 10 days after temperature treatment. Proteins were extracted and separated by fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE). Thermal A. scabra had superior heat tolerance than A. stolonifera, as indicated by the maintenance of higher chlorophyll content and photochemical efficiency under heat stress. The two-dimensional difference electrophoresis detected 68 heat-responsive proteins in the two species. Thermal A. scabra had more protein spots either down- or up-regulated at 2 days of heat stress, but fewer protein spots were altered at 10 days of heat stress compared with A. stolonifera. Many protein spots exhibited transient down-regulation in thermal A. scabra (only at 2 days of heat treatment), whereas down-regulation of many proteins was also found at 10 days of heat treatment in A. stolonifera, which suggested that protein metabolism in thermal A. scabra might acclimate to heat stress more rapidly than those in A. stolonifera. The sequences of 56 differentially expressed protein spots were identified using mass spectrometry. The results suggest that the maintenance or less severe down-regulation of proteins during long-term (10 days) heat stress may contribute to the superior heat tolerance in thermal A. scabra, including those involved in photosynthesis [RuBisCo, RuBisCo activase, chloroplastic glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), chloroplastic aldolase, oxygen-evolving complex

  1. Association between heat stress and oxidative stress in poultry; mitochondrial dysfunction and dietary interventions with phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Akbarian, Abdollah; Michiels, Joris; Degroote, Jeroen; Majdeddin, Maryam; Golian, Abolghasem; De Smet, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    Heat as a stressor of poultry has been studied extensively for many decades; it affects poultry production on a worldwide basis and has significant impact on well-being and production. More recently, the involvement of heat stress in inducing oxidative stress has received much interest. Oxidative stress is defined as the presence of reactive species in excess of the available antioxidant capacity of animal cells. Reactive species can modify several biologically cellular macromolecules and can interfere with cell signaling pathways. Furthermore, during the last decade, there has been an ever-increasing interest in the use of a wide array of natural feed-delivered phytochemicals that have potential antioxidant properties for poultry. In light of this, the current review aims to (1) summarize the mechanisms through which heat stress triggers excessive superoxide radical production in the mitochondrion and progresses into oxidative stress, (2) illustrate that this pathophysiology is dependent on the intensity and duration of heat stress, (3) present different nutritional strategies for mitigation of mitochondrial dysfunction, with particular focus on antioxidant phytochemicals. Oxidative stress that occurs with heat exposure can be manifest in all parts of the body; however, mitochondrial dysfunction underlies oxidative stress. In the initial phase of acute heat stress, mitochondrial substrate oxidation and electron transport chain activity are increased resulting in excessive superoxide production. During the later stage of acute heat stress, down-regulation of avian uncoupling protein worsens the oxidative stress situation causing mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue damage. Typically, antioxidant enzyme activities are upregulated. Chronic heat stress, however, leads to downsizing of mitochondrial metabolic oxidative capacity, up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein, a clear alteration in the pattern of antioxidant enzyme activities, and depletion of antioxidant

  2. A virtual rat for simulating environmental and exertional heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, Vineet; Stallings, Jonathan D; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-12-01

    Severe cases of environmental or exertional heat stress can lead to varying degrees of organ dysfunction. To understand heat-injury progression and develop efficient management and mitigation strategies, it is critical to determine the thermal response in susceptible organs under different heat-stress conditions. To this end, we used our previously published virtual rat, which is capable of computing the spatiotemporal temperature distribution in the animal, and extended it to simulate various heat-stress scenarios, including 1) different environmental conditions, 2) exertional heat stress, 3) circadian rhythm effect on the thermal response, and 4) whole body cooling. Our predictions were consistent with published in vivo temperature measurements for all cases, validating our simulations. We observed a differential thermal response in the organs, with the liver experiencing the highest temperatures for all environmental and exertional heat-stress cases. For every 3°C rise in the external temperature from 40 to 46°C, core and organ temperatures increased by ∼0.8°C. Core temperatures increased by 2.6 and 4.1°C for increases in exercise intensity from rest to 75 and 100% of maximal O2 consumption, respectively. We also found differences as large as 0.8°C in organ temperatures for the same heat stress induced at different times during the day. Even after whole body cooling at a relatively low external temperature (1°C for 20 min), average organ temperatures were still elevated by 2.3 to 2.5°C compared with normothermia. These results can be used to optimize experimental protocol designs, reduce the amount of animal experimentation, and design and test improved heat-stress prevention and management strategies.

  3. Comparative effects of ohmic, induction cooker, and electric stove heating on soymilk trypsin inhibitor inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Luping; Zhang, Caimeng; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-03-01

    During thermal treatment of soymilk, a rapid incorporation of Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) into protein aggregates by covalent (disulfide bond, SS) and/or noncovalent interactions with other proteins is responsible for its fast inactivation of trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). In contrast, the slow cleavage of a single Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) peptide bond is responsible for its slow inactivation of TIA and chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (CIA). In this study, the effects of Ohmic heating (220 V, 50 Hz) on soymilk TIA and CIA inactivation were examined and compared to induction cooker and electric stove heating with similar thermal histories. It was found that: (1) TIA and CIA inactivation was slower from 0 to 3 min, and faster after 3 min as compared to induction cooker and electric stove. (2) The thiol (SH) loss rate was slower from 0 to 3 min, and similar to induction cooker and electric stove after 3 min. (3) Ohmic heating slightly increased protein aggregate formation. (4) In addition to the cleavage of one BBI peptide bond, an additional reaction might occur to enhance BBI inactivation. (5) Ohmic heating was more energy-efficient for TIA and CIA inactivation. (6) TIA and CIA inactivation was accelerated with increasing electric voltage (110, 165, and 220 V) of Ohmic heating. It is likely that the enhanced inactivation of TIA by Ohmic heating is due to its combined electrochemical and thermal effects.

  4. The Response to Heat Shock and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Kevin A.; Grant, Chris M.; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2012-01-01

    A common need for microbial cells is the ability to respond to potentially toxic environmental insults. Here we review the progress in understanding the response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to two important environmental stresses: heat shock and oxidative stress. Both of these stresses are fundamental challenges that microbes of all types will experience. The study of these environmental stress responses in S. cerevisiae has illuminated many of the features now viewed as central to our understanding of eukaryotic cell biology. Transcriptional activation plays an important role in driving the multifaceted reaction to elevated temperature and levels of reactive oxygen species. Advances provided by the development of whole genome analyses have led to an appreciation of the global reorganization of gene expression and its integration between different stress regimens. While the precise nature of the signal eliciting the heat shock response remains elusive, recent progress in the understanding of induction of the oxidative stress response is summarized here. Although these stress conditions represent ancient challenges to S. cerevisiae and other microbes, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms dedicated to dealing with these environmental parameters. PMID:22209905

  5. The response to heat shock and oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Morano, Kevin A; Grant, Chris M; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2012-04-01

    A common need for microbial cells is the ability to respond to potentially toxic environmental insults. Here we review the progress in understanding the response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to two important environmental stresses: heat shock and oxidative stress. Both of these stresses are fundamental challenges that microbes of all types will experience. The study of these environmental stress responses in S. cerevisiae has illuminated many of the features now viewed as central to our understanding of eukaryotic cell biology. Transcriptional activation plays an important role in driving the multifaceted reaction to elevated temperature and levels of reactive oxygen species. Advances provided by the development of whole genome analyses have led to an appreciation of the global reorganization of gene expression and its integration between different stress regimens. While the precise nature of the signal eliciting the heat shock response remains elusive, recent progress in the understanding of induction of the oxidative stress response is summarized here. Although these stress conditions represent ancient challenges to S. cerevisiae and other microbes, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms dedicated to dealing with these environmental parameters.

  6. Electron heating in the inductive discharge array (IDA): theoretical concept and first measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahr, Philipp; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    Besides the common stochastic heating effect in inductively coupled plasmas, recently a novel heating mechanism was identified theoretically by Czarnetzki and Tarnev. It considers the movement of electrons in a plane parallel to the induced electric field lines, in contrast to the well-known case, when the considered electrons move perpendicular. To enable the possibility of non-local energy gain for electron in this parallel plane, a periodically structured electric field was proposed. To experimentally verify this hypothesis a new plasma source was designed and assembled. This source is named Inductive Discharge Array (IDA). The special spatial field structure is realized by a large electrode with an array of 6 x 6 small plane inductive coils. Due to the use of two separate electric circuits, both electric field structures mentioned in can be achieved. Here the theoretical background and the relevant design considerations are presented. In addition first experimental results are shown.

  7. Heat-shock response of the upper intertidal barnacle Balanus glandula: thermal stress and acclimation.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael S; Emlet, Richard B

    2007-06-01

    In the intertidal zone in the Pacific Northwest, body temperatures of sessile marine organisms can reach 35 degrees C for an extended time during low tide, resulting in potential physiological stress. We used immunochemical assays to examine the effects of thermal stress on endogenous Hsp70 levels in the intertidal barnacle Balanus glandula. After thermal stress, endogenous Hsp70 levels did not increase above control levels in B. glandula exposed to 20 and 28 degrees C. In a separate experiment, endogenous Hsp70 levels were higher than control levels when B. glandula was exposed to 34 degrees C for 8.5 h. Although an induced heat-shock response was observed, levels of conjugated ubiquitin failed to indicate irreversible protein damage at temperatures up to 34 degrees C. With metabolic labeling, we examined temperature acclimation and thermally induced heat-shock proteins in B. glandula. An induced heat-shock response of proteins in the 70-kDa region (Hsp70) occurred in B. glandula above 23 degrees C. This heat-shock response was similar in molting and non-molting barnacles. Acclimation of B. glandula to relatively higher temperatures resulted in higher levels of protein synthesis in the 70-kDa region and lack of an upward shift in the induction temperature for heat-shock proteins. Our results suggest that B. glandula may be well adapted to life in the high intertidal zone but may lack the plasticity to acclimate to higher temperatures.

  8. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  9. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu; Chen, Hongbo; Cheng, Yanfen; Nasir, Mohammad Abdel; Kemper, Nicole; Bao, Endong

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42˚C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480‑min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB.

  10. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    TANG, SHU; CHEN, HONGBO; CHENG, YANFEN; NASIR, MOHAMMAD ABDEL; KEMPER, NICOLE; BAO, ENDONG

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42°C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480-min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB. PMID:26719858

  11. Heat stress in grapevine: the pros and cons of acclimation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luísa C; Coito, João L; Colaço, Silvana; Sangiogo, Maurício; Amâncio, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Heat stress is a major limiting factor of grapevine production and quality. Acclimation and recovery are essential to ensure plant survival, and the recovery mechanisms can be independent of the heat response mechanisms. An experimental set up with and without acclimation to heat followed by recovery [stepwise acclimation and recovery (SAR) and stepwise recovery (SR), respectively] was applied to two grapevine varieties, Touriga Nacional (TN), and Trincadeira (TR), with different tolerance to abiotic stress. Major differences were found between leaves of SAR and SR, especially after recovery; in SAR, almost all parameters returned to basal levels while in SR they remained altered. Acclimation led to a swifter and short-term antioxidative response, affecting the plant to a lesser extent than SR. Significant differences were found among varieties: upon stress, TN significantly increased ascorbate and glutathione reduction levels, boosting the cell's redox-buffering capacity, while TR needed to synthesize both metabolites, its response being insufficient to keep the redox state at working levels. TR was affected by stress for a longer period and the up-regulation pattern of antioxidative stress genes was more obvious. In TN, heat shock proteins were significantly induced, but the canonical heat-stress gene signature was not evident probably because no shutdown of the housekeeping metabolism was needed.

  12. Inhibition of Heat Shock Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 and Enhancement of Heat Shock Protein 27 Phosphorylation by Quercetin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Kao, Jeffrey L.-F.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Pandita, Raj K.; Roti, Joseph L. Roti; Hunt, Clayton R.; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of heat-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)a expression have the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of heat induced radiosensitization of tumors. Among known small molecule inhibitors, quercetin has the advantage of being easily modified for structure-activity studies. Herein, we report the ability of five mono-methyl and five carbomethoxymethyl derivatives of quercetin to inhibit heat-induced HSP70 expression and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation in human cells. While quercetin and several derivatives inhibit HSP70 induction and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation at Ser78, other analogs selectively inhibit HSP70 induction without enhancing HSP27 phosphorylation that would otherwise aid in cell survival. We also show that good inhibitors of HSP70 induction are also good inhibitors of both CK2 and CamKII, kinases that are known to activate HSP70 expression by phosphorylation of heat shock transcription factor 1. Derivatives that show poor inhibition of either or both kinases are not good inhibitors of HSP70 induction, suggesting that quercetin’s effectiveness is due to its ability to inhibit both kinases. PMID:19296652

  13. Induced electric fields in workers near low-frequency induction heating machines.

    PubMed

    Kos, Bor; Valič, Blaž; Kotnik, Tadej; Gajšek, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Published data on occupational exposure to induction heating equipment are scarce, particularly in terms of induced quantities in the human body. This article provides some additional information by investigating exposure to two such machines-an induction furnace and an induction hardening machine. Additionally, a spatial averaging algorithm for measured fields we developed in a previous publication is tested on new data. The human model was positioned at distances where measured values of magnetic flux density were above the reference levels. All human exposure was below the basic restriction-the lower bound of the 0.1 top percentile induced electric field in the body of a worker was 0.193 V/m at 30 cm from the induction furnace.

  14. Low, medium, and high heat tolerant strains of Listeria monocytogenes and increased heat stress resistance after exposure to sublethal heat.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian; Jangam, Priyanka M; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, Wes; Silva, Juan L

    2014-08-01

    A group of 37 strains representing all 13 serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes with an initial cell density of 10(7) CFU/ml were analyzed for their heat tolerance at 60°C for 10 min. These L. monocytogenes strains were categorized into three heat tolerance groups: low (<2 log CFU/ml survival), medium (2 to 4 log CFU/ml survival), and high (4 to 6 log CFU/ml survival). Serotype 1/2a strains had relatively low heat tolerance; seven of the eight tested strains were classified as low heat tolerant. Of the two serotype 1/2b strains tested, one was very heat sensitive (not detectable) and the other was very heat resistant (5.4 log CFU/ml survival). Among the 16 serotype 4b strains, survival ranged from not detectable to 4 log CFU/ml. When one L. monocytogenes strain from each heat tolerance group was subjected to sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 30 or 60 min, the survival of heat-stressed cells at 60°C for 10 min increased by 5 log CFU/ml (D60°C-values nearly doubled) compared with the nonstressed control cells. Sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 60 or 90 min increased the lag phase of L. monocytogenes in tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract at room temperature by 3 to 5 h compared with nonstressed control cells. The heat stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was reversed after 2 h at room temperature but was maintained for up to 24 h at 4°C. Our results indicate a high diversity in heat tolerance among strains of L. monocytogenes, and once acquired this heat stress adaptation persists after cooling, which should be taken into account while conducting risk analyses for this pathogen.

  15. Dynamics of urban heat stress events in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, David

    2016-04-01

    Extreme heat stress events as measured by the wet-bulb temperature require extraordinarily high air temperatures coupled with high humidity. These conditions are rare, as relative humidity rapidly falls with rising air temperature, and this effect often results in decreasing heat stress as temperature rises. However, in certain coastal locations in the Middle East recent heat waves have resulted in wet-bulb temperatures of 33-35 degrees C, which approach the theoretical limits of human tolerance. These conditions result from the combination of extreme desert heat and humid winds off of the warm ocean waters. It is unclear if climate models properly simulate these dynamics. This study will analyse the ability of the CMIP5 model suite to replicate observed dynamics during extreme heat events in major urban areas.

  16. Ideas and perspectives: Heat stress: more than hot air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Boeck, Hans J.; Van De Velde, Helena; De Groote, Toon; Nijs, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Climate models project an important increase in the frequency and intensity of heat waves. In gauging the impact on plant responses, much of the focus has been on air temperatures, while a critical analysis of leaf temperatures during heat extremes has not been conducted. Nevertheless, direct physiological consequences from heat depend primarily on leaf rather than on air temperatures. We discuss how the interplay between various environmental variables and the plants' stomatal response affects leaf temperatures and the potential for heat stress by making use of both an energy balance model and field data. The results demonstrate that this interplay between plants and environment can cause leaf temperature to vary substantially at the same air temperature. In general, leaves tended to heat up when radiation was high and when stomates were closed, as expected. But perhaps counterintuitively, high air humidity also raised leaf temperatures, while humid conditions are typically regarded as benign with respect to plant survival since they limit water loss. High wind speeds brought the leaf temperature closer to the air temperature, which can imply either cooling or warming (i.e. abating or reinforcing heat stress) depending on other prevailing conditions. The results thus indicate that heat waves characterized by similar extreme air temperatures may pose little danger under some atmospheric conditions but could be lethal in other cases. The trends illustrated here should give ecologists and agronomists a more informed indication about which circumstances are most conducive to the occurrence of heat stress.

  17. Induction heating to trigger the nickel surface modification by in situ generated 4-carboxybenzene diazonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrotin, Bastien; Jacques, Amory; Devillers, Sébastien; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2016-05-01

    Nickel is commonly used in numerous applications and is one of the few materials that present strong ferromagnetic properties. These make it a suitable material for induction heating which can be used to activate the grafting of organic species such as diazonium salts onto the material. Diazonium compounds are often used for the modification of metals and alloys thanks to their easy chemical reduction onto the substrates and the possibility to apply a one-step in situ generation process of the diazonium species. This work focuses on the grafting of 4-aminocarboxybenzene on nickel substrates in the context of a spontaneous grafting conducted either at room temperature or by thermal assistance through conventional heating and induction heating. These modifications are also carried out with the goal of maintaining the oxides layer as much as possible unaffected. The benefits of using induction heating with respect to conventional heating are an increase of the grafting rate, a better control of the reaction and a slighter impact on the oxides layer.

  18. Cardiovascular responses to heat stress in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical reports have suggested that patients with heart diseases may be particularly vulnerable to heat injury. This review examines the effects of heat stress on cardiovascular and autonomic functions in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Laboratory investigations have shown that cutaneous vasodilator responses to heating are impaired in patients, whereas activation of skin sympathetic nerve activation is not attenuated in CHF as compared to controls. Attenuated cutaneous vasodilation may increase the risk of a heat related illness when CHF subjects are exposed to hyperthermic conditions. PMID:24599558

  19. Use of miniature magnetic sensors for real-time control of the induction heating process

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of monitoring the process of induction heating a workpiece. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can also be used to measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  20. Involvement of small heat shock proteins, trehalose, and lipids in the thermal stress management in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Attila; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Németh, Gergely L; Vince-Kontár, Katalin; Jósvay, Katalin; Hunya, Ákos; Udvardy, Andor; Gombos, Imre; Péter, Mária; Balogh, Gábor; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László; Török, Zsolt

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the levels of three structurally and functionally different important thermoprotectant molecules, namely small heat shock proteins (sHsps), trehalose, and lipids, have been investigated upon heat shock in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Both α-crystallin-type sHsps (Hsp15.8 and Hsp16) were induced after prolonged high-temperature treatment but with different kinetic profiles. The shsp null mutants display a weak, but significant, heat sensitivity indicating their importance in the thermal stress management. The heat induction of sHsps is different in wild type and in highly heat-sensitive trehalose-deficient (tps1Δ) cells; however, trehalose level did not show significant alteration in shsp mutants. The altered timing of trehalose accumulation and induction of sHsps suggest that the disaccharide might provide protection at the early stage of the heat stress while elevated amount of sHsps are required at the later phase. The cellular lipid compositions of two different temperature-adapted wild-type S. pombe cells are also altered according to the rule of homeoviscous adaptation, indicating their crucial role in adapting to the environmental temperature changes. Both Hsp15.8 and Hsp16 are able to bind to different lipids isolated from S. pombe, whose interaction might provide a powerful protection against heat-induced damages of the membranes. Our data suggest that all the three investigated thermoprotectant macromolecules play a pivotal role during the thermal stress management in the fission yeast.

  1. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  2. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention. PMID:26904076

  3. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (˜120 °C) and high (˜800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ˜1 × 10-5 Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ˜2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  4. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (∼120 °C) and high (∼800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ∼1 × 10(-5) Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ∼2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  5. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John

    2012-06-15

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 Degree-Sign C) and high ({approx}800 Degree-Sign C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 Degree-Sign C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 Degree-Sign C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 Degree-Sign C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  6. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Wayne Rigby, John Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 deg C) and high ({approx}800 deg C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 deg C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 x 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 deg C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 deg C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  7. Heated Allergens and Induction of Tolerance in Food Allergic Children

    PubMed Central

    Netting, Merryn; Makrides, Maria; Gold, Michael; Quinn, Patrick; Penttila, Irmeli

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are one of the first manifestations of allergic disease and have been shown to significantly impact on general health perception, parental emotional distress and family activities. It is estimated that in the Western world, almost one in ten children have an IgE-mediated allergy. Cow’s milk and egg allergy are common childhood allergies. Until recently, children with food allergy were advised to avoid all dietary exposure to the allergen to which they were sensitive, in the thought that consumption would exacerbate their allergy. However, recent publications indicate that up to 70% of children with egg allergy can tolerate egg baked in a cake or muffin without apparent reaction. Likewise, up to 75% of children can tolerate baked goods containing cow’s milk, and these children demonstrate IgE and IgG4 profiles indicative of tolerance development. This article will review the current literature regarding the use of heated food allergens as immunotherapy for children with cow’s milk and egg allergy. PMID:23739144

  8. Grafting of bifunctional phosphonic and carboxylic acids on Phynox: Impact of induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devillers, S.; Lanners, L.; Delhalle, J.; Mekhalif, Z.

    2011-05-01

    Phynox, a cobalt-chromium alloy, exhibits interesting mechanical properties making it a valuable material for a number of applications. However, its applications (especially biomedical ones) often require specific surface properties that can be imparted via suitable surface functionalizations. Based on Faraday's law of induction, induction heating is a widely used method to heat metallic substrates directly and contactless. The aim of this work is to compare the influence of induction heating and a conventional heating method on the functionalization of Phynox surfaces with bifunctional (6-phosphonohexanoic and 11-phosphoundecanoic acids) monolayers in order to create a platform for a large variety of post-grafting chemical reactions, e.g. with alcohols and amines, to modify and control the surface properties. In a first part, we assess the influence of the heating method on the interaction between the two terminal moieties of the 6-phosphonohexanoic and 11-phosphoundecanoic acids and the Phynox surface by studying the grafting of n-dodecylphosphonic acid and n-dodecanoic acid separately. The suitability of such bifunctional molecules for post-grafting chemical reactions has then been assessed by studying the post-grafting of a fluorinated alcohol by the Steglich esterification reaction between the carboxylic end of the grafted bifunctional molecules and the alcohol function of the post-grafted molecule. It has been shown that induction heating can lead to a much more selective adsorption of bifunctional molecules on the surface of Phynox, leaving a higher amount of free carboxylic acid functions to react during the second modification step.

  9. Reductions in labour capacity from heat stress under climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, John P.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; John, Jasmin G.

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental aspect of greenhouse-gas-induced warming is a global-scale increase in absolute humidity. Under continued warming, this response has been shown to pose increasingly severe limitations on human activity in tropical and mid-latitudes during peak months of heat stress. One heat-stress metric with broad occupational health applications is wet-bulb globe temperature. We combine wet-bulb globe temperatures from global climate historical reanalysis and Earth System Model (ESM2M) projections with industrial and military guidelines for an acclimated individual's occupational capacity to safely perform sustained labour under environmental heat stress (labour capacity)--here defined as a global population-weighted metric temporally fixed at the 2010 distribution. We estimate that environmental heat stress has reduced labour capacity to 90% in peak months over the past few decades. ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to 80% in peak months by 2050. Under the highest scenario considered (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to less than 40% by 2200 in peak months, with most tropical and mid-latitudes experiencing extreme climatological heat stress. Uncertainties and caveats associated with these projections include climate sensitivity, climate warming patterns, CO2 emissions, future population distributions, and technological and societal change.

  10. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  11. Biological stress responses to radio frequency electromagnetic radiation: are mobile phones really so (heat) shocking?

    PubMed

    Cotgreave, Ian A

    2005-03-01

    Cells phenotypically adapt to alterations in their intra- and extracellular environment via organised alterations to gene and protein expression. Many chemical and physical stimuli are known to drive such responses, including the induction of oxidative stress and heat shock. Increasing use of mobile telephones in our society, has brought focus on the potential for radio frequency (microwave) electromagnetic radiation to elicit biological stress responses, in association with potentially detrimental effects of this to human health. Here we review evidence suggesting altered gene and protein expression in response to such emissions, with particular focus on heat shock proteins. Non-thermal induction of heat shock proteins has been claimed by a number of investigations in in vitro cellular systems, and appears pleiotropic for many other regulatory events. However, many of these studies are flawed by inconsistencies in exposure models, cell types used and the independent reproducibility of the findings. Further, the paucity of evidence from in vivo experimentation is largely contradictory. Therefore, the validity of these effects in human health risk assessment remain unsubstantiated. Where possible, suggestions for further experimental clarification have been provided.

  12. Heat shock protein induction in rat pancreatic islets by recombinant human interleukin 1 beta.

    PubMed

    Helqvist, S; Polla, B S; Johannesen, J; Nerup, J

    1991-03-01

    Interleukin 1 beta, potentiated by tumour necrosis factor alpha, is cytotoxic to pancreatic Beta cells in vitro. We have hypothesized that interleukin 1 beta induces oxygen free radicals in Beta cells. Since cytotoxicity induced by free radicals and by heat may activate the same cellular repair mechanism (the heat shock response), the aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of protein synthesis in isolated islets after exposure to interleukin 1 beta (150 pg/ml, 24 h), tumour necrosis factor alpha (50 ng/ml, 24 h) heat shock (43 degrees C, 30 min) and H2O2 (0.1 mmol/l, 20 min). By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, autoradiography, Western-blot analysis and partial peptide mapping of 35S-methionine labelled islets, interleukin 1 beta was found to induce a 73 kilodalton protein belonging to the heat shock protein family heat shock protein 70, a heat shock protein 90, and haem oxygenase. A minor induction of heat shock protein 73 and haem oxygenase was seen after H2O2. Interleukin 1 beta did not induce heat shock proteins in rat thyroid cells, rat mesangial cells or in human monocytes. Tumour necrosis factor alpha did not induce selective protein synthesis. Pre-exposure of islets to heat, tumour necrosis factor alpha, or H2O2 did not prevent the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release seen after 24 h of interleukin 1 beta exposure. The data are compatible with free radical induction by interleukin 1 beta. However, the heat shock response is not specific for oxidative injury, and previous studies have shown discrepant effects as to a protective effect of free radical scavengers against interleukin 1 beta-mediated beta-cytotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Human Responses to Exercise-Heat Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    rectal temperature is a good index to assess body core heat storage (177.225). Oral ( sublingual ) temperature is widely used clinically, but less...that immunohistochemical analyses of skin biopsies from these subjects showed that VIP innervation was sparse, while calcitonin gene-related peptide ...proposed that release of one or both of the other peptides , CGRP and substance P, may be the mechanism responsible for active cutaneous vasodilation

  14. Human Adaptations to Heat and Cold Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    the terms acclimation and acclimatization will be used interchangeably. Acclimatization develops from challenges in the natural environment, and...and given adequate water and protection from the sun, a healthy acclimated persons can tolerate extended exposure to virtually any natural weather...Lewis. The nature of the increase in sweating capacity produced by heat acclimatization. J.Physiol. (Lond.) 171: 368-376, 1964. 23. Francesconi, R. P., M

  15. The response of Bacillus licheniformis to heat and ethanol stress and the role of the SigB regulon.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Birgit; Schroeter, Rebecca; Jürgen, Britta; Albrecht, Dirk; Evers, Stefan; Bongaerts, Johannes; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schweder, Thomas; Hecker, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The heat and ethanol stress response of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 was analyzed at the transcriptional and/or translational level. During heat shock, regulons known to be heat-induced in Bacillus subtilis 168 are upregulated in B. licheniformis, such as the HrcA, SigB, CtsR, and CssRS regulon. Upregulation of the SigY regulon and of genes controlled by other extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors indicates a cell-wall stress triggered by the heat shock. Furthermore, tryptophan synthesis enzymes were upregulated in heat stressed cells as well as regulons involved in usage of alternative carbon and nitrogen sources. Ethanol stress led to an induction of the SigB, HrcA, and CtsR regulons. As indicated by the upregulation of a SigM-dependent protein, ethanol also triggered a cell wall stress. To characterize the SigB regulon of B. licheniformis, we analyzed the heat stress response of a sigB mutant. It is shown that the B. licheniformis SigB regulon comprises additional genes, some of which do not exist in B. subtilis, such as BLi03885, encoding a hypothetical protein, the Na/solute symporter gene BLi02212, the arginase homolog-encoding gene BLi00198 and mcrA, encoding a protein with endonuclease activity.

  16. Development of a telemetric heat stress monitor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-21

    Hazardous-materials workers and firefighters wear clothing that protects them from external hazards, but the sealed environment of a protective suit makes its wearer susceptible to heat stress. A prototype of the Telemetric Heat Stress Monitor (THSM) was developed at LANL to warn workers, and personnel monitoring the workers, of incipient heat stress by detecting the workers` elevated temperatures and heart rates. The purpose of this CRADA was to transfer the information and technology from LANL to the industrial partner, and to assist in the further development of a commercial THSM product. The THSM is the first extensive telemetric physiological monitor to be developed; previous monitors used wires between the sensors and the recording and display equipment. Developing a reliable, small, battery-powered, inexpensive telemetry system to share the RF spectrum with today`s proliferating wireless devices was a significant technical accomplishment.

  17. Relationship between oxidative stress and heme oxygenase induction by copper sulfate.

    PubMed

    Ossola, J O; Groppa, M D; Tomaro, M L

    1997-01-15

    The effect of copper sulfate (CuSO4) on both hepatic oxidative stress and heme oxygenase induction was studied. A strong increase in in vivo rat liver chemiluminescence was observed 1 h after Cu(II) administration. To evaluate liver antioxidant enzymatic defenses, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were determined. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase were found to be significantly decreased 5 h after CuSO4 injection. In contrast, superoxide dismutase activity was increased. Heme oxygenase activity appeared 5 h after treatment, reaching a maximum value 18 h after CuSO4 administration. This induction was preceded by a decrease in the intrahepatic GSH pool and an increase in the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, both effects taking place a number of hours before induction of heme oxygenase. Administration of bilirubin, the end product of heme catabolism in mammals, and alpha-tocopherol, a widely employed antioxidant, completely prevented heme oxygenase induction as well as the decrease in hepatic GSH and the increase in chemiluminescence when administered 2 h before CuSO4 treatment. Under the same experimental conditions, beta-carotene showed a moderate preventive effect on both heme oxygenase induction and oxidative stress parameters. These data obtained with Cu(II) treatment are in agreement with our previous reports suggesting a correlation between heme oxygenase induction and oxidative stress.

  18. Age-associated differences in cardiovascular inflammatory gene induction during endotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Papaconstantinou, J

    2001-08-03

    Upon physiological stress, families of stress response genes are activated as natural defense mechanisms. Here, we show that induction of specific inflammatory genes is significantly dysregulated and altered in the heart of aged (24--26-month-old) versus young (4-month-old) mice experimentally challenged with a bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1.5 mg/kg of body mass). Whereas the LPS-mediated induction of cardiac mRNA for tumor necrosis factor alpha or inducible nitric-oxide synthase showed no age-associated differences, the induction of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 was modestly extended with aging, and the induction of IL-6 was significantly prolonged with aging. This age-associated phenomenon occurred gradually from 4 to 17 months of age and became more evident after 23 months of age. The age-associated augmentation of the cardiac IL-6 induction was also dramatic at the protein level. Immunohistochemically, the LPS-induced cardiac IL-6 was localized mainly in the microvascular walls. Aged but not young mice showed a high mortality rate during these experiments. These results demonstrate that endotoxin-mediated induction of specific inflammatory genes in cardiovascular tissues is altered with aging, which may be causally related to the increased susceptibility of aged animals to endotoxic stress.

  19. Evaluation of oxidative stress induction in rats following exposure to silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lingabathula, Harikiran; Yellu, Narsimhareddy

    2017-05-01

    The study investigated the oxidative stress induction by the 10 and 25 nm silver nanorods (SNRs) following intra-tracheal instillation in rats after 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 3 months post instillation periods at 1 and 5 mg/kg b.w. doses. The blood was withdrawn by retro orbital plexus method after exposure periods and different oxidative stress markers were estimated. The results showed that the both sizes of SNRs induced increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and depleted glutathione (GSH) levels after 1 day and 1 week post exposure periods. The 10 and 25 nm SNRs at both doses displayed that significantly reduced levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase following 1 day and 1 week post exposure periods. Also, the results have shown that decrease in total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of both sizes of SNRs significantly following 1 day and 1 week post exposure periods, indicating the oxidative stress induction by SNRs. In spite, there were no significant changes in oxidative stress markers following 1 month and 3 months post exposure periods may be due to recovery. The increased levels of MDA and decreased levels of GSH, SOD, catalase and TAC activity are strongly associated to ROS production and lipid peroxidation, suggesting the induction of oxidative stress in rats. The 10 nm SNRs at 5 mg/kg b.w. dose exposures in rats have shown greater changes in all oxidative stress parameters, indicating the greater induction of oxidative stress when compared with the 25 nm SNRs, representing the size-dose-dependent induction of oxidative stress of SNRs.

  20. Impact of Heat Stress on Cellular and Transcriptional Adaptation of Mammary Epithelial Cells in Riverine Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Kapila, Neha; Sharma, Ankita; Kishore, Amit; Sodhi, Monika; Tripathi, Pawan K.; Mohanty, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to identify the heat responsive genes and biological pathways in heat stressed buffalo mammary epithelial cells (MECs). The primary mammary epithelial cells of riverine buffalo were exposed to thermal stress at 42°C for one hour. The cells were subsequently allowed to recover at 37°C and harvested at different time intervals (30 min to 48 h) along with control samples (un-stressed). In order to assess the impact of heat stress in buffalo MECs, several in-vitro cellular parameters (lactate dehydrogenase activity, cell proliferation assay, cellular viability, cell death and apoptosis) and transcriptional studies were conducted. The heat stress resulted in overall decrease in cell viability and cell proliferation of MECs while induction of cellular apoptosis and necrosis. The transcriptomic profile of heat stressed MECs was generated using Agilent 44 K bovine oligonucleotide array and at cutoff criteria of ≥3-or ≤3 fold change, a total of 153 genes were observed to be upregulated while 8 genes were down regulated across all time points post heat stress. The genes that were specifically up-regulated or down-regulated were identified as heat responsive genes. The upregulated genes in heat stressed MECs belonged to heat shock family viz., HSPA6, HSPB8, DNAJB2, HSPA1A. Along with HSPs, genes like BOLA, MRPL55, PFKFB3, PSMC2, ENDODD1, ARID5A, and SENP3 were also upregulated. Microarray data revealed that the heat responsive genes belonged to different functional classes viz., chaperons; immune responsive; cell proliferation and metabolism related. Gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment of several biological processes like; cellular process, metabolic process, response to stimulus, biological regulation, immune system processes and signaling. The transcriptome analysis data was further validated by RT-qPCR studies. Several HSP (HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, and HSPB1), apoptotic (Bax and Bcl2), immune (IL6, TNFα and NF-kβ) and oxidative

  1. Impact of Heat Stress on Cellular and Transcriptional Adaptation of Mammary Epithelial Cells in Riverine Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kapila, Neha; Sharma, Ankita; Kishore, Amit; Sodhi, Monika; Tripathi, Pawan K; Mohanty, Ashok K; Mukesh, Manishi

    The present study aims to identify the heat responsive genes and biological pathways in heat stressed buffalo mammary epithelial cells (MECs). The primary mammary epithelial cells of riverine buffalo were exposed to thermal stress at 42°C for one hour. The cells were subsequently allowed to recover at 37°C and harvested at different time intervals (30 min to 48 h) along with control samples (un-stressed). In order to assess the impact of heat stress in buffalo MECs, several in-vitro cellular parameters (lactate dehydrogenase activity, cell proliferation assay, cellular viability, cell death and apoptosis) and transcriptional studies were conducted. The heat stress resulted in overall decrease in cell viability and cell proliferation of MECs while induction of cellular apoptosis and necrosis. The transcriptomic profile of heat stressed MECs was generated using Agilent 44 K bovine oligonucleotide array and at cutoff criteria of ≥3-or ≤3 fold change, a total of 153 genes were observed to be upregulated while 8 genes were down regulated across all time points post heat stress. The genes that were specifically up-regulated or down-regulated were identified as heat responsive genes. The upregulated genes in heat stressed MECs belonged to heat shock family viz., HSPA6, HSPB8, DNAJB2, HSPA1A. Along with HSPs, genes like BOLA, MRPL55, PFKFB3, PSMC2, ENDODD1, ARID5A, and SENP3 were also upregulated. Microarray data revealed that the heat responsive genes belonged to different functional classes viz., chaperons; immune responsive; cell proliferation and metabolism related. Gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment of several biological processes like; cellular process, metabolic process, response to stimulus, biological regulation, immune system processes and signaling. The transcriptome analysis data was further validated by RT-qPCR studies. Several HSP (HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, and HSPB1), apoptotic (Bax and Bcl2), immune (IL6, TNFα and NF-kβ) and oxidative

  2. Surface engineering glass-metal coatings designed for induction heating of ceramic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2014-06-01

    The term Surface Engineering is of relatively recent origin and use, however, the use of coatings and treatments to render surfaces of materials more suitable for certain application or environment is not new. With the advent of Vacuum Technology, Surface Engineering has gained a whole new impetus, whereby expensive materials with adequate mechanical, chemical and thermal properties are being coated or treated on their surfaces in order to achieve what is called as Surface Engineered materials. The present paper presents an overview of recent achievements in Surface Engineering and gives a detailed view of a specific application where glass-metal composite coatings were deposited on ceramic components in order to render them sensitive to induction heating. Sintered glaze coatings containing silver particles in appropriate concentration can be used for the induction heating of porcelain. Mixtures of glass ceramic powders with silver are used to prepare self-transfer patterns, which are deposited over porcelain. Several configurations of these coatings, which are aesthetic to start with, are employed and heating patterns are recorded. The microstructure of these coatings is discussed in relation to the heating ability by a classical household induction system. The results show that this technique is practical and commercially viable.

  3. Induction heating for surface triggering styrene polymerization on titanium modified with ATRP initiator.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, Bastien; Devillers, Sébastien; Minet, Isabelle; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2011-02-15

    Titanium and its alloys present high interests for technological applications due to their high corrosion resistance, mechanical properties and biocompatibility. In combination with these remarkable characteristics, some Ti applications require specific surface properties that can be imparted with suitable surface functionalizations of the TiO(2) oxide layer. The present work aims to study the surface-initiated ATR polymerization of styrene on titanium substrates, using grafted 11-(2-bromoisobutyrate)-undecyl-1-phosphonic acid as initiator and to compare the impact of two different heating ways on the efficiency of this polymerization: induction vs. conventional heating. The ability of the initiator to bind titanium substrates and act as an initiator for ATRP of styrene is investigated: both heating conditions led to the polymerization of styrene on modified titanium substrates. However, induction heating appeared to be much more efficient than conventional heating, leading to the formation of a thicker, much denser polystyrene layer than conventional heating after only 1h of polymerization.

  4. Yield-stress fluid drop impact on heated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Brendan; Wu, Alex; Ewoldt, Randy

    2015-11-01

    Yield-stress fluids, including gels and pastes, are effectively fluid at high stress and solid at low stress. In liquid-solid impacts, these fluids can stick and accumulate where they impact, motivating several applications of these rheologically-complex materials. Here we use high-speed imaging to experimentally study liquid-solid impact of yield-stress fluids on heated surfaces. At low temperatures yield-stress fluids tend to stick to surfaces and leave a coating layer. At sufficiently high temperatures the Leidenfrost effect can be observed, wherein a layer of vapor is created between the material and the surface due to rapid boiling, which can prevent a droplet of yield-stress fluid from sticking to the surface. In this study rheological material properties, drop size, drop velocity, and surface temperature are varied to characterize behavioral regimes. Material sticking to and releasing from the surface is observed as a function of the input parameters.

  5. Low, medium and high heat tolerant strains of Listeria monocytogenes and increased heat stress resistance after exposure to sublethal heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes exhibits sophisticated adaptive mechanisms to counteract higher levels of lethal acid, heat, salt or oxidative stresses after pre-exposure to sublethal concentrations of homogenous stress. A group of 37 strains representing all 13 serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes with initi...

  6. Sequence determinants of prokaryotic gene expression level under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Heng; Yang, Yi; Hu, Xiao-Pan; He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2014-11-01

    Prokaryotic gene expression is environment-dependent and temperature plays an important role in shaping the gene expression profile. Revealing the regulation mechanisms of gene expression pertaining to temperature has attracted tremendous efforts in recent years particularly owning to the yielding of transcriptome and proteome data by high-throughput techniques. However, most of the previous works concentrated on the characterization of the gene expression profile of individual organism and little effort has been made to disclose the commonality among organisms, especially for the gene sequence features. In this report, we collected the transcriptome and proteome data measured under heat stress condition from recently published literature and studied the sequence determinants for the expression level of heat-responsive genes on multiple layers. Our results showed that there indeed exist commonness and consistent patterns of the sequence features among organisms for the differentially expressed genes under heat stress condition. Some features are attributed to the requirement of thermostability while some are dominated by gene function. The revealed sequence determinants of bacterial gene expression level under heat stress complement the knowledge about the regulation factors of prokaryotic gene expression responding to the change of environmental conditions. Furthermore, comparisons to thermophilic adaption have been performed to reveal the similarity and dissimilarity of the sequence determinants for the response to heat stress and for the adaption to high habitat temperature, which elucidates the complex landscape of gene expression related to the same physical factor of temperature.

  7. Enemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardi, G. I.; Nicastro, K. R.; McQuaid, C. D.; Ng, T. P. T.; Lathlean, J.; Seuront, L.

    2016-08-01

    Positive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation.

  8. Enemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Zardi, G. I.; Nicastro, K. R.; McQuaid, C. D.; Ng, T. P. T.; Lathlean, J.; Seuront, L.

    2016-01-01

    Positive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation. PMID:27506855

  9. Survival of heat stress with and without heat hardening in Drosophila melanogaster: interactions with larval density.

    PubMed

    Arias, Leticia N; Sambucetti, Pablo; Scannapieco, Alejandra C; Loeschcke, Volker; Norry, Fabian M

    2012-07-01

    Survival of a potentially lethal high temperature stress is a genetically variable thermal adaptation trait in many organisms. Organisms cope with heat stress by basal or induced thermoresistance. Here, we tested quantitative trait loci (QTL) for heat stress survival (HSS) in Drosophila melanogaster, with and without a cyclic heat-hardening pre-treatment, for flies that were reared at low (LD) or high (HD) density. Mapping populations were two panels of recombinant inbred lines (RIL), which were previously constructed from heat stress-selected stocks: RIL-D48 and RIL-SH2, derived from backcrosses to stocks of low and high heat resistance, respectively. HSS increased with heat hardening in both LD and HD flies. In addition, HSS increased consistently with density in non-hardened flies. There was a significant interaction between heat hardening and density effects in RIL-D48. Several QTL were significant for both density and hardening treatments. Many QTL overlapped with thermotolerance QTL identified for other traits in previous studies based on LD cultures only. However, three new QTL were found in HD only (cytological ranges: 12E-16F6; 30A3-34C2; 49C-50C). Previously found thermotolerance QTL were also significant for flies from HD cultures.

  10. Research in occupational heat stress in India: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Krishnan; Maruthy, K. N.; Venugopal, Vidhya; Ramaswamy, Padmavathi

    2016-01-01

    Occupational heat stress is a major health burden with several potential negative health and well-being outcomes. It is only in the recent years medical research has addressed this risk factor. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of studies in the area of occupational heat stress and its health impacts. Research in occupational heat stress in developing countries like India is limited because of several challenges and constraints. Few challenges are permission from industries to publish the data, resistance for change from employers and workers, improper record of heat/any occupational disease by the employer or worker, study design, and paucity in number of studies. Proper education and guidelines can help to overcome some of the constraints. Proper and correct guidelines will help in mitigating the effects of excessive heat exposure on the health of workers. The studies in this area are limited, and the association between occupational heat exposure and health impacts is not clearly established. Hence, carefully designed studies are required to examine this association and thereby provide valuable information to protect worker's health. PMID:28194079

  11. Hypersonic Composites Resist Extreme Heat and Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Through research contracts with NASA, Materials and Electrochemical Research Corporation (MER), of Tucson, Arizona, contributed a number of technologies to record-breaking hypersonic flights. Through this research, MER developed a coating that successfully passed testing to simulate Mach 10 conditions, as well as provide several additional carbon-carbon (C-C) composite components for the flights. MER created all of the leading edges for the X-43A test vehicles at Dryden-considered the most critical parts of this experimental craft. In addition to being very heat resistant, the coating had to be very lightweight and thin, as the aircraft was designed to very precise specifications and could not afford to have a bulky coating. MER patented its carbon-carbon (C-C) composite process and then formed a spinoff company, Frontier Materials Corporation (FMC), also based in Tucson. FMC is using the patent in conjunction with low-cost PAN (polyacrylonitrile)-based fibers to introduce these materials to the commercial markets. The C-C composites are very lightweight and exceptionally strong and stiff, even at very high temperatures. The composites have been used in industrial heating applications, the automotive and aerospace industries, as well as in glass manufacturing and on semiconductors. Applications also include transfer components for glass manufacturing and structural members for carrier support in semiconductor processing.

  12. Closed loop control of the induction heating process using miniature magnetic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-05-20

    A method and system for providing real-time, closed-loop control of the induction hardening process. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  13. Convergent Induction of Osmotic Stress-Responses 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John C.; McElwain, Elizabeth F.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1992-01-01

    In Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, salt stress induces the accumulation of proline and a specific isoform of the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) prior to the switch from C3 to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). To determine whether plant growth regulators initiate or imitate these responses, we have compared the effects elicited by NaCl, abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinins using PEPCase and proline levels as diagnostic tools. Exogenously applied ABA is a poor substitute for NaCl in inducing proline and CAM-specific PEPCase accumulation. Even though ABA levels increase 8- to 10-fold in leaves during salt stress, inhibition of ABA accumulation does not affect these salt-induced responses. In contrast, the addition of cytokinins (6-benzylaminopurine, zeatin, 2-isopentyladenine) mimic salt by greatly increasing proline and PEPCase amounts. Endogenous zeatin levels remain unchanged during salt stress. We conclude: (a) The salt-induced accumulation of proline and PEPCase is coincident with, but is not attributable to, the rise in ABA or zeatin concentration. (b) For the first time, cytokinins and NaCl are implicated as independent initiators of a sensing pathway that signals leaves to alter PEPCase gene expression. (c) During stress, the sensing of osmotic imbalances leading to ABA, proline, and CAM-specific PEPCase accumulation may be mediated directly by NaCl. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:16652978

  14. Thermal Indices and Thermophysiological Modeling for Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Fiala, Dusan

    2015-12-15

    The assessment of the risk of human exposure to heat is a topic as relevant today as a century ago. The introduction and use of heat stress indices and models to predict and quantify heat stress and heat strain has helped to reduce morbidity and mortality in industrial, military, sports, and leisure activities dramatically. Models used range from simple instruments that attempt to mimic the human-environment heat exchange to complex thermophysiological models that simulate both internal and external heat and mass transfer, including related processes through (protective) clothing. This article discusses the most commonly used indices and models and looks at how these are deployed in the different contexts of industrial, military, and biometeorological applications, with focus on use to predict related thermal sensations, acute risk of heat illness, and epidemiological analysis of morbidity and mortality. A critical assessment is made of tendencies to use simple indices such as WBGT in more complex conditions (e.g., while wearing protective clothing), or when employed in conjunction with inappropriate sensors. Regarding the more complex thermophysiological models, the article discusses more recent developments including model individualization approaches and advanced systems that combine simulation models with (body worn) sensors to provide real-time risk assessment. The models discussed in the article range from historical indices to recent developments in using thermophysiological models in (bio) meteorological applications as an indicator of the combined effect of outdoor weather settings on humans.

  15. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, R. A.

    1988-08-01

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging from 280 to 560 GHz.

  16. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1988-08-22

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging form 280 to 560 GHz. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Inductively Heated Shape Memory Polymer for the Magnetic Actuation of Medical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, P; Mckinley, G; Wilson, T; Small, W; Benett, W; Bearinger, J; McElfresh, M; Maitland, D

    2005-09-06

    Presently there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with Nickel Zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP.

  18. Inductively heated shape memory polymer for the magnetic actuation of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick R; McKinley, Gareth H; Wilson, Thomas S; Small, Ward; Benett, William J; Bearinger, Jane P; McElfresh, Michael W; Maitland, Duncan J

    2006-10-01

    Presently, there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with nickel zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP.

  19. Heat stress assessment among workers in a Nicaraguan sugarcane farm

    PubMed Central

    Delgado Cortez, Orlando

    2009-01-01

    Background Heat illness is a major cause of preventable morbidity worldwide. Workers exposed to intense heat can become unable to activate compensation mechanisms, putting their health at risk. Heat stress also has a direct impact on production by causing poor task performance and it increases the possibility of work-related morbidity and injuries. During the sugarcane harvest period, workers are exposed to excessive sunlight and heat from approximately 6 am to 3 pm. A first assessment of heat stress during the 2006/2007 harvesting season served to redesign the existing rehydration measures. In this project, sugarcane workers were provided with more rehydration solutions and water during their work schedule. Objective To assess heat stress preventive measures in order to improve existing rehydration strategies as a means of increasing productivity. Methods A small group of 22 workers were followed up for 15 days during working hours, from 6 am to 3 pm. Selection criteria were defined: to have worked more than 50% of the day's working schedule and to have worked for at least 10 days of the follow-up period. A simple data recollection sheet was used. Information regarding the amount of liquid intake was registered. Production output data was also registered. Temperature measurements were recorded by using a portable temperature monitoring device (‘EasyLog’, model EL-USB-2). Results The average temperature measurements were above the Nicaraguan Ministry of Labour thresholds. Seven workers drank 7–8 L of liquid, improving their production. Output production increased significantly (p=0.005) among those best hydrated, from 5.5 to 8 tons of cut sugarcane per worker per day. Conclusions Productivity improved with the new rehydration measures. Awareness among workers concerning heat stress prevention was increased. PMID:20052378

  20. Induction heat treatment and technique of bioceramic coatings production on medical titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Fomina, Marina A.; Poshivalova, Elena Y.; Krasnikov, Aleksandr V.; Petrova, Natalia N.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Skaptsov, Alexander A.; Gribov, Andrey N.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-03-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, physico-mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  1. Controlled nucleation and growth of thin hydroxyapatite layers on titanium implants by using induction heating technique.

    PubMed

    Gómez Morales, J; Rodríguez Clemente, R; Armas, B; Combescure, C; Berjoan, R; Cubo, J; Martínez, E; García Carmona, J; Garelik, S; Murtra, J; Muraviev, D N

    2004-06-22

    This paper reports the results obtained by the development of a new wet method of hydroxyapatite (HA) thin layer deposition. The method is based on the localized precipitation of HA on metallic substrates activated by induction heating. The technique developed has been shown to allow for the complete coating of substrates with micrometric thin films of HA within a low processing time. The method has been successfully applied to coat Ti plaques and Ti-6A1-4V cylinders.

  2. On the optimal chamber length and electron heating mechanism in low pressure inductive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Won; Park, Il-Seo; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Plasma resistance with the chamber length was measured at different plasma densities in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas. It was found that the plasma resistance has a maximum at specific chamber length, Lopt, and the Lopt is changed with the plasma density. It is related to the maximum collisionless electron heating, which simultaneously satisfies the conditions of both the bounce resonance and the transit time resonance. Therefore, Lopt is an optimal chamber size for the power transfer to the plasma.

  3. Study of heat-stress levels in naturally ventilated sheep barns during heat waves: development and assessment of regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, D. K.; Bartzanas, T.; Panagakis, P.; Zhang, G.; Kittas, C.

    2016-11-01

    It is well documented that heat-stress burdens sheep welfare and productivity. Peak heat-stress levels are observed when high temperatures prevail, i.e. during heat waves; however, continuous measurements inside livestock buildings are not usually available for long periods so as to study the variation of summer heat-stress levels for several years, especially during extreme hot weather. Α methodology to develop a long time series of summer temperature and relative humidity inside naturally ventilated sheep barns is proposed. The accuracy and the transferability of the developed linear regression models were verified. Temperature Humidity Index (THI) was used to assess sheep's potential heat-stress. Τhe variation of THI inside a barn during heat wave and non-heat wave days was examined, and the results were comparatively assessed. The analysis showed that sheep were exposed to moderate, severe, and extreme severe heat-stress in 10, 21 and 66 % of hours, respectively, during heat wave days, while the corresponding values during non-heat wave days were 14, 33 and 43 %, respectively. The heat load on sheep was much higher during heat wave events than during non-heat wave periods. Additionally, based on the averaged diurnal variation of THI, it was concluded that extreme severe heat-stress conditions were prevailing between 1000 and 2400 hours local time during heat wave days. Cool off night periods were never and extremely rarely detected during heat wave and non-heat wave days, respectively.

  4. Electromagnetic induction heating of an orthopaedic nickel--titanium shape memory device.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian W; Pfeifer, Ronny; El-Kashef, Tarek; Hurschler, Christof; Herzog, Dirk; Oszwald, Markus; Haasper, Carl; Krettek, Christian; Gösling, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Shape memory orthopaedic implants made from nickel-titanium (NiTi) might allow the modulation of fracture healing, changing their cross-sectional shape by employing the shape memory effect. We aimed to show the feasibility and safety of contact-free electromagnetic induction heating of NiTi implants in a rat model. A water-cooled generator-oscillator combination was used. Induction characteristics were determined by measuring the temperature increase of a test sample in correlation to generator power and time. In 53 rats, NiTi implants were introduced into the right hind leg. The animals were transferred to the inductor, and the implant was electromagnetically heated to temperatures between 40 and 60°C. Blood samples were drawn before and 4 h after the procedure. IL-1, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were measured. Animals were euthanized at 3 weeks. Histological specimens from the hind leg and liver were retrieved and examined for inflammatory changes, necrosis, and corrosion pits. Cytokine measurements and histological specimens showed no significant differences among the groups. We concluded that electromagnetic induction heating of orthopedic NiTi implants is feasible and safe in a rat model. This is the first step in the development of new orthopedic implants in which stiffness or rigidity can be modified after implantation to optimize bone-healing.

  5. Recovery from heat, salt and osmotic stress in Physcomitrella patens requires a functional small heat shock protein PpHsp16.4

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant small heat shock proteins (sHsps) accumulate in response to various environmental stresses, including heat, drought, salt and oxidative stress. Numerous studies suggest a role for these proteins in stress tolerance by preventing stress-induced protein aggregation as well as by facilitating protein refolding by other chaperones. However, in vivo evidence for the involvement of sHsps in tolerance to different stress factors is still missing, mainly due to the lack of appropriate mutants in specific sHsp genes. Results In this study we characterized the function of a sHsp in abiotic stress tolerance in the moss Physcomitrella patens, a model for primitive land plants. Using suppression subtractive hybridization, we isolated an abscisic acid-upregulated gene from P. patens encoding a 16.4 kDa cytosolic class II sHsp. PpHsp16.4 was also induced by salicylic acid, dithiothreitol (DTT) and by exposure to various stimuli, including osmotic and salt stress, but not by oxidative stress-inducing compounds. Expression of the gene was maintained upon stress relief, suggesting a role for this protein in the recovery stage. PpHsp16.4 is encoded by two identical genes arranged in tandem in the genome. Targeted disruption of both genes resulted in the inability of plants to recover from heat, salt and osmotic stress. In vivo localization studies revealed that PpHsp16.4 localized in cytosolic granules in the vicinity of chloroplasts under non stress conditions, suggesting possible distinct roles for this protein under stress and optimal growth. Conclusions We identified a member of the class II sHsp family that showed hormonal and abiotic stress gene regulation. Induction of the gene by DTT treatment suggests that damaged proteins may act as signals for the stress-induction of PpHsp16.4. The product of this gene was shown to localize in cytosolic granules near the chloroplasts, suggesting a role for the protein in association with these organelles. Our study

  6. Carotid baroreflex responsiveness in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of whole body heating on human baroreflex function are relatively unknown. The purpose of this project was to identify whether whole body heating reduces the maximal slope of the carotid baroreflex. In 12 subjects, carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness were assessed in normothermia and during whole body heating. Whole body heating increased sublingual temperature (from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C, P < 0.01) and increased heart rate (from 59 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 3 beats/min, P < 0. 01), whereas mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was slightly decreased (from 88 +/- 2 to 83 +/- 2 mmHg, P < 0.01). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac responsiveness were assessed by identifying the maximal gain of MAP and heart rate to R wave-triggered changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure. Whole body heating significantly decreased the responsiveness of the carotid-vasomotor baroreflex (from -0.20 +/- 0.02 to -0.13 +/- 0.02 mmHg/mmHg, P < 0.01) without altering the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex (from -0.40 +/- 0.05 to -0.36 +/- 0.02 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1), P = 0.21). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex curves were shifted downward and upward, respectively, to accommodate the decrease in blood pressure and increase in heart rate that accompanied the heat stress. Moreover, the operating point of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex was shifted closer to threshold (P = 0.02) by the heat stress. Reduced carotid-vasomotor baroreflex responsiveness, coupled with a reduction in the functional reserve for the carotid baroreflex to increase heart rate during a hypotensive challenge, may contribute to increased susceptibility to orthostatic intolerance during a heat stress.

  7. Interactions between 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and ascorbate in autophagosome formation during the heat stress response in Solanum lycopersicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Yin, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Foyer, Christine Helen

    2016-03-01

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-CPs) function in the removal of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides but their precise roles in the induction of autophagy have not been characterized. Here we show that heat stress, which is known to induce oxidative stress, leads to the simultaneous accumulation of transcripts encoding 2-CPs and autophagy proteins, as well as autophagosomes, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Virus-induced gene silencing of the tomato peroxiredoxin genes 2-CP1, 2-CP2, and 2-CP1/2 resulted in an increased sensitivity of tomato plants to heat stress. Silencing 2-CP2 or 2-CP1/2 increased the levels of transcripts associated with ascorbate biosynthesis but had no effect on the glutathione pool in the absence of stress. However, the heat-induced accumulation of transcripts associated with the water-water cycle was compromised by the loss of 2-CP1/2 functions. The transcript levels of autophagy-related genes ATG5 and ATG7 were higher in plants with impaired 2-CP1/2 functions, and the formation of autophagosomes increased, together with an accumulation of oxidized and insoluble proteins. Silencing of ATG5 or ATG7 increased the levels of 2-CP transcripts and protein but decreased heat stress tolerance. These results demonstrate that 2-CPs fulfil a pivotal role in heat stress tolerance in tomato, via interactions with ascorbate-dependent pathways and autophagy.

  8. Molecular Basis of the Defective Heat Stress Response in Mycobacterium leprae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Diana L.; Pittman, Tana L.; Deshotel, Mike; Oby-Robinson, Sandra; Smith, Issar; Husson, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, a major human pathogen, grows poorly at 37°C. The basis for its inability to survive at elevated temperatures was investigated. We determined that M. leprae lacks a protective heat shock response as a result of the lack of transcriptional induction of the alternative sigma factor genes sigE and sigB and the major heat shock operons, HSP70 and HSP60, even though heat shock promoters and regulatory circuits for these genes appear to be intact. M. leprae sigE was found to be capable of complementing the defective heat shock response of mycobacterial sigE knockout mutants only in the presence of a functional mycobacterial sigH, which orchestrates the mycobacterial heat shock response. Since the sigH of M. leprae is a pseudogene, these data support the conclusion that a key aspect of the defective heat shock response in M. leprae is the absence of a functional sigH. In addition, 68% of the genes induced during heat shock in M. tuberculosis were shown to be either absent from the M. leprae genome or were present as pseudogenes. Among these is the hsp/acr2 gene, whose product is essential for M. tuberculosis survival during heat shock. Taken together, these results suggest that the reduced ability of M. leprae to survive at elevated temperatures results from the lack of a functional transcriptional response to heat shock and the absence of a full repertoire of heat stress response genes, including sigH. PMID:17933896

  9. Body Temperature Versus Microclimate Selection in Heat Stressed Dairy Cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the thermoregulatory responses of unrestrained heat-stressed dairy cows within a freestall environment using fan and spray configurations for cooling cows while lying or standing. An experimental treatment sprayed individual cows lying in freestalls from ...

  10. Simulating canopy temperature for modelling heat stress in cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop models must be improved to account for the large effects of heat stress effects on crop yields. To date, most approaches in crop models use air temperature despite evidence that crop canopy temperature better explains yield reductions associated with high temperature events. This study presents...

  11. Peripheral vascular responses to heat stress after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looft-Wilson, Robin C.; Gisolfi, Carl V.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether hindlimb suspension (which simulates the effects of microgravity) results in impaired hemodynamic responses to heat stress or alterations in mesenteric small artery sympathetic nerve innervation. METHODS: Over 28 d, 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were hindlimb-suspended, and 13 control rats were housed in the same type of cage. After the treatment, mean arterial pressure (MAP), colonic temperature (Tcol), and superior mesenteric and iliac artery resistances (using Doppler flowmetry) were measured during heat stress [exposure to 42 degrees C until the endpoint of 80 mm Hg blood pressure was reached (75 +/- 9 min); endpoint Tcore = 43.6 +/- 0.2] while rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital, 50 mg x kg(-1) BW). RESULTS: Hindlimb-suspended and control rats exhibited similar increases in Tcol, MAP, and superior mesenteric artery resistance, and similar decreases in iliac resistance during heat stress (endpoint was a fall in MAP below 80 mm Hg). Tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining indicated similar sympathetic nerve innervation in small mesenteric arteries from both groups. CONCLUSION: Hindlimb suspension does not alter the hemodynamic or thermoregulatory responses to heat stress in the anesthetized rat or mesenteric sympathetic nerve innervation, suggesting that this sympathetic pathway is intact.

  12. Mechanisms of Aerobic Performance Impairment With Heat Stress and Dehydration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Jones (65) demonstrated that a menthol mouth rinse reduced RPE (com- pared with placebo) by 15% and improved TTE by 9% during exercise-heat stress...potentials. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 35: 456–463, 2010. 65. Mundel T, Jones DA. The effects of swilling an l()- menthol solution during exercise in the

  13. Genetic solutions to infertility caused by heat stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive function in mammals is very susceptible to disruption by heat stress. In lactating dairy cows, for example, pregnancy rates per insemination can be as low as 10-15% in the summer vs. 25-40% in cool weather. Reduced fertility in females is caused by a combination of 1) the negative cons...

  14. Induction of the mammalian stress response gene GADD153 by oxidative stress: role of AP-1 element.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, K Z; Xu, Q; Holbrook, N J

    1996-01-01

    GADD153 is a CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-related gene that may function to control cellular growth in response to stress signals. In this study, a variety of oxidant treatments were shown to stimulate endogenous GADD153 mRNA expression and to transcriptionally activate a GADD153 promoter-reporter gene construct in transfected HeLa cells. Both commonalities and distinctions in the induction of GADD153 by H2O2 and the thiol-reactive compound arsenite were demonstrated. GADD153 mRNA induction by both H2O2 and arsenite was potentiated by GSH depletion, and completely inhibited by N-acetyl-cysteine. o-Phenanthroline and mannitol blocked GADD153 induction by H2O2, indicating that iron-generated hydroxyl radical mediates this induction. Concordantly, GSH peroxidase overexpression in WI38 cells attenuated GADD153 mRNA induction by H2O2. However, GADD153 induction by arsenite was only modestly reduced in the same cells, suggesting a lesser contribution of peroxides to gene activation by arsenite. We also demonstrated that oxidative stress participates in the induction of GADD153 by UVC (254 nm) irradiation. Finally, both promoter-deletion analysis and point mutation of the AP-1 site in an otherwise intact promoter support a significant role for AP-1 in transcriptional activation of GADD153 by UVC or oxidant treatment. Indeed, exposure of cells to oxidants or UVC stimulated binding of Fos and Jun to the GADD153 AP-1 element. Together, these results demonstrate that both free-radical generation and thiol modification can transcriptionally activate GADD153, and that AP-1 is critical to oxidative regulation of this gene. This study further supports a role for the GADD153 gene product in the cellular response to oxidant injury. PMID:8670069

  15. Causes, effects and molecular mechanisms of testicular heat stress.

    PubMed

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe

    2015-01-01

    The process of spermatogenesis is temperature-dependent and occurs optimally at temperatures slightly lower than that of the body. Adequate thermoregulation is imperative to maintain testicular temperatures at levels lower than that of the body core. Raised testicular temperature has a detrimental effect on mammalian spermatogenesis and the resultant spermatozoa. Therefore, thermoregulatory failure leading to heat stress can compromise sperm quality and increase the risk of infertility. In this paper, several different types of external and internal factors that may contribute towards testicular heat stress are reviewed. The effects of heat stress on the process of spermatogenesis, the resultant epididymal spermatozoa and on germ cells, and the consequent changes in the testis are elaborated upon. We also discuss the molecular response of germ cells to heat exposure and the possible mechanisms involved in heat-induced germ cell damage, including apoptosis, DNA damage and autophagy. Further, the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways that are involved in the intricate mechanism of germ cell apoptosis are explained. Ultimately, these complex mechanisms of apoptosis lead to germ cell death.

  16. High temperature setup for measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of thin films using inductive heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnane, L.; Williams, N.; Silva, H.; Gokirmak, A.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an automated setup for simultaneous measurement of Seebeck coefficient S(T) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) of thin film samples from room temperature to ˜650 °C. S and ρ are extracted from current-voltage (I-V) measurements obtained using a semiconductor parameter analyzer and temperature measurements obtained using commercial thermocouples. The slope and the x-axis intercept of the I-V characteristics represent the sample conductance G and the Seebeck voltage, respectively. The measured G(T) can be scaled to ρ(T) by the geometry factor obtained from the room temperature resistivity measurement of the film. The setup uses resistive or inductive heating to control the temperature and temperature gradient on the sample. Inductive heating is achieved with steel plates that surround the test area and a water cooled copper pipe coil underneath that generates an AC magnetic field. The measurements can be performed using resistive heating only or inductive heating only, or a combination of both depending on the desired heating ranges. Inductive heating provides a more uniform heating of the test area, does not require contacts to the sample holder, can be used up to the Curie temperature of the particular magnetic material, and the temperature gradients can be adjusted by the relative positions of the coil and sample. Example results obtained for low doped single-crystal silicon with inductive heating only and with resistive heating only are presented.

  17. A Chrysanthemum Heat Shock Protein Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Zhu, Xirong; Chen, Fadi; Gao, Haishun; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are associated with protection against various abiotic stresses. Here, the isolation of a chrysanthemum cDNA belonging to the HSP70 family is reported. The cDNA, designated CgHSP70, encodes a 647-residue polypeptide, of estimated molecular mass 70.90 kDa and pI 5.12. A sub-cellular localization assay indicated that the cDNA product is deposited in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The performance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants constitutively expressing CgHSP70 demonstrated that the gene enhances tolerance to heat, drought and salinity. When CgHSP70 was stably over-expressed in chrysanthemum, the plants showed an increased peroxidase (POD) activity, higher proline content and inhibited malondialdehyde (MDA) content. After heat stress, drought or salinity the transgenic plants were better able to recover, demonstrating CgHSP70 positive effect. PMID:24663057

  18. Beginning Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Stress and the Supposed Effects of Induction Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms-Lorenz, Michelle; Slof, Bert; Vermue, Carlien E.; Canrinus, Esther T.

    2012-01-01

    Induction arrangements are implemented in schools all over the world to support beginning teachers (BTs) (novices) in gradually growing into their profession. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into two key psychological processes involved in the work of a qualified beginning teacher, namely perceived stress and self-efficacy. This…

  19. Induction of Hsp70 by desiccation, ionising radiation and heat-shock in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, K Ingemar; Schill, Ralph O

    2007-04-01

    The physiology and biochemistry behind the extreme tolerance to desiccation shown by the so-called anhydrobiotic animals represents an exciting challenge to biology. The current knowledge suggests that both carbohydrates and proteins are often involved in protecting the dry cell from damage, or in the repair of induced damage. Tardigrades belong to the most desiccation-tolerant multicellular organisms, but very little research has been reported on the biochemistry behind desiccation tolerance in this group. We quantified the induction of the heat-shock protein Hsp70, a very wide-spread stress protein, in response to desiccation, ionising radiation, and heating, in the anhydrobiotic tardigrade Richtersius coronifer using an immuno-westernblot method. Elevated levels of Hsp70 were recorded after treatment of both heat and ionising radiation, and also in rehydrated tardigrades after a period of desiccation. In contrast, tardigrades in the desiccated (dry) state had reduced Hsp70 levels compared to the non-treated control group. Our results suggest that Hsp70 may be involved in the physiological and biochemical system underlying desiccation (and radiation) tolerance in tardigrades, and that its role may be connected to repair processes after desiccation rather than to biochemical stabilization in the dry state.

  20. Pathway to a Phenocopy: Heat Stress Effects in Early Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2015-01-01

    Background Heat shocks applied at the onset of gastrulation in early Drosophila embryos frequently lead to phenocopies of U-shaped mutants – having characteristic failures in the late morphogenetic processes of germband retraction and dorsal closure. The pathway from non-specific heat stress to phenocopied abnormalities is unknown. Results Drosophila embryos subjected to 30-min, 38-°C heat shocks at gastrulation appear to recover and restart morphogenesis. Post-heat-shock development appears normal, albeit slower, until a large fraction of embryos develop amnioserosa holes (diameters > 100 μm). These holes are positively correlated with terminal U-shaped phenocopies. They initiate between amnioserosa cells and open over tens of minutes by evading normal wound healing responses. They are not caused by tissue-wide increases in mechanical stress or decreases in cell-cell adhesion, but instead appear to initiate from isolated apoptosis of amnioserosa cells. Conclusions The pathway from heat shock to U-shaped phenocopies involves the opening of one or more large holes in the amnioserosa that compromise its structural integrity and lead to failures in morphogenetic processes that rely on amnioserosa-generated tensile forces. The proposed mechanism by which heat shock leads to hole initiation and expansion is heterochonicity – i.e., disruption of morphogenetic coordination between embryonic and extra-embryonic cell types. PMID:26498920

  1. Heat shock (stress response) proteins and renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Katherine J

    2005-01-01

    Acute renal failure occurs frequently, may be increasing, carries an unacceptably high mortality, yet there is no specific treatment. The induction of stress response (heat shock) proteins (HSPs) is a highly conserved response that protects many cell types from diverse physiological and environmental stressors. HSP families of different sizes function as molecular chaperones that facilitate the folding of enzymes and other proteins into functional conformations. After injury, HSPs are believed to facilitate the restoration of normal function by assisting in the refolding of denatured proteins and degradation of irreparably damaged proteins and toxic metabolites, limitation of aggregation of damaged peptides and aiding appropriate folding of newly synthesized essential polypeptides. HSPs may also regulate apoptosis and immune functions. We have demonstrated protection from the functional deficits and histological evidence of experimental ischemic renal injury with heat stress 6 but not 48 h prior to ischemia. Limitation of the induction of HSPs (either with a short period of hyperthermia or pharmacologically) attenuated the protection observed. Other investigators have demonstrated a correlation between the levels of HSP25 and renal ischemic preconditioning in the mouse. Several pharmacological agents have been shown to increase HSP expression. Enhancement of these endogenous protective mechanisms has potential benefit in human disease.

  2. Phosphoinositolphosphate (PIP) cascade induction by hypertonic stress of plant tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.; Jacoby, B. )

    1989-04-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) was determined by competition with ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 3} for binding to an IP{sub 3} specific protein. A hypertonic mannitol, sorbitol or lactose shock induced an increase in the rate of K{sup +} uptake and raised the IP{sub 3} content of Beta vulgaris slices, excised Vigna mungo and Sorghum bicolor roots, as well as attached V. mungo roots. Increased K{sup +} uptake could also be induced by compounds that artificially induce the PIP cascade, or mimic it's products. A hypertonic shock, administered to intact B. vulgaris slices, further enhanced the phosphorylation of a 20 kD protein in the plasmalemma. Maximal IP{sub 3} content was found 10 min after hypertonic induction and maximal K{sup +} uptake was obtained 10 min later. The effect of a continuous hypertonic treatment on IP{sub 3} content, but not on K{sup +} uptake, was transient. Li{sup +} decreased the rate of IP{sub 3} metabolism.

  3. Heat shock proteins in relation to heat stress tolerance of creeping bentgrass at different N levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on 'Penn-A4' creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha-1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance.

  4. Heating or freezing bone. Effects on angiogenesis induction and growth potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Leunig, M; Yuan, F; Berk, D A; Gerweck, L E; Jain, R K

    1996-08-01

    We have characterized the effect of bone graft treatment by heating or freezing (with or without dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)). Tissue culture and dorsal skin-fold chambers in mice were used as sites to quantify the effect on angiogenesis, growth and calcification of neonatal femora. Fresh femora increased in both length and cartilage diameter (calcification in vivo only), but cryopreservation or heating abolished the increase in femoral dimensions. In vivo, femora of all experimental groups elicited an angiogenic response from the host tissue, which was most pronounced for fresh femora, weaker for DMSO-preserved frozen bone and poor for unprotected frozen bone and boiled femora. Freezing in the presence of a cryopreservative (DMSO) was found to preserve the angiogenic potential of frozen bone, whereas unprotected heating or freezing significantly impaired angiogenesis induction and growth potential.

  5. Effects of heat-stress on production in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    West, J W

    2003-06-01

    The southeastern United States is characterized as humid subtropical and is subject to extended periods of high ambient temperature and relative humidity. Because the primary nonevaporative means of cooling for the cow (radiation, conduction, convection) become less effective with rising ambient temperature, the cow becomes increasingly reliant upon evaporative cooling in the form of sweating and panting. High relative humidity compromises evaporative cooling, so that under hot, humid conditions common to the Southeast in summer the dairy cow cannot dissipate sufficient body heat to prevent a rise in body temperature. Increasing air temperature, temperature-humidity index and rising rectal temperature above critical thresholds are related to decreased dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield and to reduced efficiency of milk yield. Modifications including shade, barns which enhance passive ventilation, and the addition of fans and sprinklers increase body heat loss, lowering body temperature and improving DMI. New technologies including tunnel ventilation are being investigated to determine if they offer cooling advantages. Genetic selection for heat tolerance may be possible, but continued selection for greater performance in the absence of consideration for heat tolerance will result in greater susceptibility to heat stress. The nutritional needs of the cow change during heat stress, and ration reformulation to account for decreased DMI, the need to increase nutrient density, changing nutrient requirements, avoiding nutrient excesses and maintenance of normal rumen function is necessary. Maintaining cow performance in hot, humid climatic conditions in the future will likely require improved cooling capability, continued advances in nutritional formulation, and the need for genetic advancement which includes selection for heat tolerance or the identification of genetic traits which enhance heat tolerance.

  6. An adaptability limit to climate change due to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Steven C.; Huber, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Despite the uncertainty in future climate-change impacts, it is often assumed that humans would be able to adapt to any possible warming. Here we argue that heat stress imposes a robust upper limit to such adaptation. Peak heat stress, quantified by the wet-bulb temperature TW, is surprisingly similar across diverse climates today. TW never exceeds 31 °C. Any exceedence of 35 °C for extended periods should induce hyperthermia in humans and other mammals, as dissipation of metabolic heat becomes impossible. While this never happens now, it would begin to occur with global-mean warming of about 7 °C, calling the habitability of some regions into question. With 11–12 °C warming, such regions would spread to encompass the majority of the human population as currently distributed. Eventual warmings of 12 °C are possible from fossil fuel burning. One implication is that recent estimates of the costs of unmitigated climate change are too low unless the range of possible warming can somehow be narrowed. Heat stress also may help explain trends in the mammalian fossil record. PMID:20439769

  7. Drivers of self-reported heat stress in the Australian labour force.

    PubMed

    Zander, Kerstin K; Moss, Simon A; Garnett, Stephen T

    2017-01-01

    Heat stress causes reductions in well-being and health. As average annual temperatures increase, heat stress is expected to affect more people. While most research on heat stress has explored how exposure to heat affects functioning of the human organism, stress from heat can be manifest long before clinical symptoms are evident, with profound effects on behavior. Here we add to the little research conducted on these subclinical effects of environmental heat using results from an Australian-wide cross-sectional study of nearly 2000 respondents on their self-reported level of heat stress. Slightly less than half (47%) of the respondents perceived themselves as at least sometimes, often or very often stressed by heat during the previous 12 months. Health status and smoking behavior had the expected impact on self-reported perceived heat stress. There were also regional differences with people living in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales most likely to have reported to have felt heat stressed. People generally worried about climate change, who had been influenced by recent heat waves and who thought there was a relationship between climate change and health were also more likely to have been heat stressed. Surprisingly average maximum temperatures did not significantly explain heat stress but stress was greater among people who perceived the day of the survey as hotter than usual. Currently heat stress indices are largely based on monitoring the environment and physical limitations to people coping with heat. Our results suggest that psychological perceptions of heat need to be considered when predicting how people will be affected by heat under climate change and when developing heat relief and climate change adaptation plans, at work, at home or in public spaces. We further conclude that the perception of temperature and heat stress complements measures that assess heat exposure and heat strain.

  8. Heat stress monitoring system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program involves the need to decontaminate and decommission buildings expeditiously and cost-effectively. Simultaneously, the health and safety of personnel involved in the D and D activities is of primary concern. Often, D and D workers must perform duties in inclement weather, and because they also frequently work in contaminated areas, they must wear personal protective clothing and/or respirators. Monitoring the health status of workers under these conditions is an important component of ensuring their safety. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System`s heat stress monitoring system (HSMS) is designed to monitor the vital signs of individual workers as they perform work in conditions that might be conducive to heat exhaustion or heat stress. The HSMS provides real-time data on the physiological condition of workers which can be monitored to prevent heat stress or other adverse health situations. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their condition more difficult. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System can monitor up to four channels (e.g., heart rate, body activity, ear canal, and skin temperature) and ten workers from a single supervisory station. The monitors are interfaced with a portable computer that updates and records information on individual workers. This innovative technology, even though it costs more, is an attractive alternative to the traditional (baseline) technology, which measures environmental statistics and predicts the average worker`s reaction to those environmental conditions without taking the physical condition of the individual worker into consideration. Although use of the improved technology might be justified purely on the basis of improved safety, it has the potential to pay for itself by reducing worker time lost caused by heat

  9. CFAVC scheme for high frequency series resonant inverter-fed domestic induction heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Booma; Reddy Sathi, Rama

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the investigations on the constant frequency asymmetric voltage cancellation control in the AC-AC resonant converter-fed domestic induction heating system. Conventional fixed frequency control techniques used in the high frequency converters lead to non-zero voltage switching operation and reduced output power. The proposed control technique produces higher output power than the conventional fixed-frequency control strategies. In this control technique, zero-voltage-switching operation is maintained during different duty cycle operation for reduction in the switching losses. Complete analysis of the induction heating power supply system with asymmetric voltage cancellation control is discussed in this article. Simulation and experimental study on constant frequency asymmetric voltage cancellation (CFAVC)-controlled full bridge series resonant inverter is performed. Time domain simulation results for the open and closed loop of the system are obtained using MATLAB simulation tool. The simulation results prove the control of voltage and power in a wide range. PID controller-based closed loop control system achieves the voltage regulation of the proposed system for the step change in load. Hardware implementation of the system under CFAVC control is done using the embedded controller. The simulation and experimental results validate the performance of the CFAVC control technique for series resonant-based induction cooking system.

  10. Heat Shock Protein Induction in Human Cells by CO2 Laser Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-14

    Boorstein W. A review of the role of 70 kD heat shock proteins in protein translocation across membranes. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 1990:58:137-46. 32...1991;65:363-366. 55. Young DB. Stress proteins and the immune response. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 1990;58:203-208. 56. Craig EA, Kramer J, Kosic-Smithers

  11. Induction of heat shock proteins in response to primary alcohols in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, D; Loffhagen, N; Babel, W

    1999-01-01

    Cells of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V, a species able to metabolize a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons and alcohols, were confronted with ethanol, butanol, hexanol or heat shock during growth on acetate as sole source of carbon and energy. The primary alcohols and the heat shock led to the synthesis of new proteins or amplified expression of specific, common and general proteins, which were detected by silver staining after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Some of the alcohol-inducible proteins were identified as heat shock proteins by comparing protein patterns of alcohol-shocked cells with those of heat-shocked cells, and by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. DnaK was found to be amplified after all treatments, but GroEI only after heat shock and ethanol treatment. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein, which was considerably amplified after alcohol treatment and heat shock, shows homology to HtpG (high temperature protein G). Some of the heat shock proteins induced by ethanol differ from those induced by butanol and hexanol, suggesting there are at least two different signals for the induction of some heat shock proteins by primary alcohols. This could be due to the different localization of ethanol, butanol and hexanol in the membrane, or because higher cytoplasmic concentrations of ethanol than of butanol or hexanol were applied in these tests in order to keep concentrations of the alcohols in the membrane roughly similar. Besides heat shock proteins, a group of proteins were observed which were only induced by butanol and hexanol, possibly indicating the existence of a further defense mechanism against high concentrations of hydrophobic substrates preventing protein denaturation and membrane damage.

  12. NMDA receptors mediate heat shock protein induction in the mouse brain following administration of the ibotenic acid analogue AMAA.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Ferrer, I; Rodríguez-Farré, E

    1995-11-27

    Expression of inducible heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and hsp-70 mRNA were studied in the adult mouse brain following systemic administration of the ibotenic acid analogue (+/-)-2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleacetic acid (AMAA), which is a potent N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) agonist. At the dose of 20 mg/kg, AMAA produced excitatory behaviours in adult mice but overt convulsions were not seen. This treatment did not result in any detectable morphological brain damage at 4 days following administration. At 2.5 h and 5 h following treatment induction of hsp-70 mRNA expression was found in the pyramidal cell layers of CA1 and, to a lesser extent, CA3 fields of hippocampal Ammon's horn, amygdala, olfactory lobes, tenia tecta, hypothalamic nuclei and a superficial layer of cingulate, frontal and retrosplenial cortices. The presence of HSP-70 was detected by immunochemistry at 24 h following drug administration in those regions previously showing hsp-70 mRNA induction. AMAA-induced hsp-70 mRNA expression was prevented by pre-treatment with the non-competitive NMDA antagonist MK-801. These results suggest that NMDA receptors are involved in the stress response induced by AMAA.

  13. Influence of heat stress on leaf ultrastructure, photosynthetic performance, and ascorbate peroxidase gene expression of two pear cultivars (Pyrus pyrifolia).

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-feng; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Guo-qin; Hussain, Sayed; Teng, Yuan-wen

    2013-12-01

    Plants encounter a variety of stresses in natural environments. One-year-old pot-grown trees of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai cv. Cuiguan and Wonhwang) were exposed to two heat stress regimes. Under constant short-term heat stress, chloroplasts and mitochondria were visibly damaged. Relative chlorophyll content and maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II were significantly decreased, which indicated that the leaf photosynthetic capability declined. Under chronic heat stress, mesophyll cell ultrastructure was not obviously damaged, but leaf photosynthetic capability was still restrained. As chronic heat stress was a simulation of the natural environment in summer, further study of the responses under this stress regime was undertaken. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was increased in 'Cuiguan', but not in 'Wonhwang'. Inducible expression of PpAPX genes in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts and peroxisomes was consistent with increased APX activity in 'Cuiguan', whereas only weak induction of PpAPX genes was observed in 'Wonhwang'. The isoenzymes cytosolic APX1 (cAPX1) and stromal APX (sAPX) were confirmed to be localized in the cytoplasm and chloroplasts, respectively.

  14. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise.

  15. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D.; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. PMID:25767030

  16. Nrf2 amplifies oxidative stress via induction of Klf9

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi-Smiraglia, Anna; Bogner, Paul N.; Wawrzyniak, Joseph A.; Foley, Colleen; Leonova, Katerina I.; Grimm, Melissa J.; Moparthy, Kalyana; Ionov, Yurij; Wang, Jianmin; Liu, Song; Sexton, Sandra; Kandel, Eugene S.; Bakin, Andrei V.; Zhang, Yuesheng; Kaminski, Naftali; Segal, Brahm H.; Nikiforov, Mikhail A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate NF-E2-related transcription factor 2 (Nrf2), a key transcriptional regulator driving antioxidant gene expression and protection from oxidant injury. Here we report that in response to elevation of intracellular ROS above a critical threshold, Nrf2 stimulates expression of transcription Kruppel-like factor 9 (Klf9), resulting in further Klf9-dependent increases in ROS and subsequent cell death. We demonstrated that Klf9 independently causes increased ROS levels in various types of cultured cells and in mouse tissues and is required for pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Mechanistically, Klf9 binds to the promoters and alters the expression of several genes involved in the metabolism of ROS, including suppression of thioredoxin reductase 2, an enzyme participating in ROS clearance. Our data reveal an Nrf2-dependent feed-forward regulation of ROS and identify Klf9 as a novel ubiquitous regulator of oxidative stress and lung injury. PMID:24613345

  17. Induction of alternative respiratory pathway involves nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide and ethylene under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huahua; Huang, Junjun; Bi, Yurong

    2010-12-01

    Alternative respiratory pathway (AP) plays an important role in plant thermogenesis, fruit ripening and responses to environmental stresses. AP may participate in the adaptation to salt stress since salt stress increased the activity of the AP. Recently, new evidence revealed that ethylene and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) are involved in the salt-induced increase of the AP, which plays an important role in salt tolerance in Arabidopsis callus, and ethylene may be acting downstream of H(2)O(2). Recent observations also indicated both ethylene and nitric oxide (NO) act as signaling molecules in responses to salt stress, and ethylene may be a part of the downstream signal molecular in NO action. In this addendum, a hypothetical model for NO function in regulation of H(2)O(2)- and ethylene-mediated induction of AP under salt stress is presented.

  18. A magnetic induction heating system with multi-cascaded coils and adjustable magnetic circuit for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Fang; Chao, Hsuan-Yi; Chang, Hsun-Hao; Lin, Xi-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of cancer cells that cannot survive in an environment with temperature over 42 °C, a magnetic induction heating system for cancer treatment is developed in this work. First, the methods and analyses for designing the multi-cascaded coils magnetic induction hyperthermia system are proposed, such as internal impedance measurement of power generator, impedance matching of coils, and analysis of the system. Besides, characteristics of the system are simulated by a full-wave package for engineering optimization. Furthermore, by considering the safety factor of patients, a two-sectional needle is designed for hyperthermia. Finally, this system is employed to test the liver of swine in ex-vivo experiments, and through Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain and NADPH oxidase activity assay, the feasibility of this system is verified.

  19. Enhanced autotrophic astaxanthin production from Haematococcus pluvialis under high temperature via heat stress-driven Haber-Weiss reaction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Min-Eui; Hwang, Sung Kwan; Chang, Won Seok; Kim, Byung Woo; Lee, Jeewon; Sim, Sang Jun

    2015-06-01

    High temperatures (30-36 °C) inhibited astaxanthin accumulation in Haematococcus pluvialis under photoautotrophic conditions. The depression of carotenogenesis was primarily attributed to excess intracellular less reactive oxygen species (LROS; O2 (-) and H2O2) levels generated under high temperature conditions. Here, we show that the heat stress-driven inefficient astaxanthin production was improved by accelerating the iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction to convert LROS into more reactive oxygen species (MROS; O2 and OH·), thereby facilitating lipid peroxidation. As a result, during 18 days of photoautotrophic induction, the astaxanthin concentration of cells cultured in high temperatures in the presence of iron (450 μM) was dramatically increased by 75 % (30 °C) and 133 % (36 °C) compared to that of cells exposed to heat stress alone. The heat stress-driven Haber-Weiss reaction will be useful for economically producing astaxanthin by reducing energy cost and enhancing photoautotrophic astaxanthin production, particularly outdoors utilizing natural solar radiation including heat and light for photo-induction of H. pluvialis.

  20. l-Arginine Enhances Resistance against Oxidative Stress and Heat Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heran; Ma, Yudan; Zhang, Zhixian; Zhao, Ziyuan; Lin, Ran; Zhu, Jinming; Guo, Yi; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant properties of l-arginine (l-Arg) in vivo, and its effect on enhancing resistance to oxidative stress and heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans were investigated. C. elegans, a worm model popularly used in molecular and developmental biology, was used in the present study. Here, we report that l-Arg, at a concentration of 1 mM, prolonged C. elegans life by 26.98% and 37.02% under oxidative and heat stress, respectively. Further experiments indicated that the longevity-extending effects of l-Arg may be exerted by its free radical scavenging capacity and the upregulation of aging-associated gene expression in worms. This work is important in the context of numerous recent studies that concluded that environment stresses are associated with an increased population death rate. PMID:27690079

  1. Heat stress of helicopter aircrew wearing immersion suit.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Michel B

    2006-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to define the lowest ambient air and cabin temperatures at which aircrews wearing immersion protection are starting to experience thermal discomfort and heat stress during flight operations, and to characterize during a flight simulation in laboratory, the severity of the heat stress during exposure to a typical northern summer ambient condition (25 degrees C, 40% RH). Twenty male helicopter aircrews wearing immersion suits (insulation of 2.2 Clo in air) performed 26 flights within an 8-month period at ambient temperatures ranging between -15 and 25 degrees C, and cabin temperatures ranging between 3 and 28 degrees C. It was observed based on thermal comfort ratings that the aircrews were starting to experience thermal discomfort and heat stress at ambient and cabin air conditions above 18 degrees C and at a WBGT index of 16 degrees C. In a subsequent study, seven aircrews dressed with the same clothing were exposed for 140 min to 25 degrees C and 40% RH in a climatic chamber. During the exposure, the aircrews simulated pilot flight maneuvers for 80 min followed with backender/flight engineer activities for 60 min. By the end of the 140 min exposure, the skin temperature, rectal temperature and heart rate had increased significantly to 35.7 +/- 0.2 degrees C, 38.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C and between 110 and 160 beats/min depending on the level of physical activity. The body sweat rate averaged 0.58 kg/h and the relative humidity inside the clothing was at saturation by the end of the exposure. It was concluded that aircrews wearing immersion suits during the summer months in northern climates might experience thermal discomfort and heat stress at ambient or cabin air temperature as low as 18 degrees C.

  2. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephanie J.; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B.

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h-1 and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h-1 to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  3. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Stephanie J; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h(-1) and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h(-1) to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  4. Heat stress causes substantial labour productivity loss in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, Kerstin K.; Botzen, Wouter J. W.; Oppermann, Elspeth; Kjellstrom, Tord; Garnett, Stephen T.

    2015-07-01

    Heat stress at the workplace is an occupational health hazard that reduces labour productivity. Assessment of productivity loss resulting from climate change has so far been based on physiological models of heat exposure. These models suggest productivity may decrease by 11-27% by 2080 in hot regions such as Asia and the Caribbean, and globally by up to 20% in hot months by 2050. Using an approach derived from health economics, we describe self-reported estimates of work absenteeism and reductions in work performance caused by heat in Australia during 2013/2014. We found that the annual costs were US$655 per person across a representative sample of 1,726 employed Australians. This represents an annual economic burden of around US$6.2 billion (95% CI: 5.2-7.3 billion) for the Australian workforce. This amounts to 0.33 to 0.47% of Australia’s GDP. Although this was a period when many Australians experienced what is at present considered exceptional heat, our results suggest that adaptation measures to reduce heat effects should be adopted widely if severe economic impacts from labour productivity loss are to be avoided if heat waves become as frequent as predicted.

  5. Application of Annular Linear Induction Pumps Technology for Waste Heat Rejection and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Harold E.

    2005-03-16

    The U.S.-sponsored Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) program will require a light weight, efficient, and reliable power generation system capable of a 20+ year lifespan. This requirement has renewed interest in orbiter technological development. Sub-components of the orbiter system are the primary and secondary power conversion/heat rejection systems for both the proposed nuclear reactors and Brayton cycle heat engines. Brayton-cycle conversion technology has been identified as an excellent candidate for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) power conversion systems. The conversion/rejection systems for these components typically utilize pumped molten metal as the heat transfer medium. Electromagnetic (EM) Annular Linear Induction Pumps (ALIPs) are ideal for this purpose as they can operate at moderate to high efficiency, at elevated temperature, do not involve moving parts (solid-state; long life), and require no bearings or seals. A parametric study was performed to develop a suite of ALIP preliminary designs capable of providing specified pressure and mass flow rate ranges for the proposed NaK(78) Brayton-cycle heat rejection loop. A limited study was also performed for the proposed lithium-cooled nuclear reactor heat transport loops; however, the design of these units is still in its infancy. Both studies were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with the MHD Systems’ ALIP Design Code. The studies focused on designing ALIPs that displayed reasonably high efficiency and low source voltages as well as low mass and smallest geometric envelope.

  6. Characterization of heat-shock proteins in Escherichia coli strains under thermal stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Dec, Marta; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat stress in in vitro conditions on the induction of heat-shock protein (Hsp)70 by Escherichia coli cells, and to determine the localization of Hsps in cell fractions. The material consisted of wild strains of E. coli isolated from the digestive tract of calves, suspended in an exponential-phase culture and subjected to 41.5 °C for 2 h. Individual fractions were analysed by SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Western blotting with mouse anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 mAbs was used to identify the proteins. Electrophoretic analysis of the heat-treated cells detected Hsp70 in all three fractions, cytoplasmic, periplasmic and membrane, which was confirmed by Western blotting. The proteins obtained had diverse localizations in the pH gradient in two-dimensional electrophoresis, which may indicate changes in their conformation and physical properties leading to stabilization and protection of intracellular structures in stress conditions. The presence of these Hsps in different cell fractions indicates a very strong protective adaptation in the bacteria in unfavourable conditions, which is critical for the organism infected by them.

  7. Comparative studies on temperature threshold for heat shock protein 70 induction in young and adult Murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Haque, N; Ludri, A; Hossain, S A; Ashutosh, M

    2012-10-01

    To know the temperature threshold for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction in lymphocytes and to assess physiological changes, if any, in relation to HSP70 induction in young and adult Murrah buffaloes, this study was divided into two parts: I. In vivo study: where assay of HSP70 was performed in blood samples collected from acutely exposed young and adult Murrah buffaloes (n = 6) inside a climatic chamber at 40, 42 and 45 °C for 4 h and thermoneutral temperature (22 °C). Physiological parameters viz., rectal temperature, respiratory rate, pulse rate and skin temperature of different body parts were monitored to assess magnitude of stress in the animals owing to thermal exposure II. For in vitro study, equal numbers of lymphocyte cells were separated from blood collected from young and adult buffaloes and were subjected to four temperature treatments (38, 40, 42 and 45 °C) for 4 h. A significant increase (p < 0.05) in all the physiological parameters in both young and adult buffaloes was observed after exposure to 40, 42 and 45 °C for 4 h as compared to 38 °C. The average plasma HSP70 concentrations (ng/ml) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) at 40, 42 and 45 °C as compared to 38 °C in both young and adult and were higher in young than adult buffaloes at 38 and 45 °C. Heat shock protein 70 level in lymphocyte lysate showed highest concentration after 3-h exposure to all temperatures (40, 42 and 45 °C) in both young and adult buffaloes. The intensity of changes of all physiological parameters was more in young animals than in the adults indicating the greater susceptibility of younger animals to heat stress and was found to be changed at around 40 °C when animals were exposed to different temperatures, indicating the possibility that HSP70 production may be initiated at this temperature which is 2 or 3 °C higher than core body temperature.

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with thermoregulation in lactating dairy cows exposed to heat stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy cows with increased rectal temperature during heat stress experience lower milk yield and fertility. Given that rectal temperature during heat stress is heritable in dairy cattle, genetic selection for regulation of body temperature should reduce effects of heat stress on production. One goal...

  9. Electromagnetic interference with a bipolar pacemaker by an induction heating (IH) rice cooker.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Toshihisa; Abe, Haruhiko; Kohno, Ritsuko; Toyoshima, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Kondo, Shoichi; Kabashima, Narutoshi; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Tamura, Masahito; Okazaki, Masahiro; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields may interfere with normal pacemaker function. Despite new device designs and bipolar leads, electromagnetic interference (EMI) remains a concern when pacemaker recipients are exposed to various household appliances. We report the observation of EMI by an induction heating (IH) rice cooker in a patient with sick sinus syndrome who was the recipient of a bipolar dual chamber-pacing system. Stored electrograms revealed episodes of inappropriate ventricular pacing, all coinciding with the opening of an IH rice cooker. Recipients of implantable medical devices must be warned to handle IH rice cookers with caution.

  10. Historical Review of Electric Household Appliances using Induction-Heating and Future Challenging Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Izuo; Yamashita, Hidekazu; Omori, Hideki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents historical progress on technology evolution of the electric and electronic household appliances using the inverter, especially for Induction-Heating applications, which have been put in practical use as the desk-top cooker for the first time at home in 1974 until being applied to the rice cooker and the multi-burner cooking heater. It also describes the future innovative evolution of the power semiconductor switching devices and the inverter circuit topologies supporting its progressive developments. Looking back its progress, the future trends on consumer power electronics is discussed on the practical problem in the future.

  11. Magneto-inductive heating of water-based iron oxide ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselova, Iu. P.; Safronov, A. P.; Samatov, O. M.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    Spherical magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of iron oxide were fabricated by laser target evaporation technique. Water-based ferrofluids were prepared on the basis of obtained MNPs. Their structure and magnetic properties were studied by a number of methods including transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, SQUID-magnetometry and magnetic relaxation losses measurements. Magneto-inductive heating experiment showed the specific power loss value of 2 W/g for 1.8 kA/m alternating magnetic field of 214 kHz frequency. These parameters indicate that LTE MNPs are perspective materials for biomedical applications such as hyperthermia.

  12. Induction temperature of human heat shock factor is reprogrammed in a Drosophila cell environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clos, Joachim; Rabindran, Sridhar; Wisniewski, Jan; Wu, Carl

    1993-07-01

    HEAT shock factor (HSF)1,2, the transcriptional activator of eukaryotic heat shock genes, is induced to bind DNA by a monomer to trimer transition involving leucine zipper interactions3,4. Although this mode of regulation is shared among many eukaryotic species, there is variation in the temperature at which HSF binding activity is induced. We investigated the basis of this variation by analysing the response of a human HSF expressed in Drosophila cells and Drosophila HSF expressed in human cells. We report here that the temperature that induces DNA binding and trimerization of human HSF in Drosophila was decreased by ~10 °C to the induction temperature for the host cell, whereas Drosophila HSF expressed in human cells was constitutively active. The results indicate that the activity of HSF in vivo is not a simple function of the absolute environmental temperature.

  13. [Possible pathways of heat resistance induction in plant cells by exogenous nitrogen oxide].

    PubMed

    Karpets, Iu V; Kolupaev, Iu E; Iastreb, T O; Dmitriev, A P

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of influence of exogenous nitrogen oxide (NO) on heat resistance of wheat coleoptiles have been studied. The treatment of plant cells with nitrogen oxide donor (sodium nitroprusside) resulted in the increase of superoxide anion-radical (O2*-) generation already after 10 minutes. The inhibitor of protein biosynthesis cycloheximide did not inhibit the O2*- generation by coleoptiles caused with the NO donor whereas the inhibitor of phosphatidic acid formation (butanol-1) partially inhibited it. The treatment of coleoptiles with the calcium ionophore (A23187) or activator of inositol cycle (inositol) compensated the suppression of butanol-1 effect on NO-dependent O2*- formation. Butanol-1 has also leveled the induction of coleoptiles heat resistance caused by the NO donor, whereas calcium ionophore and inositol almost completely removed the butanol-1 effect. The possible mechanisms of participation of reactive oxygen species, phosphatidic acid and calcium ions in the realization of NO physiological effects are discussed.

  14. Prototyping Energy Efficient Thermo-Magnetic & Induction Hardening for Heat Treat & Net Shape Forming Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aquil Ahmad

    2012-08-03

    Within this project, Eaton undertook the task of bringing about significant impact with respect to sustainability. One of the major goals for the Department of Energy is to achieve energy savings with a corresponding reduction in carbon foot print. The use of a coupled induction heat treatment with high magnetic field heat treatment makes possible not only improved performance alloys, but with faster processing times and lower processing energy, as well. With this technology, substitution of lower cost alloys for more exotic alloys became a possibility; microstructure could be tailored for improved magnetic properties or wear resistance or mechanical performance, as needed. A prototype commercial unit has been developed to conduct processing of materials. Testing of this equipment has been conducted and results demonstrate the feasibility for industrial commercialization.

  15. Numerical simulation of thermal disposition with induction heating used for oncological hyperthermic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dughiero, F; Corazza, S

    2005-01-01

    Hyperthermia plays an important role in oncological therapies, most often being used in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The success of this therapy is strongly dependent on the precision and control of thermal deposition. Hyperthermia based on induction heating, with thermally self-regulating thermoseeds inserted into the tumorous mass, is used for interstitial treatment. The technique was the subject of the numerical study presented in the paper. The analysis was carried out using coupled electromagnetic heating and thermo-fluid dynamic FEM simulations. During thermal deposition by induction heating of inserted seeds, the simulations estimated the thermal field inside and outside the tumour, as well as the sensitivity of the thermal field to variations regarding seed temperature, configuration and proximity to vessels. The method, for which accurate anatomical patient's information is essential, is suitable for providing useful qualitative and quantitative information about thermal transients and power density distribution for hyperthermic treatment. Several grid steps were analysed and compared. A 1 cm seed grid was resulted in good homogeneity and effectiveness of the thermal deposition. The cold spot effect caused by large vessels was demonstrated and quantified. Simulations of the heating of a tumorous mass in the liver showed that an indcutor generator operating at 200 kHz frequency and 500 A current, producing a pulsating magnetic field of H = 60 A cm(-1), was adequate for the treatment. The seeds that perform best among those tested (Nicu (28% Cu), PdNi (27.2% Ni), PdCo (6.15% Co) and ferrite core) were the PdNi (1 mm radius, 10 mm length), as they have a low Curie temperature (52 degrees C), which is the closest to the desired treatment temperature and thus reduces the risk of hot spots.

  16. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes.

  17. Conditional Induction of Oxidative Stress in RPE: A Mouse Model of Progressive Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Manas R; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Mao, Haoyu; Seo, Soo Jung; Wang, Zhaoyang; Li, Hong; Le, Yun Z; Lewin, Alfred S

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate animal model is essential to screening drugs or designing a treatment strategy for geographic atrophy. Since oxidative stress contributes to the pathological changes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), we are reporting a new mouse AMD model of retinal degeneration by inducing mitochondrial oxidative stress in RPE. Sod2 the gene for manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was deleted in RPE layer using conditional knockout strategy. Fundus microscopy, SD-OCT and electroretinography were used to monitor retinal structure and function in living animals and microscopy was used to assess pathology post mortem. Tissue specific deletion of Sod2 caused elevated signs of oxidative stress, RPE dysfunction and showed some key features of AMD. Due to induction of oxidative stress, the conditional knockout mice show progressive reduction in ERG responses and thinning of outer nuclear layer (ONL) compared to non-induced littermates.

  18. Induction of oxidative stress in the epididymis of rats after subchronic exposure to epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Kang-Hyeon; Park, Na-Hyeong; Bae, Chun-Sik; Kang, Seong-Soo; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho; Jun, Woojin; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of epichlorohydrin (ECH) on spermatogenesis and antioxidant system in rats. An increase in the incidence of clinical signs, gross pathology and histopathology findings in the epididymidis, and sperm abnormalities and a decrease in the testicular spermatid counts, epididymal sperm counts, and sperm motility were observed at 30 mg/kg/day. Oxidative stress in the epididymal tissue was detected at > or =3.3 mg/kg/day. The results show that graded doses of ECH elicit depletion of antioxidant defense system and that the adverse effects on male reproductive function in ECH-treated rats may be due to the induction of oxidative stress.

  19. Autophagy induction upon reactive oxygen species in Cd-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, WeiNa; Chen, WenLi

    2010-02-01

    Autophagy is a protein degradation process in which cells recycle cytoplasmic contents when subjected to environmental stress conditions or during certain stages of development. Upon the induction of autophagy, a double membrane autophagosome forms around cytoplasmic components and delivers them to the vacuole for degradation. In plants, autophagy has been shown previously to be induced during abiotic stresses including oxidative stress. Cd, as a toxicity heavy metal, resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this paper, we demonstrated that ROS contributed to the induction of autophagy in Cd-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana. However, pre-incubation with ascorbic acid (AsA, antioxidant molecule) and catalase (CAT, a H2O2-specific scavenger) decreased the ROS production and the number of autolysosomal-like structures. Together our results indicated that the oxidative condition was essential for autophagy, as treatment with AsA and CAT abolished the formation of autophagosomes, and ROS may function as signal molecules to induce autophagy in abiotic stress.

  20. Plastic and evolutionary responses to heat stress in a temperate dung fly: negative correlation between basal and induced heat tolerance?

    PubMed

    Esperk, T; Kjaersgaard, A; Walters, R J; Berger, D; Blanckenhorn, W U

    2016-05-01

    Extreme weather events such as heat waves are becoming more frequent and intense. Populations can cope with elevated heat stress by evolving higher basal heat tolerance (evolutionary response) and/or stronger induced heat tolerance (plastic response). However, there is ongoing debate about whether basal and induced heat tolerance are negatively correlated and whether adaptive potential in heat tolerance is sufficient under ongoing climate warming. To evaluate the evolutionary potential of basal and induced heat tolerance, we performed experimental evolution on a temperate source population of the dung fly Sepsis punctum. Offspring of flies adapted to three thermal selection regimes (Hot, Cold and Reference) were subjected to acute heat stress after having been exposed to either a hot-acclimation or non-acclimation pretreatment. As different traits may respond differently to temperature stress, several physiological and life history traits were assessed. Condition dependence of the response was evaluated by exposing juveniles to different levels of developmental (food restriction/rearing density) stress. Heat knockdown times were highest, whereas acclimation effects were lowest in the Hot selection regime, indicating a negative association between basal and induced heat tolerance. However, survival, adult longevity, fecundity and fertility did not show such a pattern. Acclimation had positive effects in heat-shocked flies, but in the absence of heat stress hot-acclimated flies had reduced life spans relative to non-acclimated ones, thereby revealing a potential cost of acclimation. Moreover, body size positively affected heat tolerance and unstressed individuals were less prone to heat stress than stressed flies, offering support for energetic costs associated with heat tolerance. Overall, our results indicate that heat tolerance of temperate insects can evolve under rising temperatures, but this response could be limited by a negative relationship between basal and

  1. Reactive oxygen species mediate heat stress-induced apoptosis via ERK dephosphorylation and Bcl-2 ubiquitination in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Tan, Hongping; Yang, Hong; Li, Feng; He, Xuan; Gu, Zhengtao; Zhao, Ming; Su, Lei

    2016-12-25

    Heat stress can induce the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HUVEC cells, indicating that apoptosis may be a prominent pathological feature of heat stroke, however, little is known about the precise mechani sms involved in it. In this study, we describe the apoptotic effect of intense heat stress on HUVEC cells and our investigation of its underlying mechanisms. Treatment of cells with intense heat stress induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a concomitant increase in activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, by over-expression of MnSOD and GPx in cells, we show that ROS, and especially superoxide, is the primary oxidative species induced by intense heat stress and responsible for cell death. In addition, we explored the mechanism by which superoxide regulates the apoptotic effect of intense heat stress, and found that it involved Bcl-2 down-regulation through ubiquitin - proteasomal degradation. Superoxide production also led to Bcl-2 dephosphorylation through inactivation of MAP kinase ERK1/2, which promoted Bcl-2 ubiquitination. Taken together, these findings describe a novel pathway downstream of heat stress-induced apoptosis in HUVEC cells, and provide new insight into the process of redox-mediated down-regulation of Bcl-2 and apoptosis induction. These results could be important in the understanding of pathogenesis of heat stroke and for the development of preventive and treatment measures, both of which are currently lacking.

  2. Carcass and meat quality traits of rabbits under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Zeferino, C P; Komiyama, C M; Fernandes, S; Sartori, J R; Teixeira, P S S; Moura, A S A M T

    2013-03-01

    Rabbits are very sensitive to heat stress because they have difficulty eliminating excess body heat. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of heat stress on slaughter weight, dressing percentage and carcass and meat quality traits of rabbits from two genetic groups. Ninety-six weaned rabbits were used: half were from the Botucatu genetic group and half were crossbreds between New Zealand White sires and Botucatu does. They were assigned to a completely randomized design in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (two genetic groups and three ambient temperatures: 18°C, 25°C and 30°C) and kept under controlled conditions in three environmental chambers from 5 to 10 weeks of age. Slaughter took place at 10 weeks, on 2 consecutive days. Meat quality measurements were made in the longissimus muscle. Actual average ambient temperature and relative humidity in the three chambers were 18.4°C and 63.9%, 24.4°C and 80.2% and 29.6°C and 75.9%, respectively. Purebred rabbits were heavier at slaughter and had heavier commercial and reference carcasses than crossbreds at 30°C; however, no differences between genetic groups for these traits were found at lower temperatures. No genetic group × ambient temperature interaction was detected for any other carcass or meat quality traits. The percentages of distal parts of legs, skin and carcass forepart were higher in crossbred rabbits, indicating a lower degree of maturity at slaughter in this group. The percentage of thoracic viscera was higher in the purebreds. Lightness of the longissimus muscle was higher in the purebreds, whereas redness was higher in the crossbreds. Slaughter, commercial and reference carcass weights and the percentages of thoracic viscera, liver and kidneys were negatively related with ambient temperature. Commercial and reference carcass yields, and the percentage of distal parts of legs, on the other hand, had a positive linear relationship with ambient temperature. Meat redness and

  3. Differential induction of FosB isoforms throughout the brain by fluoxetine and chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Vialou, Vincent; Thibault, Mackenzie; Kaska, Sophia; Cooper, Sarah; Gajewski, Paula; Eagle, Andrew; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Nestler, Eric J; Robison, A J

    2015-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is thought to arise in part from dysfunction of the brain's "reward circuitry", consisting of the mesolimbic dopamine system and the glutamatergic and neuromodulatory inputs onto this system. Both chronic stress and antidepressant treatment regulate gene transcription in many of the brain regions that make up these circuits, but the exact nature of the transcription factors and target genes involved in these processes remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate induction of the FosB family of transcription factors in ∼25 distinct regions of adult mouse brain, including many parts of the reward circuitry, by chronic exposure to the antidepressant fluoxetine. We further uncover specific patterns of FosB gene product expression (i.e., differential expression of full-length FosB, ΔFosB, and Δ2ΔFosB) in brain regions associated with depression--the nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus--in response to chronic fluoxetine treatment, and contrast these patterns with differential induction of FosB isoforms in the chronic social defeat stress model of depression with and without fluoxetine treatment. We find that chronic fluoxetine, in contrast to stress, causes induction of the unstable full-length FosB isoform in the NAc, PFC, and hippocampus even 24 h following the final injection, indicating that these brain regions may undergo chronic activation when fluoxetine is on board, even in the absence of stress. We also find that only the stable ΔFosB isoform correlates with behavioral responses to stress. These data suggest that NAc, PFC, and hippocampus may present useful targets for directed intervention in mood disorders (ie, brain stimulation or gene therapy), and that determining the gene targets of FosB-mediated transcription in these brain regions in response to fluoxetine may yield novel inroads for pharmaceutical intervention in depressive disorders.

  4. Differential induction of FosB isoforms throughout the brain by fluoxetine and chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Vialou, Vincent; Thibault, Mackenzie; Kaska, Sophia; Gajewski, Paula; Eagle, Andrew; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Nestler, Eric J.; Robison, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is thought to arise in part from dysfunction of the brain's “reward circuitry,” consisting of the mesolimbic dopamine system and the glutamatergic and neuromodulatory inputs onto this system. Both chronic stress and antidepressant treatment regulate gene transcription in many of the brain regions that make up these circuits, but the exact nature of the transcription factors and target genes involved in these processes remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate induction of the FosB family of transcription factors in ∼25 distinct regions of adult mouse brain, including many parts of the reward circuitry, by chronic exposure to the antidepressant fluoxetine. We further uncover specific patterns of FosB gene product expression (i.e., differential expression of full-length FosB, ΔFosB, and Δ2ΔFosB) in brain regions associated with depression – the nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus – in response to chronic fluoxetine treatment, and contrast these patterns with differential induction of FosB isoforms in the chronic social defeat stress model of depression with and without fluoxetine treatment. We find that chronic fluoxetine, in contrast to stress, causes induction of the unstable full-length FosB isoform in the NAc, PFC, and hippocampus even 24 hours following the final injection, indicating that these brain regions may undergo chronic activation when fluoxetine is on board, even in the absence of stress. We also find that only the stable ΔFosB isoform correlates with behavioral responses to stress. These data suggest that NAc, PFC, and hippocampus may present useful targets for directed intervention in mood disorders (ie, brain stimulation or gene therapy), and that determining the gene targets of FosB-mediated transcription in these brain regions in response to fluoxetine may yield novel inroads for pharmaceutical intervention in depressive disorders. PMID:26164345

  5. Expression of heat stress proteins by human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Sauk, J J; Norris, K; Foster, R; Moehring, J; Somerman, M J

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of the present report was to document the stress response produced by physical and chemical abuses to human periodontal ligament cells, and to review some of the known functions of stress response proteins produced as a result of such treatments. For these studies human PDL cells were exposed to sublethal challenges of 43 degrees C heat, sodium arsenite and the amino acid analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (AZC). The cells were labelled with [35S]-methionine and the proteins produced were examined by autofluorography of SDS-PAGE gels. Heat challenges were shown to induce hsps with an apparent mol. wts. of 90K, 68-72K, 41-47K, and 36 K. Arsenite-treated cells produced similar hsps including a 30k protein not produced by other forms of stress. AZC treatment resulted in the production of apparent functionless hsps with apparent molecular weights of 90,000, 72,000, 68,000 and 36,000. The function of these proteins and their possible role in periodontal disease is discussed.

  6. Short term post-partum heat stress in dairy cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuquay, J. W.; Chapin, L. T.; Brown, W. H.

    1980-06-01

    Since many dairy cows calve during late summer, the objective was to determine if heat stress immediately post-partum would (1) alter metabolism, thus, increasing susceptibility to metabolic disorders, (2) affect lactation and/or (3) affect reproduction. Forty four cows, calving during late summer, were paired with one member of each pair stressed (HS) for the first 10 post-partum days in a hot barn. Controls (CC) were kept in a cooled section of the barn. Plasma drawn weekly for 7 weeks was analyzed in an autoanalyzer for calcium, inor. phosphorus, protein, glucose and cholesterol and by radioimmunoassay for cortisol and progesterone. Ovaries and uteri were palpated weekly. Rectal temperatures were significant higher for HS during the first 10 post-partum days. No significant effects on plasma constituents were observed during the 10-day treatment period. For the 7-week period, glucose and cholesterol were lower in HS, as were cyclic peaks of progesterone and cortisol. Both calcium and inorganic phosphorus remained clinically low for the 7 weeks, but no treatment effects were seen. Uteri of HS involuted more rapidly than the CC. Treatment did not affect reproductive efficiency. Lactation milk yields did not differ, but milk fat percent was lower in HS. Heat stress immediately post-partum altered lipid metabolism, but the animal's compensatory mechanisms prevented reduction in milk production or reproductive efficiency.

  7. Short Communication: Effect of heat stress on heat-shock protein (Hsp60) mRNA expression in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Shi, H N; Liu, Z; Zhang, J P; Kang, Y J; Wang, J F; Huang, J Q; Wang, W M

    2015-05-18

    The enhanced expression of heat shock proteins (hsps) in organisms can be detected in response to many kinds of stressor. For fish, high temperature is an important stressor, and hsp expression is associated with differences in environmental temperature. In this study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were accustomed to an aquatic temperature of 18°C were exposed to an elevated temperature (25°C), and hsp60 expression in the gill, liver, spleen, heart, and head kidney was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction in unstressed and heat-stressed animals. The fish responded to heat stress in a time- and tissue-specific manner. Cardiac hsp60 mRNA levels were largely unchanged, and the greatest induction of hsp60 in heat-stressed animals was recorded in the liver, suggesting that protein damage and the consequent requirement for the Hsp60 protein are probably greater in hepatic tissue. Therefore, fish must be provided with optimal temperature conditions in order to realize their potential growth and maximize fish farm profits.

  8. Thermomechanical Stress in Cryopreservation Via Vitrification With Nanoparticle Heating as a Stress-Moderating Effect.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, David P; Bischof, John C; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on thermomechanical effects in cryopreservation associated with a novel approach of volumetric heating by means on nanoparticles in an alternating electromagnetic field. This approach is studied for the application of cryopreservation by vitrification, where the crystalline phase is completely avoided-the cornerstone of cryoinjury. Vitrification can be achieved by quickly cooling the material to cryogenic storage, where ice cannot form. Vitrification can be maintained at the end of the cryogenic protocol by quickly rewarming the material back to room temperature. The magnitude of the rewarming rates necessary to maintain vitrification is much higher than the magnitude of the cooling rates that are required to achieve it in the first place. The most common approach to achieve the required cooling and rewarming rates is by exposing the specimen's surface to a temperature-controlled environment. Due to the underlying principles of heat transfer, there is a size limit in the case of surface heating beyond which crystallization cannot be prevented at the center of the specimen. Furthermore, due to the underlying principles of solid mechanics, there is a size limit beyond which thermal expansion in the specimen can lead to structural damage and fractures. Volumetric heating during the rewarming phase of the cryogenic protocol can alleviate these size limitations. This study suggests that volumetric heating can reduce thermomechanical stress, when combined with an appropriate design of the thermal protocol. Without such design, this study suggests that the level of stress may still lead to structural damage even when volumetric heating is applied. This study proposes strategies to harness nanoparticles heating in order to reduce thermomechanical stress in cryopreservation by vitrification.

  9. Examination of the leaf proteome during flooding stress and the induction of programmed cell death in maize

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maize is a major economic crop worldwide, with substantial crop loss attributed to flooding. During a stress response, programmed cell death (PCD) can be an effective way for plants better adapt. To identify flooding stress related PCD proteins in maize leaves, proteomic analysis was performed using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry. Results Comparative proteomics was combined with physiological and biochemical analysis of maize leaves under flooding stress. Fv/Fm, qP, qN and relative water content (RWC) were found to be altered in response to flooding stress, with an increase in H2O2 content noted in vivo. Furthermore, DNA ladder detection indicated that PCD had occurred under flooding treatment. The maize leaf proteome was analyzed via 2D-DIGE gel, with a total of 32 differentially expressed spots isolated, 31 spots were successfully identified via MALDI-TOF/TOF MS which represent 28 proteins. The identified proteins were related to energy metabolism and photosynthesis, PCD, phytohormones and polyamines. To better characterize the role of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) in PCD during a stress response, mRNA expression was examined in different plants by stress-induced PCD. These included heat stress induced rice protoplasts, Tobacco Mosaic Virus infected tobacco leaves and dark induced rice and Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, all of which showed active PCD, and TCTP expression was increased in different degrees. Moreover, S-adenosylmethionine synthase 2 (SAMS2) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) mRNA expression were also increased, but ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase (ACO) mRNA expression were not found in maize leaves following flooding. Lastly, ethylene and polyamine concentrations were increased in response to flooding treatment in maize leaves. Conclusions Following flooding stress, the photosynthetic systems were damaged, resulting in a disruption in energy

  10. Induction and function of the phage shock protein extracytoplasmic stress response in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Goran; Lloyd, Louise J; Stumpf, Michael P H; Mayhew, Antony J; Buck, Martin

    2006-07-28

    The phage shock protein (Psp) F regulon response in Escherichia coli is thought to be induced by impaired inner membrane integrity and an associated decrease in proton motive force (pmf). Mechanisms by which the Psp system detects the stress signal and responds have so far remained undetermined. Here we demonstrate that PspA and PspG directly confront a variety of inducing stimuli by switching the cell to anaerobic respiration and fermentation and by down-regulating motility, thereby subtly adjusting and maintaining energy usage and pmf. Additionally, PspG controls iron usage. We show that the Psp-inducing protein IV secretin stress, in the absence of Psp proteins, decreases the pmf in an ArcB-dependent manner and that ArcB is required for amplifying and transducing the stress signal to the PspF regulon. The requirement of the ArcB signal transduction protein for induction of psp provides clear evidence for a direct link between the physiological redox state of the cell, the electron transport chain, and induction of the Psp response. Under normal growth conditions PspA and PspD control the level of activity of ArcB/ArcA system that senses the redox/metabolic state of the cell, whereas under stress conditions PspA, PspD, and PspG deliver their effector functions at least in part by activating ArcB/ArcA through positive feedback.

  11. Vascular heat shock protein expression in response to stress. Endocrine and autonomic regulation of this age-dependent response.

    PubMed Central

    Udelsman, R; Blake, M J; Stagg, C A; Li, D G; Putney, D J; Holbrook, N J

    1993-01-01

    Adaptation to stress requires coordinated interactions between the vascular and endocrine systems. Previously we demonstrated that restraint stress induces the expression of the major heat shock protein, HSP70, in the adrenal cortex of the rat. Here we demonstrate that restraint also induces expression of HSP70 in the vasculature. We further demonstrate that the adrenal and vascular responses are differentially regulated: the adrenal response is adrenocorticotropin dependent, whereas the vascular response is under adrenergic control. In addition, the adrenal response is restricted to members of the HSP70 gene family, whereas in vascular tissue the low molecular weight HSP, HSP27, is also induced by restraint. Further characterization of the vascular response revealed that HSP70 induction occurred in both the thoracic and abdominal aortas as well as in the vena cava. However, no HSP70 induction was apparent in the heart or in a wide variety of other tissues examined. In situ hybridization showed that the vascular expression was localized to the aortic smooth muscle cells with minimal expression in the endothelium. Induction of HSP70 mRNA in both the adrenal cortex and aorta was followed by an elevation in HSP70 protein. Maximum HSP70 protein levels were seen within 3-12 h after restraint, but declined thereafter. Stress induced HSP70 expression was dramatically reduced with age, which may explain, in part, the diminished tolerance to stress seen in elderly individuals. Images PMID:8094399

  12. Does heat stress alter the pig's response to dietary fat?

    PubMed

    Kellner, T A; Baumgard, L H; Prusa, K J; Gabler, N K; Patience, J F

    2016-11-01

    Heat stress (HS) results in major losses to the pork industry via reduced growth performance and, possibly, carcass fat quality. The experimental objective was to measure the effects of HS on the pig's response to dietary fat in terms of lipid digestion, metabolism, and deposition over a 35-d finishing period. A total of 96 PIC 337 × C22/C29 (PIC, Inc., Hendersonville, TN) barrows (initial BW of 100.4 ± 1.2 kg) were randomly allotted to 1 of 9 treatments arranged as a 3 × 3 factorial: thermoneutral (TN; constant 24°C; ad libitum access to feed), pair-fed thermoneutral (PFTN; constant 24°C; limit fed based on previous HS daily feed intake), or HS (cyclical 28°C nighttime, 33°C from d 0 to 7, 33.5°C from d 7 to 14, 34°C from d 14 to 21, 34.5°C from d 21 to 28, and 35°C from d 28 to 35 daytime; ab libitum access to feed) and diet (a corn-soybean meal-based diet with 0% added fat [CNTR], CNTR with 3% added tallow [TAL; iodine value {IV} = 41.8], or CNTR with 3% added corn oil [CO; IV = 123.0]). No interactions between environment and diet were evident for any major response criteria ( ≥ 0.063). Rectal temperature increased due to HS (39.0°C for HS, 38.1°C for TN, and 38.2°C for PFTN; < 0.001). Heat stress decreased ADFI (27.8%; < 0.001), ADG (0.72 kg/d for HS, 1.03 kg/d for TN, and 0.78 kg/d for PFTN; < 0.001), and G:F (0.290 for HS, 0.301 for TN, and 0.319 for PFTN; = 0.006). Heat stress barrows required 1.2 Mcal of ME intake more per kilogram of BW gain than PFTN ( < 0.001). Heat stress tended to result in the lowest apparent total tract digestibility of acid hydrolyzed ether extract (AEE; 59.0% for HS, 60.2% for TN, and 61.4% for PFTN; = 0.055). True total tract digestibility (TTTD) of AEE of CO-based diets (99.3%) was greater than that of CNTR (97.3%) and TAL-based diets (96.3%; = 0.012). Environment had no impact on TTTD of AEE ( = 0.118). Environment had no impact on jowl IV at market (69.2 g/100 g for HS, 69.3 g/100 g for TN, and 69.8 g/100 g for

  13. H2O2 mediates the crosstalk of brassinosteroid and abscisic acid in tomato responses to heat and oxidative stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jian; Li, Xin; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2014-01-01

    The production of H2O2 is critical for brassinosteroid (BR)- and abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stress tolerance in plants. In this study, the relationship between BR and ABA in the induction of H2O2 production and their roles in response to heat and paraquat (PQ) oxidative stresses were studied in tomato. Both BR and ABA induced increases in RBOH1 gene expression, NADPH oxidase activity, apoplastic H2O2 accumulation, and heat and PQ stress tolerance in wild-type plants. BR could only induced transient increases in these responses in the ABA biosynthetic mutant notabilis (not), whereas ABA induced strong and prolonged increases in these responses in the BR biosynthetic mutant d ^im compared with wild-type plants. ABA levels were reduced in the BR biosynthetic mutant but could be elevated by exogenous BR. Silencing of RBOH1 compromised BR-induced apoplastic H2O2 production, ABA accumulation, and PQ stress responses; however, ABA-induced PQ stress responses were largely unchanged in the RBOH1-silenced plants. BR induces stress tolerance involving a positive feedback mechanism in which BR induces a rapid and transient H2O2 production by NADPH oxidase. The process in turn triggers increased ABA biosynthesis, leading to further increases in H2O2 production and prolonged stress tolerance. ABA induces H2O2 production in both the apoplastic and chloroplastic compartments. PMID:24899077

  14. Heat stress abatement during the dry period influences prolactin signaling in lymphocytes Heat stress abatement during the dry period influences prolactin signaling in lymphocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress perturbs PRL release and affects dairy cow lactational performance and immune cell function. We hypothesized that greater PRL concentration in plasma of heat-stressed cows would decrease expression of PRL-R mRNA and increase mRNA expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in ...

  15. Heat stress responses modulate calcium regulations and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Huang, Chun-Feng; Cheng, Chen-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2010-04-01

    Heat stress-induced responses change the ionic currents and calcium homeostasis. However, the molecular insights into the heat stress responses on calcium homeostasis remain unclear. The purposes of this study were to examine the mechanisms of heat stress responses on calcium handling and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes. We used indo-1 fluorimetric ratio technique and whole-cell patch clamp to investigate the intracellular calcium, action potentials, and ionic currents in isolated rabbit single atrial cardiomyocytes with or without (control) exposure to heat stress (43 degrees C, 15 min) 5+/-1 h before experiments. The expressions of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA2a), and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in the control and heat stress-treated atrial myocytes were evaluated by Western blot and real-time PCR. As compared with control myocytes, the heat stress-treated myocytes had larger sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content and larger intracellular calcium transient with a shorter decay portion. Heat stress-treated myocytes also had larger L-type calcium currents, transient outward potassium currents, but smaller NCX currents. Heat stress responses increased the protein expressions, SERCA2a, NCX, and heat shock protein. However, heat stress responses did not change the RNA expression of SERCA2a and NCX. In conclusion, heat stress responses change calcium handling through protein but not RNA regulation.

  16. Acute Heat Stress and Reduced Nutrient Intake Alter Intestinal Proteomic Profile and Gene Expression in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Lonergan, Steven M.; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress and reduced feed intake negatively affect intestinal integrity and barrier function. Our objective was to compare ileum protein profiles of pigs subjected to 12 hours of HS, thermal neutral ad libitum feed intake, or pair-fed to heat stress feed intake under thermal neutral conditions (pair-fed thermal neutral). 2D-Differential In Gel Electrophoresis and gene expression were performed. Relative abundance of 281 and 138 spots differed due to heat stress, compared to thermal neutral and pair-fed thermal neutral pigs, respectively. However, only 20 proteins were different due to feed intake (thermal neutral versus pair-fed thermal neutral). Heat stress increased mRNA expression of heat shock proteins and protein abundance of heat shock proteins 27, 70, 90-α and β were also increased. Heat stress reduced ileum abundance of several metabolic enzymes, many of which are involved in the glycolytic or TCA pathways, indicating a change in metabolic priorities. Stress response enzymes peroxiredoxin-1 and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A were decreased in pair-fed thermal neutral and thermal neutral pigs compared to heat stress. Heat stress increased mRNA abundance markers of ileum hypoxia. Altogether, these data show that heat stress directly alters intestinal protein and mRNA profiles largely independent of reduced feed intake. These changes may be related to the reduced intestinal integrity associated with heat stress. PMID:26575181

  17. Heat shock factor 1 promotes TERRA transcription and telomere protection upon heat stress.

    PubMed

    Koskas, Sivan; Decottignies, Anabelle; Dufour, Solenne; Pezet, Mylène; Verdel, André; Vourc'h, Claire; Faure, Virginie

    2017-03-27

    In response to metabolic or environmental stress, cells activate powerful defense mechanisms to prevent the formation and accumulation of toxic protein aggregates. The main orchestrator of this cellular response is HSF1 (heat shock factor 1), a transcription factor involved in the up-regulation of protein-coding genes with protective roles. It has become very clear that HSF1 has a broader function than initially expected. Indeed, our previous work demonstrated that, upon stress, HSF1 activates the transcription of a non-coding RNA, named Satellite III, at pericentromeric heterochromatin. Here, we observe that the function of HSF1 extends to telomeres and identify subtelomeric DNA as a new genomic target of HSF1. We show that the binding of HSF1 to subtelomeric regions plays an essential role in the upregulation of non-coding TElomeric Repeat containing RNA (TERRA) transcription upon heat shock. Importantly, our data show that telomere integrity is impacted by heat shock and that telomeric DNA damages are markedly enhanced in HSF1 deficient cells. Altogether, our findings reveal a new direct and essential function of HSF1 in the transcriptional activation of TERRA and in telomere protection upon stress.

  18. Role of the Red Ginseng in Defense against the Environmental Heat Stress in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kui-Jin; Yoon, Kye-Yoon; Hong, Hee-Do; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2015-11-10

    Global temperature change causes heat stress related disorders in humans. A constituent of red ginseng has been known the beneficial effect on the resistance to many diseases. However, the mechanism of red ginseng (RG) against heat stress still remains unclear. To determine the effect of RG on heat stress, we examined the effect of the RG on the gene expression profiles in rats subjected to environmental heat stress. We evaluated the transcripts associated with hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in rats subjected to heat stress. We also analyzed the reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents. Our results suggested RG inhibited heat stress mediated altering mRNA expressions include HSPA1, DEAF1, HMGCR, and FMO1. We also determined RG attenuated fat accumulation in the liver by altering C/EBPβ expression. RG promoted to repress the heat stress mediated hepatic cell death by inhibiting of Bcl-2 expression in rats subjected to heat stress. Moreover, RG administered group during heat stress dramatically decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and ROS associated genes compared with the control group. Thus, we suggest that RG might influence inhibitory effect on environmental heat stress induced abnormal conditions in humans.

  19. Self organizing maps in urban heat stress projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung

    2016-04-01

    A self organizing map (SOM) is an unsupervised machine learning algorithm well suited for identifying patterns in large datasets. It has been used successfully to classify atmospheric states in climate data and as part of statistical downscaling procedures. This study aims to use SOMs to produce downscaled CMIP5-based projections of wet-bulb temperature in urban areas, taking into account the regional atmospheric state and learned local dynamics. These downscaled projections will be compared to the CMIP5 models as well as to observations and then used to project local extreme heat stress events in the future.

  20. Factors of subjective heat stress of urban citizens in contexts of everyday life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz-Plapp, Tina; Hackenbruch, Julia; Schipper, Janus Willem

    2016-04-01

    Heat waves and the consequent heat stress of urban populations have a growing relevance in urban risk management and strategies of urban adaptation to climate change. In this context, social science studies on subjective experiencing of heat as stress by urban citizens are a new emerging field. To contribute to the understanding of self-reported subjective heat stress and its major determinants in a daily life perspective, we conducted a questionnaire survey with 323 respondents in Karlsruhe, Germany, after heat waves in July and August 2013. Statistical data analysis showed that subjective heat stress is an issue permeating everyday activities. Subjective heat stress at home was lower than at work and in general. Subjective heat stress in general, at home, and at work was determined by the health impairments experienced during the heat and the feeling of being helplessly exposed to the heat. For subjective heat stress at home, characteristics of the residential building and the built environment additionally played a role. Although the rate of implemented coping measures was rather high, coping measures showed no uniform effect for the subjective heat stress. We conclude that in terms of urban adaptation strategies, further research is needed to understand how various processes of daily social (work) life enable or limit individual coping and that communication strategies are important for building capacities to better cope with future heat waves.

  1. Hormonal modulation of the heat shock response: insights from fish with divergent cortisol stress responses.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Sacha; Höglund, Erik; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Currie, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Acute temperature stress in animals results in increases in heat shock proteins (HSPs) and stress hormones. There is evidence that stress hormones influence the magnitude of the heat shock response; however, their role is equivocal. To determine whether and how stress hormones may affect the heat shock response, we capitalized on two lines of rainbow trout specifically bred for their high (HR) and low (LR) cortisol response to stress. We predicted that LR fish, with a low cortisol but high catecholamine response to stress, would induce higher levels of HSPs after acute heat stress than HR trout. We found that HR fish have significantly higher increases in both catecholamines and cortisol compared with LR fish, and LR fish had no appreciable stress hormone response to heat shock. This unexpected finding prevented further interpretation of the hormonal modulation of the heat shock response but provided insight into stress-coping styles and environmental stress. HR fish also had a significantly greater and faster heat shock response and less oxidative protein damage than LR fish. Despite these clear differences in the physiological and cellular responses to heat shock, there were no differences in the thermal tolerance of HR and LR fish. Our results support the hypothesis that responsiveness to environmental change underpins the physiological differences in stress-coping styles. Here, we demonstrate that the heat shock response is a distinguishing feature of the HR and LR lines and suggest that it may have been coselected with the hormonal responses to stress.

  2. Does the hair influence heat extraction from the head during head cooling under heat stress?

    PubMed

    Shin, Sora; Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of head hair on thermoregulatory responses when cooling the head under heat stress. Eight young males participated in six experimental conditions: normal hair (100-130 mm length) and cropped hair (5 mm length) with three water inlet temperatures of 10, 15, and 20°C. The head and neck of subjects were cooled by a liquid perfused hood while immersing legs at 42°C water for 60 min in a sitting position at the air temperature of 28°C with 30% RH. The results showed that heat removal from the normal hair condition was not significantly different from the cropped hair condition. Rectal and mean skin temperatures, and sweat rate showed no significant differences between the normal and cropped hair conditions. Heat extraction from the head was significantly greater in 10°C than in 15 or 20°C cooling (p<0.05) for both normal and cropped hair, whereas subjects preferred the 15°C more than the 10 or 20°C cooling regimen. These results indicate that the selection of effective cooling temperature is more crucial than the length of workers' hair during head cooling under heat stress, and such selection should be under the consideration of subjective perceptions with physiological responses.

  3. Does the hair influence heat extraction from the head during head cooling under heat stress?

    PubMed Central

    SHIN, Sora; PARK, Joonhee; LEE, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of head hair on thermoregulatory responses when cooling the head under heat stress. Eight young males participated in six experimental conditions: normal hair (100–130 mm length) and cropped hair (5 mm length) with three water inlet temperatures of 10, 15, and 20°C. The head and neck of subjects were cooled by a liquid perfused hood while immersing legs at 42°C water for 60 min in a sitting position at the air temperature of 28°C with 30% RH. The results showed that heat removal from the normal hair condition was not significantly different from the cropped hair condition. Rectal and mean skin temperatures, and sweat rate showed no significant differences between the normal and cropped hair conditions. Heat extraction from the head was significantly greater in 10°C than in 15 or 20°C cooling (p<0.05) for both normal and cropped hair, whereas subjects preferred the 15°C more than the 10 or 20°C cooling regimen. These results indicate that the selection of effective cooling temperature is more crucial than the length of workers’ hair during head cooling under heat stress, and such selection should be under the consideration of subjective perceptions with physiological responses. PMID:26165361

  4. Electron heating during E-H transition in inductively coupled RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Th; Küllig, C.; Meichsner, J.

    2015-08-01

    A planar inductively coupled RF discharge (13.56 MHz) in argon and oxygen was exemplarily studied using space and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The characteristic excitation rate pattern due to the electron heating during the sheath expansion was found for both gases in the E-mode. Furthermore, an intensive pattern in oxygen appears during the sheath collapse. This is associated with the electron heating caused by electric field reversal due to the strong electronegativity. The transition from the E- to the H-mode may be stepwise or continuous, depending on the gas type and total gas pressure. In the H-mode, significant differences in the excitation rate patterns exist. A broad and weakly modulated pattern is found over the RF cycle in argon, whereas in oxygen two separated patterns appear representing the electron heating for each half cycle. The reason may be the different excitation processes of the investigated resonant states and the influence of metastable argon atoms as well as attachment/detachment processes and dissociative recombination in oxygen. The E-H transition in oxygen at 5 Pa develops continuously and was studied in detail through the excitation rate. During the transition, the E- and H-mode are present and a hybrid mode was observed.

  5. Induction heating studies of dextran coated MgFe2O4 nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Khot, V M; Salunkhe, A B; Thorat, N D; Ningthoujam, R S; Pawar, S H

    2013-01-28

    MgFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles with sizes around 20 nm have been prepared by a combustion method and functionalized with dextran for their possible applications in magnetic particle hyperthermia. The induction heating study of these nanoparticles at different magnetic field amplitudes, from 6.7 kA m(-1) to 26.7 kA m(-1), showed self-heating temperature rise up to 50.25 °C and 73.32 °C (at 5 mg mL(-1) and 10 mg mL(-1) concentrations in water respectively) which was primarily thought to be due to hysteresis losses activated by an AC magnetic field. The dextran coated nanoparticles showed a maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) of about 85.57 W g(-1) at 26.7 kA m(-1) (265 kHz). Dextran coated nanoparticles at concentrations below 1.8 mg mL(-1) exhibit good viability above 86% on mice fibroblast L929 cells. The results suggest that combustion synthesized MgFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles coated with dextran can be used as potential heating agents in magnetic particle hyperthermia. Uncoated and dextran coated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and zeta potential-DLS studies.

  6. Production of pyrolytic liquids from industrial sewage sludges in an induction-heating reactor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Chang, Jeng-Hung; Hsien, Kuo-Jung; Chang, Yuan-Ming

    2009-01-01

    With the application of induction-heating, the pyrolytic experiments have been carried out for three sewage sludges from the food processing factories in an externally heated fixed-bed reactor. The thermochemical characteristics of sludge samples were first analyzed. The results indicated that the calorific value had about 15 MJ/kg on an average, suggesting that it had a potential for biomass energy source. However, its nitrogen concentration was relatively high. From the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves, it showed that the pyrolysis reaction can be almost finished in the temperature range of 450-750 degrees C. The yields of resulting liquid and char products from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge were discussed for examining the effects of pyrolysis temperature (500-800 degrees C), heating rate (200-500 degrees C/min), and holding time (1-8 min). Overall, the variation of yield was not so significant in the experimental conditions for three sewage sludges. All results of the resulting liquid products analyzed by elemental analyzer, pH meter, Karl-Fischer moisture titrator and bomb calorimeter were in consistence with those analyses by FTIR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the pyrolysis liquid products contained large amounts of water (>73% by weight) mostly derived from the bound water in the biosludge feedstocks and the condensation reactions during the pyrolysis reaction, and fewer contents of oxygenated hydrocarbons composing of carbonyl and nitrogen-containing groups, resulting in low pH and low calorific values.

  7. Eutectic Bonding Utilizing Radio Frequency Induction Heating for Fabricating Vertical Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Cui, Yinhua; Chae, Su Jin; Nam, Minwoo; Kwon, Soon Hyeong; Cha, Yong Won; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2015-11-01

    Vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) have attracted considerable attention owing to their improved thermal, electrical, and optical performance compared to conventional LEDs. To fabricate VLEDs, a bonding technique is required following laser lift-off. Eutectic bonding techniques are preferred owing to their low-heat mechanism and production safety. However, the conventional resistance heating method for eutectic bonding process, the extremely longer process time becomes a problem such as cost rise, wapage. In this study, the thermal efficiency was measured according to the diameter of the coil in order to optimize the eutectic bonding of the RF induction heating method in order to solve this problem. We confirmed that successful eutectic bonding is possible with less than 30 min processing using Sn-Glass. In addition, Au (20 wt%)/Sn (80 wt%) alloy, a mainly used the eutectic bonding interlayer material for VLEDs, can also be used as an interlayer to provide void-free eutectic bonding in less than 30 min.

  8. Induction of heme oxygenase: A general response to oxidant stress in cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, L.A.; Luscher, P.; Tyrrell, R.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Accumulation of heme oxygenase mRNA is strongly stimulated by treatment of cultured human skin fibroblasts with ultraviolet radiation, hydrogen peroxide, or the sulfhydryl reagent sodium arsenite. Since this will result in a transient reduction in the prooxidant state of cells, the phenomenon may represent an important inducible antioxidant defense mechanism. To examine the generality of the response, we have measured the accumulation of the specific mRNA in a variety of human and mammalian cell types after inducing treatments. Induction by sodium arsenite is observed in all additional human cell types tested. This includes primary epidermal keratinocytes and lung and colon fibroblasts as well as established cell lines such as HeLa, TK6 lymphoblastoid, and transformed fetal keratinocytes. Strong induction of heme oxygenase mRNA is also observed following sodium arsenite treatment of cell lines of rat, hamster, mouse, monkey, and marsupial origin. The agents which lead to induction in cultured human skin fibroblasts fall into two categories: (a) those which are oxidants or can generate active intermediates (ultraviolet A radiation, hydrogen peroxide, menadione, and the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate); (b) agents which are known to interact with or modify cellular glutathione levels (buthionine sulfoximine, sodium arsenite, iodoacetamide, diamide, and cadmium chloride). These observations strongly support the hypothesis that induction of the enzyme is a general response to oxidant stress in mammalian cells and are consistent with the possibility that the cellular redox state plays a key role.

  9. Oxidative Stress: Dual Pathway Induction in Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Virzì, Grazia Maria; Clementi, Anna; de Cal, Massimo; Brocca, Alessandra; Day, Sonya; Pastori, Silvia; Bolin, Chiara; Vescovo, Giorgio; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 (Type 1) is a specific condition which is characterized by a rapid worsening of cardiac function leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). Even though its pathophysiology is complex and not still completely understood, oxidative stress seems to play a pivotal role. In this study, we examined the putative role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CRS Type 1. Twenty-three patients with acute heart failure (AHF) were included in the study. Subsequently, 11 patients who developed AKI due to AHF were classified as CRS Type 1. Quantitative determinations for IL-6, myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitric oxide (NO), copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD), and endogenous peroxidase activity (EPA) were performed. CRS Type 1 patients displayed significant augmentation in circulating ROS and RNS, as well as expression of IL-6. Quantitative analysis of all oxidative stress markers showed significantly lower oxidative stress levels in controls and AHF compared to CRS Type 1 patients (P < 0.05). This pilot study demonstrates the significantly heightened presence of dual oxidative stress pathway induction in CRS Type 1 compared to AHF patients. Our findings indicate that oxidative stress is a potential therapeutic target, as it promotes inflammation by ROS/RNS-linked pathogenesis. PMID:25821554

  10. Induction of heat shock protein HSPA6 (HSP70B') upon HSP90 inhibition in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kuballa, Petric; Baumann, Anna-Lena; Mayer, Klaus; Bär, Ute; Burtscher, Helmut; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-06-04

    Genome-wide transcript profiling to elucidate responses to HSP90 inhibition revealed strong induction of HSPA6 in MCF-7 cells treated with 17-AAG. Time- and dose dependent induction of HSPA6 (confirmed by qPCR and Western Blots) occurred also upon treatment with Radicicol, another HSP90 inhibitor. HSPA6 was not detectable in untreated cells or cells treated with toxins that do not inhibit HSP90, or upon applying oxidative stress. Thus, HSPA6 induction is not a general response to cytotoxic insults. Modulation of HSPA6 levels by siRNA-mediated inhibition or recombinant expression did not influence 17-AAG mediated cell death. HSPA6 induction as a consequence of HSP90 inhibition occurs in various (but not all) cell lines and may be a more specific marker for HSP90 inhibition than induction of other HSP70 proteins.

  11. Radiant heat loss, an unexploited path for heat stress reduction in shaded cattle.

    PubMed

    Berman, A; Horovitz, T

    2012-06-01

    Reducing thermal radiation on shaded animals reduces heat stress independently of other means of stress relief. Radiant heat exchange was estimated as a function of climate, shade structure, and animal density. Body surface portion exposed to radiant sources in shaded environments was determined by geometrical relations to determine angles of view of radiation sources (roof underside, sky, sun-exposed ground, shaded ground) on the animal's surface. The relative representation of environment radiation sources on the body surface was determined. Animal thermal radiation balance was derived from radiant heat gained from radiation sources (including surrounding animals) and that lost from the animal surface. The animal environment was assumed to have different shade dimensions and temperatures. These were summed to the radiant heat balance of the cow. The data formed served to estimate the effect of changes in intensity of radiation sources, roof and shaded surface dimensions, and animal density on radiant heat balance (Rbal) of cattle. Roof height effect was expressed by effect of roof temperature on Rbal. Roof underside temperature (35 to 75°C) effect on Rbal was reduced by roof height. If roof height were 4m, an increase in its underside temperature from 35 to 75°C would increase mean Rbal from -63 to -2 W·m⁻², whereas if roof height were 10 m, Rbal would only increase from -99 to -88 W·m⁻². A hot ground temperature increase from 35 to 65°C reduced mean Rbal heat loss from -45 to 3 W·m⁻². Increasing the surface of the shaded area had only a minor effect on Rbal and on the effect of hot ground on Rbal. Increasing shade roof height reduced the effect of roof temperature on Rbal to minor levels when height was > 8m. Increasing the roof height from 4 to 10 m decreased Rbal from -32 to -94 W·m⁻². Increasing indirect radiation from 100 to 500 W·m⁻² was associated with an increase in Rbal from -135 to +23 W·m⁻². Their combined effects were lower

  12. New alloys and multilayer configuration of them to get self-regulated temperature cookware (SRTC) in induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeckerlé, Thierry; Fraissé, Herve; Boulogne, Bruno; Spire, Sjean Luc

    2006-09-01

    It is pointed out in this paper that the concept of self-regulating temperature cookware is valid for cooking by induction heating. This provides no overheating, improved heating rate, self-adjusted cooking temperature and further improved energy efficiency. To succeed in this, a 3-ply cladded metallic structure made of an inner stainless steel layer, a thick aluminium layer in the centre part, and an outer dedicated low-Curie-point layer made of a new FeNiCr alloy is used. The magnetic coupling between induction heater and the new structure is discussed.

  13. Use of heat stress responsive gene expression levels for early selection of heat tolerant cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ji; Jung, Won Yong; Lee, Sang Sook; Song, Jun Ho; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kim, Hyeran; Kim, Chulwook; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2013-06-04

    Cabbage is a relatively robust vegetable at low temperatures. However, at high temperatures, cabbage has disadvantages, such as reduced disease tolerance and lower yields. Thus, selection of heat-tolerant cabbage is an important goal in cabbage breeding. Easier or faster selection of superior varieties of cabbage, which are tolerant to heat and disease and have improved taste and quality, can be achieved with molecular and biological methods. We compared heat-responsive gene expression between a heat-tolerant cabbage line (HTCL), "HO", and a heat-sensitive cabbage line (HSCL), "JK", by Genechip assay. Expression levels of specific heat stress-related genes were increased in response to high-temperature stress, according to Genechip assays. We performed quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to compare expression levels of these heat stress-related genes in four HTCLs and four HSCLs. Transcript levels for heat shock protein BoHsp70 and transcription factor BoGRAS (SCL13) were more strongly expressed only in all HTCLs compared to all HSCLs, showing much lower level expressions at the young plant stage under heat stress (HS). Thus, we suggest that expression levels of these genes may be early selection markers for HTCLs in cabbage breeding. In addition, several genes that are involved in the secondary metabolite pathway were differentially regulated in HTCL and HSCL exposed to heat stress.

  14. Heat shock protein 70 gene family in the Glanville fritillary butterfly and their response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shiqi; Ahola, Virpi; Shu, Chang; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2015-02-10

    Temperature variation in the environment is a great challenge to organisms. Induction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a common genetic mechanism to cope with thermal stress. The Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) is a model species in population and evolutionary biology, and its behavior and life history are greatly influenced by ambient temperature. We cloned and sequenced the full coding sequences of seven hsp70 genes from the Glanville fritillary. Of those genes, McHsc70-1 and McHsc70-2 were identified as heat shock cognate 70 (hsc70), of which the latter located in endoplasmic reticulum. We analyzed the expression patterns of different hsp70s under various thermal stresses using quantitative PCR. Heat shock at 40°C for 2h induced high expression of McHsp70-1, McHsp70-2 and McHsc70-2. Only McHsc70-2 had a small increase after cold shock at 0°C for 2h. Acclimation at 35°C for three days before heat shock reduced expression of McHsp70 after heat shock. The maximum mRNA level of McHsp70s was reached in the first 2h after the heat shock. This study uncovers the complexity of the hsp70 system, and provides the valuable information for further temperature-related research in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

  15. Accelerated carbide spheroidisation of 1.2343 tool steel by induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlouhý, J.; Kövér, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tool steels undergo spheroidisation or soft annealing to enhance machinability and cold formability. Conventional soft annealing takes several hours. The final microstructure is composed of globular carbides in a ferritic matrix. We present an alternative process of carbide spheroidisation and steel softening. Accelerated carbide spheroidisation and refinement (ASR) was achieved by induction heating at temperatures close to the A1 temperature. The spheroidised structure was obtained in less than 5 minutes. The carbide particles that formed during the ASR were significantly finer than for the conventional soft annealing. The hardness after ASR was higher than the hardness after soft annealing because of the dispersion strengthening by finer and more densely distributed carbide particles. On the other hand, the fine structure is favourable for hardening. It enables smaller austenite grains and martensite laths to be obtained.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bio-crudes from induction-heating pyrolysis of biomass wastes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Mi, Hsiao-Hsuan; Chang, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Shyh-Yu; Chang, Jeng-Hung

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare the bio-crudes from agricultural wastes (i.e., rice straw, rice husk, sugarcane bagasse and coconut shell) by using induction-heating pyrolysis at specified conditions. The quantitative analysis of 21 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bio-crudes examined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed that the PAHs in bio-crudes were primarily dominant in the low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs, including naphthalene (1.10-2.45 mg/L) and acenaphthene (0.72-7.61 mg/L). However, by considering carcinogenic potency, the bio-crudes from rice husk and sugarcane bagasse contained higher contents of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) (0.52 and 0.92 mg/L, respectively) as compared to those from rice straw and coconut shell.

  17. Magnetically driven three-dimensional manipulation and inductive heating of magnetic-dispersion containing metal alloys

    PubMed Central

    Calabro, Joshua D.; Huang, Xu; Lewis, Brian G.; Ramirez, Ainissa G.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental to the development of three-dimensional microelectronic fabrication is a material that enables vertical geometries. Here we show low-melting-point metal alloys containing iron dispersions that can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields to create vertical geometries and thus enable novel three-dimensional assemblies. These iron dispersions enhance the mechanical properties needed for strong, reliable interconnects without significantly altering the electrical properties of the alloys. Additionally, these iron dispersions act as susceptors for magnetic induction heating, allowing the rapid melting of these novel alloys at temperatures lower than those usually reported for conventional metal alloys. By localizing high temperatures and by reducing temperature excursions, the materials and methods described have potential in a variety of device fabrication applications. PMID:20194786

  18. Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Ayelén Mariana; Martin, María Victoria; Córdoba, Juan Pablo; Bellido, Andrés Martín; D'Ippólito, Sebastián; Colman, Silvana Lorena; Soto, Débora; Roldán, Juan Alfredo; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián; Fiol, Diego Fernando; Stockwell, Brent R; Dixon, Scott J; Pagnussat, Gabriela Carolina

    2017-02-01

    In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)-induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient.

  19. Singlet oxygen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Ferretti, Ursula; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, singlet oxygen formation by lipid peroxidation induced by heat stress (40 °C) was studied in vivo in unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Primary and secondary oxidation products of lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde, were generated under heat stress as detected using swallow-tailed perylene derivative fluorescence monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Lipid peroxidation was initiated by enzymatic reaction as inhibition of lipoxygenase by catechol and caffeic acid prevented hydroperoxide formation. Ultra-weak photon emission showed formation of electronically excited species such as triplet excited carbonyl, which, upon transfer of excitation energy, leads to the formation of either singlet excited chlorophyll or singlet oxygen. Alternatively, singlet oxygen is formed by direct decomposition of hydroperoxide via Russell mechanisms. Formation of singlet oxygen was evidenced by the nitroxyl radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy and the imaging of green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Suppression of singlet oxygen formation by lipoxygenase inhibitors indicates that singlet oxygen may be formed via enzymatic lipid peroxidation initiated by lipoxygenase. PMID:26831215

  20. Effects of cold stress and heat stress on coral fluorescence in reef-building corals

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Melissa S.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread temperature stress has caused catastrophic coral bleaching events that have been devastating for coral reefs. Here, we evaluate whether coral fluorescence could be utilized as a noninvasive assessment for coral health. We conducted cold and heat stress treatments on the branching coral Acropora yongei, and found that green fluorescent protein (GFP) concentration and fluorescence decreased with declining coral health, prior to initiation of bleaching. Ultimately, cold-treated corals acclimated and GFP concentration and fluorescence recovered. In contrast, heat-treated corals eventually bleached but showed strong fluorescence despite reduced GFP concentration, likely resulting from the large reduction in shading from decreased dinoflagellate density. Consequently, GFP concentration and fluorescence showed distinct correlations in non-bleached and bleached corals. Green fluorescence was positively correlated with dinoflagellate photobiology, but its closest correlation was with coral growth suggesting that green fluorescence could be used as a physiological proxy for health in some corals. PMID:23478289

  1. Effects of cold stress and heat stress on coral fluorescence in reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Roth, Melissa S; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2013-01-01

    Widespread temperature stress has caused catastrophic coral bleaching events that have been devastating for coral reefs. Here, we evaluate whether coral fluorescence could be utilized as a noninvasive assessment for coral health. We conducted cold and heat stress treatments on the branching coral Acropora yongei, and found that green fluorescent protein (GFP) concentration and fluorescence decreased with declining coral health, prior to initiation of bleaching. Ultimately, cold-treated corals acclimated and GFP concentration and fluorescence recovered. In contrast, heat-treated corals eventually bleached but showed strong fluorescence despite reduced GFP concentration, likely resulting from the large reduction in shading from decreased dinoflagellate density. Consequently, GFP concentration and fluorescence showed distinct correlations in non-bleached and bleached corals. Green fluorescence was positively correlated with dinoflagellate photobiology, but its closest correlation was with coral growth suggesting that green fluorescence could be used as a physiological proxy for health in some corals.

  2. Heat stress and a countermeasure in the Shuttle rescueman's suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerr, D. F.; Reed, H.; Convertino, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    Rescue of the astronaut flight crew from a contingency landing may risk exposure of the rescue crew to toxic propellants spilling from potentially ruptured tanks in the crew module area. An Aquala dry diver's suit has been in service by the rescue team to preclude exposure, especially in the water rescue scenario. Heat stress has become a factor of concern in recent years when older and less physically-fit team members work in this suit. Methods: Field testing was initiated using fully instrumented rescue men in a simulated scenario to determine the extent of heat stress. Two tests were accomplished, one in the normal (N) configuration and one with a proposed cooling countermeasure, the Steele vest (S). Results: Heat stress was high as indicated by average rectal temperatures (Tre) of 38.28 degrees C(100.9 degrees F) after the 45 minute protocol. Slopes of the regression equations describing the increase in Tre with time were greater (P less than 0.05) with N (0.073 plus or minus .008) compared to S (0.060 plus or minus .007). Projection of time to the 38.89 degree C (102 degree F) limit was increased by 15.3 percent with the vest. Mean skin temperature (Tsk) was higher (P less than 0.05) in N (38.33 plus or minus .11 degrees C) compared to S (34.33 plus or minus .39 degrees C). Average heart rate was higher (P less than 0.05 in N than S. Sweat loss, as measured by weight loss, was more (P less than 0.05) for N (1.09 plus or minus .09 kg versus 0.77 plus or minus .06 kg). Air usage, while slightly less for S, was not statistically different. Conclusion: The use of the cool vest provided significant relief from thermal stress in spite of the addition of 3.4 kg (7.5 pounds) weight and some loss in mobility.

  3. The dimethylthiourea-induced attenuation of cisplatin nephrotoxicity is associated with the augmented induction of heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takayuki Kato, Akihiko; Yasuda, Hideo; Miyaji, Takehiko; Luo, Jinghui; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Ito, Hideaki; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Hishida, Akira

    2009-01-15

    Dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a potent hydroxyl radical scavenger, affords protection against cisplatin (CDDP)-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Since the suppression of oxidative stress and the enhancement of heat shock proteins (HSPs) are both reported to protect against CDDP-induced renal damage, we tested whether increased HSP expression is involved in the underlying mechanisms of the DMTU-induced renal protection. We examined the effect of DMTU treatment on the expression of HSPs in the kidney until day 5 following a single injection of CDDP (5 mg/kg BW). DMTU significantly inhibited the CDDP-induced increments of serum creatinine, the number of 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive tubular cells, and tubular damage score (p < 0.05). CDDP significantly increased renal abundances of HO-1, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90 at days 1, 3, and 5. DMTU significantly augmented only the expression of HSP60 expression mainly in the cytoplasm of the proximal tubular cells at days 1 and 3 in CDDP-induced ARF. DMTU also inhibited the CDDP-induced increment of Bax, a pro-apoptotic protein, in the fraction of organelles/membranes at day 3. The findings suggest that DMTU may afford protection against CDDP-induced ARF, partially through the early induction of cytoplasmic HSP60, thereby preventing the Bax-mediated apoptosis in renal tubular c0010el.

  4. Prediction of residual stress and distortion from residual stress in heat treated and machined aluminum parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert

    Parts machined from relatively large thickness cross sections can experience significant deformations from high residual stresses that develop in the part during the heat treatment used to form the aluminum alloy. Uphill quenching is a process that can create a part with low residual stress and stable dimensions when the process is controlled properly. The uphill quenching process involves a solution heat treat, quench, cool to liquid nitrogen, steam blast, and then age to final temper. In this thesis two parts were modeled using ANSYS. The first part underwent the uphill quench process in the rough machined state. The second part was modeled in the stock material shape and only underwent a solution heat treat, quench, and age to final temper. After the residual stress in the second part was predicted the excess material was removed by killing the associated elements and the deformation of the final machined part was predicted. For both parts analyzed measurements were made and compared against predictions with fairly good results.

  5. Testing the responses of four wheat crop models to heat stress at anthesis and grain filling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Asseng, Senthold; Liu, Leilei; Tang, Liang; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Higher temperatures caused by future climate change will bring more frequent heat stress events and pose an increasing risk to global wheat production. Crop models have been widely used to simulate future crop productivity but are rarely tested with observed heat stress experimental datasets. Four wheat models (DSSAT-CERES-Wheat, DSSAT-Nwheat, APSIM-Wheat, and WheatGrow) were evaluated with 4 years of environment-controlled phytotron experimental datasets with two wheat cultivars under heat stress at anthesis and grain filling stages. Heat stress at anthesis reduced observed grain numbers per unit area and individual grain size, while heat stress during grain filling mainly decreased the size of the individual grains. The observed impact of heat stress on grain filling duration, total aboveground biomass, grain yield, and grain protein concentration (GPC) varied depending on cultivar and accumulated heat stress. For every unit increase of heat degree days (HDD, degree days over 30 °C), grain filling duration was reduced by 0.30-0.60%, total aboveground biomass was reduced by 0.37-0.43%, and grain yield was reduced by 1.0-1.6%, but GPC was increased by 0.50% for cv Yangmai16 and 0.80% for cv Xumai30. The tested crop simulation models could reproduce some of the observed reductions in grain filling duration, final total aboveground biomass, and grain yield, as well as the observed increase in GPC due to heat stress. Most of the crop models tended to reproduce heat stress impacts better during grain filling than at anthesis. Some of the tested models require improvements in the response to heat stress during grain filling, but all models need improvements in simulating heat stress effects on grain set during anthesis. The observed significant genetic variability in the response of wheat to heat stress needs to be considered through cultivar parameters in future simulation studies.

  6. Humid heat exposure induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes through the angiotensin II signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowu; Yuan, Binbin; Dong, Wenpeng; Yang, Bo; Yang, Yongchao; Lin, Xi; Gong, Gu

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to humid heat stress leads to the initiation of serious physiological dysfunction that may result in heat-related diseases, including heat stroke, heat cramp, heat exhaustion, and even death. Increasing evidences have shown that the humid heat stress-induced dysfunction of the cardiovascular system was accompanied with severe cardiomyocyte injury; however, the precise mechanism of heat stress-induced injury of cardiomyocyte remains unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that humid heat stress promoted oxidative stress through the activation of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiomyocytes. To test our hypothesis, we established mouse models of humid heat stress. Using the animal models, we found that Ang II levels in serum were significantly up-regulated and that the Ang II receptor AT1 was increased in cardiomyocytes. The antioxidant ability in plasma and heart tissues which was detected by the ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay was also decreased with the increased ROS production under humid heat stress, as was the expression of antioxidant genes (SOD2, HO-1, GPx). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Ang II receptor antagonist, valsartan, effectively relieved oxidative stress, blocked Ang II signaling pathway and suppressed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by humid heat stress. In addition, overexpression of antioxidant genes reversed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by Ang II. Overall, these results implied that humid heat stress increased oxidative stress and caused apoptosis of cardiomyocytes through the Ang II signaling pathway. Thus, targeting the Ang II signaling pathway may provide a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases caused by humid heat stress.

  7. Biochemical analysis of 'kerosene tree' Hymenaea courbaril L. under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dinesh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Rohila, Jai S; Basu, Chhandak

    2014-01-01

    Hymenaea courbaril or jatoba is a tropical tree known for its medically important secondary metabolites production. Considering climate change, the goal of this study was to investigate differential expression of proteins and lipids produced by this tree under heat stress conditions. Total lipid was extracted from heat stressed plant leaves and various sesquiterpenes produced by the tree under heat stress were identified. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis were used to study lipid and volatile compounds produced by the plant. Several volatiles, isoprene, 2-methyl butanenitrile, β ocimene and a numbers of sesquiterpenes differentially produced by the plant under heat stress were identified. We propose these compounds were produced by the tree to cope up with heat stress. A protein gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) was performed to study differential expression of proteins in heat stressed plants. Several proteins were found to be expressed many folds different in heat stressed plants compared to the control. These proteins included heat shock proteins, histone proteins, oxygen evolving complex, and photosynthetic proteins, which, we believe, played key roles in imparting thermotolerance in Hymenaea tree. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of extensive molecular physiological study of Hymenaea trees under heat stress. This work will open avenues of further research on effects of heat stress in Hymenaea and the findings can be applied to understand how global warming can affect physiology of other plants.

  8. Biochemical analysis of ‘kerosene tree’ Hymenaea courbaril L. under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dinesh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Rohila, Jai S; Basu, Chhandak

    2014-01-01

    Hymenaea courbaril or jatoba is a tropical tree known for its medically important secondary metabolites production. Considering climate change, the goal of this study was to investigate differential expression of proteins and lipids produced by this tree under heat stress conditions. Total lipid was extracted from heat stressed plant leaves and various sesquiterpenes produced by the tree under heat stress were identified. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis were used to study lipid and volatile compounds produced by the plant. Several volatiles, isoprene, 2-methyl butanenitrile, β ocimene and a numbers of sesquiterpenes differentially produced by the plant under heat stress were identified. We propose these compounds were produced by the tree to cope up with heat stress. A protein gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) was performed to study differential expression of proteins in heat stressed plants. Several proteins were found to be expressed many folds different in heat stressed plants compared to the control. These proteins included heat shock proteins, histone proteins, oxygen evolving complex, and photosynthetic proteins, which, we believe, played key roles in imparting thermotolerance in Hymenaea tree. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of extensive molecular physiological study of Hymenaea trees under heat stress. This work will open avenues of further research on effects of heat stress in Hymenaea and the findings can be applied to understand how global warming can affect physiology of other plants. PMID:25482765

  9. A bipartite operator interacts with a heat shock element to mediate early meiotic induction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP82

    SciTech Connect

    Szent-Gyorgyi, C.

    1995-12-01

    This report seeks to characterize the activation of meiotic gene in terms of cis-acting DNA elements and their associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was found that vegetative repression and meiotic induction depend on interactions of the promoter-proximal heat shock element with a nearby bipartite repression element. The experiments described explore how two different regulatory pathways induce transcription by stimulating a single classical activation element, a nonspecific heat shock element. 81 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Whole body heat stress increases motor cortical excitability and skill acquisition in humans

    PubMed Central

    Littmann, Andrew E.; Shields, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vigorous systemic exercise stimulates a cascade of molecular and cellular processes that enhance central nervous system (CNS) plasticity and performance. The influence of heat stress on CNS performance and learning is novel. We designed two experiments to determine whether passive heat stress 1) facilitated motor cortex excitability and 2) improved motor task acquisition compared to no heat stress. Methods Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) were collected before and after 30 minutes of heat stress at 73° C. A second cohort of subjects performed a motor learning task using the FDI either following heat or the no heat condition. Results Heat stress increased heart rate to 65% of age-predicted maximum. After heat, mean resting MEP amplitude increased 48% (P < 0.05). MEP stimulus-response amplitudes did not differ according to stimulus intensity. In the second experiment, heat stress caused a significant decrease in absolute and variable error (p < 0.05) during a novel movement task using the FDI. Conclusions Passive environmental heat stress 1) increases motor cortical excitability, and 2) enhances performance in a motor skill acquisition task. Significance Controlled heat stress may prime the CNS to enhance motor skill acquisition during rehabilitation. PMID:26616546

  11. The combined effect of salt stress and heat shock on proteome profiling in Suaeda salsa.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Chunyan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2011-10-15

    Under natural conditions or in the field, plants are often subjected to a combination of different stresses such as salt stress and heat shock. Although salt stress and heat shock have been extensively studied, little is known about how their combination affects plants. We used proteomics, coupled with physiological measurements, to investigate the effect of salt stress, heat shock, and their combination on Suaeda salsa plants. A combination of salt stress and heat shock resulted in suppression of CO(2) assimilation and the photosystem II efficiency. Approximately 440 protein spots changed their expression levels upon salt stress, heat shock and their combination, and 57 proteins were identified by MS. These proteins were classified into several categories including disease/defense, photosynthesis, energy production, material transport, and signal transduction. Some proteins induced during salt stress, e.g. choline monooxygenase, chloroplastic ATP synthase subunit beta, and V-type proton ATPase catalytic subunit A, and some proteins induced during heat shock, e.g. heat shock 70kDa protein, probable ion channel DMI1, and two component sensor histidine kinase, were either unchanged or suppressed during a combination of salt stress and heat shock. In contrast, the expression of some proteins, including nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1, chlorophyll a/b binding protein, and ABC transporter I family member 1, was specifically induced during a combination of salt stress and heat shock. The potential roles of the stress-responsive proteins are discussed.

  12. Prolactin mediates effects of chronic psychological stress on induction of fibrofatty cells in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiangping; Wang, Mangyuan; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Li; Chen, Liang; Song, Zhizhao; Teng, Xiao; Xing, Yong; Chen, Kai; Zhao, Kun; Hou, Jianfeng; Yang, Pingchang

    2016-01-01

    Cardiocyte apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of heart diseases. The mechanism is unclear. It is reported that prolactin (PRL) is involved in cardiac disorders. This study aims to investigate the role of PRL in mediating the psychological stress-induced fibrofatty cell differentiation in the heart. In this study, BALB/c mice were treated with a 30-day restraint stress. The heart tissue was processed by paraffin embedding and hematoxylin and eosin. The expression of Sca1 in NIH3T3 cells was assessed by cell culture, flow cytometry and Western blotting. The results showed that chronic stress induced fibrofatty cells in the mouse heart and high serum PRL levels. The induction of fibrofatty cell was mimicked by administration with recombinant PRL. The stress also induced the expression of Sca1 in the mouse heart. Exposure of NIH3T3 cells (a fibroblast cell line) to PRL in the culture enhanced the expression of stem cell antigen-1 (Sca1), phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and expression of adipocyte-related protein molecules, including adiponectin, fatty acid binding protein (aP2), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-g (PPARg) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)α, in the cells. We conclude that psychological stress-derived PRL induces fibroblasts to differentiate into fibrofatty cells in the heart. PMID:27158356

  13. Cancer Therapeutic Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Are Associated with Oxidative Stress and Cytokine Induction.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Rina; Luo, Yi; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered to influence the inflammatory process; however, the precise mechanism and the significance in tumors are still not clear. In this study, when CT26 and LL2 mouse cancer cells were treated with 6-nm anatase titanium dioxide NPs (TDNPs) without ultraviolet irradiation, oxidative stress and induction of inflammatory cytokines were observed. Oxidative stress was further increased by disease-associated conditions such as high glucose concentrations and hypoxia. Inhaled or orally administered TDNPs generated granulomatous lesions in the lungs and colon of the rodent models tested, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also found in cancer cells treated with gold or carbon black NPs. Treatment of CT26 cells with 10- to 70-nm rutile TDNPs showed that smaller NPs produced more oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines than larger ones did. To avoid diffusion of TDNPs and to minimize toxicity, 10-nm TDNPs were suspended in a collagen gel inserted into a subcutaneous tumor in a CT26 mouse. A single TDNP treatment via this method inhibited tumor growth in a size- and dose-dependent manner, and resulted in lower levels of urinary 8-OHdG when compared to systemically administered TDNPs. These findings suggest that TDNPs might be useful for the local treatment of tumors.

  14. Role of heat shock protein Hsp25 in the response of the orofacial nuclei motor system to physiological stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Talebian, S.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Although expression of the small heat shock protein family member Hsp25 has been previously observed in the central nervous system (CNS), both constitutively and upon induction, its function in the CNS remains far from clear. In the present study we have characterized the spatial pattern of expression of Hsp25 in the normal adult mouse brain as well as the changes in expression patterns induced by subjecting mice to experimental hyperthermia or hypoxia. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a surprisingly restricted pattern of constitutive expression of Hsp25 in the brain, limited to the facial, trigeminal, ambiguus, hypoglossal and vagal motor nuclei of the brainstem. After hyperthermia or hypoxia treatment, significant increases in the levels of Hsp25 were observed in these same areas and also in fibers of the facial and trigeminal nerve tracts. Immunoblot analysis of protein lysates from brainstem also showed the same pattern of induction of Hsp25. Surprisingly, no other area in the brain showed expression of Hsp25, in either control or stressed animals. The highly restricted expression of Hsp25 implies that this protein may have a specific physiological role in the orofacial motor nuclei, which govern precise coordination between muscles of mastication and the pharynx, larynx, and face. Its rapid induction after stress further suggests that Hsp25 may serve as a specific molecular chaperone in the lower cholinergic motor neurons and along their fibers under conditions of stress or injury. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Temperature stress differentially modulates transcription in meiotic anthers of heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fluctuations in temperature occur naturally during plant growth and reproduction. However, in the hot summers this variation may become stressful and damaging for the molecular mechanisms involved in proper cell growth, impairing thus plant development and particularly fruit-set in many crop plants. Tolerance to such a stress can be achieved by constitutive gene expression or by rapid changes in gene expression, which ultimately leads to protection against thermal damage. We have used cDNA-AFLP and microarray analyses to compare the early response of the tomato meiotic anther transcriptome to moderate heat stress conditions (32°C) in a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype. In the light of the expected global temperature increases, elucidating such protective mechanisms and identifying candidate tolerance genes can be used to improve breeding strategies for crop tolerance to heat stress. Results The cDNA-AFLP analysis shows that 30 h of moderate heat stress (MHS) alter the expression of approximately 1% of the studied transcript-derived fragments in a heat-sensitive genotype. The major effect is gene down-regulation after the first 2 h of stress. The microarray analysis subsequently applied to elucidate early responses of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype, also shows about 1% of the genes having significant changes in expression after the 2 h of stress. The tolerant genotype not only reacts with moderate transcriptomic changes but also exhibits constitutively higher expression levels of genes involved in protection and thermotolerance. Conclusion In contrast to the heat-sensitive genotype, the heat-tolerant genotype exhibits moderate transcriptional changes under moderate heat stress. Moreover, the heat-tolerant genotype also shows a different constitutive gene expression profile compared to the heat-sensitive genotype, indicating genetic differences in adaptation to increased temperatures. In the heat-tolerant genotype

  16. Brazed Diamond Micropowder Bur Fabricated by Supersonic Frequency Induction Heating for Precision Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bojiang; Lou, Jianpeng; Pang, Qian

    2014-04-01

    The common brazed diamond micropowder bur fabricated in a vacuum furnace produces an even brazing alloy surface. The small brazed diamond grits show low outcropping from the brazing alloy surface, and the chip space between them is small. The bur shows a low grinding efficiency and poor heat dissipation. In this study, a brazed diamond micropowder bur was fabricated by supersonic frequency induction heating. The method afforded a fluctuant surface on the brazing alloy. The brazed diamond grits with an outcropping height distributed uniformly on the fluctuant surface. The fluctuant surface showed a certain chip space. These characteristics of the tool increased the grinding efficiency and decreased the temperature of the grinding arc area. The roughness R a of the ceramic tile surface trimmed by the tool cylinder was between 0.09 and 0.12 μm. In the first 90 min, the decrease in the weight of the ceramic tile ground by the tool cylinder was higher than that ground by the tool fabricated in a vacuum furnace. When the ceramic tile was cylindrically ground, the temperature of the grinding arc area measured using a thermocouple remained below 70 °C.

  17. A power-efficient thermocycler based on induction heating for DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debjani; Venkataraman, V.; Mohan, K. Naga; Chandra, H. Sharat; Natarajan, Vasant

    2004-09-01

    We have built a thermocycler based on the principles of induction heating for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of target sequences in DNA samples of interest. The cycler has an average heating rate of ˜0.8 °C/s and a cooling rate of ˜0.5 °C/s, and typically takes ˜4 h to complete a 40-cycle PCR protocol. It is power-efficient (˜6 W per reaction tube), micro-processor controlled, and can be adapted for battery operation. Using this instrument, we have successfully amplified a 350 bp segment from a plasmid and SRY, the human sex determining gene, which occurs as a single-copy sequence in genomic DNA of human males. The PCR products from this thermocycler are comparable to those obtained by the use of commercially available machines. Its easy front-end operation, low-power design, portability and low cost makes it suitable for diagnostic field applications of PCR.

  18. Initial Operation of the Miniaturized Inductively Heated Plasma Generator IPG6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Herdrich, Georg; Laufer, Rene; Koch, Helmut; Gomringer, Chris; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2012-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma wind tunnel facilities of similar type have been established using the inductively heated plasma source IPG6 which is based on proven IRS designs. The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160m^3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control in a wide range. First experiments have been conducted with Air, O2 and N2 as working gases and volumetric flow rates of up to 14 L/min at pressures of a few 100 Pa, although pressures below 1 Pa are achievable at lower flow rates. The maximum tested electric power so far was 8 kW. Plasma powers and total pressures in the plasma jet have been obtained. In the near future the set up of additional diagnostics, the use of other gases (i.e. H2, He), and the integration of a dust particle accelerator are planned. The intended fields of research are basic investigation in thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. in fusion devices or during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves during and after recovery from heat stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Grapes are a major fruit crop around the world. Heat stress can significantly reduce grape yield and quality. Changes at the molecular level in response to heat stress and subsequent recovery are poorly understood. To elucidate the effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery on expression of genes by grape leaves representing the classic heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms, transcript abundance of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves was quantified using the Affymetrix Grape Genome oligonucleotide microarray (15,700 transcripts), followed by quantitative Real-Time PCR validation for some transcript profiles. Results We found that about 8% of the total probe sets were responsive to heat stress and/or to subsequent recovery in grape leaves. The heat stress and recovery responses were characterized by different transcriptional changes. The number of heat stress-regulated genes was almost twice the number of recovery-regulated genes. The responsive genes identified in this study belong to a large number of important traits and biological pathways, including cell rescue (i.e., antioxidant enzymes), protein fate (i.e., HSPs), primary and secondary metabolism, transcription factors, signal transduction, and development. We have identified some common genes and heat shock factors (HSFs) that were modulated differentially by heat stress and recovery. Most HSP genes were upregulated by heat stress but were downregulated by the recovery. On the other hand, some specific HSP genes or HSFs were uniquely responsive to heat stress or recovery. Conclusion The effect of heat stress and recovery on grape appears to be associated with multiple processes and mechanisms including stress-related genes, transcription factors, and metabolism. Heat stress and recovery elicited common up- or downregulated genes as well as unique sets of responsive genes. Moreover, some genes were regulated in opposite directions by heat stress and recovery. The results indicated

  20. Metabolic adaptations to heat stress in growing cattle.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M D; Rhoads, R P; Sanders, S R; Duff, G C; Baumgard, L H

    2010-02-01

    To differentiate between the effects of heat stress (HS) and decreased dry matter intake (DMI) on physiological and metabolic variables in growing beef cattle, we conducted an experiment in which a thermoneutral (TN) control group (n=6) was pair fed (PF) to match nutrient intake with heat-stressed Holstein bull calves (n=6). Bulls (4 to 5 mo old, 135 kg body weight [BW]) housed in climate-controlled chambers were subjected to 2 experimental periods (P): (1) TN (18 degrees C to 20 degrees C) and ad libitum intake for 9 d, and (2) HS (cyclical daily temperatures ranging from 29.4 degrees C to 40.0 degrees C) and ad libitum intake or PF (in TN conditions) for 9 d. During each period, blood was collected daily and all calves were subjected to an intravenous insulin tolerance test (ITT) on day 7 and a glucose tolerance test (GTT) on day 8. Heat stress reduced (12%) DMI and by design, PF calves had similar nutrient intake reductions. During P1, BW gain was similar between environments and averaged 1.25 kg/d, and both HS and PF reduced (P<0.01) average daily gain (-0.09 kg/d) during P2. Compared to PF, HS decreased (P<0.05) basal circulating glucose concentrations (7%) and tended (P<0.07) to increase (30%) plasma insulin concentrations, but neither HS nor PF altered plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentrations. Although there were no treatment differences in P2, both HS and PF increased (P<0.05) plasma urea nitrogen concentrations (75%) compared with P1. In contrast to P1, both HS and PF had increased (16%) glucose disposal, but compared with PF, HS calves had a greater (67%; P<0.05) insulin response to the GTT. Neither period nor environment acutely affected insulin action, but during P2, calves in both environments tended (P=0.11) to have a blunted overall glucose response to the ITT. Independent of reduced nutrient intake, HS alters post-absorptive carbohydrate (basal and stimulated) metabolism, characterized primarily by increased basal insulin concentrations and

  1. Stress and Heat Transfer Analyses for Different Channel Arrangements of PCHE

    SciTech Connect

    Jong B. Lim; Robert G. Shrake; Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh

    2008-11-01

    Stress and heat transfer analyses are being performed on the different channel arrangements of Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) proposed for application of VHTRs using ABAQUS [ABAQUS, 2007] and COMSOL [COMSOL, 2007], respectively. The work is being done to determine the configuration that would result in minimum stress for the same heat performance. This paper discusses the effects of shifting the coolant channels in every other row to reduce stress.

  2. Simulation of Induction Heat Treatment of Steel Articles with the Help of ELTA 6.0 and 2DELTA Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukanin, V. A.; Zenkov, A. E.; Ivanov, A. N.; Nemkov, V. S.

    2016-11-01

    Processes of induction heat treatment of steel articles are studied with the help of ELTA and 2DELTA software for electrothermal analysis. A novel process of combined hardening of extra heavy balanced drill pipes is studied as an example. The results of the computations are confirmed by experimental data.

  3. Comparison of heat dissipation response between Malaysian and Japanese males during exercise in humid heat stress.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Lee, Joo-Young; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Saat, Mohamed; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the differences in heat dissipation response to intense heat stress during exercise in hot and humid environments between tropical and temperate indigenes with matched physical characteristics. Ten Japanese (JP) and ten Malaysian (MY) males participated in this study. Subjects performed exercise for 60 min at 55% peak oxygen uptake in 32°C air with 70% relative humidity, followed by 30 min recovery. The increase in rectal temperature (T(re)) was smaller in MY during exercise compared to JP. The local sweat rate and total body mass loss were similar in both groups. Both skin blood flow and mean skin temperature was lower in MY compared to JP. A significantly greater increase in hand skin temperature was observed in MY during exercise, which is attributable to heat loss due to the greater surface area to mass ratio and large number of arteriovenous anastomoses. Also, the smaller increase in T(re) in MY may be explained by the presence of a significantly greater core-skin temperature gradient in MY than JP. The thermal gradient is also a major factor in increasing the convective heat transfer from core to skin as well as skin blood flow. It is concluded that the greater core-skin temperature gradient observed in MY is responsible for the smaller increase in T(re).

  4. Comparison of heat dissipation response between Malaysian and Japanese males during exercise in humid heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Lee, Joo-Young; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Saat, Mohamed; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the differences in heat dissipation response to intense heat stress during exercise in hot and humid environments between tropical and temperate indigenes with matched physical characteristics. Ten Japanese (JP) and ten Malaysian (MY) males participated in this study. Subjects performed exercise for 60 min at 55% peak oxygen uptake in 32°C air with 70% relative humidity, followed by 30 min recovery. The increase in rectal temperature ( T re) was smaller in MY during exercise compared to JP. The local sweat rate and total body mass loss were similar in both groups. Both skin blood flow and mean skin temperature was lower in MY compared to JP. A significantly greater increase in hand skin temperature was observed in MY during exercise, which is attributable to heat loss due to the greater surface area to mass ratio and large number of arteriovenous anastomoses. Also, the smaller increase in T re in MY may be explained by the presence of a significantly greater core-skin temperature gradient in MY than JP. The thermal gradient is also a major factor in increasing the convective heat transfer from core to skin as well as skin blood flow. It is concluded that the greater core-skin temperature gradient observed in MY is responsible for the smaller increase in T re.

  5. Transcriptional profiling of Arabidopsis heat shock proteins and transcription factors reveals extensive overlap between heat and non-heat stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, William R; Huebner, Marianne; Weber, Andreas P

    2007-01-01

    Background The heat shock response of Arabidopsis thaliana is dependent upon a complex regulatory network involving twenty-one known transcription factors and four heat shock protein families. It is known that heat shock proteins (Hsps) and transcription factors (Hsfs) are involved in cellular response to various forms of stress besides heat. However, the role of Hsps and Hsfs under cold and non-thermal stress conditions is not well understood, and it is unclear which types of stress interact least and most strongly with Hsp and Hsf response pathways. To address this issue, we have analyzed transcriptional response profiles of Arabidopsis Hsfs and Hsps to a range of abiotic and biotic stress treatments (heat, cold, osmotic stress, salt, drought, genotoxic stress, ultraviolet light, oxidative stress, wounding, and pathogen infection) in both above and below-ground plant tissues. Results All stress treatments interact with Hsf and Hsp response pathways to varying extents, suggesting considerable cross-talk between heat and non-heat stress regulatory networks. In general, Hsf and Hsp expression was strongly induced by heat, cold, salt, and osmotic stress, while other types of stress exhibited family or tissue-specific response patterns. With respect to the Hsp20 protein family, for instance, large expression responses occurred under all types of stress, with striking similarity among expression response profiles. Several genes belonging to the Hsp20, Hsp70 and Hsp100 families were specifically upregulated twelve hours after wounding in root tissue, and exhibited a parallel expression response pattern during recovery from heat stress. Among all Hsf and Hsp families, large expression responses occurred under ultraviolet-B light stress in aerial tissue (shoots) but not subterranean tissue (roots). Conclusion Our findings show that Hsf and Hsp family member genes represent an interaction point between multiple stress response pathways, and therefore warrant functional

  6. ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEAT AND COLD STRESS ON THE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO ORGANOPHOSPHATES AND OTHER TOXICANTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most toxicological and pharmacological studies are performed in laboratory rodents maintained under comfortable environmental conditions. However, exposure to toxicants as well as some drugs can occur under stressful conditions during rest or while exercising. Heat stress can exa...

  7. Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1996-03-01

    A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small ({approximately}1 m{sup 3}) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ``secondary.`` The induced current in the ``secondary`` heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., {approximately}1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature.

  8. Aspirin upregulates αB-Crystallin to protect the myocardium against heat stress in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shu; Yin, Bin; Song, Erbao; Chen, Hongbo; Cheng, Yanfen; Zhang, Xiaohui; Bao, Endong; Hartung, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    We established in vivo and in vitro models to investigate the role of αB-Crystallin (CryAB) and assess the ability of aspirin (ASA) to protect the myocardium during prolonged heat stress. Thirty-day-old chickens were divided into three groups (n = 90): heat stress (HS, 40±1 °C); ASA(−)HS(+), 1 mg/kg ASA orally 2 h before heat stress; and ASA(+)HS(−), pretreated with aspirin, no heat stress (25 °C). Hearts were excised after 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 24 h. Heat stress increased body temperature, though the ASA(−)HS(+) group had significantly higher temperatures than the ASA(+)HS(+) group at all time points. Compared to ASA(+)HS(+), the ASA(−)HS(+) group displayed increased sensitivity to heat stress. Pathological analysis revealed the ASA (+)HS(+) myocardium showed less severe changes (narrowed, chaotic fibers; fewer necrotic cells) than the ASA(−)HS(+) group (bleeding and extensive cell death). In vitro, ASA-pretreatment significantly increased primary chicken myocardial cell survival during heat stress. ELISAs indicated ASA induced CryAB in vivo to protect against heat stress-induced myocardial damage, but ASA did not induce CryAB in primary chicken myocardial cells. The mechanisms by which ASA induces the expression of CryAB in vivo and protects the myocardium during heat stress merit further research. PMID:27857180

  9. Regulation of Non-coding RNAs in Heat Stress Responses of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; He, Qingsong; Chen, Gang; Wang, Li; Jin, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is an important factor limiting plant growth, development, and productivity; thus, plants have evolved special adaptive mechanisms to cope with high-temperature stress. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a class of regulatory RNAs that play an important role in many biological processes. Recently developed advanced technologies, such as genome-wide transcriptomic analysis, have revealed that abundant ncRNAs are expressed under heat stress. Although this area of research is still in its infancy, an increasing number of several classes of regulatory ncRNA (i.e., miRNA, siRNA, and lncRNA) related to heat stress responses have been reported. In this mini-review, we discuss our current understanding of the role of ncRNAs in heat stress responses in plants, especially miRNAs, siRNAs, and their targets. For example, the miR398-CSD/CCS-HSF, miR396-WRKY6, miR159-GAMYB, and TAS1-HTT-HSF pathways regulate plant heat tolerance. We highlight the hormone/development-related miRNAs involved in heat stress, and discuss the regulatory networks of miRNA-targets. We also note that DNA methylation and alternative splicing could affect miRNA expression under heat stress, and some lncRNAs could respond to heat stress. Finally, we briefly discuss future prospects concerning the ncRNA-related mechanisms of heat stress responses in plants. PMID:27588021

  10. Enhanced economic connectivity to foster heat stress-related losses.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Leonie; Levermann, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Assessing global impacts of unexpected meteorological events in an increasingly connected world economy is important for estimating the costs of climate change. We show that since the beginning of the 21st century, the structural evolution of the global supply network has been such as to foster an increase of climate-related production losses. We compute first- and higher-order losses from heat stress-induced reductions in productivity under changing economic and climatic conditions between 1991 and 2011. Since 2001, the economic connectivity has augmented in such a way as to facilitate the cascading of production loss. The influence of this structural change has dominated over the effect of the comparably weak climate warming during this decade. Thus, particularly under future warming, the intensification of international trade has the potential to amplify climate losses if no adaptation measures are taken.

  11. Subcellular localization of proflavine derivative and induction of oxidative stress--in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Ipóthová, Z; Paulíková, H; Cižeková, L; Hunáková, L; Labudová, M; Grolmusová, A; Janovec, L; Imrich, J

    2013-11-01

    Acridines have been studied for several decades because of their numerous biological effects, especially anticancer activity. Recently, cytotoxicity of novel acridine derivatives, 3,6-bis((1-alkyl-5-oxo-imidazolidin-2-yliden)imino)acridine hydrochlorides (AcrDIMs), was confirmed for leukemic cell lines [Bioorg. Med. Chem.2011, 19, 1790]. The mechanism of action of the most cytotoxic hexyl-AcrDIM was studied in this paper focusing attention on a subcellular distribution of the drug. Accumulation of hexyl-AcrDIM in mitochondria was confirmed after labeling mitochondria with MitoRED using ImageStream Imaging Flow Cytometer. The derivative significantly decreased intracellular ATP level (reduction of ATP level was decreased by vitamin E), and induced oxidative stress (ROS production detected by DHE assay) as well as cell cycle arrest in the S-phase (flow cytometry analysis) already after short-time incubation and induction of apoptosis. Cytotoxicity of hexyl-AcrDIM is closely connected with induction of oxidative stress in cells.

  12. Climate Change Impact on Evapotranspiration, Heat Stress and Chill Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, R. L.; Marras, S.; Spano, D.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide concentration scenarios project an increase in CO2 from 372 ppm to between 500 and 950 ppm by the year 2100, and the potential effect on temperature, humidity, and plant responses to environmental factors are complex and concerning. For 2100, mean daily temperature increase projections range from 1.2oC to 6.8oC depending on greenhouse gas emissions. On the bad side, higher temperatures are often associated with increases in evapotranspiration (ET), heat stress, and pest infestations. On the good side, increased temperature is commonly related to less frost damage, faster growth, and higher production in some cases. One misconception is that global warming will increase evapotranspiration and, hence, agricultural water demand. As the oceans and other water bodies warm, evaporation and humidity are likely to increase globally, but higher humidity tends to reduce plant transpiration and hence ET. Higher CO2 concentrations also tend to reduce ET, and, in the end, the increase in ET due to higher temperature is likely to be offset by a decrease in ET due to higher humidity and CO2. With a decrease in daytime evapotranspiration, the canopy temperature is likely to rise relative to the air temperature, and this implies that heat stress could be worse than predicted by increased air temperature. Daily minimum temperatures are generally increasing about twice as fast as maximum temperatures presumably because of the increasing dew point temperatures as more water vapor is added to the atmosphere. This could present a serious problem to meet the chill requirement for fruit and nut crops. Growing seasons, i.e., from the last spring to the first fall frost, are likely to increase, but the crop growth period is likely to shorten due to higher temperature. Thus, spring frost damage is unlikely to change but there should be fewer damaging fall frost events. In this paper, we will present some ideas on the possible impact of climate change on evapotranspiration and

  13. Induction of Oxidative Stress Responses by Dioxin and other Ligands of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, John F.; Dalton, Timothy P.; Shertzer, Howard G.; Puga, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    TCDD and other polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbon ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) have been classically considered as non-genotoxic compounds because they fail to be directly mutagenic in either bacteria or most in vitro assay systems. They do so in spite of having repeatedly been linked to oxidative stress and to mutagenic and carcinogenic outcomes. Oxidative stress, on the other hand, has been used as a marker for the toxicity of dioxin and its congeners. We have focused this review on the connection between oxidative stress induction and the toxic effects of fetal and adult dioxin exposure, with emphasis on the large species difference in sensitivity to this agent. We examine the roles that the dioxin-inducible cytochromes P450s play in the cellular and toxicological consequences of dioxin exposure with emphasis on oxidative stress involvement. Many components of the health consequences resulting from dioxin exposure may be attributable to epigenetic mechanisms arising from prolonged reactive oxygen generation. PMID:18648615

  14. Induction of oxidative stress and oxidative damage in rat glial cells by acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Kamendulis, L M; Jiang, J; Xu, Y; Klaunig, J E

    1999-08-01

    Chronic treatment of rats with acrylonitrile (ACN) resulted in a dose-related increase in glial cell tumors (astrocytomas). While the exact mechanism(s) for ACN-induced carcinogenicity remains unresolved, non-genotoxic and possibly tumor promotion modes of action appear to be involved in the induction of glial tumors. Recent studies have shown that ACN induced oxidative stress selectively in rat brain in a dose-responsive manner. The present study examined the ability of ACN to induce oxidative stress in a rat glial cell line, a target tissue, and in cultured rat hepatocytes, a non-target tissue of ACN carcinogenicity. Glial cells and hepatocytes were treated for 1, 4 and 24 h with sublethal concentrations of ACN. ACN induced an increase in oxidative DNA damage, as evidenced by increased production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in glial cells but not in rat hepatocytes. Hydroxyl radical formation following ACN treatment was also selectively increased in glial cells. Following 1 and 4 h of ACN exposure, the levels of the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione, as well as the activities of the enzymatic antioxidants catalase and superoxide dismutase were significantly decreased in the rat glial cells. Lipid peroxidation and the activity of glutathione peroxidase were not affected by ACN treatment in rat glial cells. No changes in any of these biomarkers of oxidative stress were observed in hepatocytes treated with ACN. These data indicate that ACN selectively induced oxidative stress in rat glial cells.

  15. The relationship between yield and the antioxidant defense system in tomatoes grown under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rainwater, D T; Gossett, D R; Millhollon, E P; Hanna, H Y; Banks, S W; Lucas, M C

    1996-11-01

    Four putative heat-tolerant tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) cultivars (Tamasabro, Heat Wave, LHT-24, and Solar Set) and one putative heat-sensitive tomato cultivar (Floradade) were grown in the field under non-stress (average daily temperature of 26 degrees C) and heat-stress (average daily temperature of 34 degrees C) conditions. At anthesis, approximately five weeks after being transplanted to the field, leaf samples were collected for antioxidant analyses. Yield was determined by harvesting ripe fruit seven weeks after the collection of leaf samples. Heat stress resulted in a 79.1% decrease in yield for the heat-sensitive Floradade, while the fruit yield in the heat-tolerant cultivars Heat Wave, LHT-24, Solar Set, and Tamasabro was reduced 51.5%, 22.1%, 43.8%, and 34.8% respectively. When grown under heat stress, antioxidant activities were also greater in the heat-tolerant cultivars. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased up to 9-fold in the heat-tolerant cultivars but decreased 83.1% in the heat-sensitive Floradade. Catalase, peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase activity increased significantly in all cultivars. Only Heat Wave showed a significant increase in glutathione reductase in response to heat stress but all heat-tolerant cultivars exhibited significantly lower oxidized ascorbate/reduced ascorbate ratios, greater reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione rations, and greater alpha-tocopherol concentrations compared to the heat-sensitive cultivar Floridade. These data indicate that the more heat-tolerant cultivars had an enhanced capacity for scavenging active oxygen species and a more active ascorbate-glutathione cycle and suggest a strong correlation between the ability to up-regulate the antioxidant defense system and the ability of tomatoes to produce greater yields when grown under heat stress.

  16. Age, splanchnic vasoconstriction, and heat stress during tilting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minson, C. T.; Wladkowski, S. L.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Kenney, W. L.

    1999-01-01

    During upright tilting, blood is translocated to the dependent veins of the legs and compensatory circulatory adjustments are necessary to maintain arterial pressure. For examination of the effect of age on these responses, seven young (23 +/- 1 yr) and seven older (70 +/- 3 yr) men were head-up tilted to 60 degrees in a thermoneutral condition and during passive heating with water-perfused suits. Measurements included heart rate (HR), cardiac output (Qc; acetylene rebreathing technique), central venous pressure (CVP), blood pressures, forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography), splanchnic and renal blood flows (indocyanine green and p-aminohippurate clearance), and esophageal and mean skin temperatures. In response to tilting in the thermoneutral condition, CVP and stroke volume decreased to a greater extent in the young men, but HR increased more, such that the fall in Qc was similar between the two groups in the upright posture. The rise in splanchnic vascular resistance (SVR) was greater in the older men, but the young men increased forearm vascular resistance (FVR) to a greater extent than the older men. The fall in Qc during combined heat stress and tilting was greater in the young compared with older men. Only four of the young men versus six of the older men were able to finish the second tilt without becoming presyncopal. In summary, the older men relied on a greater increase in SVR to compensate for a reduced ability to constrict the skin and muscle circulations (as determined by changes in FVR) during head-up tilting.

  17. Online induction heating for determination of isotope composition of woody stem water with laser spectrometry: A methods assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lazarus, Brynne E.; Germino, Matthew; Vander Veen, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Application of stable isotopes of water to studies of plant–soil interactions often requires a substantial preparatory step of extracting water from samples without fractionating isotopes. Online heating is an emerging approach for this need, but is relatively untested and major questions of how to best deliver standards and assess interference by organics have not been evaluated. We examined these issues in our application of measuring woody stem xylem of sagebrush using a Picarro laser spectrometer with online induction heating. We determined (1) effects of cryogenic compared to induction-heating extraction, (2) effects of delivery of standards on filter media compared to on woody stem sections, and (3) spectral interference from organic compounds for these approaches (and developed a technique to do so). Our results suggest that matching sample and standard media improves accuracy, but that isotopic values differ with the extraction method in ways that are not due to spectral interference from organics.

  18. Online induction heating for determination of isotope composition of woody stem water with laser spectrometry: a methods assessment.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Brynne E; Germino, Matthew J; Vander Veen, Jessica L

    2016-06-01

    Application of stable isotopes of water to studies of plant-soil interactions often requires a substantial preparatory step of extracting water from samples without fractionating isotopes. Online heating is an emerging approach for this need, but is relatively untested and major questions of how to best deliver standards and assess interference by organics have not been evaluated. We examined these issues in our application of measuring woody stem xylem of sagebrush using a Picarro laser spectrometer with online induction heating. We determined (1) effects of cryogenic compared to induction-heating extraction, (2) effects of delivery of standards on filter media compared to on woody stem sections, and (3) spectral interference from organic compounds for these approaches (and developed a technique to do so). Our results suggest that matching sample and standard media improves accuracy, but that isotopic values differ with the extraction method in ways that are not due to spectral interference from organics.

  19. Rapid localized heating of graphene coating on a silicon mold by induction for precision molding of polymer optics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Wenchen; Yi, Allen Y

    2017-04-01

    In compression molding of polymer optical components with micro/nanoscale surface features, rapid heating of the mold surface is critical for the implementation of this technology for large-scale applications. In this Letter, a novel method of a localized rapid heating process is reported. This process is based on induction heating of a thin conductive coating deposited on a silicon mold. Since the graphene coating is very thin (∼45  nm), a high heating rate of 10∼20°C/s can be achieved by employing a 1200 W 30 kHz electrical power unit. Under this condition, the graphene-coated surface and the polymer substrate can be heated above the polymer's glass transition temperature within 30 s and subsequently cooled down to room temperature within several tens of seconds after molding, resulting in an overall thermal cycle of about 3 min or shorter. The feasibility of this process was validated by fabrication of optical gratings, micropillar matrices, and microlens arrays on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates with very high precision. The uniformity and surface geometries of the replicated optical elements are evaluated using an optical profilometer, a diffraction test setup, and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor built with a molded PMMA microlens array. Compared with the conventional bulk heating molding process, this novel rapid localized induction heating process could improve replication efficiency with better geometrical fidelity.

  20. Insect pollination reduces yield loss following heat stress in faba bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jacob; Jones, Hannah Elizabeth; Lukac, Martin; Potts, Simon Geoffrey

    2016-03-15

    Global food security, particularly crop fertilization and yield production, is threatened by heat waves that are projected to increase in frequency and magnitude with climate change. Effects of heat stress on the fertilization of insect-pollinated plants are not well understood, but experiments conducted primarily in self-pollinated crops, such as wheat, show that transfer of fertile pollen may recover yield following stress. We hypothesized that in the partially pollinator-dependent crop, faba bean (Vicia faba L.), insect pollination would elicit similar yield recovery following heat stress. We exposed potted faba bean plants to heat stress for 5 days during floral development and anthesis. Temperature treatments were representative of heat waves projected in the UK for the period 2021-2050 and onwards. Following temperature treatments, plants were distributed in flight cages and either pollinated by domesticated Bombus terrestris colonies or received no insect pollination. Yield loss due to heat stress at 30 °C was greater in plants excluded from pollinators (15%) compared to those with bumblebee pollination (2.5%). Thus, the pollinator dependency of faba bean yield was 16% at control temperatures (18-26 °C) and extreme stress (34 °C), but was 53% following intermediate heat stress at 30 °C. These findings provide the first evidence that the pollinator dependency of crops can be modified by heat stress, and suggest that insect pollination may become more important in crop production as the probability of heat waves increases.

  1. Nutritional Interventions to Alleviate the Negative Consequences of Heat Stress12

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, Robert P.; Baumgard, Lance H.; Suagee, Jessica K.; Sanders, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a highly coordinated process, and preferred fuel(s) differ among tissues. The hierarchy of substrate use can be affected by physiological status and environmental factors including high ambient temperature. Unabated heat eventually overwhelms homeothermic mechanisms resulting in heat stress, which compromises animal health, farm animal production, and human performance. Various aspects of heat stress physiology have been extensively studied, yet a clear understanding of the metabolic changes occurring at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body levels in response to an environmental heat load remains ill-defined. For reasons not yet clarified, circulating nonesterified fatty acid levels are reduced during heat stress, even in the presence of elevated stress hormones (epinephrine, glucagon, and cortisol), and heat-stressed animals often have a blunted lipolytic response to catabolic signals. Either directly because of or in coordination with this, animals experiencing environmental hyperthermia exhibit a shift toward carbohydrate use. These metabolic alterations occur coincident with increased circulating basal and stimulated plasma insulin concentrations. Limited data indicate that proper insulin action is necessary to effectively mount a response to heat stress and minimize heat-induced damage. Consistent with this idea, nutritional interventions targeting increased insulin action may improve tolerance and productivity during heat stress. Further research is warranted to uncover the effects of heat on parameters associated with energy metabolism so that more appropriate and effective treatment methodologies can be designed. PMID:23674792

  2. Sm-Like Protein-Mediated RNA Metabolism Is Required for Heat Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Masanori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Morosawa, Taeko; Ishida, Junko; Iida, Kei; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Sm-like proteins play multiple functions in RNA metabolism, which is essential for biological processes such as stress responses in eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis thaliana sad1 mutant has a mutation of sm-like protein 5 (LSM5) and shows impaired drought and salt stress tolerances. The lsm5/sad1 mutant also showed hypersensitivity to heat stress. GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 was localized in the nucleus under optimal growth conditions. After heat stress treatment, GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 fluorescence was also observed as small cytoplasmic dots, in addition to nuclear localization. Whole genome transcriptome analysis revealed that many genes in Arabidopsis were drastically changed in response to heat stress. More heat-responsive genes were highly expressed in lsm5/sad1 mutant at both 2 and 6 h after heat stress treatment. Additionally, intron-retained and capped transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant after heat stress treatment. In this study, we also identified non-Arabidopsis Genome Initiative transcripts that were expressed from unannotated regions. Most of these transcripts were antisense transcripts, and many capped non-AGI transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant during heat stress treatment. These results indicated that LSM5/SAD1 functions to degrade aberrant transcripts through appropriate mRNA splicing and decapping, and precise RNA metabolic machinery is required for heat stress tolerance. PMID:27493656

  3. An assessment of heat stress in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasilla Álvarez, D.; Fernandez García, F.

    2010-09-01

    of heat extremes (PET > 35 °C) was compared with the occurrence of several circulation patterns, in other to validate the circulation pattern catalogue and obtain a regional signal. In order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the sources and thermodynamic characteristics of the air masses involved in those events, the atmospheric circulation prior selected episodes of heat stress was analyzed using a sequential classification procedure (up to three days) and compared with the backward trajectories supplied by the HYSPLIT model (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model; http://ready.arl.noaa.gov/HYSPLIT.php). The dependence of the PET on some geographical controls (e.g. topography, latitude, distance to sea) results on marked variation between the values calculated for different stations. Low/middle-altitude continental stations (eg. Madrid, Seville) show much higher thermal stress than coastal stations (Barcelona, Málaga) or stations in elevated areas (e.g. Burgos, Navacerrada). Besides, coastal stations display an asymmetric monthly distribution, with larger probability in August, while July is the most typical month in the interior of Iberia. 5 regions resulted from the analysis of daily PET fields: Northern, Atlantic North, Atlantic South, Mediterranean North and Mediterranean South. The extreme heat events occurrence on each region showed strong links with the atmospheric circulation, but two basic mechanisms are involved in most of them. Coastal stations experience such events when the regional atmospheric circulation overrules local circulations, replacing the cooler and moist air masses by continental downslope flows. In continental Iberia the advection of hot air masses from a diverse precedence and embedded into a weak atmospheric circulation (radiative processes) trigger most of the situations of heat stress.

  4. Characterization of genes and pathways that respond to heat stress in Holstein calves through transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Krishnamoorthy; Kwon, Anam; Lee, Eunjin; Chung, Hoyoung

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the genes and pathways that respond to heat stress in Holstein bull calves exposed to severe ranges of temperature and humidity. A total of ten animals from 4 to 6 months of age were subjected to heat stress at 37 °C and 90 % humidity for 12 h. Skin and rectal temperatures were measured before and after heat stress; while no correlation was found between them before heat stress, a moderate correlation was detected after heat stress, confirming rectal temperature to be a better barometer for monitoring heat stress. RNAseq analysis identified 8567 genes to be differentially regulated, out of which 465 genes were significantly upregulated (≥2-fold, P < 0.05) and 49 genes were significantly downregulated (≤2-fold, P < 0.05) in response to heat stress. Significant terms and pathways enriched in response to heat stress included chaperones, cochaperones, cellular response to heat stress, phosphorylation, kinase activation, immune response, apoptosis, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, Pi3K/AKT activation, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, interferon signaling, pathways in cancer, estrogen signaling pathway, and MAPK signaling pathway. The differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, which confirmed the tendency of the expression. The genes and pathways identified in this analysis extend our understanding of transcriptional response to heat stress and their likely functioning in adapting the animal to hyperthermic stress. The identified genes could be used as candidate genes for association studies to select and breed animals with improved heat tolerance.

  5. Investigation of countermeasure for unloading-related muscle plasticity: role of heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Kojima, A.; Akema, T.; Sugiura, T.; Yamada, S.; Ohira, Y.; Yoshioka, T.

    We have been studying the mechanisms responsible for unloading- or loading-related muscle plasticity. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of heat stress on the growth of mammalian skeletal muscles in vivo. Male Wistar rats (7 weeks old) were divided into two groups: control (n = 24) and heat stress (n = 24). Rats of heat stressed group were exposed to environmental heat stress (41°C for 60 min) in a heat chamber without anesthesia. The soleus muscles were dissected 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after the heat exposure. The wet weights of muscle relative to body weights in heat stressed group were significantly higher than control group 7 days after the exposure (p<0.05). The relative proportion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine- and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive nuclei, that are indicators for the cell proliferation, were increased 1 day after heating (p<0.05). Pax7-positive nuclei, that are indicators for the muscle satellite cells, were also increased 3 day after heat exposure. The expression of phosphorylated p70 S6 kinase was increased 1 day following heat exposure. These results suggest that heat stress could promote cell proliferation, activate satellite cells, and induce muscular hypertrophy.

  6. Genome scale transcriptional response diversity among ten ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana during heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh D.; Mundy, John; Bones, Atle M.

    2013-01-01

    In the scenario of global warming and climate change, heat stress is a serious threat to crop production worldwide. Being sessile, plants cannot escape from heat. Plants have developed various adaptive mechanisms to survive heat stress. Several studies have focused on diversity of heat tolerance levels in divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, but comprehensive genome scale understanding of heat stress response in plants is still lacking. Here we report the genome scale transcript responses to heat stress of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes (Col, Ler, C24, Cvi, Kas1, An1, Sha, Kyo2, Eri, and Kond) originated from different geographical locations. During the experiment, A. thaliana plants were subjected to heat stress (38°C) and transcript responses were monitored using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. The responses of A. thaliana ecotypes exhibited considerable variation in the transcript abundance levels. In total, 3644 transcripts were significantly heat regulated (p < 0.01) in the 10 ecotypes, including 244 transcription factors and 203 transposable elements. By employing a systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA), we have constructed an in silico transcript regulatory network model for 35 heat responsive transcription factors during cellular responses to heat stress in A. thaliana. The computed activities of the 35 transcription factors showed ecotype specific responses to the heat treatment. PMID:24409190

  7. Possible involvement of phosphorylated heat-shock factor-1 in changes in heat shock protein 72 induction in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Murata, Mao; Takagi, Norio; Tanonaka, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    It is supposed that an increase in the level of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in the failing heart would be beneficial for reducing the myocardial damage. However, the induction of HSP72 after an exposure to heat shock is blunted in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction. In this study, to clarify the possible mechanisms underlying this reduction in the ability for HSP72 induction in the failing heart, the possible involvement of heat-shock factor-1 (HSF1), an HSP transcription factor, in this reduction was examined. When hemodynamic parameters of rats with myocardial infarction 8 weeks after coronary artery ligation were measured, the animals showed the signs of chronic heart failure. The HSF1 content was increased in the viable myocardium in the failing heart. The ability to induce cardiac HSP72 was reduced after an exposure to hyperthermia. The level of HSF1 in the cytosolic fraction from the failing heart with or without exposure to hyperthermia was increased, whereas that of HSF1 in the nuclear fraction was reduced. In the failing heart, the level of HSF1 on its serine 303 (Ser303) residue, which phosphorylation represses HSF1, was increased. These findings suggest that HSF1 translocation from the cytosol into the nucleus was attenuated after an exposure to hyperthermia and that an increase in the phosphorylation of HSF1 Ser303 was involved in the impairment of heat shock-induced HSP72 induction in the failing heart following myocardial infarction.

  8. Examination of Buoyancy-Reduction Effect in Induction-Heating Cookers by Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Tanaka, Kazufumi; Hara, Takehisa

    In recent years, induction-heating (IH) cookers that can be used to heat nonmagnetic metals such as aluminum have been produced. Occasionally, a light pan moves on a glass plate due to buoyancy when heated by an IH cooker. In some IH cookers, an aluminum plate is mounted between the glass plate and the coil in order to reduce the buoyancy effect. The objective of this research is to evaluate the buoyancy-reduction effect and the heating effect of buoyancy-reduction plates. Eddy current analysis is carried out by 3D finite element method, and the electromagnetic force and the heat distribution on the heating plate are calculated. After this calculation is performed, the temperature distribution of the heating plate is calculated by heat transfer analysis. It is found that the shape, area, and the position of the buoyancy reduction plate strongly affect the buoyancy and the heat distribution. The impact of the shape, area, and position of the buoyancy reduction plate was quantified. The phenomena in the heating were elucidated qualitatively.

  9. Induction heating pure vapor source of high temperature melting point materials on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Kutsumi, Osamu; Kato, Yushi; Matsui, Yuuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Uchida, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    Multicharged ions that are needed are produced from solid pure material with high melting point in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating (IH) with multilayer induction coil, which is made from bare molybdenum or tungsten wire without water cooling and surrounding the pure vaporized material. We optimize the shapes of induction coil and vaporized materials and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. IH evaporator produces pure material vapor because materials directly heated by eddy currents have no contact with insulated materials, which are usually impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10(-4)-10(-3) Pa. We measure the temperature of the vaporized materials with different shapes, and compare them with the result of modeling. We estimate the efficiency of the IH vapor source. We are aiming at the evaporator's higher melting point material than that of iron.

  10. Expression and interaction of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) in rice in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhai; Lin, Shoukai; Liu, Qiulin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Wenfeng; Lin, Jun; Wang, Yongfei; Ke, Yuqin; He, Huaqin

    2014-04-01

    The inherent immobility of rice (Oryza sativa L.) limited their abilities to avoid heat stress and required them to contend with heat stress through innate defense abilities in which heat shock proteins played important roles. In this study, Hsp26.7, Hsp23.2, Hsp17.9A, Hsp17.4 and Hsp16.9A were up-regulated in Nipponbare during seedling and anthesis stages in response to heat stress. Subsequently, the expressing levels of these five sHsps in the heat-tolerant rice cultivar, Co39, were all significantly higher than that in the heat-susceptible rice cultivar, Azucena. This indicated that the expressive level of these five sHsps was positively related to the ability of rice plants to avoid heat stress. Thus, the expression level of these five sHsps can be regarded as bio-markers for screening rice cultivars with different abilities to avoid heat stress. Hsp18.1, Hsp17.9A, Hsp17.7 and Hsp16.9A, in the three rice cultivars under heat stress were found to be involved in one protein complex by Native-PAGE, and the interactions of Hsp18.1 and Hsp 17.7, Hsp18.1 and Hsp 17.9A, and Hsp17.7 and Hsp16.9A were further validated by yeast 2-hybridization. Pull down assay also confirmed the interaction between Hsp17.7 and Hsp16.9A in rice under heat stress. In conclusion, the up-regulation of the 5 sHsps is a key step for rice to tolerate heat stress, after that some sHsps assembled into a large hetero-oligomeric complex. In addition, through protein-protein interaction, Hsp101 regulated thiamine biosynthesis, and Hsp82 homology affected nitrogen metabolism, while Hsp81-1 were involved in the maintenance of sugar or starch synthesis in rice plants under heat stress. These results provide new insight into the regulatory mechanism of sHsps in rice.

  11. Reynolds stress and heat flux in spherical shell convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Mantere, M. J.; Guerrero, G.; Brandenburg, A.; Chatterjee, P.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Turbulent fluxes of angular momentum and enthalpy or heat due to rotationally affected convection play a key role in determining differential rotation of stars. Their dependence on latitude and depth has been determined in the past from convection simulations in Cartesian or spherical simulations. Here we perform a systematic comparison between the two geometries as a function of the rotation rate. Aims: Here we want to extend the earlier studies by using spherical wedges to obtain turbulent angular momentum and heat transport as functions of the rotation rate from stratified convection. We compare results from spherical and Cartesian models in the same parameter regime in order to study whether restricted geometry introduces artefacts into the results. In particular, we want to clarify whether the sharp equatorial profile of the horizontal Reynolds stress found in earlier Cartesian models is also reproduced in spherical geometry. Methods: We employ direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection in spherical and Cartesian geometries. In order to alleviate the computational cost in the spherical runs, and to reach as high spatial resolution as possible, we model only parts of the latitude and longitude. The rotational influence, measured by the Coriolis number or inverse Rossby number, is varied from zero to roughly seven, which is the regime that is likely to be realised in the solar convection zone. Cartesian simulations are performed in overlapping parameter regimes. Results: For slow rotation we find that the radial and latitudinal turbulent angular momentum fluxes are directed inward and equatorward, respectively. In the rapid rotation regime the radial flux changes sign in accordance with earlier numerical results, but in contradiction with theory. The latitudinal flux remains mostly equatorward and develops a maximum close to the equator. In Cartesian simulations this peak can be explained by the strong "banana cells". Their effect in the

  12. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Downs, C A; McDougall, Kathleen E; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Richmond, Robert H; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  13. Heat-Stress and Light-Stress Induce Different Cellular Pathologies in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate during Coral Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Downs, C. A.; McDougall, Kathleen E.; Woodley, Cheryl M.; Fauth, John E.; Richmond, Robert H.; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W.; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m−2 s−1 PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching. PMID:24324575

  14. Ultra-high vacuum compatible induction-heated rod casting furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Neubauer, A.; Münzer, W.; Regnat, A.; Benka, G.; Meven, M.; Pedersen, B.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2016-06-01

    We report the design of a radio-frequency induction-heated rod casting furnace that permits the preparation of polycrystalline ingots of intermetallic compounds under ultra-high vacuum compatible conditions. The central part of the system is a bespoke water-cooled Hukin crucible supporting a casting mold. Depending on the choice of the mold, typical rods have a diameter between 6 mm and 10 mm and a length up to 90 mm, suitable for single-crystal growth by means of float-zoning. The setup is all-metal sealed and may be baked out. We find that the resulting ultra-high vacuum represents an important precondition for processing compounds with high vapor pressures under a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 3 bars. Using the rod casting furnace, we succeeded to prepare large high-quality single crystals of two half-Heusler compounds, namely, the itinerant antiferromagnet CuMnSb and the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb.

  15. Ultra-high vacuum compatible induction-heated rod casting furnace.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A; Neubauer, A; Münzer, W; Regnat, A; Benka, G; Meven, M; Pedersen, B; Pfleiderer, C

    2016-06-01

    We report the design of a radio-frequency induction-heated rod casting furnace that permits the preparation of polycrystalline ingots of intermetallic compounds under ultra-high vacuum compatible conditions. The central part of the system is a bespoke water-cooled Hukin crucible supporting a casting mold. Depending on the choice of the mold, typical rods have a diameter between 6 mm and 10 mm and a length up to 90 mm, suitable for single-crystal growth by means of float-zoning. The setup is all-metal sealed and may be baked out. We find that the resulting ultra-high vacuum represents an important precondition for processing compounds with high vapor pressures under a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 3 bars. Using the rod casting furnace, we succeeded to prepare large high-quality single crystals of two half-Heusler compounds, namely, the itinerant antiferromagnet CuMnSb and the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb.

  16. Post-heading heat stress and yield impact in winter wheat of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Liu, Leilei; Tian, Liying; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan; Asseng, Senthold

    2014-02-01

    Wheat is sensitive to high temperatures, but the spatial and temporal variability of high temperature and its impact on yield are often not known. An analysis of historical climate and yield data was undertaken to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of heat stress between heading and maturity and its impact on wheat grain yield in China. Several heat stress indices were developed to quantify heat intensity, frequency, and duration between heading and maturity based on measured maximum temperature records of the last 50 years from 166 stations in the main wheat-growing region of China. Surprisingly, heat stress between heading and maturity was more severe in the generally cooler northern wheat-growing regions than the generally warmer southern regions of China, because of the delayed time of heading with low temperatures during the earlier growing season and the exposure of the post-heading phase into the warmer part of the year. Heat stress between heading and maturity has increased in the last decades in most of the main winter wheat production areas of China, but the rate was higher in the south than in the north. The correlation between measured grain yields and post-heading heat stress and average temperature were statistically significant in the entire wheat-producing region, and explained about 29% of the observed spatial and temporal yield variability. A heat stress index considering the duration and intensity of heat between heading and maturity was required to describe the correlation of heat stress and yield variability. Because heat stress is a major cause of yield loss and the number of heat events is projected to increase in the future, quantifying the future impact of heat stress on wheat production and developing appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies are critical for developing food security policies in China and elsewhere.

  17. Slow accumulation of mutations in Xpc-/- mice upon induction of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Melis, Joost P M; Kuiper, Raoul V; Zwart, Edwin; Robinson, Joke; Pennings, Jeroen L A; van Oostrom, Conny T M; Luijten, Mirjam; van Steeg, Harry

    2013-12-01

    XPC is one of the key DNA damage recognition proteins in the global genome repair route of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Previously, we demonstrated that NER-deficient mouse models Xpa(-/-) and Xpc(-/-) exhibit a divergent spontaneous tumor spectrum and proposed that XPC might be functionally involved in the defense against oxidative DNA damage. Others have mechanistically dissected several functionalities of XPC to oxidative DNA damage sensitivity using in vitro studies. XPC has been linked to regulation of base excision repair (BER) activity, redox homeostasis and recruitment of ATM and ATR to damage sites, thereby possibly regulating cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis. XPC has additionally been implicated in recognition of bulky (e.g. cyclopurines) and non-bulky DNA damage (8-oxodG). However, the ultimate contribution of the XPC functionality in vivo in the oxidative DNA damage response and subsequent mutagenesis process remains unclear. Our study indicates that Xpc(-/-) mice, in contrary to Xpa(-/-) and wild type mice, have an increased mutational load upon induction of oxidative stress and that mutations arise in a slowly accumulative fashion. The effect of non-functional XPC in vivo upon oxidative stress exposure appears to have implications in mutagenesis, which can contribute to the carcinogenesis process. The levels and rate of mutagenesis upon oxidative stress correlate with previous findings that lung tumors in Xpc(-/-) mice overall arise late in the lifespan and that the incidence of internal tumors in XP-C patients is relatively low in comparison to skin cancer incidence.

  18. Spectral characteristics of skin sympathetic nerve activity in heat-stressed humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Sathishkumar, Mithra; Wilson, Thad E; Shibasaki, Manabu; Davis, Scott L; Crandall, Craig G

    2006-04-01

    Skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) exhibits low- and high-frequency spectral components in normothermic subjects. However, spectral characteristics of SSNA in heat-stressed subjects are unknown. Because the main components of the integrated SSNA during heat stress (sudomotor/vasodilator activities) are different from those during normothermia and cooling (vasoconstrictor activity), we hypothesize that spectral characteristics of SSNA in heat-stressed subjects will be different from those in subjects subjected to normothermia or cooling. In 17 healthy subjects, SSNA, electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure (via Finapres), respiratory activity, and skin blood flow were recorded during normothermia and heat stress. In 7 of the 17 subjects, these variables were also recorded during cooling. Spectral characteristics of integrated SSNA, R-R interval, beat-by-beat mean blood pressure, skin blood flow variability, and respiratory excursions were assessed. Heat stress and cooling significantly increased total SSNA. SSNA spectral power in the low-frequency (0.03-0.15 Hz), high-frequency (0.15-0.45 Hz), and very-high-frequency (0.45-2.5 Hz) regions was significantly elevated by heat stress and cooling. Interestingly, heat stress caused a greater relative increase of SSNA spectral power within the 0.45- to 2.5-Hz region than in the other spectral ranges; cooling did not show this effect. Differences in the SSNA spectral distribution between normothermia/cooling and heat stress may reflect different characteristics of central modulation of vasoconstrictor and sudomotor/vasodilator activities.

  19. Invited review: heat stress effects during late gestation on dry cows and their calves.

    PubMed

    Tao, S; Dahl, G E

    2013-07-01

    In dairy cattle, late gestation is a critical period for fetal growth and physiological transition into the next lactation. Environmental factors, such as temperature and light, exert dramatic effects on the production, health, and well-being of animals during this period and after parturition. The aim of this review was to introduce effects of heat stress during late gestation on dairy cattle, and discuss the biological mechanisms that underlie the observed production and health responses in the dam and her fetus. Relative to cooled cows, cows that are heat stressed during late gestation have impaired mammary growth before parturition and decreased milk production in the subsequent lactation. In response to higher milk yield, cows cooled prepartum undergo a series of homeorhetic adaptations in early lactation to meet higher demand for milk synthesis compared with heat-stressed cows, but no direct effect of environmental heat stress on metabolism exists during the dry period. Prepartum cooling improves immune status of transition cows and evidence suggests that altered prolactin signaling in immune cells mediates the effects of heat stress on immune function. Late-gestation heat stress compromises placental development, which results in fetal hypoxia, malnutrition, and eventually fetal growth retardation. Maternal heat stress may also have carryover effects on the postnatal growth of offspring, but direct evidence is still lacking. Emerging evidence suggests that offspring from prepartum heat-stressed cows have compromised passive immunity and impaired cell-mediated immune function compared with those from cooled cows.

  20. Heat Stress Alters Ruminal Fermentation and Digesta Characteristics, and Behavior in Lactating Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a study designed to assess the impact and interaction of nonfiber carbohydrates (NFC) and ruminally degradable protein (RDP) on ruminal characteristics and animal behavior, animals experienced heat stress in the first period (HS), and no/greatly reduced heat stress (NHS) in the second period, all...

  1. Effects of exogenous desmopressin on a model of heat stress nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Milagres, Tamara; Andres-Hernando, Ana; Kuwabara, Masanari; Jensen, Thomas; Song, Zhilin; Bjornstad, Petter; Garcia, Gabriela E; Sato, Yuka; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura G; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Johnson, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    Recurrent heat stress and dehydration have recently been shown experimentally to cause chronic kidney disease (CKD). One potential mediator may be vasopressin, acting via the type 2 vasopressin receptor (V2 receptor). We tested the hypothesis that desmopressin accelerates CKD in mice subjected to heat stress and recurrent dehydration. Recurrent exposure to heat with limited water availability was performed in male mice over a 5-wk period, with one group receiving desmopressin two times daily and the other group receiving vehicle. Two additional control groups were not exposed to heat or dehydration and received vehicle or desmopressin. The effects of the treatment on renal injury were assessed. Heat stress and recurrent dehydration induced functional changes (albuminuria, elevated urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated protein), glomerular changes (mesangiolysis, matrix expansion), and tubulointerstitial changes (fibrosis, inflammation). Desmopressin also induced albuminuria, glomerular changes, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis in normal animals and also exacerbated injury in mice with heat stress nephropathy. Both heat stress and/or desmopressin were also associated with activation of the polyol pathway in the renal cortex, likely due to increased interstitial osmolarity. Our studies document both glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury and inflammation in heat stress nephropathy and may be clinically relevant to the pathogenesis of Mesoamerican nephropathy. Our data also suggest that vasopressin may play a role in the pathogenesis of the renal injury of heat stress nephropathy, likely via a V2 receptor-dependent pathway.

  2. Heat-resistant protein expression during germination of maize seeds under water stress.

    PubMed

    Abreu, V M; Silva Neta, I C; Von Pinho, E V R; Naves, G M F; Guimarães, R M; Santos, H O; Von Pinho, R G

    2016-08-12

    Low water availability is one of the factors that limit agricultural crop development, and hence the development of genotypes with increased water stress tolerance is a challenge in plant breeding programs. Heat-resistant proteins have been widely studied, and are reported to participate in various developmental processes and to accumulate in response to stress. This study aimed to evaluate heat-resistant protein expression under water stress conditions during the germination of maize seed inbreed lines differing in their water stress tolerance. Maize seed lines 91 and 64 were soaked in 0, -0.3, -0.6, and -0.9 MPa water potential for 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h. Line 91 is considered more water stress-tolerant than line 64. The analysis of heat-resistant protein expression was made by gel electrophoresis and spectrophotometry. In general, higher expression of heat-resistant proteins was observed in seeds from line 64 subjected to shorter soaking periods and lower water potentials. However, in the water stress-tolerant line 91, a higher expression was observed in seeds that were subjected to -0.3 and -0.6 MPa water potentials. In the absence of water stress, heat-resistant protein expression was reduced with increasing soaking period. Thus, there was a difference in heat-resistant protein expression among the seed lines differing in water stress tolerance. Increased heat-resistant protein expression was observed in seeds from line 91 when subjected to water stress conditions for longer soaking periods.

  3. Study of heat exchange in cooling systems of heat-stressed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikulin, A. V.; Yaroslavtsev, N. L.; Zemlyanaya, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing working parameters of the cycle of gas-turbine engines, complicating design of gas-turbine plants, as well as growing aerodynamic, thermal, static, and dynamic loads, necessitate the development of promising cooling systems for heat-stressed structures. This work is devoted to an experimental study of heat exchange in ducts equipped with systems of inclined and cross walls (fins). It has been found that an increase in the Reynolds number Re from 3000 to 20000 leads to a decrease in the heat exchange, which is characterized by the relative Nusselt number overline{Nu}, by 19-30% at the angle of inclination of the walls φ = 0, 40°, 50°, and 90° if the length of the walls x w is comparable to the spacing b s and by 12-15% at φ = 30° and 90° if x w ≫ b s. If cross walls are used in cooling ducts, the length of the walls x w plays the governing role; an increase in this characteristic from 1.22 × 10-3 to 3.14 × 10-3 m leads to an increase in the intensity of heat exchange by 30-40% and to a decrease in the capacity of the entire system of the walls. It has been shown that, on surfaces with wavy fins, the intensity of heat exchange is closest to that determined in the models under study. For example, values of the Colborne criterion StPr2/3 for ducts equipped with wavy fins and for the models under study differ only slightly (by 2-20% depending on the value of the angle φ). However, the difference for surfaces with short plate fins and ducts equipped with inclined walls is high (30-40%). This is due to the design features of these surfaces and to the severe effect of the inlet portion on heat exchange, since the surfaces are characterized by a higher ratio of the duct length to the hydraulic diameter L/d h at small fin thicknesses ((0.1-0.15) × 10-3 m). The experimental results can be used in developing designs of nozzle and rotor blades of high-temperature gas turbines in gas-turbine engines and plants.

  4. Meta-analysis of transcripts associated with race-specific resistance to stripe rust in wheat demonstrates common induction of blue copper-binding protein, heat-stress transcription factor, pathogen-induced WIR1A protein, and ent-kaurene synthase transcripts.

    PubMed

    Coram, Tristan E; Huang, Xueling; Zhan, Gangming; Settles, Matthew L; Chen, Xianming

    2010-08-01

    Resistance to stripe rust in wheat is a preferred method of disease prevention. Race-specific all-stage resistance usually provides complete protection; thus an understanding of the molecular control of race-specific resistance is important. To build on previous studies of race-specific resistance controlled by the Yr5 gene, this study reports the construction and use of a custom oligonucleotide microarray to perform a meta-analysis of the transcriptional response involved in race-specific resistance conferred by Yr1, Yr5, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr10, Yr15, and Yr17. By profiling the response of eight resistance genes in a common background, we identified 28 transcripts significantly involved in the resistance phenotype across all genotypes. The most significant of these were annotated as blue copper-binding protein, heat-stress transcription factor, pathogen-induced WIR1A protein, and ent-kaurene synthase transcripts. Unique transcripts significant in each genotype were also identified, which highlighted some transcriptional events specific to certain genotypes. The approach was effective in narrowing down the list of candidate genes in comparison to studying individual genotypes. Annotation revealed key gene expression events involved in race-specific resistance. The results confirm the activity of known R-gene-mediated pathway race-specific resistance, including an oxidative burst that likely contributes to a hypersensitive response, as well as pathogenesis-related protein expression and activity of the phenylpropanoid pathway. However, several identified transcripts remained unknown and may prove interesting candidates for further characterization.

  5. Synergistic induction of apoptosis and caspase-independent autophagic cell death by a combination of nitroxide Tempo and heat shock in human leukemia U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing-Li; Fujiwara, Yoshisada; Kondo, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that heat stress or a superoxide dismutase mimic nitroxide, Tempo, induces apoptosis, while their combination causes nonapoptotic cell death; however, the underlying mechanism for this switch remains unclear. Here we identified for the first time that 10 mM Tempo present during heating at 44°C for 30 min rapidly induced autophagy in U937 leukemic cells in spite of Bax activation and mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) permeabilization. This co-treatment inhibited the processing of heat-activated procaspases-2, -8, -9 and -3 into active small subunits, leading to the inhibition of caspase-dependent apoptosis, and instead caused the induction of autophagy. The inactivation of caspases, a key event, could result from oxidation of active-site-CysSH of all caspases by a prooxidant oxo-ammonium cation, an intermediate derived Tempo during dismutation of heat-induced superoxide anion. In addition, the co-treatment caused mitochondrial calcium overloads, the mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization, profound mitochondrial dysfunction, and liberation of Beclin 1 from the Bcl-2/Beclin 1 complex, all of which contributed to induction of autophagy. These autophagic cells underwent propidium iodide-positive necrosis in a delayed fashion, leading to the complete proliferative inhibition. Remarkably, ruthenium red and BAPTA, which interfere with mitochondrial calcium uptake, facilitated autophagic necrotic death. Cyclosporin A, which binds to cyclophilin D, had a similar necrotic effect. 3-Methyladenine facilitated the necrosis of autophagic cells. In contrast, 5 mM Tempo-44°C/10 min or 44°C/30 min induced Bax-mediated MOM permeabilization and caspase-dependent apoptosis more potently than Tempo alone. Thus, Tempo is a unique thermosensitizer to synergistically induce apoptosis and autophagic cell death.

  6. Mitigation of heat stress-related complications by a yeast fermentate product.

    PubMed

    Giblot Ducray, Henri Alexandre; Globa, Ludmila; Pustovyy, Oleg; Reeves, Stuart; Robinson, Larry; Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Sorokulova, Iryna

    2016-08-01

    Heat stress results in a multitude of biological and physiological responses which can become lethal if not properly managed. It has been shown that heat stress causes significant adverse effects in both human and animals. Different approaches have been proposed to mitigate the adverse effects caused by heat stress, among which are special diet and probiotics. We characterized the effect of the yeast fermentate EpiCor (EH) on the prevention of heat stress-related complications in rats. We found that increasing the body temperature of animals from 37.1±0.2 to 40.6±0.2°C by exposure to heat (45°C for 25min) resulted in significant morphological changes in the intestine. Villi height and total mucosal thickness decreased in heat-stressed rats pre-treated with PBS in comparison with control animals not exposed to the heat. Oral treatment of rats with EH before heat stress prevented the traumatic effects of heat on the intestine. Changes in intestinal morphology of heat-stressed rats, pre-treated with PBS resulted in significant elevation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) level in the serum of these animals. Pre-treatment with EH was effective in the prevention of LPS release into the bloodstream of heat-stressed rats. Our study revealed that elevation of body temperature also resulted in a significant increase of the concentration of vesicles released by erythrocytes in rats, pre-treated with PBS. This is an indication of a pathological impact of heat on the erythrocyte structure. Treatment of rats with EH completely protected their erythrocytes from this heat-induced pathology. Finally, exposure to heat stress conditions resulted in a significant increase of white blood cells in rats. In the group of animals pre-treated with EH before heat stress, the white blood cell count remained the same as in non-heated controls. These results showed the protective effect of the EH product in the prevention of complications, caused by heat stress.

  7. Glyphosate Inhibits PPAR Gamma Induction and Differentiation of Preadipocytes and is able to Induce Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Martini, Claudia N; Gabrielli, Matías; Brandani, Javier N; Vila, María Del C

    2016-08-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GF) are extensively used for weed control. Thus, it is important to investigate their putative toxic effects. We have reported that GF at subagriculture concentrations inhibits proliferation and differentiation to adipocytes of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. In this investigation, we evaluated the effect of GF on genes upregulated during adipogenesis. GF was able to inhibit the induction of PPAR gamma, the master gene in adipogenesis but not C/EBP beta, which precedes PPAR gamma activation. GF also inhibited differentiation and proliferation of another model of preadipocyte: mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In exponentially growing 3T3-L1 cells, GF increased lipid peroxidation and the activity of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. We also found that proliferation was inhibited with lower concentrations of GF when time of exposure was extended. Thus, GF was able to inhibit proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and to induce oxidative stress, which is indicative of its ability to alter cellular physiology.

  8. Myocardial function improved by electromagnetic field induction of stress protein hsp70.

    PubMed

    George, Isaac; Geddis, Matthew S; Lill, Zachary; Lin, Hana; Gomez, Teodoro; Blank, Martin; Oz, Mehmet C; Goodman, Reba

    2008-09-01

    Studies on myocardial function have shown that hsp70, stimulated by an increase in temperature, leads to improved survival following ischemia-reperfusion (I-R). Low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) also induce the stress protein hsp70, but without elevating temperature. We have examined the hemodynamic changes in concert with EMF pre-conditioning and the induction of hsp70 to determine whether improved myocardial function occurs following I-R injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were exposed to EMF (60 Hz, 8 microT) for 30 min prior to I-R. Ischemia was then induced by ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) for 30 min, followed by 30 min of reperfusion. Blood and heart tissue levels for hsp70 were determined by Western blot and RNA transcription by rtPCR. Significant upregulation of the HSP70 gene and increased hsp70 levels were measured in response to EMF pre-exposures. Invasive hemodynamics, as measured using a volume conductance catheter, demonstrated significant recovery of systolic contractile function after 30 min of reperfusion following EMF exposure. Additionally, isovolemic relaxation, a measure of ventricular diastolic function, was markedly improved in EMF-treated animals. In conclusion, non-invasive EMF induction of hsp70 preserved myocardial function and has the potential to improve tolerance to ischemic injury.

  9. Consideration of different heating lengths of needles with induction heating and resistance system: A novel design of needle module for thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Bui, Huy-Tien; Hwang, Sheng-Jye; Lee, Huei-Huang; Huang, Durn-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Thermal ablation using alternating electromagnetic fields is a promising method to treat tissues including tumors. With this approach, an electromagnetic field is generated around an induction coil, which is supplied with high frequency current from a power source. Any electrically conducting object, which is placed in the electromagnetic field, is then heated due to eddy currents. Basic principles underlying this novel thermotherapy needle system are internal induction and resistance heating. This presents a new design of a standard gauge 18 percutaneous trans-hepatic cholangiography needle module combined with a compact power source. Three needle modules containing coils of different lengths were used to locally heat up different volumes of tissues in in vitro experiments on pig livers. Temperature on the inside surface of the needle was controlled and monitored through a K-type thermocouple. By using this needle module system, no two-section or ferromagnetic nanoparticle-coated needles were required; the system worked well with the SUS-304 stainless-steel needle. Successful results were demonstrated in the in vitro experiments on pig livers with different heating lengths of 10, 20, and 30 mm needles. With low power sources, needles could be heated up to a high temperature. The novel design of the needle module incorporated with a high frequency power source was thus shown to be a promising technology for tissue ablation. Bioelectromagnetics.38:220-226, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Enhanced resistance against Vibrio harveyi infection by carvacrol and its association with the induction of heat shock protein 72 in gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Phong, Ho Phuong Pham Duy; Smagghe, Guy; Bossier, Peter

    2017-03-16

    Induction of HSP72 is a natural response of stressed organisms that protects against many insults including bacterial diseases in farm (aquatic) animals. It would therefore be of great health benefit to search for natural compounds that are clinically safe yet able to induce HSP72 in animals. The phenolic compound carvacrol, an approved food component, had been shown in in vitro study to act as a co-inducer of HSP72, enhancing HSP72 production only in combination with a bona fide stress compared to the compound alone. However, in vitro model systems do not completely represent an in vivo physiology. Here, using the well-established gnotobiotic Artemia model system, we determined whether carvacrol could induce HSP72 in vivo, whether this putative effect could generate resistance in Artemia against biotic/abiotic stress and also unraveled the mechanism behind the possible HSP72-inducing effect of carvacrol. The gnotobiotic system is crucial for such studies because it avoids the interference of any extraneous factors on host-compound interaction. Here, carvacrol was shown to be a potent HSP72 inducer. Induction of HSP72 was associated with the generation of resistance in Artemia larvae against subsequent lethal heat stress or pathogenic Vibrio harveyi. Our results also provided new insight on the mode of HSP72 inducing action of carvacrol, in which the initial generation of reactive molecule H2O2 by the compound plays a key role. Overall results add new information about the bioactivity of carvacrol and advance our knowledge of this compound as potential prophylactic agent for controlling Vibrio infection in aquaculture animals.

  11. Acquired thermotolerance independent of heat shock factor A1 (HsfA1), the master regulator of the heat stress response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiang-chin; Charng, Yee-yung

    2012-05-01

    The heat stress (HS) response in eukaryotes is mainly regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Genetic disruption of the master HSF gene leads to dramatically reduced HS response and thermotolerance in several model organisms. However, it is not clear whether organisms devoid of the master regulator can still acclimate to heat. Previously, we showed that Arabidopsis HsfA1a, HsfA1b, and HsfA1d act as master regulators in the HS response. In this study, we examined the heat acclimation capacity of the Arabidopsis quadruple and triple T-DNA knockout mutants of HsfA1a, HsfA1b, HsfA1d, and HsfA1e. Our data showed that in the absence of the master regulators, a minimal but significant level of acquired thermotolerance could be attained in the Arabidopsis mutants after acclimation. The optimum acclimation temperature for the HsfA1 quadruple mutant was lower than that for the wild type plants, suggesting that plant cells have two HS-sensing mechanisms that can be distinguished genetically. The acquired thermotolerance of the quadruple mutant was likely due to the induction of a small number of HsfA1-independent HS response genes regulated by other transcription factors. Here, we discuss the possible candidates and propose a working model of the transcription network of the HS response by including the HsfA1-dependent and -independent pathways.

  12. Temperature and blood flow distribution in the human leg during passive heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Scott T.; Trangmar, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the hemodynamic adjustments to direct passive heat stress within the leg's major arterial and venous vessels and compartments remains unclear. Fifteen healthy young males were tested during exposure to either passive whole body heat stress to levels approaching thermal tolerance [core temperature (Tc) + 2°C; study 1; n = 8] or single leg heat stress (Tc + 0°C; study 2; n = 7). Whole body heat stress increased perfusion and decreased oscillatory shear index in relation to the rise in leg temperature (Tleg) in all three major arteries supplying the leg, plateauing in the common and superficial femoral arteries before reaching severe heat stress levels. Isolated leg heat stress increased arterial blood flows and shear patterns to a level similar to that obtained during moderate core hyperthermia (Tc + 1°C). Despite modest increases in great saphenous venous (GSV) blood flow (0.2 l/min), the deep venous system accounted for the majority of returning flow (common femoral vein 0.7 l/min) during intense to severe levels of heat stress. Rapid cooling of a single leg during severe whole body heat stress resulted in an equivalent blood flow reduction in the major artery supplying the thigh deep tissues only, suggesting central temperature-sensitive mechanisms contribute to skin blood flow alone. These findings further our knowledge of leg hemodynamic responses during direct heat stress and provide evidence of potentially beneficial vascular alterations during isolated limb heat stress that are equivalent to those experienced during exposure to moderate levels of whole body hyperthermia. PMID:26823344

  13. Management of climatic heat stress risk in construction: a review of practices, methodologies, and future research.

    PubMed

    Rowlinson, Steve; Yunyanjia, Andrea; Li, Baizhan; Chuanjingju, Carrie

    2014-05-01

    Climatic heat stress leads to accidents on construction sites brought about by a range of human factors emanating from heat induced illness, and fatigue leading to impaired capability, physical and mental. It is an occupational characteristic of construction work in many climates and the authors take the approach of re-engineering the whole safety management system rather than focusing on incremental improvement, which is current management practice in the construction industry. From a scientific viewpoint, climatic heat stress is determined by six key factors: (1) air temperature, (2) humidity, (3) radiant heat, and (4) wind speed indicating the environment, (5) metabolic heat generated by physical activities, and (6) "clothing effect" that moderates the heat exchange between the body and the environment. By making use of existing heat stress indices and heat stress management processes, heat stress risk on construction sites can be managed in three ways: (1) control of environmental heat stress exposure through use of an action-triggering threshold system, (2) control of continuous work time (CWT, referred by maximum allowable exposure duration) with mandatory work-rest regimens, and (3) enabling self-paced working through empowerment of employees. Existing heat stress practices and methodologies are critically reviewed and the authors propose a three-level methodology for an action-triggering, localized, simplified threshold system to facilitate effective decisions by frontline supervisors. The authors point out the need for "regional based" heat stress management practices that reflect unique climatic conditions, working practices and acclimatization propensity by local workers indifferent geographic regions. The authors set out the case for regional, rather than international, standards that account for this uniqueness and which are derived from site-based rather than laboratory-based research.

  14. ABA Is Required for Plant Acclimation to a Combination of Salt and Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Bassil, Elias; Hamilton, Jason S.; Inupakutika, Madhuri A.; Zandalinas, Sara Izquierdo; Tripathy, Deesha; Luo, Yuting; Dion, Erin; Fukui, Ginga; Kumazaki, Ayana; Nakano, Ruka; Rivero, Rosa M.; Verbeck, Guido F.; Azad, Rajeev K.; Blumwald, Eduardo; Mittler, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, heat or salinity are a major cause of yield loss worldwide. Recent studies revealed that the acclimation of plants to a combination of different environmental stresses is unique and cannot be directly deduced from studying the response of plants to each of the different stresses applied individually. Here we report on the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to a combination of salt and heat stress using transcriptome analysis, physiological measurements and mutants deficient in abscisic acid, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid or ethylene signaling. Arabidopsis plants were found to be more susceptible to a combination of salt and heat stress compared to each of the different stresses applied individually. The stress combination resulted in a higher ratio of Na+/K+ in leaves and caused the enhanced expression of 699 transcripts unique to the stress combination. Interestingly, many of the transcripts that specifically accumulated in plants in response to the salt and heat stress combination were associated with the plant hormone abscisic acid. In accordance with this finding, mutants deficient in abscisic acid metabolism and signaling were found to be more susceptible to a combination of salt and heat stress than wild type plants. Our study highlights the important role abscisic acid plays in the acclimation of plants to a combination of two different abiotic stresses. PMID:26824246

  15. ABA Is Required for Plant Acclimation to a Combination of Salt and Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Bassil, Elias; Hamilton, Jason S; Inupakutika, Madhuri A; Zandalinas, Sara Izquierdo; Tripathy, Deesha; Luo, Yuting; Dion, Erin; Fukui, Ginga; Kumazaki, Ayana; Nakano, Ruka; Rivero, Rosa M; Verbeck, Guido F; Azad, Rajeev K; Blumwald, Eduardo; Mittler, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, heat or salinity are a major cause of yield loss worldwide. Recent studies revealed that the acclimation of plants to a combination of different environmental stresses is unique and cannot be directly deduced from studying the response of plants to each of the different stresses applied individually. Here we report on the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to a combination of salt and heat stress using transcriptome analysis, physiological measurements and mutants deficient in abscisic acid, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid or ethylene signaling. Arabidopsis plants were found to be more susceptible to a combination of salt and heat stress compared to each of the different stresses applied individually. The stress combination resulted in a higher ratio of Na+/K+ in leaves and caused the enhanced expression of 699 transcripts unique to the stress combination. Interestingly, many of the transcripts that specifically accumulated in plants in response to the salt and heat stress combination were associated with the plant hormone abscisic acid. In accordance with this finding, mutants deficient in abscisic acid metabolism and signaling were found to be more susceptible to a combination of salt and heat stress than wild type plants. Our study highlights the important role abscisic acid plays in the acclimation of plants to a combination of two different abiotic stresses.

  16. BAG3 affects the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HSF1 upon heat stress

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Young-Hee; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kim, Soo-A.

    2015-08-21

    Bcl2-associated athoanogene (BAG) 3 is a member of the co-chaperone BAG family. It is induced by stressful stimuli such as heat shock and heavy metals, and it regulates cellular adaptive responses against stressful conditions. In this study, we identified a novel role for BAG3 in regulating the nuclear shuttling of HSF1 during heat stress. The expression level of BAG3 was induced by heat stress in HeLa cells. Interestingly, BAG3 rapidly translocalized to the nucleus upon heat stress. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that BAG3 interacts with HSF1 under normal and stressed conditions and co-translocalizes to the nucleus upon heat stress. We also demonstrated that BAG3 interacts with HSF1 via its BAG domain. Over-expression of BAG3 down-regulates the level of nuclear HSF1 by exporting it to the cytoplasm during the recovery period. Depletion of BAG3 using siRNA results in reduced nuclear HSF1 and decreased Hsp70 promoter activity. BAG3 in MEF(hsf1{sup −/−}) cells actively translocalizes to the nucleus upon heat stress suggesting that BAG3 plays a key role in the processing of the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HSF1 upon heat stress. - Highlights: • The expression level of BAG3 is induced by heat stress. • BAG3 translocates to the nucleus upon heat stress. • BAG3 interacts with HSF1 and co-localizes to the nucleus. • BAG3 is a key regulator for HSF1 nuclear shuttling.

  17. Gene expression changes in response to aging compared to heat stress, oxidative stress and ionizing radiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Landis, Gary; Shen, Jie; Tower, John

    2012-11-01

    Gene expression changes in response to aging, heat stress, hyperoxia, hydrogen peroxide, and ionizing radiation were compared using microarrays. A set of 18 genes were up-regulated across all conditions, indicating a general stress response shared with aging, including the heat shock protein (Hsp) genes Hsp70, Hsp83 and l(2)efl, the glutathione-S-transferase gene GstD2, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mUPR) gene ref(2)P. Selected gene expression changes were confirmed using quantitative PCR, Northern analysis and GstD-GFP reporter constructs. Certain genes were altered in only a subset of the conditions, for example, up-regulation of numerous developmental pathway and signaling genes in response to hydrogen peroxide. While aging shared features with each stress, aging was more similar to the stresses most associated with oxidative stress (hyperoxia, hydrogen peroxide, ionizing radiation) than to heat stress. Aging is associated with down-regulation of numerous mitochondrial genes, including electron-transport-chain (ETC) genes and mitochondrial metabolism genes, and a sub-set of these changes was also observed upon hydrogen peroxide stress and ionizing radiation stress. Aging shared the largest number of gene expression changes with hyperoxia. The extensive down-regulation of mitochondrial and ETC genes during aging is consistent with an aging-associated failure in mitochondrial maintenance, which may underlie the oxidative stress-like and proteotoxic stress-like responses observed during aging.

  18. Comparison of Temperature Indexes for the Impact Assessment of Heat Stress on Heat-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Min; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Kim, Eun-Hye

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In order to evaluate which temperature index is the best predictor for the health impact assessment of heat stress in Korea, several indexes were compared. Methods We adopted temperature, perceived temperature (PT), and apparent temperature (AT), as a heat stress index, and changes in the risk of death for Seoul and Daegu were estimated with 1℃ increases in those temperature indexes using generalized additive model (GAM) adjusted for the non-temperature related factors: time trends, seasonality, and air pollution. The estimated excess mortality and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) due to the increased temperature indexes for the 75th percentile in the summers from 2001 to 2008 were compared and analyzed to define the best predictor. Results For Seoul, all-cause mortality presented the highest percent increase (2.99% [95% CI, 2.43 to 3.54%]) in maximum temperature while AIC showed the lowest value when the all-cause daily death counts were fitted with the maximum PT for the 75th percentile of summer. For Daegu, all-cause mortality presented the greatest percent increase (3.52% [95% CI, 2.23 to 4.80%]) in minimum temperature and AIC showed the lowest value in maximum temperature. No lag effect was found in the association between temperature and mortality for Seoul, whereas for Daegu one-day lag effect was noted. Conclusions There was no one temperature measure that was superior to the others in summer. To adopt an appropriate temperature index, regional meteorological characteristics and the disease status of population should be considered. PMID:22125770

  19. Effect of heat stress on production parameters and immune responses of commercial laying hens.

    PubMed

    Mashaly, M M; Hendricks, G L; Kalama, M A; Gehad, A E; Abbas, A O; Patterson, P H

    2004-06-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the adverse effects of high temperature and humidity not only on live performance and egg quality but also on immune function in commercial laying hens. One hundred eighty 31-wk-old laying hens at peak production were used in this study. Hens were housed in cages (15 cages of 4 birds/cage) in each of 3 environmental chambers and received 1 of 3 treatments. The 3 treatments were control (average temperature and relative humidity), cyclic (daily cyclic temperature and humidity), and heat stress (constant heat and humidity) for 5 wk. Different production and immune parameters were measured. Body weight and feed consumption were significantly reduced in hens in the heat stress group. Egg production, egg weight, shell weight, shell thickness, and specific gravity were significantly inhibited among hens in the heat stress group. Likewise, total white blood cell (WBC) counts and antibody production were significantly inhibited in hens in the heat stress group. In addition, mortality was higher in the heat stress group compared to the cyclic and control groups. Even though T- and B-lymphocyte activities were not significantly affected by any of the treatments, lymphocytes from hens in the heat stress group had the least activity at 1 wk following treatment. These results indicate that heat stress not only adversely affects production performance but also inhibits immune function.

  20. Heat stress management program improving worker health and operational effectiveness: a case study.

    PubMed

    Huss, Rosalyn G; Skelton, Scott B; Alvis, Kimberly L; Shane, Leigh A

    2013-03-01

    Heat stress monitoring is a vital component of an effective health and safety program when employees work in exceptionally warm environments. Workers at hazardous waste sites often wear personal protective equipment (PPE), which increases the body heat stress load. No specific Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations address heat stress; however, OSHA does provide several guidance documents to assist employers in addressing this serious workplace health hazard. This article describes a heat stress and surveillance plan implemented at a hazardous waste site as part of the overall health and safety program. The PPE requirement for work at this site, coupled with extreme environmental temperatures, made heat stress a significant concern. Occupational health nurses and industrial hygienists developed a monitoring program for heat stress designed to prevent the occurrence of significant heat-related illness in site workers. The program included worker education on the signs of heat-related illness and continuous physiologic monitoring to detect early signs of heat-related health problems. Biological monitoring data were collected before workers entered the exclusion zone and on exiting the zone following decontamination. Sixty-six site workers were monitored throughout site remediation. More than 1,700 biological monitoring data points were recorded. Outcomes included improved worker health and safety, and increased operational effectiveness.

  1. Improvement of efficiency and temperature control of induction heating vapor source on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, T; Kiriyama, R; Muramatsu, M; Kitagawa, A; Uchida, T; Kurisu, Y; Nozaki, D; Yano, K; Yoshida, Y; Sato, F; Kato, Y; Iida, T

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is used to generate multicharged ions for many kinds of the fields. We have developed an evaporator by using induction heating method that can generate pure vapor from solid state materials in ECRIS. We develop the new matching and protecting circuit by which we can precisely control the temperature of the induction heating evaporator. We can control the temperature within ±15 °C around 1400 °C under the operation pressure about 10(-4) Pa. We are able to use this evaporator for experiment of synthesizing process to need pure vapor under enough low pressure, e.g., experiment of generation of endohedral Fe-fullerene at the ECRIS.

  2. Development of ti-coated ferromagnetic needle, adaptable for ablation cancer therapy by high-frequency induction heating.

    PubMed

    Naohara, Takashi; Aono, Hiromichi; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Matsutomo, Shinya; Watanabe, Yuji

    2012-03-06

    To develop a novel ablation therapy for human solid cancer, the heating properties of a ferromagnetic carbon steel rod and a prototype Ti-coated needle using this carbon steel rod, were investigated in several high-frequency outputs at 300 kHz. In the former, the heating property was drastically different among the three inclination angles (θ = 0°, 45° and 90°) relative to the magnetic flux direction as a result of the shape magnetic anisotropy. However, the effect of the inclination angles was completely eliminated in the latter. It is considered that the complete non-oriented heating property relative to the magnetic flux direction allows the precise control of the ablation temperature during minimally invasive thermotherapy without a lead-wire connected to a fiber-optic thermometer. This newly designed Ti-coated device will be suitable for clinical use combined with its superior biocompatibility for ablation treatments using high-frequency induction heating.

  3. Measuring Inductive-Heating Coupling Coefficients and Thermal Loss Characteristics as a Function of Crucible Geometry and Material Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Jay

    A power measurement system has been designed for an ultra-high temperature inductively heated molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) reactor. The work presented in this research contributes to three different aspects of the induction heated MOE reactor facility: mathematical modeling of coil-to-workpiece power transfer, numerical modeling of heat transfer within the reactor, and experiments to measure the total hemispherical emittance of potential crucible materials. Facility-specific coupling coefficients for various samples have been experimentally determined for the MOE reactor facility. An analytical model coupling the predicted power input with heat transfer software was developed using COMSOL Multiphysics, and validated with experimental measurements of the steady state temperature gradient inside the reactor. These models were used to support the design of an experiment to measure the total hemispherical emissivity (epsilon) of conductive samples using a transient calorimetric technique. Results of epsilon are presented over a wide range of temperatures for copper, nickel, graphite and molybdenum. Furthermore, an investigation into optimizing the reactor system for heating will be discussed.

  4. Interactive effects of water, light and heat stress on photosynthesis in Fremont cottonwood.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emily S; Easlon, Hsien Ming; Richards, James H

    2013-08-01

    Fremont cottonwood seedlings are vulnerable to water stress from rapid water-table decline during river recession in spring. Water stress is usually cited as the reason for reduced establishment, but interactions of water stress with microclimate extremes are more likely the causes of mortality. We assessed photosynthetic responses of Fremont cottonwood seedlings to water, light and heat stresses, which commonly co-occur in habitats where seedlings establish. Under moderate temperature and light conditions, water stress did not affect photosynthetic function. However, stomatal closure during water stress predisposed Fremont cottonwood leaves to light and heat stress, resulting in greatly reduced photosynthesis beginning at 31 °C versus at 41 °C for well-watered plants. Ontogenetic shifts in leaf orientation from horizontal to vertical, which occur as seedlings mature, reduce heat and light stress, especially during water stress. When compared with naturally occurring microclimate extremes, seedling stress responses suggest that reduced assimilation and photoprotection are common for Fremont cottonwood seedlings on exposed point bars where they establish. These reductions in photosynthesis likely have negative impacts on growth and may predispose young (<90-day-old) seedlings to early mortality during rapid water-table declines. Interactions with heat and light stress are more important in these effects than water stress alone.

  5. Oxide-bioceramic coatings obtained on titanium items by the induction heat treatment and modified with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Fomina, Marina A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Koshuro, Vladimir A.; Petrova, Natalia V.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-06-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from cp-titanium and medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  6. Expression of HSPs: an adaptive mechanism during long-term heat stress in goats ( Capra hircus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangi, Satyaveer Singh; Gupta, Mahesh; Dangi, Saroj K.; Chouhan, Vikrant Singh; Maurya, V. P.; Kumar, Puneet; Singh, Gyanendra; Sarkar, Mihir

    2015-08-01

    Menacing global rise in surface temperature compelled more focus of research over understanding heat stress response mechanism of animals and mitigation of heat stress. Twenty-four goats divided into four groups ( n = 6) such as NHS (non-heat-stressed), HS (heat-stressed), HS + VC (heat-stressed administered with vitamin C), and HS + VE + Se (heat-stressed administered with vitamin E and selenium). Except NHS group, other groups were exposed to repeated heat stress (42 °C) for 6 h on 16 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected at the end of heat exposure on days 1, 6, 11, and 16. When groups compared between days, expression of all heat shock proteins (HSPs) showed a similar pattern as first peak on day 1, reached to basal level on the sixth day, and followed by second peak on day 16. The relative messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of HSP 60, HSP70, and HSP90 was observed highest ( P < 0.05) in HS group, followed by antioxidant-administered group on days 1 and 16, which signifies that antioxidants have dampening effect on HSP expression. HSP105/110 expression was highest ( P < 0.05) on day 16. We conclude that HSP expression pattern is at least two-peak phenomenon, i.e., primary window of HSP protection on the first day followed by second window of protection on day 16. HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 play an important role during the initial phase of heat stress acclimation whereas HSP105/110 joins this cascade at later phase. Antioxidants may possibly attenuate the HSP expression by reducing the oxidative stress.

  7. Expression of HSPs: an adaptive mechanism during long-term heat stress in goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Dangi, Satyaveer Singh; Gupta, Mahesh; Dangi, Saroj K; Chouhan, Vikrant Singh; Maurya, V P; Kumar, Puneet; Singh, Gyanendra; Sarkar, Mihir

    2015-08-01

    Menacing global rise in surface temperature compelled more focus of research over understanding heat stress response mechanism of animals and mitigation of heat stress. Twenty-four goats divided into four groups (n = 6) such as NHS (non-heat-stressed), HS (heat-stressed), HS + VC (heat-stressed administered with vitamin C), and HS + VE + Se (heat-stressed administered with vitamin E and selenium). Except NHS group, other groups were exposed to repeated heat stress (42 °C) for 6 h on 16 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected at the end of heat exposure on days 1, 6, 11, and 16. When groups compared between days, expression of all heat shock proteins (HSPs) showed a similar pattern as first peak on day 1, reached to basal level on the sixth day, and followed by second peak on day 16. The relative messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of HSP 60, HSP70, and HSP90 was observed highest (P < 0.05) in HS group, followed by antioxidant-administered group on days 1 and 16, which signifies that antioxidants have dampening effect on HSP expression. HSP105/110 expression was highest (P < 0.05) on day 16. We conclude that HSP expression pattern is at least two-peak phenomenon, i.e., primary window of HSP protection on the first day followed by second window of protection on day 16. HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 play an important role during the initial phase of heat stress acclimation whereas HSP105/110 joins this cascade at later phase. Antioxidants may possibly attenuate the HSP expression by reducing the oxidative stress.

  8. Induction of the DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of heat shock factor 1 is uncoupled in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, S; Hnatov, A; Ali, A; Ovsenek, N

    1998-03-12

    The DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of the heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) are repressed under normal conditions and rapidly upregulated by heat stress. Here, we tested for the ability of various stress agents to activate HSF1 in the Xenopus oocyte model system. The HSE-binding activity of HSF1 was induced by a number of chemical stresses including cadmium, aluminum, iron, mercury, arsenite, ethanol, methanol, and salicylate. HSE-binding was not induced by several stresses known to induce the synthesis of hsps in other cell types in different organisms including zinc, copper, cobalt, manganese, recovery from anoxia, UV-irradiation, and increased pH. The inability of several known inducers of the stress response to activate the HSE-binding ability of HSF1 suggests that certain stress activation pathways may be absent or inactive in oocytes. The transcriptional activity of oocyte HSF1 was induced by heat, cadmium, and arsenite, but many of the agents that induced HSE-binding failed to stimulate HSF1-mediated transcription. The apparent uncoupling of inducible HSE-binding and transcriptional activities of HSF1 under a variety of stress regimes indicates that these events are regulated by independent mechanisms in the oocyte.

  9. Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum stress-mediated endothelial cell death and impaired angiogenic capacity.

    PubMed

    Maamoun, Hatem; Zachariah, Matshediso; McVey, John H; Green, Fiona R; Agouni, Abdelali

    2017-03-01

    Most of diabetic cardiovascular complications are attributed to endothelial dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and oxidative stresses were shown to play a pivotal role in the development of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) was shown to protect against oxidative stress in diabetes; however, its role in alleviating ER stress-induced endothelial dysfunction remains not fully elucidated. We aim here to test the protective role of HO-1 against high glucose-mediated ER stress and endothelial dysfunction and understand the underlying mechanisms with special emphasis on oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) were grown in either physiological or intermittent high concentrations of glucose for 5days in the presence or absence of Cobalt (III) Protoporphyrin IX chloride (CoPP, HO-1 inducer) or 4-Phenyl Butyric Acid (PBA, ER stress inhibitor). Using an integrated cellular and molecular approach, we then assessed ER stress and inflammatory responses, in addition to apoptosis and angiogenic capacity in these cells. Our results show that HO-1 induction prevented high glucose-mediated increase of mRNA and protein expression of key ER stress markers. Cells incubated with high glucose exhibited high levels of oxidative stress, activation of major inflammatory and apoptotic responses [nuclear factor (NF)-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)] and increased rate of apoptosis; however, cells pre-treated with CoPP or PBA were fully protected. In addition, high glucose enhanced caspases 3 and 7 cleavage and activity and augmented cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) expression whereas HO-1 induction prevented these effects. Finally, HO-1 induction and ER stress inhibition prevented high glucose-induced reduction in NO release and impaired the angiogenic capacity of HUVECs, and enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A expression. Altogether, we show here the

  10. A New Approach in Optimizing the Induction Heating Process Using Flux Concentrators: Application to 4340 Steel Spur Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barka, Noureddine; Chebak, Ahmed; El Ouafi, Abderrazak; Jahazi, Mohammad; Menou, Abdellah

    2014-09-01

    The beneficial effects of using flux concentrators during induction heat treatment process of spur gears made of 4340 high strength steel is demonstrated using 3D finite element model. The model is developed by coupling electromagnetic field and heat transfer equations and simulated by using Comsol software. Based on an adequate formulation and taking into account material properties and process parameters, the model allows calculating temperature distribution in the gear tooth. A new approach is proposed to reduce the electromagnetic edge effect in the gear teeth which allows achieving optimum hardness profile after induction heat treatment. In the proposed method, the principal gear is positioned in sandwich between two other gears having the same geometry that act as flux concentrators. The gap between the gear and the flux concentrators was optimized by studying temperature variation between the tip and root regions of gear teeth. Using the proposed model, it was possible identifying processing conditions that allow for quasi-uniform final temperature profile in the medium and high frequency conditions during induction hardening of spur gears.

  11. Increased light intensity induces heat shock protein Hsp60 in coral species.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ari M; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Khalouei, Sam; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Brown, Ian R

    2009-09-01

    The effect of increased light intensity and heat stress on heat shock protein Hsp60 was examined in two coral species using a branched coral and a laminar coral, selected for their different resistance to environmental perturbation. Transient Hsp60 induction was observed in the laminar coral following either light or thermal stress. Sustained induction was observed when these stresses were combined. The branched coral exhibited comparatively weak transient Hsp60 induction after heat stress and no detectable induction following light stress, consistent with its susceptibility to bleaching in native environments compared to the laminar coral. Our observations also demonstrate that increased light intensity and heat stress exhibited a greater negative impact on the photosynthetic capacity of environmentally sensitive branched coral than the more resistant laminar coral. This supports a correlation between stress induction of Hsp60 and (a) ability to counter perturbation of photosynthetic capacity by light and heat stress and (b) resistance to environmentally induced coral bleaching.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by heat stress in cultured rat CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    White, Michael G; Saleh, Osama; Nonner, Doris; Barrett, Ellen F; Moraes, Carlos T; Barrett, John N

    2012-10-01

    Previous work demonstrated that hyperthermia (43°C for 2 h) results in delayed, apoptotic-like death in striatal neuronal cultures. We investigated early changes in mitochondrial function induced by this heat stress. Partial depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)) began about 1 h after the onset of hyperthermia and increased as the stress continued. When the heat stress ended, there was a partial recovery of ΔΨ(m), followed hours later by a progressive, irreversible depolarization of ΔΨ(m). During the heat stress, O(2) consumption initially increased but after 20-30 min began a progressive, irreversible decline to about one-half the initial rate by the end of the stress. The percentage of oligomycin-insensitive respiration increased during the heat stress, suggesting an increased mitochondrial leak conductance. Analysis using inhibitors and substrates for specific respiratory chain complexes indicated hyperthermia-induced dysfunction at or upstream of complex I. ATP levels remained near normal for ∼4 h after the heat stress. Mitochondrial movement along neurites was markedly slowed during and just after the heat stress. The early, persisting mitochondrial dysfunction described here likely contributes to the later (>10 h) caspase activation and neuronal death produced by this heat stress. Consistent with this idea, proton carrier-induced ΔΨ(m) depolarizations comparable in duration to those produced by the heat stress also reduced neuronal viability. Post-stress ΔΨ(m) depolarization and/or delayed neuronal death were modestly reduced/postponed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a calpain inhibitor, and increased expression of Bcl-xL.

  13. Effects of heat shock protein 90 expression on pectoralis major oxidation in broilers exposed to acute heat stress.

    PubMed

    Hao, Y; Gu, X H

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) expression on pH, lipid peroxidation, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression of pectoralis major in broilers exposed to acute heat stress. In total, 90 male broilers were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control (CON), heat stress (HS), or geldanamycin treatment (GA). On d 41, the broilers in the GA group were injected intraperitoneally with GA (5 μg/kg of BW), and the broilers in the CON and HS groups were injected intraperitoneally with saline. Twenty-four hours later, the broilers in the CON group were moved to environmental chambers controlled at 22°C for 2 h, and the broilers in the HS and GA groups were moved to environmental chambers controlled at 40°C for 2 h. The pH values of the pectoralis major after 30 min and 24 h of chilling after slaughter of HS and GA broilers were significantly lower (P < 0.01) than those of the CON broilers. Heat stress caused significant increases in sera corticosterone and lactic dehydrogenase, the activity of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase, the expression of HSP90 and HSP70, and nuclear expression of GR protein in the pectoralis major (P < 0.05). Heat stress induced a significant decrease in GR protein expression in the cytoplasm and GR mRNA expression. Furthermore, the low expression of HSP90 significantly increased levels of lactic dehydrogenase and malondialdehyde and GR protein expression in the cytoplasm under heat stress (P < 0.01), and significantly decreased nuclear GR protein expression (P < 0.01). Heat shock protein 90 was positively correlated with corticosterone and superoxide dismutase activities (P < 0.01), and HSP90 mRNA was negatively correlated with pH after chilling for 24 h. The results demonstrated that HSP90 plays a pivotal role in protecting cells from oxidation.

  14. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the response of maize leaves to drought, heat and their combination stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiuli; Wu, Liuji; Zhao, Feiyun; Zhang, Dayong; Li, Nana; Zhu, Guohui; Li, Chaohao; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Drought and heat stress, especially their combination, greatly affect crop production. Many studies have described transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome changes in response of plants to drought or heat stress. However, the study about the phosphoproteomic changes in response of crops to the combination stress is scare. To understand the mechanism of maize responses to the drought and heat combination stress, phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on maize leaves by using multiplex iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and LC-MS/MS methods. Five-leaf-stage maize was subjected to drought, heat or their combination, and the leaves were collected. Globally, heat, drought and the combined stress significantly changed the phosphorylation levels of 172, 149, and 144 phosphopeptides, respectively. These phosphopeptides corresponded to 282 proteins. Among them, 23 only responded to the combined stress and could not be predicted from their responses to single stressors; 30 and 75 only responded to drought and heat, respectively. Notably, 19 proteins were phosphorylated on different sites in response to the single and combination stresses. Of the seven significantly enriched phosphorylation motifs identified, two were common for all stresses, two were common for heat and the combined stress, and one was specific to the combined stress. The signaling pathways in which the phosphoproteins were involved clearly differed among the three stresses. Functional characterization of the phosphoproteins and the pathways identified here could lead to new targets for the enhancement of crop stress tolerance, which will be particularly important in the face of climate change and the increasing prevalence of abiotic stressors.

  15. The development of the Hong Kong Heat Index for enhancing the heat stress information service of the Hong Kong Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. L.; Chan, Y. H.; Lee, T. C.; Goggins, William B.; Chan, Emily Y. Y.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a study to develop a heat index, for use in hot and humid sub-tropical climate in Hong Kong. The study made use of hospitalization data and heat stress measurement data in Hong Kong from 2007 to 2011. The heat index, which is called Hong Kong Heat Index (HKHI), is calculated from the natural wet bulb temperature, the globe temperature, and the dry bulb temperature together with a set of coefficients applicable to the high humidity condition in the summer of Hong Kong. Analysis of the response of hospitalization rate to variation in HKHI and two other heat indices, namely Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) and Net Effective Temperature (NET), revealed that HKHI performed generally better than WBGT and NET in reflecting the heat stress impact on excess hospitalization ratio in Hong Kong. Based on the study results, two reference criteria of HKHI were identified to establish a two-tier approach for the enhancement of the heat stress information service in Hong Kong.

  16. The development of the Hong Kong Heat Index for enhancing the heat stress information service of the Hong Kong Observatory.

    PubMed

    Lee, K L; Chan, Y H; Lee, T C; Goggins, William B; Chan, Emily Y Y

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a study to develop a heat index, for use in hot and humid sub-tropical climate in Hong Kong. The study made use of hospitalization data and heat stress measurement data in Hong Kong from 2007 to 2011. The heat index, which is called Hong Kong Heat Index (HKHI), is calculated from the natural wet bulb temperature, the globe temperature, and the dry bulb temperature together with a set of coefficients applicable to the high humidity condition in the summer of Hong Kong. Analysis of the response of hospitalization rate to variation in HKHI and two other heat indices, namely Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) and Net Effective Temperature (NET), revealed that HKHI performed generally better than WBGT and NET in reflecting the heat stress impact on excess hospitalization ratio in Hong Kong. Based on the study results, two reference criteria of HKHI were identified to establish a two-tier approach for the enhancement of the heat stress information service in Hong Kong.

  17. Soybean Roots Grown under Heat Stress Show Global Changes in Their Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Batek, Josef; Gomez-Hernandez, Nicolas; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C.; Zhang, Ning; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Hixson, Kim K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is likely to be a key factor in the negative impact of climate change on crop production. Heat stress significantly influences the functions of roots, which provide support, water, and nutrients to other plant organs. Likewise, roots play an important role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with different microorganisms. Despite the physiological relevance of roots, few studies have examined their response to heat stress. In this study, we performed genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on isolated root hairs, which are a single, epidermal cell type, and compared their response to stripped roots. On average, we identified 1849 and 3091 genes differentially regulated in root hairs and stripped roots, respectively, in response to heat stress. Our gene regulatory module analysis identified 10 key modules that might control the majority of the transcriptional response to heat stress. We also conducted proteomic analysis on membrane fractions isolated from root hairs and compared these responses to stripped roots. These experiments identified a variety of proteins whose expression changed within 3 h of application of heat stress. Most of these proteins were predicted to play a significant role in thermo-tolerance, as well as in chromatin remodeling and post-transcriptional regulation. The data presented represent an in-depth analysis of the heat stress response of a single cell type in soybean. PMID:27200004

  18. Characterization of physiological response and identification of associated genes under heat stress in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Xue, Da-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Hu, Jiang; Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Guo, Long-Biao; Zeng, Da-Li; Dong, Guo-Jun; Sun, Guo-Chang; Qian, Qian

    2012-12-01

    Global warming, which is caused by greenhouse gas emissions, makes food crops more vulnerable to heat stress. Understanding the heat stress-related mechanisms in crops and classifying heat stress-related genes can increase our knowledge in heat-resistant molecular biology and propel developments in molecular design breeding, which can help rice cope with unfavorable temperatures. In this study, we carried out a physiological analysis of rice plants after heat stress. The results show a dramatic increase in malondialdehyde contents and SOD activities. We successfully isolated 11 heat-related rice genes with known function annotation through DNSH, which is an improved SSH method for screening long cDNA fragments. The reanalysis of microarray data from public database revealed that all these genes displayed various expression patterns after heat stress, drought, cold and salt. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR was also performed to validate the expression of these genes after heat stress. The expressions in 10 genes were all significantly changed except for contig 77, which is a CBL-interacting protein kinase. Several reports have been published about the members of the same gene family.

  19. Leaf Proteome Analysis Reveals Prospective Drought and Heat Stress Response Mechanisms in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aayudh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Paudel, Bimal; Kim, Dea-Wook; Hemmati, Homa; Basu, Chhandak

    2016-01-01

    Drought and heat are among the major abiotic stresses that affect soybean crops worldwide. During the current investigation, the effect of drought, heat, and drought plus heat stresses was compared in the leaves of two soybean varieties, Surge and Davison, combining 2D-DIGE proteomic data with physiology and biochemical analyses. We demonstrated how 25 differentially expressed photosynthesis-related proteins affect RuBisCO regulation, electron transport, Calvin cycle, and carbon fixation during drought and heat stress. We also observed higher abundance of heat stress-induced EF-Tu protein in Surge. It is possible that EF-Tu might have activated heat tolerance mechanisms in the soybean. Higher level expressions of heat shock-related protein seem to be regulating the heat tolerance mechanisms. This study identifies the differential expression of various abiotic stress-responsive proteins that regulate various molecular processes and signaling cascades. One inevitable outcome from the biochemical and proteomics assays of this study is that increase of ROS levels during drought stress does not show significant changes at the phenotypic level in Davison and this seems to be due to a higher amount of carbonic anhydrase accumulation in the cell which aids the cell to become more resistant to cytotoxic concentrations of H2O2. PMID:27034942

  20. Leaf Proteome Analysis Reveals Prospective Drought and Heat Stress Response Mechanisms in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Das, Aayudh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Paudel, Bimal; Kim, Dea-Wook; Hemmati, Homa; Basu, Chhandak; Rohila, Jai S

    2016-01-01

    Drought and heat are among the major abiotic stresses that affect soybean crops worldwide. During the current investigation, the effect of drought, heat, and drought plus heat stresses was compared in the leaves of two soybean varieties, Surge and Davison, combining 2D-DIGE proteomic data with physiology and biochemical analyses. We demonstrated how 25 differentially expressed photosynthesis-related proteins affect RuBisCO regulation, electron transport, Calvin cycle, and carbon fixation during drought and heat stress. We also observed higher abundance of heat stress-induced EF-Tu protein in Surge. It is possible that EF-Tu might have activated heat tolerance mechanisms in the soybean. Higher level expressions of heat shock-related protein seem to be regulating the heat tolerance mechanisms. This study identifies the differential expression of various abiotic stress-responsive proteins that regulate various molecular processes and signaling cascades. One inevitable outcome from the biochemical and proteomics assays of this study is that increase of ROS levels during drought stress does not show significant changes at the phenotypic level in Davison and this seems to be due to a higher amount of carbonic anhydrase accumulation in the cell which aids the cell to become more resistant to cytotoxic concentrations of H2O2.

  1. Latent heat in uniaxially stressed KMnF3 ferroelastic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, F. J.; Gallardo, M. C.; Jimenez, J.; del Cerro, J.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2000-05-01

    The influence of weak uniaxial stress on both the latent heat and the coexistence interval of the ferroelastic phase transition of KMnF3 has been measured using a sensitive conduction calorimeter. The latent heat of the sample without stress is 0.129 J g-1 and, in the range of \\mbox{0-12} bar, it increases weakly with the stress. The width of the interval where the latent heat appears increases with stress, with an apparently larger coexistence interval. Heating and cooling processes show different kinetic behaviours. On cooling, the maximum of the differential thermal analysis traces splits into two peaks when a uniaxial stress is applied, which is related to the formation of ferroelastic domain patterns.

  2. Transgenerational phenotypic and epigenetic changes in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Migicovsky, Zoë; Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to heat stress causes physiological and epigenetic changes in plants, which may also be altered in the progeny. We compared the progeny of stressed and control Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and Dicer-like mutant dcl2, dcl3, and dcl4 plants for variations in physiology and molecular profile, including global genome methylation, mRNA levels, and histone modifications in the subset of differentially expressed genes at normal conditions and in response to heat stress. We found that the immediate progeny of heat-stressed plants had fewer, but larger leaves, and tended to bolt earlier. Transposon expression was elevated in the progeny of heat-stressed plants, and heat stress in the same generation tended to decrease global genome methylation. Progeny of stressed plants had increased expression of HSFA2, and reduction in MSH2, ROS1, and several SUVH genes. Gene expression positively correlated with permissive histone marks and negatively correlated with repressive marks. Overall, the progeny of heat stressed plants varied in both their physiology and epigenome and dcl2 and dcl3 mutants were partially deficient for these changes.

  3. TC1 (C8orf4) is upregulated by cellular stress and mediates heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Park, Juhee; Jung, Yusun; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Ka-Young; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Song, Kyuyoung; Lee, Inchul

    2007-08-24

    TC1 (C8orf4) is associated with aggressive behavior and poor survival in cancer. We have recently reported that it is a target gene of NF-kappaB and regulates the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Here, we show that TC1 is upregulated by various cellular stresses and mediates heat shock response. Heat shock and other cellular stresses including H2O2, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and UV enhance TC1 transcription in HeLa, KATO-III, HEK293T, and HK cells. TC1 protein then moves into the nuclei independently of NF-kappaB activation. TC1 upregulates heat shock proteins, and TC1-knockdown inhibits stress-induced downstream regulation significantly. Heat shock factor 1(HSF1) and TC1 upregulate each other, suggesting a potential positive feedback in the heat shock response regulation. Our data suggest that TC1 is a novel heat shock response regulator.

  4. The role of cardiac sympathetic innervation and skin thermoreceptors on cardiac responses during heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Umemoto, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Tokio; Kouda, Ken; Ito, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Crandall, Craig G.; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) for the changes in cardiac function during heat stress remain unknown. This study tested two unique hypotheses. First, sympathetic innervation to the heart is required for increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress. This was accomplished by comparing responses during heat stress between paraplegics versus tetraplegics, with tetraplegics having reduced/absent cardiac sympathetic innervation. Second, stimulation of skin thermoreceptors contributes to cardiovascular adjustments that occur during heat stress in humans. This was accomplished by comparing responses during leg only heating between paraplegic versus able-bodied individuals. Nine healthy able-bodied, nine paraplegics, and eight tetraplegics participated in this study. Lower body (i.e., nonsensed area for para/tetraplegics) was heated until esophageal temperature had increased by ∼1.0°C. Echocardiographic indexes of diastolic and systolic function were performed before and at the end of heat stress. The heat stress increased cardiac output in all groups, but the magnitude of this increase was attenuated in the tetraplegics relative to the able-bodied (1.3 ± 0.4 vs. 2.3 ± 1.0 l/min; P < 0.05). Diastolic function was maintained in all groups. Indexes of left atrial and ventricular systolic function were enhanced in the able-bodied, but did not change in tetraplegics, while these changes in paraplegics were attenuated relative to the able-bodied. These data suggest that the cardiac sympathetic innervation is required to achieve normal increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress but not required to maintain diastolic function during this exposure. Second, elevated systolic function during heat stress primarily occurs as a result of increases in internal temperature, although stimulation of skin thermoreceptors may contribute. PMID:25795714

  5. Effects of heat stress on Young's modulus of outer hair cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Michio; Yoshida, Naohiro; Kitsunai, Yoko; Iida, Koji; Kumano, Shun; Suzuki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Wada, Hiroshi

    2006-08-30

    Intense sound exposure causes permanent hearing loss due to hair cell and cochlear damage. Prior conditioning with sublethal stressors, such as nontraumatic sound, heat stress and restraint protects the ear from acoustic injury. However, the mechanisms underlying conditioning-related cochlear protection remain unknown. In this paper, Young's modulus and the amount of filamentous actin (F-actin) of outer hair cells (OHCs) with/without heat stress were investigated by atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively. Conditioning with heat stress resulted in a statistically significant increase in Young's modulus of OHCs at 3-6 h after application, and such modulus then began to decrease by 12 h and returned to pre-conditioning level at 48 h after heat stress. The amount of F-actin began to increase by 3 h after heat stress and peaked at 12 h. It then began to decrease by 24 h and returned to the pre-conditioning level by 48-96 h after heat stress. These time courses are consistent with a previous report in which heat stress was shown to suppress permanent threshold shift (PTS). In addition, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were confirmed to be enhanced by heat stress. These results suggest that conditioning with heat stress structurally modifies OHCs so that they become stiffer due to an increase in the amount of F-actin. As a consequence, OHCs possibly experience less strain when they are exposed to loud noise, resulting in protection of mammalian hearing from traumatic noise exposure.

  6. Effect of Permissive Dehydration on Induction and Decay of Heat Acclimation, and Temperate Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Rebecca A.; Massey, Heather C.; Tipton, Michael J.; Young, John S.; Corbett, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that dehydration is an independent stimulus for heat acclimation (HA), possibly through influencing fluid-regulation mechanisms and increasing plasma volume (PV) expansion. There is also some evidence that HA may be ergogenic in temperate conditions and that this may be linked to PV expansion. We investigated: (i) the influence of dehydration on the time-course of acquisition and decay of HA; (ii) whether dehydration augmented any ergogenic benefits in temperate conditions, particularly those related to PV expansion. Methods: Eight males [VO2max: 56.9(7.2) mL·kg−1·min−1] undertook two HA programmes (balanced cross-over design), once drinking to maintain euhydration (HAEu) and once with restricted fluid-intake (HADe). Days 1, 6, 11, and 18 were 60 min exercise-heat stress tests [HST (40°C; 50% RH)], days 2–5 and 7–10 were 90 min, isothermal-strain (Tre ~ 38.5°C), exercise-heat sessions. Performance parameters [VO2max, lactate threshold, efficiency, peak power output (PPO)] were determined pre and post HA by graded exercise test (22°C; 55%RH). Results: During isothermal-strain sessions hypohydration was achieved in HADe and euhydration maintained in HAEu [average body mass loss −2.71(0.82)% vs. −0.56(0.73)%, P < 0.001], but aldosterone concentration, power output, and cardiovascular strain were unaffected by dehydration. HA was evident on day 6 {reduced end-exercise Tre [−0.30(0.27)°C] and exercise heart rate [−12(15) beats.min−1], increased PV [+7.2(6.4)%] and sweat-loss [+0.25(0.22) L.h−1], P < 0.05} with some further adaptations on day 11 {further reduced end-exercise Tre [−0.25(0.19)°C] and exercise heart rate [−3(9) beats.min−1], P < 0.05}. These adaptations were not notably affected by dehydration and were generally maintained 7-days post HA. Performance parameters were unchanged, apart from increased PPO (+16(20) W, irrespective of condition). Conclusions: When thermal-strain is matched

  7. Expression profiles of the heat shock protein 70 gene in response to heat stress in Agrotis c-nigrum (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yang, Shuai; Zhao, Kuijun; Han, Lanlan

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones, and their overexpression enhances the survivability and stress tolerance of the cell. To understand the characteristics of HSP70 in Agrotis c-nigrum Linnaeus larvae, the coding sequence of this protein was cloned, and the effect of heat stress on transcription and protein properties was assessed. The obtained cDNA sequence of HSP70 was 2,213 bp, which contained an ORF of 1,965 bp and encoded 654 amino acid residues. Isolated HSP70 cDNA demonstrated more than 80% identity with the sequences of other known insect HSP70s. Next, HSP70 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and identified using SDS-PAGE and western blotting analyses. In addition, anti-HSP70-specific antisera were prepared using a recombinant HSP70 protein, and the results showed that this antisera was very specific to AcHSP70. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction detected the relative transcription of the HSP70 gene in larvae and the transcription of A. c-nigrum in response to high temperatures. Induction of HSP70 was up-regulated to peak expression at 36°C.

  8. Expression Profiles of the Heat Shock Protein 70 Gene in Response to Heat Stress in Agrotis c-nigrum (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Yang, Shuai; Zhao, Kuijun; Han, Lanlan

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones, and their overexpression enhances the survivability and stress tolerance of the cell. To understand the characteristics of HSP70 in Agrotis c-nigrum Linnaeus larvae, the coding sequence of this protein was cloned, and the effect of heat stress on transcription and protein properties was assessed. The obtained cDNA sequence of HSP70 was 2,213 bp, which contained an ORF of 1,965 bp and encoded 654 amino acid residues. Isolated HSP70 cDNA demonstrated more than 80% identity with the sequences of other known insect HSP70s. Next, HSP70 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and identified using SDS-PAGE and western blotting analyses. In addition, anti-HSP70-specific antisera were prepared using a recombinant HSP70 protein, and the results showed that this antisera was very specific to AcHSP70. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction detected the relative transcription of the HSP70 gene in larvae and the transcription of A. c-nigrum in response to high temperatures. Induction of HSP70 was up-regulated to peak expression at 36°C. PMID:25688087

  9. The heat shock factor A4A confers salt tolerance and is regulated by oxidative stress and the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Salamó, Imma; Papdi, Csaba; Rigó, Gábor; Zsigmond, Laura; Vilela, Belmiro; Lumbreras, Victoria; Nagy, István; Horváth, Balázs; Domoki, Mónika; Darula, Zsuzsa; Medzihradszky, Katalin; Bögre, László; Koncz, Csaba; Szabados, László

    2014-05-01

    Heat shock factors (HSFs) are principal regulators of plant responses to several abiotic stresses. Here, we show that estradiol-dependent induction of HSFA4A confers enhanced tolerance to salt and oxidative agents, whereas inactivation of HSFA4A results in hypersensitivity to salt stress in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Estradiol induction of HSFA4A in transgenic plants decreases, while the knockout hsfa4a mutation elevates hydrogen peroxide accumulation and lipid peroxidation. Overexpression of HSFA4A alters the transcription of a large set of genes regulated by oxidative stress. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, HSFA4A shows homomeric interaction, which is reduced by alanine replacement of three conserved cysteine residues. HSFA4A interacts with mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 in yeast and plant cells. MPK3 and MPK6 phosphorylate HSFA4A in vitro on three distinct sites, serine-309 being the major phosphorylation site. Activation of the MPK3 and MPK6 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway led to the transcriptional activation of the HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN17.6A gene. In agreement that mutation of serine-309 to alanine strongly diminished phosphorylation of HSFA4A, it also strongly reduced the transcriptional activation of HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN17.6A. These data suggest that HSFA4A is a substrate of the MPK3/MPK6 signaling and that it regulates stress responses in Arabidopsis.

  10. Enhancement of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 stress tolerance via pre-heating.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masanori; Itoh, Youko; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Kogenta; Sumitomo, Makoto; Nitta, Masakazu

    2012-03-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection causes several hundred cases of food poisoning every year in Japan. In severe cases, this type of food poisoning can be fatal. In the present study, we examined the induction of HSP70 in E. coli O157:H7 cells at various temperatures and the thermotolerance of E. coli O157:H7 cells alone and in contaminated food following pre-heating. We evaluated the possibility that thermotolerance by E. coli O157:H7 increases the likelihood of food poisoning. E. coli O157:H7 cells were heated at 43-51 °C, and the survival rate was examined. The temperature of highest induction of HSP70 was used as the pre-heating temperature. We measured the thermotolerance of E. coli O157:H7 cells following pre-heating as the survival after heating at 53 °C (lethal temperature). Additionally, we evaluated the thermotolerance of E. coli O157:H7 cells in ground beef following pre-heating. Heating at 47 °C for 30 min caused the highest induction of HSP70 and this temperature was selected as the pre-heating temperature. The survival rate was significantly higher for 0-90 min compared to that in cultures incubated at 53 °C without pre-heating indicating thermotolerance. Additionally, in ground beef, thermotolerance in E. coli O157:H7 cells was induced by pre-heating. We showed that E. coli O157:H7 cells acquired thermotolerance after pre-heating, which significantly increased survival after a lethal temperature, and increased the likelihood of food poisoning.

  11. Ethylene is involved in maintaining tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) pollen quality under heat-stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Firon, Nurit; Pressman, Etan; Meir, Shimon; Khoury, Reham; Altahan, Leviah

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Exposure to higher-than-optimal temperatures reduces crop yield and quality, mainly due to sensitivity of developing pollen grains. The mechanisms maintaining high pollen quality under heat-stress conditions are poorly understood. Our recently published data indicate high heat-stress-induced expression of ethylene-responsive genes in tomato pollen, indicating ethylene involvement in the pollen heat-stress response. Here we elucidated ethylene's involvement in pollen heat-stress response and thermotolerance by assessing the effects of interfering with the ethylene signalling pathway and altering ethylene levels on tomato pollen functioning under heat stress. Methodology Plants of the ethylene-insensitive mutant Never ripe (Nr)—defective in an ethylene response sensor (ERS)-like ethylene receptor—and the corresponding wild type were exposed to control or heat-stress growing conditions, and pollen quality was determined. Starch and carbohydrates were measured in isolated pollen grains from these plants. The effect of pretreating cv. Micro-Tom tomato plants, prior to heat-stress exposure, with an ethylene releaser or inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis on pollen quality was assessed. Principal results Never ripe pollen grains exhibited higher heat-stress sensitivity, manifested by a significant reduction in the total number of pollen grains, reduction in the number of viable pollen and elevation of the number of non-viable pollen, compared with wild-type plants. Mature Nr pollen grains accumulated only 40 % of the sucrose level accumulated by the wild type. Pretreatment of tomato plants with an ethylene releaser increased pollen quality under heat stress, with an over 5-fold increase in the number of germinating pollen grains per flower. Pretreatment with an ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor reduced the number of germinating pollen grains following heat-stress exposure over 5-fold compared with non-treated controls. Conclusions Ethylene plays a

  12. Overexpression of Small Heat Shock Protein Enhances Heat- and Salt-Stress Tolerance of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705.

    PubMed

    Khaskheli, Gul Bahar; Zuo, FangLei; Yu, Rui; Chen, ShangWu

    2015-07-01

    Bifidobacteria are probiotics that are incorporated live into various dairy products. They confer health-promotive effects via gastrointestinal tract colonization. However, to provide their health-beneficial properties, they must battle the various abiotic stresses in that environment, such as bile salts, acids, oxygen, and heat. In this study, Bifidobacterium longum salt- and heat-stress tolerance was enhanced by homologous overexpression of a small heat shock protein (sHsp). A positive contribution of overproduced sHsp to abiotic stress tolerance was observed when the bacterium was exposed to heat and salt stresses. Significantly higher survival of B. l ongum NCC2705 overexpressing sHsp was observed at 30 and 60 min into heat (55 °C) and salt (5 M NaCl) treatment, respectively. Thermotolerance analysis at 47 °C with sampling every 2 h also revealed the great potential tolerance of the engineered strain. Cell density and acid production rate increased for the sHsp-overexpressing strain after 8 and 10 h of both heat and salt stresses. In addition, tolerance to bile salts, low pH (3.5) and low temperature (4 °C) was also increased by homologous overexpression of the sHsp hsp20 in B. l ongum. Results revealed that hsp20 overexpression in B longum NCC2705 plays a positive cross-protective role in upregulating abiotic responses, ensuring the organism's tolerance to various stress conditions; therefore, sHsp-overexpressing B. l ongum is advised for fermented dairy foods and other probiotic product applications.

  13. Stress Responses of Small Heat Shock Protein Genes in Lepidoptera Point to Limited Conservation of Function across Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Jincheng; Peng, Yu; Liu, Xiaoxia; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2015-01-01

    The small heat shock protein (sHsp) family is thought to play an important role in protein refolding and signal transduction, and thereby protect organisms from stress. However little is known about sHsp function and conservation across phylogenies. In the current study, we provide a comprehensive assessment of small Hsp genes and their stress responses in the oriental fruit moth (OFM), Grapholita molesta. Fourteen small heat shock proteins of OFM clustered with related Hsps in other Lepidoptera despite a high level of variability among them, and in contrast to the highly conserved Hsp11.1. The only known lepidopteran sHsp ortholog (Hsp21.3) was consistently unaffected under thermal stress in Lepidoptera where it has been characterized. However the phylogenetic position of the sHsps within the Lepidoptera was not associated with conservation of induction patterns under thermal extremes or diapause. These findings suggest that the sHsps have evolved rapidly to develop new functions within the Lepidoptera. PMID:26196395

  14. Development of a UF{sub 6} cylinder transient heat transfer/stress analysis model

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    A heat transfer/stress analysis model is being developed to simulate the heating to a point of rupture of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when it is exposed to a fire. The assumptions underlying the heat transfer portion of the model, which has been the focus of work to date, will be discussed. A key aspect of this model is a lumped parameter approach to modeling heat transfer. Preliminary results and future efforts to develop an integrated thermal/stress model will be outlined.

  15. Thermal elasto-plastic stress analysis during laser heating of a metal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanbei; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2008-03-01

    During laser heating of a metal material, the continuity of material confines its free expansion, thermal stresses arise. On one hand the thermal expansion of the heated zone of the material increases with the increase of temperature, the thermal stress level increases correspondingly; on the other hand the mechanical properties of the material will change with the increase of temperature, especially the elastic modulus, yield strength and tensile strength drop significantly, which is the so-called thermal softening problem. Due to the effect of the two factors, as the heating time or the intensity of the laser beam increases, it is possible that the stress levels of the heated zone of the material exceed the yield strength, which leads the material to come into a plastic stage. Thus, a thermal plastic problem occurs. In this study, thermal elasto-plastic stresses during laser heating of a metal plate are computed by the finite element method (FEM) based on thermal elasto-plastic constitutive theory. The mechanical behaviors of the metal material during the laser heating are analyzed. By the analysis of the results, it is found that thermal expansion leads to the increase of stress level early during the laser irradiating, and thermal softening causes the decrease of stress levels in the plastic zone and the slow growth and even decrease of stress levels in elastic zone later. The radial stresses are all compressive stresses, and the hoop stresses are compressive stresses within about the laser spot and are tensile stresses at other place. This work may be beneficial to the laser processing of metal materials.

  16. Developmental and heat stress-regulated expression of HsfA2 and small heat shock proteins in tomato anthers

    PubMed Central

    Giorno, Filomena; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grillo, Stefania; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Vriezen, Wim H.; Mariani, Celestina

    2010-01-01

    The high sensitivity of male reproductive cells to high temperatures may be due to an inadequate heat stress response. The results of a comprehensive expression analysis of HsfA2 and Hsp17-CII, two important members of the heat stress system, in the developing anthers of a heat-tolerant tomato genotype are reported here. A transcriptional analysis at different developmental anther/pollen stages was performed using semi-quantitative and real-time PCR. The messengers were localized using in situ RNA hybridization, and protein accumulation was monitored using immunoblot analysis. Based on the analysis of the gene and protein expression profiles, HsfA2 and Hsp17-CII are finely regulated during anther development and are further induced under both short and prolonged heat stress conditions. These data suggest that HsfA2 may be directly involved in the activation of protection mechanisms in the tomato anther during heat stress and, thereby, may contribute to tomato fruit set under adverse temperatures. PMID:19854799

  17. Curcumin ameloriates heat stress via inhibition of oxidative stress and modulation of Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in quail.

    PubMed

    Sahin, K; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, Z; Tuzcu, M; Sahin, N

    2012-11-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenol in the spice turmeric, exhibits antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. This study was conducted to elucidate the action mode of curcumin alleviation of oxidative stress in heat-stressed quail. A total of 180 birds (10 d old) were assigned randomly to be reared at either 22°C (Thermoneutral) or 34°C (Heat stress) for 8 h/d (0900-1700) until the age of 42 d. Birds in both environments were randomly fed 1 of 3 diets: basal diet and basal diet added with 0, 200 or 400 mg of curcumin per kg of diet. Each of the 2×3 factorially arranged experimental groups was replicated in 10 cages, each containing three birds. In response to increasing supplemental curcumin level, there were linear increases in cumulative feed intake, final body weight, and weight gain, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor two level and heme oxygenase one level; linear decreases in feed efficiency, serum, muscle and liver malondialdehyde level, respectively and inflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB and heat shock proteins 70 level (P<0.0001 for all). The results indicated that curcumin alleviates oxidative stress through modulating the hepatic nuclear transcription factors and heat shock proteins 70 in heat-stressed quails.